WorldWideScience

Sample records for part iii oversight

  1. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  2. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  3. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  4. Counterfeit Parts: DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    agencies and contractors we met with stated that they have encountered counterfeit parts less frequently in the DOD supply chain , in part, because...the DOD supply chain as a method to prevent further counterfeiting.22 DOD and industry officials noted that timely reporting of...COUNTERFEIT PARTS DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk Report to Congressional Committees

  5. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field's quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department's quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department's QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department's QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues

  6. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  7. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wojczal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler. Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity.

  8. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  9. 76 FR 10135 - Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Vol. 76 Wednesday, No. 36 February 23, 2011 Part III Department of Housing and Urban Development 24 CFR Parts 901, 902, and 907 Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing...

  10. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate...... of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself....

  11. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS). Part III. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Mining, Forest Management, and Bonneville Power Administration of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eight Congress, Second Session, March 28 and August 2, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Part III of the hearing record contains the testimony of Peter Johnson, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator, and Energy Secretary Donald Hodel on the subject of BPA's contracts with the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) in which BPA will assume responsibility of WPPSS nuclear projects 1, 2, and 3. At issue was whether the contracts exceed BPA's authority and the protection of BPA's $1.9 billion invested in the projects. Johnson denied any secret agreements and emphasized that the intent was to preserve the assets for the federal government and federal power system. On the second hearing day, Hodel explained DOE's involvement in the agreements and its concurrence with BPA because of related litigation. An appendix with additional correspondence and statements submitted for the record follows the testimony

  12. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, Barbara [Melber Consulting, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Nancy E. [Nancy E. Durbin Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Tael, Irene (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy

  13. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, Barbara; Durbin, Nancy E.; Tael, Irene

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy and a

  14. Introduction to Part III: Application of LCA in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2018-01-01

    While Part II of this book presents the theoretical foundation and methodology of LCA, Part III is dedicated to a comprehensive discussion of how this methodology has been adapted and applied in practice. The chapters of Part III provide an easily readable and accessible introduction to different...

  15. Cubby : Multiscreen Desktop VR Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajadiningrat, J.P.; Gribnau, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this month's final episode of our 'Cubby: Multiscreen Desktop VR' trilogy we explain how you read the InputSprocket driver from part II, how you use it as input for the cameras from part I and how you calibrate the input device so that it leads to the correct head position.

  16. Warship Radar Signatures (Ship Survivability Part III-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galle, L.F.; Heemskerk, H.J.M.; Ewijk, L.J. van

    2000-01-01

    Radar Cross Section (RCS) management is of paramount importance for a warships's survivability. In this first part of the paper (Part III-A), the operational benefits of low RCS will be explained. Basic RCS theory, measurement and simulation techniques will be addressed. The RCS of representative

  17. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications, Prognosis and management. ... It should be possible to set a definite prognosis within 2 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis, and in many cases even sooner. In the prognosis of facial paralysis the aetiological and time factors involved, the completeness of ...

  18. Solar neutrino oscillation parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Liu Qiuyu

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ 12 . Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND , we obtain the parameters Δm 12 2 =7.684 -0.208 +0.212 x 10 -5 eV 2 , tan 2 θ 12 =0.440 -0.057 +0.059 . We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ 13 . (authors)

  19. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. III Appendix III to Part 27—Fair Housing Lending...

  20. Thallium (III) salts utilization in organic synthesis. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, H.M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The utilizations of thallium (III) salts in organic synthesis with carbonylic and acitylenic substrates are presented. The reactions of carbonylic substra3ts with kitones and the oxidation reactions of acetylenic substrates are shown. Others reactions including thallium (III) salts and non aromatic unsatured substracts, as cleasage of ethers and epoxide using thallium trinitrate, hydrazones treatments with thallium triacetates, etc, are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. Tanzania 1895-1920 : Part III: 1914-1920s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    An earlier version of this African Postal Heritage Paper was published as African Studies Centre Leiden Working Paper 119 / 2015: "A postal history of the First World War in Africa and its aftermath - German colonies; III Deutsch Ostafrika / German East Africa", written by Ton Dietz.

  2. Inteligencia Artificial y Neurología. (III Parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Camacho Pinto

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available

    De acuerdo con mi anuncio esta III Parte estaría constituida por los mecanismos cerebrales susceptibles de extrapolación tal como fueron enumerados por mí: control de input-output para realizar conductas, y de inteligencia y aprendizaje, de los cuales por razón de espacio sólo se publica la mitad en esta edición de Medicina. Se trata de una presentación esquemática, auncuando ahora encuentro quizás más atractivo el enfoque de J’urgen Ruech expuesto en el Capítulo Comunicación y Psiquiatría de la obra extensa de Freedman (1 así: Input = percepción; análisis de datos = reconocimiento; procesamiento de datos = pensamiento; almacenamiento de datos = memoria; output = expresión y acción. A mi modo de ver se completaría este encuadre funcional con el tópico aprendizaje, proceso contiguo al de la memoria. Antes de entrar en materia hago unas consideraciones preliminares. En la primera me refiero a otro enfoque del concepto de LA. no incluido anteriormente. Se trata de Schank Roger y Hunter Larry (2 para quienes las indagaciones a que conduce el trasegar acerca de lA son las más atrevidas de nuestra existencia: ¿cuál es la naturaleza de la mente, qué pasa cuando estamos pensando, sintiendo, viendo o entendiendo? ¿Es posible comprender cómo trabaja nuestra mente realmente? Preguntas milenarias en cuyas respuestas no se ha registrado progreso. La lA ofrece una nueva herramienta para avanzar en este sentido: el computador.

    Las teorías sobre la mente han consistido en procesos descriptivos. Y los planteamientos iníciales hechos sobre lA por los investigadores han sido enfocados hacia lo que ellos mismos consideraron como manifestaciones de alta inteligencia: problemas matemáticos, ajedrez, rompecabezas complejos, etc.; gran cantidad de energía fue dedicada y se encontraron técnicas computacionales exitosas. Pero se comprendió que las técnicas desarrolladas no eran las mismas que emplea el cerebro, por lo cual se

  3. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report - I-IV, Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    This third part of the final report include the following: Annex 5 - device for opening the cover; Annex 6 - inner part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 7 - outer part of the device for sampling of the radioactive solution; Annex 8 - pneumatic taps [sr

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  6. Oversight and enforcement at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, I.E., Christopher, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses recent changes to the independent oversight and enforcement programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and applications to criticality safety. DOE's Office of Oversight (Oversight hereafter), in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH), independently evaluates whether management systems ensure adequate protection of the worker, public, and environment. Oversight has adopted a new approach to performing evaluations based on the guiding principles for safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy. The principles Oversight evaluates are line management responsibility for safety and health, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibilities. Recently, the DOE codified the implementation of integrated safety management, further expounding on these basic guiding principles and Oversight's role. The Office of Enforcement and Investigations in EH (Enforcement hereafter) is responsible for enforcement, and relevant documents describe its role. This paper briefly discusses criticality safety aspects of the twin initiatives of Oversight and Enforcement

  7. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  8. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part III: Normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, Elizabeth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This is the third part of a course designed for residents in radiation oncology preparing for their boards. This part of the course will focus on the mechanisms underlying damage in normal tissues. Although conventional wisdom long held that killing and depletion of a critical cell(s) in a tissue was responsible for the later expression of damage, histopathologic changes in normal tissue can now be explained and better understood in terms of the new molecular biology. The concept that depletion of a single cell type is responsible for the observed histopathologic changes in normal tissues has been replaced by the hypothesis that damage results from the interaction of many different cell systems, including epithelial, endothelial, macrophages and fibroblasts, via the production of specific autocrine, paracrine and endocrine growth factors. A portion of this course will discuss the clinical and experimental data on the production and interaction of those cytokines and cell systems considered to be critical to tissue damage. It had long been suggested that interindividual differences in radiation-induced normal tissue damage was genetically regulated, at least in part. Both clinical and experimental data supported this hypothesis but it is the recent advances in human and mouse molecular genetics which have provided the tools to dissect out the genetic component of normal tissue damage. These data will be presented and related to the potential to develop genetic markers to identify sensitive individuals. The impact on clinical outcome of the ability to identify prospectively sensitive patients will be discussed. Clinically it is well-accepted that the volume of tissue irradiated is a critical factor in determining tissue damage. A profusion of mathematical models for estimating dose-volume relationships in a number of organs have been published recently despite the fact that little data are available to support these models. This course will review the

  9. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware River...

  10. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  11. ATWS: a reappraisal. Part III. Frequency of anticipated transients. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, F.L. Jr.; Koren, J.M.; Erdmann, R.C.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1978-07-01

    The document is Part III of the Institute study of the ATWS question. The frequencies of the various events which have led to a reactor scram are documented from the nuclear power plant records. Some of these events, in the absence of scram, could lead to undesirable system response and are the ''transients of significance'' which comprise the anticipated transients of the ATWS question

  12. Market Analysis and Consumer Impacts Source Document. Part III. Consumer Behavior and Attitudes Toward Fuel Efficient Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    This source document on motor vehicle market analysis and consumer impacts consists of three parts. Part III consists of studies and reviews on: consumer awareness of fuel efficiency issues; consumer acceptance of fuel efficient vehicles; car size ch...

  13. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter III: impurity control (engineering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Miki, Nobuharu; Shibutani, Yoji; Fujimura, Kaoru; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Kosuke; Fujii, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Itoh, Shin-ichi.

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to the second half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made on candidate materials for the divertor, limiter, and the first wall. Engineering trade-off studies are made for the high-recycling and low temperature conditions. The studies include material considerations, configuration, thermohydraulic and stress analysis, disruption, lifetime analysis, and tritium permeation. (author)

  14. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX.

  15. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX

  16. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX.

  17. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  19. ENSI Approach to Oversight of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbel Haag, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Claudia Humbel Haag presented developments in ENSI approach to safety culture oversight. ENSI has developed a definition/understanding of Safety Culture and a concept of how to perform oversight of Safety Culture. ENSI defines safety culture in the following way: Safety Culture comprises the behaviour, world views (in the sense of conceptualisations of reality and explanation models), values (in the sense of aims and evaluation scales), and features of the physical environment (specifically, the nuclear power plant and the documents used) which are shared by many members of an organization, in as much as these are of significance to nuclear safety. A model of the accessibility of safety culture was presented ranging from the observable (external aspects of safety culture), to aspects that are accessible by asking questions, through to aspects that are not accessible (internal part of safety culture). ENSI considers observable aspects through the existing systematic safety assessment compliance program. Aspects that are observable by asking questions will be addressed by additional oversight activities outside the systematic assessment program. Aspects that are not accessible are addressed by helping the licensee to re-think its safety culture through proactive discussions on safety culture. Reports are issued to the licensee on assumptions and observations identified through the discussions. The conclusions of the presentation emphasised the importance of basing any interventions in this area on a solid understanding of the concept of safety culture. ENSI safety culture oversight principles were also described. These include licensee responsibility for safety, and the need for the regulator to critically review their own activities to ensure a positive influence on the licensee

  20. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance.

  1. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself.

  2. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1977-01-01

    This is the third part of an article on the distribution of power and the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and their implications in medicine. Parts I and II were published in the preceding issue of this Journal. Part I presented a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discussed the countervailing pluralist and power of elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concluded with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presented a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine.

  3. Information exchange - DOE oversight programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbs, D.C.; Field, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Oversight programs are conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to review activities carried out by field and contractor organizations. Two of these oversight programs focus on safeguards and security and on safety and health activities. These two programs are independent, but share many common objectives and review techniques. The mutual potential benefit was recognized from an exchange of information on review techniques. The first step in this exchange was the participation by an Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) staff member with the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) during their planning, conduct and reporting of a Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA). This paper briefly describes the OSE and ONS programs. It also identifies and analyzes the similarities and differences of the two programs. The purpose of this paper is to provide perspectives on the approach taken, the techniques used and the differences between two oversight programs conducted by the Department of Energy

  4. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 960—Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process 1. This appendix... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE...

  5. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part III: whole-body sensation and comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

    2009-01-01

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specifi...

  6. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    has evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  7. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  8. Acuity and case management: a healthy dose of outcomes, part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Diane L; Craig, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This is the third of a 3-part series presenting 2 effective applications--acuity and dosage--that describe how the business case for case management (CM) can be made. In Part I, dosage and acuity concepts were explained as client need-severity, CM intervention-intensity, and CM activity-dose prescribed by amount, frequency, duration, and breadth of activities. Concepts were presented that related the practice of CM to the use of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, and methods and the development of instruments that measure and score pivotal CM actions. Part I also featured a specific exemplar, the CM Acuity Tool, and described how to use acuity to identify and score the complexity of a CM case. Part II further explained dosage and 2 acuity instruments, the Acuity Tool and AccuDiff. Part III presents linkage to EBP and practical applications. The information contained in the 3-part series applies to all CM practice settings and contains ideas and recommendations useful to CM generalists, specialists, supervisors, and business and outcomes managers. The Acuity Tools Project was developed from frontline CM practice in one large, national telephonic CM company. Dosage: A literature search failed to find research into dosage of a behavioral intervention. The Huber-Hall model was developed and tested in a longitudinal study of CM models in substance abuse treatment and reported in the literature. Acuity: A structured literature search and needs assessment launched the development of the suite of acuity tools. A gap analysis identified that an instrument to assign and measure case acuity specific to CM activities was needed. Clinical experts, quality specialists, and business analysts (n = 7) monitored the development and testing of the tools, acuity concepts, scores, differentials, and their operating principles and evaluated the validity of the acuity tools' content related to CM activities. During the pilot phase of development, interrater reliability testing of

  9. Oversight Institutions Within the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam

    2015-01-01

    This article will give a description of the role of internal audit and governance functions within the United Nations system. The United Nations has, during the last 10 years, worked to establish effective oversight services. Oversight, governance and hereunder the internal audit function has been...

  10. 5 CFR 330.611 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight. 330.611 Section 330.611 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.611 Oversight. OPM provides advice and assistance to agencies in implementing their Career...

  11. 12 CFR 370.10 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... LIQUIDITY GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 370.10 Oversight. (a) Participating entities are subject to the FDIC's oversight regarding compliance with the terms of the temporary liquidity guarantee program. (b) A..., for the duration of the temporary liquidity guarantee program, to be subject to the FDIC's authority...

  12. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  13. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  14. 13 CFR 120.1005 - Bureau of PCLP Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bureau of PCLP Oversight. 120.1005 Section 120.1005 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1005 Bureau of PCLP Oversight. SBA's Bureau of PCLP Oversight within...

  15. 12 CFR 985.4 - Finance Board oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board oversight. 985.4 Section 985.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE THE OFFICE OF FINANCE § 985.4 Finance Board oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. The Finance Board shall have the same regulatory oversight authority and enforcement powers...

  16. Fracture toughness of A533B Part III - variability of A533B fracture toughness as determined from Charpy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.G.; Eyre, B.L.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final part of a series of three reports examining the upper shelf fracture toughness of A533B Class 1 pressure vessel steel. Part I (AERE R 8968) critically reviews the current elasto plastic fracture mechanics methodologies employed to characterise toughness following extensive yielding and Part II (AERE R 8969) examines several sources of fracture mechanics data pertinent to A533B Class 1 in the longitudinal (RW) orientation. Part III is a review of the effects of (i) position and orientation within the plate (ii) welding processes and post weld heat treatment and (iii) neutron irradiation as measured by Charpy impact testing. It is concluded that the upper shelf factor energy is dependent on orientation and position and can be reduced by welding, extended post weld heat treatments and neutron irradiation. Neutron irradiation effects are known to be strongly dependent on composition and metallurgical conditions, but an explanation for the variability following extended post weld treatments has yet to be resolved. (author)

  17. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs.

  18. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  19. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments, part III: Whole-body sensation and comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie [Center for the Built Environment, UC Berkeley (United States); Han, Taeyoung [General Motors Company (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A three-part series presents the development of models for predicting the local thermal sensation (Part I) and local thermal comfort (Part II) of different parts of the human body, and also the whole-body sensation and comfort (Part III) that result from combinations of local sensation and comfort. The models apply to sedentary activities in a range of environments: uniform and non-uniform, stable and transient. They are based on diverse findings from the literature and from body-part-specific human subject tests in a climate chamber. They were validated against a test of automobile passengers. The series is intended to present the models' rationale, structure, and coefficients, so that others can test them and develop them further as additional empirical data becomes available. A) The whole-body (overall) sensation model has two forms, depending on whether all of the body's segments have sensations effectively in the same direction (e.g warm or cool), or whether some segments have sensations opposite to those of the rest of the body. For each, individual body parts have different weights for warm versus cool sensations, and strong local sensations dominate the overall sensation. If all sensations are near neutral, the overall sensation is close to the average of all body sensations. B) The overall comfort model also has two forms. Under stable conditions, people evaluate their overall comfort by a complaint-driven process, meaning that when two body parts are strongly uncomfortable, no matter how comfortable the other body parts might be, the overall comfort will be near the discomfort level of the two most uncomfortable parts. When the environmental conditions are transient, or people have control over their environments, overall comfort is better than that of the two most uncomfortable body parts. This can be accounted for by adding the most comfortable vote to the two most uncomfortable ones. (author)

  20. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  1. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  2. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice ar...

  3. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen...

  4. Antibacterianos de acción sistémica: Parte III. Sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Se presenta la tercera parte de una revisión bibliográfica sobre los antibacterianos de elección, en la cual se abordan los grupos sulfonamidas y tetraciclinas; además, se incluye un cuadro resumen con los antibióticos tratados en las tres partes, así como sus vías de administración y nombres comerciales que se utilizan en Cuba. Se hacen algunas consideraciones sobre la manera de enfrentar la gran variedad de antibióticos y el costo de la antibióticoterapia por parte de los países en vías de desarrollo, tomando como referencia algunas recomendaciones hechas por la OPS/OMSSummary: The third part of a bibliographic review on the elective antibacterials in which the groups of sulfonamides and tetracyclines are approached is presented. It is also included a summary picture with the antibiotics dealt with in the three parts, the routes of administration, and the trade names used in Cuba. Some considerations are made on the way to face the wide range of antibiotics and the cost of antibiotic therapy in the developing countries, taking into account some recommendations made by the PAHO/WHO

  5. Transport properties of gaseous ions over a wide energy range. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, H.W.; Thackston, M.G.; McDaniel, E.W.; Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper updates and extends in scope our two previous papers entitled ''Transport Properties of Gaseous Ions over a Wide Energy Range.'' The references to the earlier publications (referred to as ''Part I'' and ''Part II'') are I, H. W. Ellis, R. Y. Pai, E. W. McDonald, E. A. Mason, and L. A. Viehland, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 17, 177--210 (19876); and II, H. W. Ellis, E. W. McDaniel, D. L. Albritton, L. A. Veihland, S. L. Lin, and E. A. Mason, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 22, 179--217 (1978). Parts I and II contained compilations of experimental data on ionic mobilities and diffusion coefficients (both longitudinal and transverse) for ions in neutral gase (almost exclusively at room temperature) in an externally applied electric field

  6. Nuclear Oversight Function at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear oversight function is used at the Krsko NPP constructively to strengthen safety and improve performance. Nuclear safety is kept under constant examination through a variety of monitoring techniques and activities, some of which provide an independent review. The nuclear oversight function at the Krsko NPP is accomplished by Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (SKV). SKV has completed its mission through a combination of compliance, performance and effectiveness-based assessments. The performance-based assessment is an assessment using various techniques (observations, interviews, walk-downs, document reviews) to assure compliance with standards and regulations, obtain insight into performance, performance trends and also to identify opportunities to improve effectiveness of implementation. Generally, the performance-based approach to oversight function is based on some essential elements. The most important one which is developed and implemented is an oversight program (procedure). The program focuses on techniques, activities and objectives commensurate with their significance to plant operational safety. These techniques and activities are: self-assessments, assessments, audits, performance indicators, monitoring of corrective action program (CAP), industry independent reviews (such as IAEA's OSART and WANO Peer Review), industry benchmarking etc. Graded approach is an inherent product of a performance based program and ranking process. It is important not only to focus on the highest ranked performance based attributes but to lead to effective utilization of an oversight program. The attributes selected for oversight need to be based on plant specific experience, current industry operating experience, supplier's performance and quality issues. Collaboration within the industry and effective utility oversight of processes and design activities are essential for achieving good plant performance. So the oversight program must integrate relevant

  7. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (III faza) I-IV, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-01-15

    Report on calculation of poisoning in experimental and power reactor includes four parts. Part one describes the influence of poisoning on the physical parameters of a reactor. part two includes transformation of differential equations for iodine and xenon. It was needed for easier solution of of differential equation using the analog computer. This calculation was done for RA reactor operating at 5 MW power. The RA reactor was used an example of calculation by the proposed method. Part four shows the application of the method for calculating the Calder Hall power reactor.

  8. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  9. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  10. CBIOS Science Sessions - 2016 - Part I and III National Symposium on Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology - Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues, et al.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CBiOS Science Sessions - 2016 – Part 1 New methods to explore efficacy and safety of natural origin products; Stefânia Duz Delsin Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in women with pelvic floor dysfunctions; Beatriz Navarro Brazález Indoor air quality in baby rooms: a study about VOC levels; Raquel Rodrigues dos Santos, Ana Sofia Fernandes e Liliana Mendes A medicinal chemistry approach for the development of novel anti-tumor agentes; Maria M. M. Santos Isolation, modelling and phytosome forms of antibacterial and anti-proliferative compounds from Plectranthus spp; Diogo Matias Intellectual Property – Patenting Propriedade Intelectual – Patenteamento Rui Gomes Biomarkers in wastewater; Álvaro Lopes A Contribution for a Better Comprehension of Donkey Dentistry: the Importance of Dental Care; João Brandão Rodrigues Characterization of Lusitano’s Pure Blood Pressure Centers using two pressure plates; Pequito M.; Gomes-Costa M.; Prazeres J.; Bragança M.; Roupa I.; Fonseca R.G.; Abrantes J. Application of photoplethysmography to monitor heart rate in dogs; Rui Assunção, Henrique Silva, João Requicha, Luis Lobo, Luis Monteiro Rodrigues Looking into the oscillatory properties of the laser Doppler flowmetry signal in human microcirculation; Henrique Silva, Hugo Ferreira, Marie-Ange Renault, Alain-Pierre Gadeau, Julia Buján, LM Rodrigues III Symposium of Nanoscience and Biomedical Nanotechnology – Proceedings April 15/04/2016 Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Engenheiros, Carlos Matias Ramos Sr. Bastonário da Ordem dos Médicos, José Silva Vice-presidente do Conselho de Enfermagem, Maria José Costa Dias Presidente da Associação Nacional de Farmácias, Paulo Cleto Duarte Presidente da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ci

  11. LHC Beam Dump Design Study - Part III : Off-normal operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, L; Ross, M; Sala, P

    2000-01-01

    The LHC beam dump design study has been preliminarily substantiated by energy deposition simulations (Part I) and heat transfer analyses (Part II). The present report is devoted to the abnormal operating conditions induced by a malfunction of the beam diluters. A general approach to the analysis of off-normal operation is presented, which is derived from standard design norms adopted in the nuclear industry. Attention is focused mainly on the carbon core, which is longitudinally split into segments of different density in order to better distribute the deposited energy. The maximum energy density it absorbs decreases by at least 33%, compared to a uniform standard density carbon core. This structure may sustain any partial sweep failure without major damage, up to the ultimate beam intensity and energy. To minimise the risks inherent in a fully unswept beam, a sacrificial graphite mandrel will be placed on the core axis, surrounded by a thick high strength carbon-carbon composite tube. With this arrangement, ...

  12. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  13. Burnout in boiling heat transfer. Part III. High-quality forced-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergles, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This is the final part of a review of burnout during boiling heat transfer. The status of burnout in high-quality forced-convection systems is reviewed, and recent developments are summarized in detail. A general guide to the considerable literature is given. Parametric effects and correlations for water in circular and noncircular ducts are presented. Other topics discussed include transients, steam-generator applications, correlations for other fluids, fouling, and augmentation

  14. PIO I-II tendencies case study. Part 1. Mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a study is performed from the perspective of giving a method to reduce the conservatism of the well known PIO (Pilot-Induced Oscillation criteria in predicting the susceptibility of an aircraft to this very harmful phenomenon. There are three interacting components of a PIO – the pilot, the vehicle, and the trigger (in fact, the hazard. The study, conceived in two parts, aims to underline the importance of human pilot model involved in analysis. In this first part, it is shown, following classical sources, how the LQG theory of control and estimation is used to obtain a complex model of human pilot. The approach is based on the argument, experimentally proved, that the human behaves “optimally” in some sense, subject to his inherent psychophysical limitations. The validation of such model is accomplished based on the experimental model of a VTOL-type aircraft. Then, the procedure of inserting typical saturation nonlinearities in the open loop transfer function is presented. A second part of the paper will illustrate PIO tendencies evaluation by means of a grapho-analytic method.

  15. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  16. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-04-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  17. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  18. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs

  19. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs.

  20. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  1. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Passarino, G.

    2006-12-01

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  2. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  3. Study of irradiated bone: Part III. /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate autoradiographic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Corriveau, O.; Casarett, G.W.; Weber, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The macroautoradiographic and microautoradiographic localization of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/TcPPi) was studied in x-irradiated bone of rabbits up to one year post-irradiation. In cortical bone, /sup 99m/TcPPi was concentrated on bone surfaces near vasculature. Both forming and resorbing bone surfaces were comparably labeled at 2 hrs post-injection. Uptake on the surface of sites of haversian bone remodeling was observed to be at least part of the increased /sup 99m/TcPPi observed in irradiated bone in camera images. In irradiated trabecular bone 12 months following irradiation, a patchy decrease in /sup 99m/TcPPi uptake was correlated with localized decreases in vasculature

  4. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 22 figs

  5. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 22 figs.

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs

  7. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs.

  8. Notes on the Birds of Central Oaxaca, Part III: Hirundinidae to Fringillidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Forcey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Notas sobre las aves de Oaxaca central, parte II: Hirundinidae a Fringillidae Se reportan nuevos datos que amplían y clarifican nuestro conocimiento del estatus y distribución de 112 especies de aves en la región central del Estado de Oaxaca. Las observaciones se realizaron abarcando partes de los distritos de Centro, Etla, Ixtlan, Tlacolula, y Zaachila dentro de 35 km alrededor de la Ciudad de Oaxaca. El reporte se basa en observaciones tomadas durante 752 días, comprendidos entre diciembre 1996 y mayo 2002. Los principales hábitats del área son de pino-encino (incluyendo zonas pequeñas de pino-encino-oyamel y pino-encino mezclado con pastizales, matorral de encino, matorral subtropical, vegetación riparia, y vegetación secundaria, campos agrícolas y otros (incluyendo áreas urbanas, jardines, y parques. Las siguientes especies se reportan por primera vez en la zona: Progne sinaloae (registro nuevo en el estado de Oaxaca, Thryothorus felix, Hylocichla mustelina, Vermivora pinus, Vermivora chrysoptera, Dendroica pensylvanica, Dendroica magnolia, Dendroica fusca, Dendroica graciae, Oporornis philadelphia, Wilsonia canadensis, y Spiza americana.Además, las siguientes nueve especies se han reportado solamente en los Conteos Navideños o por registros únicos: Tachycineta bicolor, Dumetella carolinensis, Vermivora peregrina, Dendroica dominica, Dendroica discolor, y Piranga erythrocephala (en temporada de reproducción. Se reportan datos de la reproducción de 43 especies, 18 de los cuales no se habían registrado en estado reproductivo antes en esta zona. De estos 43, 39 se pueden agrupar como reproduciéndose en los meses de abril a julio.

  9. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2103... BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The NCS Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired by the Staff Counsel of the National Security...

  10. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired...

  11. 13 CFR 120.1000 - Risk-Based Lender Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-Based Lender Oversight. 120.1000 Section 120.1000 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1000 Risk-Based Lender Oversight. (a) Risk-Based Lender...

  12. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a... ``Public Aircraft Oversight Forum: Ensuring Safety for Critical Missions'', are to (1) raise awareness of...

  13. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-01-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18–66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r 1 , r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 or 1/c 2 . These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r 1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r 2 , r 3 , 1/c 1 and 1/c 2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions. (paper)

  14. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Olalde Rangel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life.

  15. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  16. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  17. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  18. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part III: Injuries and postoperative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The previous articles of the series devoted to ultrasound diagnostics of peripheral nerves concerned the most common nerve pathologies, i.e. entrapment neuropathies. The aim of the last part of the series is to present ultrasound possibilities in the postoperative control of the peripheral nerves as well as in the diagnostics of the second most common neuropathies of peripheral nerves, i.e. posttraumatic lesions. Early diagnostics of posttraumatic changes is of fundamental importance for the course of treatment and its long-term effects. It aids surgeons in making treatment decisions (whether surgical or conservative. When surgical treatment is necessary, the surgeon, based on US findings, is able to plan a given type of operative method. In certain cases, may even abandon the corrective or reconstructive surgery of the nerve trunk (when there are extensive defects of the nerve trunks and instead, proceed with muscle transfers. Medical literature proposes a range of divisions of the kinds of peripheral nerve injuries depending on, among others, the mechanism or degree of damage. However, the most important issue in the surgeon-diagnostician communication is a detailed description of stumps of the nerve trunks, their distance and location. In the postoperative period, ultrasound is used for monitoring the operative or conservative treatment effects including the determination of the causes of a persistent or recurrent neuropathy. It facilitates decision-making concerning a repeated surgical procedure or assuming a wait-and-see attitude. It is a difficult task for a diagnostician and it requires experience, close cooperation with a clinician and knowledge concerning surgical techniques. Apart from a static assessment, a dynamic assessment of possible adhesions constitutes a crucial element of postoperative examination. This feature distinguishes ultrasound scanning from other methods used in the diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  19. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  20. Recommendations for oversight of nanobiotechnology: dynamic oversight for complex and convergent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Wolf, Susan M.; Paradise, Jordan; Kuzma, Jennifer; Hall, Ralph; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Fatehi, Leili

    2011-01-01

    Federal oversight of nanobiotechnology in the U.S. has been fragmented and incremental. The prevailing approach has been to use existing laws and other administrative mechanisms for oversight. However, this “stay-the-course” approach will be inadequate for such a complex and convergent technology and may indeed undermine its promise. The technology demands a new, more dynamic approach to oversight. The authors are proposing a new oversight framework with three essential features: (a) the oversight trajectory needs to be able to move dynamically between “soft” and “hard” approaches as information and nano-products evolve; (b) it needs to integrate inputs from all stakeholders, with strong public engagement in decision-making to assure adequate analysis and transparency; and (c) it should include an overarching coordinating entity to assure strong inter-agency coordination and communication that can meet the challenge posed by the convergent nature of nanobiotechnology. The proposed framework arises from a detailed case analysis of several key oversight regimes relevant to nanobiotechnology and is informed by inputs from experts in academia, industry, NGOs, and government.

  1. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit F: Managing Human Resources. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-level colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit F focuses on proper management of human…

  2. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Managing the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit A focuses on the management process. It…

  3. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit B: Financial Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit B focuses on good financial management…

  4. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  5. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit G: Community Relations. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups of vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit G focuses on community relations. It…

  6. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit E: Successful Selling. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit E focuses on personal (face-to-face)…

  7. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  8. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  9. Workshop 95. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.)

  10. Workshop 95. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.).

  11. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  12. Hospital board oversight of quality and safety: a stakeholder analysis exploring the role of trust and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross; Freeman, Tim; Mannion, Russell

    2015-06-16

    Hospital boards, those executive members charged with developing appropriate organisational strategies and cultures, have an important role to play in safeguarding the care provided by their organisation. However, recent concerns have been raised over boards' ability to enact their duty to ensure the quality and safety of care. This paper offers critical reflection on the relationship between hospital board oversight and patient safety. In doing so it highlights new perspectives and suggestions for developing this area of study. The article draws on 10 interviews with key informants and policy actors who form part of the 'issue network' interested in the promotion of patient safety in the English National Health Service. The interviews surfaced a series of narratives regarding hospital board oversight of patient safety. These elaborated on the role of trust and intelligence in highlighting the potential dangers and limitations of approaches to hospital board oversight which have been narrowly focused on a risk-based view of organisational performance. In response, a need to engage with the development of trust based organisational relationships is identified, in which effective board oversight is built on 'trust' characterised by styles of leadership and behaviours that are attentive to the needs and concerns of both staff and patients. Effective board oversight also requires the gathering and triangulating of 'intelligence' generated from both national and local information sources. We call for a re-imagination of hospital board oversight in the light of these different perspectives and articulate an emerging research agenda in this area.

  13. Superfund oversight. Hearing before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session to receive testimony from Rita M. Lavelle, February 23, 1983. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Rita M. Lavelle, former Assistant Administrator for Solid Waste and Emergency Response of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lavelle was asked to respond to charges against her performance and to describe how policy decisions are made at the agency. At issue were criticisms that EPA administrators were obstructing the implementation of environmental laws. Lavelle accused critics of undermining the agency's effectiveness and credibility in their handling of her departure from EPA, and responded to questions on her relationships with agency personnel. (DCK)

  14. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  15. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision…

  17. Regulatory oversight of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainulainen, E. (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report constitutes the report on regulatory control in the field of nuclear energy which the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is required to submit once a year to the Ministry of Employment and the Economy pursuant to Section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. The report is also delivered to the Ministry of Environment, the Finnish Environment Institute, and the regional environmental authorities of the localities in which a nuclear facility is located. The regulatory control of nuclear safety in 2011 included the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as nuclear waste management and nuclear materials. The first parts of the report explain the basics of nuclear safety regulation included as part of STUK's responsibilities, as well as the objectives of the operations, and briefly introduce the objects of regulation. The chapter concerning the development and implementation of legislation and regulations describes changes in nuclear legislation, as well as the progress of STUK's YVL Guide revision work. The section concerning the regulation of nuclear facilities contains an overall safety assessment of the nuclear facilities currently in operation or under construction. The chapter concerning the regulation of the final disposal project for spent nuclear fuel de-scribes the preparations for the final disposal project and the related regulatory activities. The section concerning nuclear non-proliferation describes the nuclear non-proliferation control for Finnish nuclear facilities and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, as well as measures required by the Additional Protocol of the Safeguards Agreement. The chapter describing the oversight of security arrangements in the use of nuclear energy discusses oversight of the security arrangements in nuclear power plants and other plants, institutions and functions included within the scope of STUK's regulatory oversight. The chapter also discusses the national and

  18. Improving regulatory oversight of maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.

    2008-01-01

    Safe nuclear power plant operation requires that risks due to failure or unavailability of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) be minimized. Implementation of an effective maintenance program is a key means for achieving this goal. In its regulatory framework, the important relationship between maintenance and safety is acknowledged by the CNSC. A high level maintenance program requirement is included in the Class I Facilities Regulations. In addition, the operating licence contains a condition based on the principle that the design function and performance of SSCs needs to remain consistent with the plant's design and analysis documents. Nuclear power plant licensees have the primary responsibility for safe operation of their facilities and consequently for implementation of a successful maintenance program. The oversight role of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is to ensure that the licensee carries out that responsibility. The challenge for the CNSC is how to do this consistently and efficiently. Three opportunities for improvement to regulatory maintenance oversight are being pursued. These are related to the regulatory framework, compliance verification inspection activities and monitoring of self-reporting. The regulatory framework has been improved by clarifying expectations through the issuance of S-210 'Maintenance Programs for Nuclear Power Plants'. Inspection activities have been improved by introducing new maintenance inspections into the baseline program. Monitoring is being improved by making better use of self-reported and industry produced maintenance related performance indicators. As with any type of program change, the challenge is to ensure the consistent and optimal application of regulatory activities and resources. This paper is a summary of the CNSC's approach to improving its maintenance oversight strategy. (author)

  19. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III) - Part 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Zirui; Li, Meng; Xin, Jinyuan; Tao, Zhining; Li, Jiawei; Kang, Jeong-Eon; Huang, Kan; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Ge, Baozhu; Wu, Qizhong; Cheng, Yafang; Wang, Yuesi; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Fu, Joshua S.; Wang, Tijian; Chin, Mian; Woo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2018-04-01

    Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China) and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5) for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean) can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs) from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity). These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemical

  20. 12 CFR 4.66 - Oversight and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight and monitoring. 4.66 Section 4.66 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS...; Contracting for Goods and Services § 4.66 Oversight and monitoring. The Deputy Comptroller for Resource...

  1. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed by...

  2. 10 CFR 440.23 - Oversight, training, and technical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight, training, and technical assistance. 440.23... PERSONS § 440.23 Oversight, training, and technical assistance. (a) The Secretary and the appropriate..., directly or indirectly, training and technical assistance to any grantee or subgrantee. Such training and...

  3. 10 Standards for Oversight and Transparency of National Intelligence Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskens, S.; van Daalen, O.; van Eijk, N.

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to enhance the policy debate on surveillance by intelligence services by focusing on two key components: oversight and transparency. Both oversight and transparency are essential to devising checks and balances in a way that respects human rights. By offering this concise list of

  4. 27 | Page OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    2004-09-06

    Sep 6, 2004 ... its oversight functions remains weak because legislative role and ... ministers of his government and other officers in the public service of the Federation9, while .... 22 “Parliamentary Oversight of Finance and the Budgetary Process” - The ... Association of First Nations National, Chief Matthew Coon29 ...

  5. Navy Acquisition Executive's Management Oversight and Procurement Authority Category I and II Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... This report discusses the management oversight and procurement authority within the Navy. Two other reports discussed the management oversight and procurement authority within the Army and Air Force...

  6. A Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) With Fixed Blowdown According to ASME Section III,Part NC-7512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follmer, Bernhard; Schnettler, Armin

    2002-01-01

    In 1986, the NRC issued the Information Notice (IN) 86-05 'Main Steam Safety Valve test failures and ring setting adjustments'. Shortly after this IN was issued, the Code was revised to require that a full flow test has to be performed on each CL.2 MSSV by the manufacturer to verify that the valve was adjusted so that it would reach full lift and thus full relieving capacity and would re-close at a pressure as specified in the valve Design Specification. In response to the concern discussed in the IN, the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) performed extensive full flow testing on PWR MSSVs and found that each valve required a unique setting of a combination of two rings in order to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and re-closing at a blowdown of 5%. The Bopp and Reuther MSSV type SiZ 2507 has a 'fixed blowdown' i.e. without any adjusting rings to adjust the 'blowdown' so that the blowdown is 'fixed'. More than 1000 pieces of this type are successfully in nuclear power plants in operation. Many of them since about 25 years. Therefore it can be considered as a proven design. It is new that an optimization of this MSSV type SiZ 2507 fulfill the requirements of part NC-7512 of the ASME Section III although there are still no adjusting rings in the flow part. In 2000, for the Qinshan Candu unit 1 and 2 full flow tests were performed with 32 MSSV type SiZ 2507 size 8'' x 12'' at 51 bar saturated steam in only 6 days. In all tests the functional performance was very stable. It was demonstrated by recording the signals lift and system pressure that all valves had acceptable results to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and to re-close at blowdown of 5%. This is an advantage which gives a reduction in cost for flow tests and which gives more reliability after maintenance work during outage compared to the common MSSV design with an individual required setting of the combination of the two rings. The design of the type SiZ 2507 without any adjusting rings in the

  7. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  8. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  9. The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee. Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Contracted services are an integral part of the design, construction and operation of a nuclear facility. Changes in the nuclear industry sector, including varied availability of nuclear expertise, the expansion of the international supply market and the introduction of new technologies, have tended to increase licensees' use of contracted services. These changes have created challenges for licensees and regulators related to the retention of nuclear expertise, the effective management of the interfaces between the licensees and contractors, and the oversight of contractor manufacturing quality in the context of greater multinational diversity. The regulatory body must address these challenges to provide assurance that the licensees maintain their responsibility for the safety of the facilities, regardless of who provides goods and services or where the activities involved in the supply chain take place. This report is intended to assist regulatory bodies in assessing their current practices for the regulatory oversight of licensees' use of contractors, and adapting them where necessary to meet the evolving situation

  10. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture — Korea’s Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.J.; Choi, Y.S.; Kim, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, a regulatory oversight program of safety culture was launched in 2012 to establish regulatory measures against several events caused by weak safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper is intended to introduce the preliminary regulatory oversight framework, development and validation of safety culture components, pilot safety culture inspection results and lessons learned. The safety culture model should be based on a sound understanding of the national culture and industry characteristics where the model will be applied. The nuclear safety culture oversight model is being developed and built on the Korean regulatory system to independently assess the nuclear power operating organizations’ safety culture.

  11. A Study of Construction Reactor Oversight Process in US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, I.; Kim, S. Y.; Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    This process provides a risk-informed approach such as construction significance determination process (SDP) and construction program performance index analogous to those used in the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP). The cROP has been applied to Vogtle units 3, 4 and V.C. Summer units 2, 3 under construction for the regulatory inspection. In this paper, the cROP is dissected to present its major contents and characteristics. The main features of the cROP can be summarized as followings: 1) The cROP which adopts the concept of the ROP used for operating NPPs assesses NPP under construction periodically to determine the appropriate level of regulatory response. 2) The cROP consists of three parts: the CIP, the CAP and the CEP. 3) The inspections for NPPs under construction can be categorized into three parts: vendor inspection, baseline inspection and supplemental and plant specific inspections. USNRC's regulatory resources can be used effectively based on baseline inspection, which is using ITAAC inspections. The construction SDP is used to assign the color scheme to categorize the significance of inspection findings. Regulatory actions are taken from CAM to which the significance of inspection findings input. In this paper, major contents and characteristics of USNRC's cROP have been presented

  12. Aviation Safety: FAA Oversight of Repair Stations Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-24

    This report by the General Accounting Office examines the Federal Aviation : Administration's (FAA) oversight of the aviation repair station industry. : Specifically, this report addresses the following questions: (1) What is the : nature and scope o...

  13. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accreditation and Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.32 Internal structure and oversight. (a) The... number of such other provider; and (3) The name, address, and phone number of any entity it uses or...

  14. Review of the OSHA framework for oversight of occupational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The OSHA system for oversight of chemicals in the workplace was evaluated to derive lessons for oversight of nanotechnology. Criteria relating to the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of the system were used for evaluation that was based upon quantitative expert elicitation and historical literature analysis. The oversight system had inadequate resources in terms of finances, expertise, and personnel, and insufficient incentive for compliance. The system showed a lack of flexibility in novel situations. There were minimal requirements on companies for data on health and safety of their products. These factors have a strong influence on public confidence and health and safety. The oversight system also scored low on attributes such as public input, transparency, empirical basis, conflict of interest, and informed consent. The experts in our sample tend to believe that the current oversight system for chemicals in the workplace is neither adequate nor effective. It is very likely that the performance of the OSHA oversight system for nanomaterials will be equally inadequate.

  15. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, "soft law" approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  16. Human factors in nuclear safety oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the nuclear safety oversight function at the Savannah River Plant is to enhance the process and nuclear safety of site facilities. One of the major goals surrounding this mission is the reduction of human error. It is for this reason that several human factors engineers are assigned to the Operations assessment Group of the Facility Safety Evaluation Section (FSES). The initial task of the human factors contingent was the design and implementation of a site wide root cause analysis program. The intent of this system is to determine the most prevalent sources of human error in facility operations and to assist in determining where the limited human factors resources should be focused. In this paper the strategy used to educate the organization about the field of human factors is described. Creating an awareness of the importance of human factors engineering in all facets of design, operation, and maintenance is considered to be an important step in reducing the rate of human error

  17. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, John

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, “soft law” approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  18. RA reactor safety analysis, Part II - Accident analysis; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, Deo II - Analiza akcidenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Radanovic, Lj; Milovanovic, M; Afgan, N; Kulundzic, P [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    This part of the RA reactor safety analysis includes analysis of possible accidents caused by failures of the reactor devices and errors during reactor operation. Two types of accidents are analyzed: accidents resulting from uncontrolled reactivity increase, and accidents caused by interruption of cooling.

  19. [Blood-brain barrier part III: therapeutic approaches to cross the blood-brain barrier and target the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Miller, F; Cazaubon, S; Couraud, P-O

    2010-03-01

    Over the last few years, the blood-brain barrier has come to be considered as the main limitation for the treatment of neurological diseases caused by inflammatory, tumor or neurodegenerative disorders. In the blood-brain barrier, the close intercellular contact between cerebral endothelial cells due to tight junctions prevents the passive diffusion of hydrophilic components from the bloodstream into the brain. Several specific transport systems (via transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells) are implicated in the delivery of nutriments, ions and vitamins to the brain; other transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells extrude endogenous substances or xenobiotics, which have crossed the cerebral endothelium, out of the brain and into the bloodstream. Recently, several strategies have been proposed to target the brain, (i) by by-passing the blood-brain barrier by central drug administration, (ii) by increasing permeability of the blood-brain barrier, (iii) by modulating the expression and/or the activity of efflux transporters, (iv) by using the physiological receptor-dependent blood-brain barrier transport, and (v) by creating new viral or chemical vectors to cross the blood-brain barrier. This review focuses on the illustration of these different approaches. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  2. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Context: Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models. Objective: To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility. Results: In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative). Conclusions: The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties. PMID:27977302

  3. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

     Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  4. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the small Magellanic cloud - part III: Compact Hii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss a new catalogue of 48 compact Hii regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and a newly created deep 1420 MHz (λ=20 cm radio-continuum image of the N19 region located in the southwestern part of the SMC. The new images were created by merging 1420 MHz radiocontinuum archival data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The majority of these detected radio compact Hii regions have rather flat spectral indices which indicates, as expected, that the dominant emission mechanism is of thermal nature.

  5. Mammalian Toxicity of Munition Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses. Part III. 2,6-Dinitrotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    and the neuromuscular effects in these dogs were not due to hypocalcemia . The lowest serum calcium concen- tration in these dogs was 4.2 meq/liter...motor end plate might produce a local hypocalcemia . Such a mechanism is purely speculative. Qualitatively and quantitavely, most of the effects of 2,6...I ýNw,- -MIM I/ MIDWEST RESEARCH INS14ITUTE H0q .3L I LU -_ MAMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUlNDSPHASE II: EFFECTS OF MiULTIPLE DOSES C* •PART

  6. A-Part Gel, an adhesion prophylaxis for abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled phase I-II safety study [NCT00646412].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Reinhold; Baumann, Petra; Schmoor, Claudia; Odermatt, Erich K; Wente, Moritz N; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal surgical intervention can cause the development of intra-peritoneal adhesions. To reduce this problem, different agents have been tested to minimize abdominal adhesions; however, the optimal adhesion prophylaxis has not been found so far. Therefore, the A-Part(®) Gel was developed as a barrier to diminish postsurgical adhesions; the aim of this randomized controlled study was a first evaluation of its safety and efficacy. In this prospective, controlled, randomized, patient-blinded, monocenter phase I-II study, 62 patients received either the hydrogel A-Part-Gel(®) as an anti-adhesive barrier or were untreated after primary elective median laparotomy. Primary endpoint was the occurrence of peritonitis and/or wound healing impairment 28 ± 10 days postoperatively. As secondary endpoints anastomotic leakage until 28 days after surgery, adverse events and adhesions were assessed until 3 months postoperatively. A lower rate of wound healing impairment and/or peritonitis was observed in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control group: (6.5 vs. 13.8 %). The difference between the two groups was -7.3%, 90 % confidence interval [-20.1, 5.4 %]. Both treatment groups showed similar frequency of anastomotic leakage but incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events were slightly lower in the A-Part Gel(®) group compared to the control. Adhesion rates were comparable in both groups. A-Part Gel(®) is safe as an adhesion prophylaxis after abdominal wall surgery but no reduction of postoperative peritoneal adhesion could be found in comparison to the control group. This may at least in part be due to the small sample size as well as to the incomplete coverage of the incision due to the used application. NCT00646412.

  7. Dental compensation for skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth. Part 1: Occlusal situation 12 years after completion of active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Schenk-Kazan, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to statistically evaluate the outcomes achieved by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth (second premolars or first molars) for Class III compensation. Part A of the study dealt with the quality of outcomes at the end of active treatment, using weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores determined on the basis of casts for 25 (14 female and 11 male) consecutive patients aged 16 ± 1.7 years at the time of debonding. These results were compared to the scores in a randomly selected control group of 25 (14 female and 11 male) patients who were 14.7 ± 1.9 years old at debonding. Part B evaluated the long-term stability of the outcomes based on 12 (all of them female) patients available for examination after a mean of 11.8 years. The mean weighted PAR scores obtained in both study parts were analyzed for statistical differences using a two-tailed paired Student's t-test at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Mean weighted PAR scores of 4.76 ± 3.94 and 3.92 ± 3.44 were obtained in the Class III extraction group and the control group, respectively, at the end of active treatment. This difference was not significant (p = 0.49). Among the 12 longitudinal patients, the mean score increased from 4 ± 3.46 at debonding to 6.25 ± 3.67 by the end of the 11.8-year follow-up period. This difference was significant (p = 0.0008). Treatment of Class III anomalies by isolated extraction of lower premolars or molars can yield PAR scores similar to those achieved by standard therapies. These scores, while increasing significantly, remained at a clinically acceptable level over 11.8 years. Hence this treatment modality--intended for cases that border on requiring orthognathic surgery--may also be recommended from a long-term point of view.

  8. Use of rumination and activity monitoring for the identification of dairy cows with health disorders: Part III. Metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Caixeta, L S; Al-Abri, M A; Giordano, J O

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the performance of an automated health-monitoring system (AHMS) to identify cows with metritis based on an alert system (health index score, HIS) that combines rumination time and physical activity; (2) the number of days between the first HIS alert and clinical diagnosis (CD) of metritis by farm personnel; and (3) the daily rumination time, physical activity, and HIS patterns around CD. In this manuscript, the overall performance of HIS to detect cows with all disorders of interest in this study [ketosis, displaced abomasum, indigestion (companion paper, part I), mastitis (companion paper, part II), and metritis] is also reported. Holstein cattle (n=1,121; 451 nulliparous and 670 multiparous) were fitted with a neck-mounted electronic rumination and activity monitoring tag (HR Tags, SCR Dairy, Netanya, Israel) from at least -21 to 80 d in milk (DIM). Raw data collected in 2-h periods were summarized per 24 h as daily rumination and activity. An HIS (0 to 100 arbitrary units) was calculated daily for individual cows with an algorithm that used rumination and activity. A positive HIS outcome was defined as an HIS of cows (n=459) at -11±3, -4±3, 0, 3±1, 7±1, 14±1, and 28±1 DIM. The overall sensitivity of HIS was 55% for all cases of metritis (n=349), but it was greater for cows with metritis and another disorder (78%) than for cows with metritis only (53%). Cows diagnosed with metritis and flagged based on HIS had substantial alterations in their rumination, activity, and HIS patterns around CD, alterations of blood markers of metabolic and health status around calving, reduced milk production, and were more likely to exit the herd than cows not flagged based on the HIS and cows without disease, suggesting that cows flagged based on the HIS had a more severe episode of metritis. Including all disorders of interest for this study, the overall sensitivity was 59%, specificity was 98%, positive predictive value was

  9. Controlled production of camembert-type cheeses: part III role of the ripening microflora on free fatty acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Corrieu, Georges; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2007-05-01

    Phenomena generating FFAs, important flavour precursors, are significant in cheese ripening. In Camembert-like cheeses, it was intended to establish the relationships between the dynamics of FFA concentrations changes and the succession of ripening microflora during ripening. Experimental Camembert-type cheeses were prepared in duplicate from pasteurised milk inoculated with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum under aseptic conditions. For each cheese and each cheesy medium, concentrations of FFAs with odd-numbered carbons, except for 9:0 and 13:0, did not change over time. For long-chain FFAs, concentrations varied with the given cheese part (rind or core). K. lactis produced only short or medium-chain FFAs during its growth and had a minor influence on caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids in comparison with G. candidum, the most lipolytic of the strains used here. It generated all short or medium-chain FFAs (4:0-12:0) during its exponential and slowdown growth periods and only long-chain ones (14:0-18:0) during its stationary phase. Pen. camemberti produced more long-chain FFAs (14:0-18:0) during its sporulation. Brev. aurantiacum did not generate any FFAs. The evidence of links between specific FFAs and the growth of a given microorganism is shown.

  10. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later...

  11. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  12. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal Housing...

  13. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight agency safety and security reviews. 659... Role of the State Oversight Agency § 659.29 Oversight agency safety and security reviews. At least... safety program plan and system security plan. Alternatively, the on-site review may be conducted in an on...

  14. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  15. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Juan, D.

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III to Cr(VI with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Primene 81R, 10 % isodecanol and kerosene. All the iron, 91 % Cr, 10 % Ni and large part of the copper contained in the initial leach solution are recovered in the organic phase. In the scrubbing stage (with a sulphuric acid solution at pH 1,4, all the copper and nickel and 30 % Cr go to the washing liquor, while all the iron and 70 % Cr remained in the organic phase. In the stripping stage (with a 2N NH4OH or 2N NaOH solution all the iron and chromium are recovered as a precipitate of highly absorbent hydroxides. After the treatment mentioned, 63 % Cr and 100 % Fe are recovered as a mixture of hydroxides, and 28 % of the initial chromium, all the nickel and the copper are found in the washing liquor.

    Se estudia la aplicación del Primene 81R como agente de extracción del cromo presente en residuos sólidos que poseen níquel, hierro y cobre. El residuo se lixivió con disolución de ácido sulfúrico hasta pH 3 y se investigó la oxidación del Cr(III a Cr(VI con ácido de Caro. Ante el nulo resultado en la oxidación, se actuó directamente sobre el Cr(III. Se estudió el proceso de extracción/lavado/reextracción sobre la lejía de lixiviación. La fase orgánica empleada en la extracción estaba constituida por 10 % v/v de Primene 81R, 10 % de isodecanol y queroseno. En la fase orgánica se recupera todo el hierro, el 91 % Cr, el 10 % Ni y gran parte del cobre contenidos en la lejía de partida. En la etapa de lavado (con disolución de

  16. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site reviews...

  17. Oversight of Department of Defense Reconstruction Projects in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    had to reschedule some of our site visits multiple times due to security conditions. As an alternative means for conducting oversight, due to a limited...employed less than 20 percent of the staff it was expected to employ. According to the doctors and nurses on site during our inspection, the limited

  18. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE OF...

  19. Notification: Oversight of Clean Water State Revolving Loan Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY15-0153, April 6, 2015. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is beginning preliminary research on the EPA oversight of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF).

  20. 40 CFR 51.362 - Motorist compliance enforcement program oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... deviate from established requirements, or in the case of non-government entities that process... registrations; and (10) The prevention of fraudulent procurement or use of inspection documents by controlling... measurements. (c) SIP requirements. The SIP shall include a description of enforcement program oversight and...

  1. Strategic planning of an integrated program for state oversight agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzer, A.E.; Cothron, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Among the barrage of agreements faced by federal facilities are the State Oversight Agreements (known as Agreements in Principle in many states). These agreements between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the states fund the states to conduct independent environmental monitoring and oversight which requires plans, studies, inventories, models, and reports from DOE and its management and operating contractors. Many states have signed such agreements, including Tennessee, Kentucky, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, California, and Florida. This type of oversight agreement originated in Colorado as a result of environmental concerns at the Rocky Flats Plant. The 5-year State Oversight Agreements for Tennessee and Kentucky became effective on May 13, 1991, and fund these states nearly $21 million and $7 million, respectively. Implementation of these open-quotes comprehensive and integratedclose quotes agreements is particularly complex in Tennessee where the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation houses three installations with distinctly different missions. The program development and strategic planning required for coordinating and integrating a program of this magnitude is discussed. Included are the organizational structure and interfaces required to define and coordinate program elements across plants and to also effectively negotiate scope and schedules with the state. The planned Program Management Plan, which will contain implementation and procedural guidelines, and the management control system for detailed tracking of activities and costs are outlined. Additionally, issues inherent in the nature of the agreements and implementation of a program of this magnitude are discussed. Finally, a comparison of the agreements for Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, and Idaho is made to gain a better understanding of the similarities and differences in State Oversight Agreements to aid in implementation of these agreements

  2. Milliped Miscellany — Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1956-01-01

    MATERIAL: Eritrea: Gula (15° 36’ N., 38° 21’ E.), 500 m., 19 July 1953, Coll. W. J. STOWER, 1 ♂ (holotype). COLOUR : Head, except the lower portion of the clypeus and a sharply demarcated spot at the medio-posterior side of the antennal sockets which are yellowish, very dark brown. Antennae and legs

  3. Tarski Geometry Axioms. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we continue the formalization of the work devoted to Tarski’s geometry - the book “Metamathematische Methoden in der Geometrie” by W. Schwabhäuser, W. Szmielew, and A. Tarski. After we prepared some introductory formal framework in our two previous Mizar articles, we focus on the regular translation of underlying items faithfully following the abovementioned book (our encoding covers first seven chapters. Our development utilizes also other formalization efforts of the same topic, e.g. Isabelle/HOL by Makarios, Metamath or even proof objects obtained directly from Prover9. In addition, using the native Mizar constructions (cluster registrations the propositions (“Satz” are reformulated under weaker conditions, i.e. by using fewer axioms or by proposing an alternative version that uses just another axioms (ex. Satz 2.1 or Satz 2.2.

  4. Workshop 97. Part III. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This volume of the Proceedings covers the following branches of science and technology: power systems and electrical engineering, electronics and measuring and communication engineering, optics, quantum electronics and photonics, microelectronics, and biomedical engineering. Out of the contributions, 2 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  5. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  6. MicroVent (part III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreau, Jerome Le; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    This study aims at using the InVentilate unit in the cooling case, without heat recovery. It results in a relatively low inlet air temperature. Different solutions have been tested to decrease the risk of draught in the occupied zone: ‐ Using a mixer (2 designs) ‐ Using an inlet grille ‐ Using...

  7. Lessons Learned from a Five-year Evaluation of the Belgian Safety Culture Oversight Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Belgian Regulatory Body has implemented a Safety Culture oversight process since 2010. In a nutshell, this process is based on field observations provided by inspectors or safety analysts during any contact with a licencee (inspections, meetings, phone calls, etc). These observations are recorded within an observation (excel) sheet—aiming at describing factual and contextual issues — and are linked to IAEA Safety Culture attributes. It should be stressed that the purpose of the process is not to give a comprehensive view of a licencee safety culture but to address findings that require attention or action on the part of a licencee. In other words, gathering safety culture observations aims at identifying cultural, organizational or behavioural issues in order to feed a regulatory response to potential problems. Safety Culture Observations (SCO) are then fully integrated in routine inspection activities and must be seen as an input of the overall oversight process. As a result, the assessment of the SCO is inserted within the yearly safety evaluation report performed by Bel V and transmitted to the licencee. However, observing safety culture is not a natural approach for engineers. Guidance, training and coaching must be provided in order to open up safety dimensions to be captured. In other words, a SCO process requires a continuous support in order to promote a holistic and systemic view of safety.

  8. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  9. PARTICULARITIES OF PARLIAMENTARY OVERSIGHT IN DIFFERENT POLITICAL REGIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Claudia CĂLIN-MIHALCEA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality and intensity of the parliamentary oversight performed over the Government are shaped by several major criteria: political regime, electoral system, structure of the Parliament (unicameral/bicameral, parliamentary culture and tradition. This paper emphasizes some distinctive elements and particular mechanisms of the control exercised over the activities of the executive power, from the point of view of the political regime established in states with modern democracies.

  10. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  11. Oil and gas site contamination risks : improved oversight needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    British Columbia has seen record levels of activities in the oil and gas sector. Upstream petroleum processes include exploration, well completion and production. Site contamination can occur during all of these activities, resulting in potential environmental and human health impacts. Although well operators are responsible by law for site restoration, there is a potential risk that some operators will not fulfill their responsibilities, thereby leaving the province liable for the site restoration costs. In British Columbia, the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) is responsible for managing these risks through oversight activities designed to ensure that industry meets its obligations. The OGC also manages the orphan sites reclamation fund. This report presented an audit of the OGC in order to determine if it is providing adequate oversight of upstream oil and gas site contamination risks. The audit examined whether the agency responsibilities are clear and whether the OGC is fully aware of the environmental and financial risks associated with upstream oil and gas site contamination. The audit also examined if the OGC has established appropriate procedures to oversee the risks and to inform the public of how effectively site contamination risks are being managed. The report presented the audit background, audit expectations, findings, conclusions and recommendations. It was concluded that the OGC's oversight of the environmental and financial risks associated with oil and gas site contamination needs improving. tabs., figs.

  12. Feeling to See: Oversight in Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    Science as a practice is characterised by two types of visibility. On the one hand scientists make nature visible via imaging technologies; on the other hand they make scientific practice visible as relevant and useful to society. The sociology of translation has paved the way for analysing...... these two types of visibility as intrinsic parts of the same scientific practice but does not take into account the costs of putting science itself under the gaze. Based on ethnographic field work with Nano scientists the paper compares the costs of making nature visible with the costs of making science....... Both types of visibility entail a necessary process of manufacturing the object of knowledge in order for it to display 'feelable forces' in relation the gaze through which visibility is obtained. The paper analyses how science acquires double visibility by a process of enhancement and erasure; two...

  13. Scalable, sustainable cost-effective surgical care: a model for safety and quality in the developing world, part III: impact and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alex; Restrepo, Carolina; Mackay, Don; Sherman, Randy; Varma, Ajit; Ayala, Ruben; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Magee, William

    2014-09-01

    The Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) utilizes a high-volume, subspecialized institution to provide safe, quality, and comprehensive and cost-effective surgical care to a highly vulnerable patient population. The GCCCC utilized a diagonal model of surgical care delivery, with vertical inputs of mission-based care transitioning to investments in infrastructure and human capital to create a sustainable, local care delivery system. Over the first 2.5 years of service (May 2011-November 2013), the GCCCC made significant advances in numerous areas. Progress was meticulously documented to evaluate performance and provide transparency to stakeholders including donors, government officials, medical oversight bodies, employees, and patients. During this time period, the GCCCC provided free operations to 7,034 patients, with improved safety, outcomes, and multidisciplinary services while dramatically decreasing costs and increasing investments in the local community. The center has become a regional referral cleft center, and governments of surrounding states have contracted the GCCCC to provide care for their citizens with cleft lip and cleft palate. Additional regional and global impact is anticipated through continued investments into education and training, comprehensive services, and research and outcomes. The success of this public private partnership demonstrates the value of this model of surgical care in the developing world, and offers a blueprint for reproduction. The GCCCC experience has been consistent with previous studies demonstrating a positive volume-outcomes relationship, and provides evidence for the value of the specialty hospital model for surgical delivery in the developing world.

  14. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products.

  15. MEDICAID FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Better Oversight of State Claims for Federal Reimbursement Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calbom, Linda

    2002-01-01

    .... Developing baseline information on Medicaid issues at greatest risk for improper payments and measuring improvements in program management against that baseline is key to achieving effective financial oversight...

  16. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition

  17. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of providing policy and budget oversight of Ukrainian intelligence organizations in accordance with norms and practices developed in contemporary Western democracies...

  18. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  19. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (II faza) I-V, III Deo, Zatrovanje reaktora, II faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-10-15

    This phase is dealing with influence of all the fission products except Xe{sup 135} on the reactivity of a reactor, usually named as reactor poisoning. The first part of the report is a review of methods for calculation of reactor poisoning. The second part shows the most frequently used method for calculation of cross sections and yields of pseudo products (for thermal neutrons). The system of equations was adopted dependent on the conditions of the available computer system. It is described in part three. Detailed method for their application is described in part four and results obtained are presented in part five.

  20. Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight's (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE's nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO's environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO's GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with open-quotes black boxclose quotes models and data interpretation. OFFO's independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO's achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO's two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS

  1. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [es

  2. Extracción de cromo con disolventes orgánicos. III parte. Aplicación al tratamiento de residuos polimetálicos industriales

    OpenAIRE

    de Juan, D.; Meseguer, V.; Lozano, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH 3 and oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III) directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10 % v/v Pr...

  3. RA Reactor operation and maintenance (I-IX), Part III, Task 3.08/04-02 Refurbishment of the electrical equipment; Pogon i odrzavanje reaktora RA (I-IX), III Deo, Zadatak 3.08/04-02 Remont elektro opreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V; Nikolic, M; Poznanovic, B; Rajic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    This volume contains detailed action plan for repair of electrical equipment of the RA reactor, the list of electrical equipment parts which were either repaired or exchanged for improvement of their performance. Detailed work describing the repair and maintenance work done of the listed equipment is part of this report. Equipment related to dosimetry and control systems are included as well.

  4. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  5. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieracki, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The NRC recognises that it is important for all organizations performing or overseeing regulated activities to establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The NRC’s approach to safety culture is based on the premise that licencees bear the primary responsibility for safety. The NRC provides oversight of safety culture through expectations detailed in policy statements, safety culture assessor training for NRC inspectors, the oversight process, and the Allegations and Enforcement Programs. The NRC’s Safety Culture Policy Statement (SCPS) sets forth the Commission’s expectation that individuals and organizations establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The SCPS is not a regulation. It applies to all licencees, certificate holders, permit holders, authorisation holders, holders of quality assurance program approvals, vendors and suppliers of safety-related components, and applicants for a licence, certificate, permit, authorisation, or quality assurance program approval, subject to NRC authority.

  7. Geology of quadrangles H-12, H-13, and parts of I-12 and I-13, (zone III) in northeastern Santander Department, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dwight Edward; Goldsmith, Richard; Cruz, Jaime B.; Restrepo, Hernan A.

    1974-01-01

    A program of geologic mapping and mineral investigation in Colombia was undertaken cooperatively by the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Geologico-Mineras (formerly known as the Inventario Minero Nacional), and the U. S. Geological Survey; by the Government of Colombia and the Agency for International Development, U. S. Department of State. The purpose was to study, and evaluate mineral resources (excluding of petroleum, coal, emeralds, and alluvial gold) of four selected areas, designated Zones I to IV, that total about 70,000 km2. The work in Zone III, in the Cordillera Oriental, was done from 1965 to 1968. The northeast trend of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia swings abruptly to north-northwest in the area of this report, and divides around the southern end of the Maracaibo Basin. This section of the Cordillera Oriental is referred to as the Santander Massif. Radiometric age determinations indicate that the oldest rocks of the Santander massif are Precambrian and include high-grade gneiss, schist, and migmatite of the Bucaramanga Formation. These rocks were probably part of the Precambrian Guayana Shield. Low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks of late Precambrian to Ordovician age .include phyllite, schist, metasiltstone, metasandstone, and marble of the Silgara Formation, a geosynclinal series of considerable extent in the Cordillera Oriental and possibly the Cordillera de Merida of Venezuela. Orthogneiss ranging from granite to tonalite is widely distributed in the high- and medium-grade metamorphic rocks of the central core of the massif and probably represents rocks of two ages, Precambrian and Ordovician to Early Devonian. Younger orthogneiss and the Silgara are overlain by Middle Devonian beds of the Floresta Formation which show a generally low but varying degree of metamorphism. Phyllite and argillite are common, and infrequent marble and other calcareous beds are fossiliferous. Except for recrystallization in limestones of !the

  8. 17 CFR 201.440 - Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Commission Review § 201.440 Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight... for registration of a public accounting firm, may file an application for review. (b) Procedure. An... the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. 201.440 Section 201.440 Commodity and Securities...

  9. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information...

  10. 75 FR 39954 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ...] Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location AGENCY: Food and Drug... location for the upcoming public meeting entitled ``Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' A new... the public meeting, FDA is announcing in this notice a new location for the public meeting. II. New...

  11. Creating a Learning Organization in Law Enforcement: Maturity Levels for Police Oversight Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a stage model for maturity levels for police oversight agencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering police oversight organizations and stages of growth models. Findings: As a conceptual paper, the main findings are related to the appropriateness of…

  12. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent and...

  13. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations Report...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-15-477, a report to congressional requesters May 2015 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD

  14. Defense Forensics: Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    forensic pathology, forensic anthropology, and forensic toxicology . 13DOD’s forensic directive defines DOD components as the Office of the...DEFENSE FORENSICS Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic ...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Forensics : Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring

  15. 76 FR 31416 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ...-AL92 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs AGENCY: Department of... that contractors have implemented the mandatory contractor business ethics program requirements. DATES... to Improve DoD's Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs. The ethics program requirement flows from...

  16. 76 FR 52997 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's... August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the... public accounting firm, in amounts that are sufficient to cover the costs of processing and reviewing...

  17. 17 CFR 202.11 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. 202.11 Section 202.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES § 202.11 Public Company Accounting Oversight...

  18. Parliamentary Oversight of European Security and Defence Policy: A Matter of Formal Competences or the Will of Parliamentarians?

    OpenAIRE

    Maatsch, A.; Galella, P.

    2016-01-01

    Are parliaments with strong formal powers for the deployment of troops likely to conduct more intensive oversight than their counterparts with weak or no powers? The literature suggests that strong formal powers delineate boundaries of parliamentary oversight. However, this article demonstrates that strong formal powers are not necessary for parliaments in order to conduct oversight. If parliaments with weak formal powers had strong incentives to carry out oversight of the EU NAVFOR Operation...

  19. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia IIIPart 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry–meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET. The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5 for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity. These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA

  20. Clinical oversight and the avoidance of repeat induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovetty, Erica L; Clare, Camille A; Squire, Mary-Beatrice; Kubal, Keshar P; Liou, Sherry; Inchiosa, Mario A

    2018-06-03

    To evaluate the impact of patient counseling, demographics, and contraceptive methods on repeat induced abortion in women attending family planning clinics. A retrospective chart review of repeat induced abortions was performed. The analysis included patients with an initial induced abortion obtained between January 1, 2001, and March 31, 2014, at New York City Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan. The duration of involvement in the family planning program, the use of contraceptive interventions, and 18 patient factors were analyzed for their correlation with the incidence of repeat induced abortions per year of follow-up. A decreased rate of repeat induced abortions was associated with a longer duration of clinical oversight (r 2 =0.449, Pabortions. By determining the patient characteristics that most influence repeat induced abortion rates, providers can best choose the most efficacious method of contraception available. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  1. External Police Oversight in Mexico: Experiences, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Guzmán Sánchez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After nearly 20 years of ‘reformist’ measures, the police in Mexico continues to be an ineffective, unreliable, and ‘far from citizen’ institution. The efforts made so far have faded amongst political interests and agendas; multidimensional frameworks out-dated at both conceptual and interagency levels; short-sighted competition for resources; evaluation and performance monitors that are handicapped by bureaucratic inaction; and weak transparency and accountability that perpetuate the opacity in which the police operate. In this context, the agenda of external police oversight is still at a rudimentary stage. However, there are several initiatives that have managed to push the issue to the frontier of new knowledge and promising practices. This paper outlines the experiences and challenges of—as well as the lessons learned by—the Institute for Security and Democracy (Insyde A.C., one of the most recognised think tanks in Mexico.

  2. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit C: Keeping the Business Records. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part II is operating a business. Unit C focuses on record keeping. It introduces…

  3. Peatlands as Filters for Polluted Mine Water?—A Case Study from an Uranium-Contaminated Karst System in South Africa—Part III: Quantifying the Hydraulic Filter Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Winde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As Part III of a four-part series on the filter function of peat for uranium (U, this paper focuses on the hydraulic component of a conceptual filter model introduced in Part II. This includes the quantification of water flow through the wetland as a whole, which was largely unknown and found to be significantly higher that anticipated. Apart from subaquatic artesian springs associated with the underlying karst aquifer the higher flow volumes were also caused by plumes of polluted groundwater moving laterally into the wetland. Real-time, quasi-continuous in situ measurements of porewater in peat and non-peat sediments indicate that rising stream levels (e.g., during flood conditions lead to the infiltration of stream water into adjacent peat deposits and thus allow for a certain proportion of flood water to be filtered. However, changes in porewater quality triggered by spring rains may promote the remobilization of possibly sorbed U.

  4. The Effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for Class III correction: part I--jaw-motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the mandibular range of motion in Class III patients with and without early physiotherapy after orthognathic surgery (OGS). This study consisted of 63 Class III patients who underwent 2-jaw OGS. The experimental group comprised 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation. The control group consisted of 32 patients who did not have physical rehabilitation. Twelve variables of 3-dimensional (3D) jaw-motion analysis (JMA) were recorded before surgery (T1) and 6 weeks (T2) and 6 months (T3) after surgery. A 2-sample t test was conducted to compare the JMA results between the two groups at different time points. At T2, the JMA data were measured to be 77.5%-145.7% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 60.3%-90.6% in the control group. At T3, the measurements were 112.2%-179.2% of presurgical values in the experimental group, and 77.6%-157.2% in the control group. The patients in the experimental group exhibited more favorable recovery than did those in the control group, from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. However, after termination of physiotherapy, no significant difference in the extent of recovery was observed between groups up to 6 months after OGS. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  6. Tennessee Oversight Agreement combined annual reports, May 13, 1991--May 12, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Tennessee Oversight Agreement provides independent oversight and monitoring of the Department of Energy's activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation by the State. The agreement obligates the state to provide an annual report to DOE and for public distribution of the results of the DOE Oversight Division's monitoring and analysis activities and its findings of the quality and effectiveness of the Department of Energy's environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. The DOE Oversight Division's first report will discuss the status of the entire oversight agreement for the first two years of its existence. The 1991--1993 combined annual reports include a short history of the Division, a list of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement commitments and a status report on each of DOE Oversight Division's programs. Each Division program includes a descriptive status of its findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were also consolidated into a separate segment of the report (Chapter 7). Findings indicate there have been genuine successes in the areas of site access and data availability. More effort, however, is required in both of these areas before the state can verify that DOE and its contractors are meeting its obligations. Ambient surveillance monitoring by DOE is extensive. The DOE Oversight Division reviews this data to assure the state and its citizens that all areas of the environment are adequately protected by DOE operations. There is a noticeable lack of research and development in the technology for environmental remediation and radiological and mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal. The DOE Oversight Division's recommendations for improvement are provided with each of the findings listed in this report

  7. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III; Redovisning av saekerhet efter foerslutning av slutfoervaret foer anvaent kaernbraensle. Huvudrapport fraan projekt SR-Site. Del III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  8. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-II, Part I - RA reactor technical and operation characteristics; Analiza sigurnosti rada reaktora RA - I-III, I deo - Tehnicke i pogonske karakteristike reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    RA research reactor is a thermal, heavy water moderated system with graphite reflector having nominal power 6.5 MW. The 2% enriched metal uranium fuel in the reactor core produces mean thermal neutron flux of 2.9 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s, and maximum neutron flux 5.5 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} s. main components of the reactor described in this report are: rector core, reflector, biological shield, heavy water cooling system, ordinary water cooling system, helium system, reactor control system, reactor safety system, dosimetry system, power supply system, and fuel transport system. Detailed reactor properties and engineering drawings of all the system are part of this volume.

  9. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  10. 46 CFR 160.076-29 - Production oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Samples selected for the indicated tests may not be used for more than one test. (iii) If a sample fails... 12 months. (iii) One sample of each means of marking on each type of fabric or finish used in PFD... if any sample fails one or more tests. (3) In lots of more than 200 PFDs, the lot must be rejected if...

  11. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective Part II. Fall and resurrection of chromosome territories during the 1950s to 1980s. Part III. Chromosome territories and the functional nuclear architecture: experiments and m

    OpenAIRE

    T Cremer; C Cremer

    2009-01-01

    Part II of this historical review on the progress of nuclear architecture studies points out why the original hypothesis of chromosome territories from Carl Rabl and Theodor Boveri (described in part I) was abandoned during the 1950s and finally proven by compelling evidence forwarded by laser-uvmicrobeam studies and in situ hybridization experiments. Part II also includes a section on the development of advanced light microscopic techniques breaking the classical Abbe limit written for reade...

  12. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model.

  13. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model. PMID:24518851

  14. Authorization of appropriations for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for fiscal years 1982 and 1983 (implementation of Section 110, Public Law 96-295). Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, February 27, 1981. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Part II of the budget authorization hearings covers the testimony of two panels, one with representatives of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and one with members of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). Their testimony focused on section 10 of the authorization law which deals with requirements of systematic safety evaluation of operating reactors. NRC revisions to section 10 have quieted some industry criticisms that the plan will drain manpower and resources without accomplishing anything significant. UCS panelists challenged the NRC to provide objective scientific evidence that nuclear power plants are operating safely. They urged an augmented budget for further safety research. An appendix with additional statements and material follows the testimony

  15. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part III (unsolved questions & subsequent case law)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    invigorated U.S. debate on patent eligibility, referring inter alia to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos and the pending certiorari in Prometheus v. Mayo (1). Before this background, Part I recited the complex procedural history of AMP v. USPTO (2) and summarized the underpinnings...... of the outcome, i.e. the three different opinions of the Federal Circuit judges Lourie, Moore & Bryson who comprised the panel (3). Part II continued the tale with a detailed analysis of the decision's practical implications (4), which is followed by a closer look on the chances for an ultimate Supreme Court...... decision in Prometheus v. Mayo. Part IV, which is to be published in issue 4, will finally offer a broader discussion of the recent US patent-eligibility developments from an innovation policy perspective including brief references to recent European developments (7). This will provide the basis...

  16. Post-approval monitoring and oversight of U.S.-initiated human subjects research in resource-constrained countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brandon; Kinsler, Janni; Folayan, Morenike O; Allen, Karen; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2014-06-01

    The history of human subjects research and controversial procedures in relation to it has helped form the field of bioethics. Ethically questionable elements may be identified during research design, research implementation, management at the study site, or actions by a study's investigator or other staff. Post-approval monitoring (PAM) may prevent violations from occurring or enable their identification at an early stage. In U.S.-initiated human subjects research taking place in resource-constrained countries with limited development of research regulatory structures, arranging a site visit from a U.S. research ethics committee (REC) becomes difficult, thus creating a potential barrier to regulatory oversight by the parent REC. However, this barrier may be overcome through the use of digital technologies, since much of the world has at least remote access to the Internet. Empirical research is needed to pilot test the use of these technologies for research oversight to ensure the protection of human subjects taking part in research worldwide.

  17. A complex study on the reliability assessment of the containment of a PWR. Part III.- Structural reliability assessment under internal and external loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Schueller, G.I.

    1977-01-01

    The first part of the analysis is concerned with the determination of the failure probability of the steel hull under internal load conditions. Two independent failure criteria are the basis for this calculation; the first one being the ultimate yield which is actually an instability condition and the second one being the fracture condition as described in Part II of the paper. Both the global and the local failure probabilities are investigated. The second part of the analysis is concerned with the external load case of earthquake. As it has already been described in Part I the probability of occurrence of a LOCA, given an earthquake has been considered in connection with the probable damage which the steel hull might experience during the earthquake. In other words the survival probability of the hull with deteriorated resistance is calculated, taking into account the frequencies of occurrence of the various events. The third part of the analysis is concerned with the reliability determination of the reinforced concrete dome structure, which is supposed to protect, the steel hull against external load conditions such as airplane crash and external pressure waves (the latter covering the load case of tornado occurrence). The reliability analysis of the reinforced concrete structure under earthquake loading is performed by utilizing the time-history method. Some aspects of the drawbacks of the response spectra method -when used in a risk analysis- are pointed out. The probability distribution of the concrete strength as determined under intermediate strain rate as described in Part II is utilized in the analysis. Finally the remaining two external load cases are discussed in light of their use in a reliability analysis and with respect to their frequency of occurrence and the probability distribution of their load intensities. The reliability demonstration is performed using the containment structure of the PWR-plant 'Biblis B' which is locate

  18. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  19. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Science and Technology part III : Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamsul Abraha; Yateman Arryanto; Sri Jauhari S; Agus Taftazani; Kris Tri Basuki; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.; Sukarsono, R.; Samin; Syarip; Suryadi, MS; Sardjono, Y.; Tri Mardji Atmono; Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Tjipto Sujitno, BA.

    2007-08-01

    The Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Accelerator Technology and Material Process, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Meeting was held in Yogyakarta on July 10, 2007. The proceedings contains papers presented on the meeting about Radioactive Waste Management and Environment and there are 25 papers which have separated index. The proceedings is the third part of the three parts which published in series. (PPIN)

  20. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  1. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    .... Official government documents, news reports and other literature on the intelligence system in Ukraine, as well as studies of intelligence oversight within democracies are the primary sources of data...

  2. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  3. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  4. A simple, fast, and accurate thermodynamic-based approach for transfer and prediction of gas chromatography retention times between columns and instruments Part III: Retention time prediction on target column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Siyuan; Stevenson, Keisean A J M; Harynuk, James J

    2018-03-27

    This is the third part of a three-part series of papers. In Part I, we presented a method for determining the actual effective geometry of a reference column as well as the thermodynamic-based parameters of a set of probe compounds in an in-house mixture. Part II introduced an approach for estimating the actual effective geometry of a target column by collecting retention data of the same mixture of probe compounds on the target column and using their thermodynamic parameters, acquired on the reference column, as a bridge between both systems. Part III, presented here, demonstrates the retention time transfer and prediction from the reference column to the target column using experimental data for a separate mixture of compounds. To predict the retention time of a new compound, we first estimate its thermodynamic-based parameters on the reference column (using geometric parameters determined previously). The compound's retention time on a second column (of previously determined geometry) is then predicted. The models and the associated optimization algorithms were tested using simulated and experimental data. The accuracy of predicted retention times shows that the proposed approach is simple, fast, and accurate for retention time transfer and prediction between gas chromatography columns. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Does nanobiotechnology oversight present a uniquely complex challenge to interagency cooperation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkkainen, Bradley C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous regulatory and oversight challenges exist in the field of nanobiotechnology. Although these challenges may appear novel and complex, similar issues have plagued environmental regulation since the 1970 s. This article argues that complexity, uncertainty, and regulatory gaps are common problems in environmental regulation, and that the lessons learned and progress made during more than 40 years of environmental regulation can serve as a guidepost for addressing nanobiotechnology regulation and oversight issues.

  6. Poor Government Oversight of Anham and Its Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-30

    contractor purchasing system review of Anham. Management Comments and Audit Response The Defense Contract Mangement Agency and the U.S. Central... Introduction 1  Background 1  Government Agency Roles and Oversight Responsibilities 4  Objectives 7  Weak Government Oversight Resulted in Significant...Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected SIGIR 11-022 July 30, 2011 Introduction Since 2003, the United States Government

  7. Ideal Police Oversight and Review: The Next Piece of the Community Policing Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    oversight. Included in that malpractice are instances of perceived physical and verbal abuse , perceived harassment, failure to take appropriate action...a kid from south Stockton. 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. PROBLEM STATEMENT—BACKGROUND Independent oversight boards are asked to make the complaint...communities with inclusion and investigative transparency when filing complaints of police misconduct and abuse of police powers. In his article “Race

  8. Reinventing oversight in the twenty-first century: the question of capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosso, Christopher; DeLeo, Rob A.; Kay, W. D.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses a key question emerging from this project based at the University of Minnesota: the fundamental capacity of government to engage in “dynamic oversight” of emergent technologies. This conception of oversight requires additional or new types of capacity for government agencies that must arbitrate conflicts and endow any outcomes with necessary democratic legitimacy. Rethinking oversight thus also requires consideration of the fundamental design and organizational capacity of the regulatory regime in the democratic state.

  9. Simulación de la fluencia en caliente de un acero microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. III parte. Ecuaciones constitutivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera, J. M.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the part 1 of this work the constitutive equations of the hot flow behaviour of a commercial microalloyed steel have been obtained. For this purpose, the uniaxial hot compression tests described in the part 2 were employed. Tests were carried out over a range of 5 orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 °C of temperature. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical model introduced in the first part of this study. It is concluded that deviations between experimental and theoretical curves are lower than 10 %. It is shown that the classical hiperbolic sine constitutive equation described accurately the experimental behaviour provided that stresses are normalized by the Young's modulus and strain rates by the self-diffusion coefficient. An internal stress must also be introduced in the latter equation when the initial grain size is fine enough.

    Siguiendo el planteamiento teórico efectuado en la I parte de este trabajo, se determinaron las ecuaciones constitutivas del comportamiento a la deformación en caliente de un acero comercial microaleado con un contenido medio de carbono. Para este objetivo se emplearon los ensayos de compresión uniaxial en caliente ya descritos en la II parte, los cuales se efectuaron en un rango de cinco órdenes de magnitud en velocidad de deformación y 300 °C de temperatura. Se comparan los resultados experimentales con el modelo teórico introducido en la I parte y se verifica que el error es inferior al 10 %. Se comprobó que la clásica ecuación del seno hiperbólico podía describir con precisión el comportamiento observado siempre y cuando las tensiones se normalicen por el módulo de Young, las velocidades de deformación por el coeficiente de autodifusión de la austenita, y se considere un efecto adicional sobre la tensión cuando el tamaño de grano inicial sea suficientemente fino.

  10. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Restart oversight assessment of Hanford 242-A evaporator: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes a January 17--28, 1994, oversight assessment of restart activities for the 242-A Evaporator at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site about 25 miles northeast of Hanford, Washington. The assessment was conducted by qualified staff and consultants from the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Its focus was the readiness of the facility for the resumption of safe operations, in particular those operations involved in the treatment and disposal of condensate from the evaporation of liquid radioactive waste, a key element of the tank waste remediation project administered by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Overall, the assessment yielded eight programmatic concerns, supported by 38 individual findings. Of the concerns, four have already been closed, and the other four have been resolved. Results pointed up strengths in management and engineering design, as well as effective support of facility training programs by the management and operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Weaknesses were evident, however, in conduct of operations, maintenance, and radiological practices. Furthermore, problems in the submittal and approval of Compliance Schedule Approvals--that is, WHC documentation of the status of compliance with DOE orders--were indicative of a programmatic breakdown in the DOE Order compliance process. According to the results of this assessment, there are no safety and health issues that would preclude or delay restart of the evaporator

  12. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes

  13. Regulatory Oversight for New Projects - Challenges and Improvement in Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lall, F.

    2016-01-01

    From inception, there has been rise in number of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) even though very few accidents / events led to intermittent setbacks. However these accidents / events have posed challenges towards enhancement of safety and scope of regulation in all phases of NPP such as siting, design, construction, commissioning and decommissioning. It is essential to ensure compliance to these enhanced safety requirements during all phases of NPP. New and evolutionary reactors are under threshold for regulatory consideration world over. The variety of technologies and genres by themselves pose challenges to regulatory bodies. These challenges are to be addressed through systematic enhancement of the regulation including updating of regulatory documents. The paper touches upon some key elements to be considered towards such enhancement of regulation during all stages of NPP. These being; ensuring quality assurance, regulatory oversight especially over supply chain and contractors, counterfeit material specifically in case of international dealings, emergency handling in case of multi-unit site, feedback and associated enhancements from international events, construction experience database and feedback for safety enhancement, qualification and acceptance of first of a kind systems, regulatory enforcement specifically in case of imported reactors and maintaining interface between safety and security. Regulation in present context has become dynamic and Regulatory bodies need to continue enhancement of its current regulation taking into account the technological developments, feedback from construction, operation and accidents in the current fleet of plants. The paper touches upon some of these elements and highlights the challenges and improvements in regulation. (author)

  14. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112; La eliminación de metales tóxicos presentes en efluentes líquidos mediante resinas de cambio iónico. Parte IV: cromo(III)/H+/Lewatit SP112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-09-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la eliminación de cromo(III) de disoluciones acuosas (pH 0-5) mediante la resina de intercambio catiónico Lewatit SP112. Se han investigado algunas variables que pueden afectar al sistema: influencia de la agitación, temperatura, pH y fuerza iónica del medio acuoso y cantidad de resina; también se ha investigado acerca de la selectividad del sistema cuando otros metales están presentes en el medio acuoso, comparándose los resultados de la eliminación del cromo(III) usando la resina con los resultados obtenidos cuando se emplea otro adsorbente como son los nanotubos de carbono de pared múltiple. Los resultados experimentales indican que la carga del cromo(III) en la resina responde mejor al modelo de Langmuir, mientras que los modelos cinéticos indican que la carga del metal en la resina responde al modelo de pseudo-segundo orden y difusión en la capa límite. La elución del cromo(III) se realiza con disoluciones de hidróxid.

  15. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  16. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  17. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  18. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  19. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  20. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed.

  1. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson–Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-01-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson–Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker–Planck–Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed. (paper)

  2. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.; Jovanovic, S.

    1961-12-01

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator

  3. The role of Quality Oversight in nuclear and hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, H.Y.

    1994-05-01

    The historical factors that led to the waste at Hanford are outlined. Westinghouse Hanford Company mission and organization are described. The role of the Quality Oversight organization in nuclear hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company is delineated. Tank Waste Remediation Systems activities and the role of the Quality Oversight organization are described as they apply to typical projects. Quality Oversight's role as the foundation for implementation of systems engineering and operation research principles is pointed out

  4. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  5. Importance of characteristics and modalities of physical activity and exercise in the management of cardiovascular health in individuals with cardiovascular disease (Part III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhees, L; Rauch, B; Piepoli, M; van Buuren, F; Takken, T; Börjesson, M; Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Doherty, P; Dugmore, D; Halle, M

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise training and exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on symptom-free exercise capacity,cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function, quality of life, general healthy lifestyle, and reduction of depressive symptoms and psychosocial stress is nowadays well recognized. However, it remains largely obscure, which characteristics of physical activity (PA) and exercise training--frequency, intensity, time (duration), type (mode), and volume (dose: intensity x duration) of exercise--are the most effective. The present paper, therefore, will deal with these exercise characteristics in the management of individuals with cardiovascular disease, i.e. coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure patients, but also in patients with congenital or valvular heart disease. Based on the current literature, and if sufficient evidence is available, recommendations from the European Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation are formulated regarding frequency, intensity, time and type of PA, and safety aspects during exercise inpatients with cardiovascular disease. This paper is the third in a series of three papers, all devoted to the same theme: the importance of the exercise characteristics in the management of cardiovascular health. Part I is directed to the general population and Part II to individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. In general, PA recommendations and exercise training programmes for patients with coronary artery disease or chronic heart failure need to be tailored to the individual's exercise capacity and risk profile, with the aim to reach and maintain the individually highest fitness level possible and to perform endurance exercise training 30–60 min daily (3–5 days per week) in combination with resistance training 2–3 times a week. Because of the frequently reported dose–response relationship between training effect and exercise intensity, one should seek sufficiently high training intensities

  6. The classification of the finite simple groups, number 7 part III, chapters 7-11 the generic case, stages 3b and 4a

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenstein, Daniel; Solomon, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    The classification of finite simple groups is a landmark result of modern mathematics. The multipart series of monographs which is being published by the AMS (Volume 40.1-40.7 and future volumes) represents the culmination of a century-long project involving the efforts of scores of mathematicians published in hundreds of journal articles, books, and doctoral theses, totaling an estimated 15,000 pages. This part 7 of the series is the middle of a trilogy (Volume 40.5, Volume 40.7, and forthcoming Volume 40.8) treating the Generic Case, i.e., the identification of the alternating groups of degree at least 13 and most of the finite simple groups of Lie type and Lie rank at least 4. Moreover, Volumes 40.4-40.8 of this series will provide a complete treatment of the simple groups of odd type, i.e., the alternating groups (with two exceptions) and the groups of Lie type defined over a finite field of odd order, as well as some of the sporadic simple groups. In particular, this volume completes the construction, be...

  7. Differences between easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Part III: free sugar and non-starch polysaccharide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2014-05-01

    Parts I and II of this series of papers identified several associations between the ease of milling and the chemical compositions of different chickpea seed fractions. Non-starch polysaccharides were implicated; hence, this study examines the free sugars and sugar residues. Difficult milling is associated with: (1) lower glucose and xylose residues (less cellulose and xyloglucans) and more arabinose, rhamnose and uronic acid in the seed coat, suggesting a more flexible seed coat that resists cracking and decortication; (2) a higher content of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharide fractions in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a pectic polysaccharide mechanism comprising arabinogalacturonan, homogalacturonan, rhamnogalalcturonan, and glucuronan backbone structures; (3) higher glucose and mannose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a lectin-mediated mechanism of adhesion; and (4) higher arabinose and glucose residues in the cotyledon periphery, supporting a mechanism involving arabinogalactan-proteins. This series has shown that the chemical composition of chickpea does vary in ways that are consistent with physical explanations of how seed structure and properties relate to milling behaviour. Seed coat strength and flexibility, pectic polysaccharide binding, lectins and arabinogalactan-proteins have been implicated. Increased understanding in these mechanisms will allow breeding programmes to optimise milling performance in new cultivars. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Winter ecology of the Porcupine caribou herd, Yukon: Part III, Role of day length in determining activity pattern and estimating percent lying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Russell

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on the activity pattern, proportion of time spent lying and the length of active and lying periods in winter are presented from a 3 year study on the Porcupine caribou herd. Animals were most active at sunrise and sunset resulting in from one (late fall, early and mid winter to two (early fall and late winter to three (spring intervening lying periods. Mean active/lying cycle length decreased from late fall (298 mm to early winter (238 min, increased to a peak in mid winter (340 min then declined in late winter (305 min and again in spring (240 min. Mean length of the lying period increased throughout the 3 winter months from 56 min m early winter to 114 min in mid winter and 153 min in late winter. The percent of the day animals spent lying decreased from fall to early winter, increased throughout the winter and declined in spring. This pattern was related, in part, to day length and was used to compare percent lying among herds. The relationship is suggested to be a means of comparing quality of winter ranges.

  9. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  10. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin

    2015-01-01

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  11. Improving MC and A Oversight in Russia by Implementing Measurement and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN) determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilities. Last year, GAN developed and implemented their Nuclear Material Measurement Program Plan which documents current non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement capability in all regions of GAN; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This Program Plan has helped to give the GAN inspection measurements more legal and official status as an oversight tool, and has also helped to improve other GAN MC and A oversight activities. These improvements include developing a tamper-indicating device program, conducting NDA workshops at specific Russian nuclear facilities to better train MC and A inspectors, and developing training evaluation programs. The Program is an important tool to address the GAN role in oversight of the Russian Federal Information System nuclear material database. This paper describes the feedback received from the GAN regional offices on the implementation of the Program Plan during its first year in operation and how the Program Plan has affected other GAN inspection activities to improve MC and A oversight.

  12. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  13. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Finland: A Systemic Approach to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Väisäsvaara, J.

    2016-01-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK specifies detailed regulatory requirements for good safety culture. Both the requirements and the practical safety culture oversight activities reflect a systemic approach to safety: the interconnections between the technical, human and organizational factors receive special attention. The conference paper aims to show how the oversight of safety culture can be integrated into everyday oversight activities. The paper also emphasises that the scope of the safety culture oversight is not specific safety culture activities of the licencees, but rather the overall functioning of the licence holder or the new build project organization from safety point of view. The regulatory approach towards human and organizational factors and safety culture has evolved throughout the years of nuclear energy production in Finland. Especially the recent new build projects have highlighted the need to systematically pay attention to the non-technical aspects of safety as it has become obvious how the HOF issues can affect the design processes and quality of construction work. Current regulatory guides include a set of safety culture related requirements. The requirements are binding to the licence holders and they set both generic and specific demands on the licencee to understand, monitor and to develop safety culture of their own organization but also that of their supplier network. The requirements set for the licence holders has facilitated the need to develop the regulator’s safety culture oversight practices towards a proactive and systemic approach.

  14. Biological Select Agents and Toxins: Risk-Based Assessment Management and Oversight.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, LouAnn Crawford; Brodsky, Benjamin H.

    2016-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' International Biological and Chemical Threat Reduction (SNL/IBCTR) conducted, on behalf of the Federal Select Agent Program (FSAP), a review of risk assessment in modern select agent laboratories. This review and analysis consisted of literature review, interviews of FSAP staff, entities regulated by FSAP, and deliberations of an expert panel. Additionally, SNL/IBCTR reviewed oversight mechanisms used by industries, US agencies, and other countries for high-consequence risks (e.g, nuclear, chemical, or biological materials, aviation, off-shore drilling, etc.) to determine if alternate oversight mechanisms existed that might be applicable to FSAP oversight of biological select agents and toxins. This report contains five findings, based on these reviews and analyses, with recommendations and suggested actions for FSAP to consider.

  15. Brief introduction of USA new reactor oversight process and suggestions for our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng; Chen Rui; Zhou Limin; Wang Xiuqing

    2002-01-01

    The NRC New Reactor Oversight Process focuses the nuclear safety supervision on the 3 areas: Reactor Safety, Radiation safety and Plant Security. Within the 3 areas, 7 cornerstones are detailed for the purpose. They are Initiating Events, Mitigating Systems, Barrier Integrity, Emergency Preparedness, Occupational Radiation Protection, Public Radiation Safety and Physical Protection. On cooperating with the inspections, the new process ensures a more effective, objective and timely evaluation of the safety level of the operating nuclear power plants. On considering the practices and the status in China nuclear safety supervision, the authors have to learn something from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process. The authors must make an optimization on Chinese limited resources and put the emphasis on the issues with high risk in order to prevent the occurrence of the accidents. Properly inducing some ideas and methodology from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process will benefit the development and perfection of the supervision mode of the NNSA

  16. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take appropriate steps to mitigate the risks of working with these biologic hazards. This article will review responsibilities for institutional oversight of occupational health and safety for research involving biologic hazards.

  17. A Grey Area: Congressional Oversight of the Middle Ground Between Title 10 and Title 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1950’s, just a few short years after the Agency’s creation.1 With Watergate fresh on the country’s mind having just witnessed President Nixon’s...3 Congressional Oversight Legislative Overview Congressional oversight is not a result of modern scandals as one might think; it is as old as the...President Reagan’s tenure, however, members of Congress believed that he had overstepped his authority in the so-called “Iran-Contra affair.” The scandal

  18. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  19. Oversight of the Air Force - What is the Audit Component and How Can Air Force Managers Deal with It Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    This report discusses authority, mission, and responsibilities of the audit organizations that perform oversight of Air Force operations. A...the discussion of the major audit organizations. The audit oversight function is here to stay. Auditors and audit organizations can be beneficial to Air

  20. Surrogate receptivity to participation in critical illness genetic research: aligning research oversight and stakeholder concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Bradley D; Butler, Kevin; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Clarridge, Brian R; Kennedy, Carie R; LeBlanc, Jessica; Chandros Hull, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Collection of genetic biospecimens as part of critical illness investigations is increasingly commonplace. Oversight bodies vary in restrictions imposed on genetic research, introducing inconsistencies in study design, potential for sampling bias, and the possibility of being overly prohibitive of this type of research altogether. We undertook this study to better understand whether restrictions on genetic data collection beyond those governing research on cognitively intact subjects reflect the concerns of surrogates for critically ill patients. We analyzed survey data collected from 1,176 patients in nonurgent settings and 437 surrogates representing critically ill adults. Attitudes pertaining to genetic data (familiarity, perceptions, interest in participation, concerns) and demographic information were examined using univariate and multivariate techniques. We explored differences among respondents who were receptive (1,333) and nonreceptive (280) to genetic sample collection. Whereas factors positively associated with receptivity to research participation were "complete trust" in health-care providers (OR, 2.091; 95% CI, 1.544-2.833), upper income strata (OR, 2.319; 95% CI, 1.308-4.114), viewing genetic research "very positively" (OR, 3.524; 95% CI, 2.122-5.852), and expressing "no worry at all" regarding disclosure of results (OR, 2.505; 95% CI, 1.436-4.369), black race was negatively associated with research participation (OR, 0.410; 95% CI, 0.288-0.585). We could detect no difference in receptivity to genetic sample collection comparing ambulatory patients and surrogates (OR, 0.738; 95% CI, 0.511-1.066). Expressing trust in health-care providers and viewing genetic research favorably were associated with increased willingness for study enrollment, while concern regarding breach of confidentiality and black race had the opposite effect. Study setting had no bearing on willingness to participate.

  1. Contemporary Approaches to Safety Culture: Lessons from Developing a Regulatory Oversight Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, V.; Heppell-Masys, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment, and to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public. In the late 1990s, the CNSC conducted research into an Organization and Management (O&M) assessment method. Based on this research the CNSC conducted O&M assessments at all Canadian nuclear power plants and conducted additional assessments of nuclear research and uranium mine and mill operations. The results of these assessments were presented to licencees and used to inform their ongoing actions related to safety culture. Additional safety culture outreach and oversight activities provided licencees with opportunities to develop effective safety culture assessment methods, to share best practices across industry, and to strive for continual improvement of their organizations. Recent changes to the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) management system standard have resulted in the inclusion of requirements associated to safety culture and human performance. Representatives from several sectors of Canada’s nuclear industry, as well as participation from regulators such as the CNSC took part to the development of this consensus standard. Specifically, these requirements focus on monitoring and understanding safety culture, integrating safety into all of the requirements of the management system, committing workers to adhere to the management system and supporting excellence in workers’ performance. The CNSC is currently developing a regulatory document on safety culture which includes key concepts applicable to all licencees and specific requirements related to self-assessment, and additional guidance for nuclear power plants. Developing a regulatory document on safety culture requires consultation and fact finding initiatives at

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  3. [Medicine in notafilia--Part III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Rade R; Babić, Gordana Stanković

    2013-01-01

    Notafilia is the study of paper money. Only a few countries in the world have issued banknotes with portraits of well-known scientists who brought international fame to their own people and medicine. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF YUGOSLAVIA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA. Nikola Tesla and Mihailo Pupin Idvorski were the ingenious inventors and scientists of our time who made special contributions to radiology. Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) pioneered the use of X-rays for medical purposes, thus effectively laying the foundations of radiology and radiography, and revealed the existence of harmful effects of X-rays on the human body. Mihailo Pupin Idvorski (1854-1935) was worldwide famous for applying physics in practice, as well as in the basis of telephone and telegraph transmissions. He also studied the nature of X-rays and contributed to establishing of radiology. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF THE WORLD: Maria Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was the first woman to gain the academic title of the Academy of Medicine, Paris. Together with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) she gave an outstanding contribution to science and medicine. The discovery of the radioactive elements introduced the concept of "radioactivity" into physics and "radiotherapy" as a new discipline in medicine, thus creating the conditions for the development of nuclear medicine, oncology, and mobile diagnostic radiology. This paper presents the banknotes featuring the portraits of Nikola Tesla, Mihailo Pupin Idvorski, Maria Sklodowska Curie and Pierre Curie, the world renowned scientists, who made enormous contributions to medicine and laid the foundation for radiology.

  4. 'Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-01-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360 deg. in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360 deg. in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called 'Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90 deg. bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a 'rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions

  5. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.

    1961-12-01

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction

  6. `Riesenrad' ion gantry for hadrontherapy: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, M.; Bryant, P.; Holy, P.; Pullia, M.

    1999-07-01

    When using accelerator beams for cancer therapy, the three-dimensional freedom afforded by a gantry helps the treatment planner to spread out surface doses, avoid directions that intercept vital organs and irradiate a volume that is conformal with the tumour. The general preference is for an iso-centric gantry turning 360° in the vertical plane around the patient bed with sufficient space to be able to orientate the patient through 360° in the horizontal plane. For hadrontherapy, gantries are impressive structures of the order of 10 m in diameter and 100 ton in weight and to date only proton gantries have been demonstrated to operate satisfactorily. The increased magnetic rigidity of say carbon ions will make ion gantries more difficult and costly to build. For this reason, exo-centric gantries and, in particular the so-called `Riesenrad' gantry with a single 90° bending magnet, merit further attention. The power consumption is reduced and the heavy magnets with their counterbalance weight are reduced and are kept close to the axis. The treatment room, which is lighter, is positioned at a larger radius, but only the patient bed requires careful alignment. An optics module called a `rotator' is needed to match an incoming dispersion vector to the gantry in order to have an achromatic beam at the patient. A practical design is described that assumes the beam is derived from a slow-extraction scheme in a synchrotron and that the beam sizes are controlled by modules in the transfer line. Magnetic scanning is integrated into the gantry optics for both transverse directions.

  7. Topics in Finance Part III--Leverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates operating and financial leverage from the perspective of the financial manager, accenting the relationships to stockholder wealth maximization (SWM), risk and return, and potential agency problems. It also covers some of the pertinent literature related specifically to the implications of operating and financial risk and…

  8. Multibarrier waste forms. Part III: Process considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1979-10-01

    The multibarrier concept for the solidification and storage of radioactive waste utilizes up to three barriers to isolate radionuclides from the environment: a solidified waste inner core, an impervious coating, and a metal matrix. The coating and metal matrix give the composite waste form enhanced inertness with improvements in thermal stability, mechanical strength, and leach resistance. Preliminary process flow rates and material costs were evaluated for four multibarrier waste forms with the process complexity increasing thusly: glass marbles, uncoated supercalcine, glass-coated supercalcine, and PyC/Al 2 O 3 -coated supercalcine. This report discusses the process variables and their effect on optimization of product quality, processing simplicity, and material cost. 11 figures, 2 tables

  9. Rise, fall and resurrection of chromosome territories: a historical perspective. Part II. Fall and resurrection of chromosome territories during the 1950s to 1980s. Part III. Chromosome territories and the functional nuclear architecture: experiments and models from the 1990s to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, T; Cremer, C

    2006-01-01

    Part II of this historical review on the progress of nuclear architecture studies points out why the original hypothesis of chromosome territories from Carl Rabl and Theodor Boveri (described in part I) was abandoned during the 1950s and finally proven by compelling evidence forwarded by laser-uv-microbeam studies and in situ hybridization experiments. Part II also includes a section on the development of advanced light microscopic techniques breaking the classical Abbe limit written for readers with little knowledge about the present state of the theory of light microscopic resolution. These developments have made it possible to perform 3D distance measurements between genes or other specifically stained, nuclear structures with high precision at the nanometer scale. Moreover, it has become possible to record full images from fluorescent structures and perform quantitative measurements of their shapes and volumes at a level of resolution that until recently could only be achieved by electron microscopy. In part III we review the development of experiments and models of nuclear architecture since the 1990s. Emphasis is laid on the still strongly conflicting views about the basic principles of higher order chromatin organization. A concluding section explains what needs to be done to resolve these conflicts and to come closer to the final goal of all studies of the nuclear architecture, namely to understand the implications of nuclear architecture for nuclear functions.

  10. 75 FR 81684 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2011 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''), established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  11. 78 FR 11915 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2013 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  12. 77 FR 2576 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2012 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  13. 75 FR 3509 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 7, Engagement Quality... (the ``Commission'') a notice (the ``Notice'') of proposed rules (File No. PCAOB-2009-02) on Auditing... identify any significant engagement deficiencies before it issues its audit report. Auditing Standard No. 7...

  14. Beyond Measure: New Approaches to Analyzing Congressional Oversight of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    published books and peer reviewed journal articles. The Congressional Research Service being the key source on congressional procedure and theory ...Transportation Committee 1 Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee 15 Senate Small Business & Entrepreneurship 1 Senate Special...military contracting procedures in a war zone are not necessarily oversight of national security functions, reviews of FEMA contracting practices

  15. 75 FR 82417 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Standards Board (``ASB'') of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants); and observations from... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63606; File No. PCAOB 2010-01] Public Company.... Introduction On September 15, 2010, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB...

  16. 48 CFR 936.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 936.609-3 Section 936.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 936.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. In addition to the clause at 48...

  17. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting officer...

  18. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This guidance provides questions and answers that address.... 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997...

  19. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' The draft guidance provides questions and answers... assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration...

  20. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation

  1. 75 FR 78779 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Supplemental Budget Request To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...; Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Release No. 63526/December 10, 2010] Order Approving Public Company... Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``PCAOB'') to oversee the audits of companies and related matters..., subject to approval by the Commission, auditing and related attestation, quality control, ethics, and...

  2. A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Legislative Oversight Agencies' Efforts to Achieve Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandingham, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    While legislative oversight offices, like many evaluation and policy analysis units, face substantial challenges in promoting use of their work by policymakers, they often have not taken steps to overcome these challenges by adopting the strategies suggested by the evaluation literature. Although the offices seek utilization, they have not fully…

  3. More DoD Oversight Needed for Purchases Made Through the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    obligations or to liquidate prior valid obligations. However, expired funds are not available for new obligations nor can they be used for new requirements...Oversight Would Enable The Department of Homeland Security To Address Risks,” September 2006 GAO Report No. GAO-05-456, “Interagency Contracting Franchise

  4. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  5. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-28

    statements and to report on the adequacy of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations. We contracted the audit of the FY 2000 Military...performed on the oversight of the audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements.

  6. 20 CFR 411.595 - What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EN payment systems? 411.595 Section 411.595 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.595 What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems? We use audits, reviews, studies and observation of daily...

  7. 78 FR 49257 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... award. Each reserve compiles an ecological characterization or site profile to describe the biological... Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System... estuarine research reserves representative of various regions and estuarine types in the United States to...

  8. AGB Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality," approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) in March 2011, urges institutional administrators and governing boards to engage fully in this area of board responsibility. The seven principles in this statement offer suggestions to…

  9. 76 FR 52996 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection Related to Audits of Brokers and Dealers August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public... that would be imposed on different categories of registered public accounting firms and classes of...

  10. Approaches to the mathematical description of NPP operational safety management and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilej, D.V.; Berzhanskij, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents analysis of features related to NPP operational safety management and oversight. According to analysis results, approaches are proposed to perform mathematical description of specific processes and to develop a scale for management to the current safety level as regards NPP power generation. Proposed approaches are making experimental equations and process approach of ISO-9001 quality system

  11. 77 FR 6411 - Training, Qualification, and Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of... establishing minimum training standards for each category and subcategory of safety-related railroad employee... or contractor that employs one or more safety-related railroad employee to develop and submit a...

  12. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

  13. Policy, Practice, and Research Agenda for Emergency Medical Services Oversight: A Systematic Review and Environmental Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymour, Rekar K; Abir, Mahshid; Chamberlin, Margaret; Dunne, Robert B; Lowell, Mark; Wahl, Kathy; Scott, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In a 2015 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM; Washington, DC USA), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM; Washington, DC USA), stated that the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) exhibits signs of fragmentation; an absence of system-wide coordination and planning; and a lack of federal, state, and local accountability. The NAM recommended clarifying what roles the federal government, state governments, and local communities play in the oversight and evaluation of EMS system performance, and how they may better work together to improve care. This systematic literature review and environmental scan addresses NAM's recommendations by answering two research questions: (1) what aspects of EMS systems are most measured in the peer-reviewed and grey literatures, and (2) what do these measures and studies suggest for high-quality EMS oversight? To answer these questions, a systematic literature review was conducted in the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA), SCOPUS (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands), and EMBASE (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands) databases for peer-reviewed literature and for grey literature; targeted web searches of 10 EMS-related government agencies and professional organizations were performed. Inclusion criteria required peer-reviewed literature to be published between 1966-2016 and grey literature to be published between 1996-2016. A total of 1,476 peer-reviewed titles were reviewed, 76 were retrieved for full-text review, and 58 were retained and coded in the qualitative software Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, California USA) using a codebook of themes. Categorizations of measure type and level of application were assigned to the extracted data. Targeted websites were systematically reviewed and 115 relevant grey literature documents were retrieved. A total of 58 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion

  14. A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind phase I-II clinical trial on the safety of A-Part® Gel as adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal surgery versus non-treated group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative adhesions occur when fibrous strands of internal scar tissue bind anatomical structures to one another. The most common cause of intra-abdominal adhesions is previous intra-abdominal surgical intervention. Up to 74% of intestinal obstructions are caused by post surgical adhesions. Although a variety of methods and agents have been investigated to prevent post surgical adhesions, the problem of peritoneal adhesions remains largely unsolved. Materials serving as an adhesion barrier are much needed. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomised, controlled, patient blinded and observer blinded, single centre phase I-II trial, which evaluates the safety of A-Part® Gel as an adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal wall surgery, in comparison to an untreated control group. 60 patients undergoing an elective median laparotomy without prior abdominal surgery are randomly allocated into two groups of a 1:1- ratio. Safety parameter and primary endpoint of the study is the occurrence of wound healing impairment or peritonitis within 28 (+10 days after surgery. The frequency of anastomotic leakage within 28 days after operation, occurrence of adverse and serious adverse events during hospital stay up to 3 months and the rate of adhesions along the scar within 3 months are defined as secondary endpoints. After hospital discharge the investigator will examine the enrolled patients at 28 (+10 days and 3 months (±14 days after surgery. Discussion This trial aims to assess, whether the intra-peritoneal application of A-Part® Gel is safe and efficacious in the prevention of post-surgical adhesions after median laparotomy, in comparison to untreated controls. Trial registration NCT00646412

  15. Cetuximab in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI) in the initial treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre two-part phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoul, Jean-Luc; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Peeters, Marc; Brezault, Catherine; Husseini, Fares; Cals, Laurent; Nippgen, Johannes; Loos, Anja-Helena; Rougier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab combined with irinotecan, folinic acid (FA) and two different doses of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the first-line treatment of EGFR-detectable metastatic colorectal cancer. The 5-FU dose was selected on the basis of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) during part I of the study. Patients received cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 initial dose and 250 mg/m 2 /week thereafter) and every 2 weeks irinotecan (180 mg/m 2 ), FA (400 mg/m 2 ) and 5-FU (either low dose [LD], 300 mg/m 2 bolus plus 2,000 mg/m 2 46-hour infusion, n = 7; or, high-dose [HD], 400 mg/m 2 bolus plus 2,400 mg/m 2 ; n = 45). Only two DLTs occurred in the HD group, and HD 5-FU was selected for use in part II. Apart from rash, commonly observed grade 3/4 adverse events such as leucopenia, diarrhoea, vomiting and asthenia occurred within the expected range for FOLFIRI. Among 52 patients, the overall response rate was 48%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8.6 months (counting all reported progressions) and the median overall survival was 22.4 months. Treatment facilitated the resection of initially unresectable metastases in fourteen patients (27%): of these, 10 patients (71%) had no residual tumour after surgery, and these resections hindered the estimation of PFS. The combination of cetuximab and FOLFIRI was active and well tolerated in this setting. Initially unresectable metastases became resectable in one-quarter of patients, with a high number of complete resections, and these promising results formed the basis for the investigation of FOLFIRI with and without cetuximab in the phase III CRYSTAL trial

  16. Cetuximab in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI in the initial treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre two-part phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Laurent

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitor cetuximab combined with irinotecan, folinic acid (FA and two different doses of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in the first-line treatment of EGFR-detectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods The 5-FU dose was selected on the basis of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs during part I of the study. Patients received cetuximab (400 mg/m2 initial dose and 250 mg/m2/week thereafter and every 2 weeks irinotecan (180 mg/m2, FA (400 mg/m2 and 5-FU (either low dose [LD], 300 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,000 mg/m2 46-hour infusion, n = 7; or, high-dose [HD], 400 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,400 mg/m2; n = 45. Results Only two DLTs occurred in the HD group, and HD 5-FU was selected for use in part II. Apart from rash, commonly observed grade 3/4 adverse events such as leucopenia, diarrhoea, vomiting and asthenia occurred within the expected range for FOLFIRI. Among 52 patients, the overall response rate was 48%. Median progression-free survival (PFS was 8.6 months (counting all reported progressions and the median overall survival was 22.4 months. Treatment facilitated the resection of initially unresectable metastases in fourteen patients (27%: of these, 10 patients (71% had no residual tumour after surgery, and these resections hindered the estimation of PFS. Conclusion The combination of cetuximab and FOLFIRI was active and well tolerated in this setting. Initially unresectable metastases became resectable in one-quarter of patients, with a high number of complete resections, and these promising results formed the basis for the investigation of FOLFIRI with and without cetuximab in the phase III CRYSTAL trial.

  17. Regulatory oversight of safety culture in nuclear installations - New IAEA developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerhoas, Anne; )

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Anne Kerhoas described the IAEA work on guidance for regulatory oversight of safety culture. She summarised the various IAEA, OECD/NEA and ANS meetings that have been held on the topic between 1995 and 2011. The IAEA has carried out two recent projects with the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies to develop a safety culture oversight program. The work was funded by the Norwegian government and has involved 30 experts from 17 different countries. Draft guidance for regulators on how to monitor licensee safety culture has also been produced (IAEA-TECDOC-DD1070). The document is intended to provide practical guidance on oversight strategies and is applicable to a wide range of nuclear installations, including nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities, research reactors and waste management facilities. A number of principles for regulatory oversight of safety culture were summarised. For example, the primary responsibility for safety remains with the licensee, safety culture oversight should be performed at all stages of the life cycle of the nuclear installation, and multiple data collection methods should be used. The overall approach to safety culture described in the draft IAEA Tech doc includes a range of approaches to build up a meaningful picture of the licensee's safety culture. These include interviews, observations, review of documents, review of events, discussions and surveys. The importance of ongoing discussion with the licensee throughout the process to develop a deeper shared understanding of issues was emphasised. The results of the Chester 2 workshop will be used as an input to finalization of the draft Tech Doc

  18. Aspectos da Reologia e da Estabilidade de Suspensões Cerâmicas. Parte III: Mecanismo de Estabilização Eletroestérica de Suspensões com Alumina Aspects of Rheology and Stability of Ceramic Suspensions. Part III: Electrosteric Stabilization Mechanism of Alumina Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Ortega

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta terceira e última parte da revisão sobre os aspectos reológicos e de estabilização de suspensões com pós cerâmicos vem reunir a aplicação dos conhecimentos adquiridos nas primeiras duas partes publicadas anteriormente. Aqui, os fenômenos eletrostático devido à dupla camada elétrica, e estérico, relacionado à adsorção de moléculas poliméricas, são combinados para explicar o mecanismo eletroestérico de estabilização de suspensões cerâmicas. Os defloculantes que atuam através desse mecanismo abrangem uma classe específica de polímero denominada polieletrólitos, a qual é constituída por macromoléculas ionizáveis quando em solução. O estudo da forma com que os polieletrólitos atuam justifica-se devido à larga utilização desta classe de polímeros na indústria cerâmica. Os ácidos poliacrílico (PAA e polimetacrílico (PMAA são exemplos de polieletrólitos amplamente utilizados no processo de materiais à base de alumina. Dá-se destaque à influência do pH do meio e da presença de íons, sendo novamente aqui importante o conceito de força iônica da suspensão. Como aplicação prática, apresenta-se a estabilidade do sistema alumina-PMAA, reportando-se sobre o comportamento da viscosidade e da efetiva defloculação da suspensão. Este estudo é concluído apresentando resultados do efeito do peso molecular sobre a viscosidade, chamando atenção para o fato de que não basta definir apenas a classe de polímero a ser usada, sendo também fundamental especificar o peso molecular médio do polímero selecionado.The third and last part of this review about stabilization and rheological aspects of ceramic suspension gathers the knowledge in the two parts previously published. Here, the electrostatic and steric phenomena, related to the electrical double layer and polymeric molecules adsorption, respectively, are combined to explain the electrosteric stabilization mechanism of ceramic suspensions. The

  19. 45 CFR 265.1 - What does this part cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... oversight responsibilities. (b) This part describes the information in the quarterly and annual reports that... quarterly Data Report, the quarterly Financial Report, and the Annual Report on State MOE Programs, as well... Caseload Reduction Report described at § 261.41(b) of this chapter. (1) The case record information...

  20. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  1. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  2. Oral Assessment Kit, Levels II & III. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelo-Gonzalez, Maria; And Others

    The assessment packet includes a series of oral tests to help develop speaking as an integral part of second language instruction at levels II and III. It contains: 8 mini-tests for use at level II; 9 mini-tests for use at level III; a rating scale and score sheet masters for evaluating performance on these tests; and a collection of suggested…

  3. Notification: Audit of EPA's Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, August 28, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel to Oklahoma.

  4. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear safety and security culture - an integrated approach to regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the development and implementation of regulatory guidelines for the oversight of safety and security culture within licensees organizations. CNCAN (the National Commission for Nuclear Activities of Romania) has used the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) attributes for a strong safety culture as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors for recognizing and gathering information relevant to safety culture. These guidelines are in process of being extended to address also security culture, based on the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 7 document Nuclear Security Culture: Implementing Guide. Recognizing that safety and security cultures coexist and need to reinforce each other because they share the common objective of limiting risk and that similar regulatory review and inspection processes are in place for nuclear security oversight, an integrated approach is considered justified, moreover since the common elements of these cultures outweigh the differences. (authors)

  6. Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs the public. Vision Our vision is to be a model oversight organization in the...Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and P220, Ammunition Supply Point, with combined estimated costs of $65.2 million, for audit . This is one in a series of...The Director stated that maintaining contract files was secondary to construction completion. As a result, there is an increased risk that

  7. Environment, safety, and health. Status of DOE's reorganization of its safety oversight function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, Carl J.; Cannon, Doris E.; Jones, Gary L.; Ulrich, Timothy W.

    1990-01-01

    Several major events that preceded the Secretary's decision to restructure DOE's management of its nuclear facilities were identified. The proposed restructuring plan, in concept, is designed to set in place an oversight framework, which will provide confidence in DOE's ability to operate its nuclear facilities in a safe manner. Further, on the basis of the previous work in this area as well as other independent studies, several issues were identified that may affect the success of the proposed restructuring plan

  8. Contract Audits: Role in Helping Ensure Effective Oversight and Reducing Improper Payments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    the risk of improper paymen Department of Energy (DOE). DOE’s internal controls over payments to its Waste Treatment Plant ( WTP ) contractor did not...provide reasonab assurance against the risk of improper payments, particularly given the WTP project’s substantial inherent risks. 18 Several factors...DCAA and the contractor, with little oversight of its own, exposed the hundreds of millions of dolla spent annually on the WTP project to an

  9. Maintaining Oversight of Licensee Safety Culture. CSNI/WGHOF Survey Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for this workshop, a survey was sent to members of the WGHOF in Autumn 2006. Purpose of the Survey was to explore and share the methods and approaches used to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. 13 countries responded to the survey. The responses were used in the development of discussion topics and themes for this workshop. This presentation (slides) summarizes the results of the survey

  10. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-01-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take app...

  11. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation's DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE's Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs

  12. Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    Representatives Subject: Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight From fiscal...year 2005 through fiscal year 2008, the military services received about $295 million in monetary and nonmonetary gifts from individuals and...organizations wishing to donate gifts to the Department of Defense (DOD).1 Section 2601(a) of Title 10, U.S. Code is a long-standing authority under which

  13. Auditing the Auditors: Has the Establishment of the Audit Oversight Board Affected Audit Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Hashanah; Theng, Ung Chui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a research into the relationship between audit quality during the years before and after the incorporation of the Audit Oversight Board (AOB) in Malaysia in 2010. As the AOB only audits auditors of listed companies this study is based on 50 companies’ audited financial statements 2 years before and after AOB was established. A total of 200 firm years were observed. Using reported companies’ earnings to proxy for earnings and audit quality the data collecte...

  14. Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch

    OpenAIRE

    Quigley, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Fran Quigley, Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch, 20 Cornell J. L. & Pub. Pol'y 271 (2010) Allegations of Executive Branch misconduct present an inherent conflict of interest because prosecutorial discretion is invested in a U.S. Attorney General appointed by – and serving at the pleasure of – the President. Various commentators, including Justice Antonin Scalia, Professor Stephen Carter, and the many critics of the former indep...

  15. A survey of front-line paramedics examining the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Christopher R; Tavares, Walter; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2018-03-01

    Paramedicine is often dependent on physician medical directors and their associated programs for direction and oversight. A positive relationship between paramedics and their oversight physicians promotes safety and quality care while a strained or ineffective one may threaten these goals. The objective of this study was to explore and understand the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight as viewed by front-line paramedics. All active front-line paramedics from four municipal paramedic services involving three medical oversight groups in Ontario were invited to complete an online survey. Five hundred and four paramedics were invited to participate in the study, with 242 completing the survey (48% response rate); 66% male, 76% primary care paramedics with an average of 13 (SD=9) years of experience. Paramedics had neutral or positive perceptions regarding their autonomy, opportunities to interact with their medical director, and medical director understanding of the prehospital setting. Paramedics perceived medical directives as rigid and ambiguous. A significant amount of respondents reported a perception of having provided suboptimal patient care due to fear of legal or disciplinary consequences. Issues of a lack of support for critical thinking and a lack of trust between paramedics and medical oversight groups were often raised. Paramedic perceptions of physician medical oversight were mixed. Concerning areas identified were perceptions of ambiguous written directives and concerns related to the level of trust and support for critical thinking. These perceptions may have implications for the system of care and should be explored further.

  16. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Christopher A; Sanchez, Ana M; Garcia, Ambrosia; Denny, Thomas N; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2014-07-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting endpoint assays for human clinical trials. EQAPOL adapted these guidelines to the management of proficiency testing programs while simultaneously incorporating aspects of ISO/IEC 17043 which are specifically designed for external proficiency management. Over the first two years of the contract, the EQAPOL Oversight Laboratories received training, developed standard operating procedures and quality management practices, implemented strict quality control procedures for equipment, reagents, and documentation, and received audits from the EQAPOL Central Quality Assurance Unit. GCLP programs, such as EQAPOL, strengthen a laboratory's ability to perform critical assays and provide quality assessments of future potential vaccines. © 2013.

  18. Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the "Internet of Things": Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Steven M; Davies, Gail F

    2016-12-01

    Stages of drug (and vaccine) discovery and evaluation that involve laboratory animals increasingly occur via scientific collaborations across national borders and continents. Many of these research collaborations are between asset-rich institutions and others in less wealthy parts of the world. The care and use of laboratory animals in geographically disparate locations introduces new complexities, such as different oversight requirements and available resources, as well as diverse organizational and cultural milieus. These complexities can hamper the effectiveness of local animal welfare committees and regulatory compliance, as well as compromise good science and animal welfare. At the same time, new technologies are becoming available that offer greater transparency in how these collaborations and their animal subjects are faring in real time that, in turn, can enable progress towards the 3 Rs. The focus of this essay is to identify potential rewards and risks stemming from new techniques for producing and connecting data in preclinical pharmaceutical development and consider how further social scientific investigations have the potential to enhance the benefits of international research collaborations for both human health and animal welfare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  20. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  1. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code...

  2. Continued oversight of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, R. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed environmental standards applicable to the disposal of defence-related transuranic wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). By statute, EPA also serves as the regulator and implements these standards at WIPP, which has been in operation since 1999. The general environmental standards are set forth in the Agency's 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (US NARA, 1985). These standards are implemented by site-specific compliance criteria at 40 CFR 194 (US NARA, 1996). The repository waste area is ∼650 meters below ground surface in a thick bedded salt formation that dips from west to east at ∼1 deg.. WIPP is located in the Chihuahuan Desert of south-eastern New Mexico, where the annual precipitation averages between 25 and 40 centimetres and there is high evapotranspiration. Much of the area around WIPP is federal land, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and the area is sparsely populated. The transuranic waste disposed of at WIPP consists of materials such as radioactive sludges, soils and laboratory materials (e.g. chemical mixtures, contaminated glove boxes, paper and glass). Wastes are typically not treated unless necessary for shipping purposes (e.g. to limit hydrogen build-up). The waste is contaminated with plutonium, americium and other radionuclides, including some caesium and strontium. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with radionuclides heavier than uranium containing more than 3 700 Bq (100 nanocuries) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste; isotopes must have half-lives greater than 20 years. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act limits the total disposal volume to ∼177 000 cubic meters (6.2 million cubic feet) and creates two categories of waste based on operational

  3. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF, whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4 vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3. Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated

  4. WTO oversight over bilateral agreements: from a notification to an examination process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Ladefoged

    2014-01-01

    The TTIP will – like other free trade agreements (FTAs) – violate one of the cornerstones of the WTO, i.e. the Most-Favoured-Nation (MFN) principle. However, the multilateral trading system has since 1947 permitted the formation of trading blocks and preferential bilateral trading partnerships....... This contribution asks how the WTO can fulfill its task of ensuring that FTAs do not systematically undermine the multilateral trading order. It focuses on the issue of transparency in the current oversight process and discusses whether the WTO secretariat should be granted a stronger mandate to proactively...... investigate the economic effects of the notified FTAs....

  5. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device; Reaktorski oscilator - I-III, III Deo - Elektronski uredjaj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Jovanovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator.

  6. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran; Ram

    2012-09-01

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  7. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-04-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  8. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  9. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa ON K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  10. Health physics self-assessment and the nuclear regulatory oversight process at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed improvements in their Nuclear Power Plant inspection, assessment and enforcement practices. The objective of these changes was to link regulatory action with power plant performance through a risk- informed process which is intended to enhance objectivity. One of the Strategic Performance Areas of focus by the U.S. NRC is radiation safety. Two cornerstones, Occupational Radiation Safety and Public Radiation Safety, make up this area. These cornerstones are being evaluated through U.S. NRC Performance Indicators (PI) and baseline site inspections. Key to the U.S. NRC's oversight program is the ability of the licensee to implement a self-assessment program which pro-actively identifies potential problems and develops improvements to enhance management's effectiveness. The Health Physics Self-Assessment Program at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) identifies radiation protection-related weakness or negative trends. The intended end result is improved performance through rapid problem identification, timely evaluation, corrective action and follow-up effectiveness reviews. A review of the radiation protection oversight process and the SONGS Health Physics Self-Assessment Program will be presented. Lessons learned and management tools, which evaluate workforce and Health Physics (HP) staff performance to improve radiological practices, are discussed. (author)

  11. The impact of masculinity on safety oversights, safety priority and safety violations in two male-dominated occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent; Hansen, Claus D.; Bloksgaard, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men have a higher risk of occupational injuries than women the role of masculinity for organizational safety outcomes has only rarely been the object of research. Aim The current study investigated the association between masculinity and safety oversights, safety priority......-related context factors (safety leadership, commitment of the safety representative, and safety involvement) and three safety-related outcome factors (safety violations, safety oversights and safety priority) were administered twice 12 months apart to Danish ambulance workers (n = 1157) and slaughterhouse workers...

  12. Control, oversight and related terms in the international guidance on geological disposal of radioactive waste - Review of definitions and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the most complete analysis of the use of the words control, oversight, etc. as used in NEA, IAEA and ICRP literature connected to radioactive waste disposal. It reveals the many different ways the same word, 'control', has been used in international guidance and ambiguities than can arise, especially so for the post-closure phase of the repository. The newly introduced ICRP terminology, namely the use of the words 'oversight' and 'built-in controls', represents a step forward in terminology and resolves the ambiguity

  13. The concept of oversight, its connection to memory keeping and its relevance for the medium term: The findings of the RK and M initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotzel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The medium term was introduced as the period of indirect oversight after repository closure, with timescales in the order of a few hundred years. While the importance of intrinsic control or 'passive' safety features in the post-closure phase of a geological repository has been recognised and stressed before, the role of oversight, by providing the capability to reduce or avoid some exposures, has come to the fore only recently. Oversight for the time being generally refers to 'watchful care' and society 'keeping an eye' on the technical system and the actual implementation of plans and decisions. In some regulatory frameworks oversight is indirectly required, for instance when mandating the creation of a land exclusion zone. In other frameworks, oversight is directly required, as illustrated, for instance, by the long-term stewardship concept of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although sheer memory of the presence of the facility cannot be enough to constitute oversight, oversight and RK and M preservation do go hand in hand. For example, monitoring after repository closure fosters RK and M preservation, and vice versa. The presenter focused on terminology, potential oversight measures, and on roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders

  14. 17 CFR 240.19d-4 - Notice by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. (a) Definitions—(1... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. 240.19d-4 Section 240.19d-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES...

  15. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part IV, Influence of isotopic composition of nuclear fuel on the reactivity with constant flux; Razrada metoda teorijske analize nuklearnih reaktora (III faza) I-IV, IV Deo, Uticaj promene izotopnog sastava goriva na reaktivnost uz konstantan fluks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-01-15

    Part one of this report presents a series of differential equations describing the nuclear fuel depletion during reactor operation. This series of differential equations is extended to describe the fission products. This part includes equations for effective multiplication factor k{sub eff} and reactivity {rho} as a function of irradiation {tau}. Part two includes results obtained on the analog computer PACE 231 R, and related to Calder Hall type reactor. Part three covers detailed preparation of the series of equations for solution by using the analog computer. Part four includes the list of references related to this task.

  16. Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project. Part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; De Jonge, J.; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media around the repository. For Bench Mark Test no. 1 (BMT1) of the DECOVALEX III project, seven multinational research teams studied the implications of coupled THM processes on the safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the near-field and are presented in three accompany papers in this issue. This paper is the first of the three companion papers, which provides the conceptualization and characterization of the BMT1 as well as some general conclusions based on the findings of the numerical studies. It also shows the process of building confidence in the mathematical models by calibration with a reference T-H-M experiment with realistic rock mass conditions and bentonite properties and measured outputs of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical variables

  17. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...... the putative differences between the rat brain MT isoforms, namely MT-I+II and MT-III, in the freeze lesion model of brain damage, and for developing an ELISA for MT-III suitable for brain samples. In the normal rat brain, MT-III was mostly present primarily in astrocytes. However, lectin staining indicated...

  18. Study of effects of climate change in the Great South East. Stage 1. PACA report - Part I: Context and study summary, Part II: Climate simulations, Part III: Impact sector sheets, General report. Prospective study of effects of climate change in the Great South East (phase 2) - Mission of study of inter-regional and European collaborations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornmann, Francois; Guiran, Ghislaine; Sadoux, Emmanuel; Weill, Frederic; Benkhelifa, Fouzi

    2008-01-01

    After a presentation of study objectives and scope, a first report outlines the actuality of climate change, describes predicted climate changes for the PACA region in terms of warming and decrease of precipitations. Regional social-economic challenges and sector impacts are also briefly described. The second report presents the adopted climate simulation parameters, and discusses results obtained in terms of temperature and of precipitations by 2030, 2050 and 2080 for the whole Great South East region. The third part proposes sector sheets which contain discussions of effects of climate change on the water resource, on biodiversity, on forest, on agriculture, on human health, on tourism, on energy, on building and transports, on natural risks. The next document is based on the previous ones. It discusses and comments the outcome of the first phase, the present situation of the region in terms of territorial dynamics and effects of climate change, and indicators of climate change. It also draws lessons from the prospective study which resulted in three scenarios for which a strategic assessment is proposed

  19. The Global Fund's paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ashley; Cordon, Roberto; Told, Michaela; de Savigny, Don; Kickbusch, Ilona; Tanner, Marcel

    2017-12-12

    The Global Fund is one of the largest actors in global health. In 2015 the Global Fund was credited with disbursing close to 10 % of all development assistance for health. In 2011 it began a reform process in response to internal reviews following allegations of recipients' misuse of funds. Reforms have focused on grant application processes thus far while the core structures and paradigm have remained intact. We report results of discussions with key stakeholders on the Global Fund, its paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique. We conducted 38 semi-structured in-depth interviews in Maputo, Mozambique and members of the Global Fund Board and Secretariat in Switzerland. In-country stakeholders were representatives from Global Fund country structures (eg. Principle Recipient), the Ministry of Health, health or development attachés bilateral and multilateral agencies, consultants, and the NGO coordinating body. Thematic coding revealed concerns about the combination of weak country oversight with stringent and cumbersome requirements for monitoring and evaluation linked to performance-based financing. Analysis revealed that despite the changes associated with the New Funding Model, respondents in both Maputo and Geneva firmly believe challenges remain in Global Fund's structure and paradigm. The lack of a country office has many negative downstream effects including reliance on in-country partners and ineffective coordination. Due to weak managerial and absorptive capacity, more oversight is required than is afforded by country team visits. In-country partners provide much needed support for Global Fund recipients, but roles, responsibilities, and accountability must be clearly defined for a successful long-term partnership. Furthermore, decision-makers in Geneva recognize in-country coordination as vital to successful implementation, and partners welcome increased Global Fund engagement. To date, there are no institutional requirements for

  20. The World Bank Inspection Panel and Quasi-Judicial Oversight: In Search of the 'Judicial Spirit' in Public International Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Naudé Fourie (Andria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD dissertation conceptualizes the World Bank Inspection Panel as a mechanism of quasi-judicial review or oversight, aimed at enhancing the accountability and legitimacy of the World Bank – which is conceived as an international institution exercising public power. The author

  1. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING § 361...

  2. Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data

  3. 76 FR 40950 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... available, the issuer's net asset value. (i)(v) Issuer Accounting Support Fee The term ``issuer accounting... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other Amendments to the Board's...

  4. 42 CFR 137.368 - Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health and safety codes during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance of health and safety codes during construction projects being performed by a Self-Governance Tribe... SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.368 Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health...

  5. 76 FR 53683 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations: A Risk-Based Approach to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... 200N, Rockville, MD 20852-1448; or the Office of Communication, Education and Radiation Programs... describes a modern, risk-based approach to monitoring that focuses on critical study parameters and relies... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Title: Draft Guidance for Industry: Oversight of...

  6. 76 FR 40961 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... of the Board Section 1. General Provisions * * * Rule 1001. Definitions of Terms Employed in Rules... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection... Act of 2002 (the ``Act''), notice is hereby given that on June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting...

  7. Report: Enhanced EPA Oversight and Action Can Further Protect Water Resources From the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0204, July 16, 2015. Enhanced EPA oversight of the permitting process for diesel fuel use during hydraulic fracturing can further EPA efforts to protect water resources, and establishment of a plan for determining whether to propose a chemical

  8. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  9. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  10. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  11. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  12. Use of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) methodology in health-physics program appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    In January 1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assumed a major role in helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conduct comprehensive health physics appraisals at 47 operating nuclear power plants. These appraisals required the development of an analytical technique that permitted a deductive analysis of a health-physics program on an element-by-element basis. The technique employed was a modification of the Management Oversight and risk Tree (MORT) analytical logic methodology used in probabilistic assessments. This paper includes the method used in establishing the appraisal guidelines and assigning the proper level of importance within the analytical tree structure. The system for ensuring the proper subdivision necessary for an adequate assessment of each area (e.g., exposure controls and radioactive waste management) will also be discussed. In addition to these major subjects, the generation of specific review questions that correspond to the analytical trees is addressed

  13. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  14. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993 - May 12, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division's efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division's efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE's compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division's findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division's request to be an active participant in DOE's prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year's annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division's office

  15. Enhancing board oversight on quality of hospital care: an agency theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Fraser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Community hospitals in the United States are almost all governed by a governing board that is legally accountable for the quality of care provided. Increasing pressures for better quality and safety are prompting boards to strengthen their oversight function on quality. In this study, we aimed to provide an update to prior research by exploring the role and practices of governing boards in quality oversight through the lens of agency theory and comparing hospital quality performance in relation to the adoption of those practices. Data on board practices from a survey conducted by The Governance Institute in 2007 were merged with data on hospital quality drawn from two federal sources that measured processes of care and mortality. The study sample includes 445 public and private not-for-profit hospitals. We used factor analysis to explore the underlying dimensions of board practices. We further compared hospital quality performance by the adoption of each individual board practice. Consistent with the agency theory, the 13 board practices included in the survey appear to center around enhancing accountability of the board, management, and the medical staff. Reviewing the hospital's quality performance on a regular basis was the most common practice. A number of board practices, not examined in prior research, showed significant association with better performance on process of care and/or risk-adjusted mortality: requiring major new clinical programs to meet quality-related criteria, setting some quality goals at the "theoretical ideal" level, requiring both the board and the medical staff to be as involved as management in setting the agenda for discussion on quality, and requiring the hospital to report its quality/safety performance to the general public. Hospital governing boards should examine their current practices and consider adopting those that would enhance the accountability of the board itself, management, and the medical staff.

  16. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  17. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  18. Tasks related to increase of RA reactor exploitation and experimental potential, 04. Device for transport of radioactive reactor channels and semi channels of the RA reactor, design project (I-III) Part II, Vol. II; Radovi na povecanju eksploatacionih i eksperimentalnih mogucnosti reaktora RA, 04. Uredjaj za transport aktivnih tehnoloskih kanala I semikanala reaktora RA - izrada projekta (I-III), II Deo, Album II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavicevic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-07-15

    This second volume includes calculations of the main components of the transporter, description of the mechanical part of the transporter and the engineering drawing of the device for transport of radioactive reactor channels and semi channels of the RA reactor.

  19. Fe (III) complex of mefloquine hydrochloride: Synthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of the ongoing research for more effective antimalarial drug, Fe (III) complex of mefloquine hydrochloride (antimalarial drug) was synthesized using template method. Mefloquine was tentatively found to have coordinated through the hydroxyl and the two nitrogen atoms in the quinoline and piperidine in the structure, ...

  20. Part I. An investigation into the mechanism of the samarium (II)-promoted Barbier reaction: Sequential radical cyclization/organometallic addition. Part II. Conjugate addition reactions of organosamarium reagents by in situ transmetalation to cuprates. Part III. Approximate absolute rate constants for the reaction of tributyltin radicals with aryl and vinyl halides. Part IV. An investigation into the synthetic utility of tri-n-butylgermanium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totleben, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the mechanism of the samarium diiodide mediated Barbier reaction was conducted. Through a series of alkyl halide-carbonyl coupling and deuterium labelling experiments, evidence supportive of an organometallic addition mechanism was collected. Further probing led to an expansion of the utility of SmI[sub 2] in synthesis. The author has shown that radical cyclization of aryl and alkyl radicals to olefins, followed by reduction to primary and secondary organosamarium species is feasible. Organosamarium (III) reagents, produced by the reduction of alkyl and select aryl halides with 2 equiv of SmI[sub 2] in THF/HMPA, were treated with copper (I) salts and complexes to effect in situ transmetalation to cuprates. This allowed the 1,4-addition to [alpha],[beta]-unsaturated ketones. This new methodology allows for the sequential formation of carbon-carbon bonds through a combination of free radical and cuprate chemistry. Absolute rate constants for the abstraction of bromine atoms (k[sub Br]) by tri-n-butyltin radicals from a series of vinyl and aryl bromides have been determined. Atom abstraction was modestly enhanced by proximity of the halogen to a substituent in the following order: para < meta < ortho. Tri-n-butyl germanium hydride is known to be a poorer hydrogen atom donor than its tin analog. This feature makes it attractive for use in slow radical cyclizations where tin hydride would provide mainly for reduction. A brief study was executed to improve on the utility of the reagent as current conditions do not yield desired products in high amounts. Initial investigations examined the effect of initiator on reduction by germanium hydride, and subsequent experiments probed solvent effects. t-Butyl alcohol was determined to be superior to benzene or acetonitrile, giving consistently higher yields of reduction products.

  1. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  2. AGENDA 21 - the basic conceptual document - Agenda of the 21 century which was accepted on the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Part III. Fortification of role of the significant groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This part of the AGENDA 21 contains 10 chapters: (23) Preamble; (24) The global caught up of women into sustainable and balanced development; (25) Children and youth in sustainable development; (26) The accolade and fortification of role of the indigenous inhabitants and their consortium; (27) The fortification of role of the non-governmental organizations: partners for sustainable development; (28) The initiatives of autonomy organs aimed on support of the Agenda 21; (29) The fortification of role of the workings and their trade unions; (30) The fortification of role of the trading and industry; (31) The scientific and technical community; (32) The fortification of role of the agriculturalists

  3. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  4. Notification: Audit of EPA’s Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel (2nd notification)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, October 6, 2017 - The EPA OIG plans to expand the scope of preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel.

  5. Sedimentation studies relevant to low-level radioactive effluent dispersal in the Irish Sea. Part III. An evaluation of possible mechanisms for the incorporation of radionuclides into marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, R.; Parker, W.R.; Pentreath, R.J.; Lovett, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Based on circumstantial evidence the Cumbrian mud area was previously interpreted as accretionary. There are no measurements confirming that riverborne sediment reaches the mud area and the postulated subtidal sources appear to be sealed by a lag gravel. In contrast, fine sediment deposited in Liverpool Bay is known to return to the Ribble, Mersey and Dee. Similarly 'hot' particles originating in the Sellafield outfall are implied to travel, perhaps accompanied by natural fine sediment, into the Ravenglass Estuary and elsewhere. The likely interpretation is that fine sediment accumulating in the coastal zone of the eastern Irish Sea is partly derived from seawards. Possible sources are coast erosion and the unconsolidated mud areas themselves. Radionuclide profiles from the Cumbrian mud area have previously been interpreted as confirming the accretionary hypothesis. In fact three principal types of radionuclide profiles occur, which are interpreted here to indicate progressively more efficient bioturbation. Burrowing animals may also supply uncontaminated sediment to the bed, where it absorbs radionuclides before, in part, being redeposited locally. This implies that no large external sediment source is necessary to explain the radionuclide profiles encountered. We thus interpret the area as a relatively stable sedimentary regime dominated by biological processes. (author)

  6. 1991 Annual performance report for environmental oversight and monitoring at Department of Energy Facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    On October 22, 1990 an agreement was entered into between the US DOE and the State of New Mexico. The agreement was designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that the environment is protected and that public health, as related to the environment is also protected. The Agreement reflects the understanding and commitments between the parties regarding environmental oversight, monitoring, remediation and emergency response at the following DOE facilities: the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These provision are ongoing through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight; prioritization of clean-up and compliance activities; and new commitments by DOE. While the initial assessment of the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs is not yet complete, preliminary findings are presented regarding air quality monitoring, environmental monitoring, and groundwater monitoring

  7. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico's DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad

  8. US system of oversight for genetic testing: a report from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Teutsch, Steven; Williams, Marc S; Au, Sylvia M; Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Miller, Paul Steven; Fomous, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    As genetic testing technology is integrated into healthcare, increasingly detailed information about individual and population genetic variation is available to patients and providers. Health professionals use genetic testing to diagnose or assess the risk of disease in individuals, families and populations and to guide healthcare decisions. Consumers are beginning to explore personalized genomic services in an effort to learn more about their risk for common diseases. Scientific and technological advances in genetic testing, as with any newly introduced medical technology, present certain challenges to existing frameworks of oversight. In addition, the growing use of genetic testing will require a significant investment in evidence-based assessments to understand the validity and utility of these tests in clinical and personal decisionmaking. To optimize the use of genetic testing in healthcare, all sectors of the oversight system need to be strengthened and yet remain flexible in order to adapt to advances that will inevitably increase the range of genetic tests and methodologies.

  9. Further Improvements Needed in Navy’s Oversight and Management of Contracting for Facilities Construction on Diego Garcia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-23

    1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimbursable contract to a joint venture to construct facility projects for fiscal years 1981 and 1982 with an estimated...through fiscal year 1986. In July 1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimburs - able contract (cost plus award fee) to Raymond, Brown & Root, Molem, a joint...Navy’s oversight and management of the acquisition of these facilities. A COST REIMBURSABLE CONTRACT MAKES STRONG CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION VITAL Under

  10. Construction of the Cleo III drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csorna, S.; Marka, S.; Dickson, M.; Dombrowski, S. von; Peterson, D.; Thies, P.; Glenn, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Kravchenko, I.

    1998-01-01

    The CLEO III group is constructing a new chamber to be installed as part of the staged luminosity upgrade program at the Cornell electron storage ring and compatible with the interaction region optics. Although having less radial extent than the current CLEO II tracking system, CLEO III will have equivalent momentum resolution because of material reduction in the drift chamber inner skin and gas. The thin inner skin requires special attention to the end-plate motion due to wire creep. During stringing, use of a robot will fully automate the wire handling on the upper end. (author)

  11. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  12. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State`s lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities` environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met

  14. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State's lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame

  15. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Kevin C., E-mail: ke@sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Department of Philosophy, USC NanoCenter (United States); Volz, David C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  16. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345–1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  17. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  18. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  19. Common Occupational Disability Tests and Case Law References: An Ontario MVA perspective on interpretation and best practice methodology supporting a holistic model, Part I of III (Pre-104 IRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J Douglas; Gouws, Jacques J; Bachmann, Corina Anghel

    2016-05-01

    This three-part paper presents practical holistic models of determining impairment and occupational disability with respect to common "own occupation" and "any occupation" definitions. The models consider physical, emotional and cognitive impairments in unison, and draw upon case law support for empirically based functional assessment of secondary cognitive symptoms arising from psychological conditions, including chronic pain disorders. Case law is presented, primarily in the context of Ontario motor vehicle accident legislation, to demonstrate how triers of fact have addressed occupational disability in the context of chronic pain; and interpreted the "own occupation" and "any occupation" definitions. In interpreting the definitions of "own occupation" and "any occupation", courts have considered various concepts, such as: work as an integrated whole, competitive productivity, demonstrated job performance vs. employment, work adaptation relative to impairment stability, suitable work, retraining considerations, self-employment, and remuneration/socio-economic status. The first segment of the paper reviews the above concepts largely in the context of pre-104 Income Replacement Benefit (IRB) entitlement, while the second segment focuses on post-104 IRB entitlement. In the final segment, the paper presents a critical evaluation of computerized transferable skills analysis (TSAs) in the occupational disability context. By contrast, support is offered for the notion that (neuro) psychovocational assessments and situational work assessments should play a key role in "own occupation" disability determination, even where specific vocational rehabilitation/retraining recommendations are not requested by the referral source (e.g., insurer disability examination).

  20. Relationships between molecular structure and kinetic and thermodynamic controls in lipid systems. Part III. Crystallization and phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS) and tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2012-01-01

    The phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-distearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS)/tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system was investigated in terms of polymorphism, crystallization and melting behavior, microstructure and solid fat content (SFC) using widely different constant cooling rates. Kinetic phase diagrams were experimentally determined from the DSC heating thermograms and analyzed using a thermodynamic model to account for non-ideality of mixing. The kinetic phase diagram presented a typical eutectic behavior with a eutectic point at the 0.5(PSS) mixture with a probable precipitation line from 0.5(PSS) to 1.0(PSS), regardless of the rate at which the sample was cooled. The eutectic temperature decreased only slightly with increasing cooling rate. PSS has a strong effect on the physical properties of the PSS-SSS mixtures. In fact, the overall phase behavior of the PSS-SSS binary system was determined, for a very large part, by the asymmetrical TAG. Moreover, PSS is a key driver of the high stability observed in crystal growth, polymorphism and phase development. Levels as low as 10% PSS, when cooled slowly, and 30% when cooled rapidly, were found to be sufficient to suppress the effect of thermal processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The SINTRAN III NODAL system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaali, T.B.

    1980-10-01

    NODAL is a high level programming language based on FOCAL and SNOBOL4, with some influence from BASIC. The language was developed to operate on the computer network controlling the SPS accelerator at CERN. NODAL is an interpretive language designed for interactive use. This is the most important aspect of the language, and is reflected in its structure. The interactive facilities make it possible to write, debug and modify programs much faster than with compiler based languages like FORTRAN and ALGOL. Apart from a few minor modifications, the basic part of the Oslo University NODAL system does not differ from the CERN version. However, the Oslo University implementation has been expanded with new functions which enable the user to execute many of the SINTRAN III monitor calls from the NODAL level. In particular the most important RT monitor calls have been implemented in this way, a property which renders possible the use of NODAL as a RT program administrator. (JIW)

  2. Investigation and consideration on the framework of oversight-based safety regulation. U.S. NRC 'Risk-Informed, Performance-Based' Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Gen

    2001-01-01

    Regulation on safety, environment and health in Japan has before today been intended to correspond with an accident at forms of reinforcement of national standards and monitoring, if any. However, as it was thought that such regulation reinforcement was afraid to bring some social rigidity, and to weaken independent responsibility, as a result, because of anxiety of losing peoples' merits inversely, some fundamental directivity such as respect of self-responsibility principle' and 'necessary and least limit of regulation' were selected as a part of political innovation. On the other hand, at a background of wide improvements on various indexing values showing operation results of nuclear power stations in U.S.A., private independent effort on upgrading of safety is told to largely affect at beginning of INPO (Institute of Nuclear Power Operations), without regulation reinforcement of NRC side. This is a proof of concrete effect of transfer to oversight-based safety regulation. Here were introduced on nuclear safety in U.S.A. at a base of some references obtained on entering the 'MIT summer specialist program. Nuclear system safety', on focussing at new safety regulation of NRC and its effect and so on, and adding some considerations based on some knowledge thereafter. (G.K.)

  3. Twitter as a Potential Disaster Risk Reduction Tool. Part III: Evaluating Variables that Promoted Regional Twitter Use for At-risk Populations During the 2013 Hattiesburg F4 Tornado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Guy Paul; Yeager, Violet; Burkle, Frederick M; Subbarao, Italo

    2015-06-29

    Study goals attempt to identify the variables most commonly associated with successful tweeted messages and determine which variables have the most influence in promoting exponential dissemination of information (viral spreading of the message) and trending (becoming popular) in the given disaster affected region. Part II describes the detailed extraction and triangulation filtration methodological approach to acquiring twitter data for the 2013 Hattiesburg Tornado. The data was then divided into two 48 hour windows before and after the tornado impact with a 2 hour pre-tornado buffer to capture tweets just prior to impact. Criteria-based analysis was completed for Tweets and users. The top 100 pre-Tornado and post-Tornado retweeted users were compared to establish the variability among the top retweeted users during the 4 day span.  Pre-Tornado variables that were correlated to higher retweeted rates include total user tweets (0.324), and total times message retweeted (0.530).  Post-Tornado variables that were correlated to higher retweeted rates include total hashtags in a retweet (0.538) and hashtags #Tornado (0.378) and #Hattiesburg (0.254). Overall hashtags usage significantly increased during the storm. Pre-storm there were 5,763 tweets with a hashtag and post-storm there was 13,598 using hashtags. Twitter's unique features allow it to be considered a unique social media tool applicable for emergency managers and public health officials for rapid and accurate two way communication.  Additionally, understanding how variables can be properly manipulated plays a key role in understanding how to use this social media platform for effective, accurate, and rapid mass information communication.

  4. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    e, 40 µM complex, 10 hrs after dissolution, f, 40 µM complex, after irradiation dose 15 Gy. and H-atoms result in reduction of Co(III) to Co. (II). 6. It is interesting to see in complex containing multiple ligands what is the fate of electron adduct species formed by electron addition. Reduction to. Co(II) and intramolecular transfer ...

  5. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  6. A Citation Tracking System to Facilitate Sponsoring Institution Oversight of ACGME-Accredited Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Poe, John D; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rose, Steven H

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official to ensure that citations for noncompliance with the accreditation standards and institutional trends in citations are reviewed and corrected. To describe a citation tracking system (CTS) that uses Microsoft Office Access to efficiently catalogue, monitor, and document resolution of citations. The CTS was implemented in a sponsoring institution with oversight of 133 ACGME-accredited programs. The designated institutional official and the graduate medical education committee review all program letters of notification and enter citations into the CTS. A program-correction plan is required for each citation and is entered into the database. Open citations and action plans are reviewed by the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official on a quarterly basis, with decisions ranging from "closing" the citation to approving the action plan in process to requiring a new or modified action plan. Citation categories and subcategories are accessed on the ACGME website and entered into the CTS to identify trends. All 236 citations received since the 2006 Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education institutional site visit were entered into the CTS. On November 22, 2011, 26 of 236 citations (11%) were in active status with ongoing action plans, and 210 (89%) citations had been resolved and were closed. The CTS uses commercially available software to ensure citations are monitored and addressed and to simplify analysis of citation trends. The approach requires minimal staff time for data input and updates and can be performed without institutional information technology assistance.

  7. Reactions of sigma-bonded organochromium(III)complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, J.P. II.

    1975-12-01

    Three projects were carried out, each dealing with the kinetics and mechanism of reactions of sigma-bonded organochromium(III) complexes of the form (H 2 O) 5 CrR 2+ . Part I describes the kinetics of the reaction of dichloromethylchromium(III) ion with chromium(II) ion in aqueous acid. Part II deals with the radioexchange of 4-pyridinomethylchromium(III) ion with 51 Cr 2+ and the kinetics of formation of the organochromium species at 55 0 in 1 M H + . Part III deals with the reactions of Hg 2+ and CH 3 Hg + with a series of (H 2 O) 5 CrR 2+ complexes, in which R is an aliphatic alkyl group, a haloalkyl group, or an aralkyl group

  8. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    1992-01-01

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  9. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  10. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  11. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium (indoor air, food, tap water, etc.) and to an exposed individual. Exposure scenarios are used to define plausible pathways for human contact. Recognition of the multiple pathways possible for exposure highlights the importance of a multimedia, multipathway exposure framework.

  12. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this third and final lecture, we present applications of the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection and astrophysics.

  13. The singing revolution : part II-III / Mait Ando Raun

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raun, Mait, 1963-

    2000-01-01

    Tartu rahu ja vabariigi aastapäeva tähistamisest 1988. aastal; Sündmused veebruarist aprillini 1988: üliõpilaste demonstratsioonist veebruaris, Loominguliste Liitude ühispleenumist, Rahvarinde loomisest ja Tartu muinsuskaitsepäevadest aprillis. Järg nr.4, lk.70-73

  14. Geographical Information Extraction With Remote Sensing. Part III - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    images available. TNO report B.72 FEL-98-A077 Appendix B DA020 Barren ground ( kale grond) Definition: Land surface void of vegetation or other specific...BH 100I/BH 140 B13 dam BI020LJDBO90 Bat area lake/ponds BHO80 Ba2 inundation BH090 E Eal area barren ground DA020 Vegetation /soil Ea2 cropland EAO1O...various categories like private, context military, agricultural etc (see FACC 1 ). VEG vegetation characteristics type of plant or plantings, like

  15. Leveraging business intelligence to make better decisions: Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Accounts receivable and scheduling datasets have been available to medical practices since the 1990s, and discrete medical records data have become available over the past few years. But the frustrations that arose from the difficulties in reporting data grew with each keyboard stroke and mouse click. With reporting mandated to meet changing payment models, measuring quality of care and medical outcomes, practice managers must find more efficient and effective methods of extracting and compiling the data they have in their systems. Taming the reporting beast and learning to effectively apply business intelligence (BI) tools will become an expected managerial proficiency in the next few years. Practice managers' roles are changing quickly, and they will be required to understand the meaning of their practice's data and craft ways to leverage that data toward a strategic advantage.

  16. Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals: Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Haruo; Yamada, Kenichi; Hori, Hajime; Kumagai, Shinji; Murata, Masaru; Nagoya, Toshio; Nakahara, Hirohiko; Mochida, Nobuyuki

    2018-01-25

    This Document, "Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals" ("this Guideline"), has been prepared by "The Committee for Personal Exposure Monitoring" ("the Committee") of the Expert Division of Occupational Hygiene & Ergonomics, Japan Society for Occupational Health. Considering the background of the growing importance of personal exposure monitoring in risk assessment and the need to prepare for the introduction of monitoring using personal samplers from an administrative perspective in recent years, the Committee was organized in November 2012. The Committee has prepared this Guideline as a "practical guideline" for personal exposure monitoring, so as to offer proposals and recommendations to the members of the Japan Society for Occupational Health and to society in general. The scope of this Guideline covers all chemical substances and all related workplaces regarded as targets for general assessment and the management of risk. It thus is not to be considered to comment on legal regulations and methodology. The main text provides the basic methods and concepts of personal exposure monitoring, while 31 "Appendices" are provided in this Guideline throughout the series; technical descriptions, statistical bases, and actual workplace examples are provided in these appendices, to assist better understanding. The personal exposure monitoring described as per this Guideline is equivalent to an "expert-centered basic method to reasonably proceed with the assessment and management of risk at workplaces." It is considered that practicing and expanding on this method will significantly contribute in reforming the overall framework of occupational hygiene management in Japan.

  17. Modeling ecological and economic systems with STELLA : Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costanza, Robert; Voinov, Alexey

    2001-01-01

    This special issue contains a group of eight modeling studies covering a range of ecological and economic systems and problems. The models were all developed using Stella®, an icon-based software package specifically designed for dynamic systems modeling. Models included in the special issue were

  18. BETTY FREUND: A NURSE IN FRANCE - PART III

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    September 1914 during the battle of Tannenberg, where 100000 men were taken ... authorised members of the Royal Family with German titles to relinquish such titles and ...... force which had landed in Salonika, Greece, to aid the Serbs, was.

  19. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of industry processes simulators. Part III (Continuous casting)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Morales, R.; Morales, A. J.; Ramos, A.; Solorio, G.

    2006-01-01

    This work written for illustrating the use of Monte Carlo methods and generating of random number in combination with the information of the simulation system of thermal behaviour described previously in order to reproduce in a computer the solidification process of the steel and simulate the formation of strictures of casting step by step. (Author). 12 refs

  1. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 < approximately 1.5/h, the 2-point or ASCE method are a good fit to experimental data, but the fit breaks down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  2. Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey, 1975. Part III. Technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Studies of the technical feasibility of nuclear energy centers (NECs) and the comparison between NEC technical feasibility and that of nuclear facilities on dispersed sites are reviewed. The conclusions related to technical feasibility of NEC are summarized. Technical feasibility was found to rest mainly on five major issues: heat dissipation, transmission, facility construction, radiological impact, and environmental impact. Although general conclusions can be reached in these five areas, it is recognized that they are interdependent, and detailed site-by-site analysis will be necessary. Some general conclusions on technical feasibility of NECs are presented, then detailed conclusions derived from the technical evaluation of NECs compared to dispersed site facilities are presented. The findings of this study on each of the five major feasibility issues are then discussed in sequence. The study concludes that nuclear energy centers, as defined herein, are technically feasible

  3. The Pollution Detectives, Part III: Roadside Lead Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Phil

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple test tube method developed lead analysis of samples of roadside soil. The relationship between the results and the traffic flow indicate car exhausts are the major source of lead pollution. Materials and procedures are detailed. An example of results is provided. (Author/CW)

  4. Suicide and the media. Part III: Theoretical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, R W; Pirkis, J

    2001-01-01

    The body of evidence suggests that there is a causal association between nonfictional media reporting of suicide (in newspapers, on television, and in books) and actual suicide, and that there may be one between fictional media portrayal (in film and television, in music, and in plays) and actual suicide. This finding has been explained by social learning theory. The majority of studies upon which this finding is based fall into the media "effects tradition," which has been criticized for its positivist-like approach that fails to take into account of media content or the capacity of audiences to make meaning out of messages. A cultural studies approach that relies on discourse and frame analyses to explore meanings, and that qualitatively examines the multiple meanings that audiences give to media messages, could complement the effects tradition. Together, these approaches have the potential to clarify the notion of what constitutes responsible reporting of suicide, and to broaden the framework for evaluating media performance.

  5. Concretes with ternary composite cements. Part III: multicriteria optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irassar, E. F.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimization methods are tools of vital importance in composite material design, where large numbers of components and design criteria must be taken into account. The formulation of today’s separately milled custommade cements is a clear example of just such a case, for the components must be proportioned to yield mortars and concretes with the proper balance of durability, strength, financial and environmental features. Multicriteria optimization has been used to develop many materials, although its application in cement formulation has yet to be explored. The present paper discusses the use of an objective function to jointly optimize sorptivity and compressive strength in limestone- (up to 20% and/or granulated blast furnace slag- (up to 20% additioned Portland cement concrete.Los métodos de optimización constituyen una herramienta de vital importancia en el diseño de materiales compuestos, donde la cantidad de componentes de la mezcla y los criterios de diseño que deben tenerse en cuenta en el proceso de fabricación son numerosos. En la actualidad, la formulación de un cemento a medida (tailor made a partir del proceso de molienda separada es un claro ejemplo de ello, pues las proporciones relativas de las componentes de la mezcla deben permitir luego obtener morteros y hormigones con el equilibrio justo entre los requerimientos durables, mecánicos, económicos y ecológicos que se soliciten. La optimización por multicriterios ha sido empleada en el desarrollo de diversos materiales, sin embargo, su aplicación en la formulación del cemento no ha sido aún explorada. En este trabajo se presenta la optimización conjunta de la capacidad de absorción y la resistencia a compresión de hormigones elaborados con cemento Portland con caliza (hasta un 20% y/o escoria granulada de alto horno (hasta un 20% utilizando la función objetivo.

  6. Multiculturalism, Medicine, and Health Part III: Health Beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    Supernatural beliefs relate to a Power or powers considered beyond nature. Persons who wish to draw upon the power of supernatural forces often attempt to do so through prayers, ceremonies, or special acknowledgement. While some physicians feel uncomfortable at times with beliefs that differ from their own, the chaplaincy system, in place in most hospitals, is evidence that health-care systems can comfortably accommodate supernatural beliefs. We must make an effort to understand and accommoda...

  7. Desarrollo de Simuladores para Procesos Industriales. Parte III (Colada continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez, A.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This work was written for illustrating the use of Monte Carlo methods and generating of random number in combination with the information of the simulation system for thermal behavior described previously in order to reproduce in a computer the solidification process of the steel and simulate the formation of structures of casting step by step.

    Este trabajo muestra el empleo de técnicas de métodos de Monte Carlo y generación de números aleatorios en combinación con datos obtenidos del sistema de simulación (SSCC para comportamiento térmico previamente descrito para la reproducción computacional del proceso de solidificación del acero y simular la formación de estructuras de colada paso a paso.

  8. Chromatographic separation of low-temperature tar. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terres, E; Gebert, F; Huelsemann, H; Petereit, H; Toepsch, H; Ruppert, W

    1955-01-01

    Experiments with crude phenolic mixtures in benzene-MeOH over an alumina chromatographic column are reported. The most effective separation into crude fractions was obtained from a petroleum-ether solution with benzene and benzene-MeOH elution. These fractions are analyzed by paper chromatography. R/sub f/ values for 29 phenols and benzoic acid from water-saturated AmOH are given. Folin-Denis reagent and ultraviolet absorption is used for identification of the phenolic compounds. R/sub f/ values for monohydroxy compounds are larger than 0.9, dihydroxy 0.80 to 0.9, trihydroxy 0.6, hydroxytoluic acids 0.39 to 0.56. R/sub f/ values of Na and K salts are different from those of the free phenols. Tests in aqueous solution near 0/sup 0/ gave important results. R/sub f/ values of the less polar materials decrease and less material is lost through evaporation, smaller and sharper spots are obtained and liquids move at a more even rate. A series of isomeric alkyl phenols is reported; ortho alkyl groups decrease the migration rate most effectively.

  9. Distribution and Translocation of 141Ce (III) in Horseradish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoshan; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Fang, Min; Huang, Xiaohua

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Rare earth elements (REEs) are used in agriculture and a large amount of them contaminate the environment and enter foods. The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish was investigated in order to help understand the biochemical behaviour and toxic mechanism of REEs in plants. Method The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish were investigated using autoradiography, liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and electron microscopic autoradiography (EMARG) techniques. The contents of 141Ce (III) and nutrient elements were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Results The results from autoradiography and LSC indicated that 141Ce (III) could be absorbed by horseradish and transferred from the leaf to the leaf-stalk and then to the root. The content of 141Ce (III) in different parts of horseradish was as follows: root > leaf-stalk > leaf. The uptake rates of 141Ce (III) in horseradish changed with the different organs and time. The content of 141Ce (III) in developing leaves was greater than that in mature leaves. The results from EMARG indicated that 141Ce (III) could penetrate through the cell membrane and enter the mesophyll cells, being present in both extra- and intra-cellular deposits. The contents of macronutrients in horseradish were decreased by 141Ce (III) treatment. Conclusions 141Ce (III) can be absorbed and transferred between organs of horseradish with time, and the distribution was found to be different at different growth stages. 141Ce (III) can enter the mesophyll cells via apoplast and symplast channels or via plasmodesmata. 141Ce (III) can disturb the metabolism of macronutrients in horseradish. PMID:17921527

  10. Overseeing oversight: governance of quality and safety by hospital boards in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw; Freeman, Tim; Millar, Ross; Jacobs, Rowena; Kasteridis, Panos

    2015-01-01

    To contribute towards an understanding of hospital board composition and to explore board oversight of patient safety and health care quality in the English NHS. We reviewed the theory related to hospital board governance and undertook two national surveys about board management in NHS acute and specialist hospital trusts in England. The first survey was issued to 150 trusts in 2011/2012 and was completed online via a dedicated web tool. A total 145 replies were received (97% response rate). The second online survey was undertaken in 2012/2013 and targeted individual board members, using a previously validated standard instrument on board members' attitudes and competencies (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire). A total of 334 responses were received from 165 executive and 169 non-executive board members, providing at least one response from 95 of the 144 NHS trusts then in existence (66% response rate). Over 90% of the English NHS trust boards had 10-15 members. We found no significant difference in board size between trusts of different types (e.g. Foundation Trusts versus non-Foundation Trusts and Teaching Hospital Trusts versus non-Teaching Hospital Trusts). Clinical representation on boards was limited: around 62% had three or fewer members with clinical backgrounds. For about two-thirds of the trusts (63%), board members with a clinical background comprised less than 30% of the members. Boards were using a wide range and mix of quantitative performance metrics and soft intelligence (e.g. walk-arounds, patient stories) to monitor their organisations with regard to patient safety. The Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire data showed generally high or very high levels of agreement with desirable statements of practice in each of its six dimensions. Aggregate levels of agreement within each dimension ranged from 73% (for the dimension addressing interpersonal issues) to 85% (on the political). English NHS boards largely hold a wide range of attitudes and

  11. Hadron component of families (exp. 'Pamir' III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Possibilities of nuclear interaction investigation at 10 15 - 10 16 ev by means of analysis of family hadron component, registered in carbon and deep lead x-ray emulsion chambers, are discussed. The paper is divided in three parts. General properties of hadron families are discribed and compared in C and Pb chambers (part I). Correlations between gamma and hadron components of families are studied in the part II. It is shown that fluctuations of energies of this component are wider than in usually used models of nuclear interactions. The ratio of single hadron flux to the flux of γ-families is connected with cross-section and energy dissipation of nuclear interactions at about 10 16 ev (part III). (author)

  12. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia M. Al-Hummayani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  13. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  14. Fast ejendom III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Bogen er det tredje bind af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen og III Ejerbeføjelsen. Fremstillingens giver et grundigt overblik over centrale områder af en omfattende regulering af fast ejendom, med angivelse af litteratur, hvor læseren kan søge yderligere...... oplysning. En ejer af fast ejendom er på særdeles mange områder begrænset i sin råden sammenlignet med ejeren af et formuegode i almindelighed. Fremstillingen tager udgangspunkt i ejerens perspektiv (fremfor samfundets eller myndighedernes). Både den privatretlige og offentligretlige regulering behandles......, eksempelvis ejendomsdannelsen, servitutter, naboretten, hævd, zoneinddelingen, den fysiske planlægning, beskyttelse af natur, beskyttelse af kultur, forurening fra fast ejendom, erstatning for forurening, jordforurening, ekspropriation, byggeri og adgang til fast ejendom....

  15. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase III. Effects of Life-Time Exposure. Part III. Nitrocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    the enzyme reference for each assay. 5. BUN: BUN is measured using the BUN Strate Kit (General Diag- nostic) which is based on the urease method. 12...at the end of cleav- age, is referred to as a blastula and consists of a layer of cells, the blastoderm, surrounding a cavity, the blastocoele. The...involves the forma- tion of germinal layers from the blastoderm. Primary organ rudiments are derived from the germinal layers during organogenesis, the

  16. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I; Reaktorski oscilator - I-III, I Deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction.

  17. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Michael; Hundt, Ferdinand; Busta, Susanne; Mikus, Stefan; Sanden, Per-Holger; Sörgel, Andrea; Ruppert, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs) involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA) when performing outsourced clinical studies. This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s). Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight's evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  18. Historic low-level radioactive waste federal policies, programs and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchette, M.; Kenney, J.; Zelmer, B.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' The management of radioactive waste is one of the most serious environmental problems facing Canadians. From the early industrial uses of radioactive material in the 1930s to the development of nuclear power reactors and the medical and experimental use of radio-isotopes today, there has been a steady accumulation of waste products. Historic waste is low-level radioactive waste for which the federal government has accepted responsibility for long-term management. This paper will outline the policy framework used to govern institutional and financial arrangements for the disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners and the major radioactive projects in which the Government of Canada is currently involved. It will provide an overview of the organizations established for the management of historic radioactive waste and NRCan's oversight role. Finally, an overview of the historic waste program activities managed on behalf of the federal government through these organizations in the Port Hope area, the Greater Toronto Area, in Fort McMurray, Alberta and along the Northern Transportation Route is provided. Canada's Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, sets out principles that govern the institutional and financial arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners. According to the Policy Framework: The federal government will ensure that radioactive waste disposal is carried out in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner; The federal government has the responsibility to develop policy, to regulate, and to oversee producers and owners; and, The waste producers and owners are responsible, in accordance with the principle of 'polluter pays', for the funding, organization, management and operation of disposal and other facilities required for their wastes. Arrangements may be different for nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste and

  19. A Critical Review of the Oversight Role of the Office of the Auditor-General in Financial Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogochukwu Nzewi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Accountability is the very essence of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No. 108 of 1996. In this regard, the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA as the supreme audit institution of the Republic of South Africa plays an important oversight role of promoting financial accountability in government. The purpose of this article is to examine the challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General in executing its oversight role of promoting financial accountability in the sphere of provincial government. Information and sources for this article was gathered through literature review. The article gives some background on the establishment and rationale of Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI. It explores some policy framework that informs public finance management in the Republic of South Africa, establishing the role of the AGSA within this purview. Based on the data gathered through literature review, the key challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General are discussed. Finally, possible solutions are recommended to the challenges that were identified.

  20. Why budget accountability fails? The elusive links between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of the budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS SANTISO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTParliaments and audit agencies have critical and complementary roles in the oversight of the budget and the enforcement of government accountability. Yet, the nexus between parliaments and audit agencies is one of the weakest links in the accountability chain, generating an accountability gap in the budget process. This articles analyses the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of government finances during the latter stages of the budget process. Using proxies to evaluate the quality of those linkages, such as the follow-up to audit findings and the discharge of government, it shows important dysfunctions in the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies due to a combination of technical capacity constraints and political economy disincentives. It suggests that the effective functioning of the system of checks and balances in public budgeting critically hinges on the agility of the linkages between accountability institutions. As such, the failure of budget accountability is due to systemic dysfunctions in the systems of accountability, rather than the failure of an individual accountability institution acting in isolation. In addition, the effectiveness of the horizontal accountability architecture depends on the political economy incentives shaping the budget process, which are generated by the interactions between the choice of institutional design and budget rules, with the degree of political competition and electoral rules.

  1. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  2. Considerations Related to LTO for Gen II/III NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojan, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    Today there are some 435 nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with a combined capacity of over 372 GWe. In 2011 these provided 2518 billion kWh, about 14% of the world's electricity [1]. The next evolutionary design of Generation III reactors to be deployed over many decades will represent a large part of the worldwide fleet throughout the 21st century. Generation III reactors are the future NPPs with improved safety and reliability, with passive safety systems and with a very low probability for core melt. The objective of this paper is to present the R and D activities that support LTO for Generation II / III Nuclear Reactors. (author)

  3. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  4. Complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenc, W.; Bernat, M; Gluchowska, H.W.; Sarzynski, J.

    2010-01-01

    The complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) have been synthesized as polycrystalline hydrated solids, and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy, magnetic studies and also by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric measurements. The analysed complexes have the following colours: violet for Nd(III), white for Gd(III) and cream for Ho(III) compounds. The carboxylate groups bind as bidentate chelating (Ho) or bridging ligands (Nd, Gd). On heating to 1173K in air the complexes decompose in several steps. At first, they dehydrate in one step to form anhydrous salts, that next decompose to the oxides of respective metals. The gaseous products of their thermal decomposition in nitrogen were also determined and the magnetic susceptibilities were measured over the temperature range of 76-303K and the magnetic moments were calculated. The results show that 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) are high-spin complexes with weak ligand fields. The solubility value in water at 293K for analysed 4-chlorophenoxyacetates is in the order of 10 -4 mol/dm 3 . (author)

  5. Human Factors: FAA's Guidance and Oversight of Pilot Crew Resource Management Training Can Be Improved

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... The current level of airline safety has been achieved, in part, because the airline industry and government regulatory agencies have implemented rigorous pilot training and evaluation programs...

  6. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  7. Alimentos industrializados congelados gama III y IV

    OpenAIRE

    Tupone Reverter, Paula

    2012-01-01

    El presente estudio tiene como objetivo, indagar sobre el consumo, el grado de información y contenido de sodio, grasas saturadas y colesterol de los principales alimentos congelados Gama III y V consumidos por los encuestados. A partir de esto, se realiza una encuesta de frecuencia de consumo y preguntas varias a 250 personas de entre 30 a 60 años, que concurren a cuatro supermercados de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, para determinar el conocimiento por parte de los encuestados e...

  8. Mort User's Manual: For use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  9. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA when performing outsourced clinical studies.This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s.Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight’s evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  10. Basel III D: Swiss Finish to Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Natalia Tente; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    After the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) introduced the Basel III framework in 2010, individual countries confronted the question of how best to implement the framework given their unique circumstances. Switzerland, with a banking industry that is both heavily concentrated and very large relative to the size of its overall economy, faced a special challenge. It ultimately adopted what is sometimes referred to as the “Swiss Finish” to Basel III – enhanced requirements applicable...

  11. Outcome of tyrosinaemia type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, C J; Holme, E; Standing, S; Preece, M A; Green, A; Ploechl, E; Ugarte, M; Trefz, F K; Leonard, J V

    2001-12-01

    Tyrosinaemia type III is a rare disorder caused by a deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. The majority of the nine previously reported patients have presented with neurological symptoms after the neonatal period, while others detected by neonatal screening have been asymptomatic. All have had normal liver and renal function and none has skin or eye abnormalities. A further four patients with tyrosinaemia type III are described. It is not clear whether a strict low tyrosine diet alters the natural history of tyrosinaemia type III, although there remains a suspicion that treatment may be important, at least in infancy.

  12. Thermodecomposition of lanthanides (III) and ytrium (III) glucoheptonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giolito, J.

    1987-01-01

    The lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) glucoheptonates as well the D-glucoheptono 1-4 lactone were studied using common analytical methods, elemental microanalysis of carbon and hydrogen, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. These compounds were prepared from the reaction between the lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) hydroxides and glucoheptonic acid aqueous solution obtained by means of the delta lactone hydrolysis of this acid. After stoichiometric reaction the compounds were precipitated by the addition of absolute ethanol, washed with the same solvent and dried in desiccator. Thermogravimetric the (TG) curves of the lanthanides glucoheptonates of the ceric group present thermal profiles with enough differences permitting an easy caracterization of each compound and the yttrium (III) glucoheptonate TG curve showed a great similarity with the erbium (III) compound TG curve. The differential scanning calometry (DSC) curves showed endothermic and exothermic peaks by their shape, height and position (temperature) permit an easy and rapid identification of each compound specially if DSC and TG curves were examined simultaneously. (author) [pt

  13. Human factors : FAA's guidance and oversight of pilot crew resource management training can be improved

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Of the 169 accidents that involved the major airlines and that were : investigated and reported on in detail by the National Transportation : Safety Board from 1983 through 1995, about 30 percent were caused in : part by the pilots performance, ac...

  14. Comparison with experiment of COMETHE III-L fuel rod behaviour predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J. van; Billaux, M.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison is presented between experimental results and COMETHE III-L fuel rod behaviour predictions. The first part of the paper focuses on mechanical aspects, with as main experiments, AECL X-264 and Studsvik Interramp. The second part presents the results of a wide FGR benchmarking campaign, with a reference to previous COMETHE versions. It appears that the variance between experiment and calculation has decreased by a factor four when the III-J version was improved into the III-L version. As conclusion, some COMETHE III-L calculations are presented in order to illustrate its capability of predicting fuel rod performance limits. (author)

  15. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS

  16. Complexes of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), samarium(III) and dysprosium(III) with substituted piperidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhas, B S; Trikha, A K; Singh, H; Chander, M

    1983-11-01

    Complexes of the general formulae M/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(L)/sub 3/.C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH and M/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/(L)/sub 2/.CH/sub 3/OH have been synthesised by the reactions of chlorides and nitrates of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) with 2-methylpiperidine, 3-methylpiperidine and 4-methylpiperidine. These complexes have been characterised on the basis of their elemental analysis, and IR and electronic reflectance spectra. IR spectral data indicate the presence of coordinated ethanol and methanol molecules and bidentate nitrate groups. Coordination numbers of the metal ions vary from 5 to 8. 19 refs.

  17. Effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The transuranic elements, such as Am(III) and Cm(III), are highly toxic because they emit high-energy α particles and have long half-lives. To estimate their long-term environmental behavior, we need to elucidate degradation of actinide-organic complexes by microorganisms. We studied the biodegradation of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Malic acid is ubiquitous in the environment and is one of the microbial metabolites that is part of the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Europium(III) is a good analogue for Am(III) and Cm(III). To investigate the effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by P. fluorescens, we compared the degradation behavior of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes to that of Fe(III) and Al(III)-malic acid complexes. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0-0.5 mM Fe(III), malic acid was degraded completely. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Al(III), malic acid was degraded until the concentration of malic acid became equal to that of Al(III), indicating that Al(III)-malic acid complex with 1: 1 molar ratio was recalcitrant to biodegradation. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Eu(III), degradation of malic acid was not observed. The effect of metals on degradation of malic acid was in the order of Fe(III) < Al(III) < Eu(III). The stability constants of 1:1 Fe(III)-, Al(III)-, and Eu(III)-malic acid complexes are 7.1, 4.6, and 4.9, respectively. These results indicate that degradability of malic acid does not depend on the stability constants of metal-malic acid complexes. We found that 10 mM malic acid was degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III) but 1 mM malic acid was not degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III). The degradation rate of malic acid increased with a decreasing ratio of Eu(III) to malic acid. (authors)

  18. Celestine III and the North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår pave Cølestin IIIs forhold til de nordiske kongeriger i perioden 1191-1198. Artiklen viser, at paven, som i forskningen traditionelt år har stået i skyggen af sin berømte, energiske og især: yngre efterfølger, Innocens III, har været på forkant med udviklingen i de nordiske rig...

  19. MALAYSIAN LICHENS—III*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. GROBNHART

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the lichens sent by the late Mr C. C. Schroter at Tjibodas (West Java, a peculiar blue-grey species drew my attention. At first sight I intended to assign it provisionally to Collemaceae indeterminatae, but on closer examination I doubted whether it was really a species of Collemaceae. Therefore. I examined it more carefully, with the following result. The granular thallus grows in smaller to larger patches over mosses, lichens, and detritus on bark. Soredia and isidia are absent and the thallus is not surrounded by a dark hypothalline line. The granular appearance of the thallus is caused by the relatively large gonidia, which belong to Stygonemataceae. The yellowish green cells are rounded, angular to semilunate, 8—12µ, wide and 10—15 µ long; one or more of them are enclosed within a gelatinous, colourless to pale citrine sheeth 4—6 µ thick. These clusters of gonidia are held together by the thalline hyphae constituting in this way a homoiomeric thallus. There is some resemblance with the thallus of Moriolaceae but in this family the gonidia are totally surrounded with a network of short hyphae lying close together. In the thallus of Cyanoporina, as I call this new lichen, such a network does not exist. The hyphae lie irregularly around the gonidia and cover them but partly. These gonidial hyphae are 2—3µ thick and possess very short cells. The thalline hyphae are 3 µ, thick, with inconspicuous lumen. Even with the aid of a dissecting microscope the perithecia are almost* invisible. Most of them are covered by the granules of the thallus. Yet the thallus is abundantly fruiting and in sections perithecia are always present. They are globose, 110—130µ in diameter, pale fulvescent to yellowish, with a pseudoparenchymatic wall 10—12 µ thick, composed of densely interwoven hyphae. I could, not discover a pore. The paraphyses are diffluent and only fragments were found.

  20. Technical realisation of the VISA-3 project, Parts I-II, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.; Smokovic, Z.

    1966-11-01

    This task is related to irradiation of reactor materials (steel, Al, MgO, Al 2 O 3 , ets.) at higher temperatures (200-500 deg C) in the fast neutron flux. This volume contains includes design specification and detailed engineering drawings of VISA-3 capsules, electric heaters, and all the devices needed for completing the task

  1. Spectrophotometric and pH-Metric Studies of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III Metal Complexes with Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sonar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal-ligand and proton-ligand stability constant of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III metals with substituted heterocyclic drug (Rifampicin were determined at various ionic strength by pH metric titration. NaClO4 was used to maintain ionic strength of solution. The results obtained were extrapolated to the zero ionic strength using an equation with one individual parameter. The thermodynamic stability constant of the complexes were also calculated. The formation of complexes has been studied by Job’s method. The results obtained were of stability constants by pH metric method is confirmed by Job’s method.

  2. Motorcycle Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    An article in NASA Tech Briefs describing a vacuum bagging process for forming composite parts helped a small Oklahoma Company to improve its manufacturing process. President of Performance Extremes, Larry Ortega, and his partners make motorcycle parts from carbon/epoxy to reduce weight. Using vacuum bags, parts have a better surface and fewer voids inside. When heat used in the vacuum bag process caused deformation upon cooling, a solution found in another tech brief solved the problem. A metal plate inside the vacuum bag made for more even heat transfer. A third article described a simple procedure for repairing loose connector pins, which the company has also utilized.

  3. Joint Professional Military Education: Opportunities Exist for Greater Oversight and Coordination of Associated Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    research requests across the department exposes DOD to the risk of potential overlap of studies and analysis research. View GAO-14-216. For more...National Defense University GPRA Government Performance and Results Act CCO Center for Complex Operations CSR Center for Strategic...their future leadership positions. To provide broad educational experiences, students can conduct research at the JPME research institutions as part

  4. Making progress with PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Nichols, R.; McDonald, N.

    1989-01-01

    The thirdphase of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC III) was begun in 1986 with the aim of assessing inspection capability and reliability for actual defects in full scale components under realistic nuclear power plant conditions. It is organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Ispra Joint Research Centre of the European Communities Commission. The objectives and status of each of the seven areas of PISC III are given. The areas are: real contaminated structures; full scale vessel tests; nozzles and dissimilar metal welds; austenitic steel testing; steam generator integrity testing; mathematical modelling of non-destructive examination; and human reliability studies. (U.K.)

  5. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  6. Conservative treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hélder Ferreira de Aguiar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by anteroposterior dental discrepancy which might be associated or not with skeletal changes. Class III molar relationship is associated with vertical or lingually tipped mandibular incisors and a usually concave profile. These characteristics seriously affect facial esthetics and most frequently are the reason why patients seek orthodontic treatment. This case was presented to the committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  7. How can nanobiotechnology oversight advance science and industry: examples from environmental, health, and safety studies of nanoparticles (nano-EHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Asbach, Christof; Fissan, Heinz; Hülser, Tim; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Thompson, Drew; Pui, David Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology has great potential to transform science and industry in the fields of energy, material, environment, and medicine. At the same time, more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanomaterials in the workplace and the implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems. Studies on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials have a strong influence on public acceptance of nanotechnology and, eventually, affect its sustainability. Oversight and regulation by government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play significant roles in ensuring responsible and environmentally friendly development of nanotechnology. The EHS studies of nanomaterials can provide data and information to help the development of regulations and guidelines. We present research results on three aspects of EHS studies: physico-chemical characterization and measurement of nanomaterials; emission, exposure, and toxicity of nanomaterials; and control and abatement of nanomaterial releases using filtration technology. Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument, the Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA), is discussed. Exposure measurement results for silicon nanoparticles in a pilot scale production plant are presented, as well as exposure measurement and toxicity study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filtration studies of nanoparticle agglomerates are also presented as an example of emission control methods.

  8. Role of the Regulatory Body in Implementing Defence in Depth in Nuclear Installations - Regulatory Oversight in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sheikh, B. M., E-mail: badawymel@yahoo.com [Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are operated at all times in an acceptably safe manner including the safe conduct of decommissioning activities. Defence in depth is recognized as one of the fundamental safety principles that underlie the safety of nuclear power plants. Defence in depth is implemented to provide a graded protection against a wide variety of transients, incidents and accidents, including equipment failures and human errors within nuclear power plants and events initiated outside plants. The Regulator Body plays an important role in implementing defence in depth in nuclear installations in the context of a clear allocation of responsibilities with an operating organization. This role starting with setting safety objectives and by its own independent review and technical assessment of the safety justifications provided by the operating organization in addition to safety culture investigating within relevant organizations. This paper briefly reviews this role in normal operation and post accidents, and its effects on overall nuclear safety in nuclear installations with reference to Egyptian regulatory oversight. (author)

  9. Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lampl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD model recognizes growth in infancy and childhood as a fundamental determinant of lifespan health. Evidence of long-term health risks among small neonates who subsequently grow rapidly poses a challenge for interventions aiming to support healthy growth, not merely drive weight gain. Defining healthy growth beyond “getting bigger” is essential as infant and young child feeding industries expand. Liquid-based nutritional supplements, originally formulated for undernourished children, are increasingly marketed for and consumed by children generally. Clarifying the nature of the evidentiary base on which structure/function claims promoting “healthy growth” are constructed is important to curb invalid generalizations. Evidence points to changing social beliefs and cultural practices surrounding supplementary feeding, raising specific concerns about the long-term health consequences of an associated altered feeding culture, including reduced dietary variety and weight gain. Reassessing the evidence for and relevance of dietary supplements’ “promoting healthy growth” claims for otherwise healthy children is both needed in a time of global obesity and an opportunity to refine intervention approaches among small children for whom rapid subsequent growth in early life augments risk for chronic disease. Scientific and health care partnerships are needed to consider current governmental oversight shortfalls in protecting vulnerable populations from overconsumption. This is important because we may be doing more harm than good.

  10. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  11. Ion temperatures in TORTUR III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, F.B.

    1985-12-01

    Spatially resolved ion-energy distributions are presented for discharges in the TORTUR III tokamak. The measurements are performed in an active method, using a neutral hydrogen probing beam of 20-30 keV, to enhance charge-exchange processes along its path, as well as by the usual passive method. Ion temperatures can amount up to 1 keV

  12. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-12-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at - 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at - 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  13. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-01-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at − 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at − 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  14. Research and experience report 2008. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reviews research into regulatory safety and the work done during 2008. In the area of reactor safety, research - in addition to research into materials - was concentrated primarily on safety and reliability analyses. ENSI supports projects looking at ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks under a range of environmental conditions. Topics such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete as well as the development of methods and computer codes are covered. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human and organisational factors and safety culture now account for an increasing part of the work of this regulatory body. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities, publications and the basic principles of the new ENSI guidelines

  15. The oversight of nuclear safety - a mission in the service of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, J.

    2001-01-01

    A country introducing nuclear power in their energy strategy has a life long obligation to the public. The obligation is not a question of energy production. It is an obligation to maintain safety during the phase of construction, energy production as well as for the disposal of waste and spent fuel. One part of this obligation and responsibility to the public is a matter of trust. A responsible government should never accept that fear related to Nuclear Power is a lack in trust. Trust can never be regulated or forced upon the public. Trust is something you have to earn. We must remember that we as Nuclear Safety Regulators have a mission in the service of the public. We are by the public seen as guarantor for the safety of Nuclear Installations in our countries. Our aim must be that the public is trusting that our work will lead to a safe operation of Nuclear Installations. (author)

  16. 50 CFR 23.4 - What are Appendices I, II, and III?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF... of Appendix-I, -II, and -III species and their parts, products, and derivatives through a system of...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III) and Dy(III) complexes of 2-acetylfuran-2-thenoylhydrazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Singh, Praveen K.

    1998-01-01

    The reaction of 2-acetylfuran-2-thenoylhydrazone(afth) with Ln(III) trichlorides yields complexes of the type [Ln(afth)Cl 2 (H 2 O)(EtOH)]Cl, [Ln(III) = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy]. The complexes have been characterized by molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility and TGA and DTA measurements, magnetic susceptibility and TGA and DTA measurements, FAB mass, infrared, proton NMR, electronic absorption and emission spectra. The terbium complex is found to be monomer from the FAB mass spectrum. The IR and NMR spectra suggest neutral tridentate behaviour of the Schiff base. A coordination number seven is proposed around the metal ions. Emission spectra suggest C 3v , symmetry around the metal ion with capped octahedron geometry for the europium complex. (author)

  18. 'We all want to succeed, but we've also got to be realistic about what is happening': an ethnographic study of relationships in trial oversight and their impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W; Sydes, Matthew R; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2017-12-22

    The oversight and conduct of a randomised controlled trial involves several stakeholders, including a Trial Steering Committee (TSC), Trial Management Group (TMG), Data Monitoring Committee (DMC), funder and sponsor. We aimed to examine how the relationships between these stakeholders affect the trial oversight process and its rigour, to inform future revision of Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Using an ethnographic study design, we observed the oversight processes of eight trials and conducted semi-structured interviews with members of the trials' TSCs and TMGs, plus other relevant informants, including sponsors and funders of trials. Data were analysed thematically, and findings triangulated and integrated to give a multi-perspective account of current oversight practices in the UK. Eight TSC and six TMG meetings from eight trials were observed and audio-recorded, and 66 semi-structured interviews conducted with 52 purposively sampled key informants. Five themes are presented: (1) Collaboration within the TMG and role of the CTU; (2) Collaboration and conflict between oversight committees; (3) Priorities; (4) Communication between trial oversight groups and (5) Power and accountability. There was evidence of collaborative relationships, based on mutual respect, between CTUs, TMGs and TSCs, but also evidence of conflict. Relationships between trial oversight committees were influenced by stakeholders' priorities, both organisational and individual. Good communication following specific, recognised routes played a central role in ensuring that relationships were productive and trial oversight efficient. Participants described the possession of power over trials as a shifting political landscape, and there was lack of clarity regarding the roles and accountability of each committee, the sponsor and funder. Stakeholders' perceptions of their own power over a trial, and the power of others, influenced relationships between those involved in trial oversight. Recent

  19. Class III malocclusion with severe anteroposterior discrepancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Maria Deon Rizzatto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at reporting the clinical case of a patient with Class III skeletal malocclusion with severe maxillary deficiency, producing a reduced midface associated with severe mandibular prognathism. The pre-surgical orthodontic preparation was composed mainly by dentoalveolar expansion and repositioning of the incisors in the lower arch. Then, a combined maxillary and mandibular orthognathic surgery was performed. The treatment objectives were achieved, with significant improvement in facial esthetics and occlusion, followed by post-treatment stability. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as part of the requirements for obtaining the title of Diplomate by BBO.O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso clínico de um paciente portador de má oclusão de Classe III esquelética com acentuada deficiência maxilar, causando redução do terço médio da face, associada a severo prognatismo mandibular. O preparo ortodôntico pré-cirúrgico foi composto, principalmente, pela expansão dentoalveolar da maxila e o reposicionamento dos incisivos na arcada inferior. Depois, foi realizada a cirurgia ortognática combinada maxilomandibular. Os objetivos do tratamento foram atingidos, com significativa melhora da oclusão e da estética facial, seguida de estabilidade pós-tratamento. Esse caso foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.

  20. Regulatory oversight of maintenance activities at nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouton, J.P.; Lallement, J.

    1997-01-01

    In France the nuclear safety authority sets out the main safety objectives but the operator remains the first responsible for the NPP safety. During the operation, operators have to demonstrate that the safety level remains the same as defined in the design studies. Maintenance contributes to meet this objective. The French regulation insists on the quality of the safety related components maintenance, especially in the 1984 order. All gap between results and requirements have to be analyzed by operator who provide feedback measures to avoid similar failure to occur. This gap have to be mentioned to regulators. The use of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) and reliability centered maintenance (RCM) methods is not well developed in France to optimize maintenance. For the French regulatory, the major difficulties in the use of PSA are: The impossibility to detect unanticipated failure mode; the validity of the input data; the validity of model use, based on ''engineering judgement''. For the specific case of passive components inspection, such as the vessel of the primary circuit, the French regulator has already indicated to the operator that the optimization of maintenance by use of PSA cannot be used, for the following reasons: The safety analysis does not take into account the failure of the vessel; unanticipated failure modes have already damaged part of the primary circuit; the use of defense in depth concept requires a systematic detection of any defect on the vessel. (author)

  1. Sorption of trace amounts of gallium (III) on iron (III) oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Music, S; Gessner, M; Wolf, R H.H. [Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been studied as a function of pH. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of traces of gallium(III) by iron(III) oxide. The influence of surface active substances and of complexing agents on the sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been also studied.

  2. Sorption of trace amounts of gallium (III) on iron (III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been studied as a function of pH. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of traces of gallium(III) by iron(III) oxide. The influence of surface active substances and of complexing agents on the sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been also studied. (orig.) [de

  3. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of europium(III) and curium(III) with components of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the health risks of lanthanides (Ln) and radiotoxic actinides (An) in case of ingestion accidents etc., investigations into the chemical reactions of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Our previous study revealed that mucin, an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system, shows a strong interaction with Eu(III). Based on these results, the present study focuses on the components of this glycoprotein and identified N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) as the dominant binding carbohydrate of mucin. TRLFS measurements suggest the formation of a 1: 1 complex with log β of 3.2 ± 0.1 for Eu(III) and 3.3 ± 0.1 for Cm(III), respectively.

  4. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  5. Firebird-III program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.R.; Prawirosochardjo, S.; Rennick, D.F.; Wessman, E.; Blain, R.J.D.; Wilson, J.M.

    1979-09-01

    The FIREBIRD-III digital computer program is a general network code developed primarily for predicting the thermalhydraulic behaviour of CANDU power reactors during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident and the subsequent emergency coolant injection. Because of its flexibility, the code can also be used to solve a large variety of general two-phase flow problems. This report describes the thermalhydraulic models and the computation methods used in the program

  6. Mechatronic systems and materials III

    CERN Document Server

    Gosiewski, Zdzislaw

    2009-01-01

    This very interesting volume is divided into 24 sections; each of which covers, in detail, one aspect of the subject-matter: I. Industrial robots; II. Microrobotics; III. Mobile robots; IV. Teleoperation, telerobotics, teleoperated semi-autonomous systems; V. Sensors and actuators in mechatronics; VI. Control of mechatronic systems; VII. Analysis of vibration and deformation; VIII. Optimization, optimal design; IX. Integrated diagnostics; X. Failure analysis; XI. Tribology in mechatronic systems; XII. Analysis of signals; XIII. Measurement techniques; XIV. Multifunctional and smart materials;

  7. Revised SNAP III Training Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Calvin Elroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Samuel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rothrock, Richard Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sorensen, Eric Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundby, Gary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The Shielded Neutron Assay Probe (SNAP) technique was developed to determine the leakage neutron source strength of a radioactive object. The original system consisted of an EberlineTM Mini-scaler and discrete neutron detector. The system was operated by obtaining the count rate with the EberlineTM instrument, determining the absolute efficiency from a graph, and calculating the neutron source strength by hand. In 2003 the SNAP III, shown in Figure 1, was designed and built. It required the operator to position the SNAP, and then measure the source-to-detector and detectorto- reflector distances. Next the operator entered the distance measurements and started the data acquisition. The SNAP acquired the required count rate and then calculated and displayed the leakage neutron source strength (NSS). The original design of the SNAP III is described in SNAP III Training Manual (ER-TRN-PLN-0258, Rev. 0, January 2004, prepared by William Baird) This report describes some changes that have been made to the SNAP III. One important change is the addition of a LEMO connector to provide neutron detection output pulses for input to the MC-15. This feature is useful in active interrogation with a neutron generator because the MC-15 has the capability to only record data when it is not gated off by a pulse from the neutron generator. This avoids recording of a lot of data during the generator pulses that are not useful. Another change was the replacement of the infrared RS-232 serial communication output by a similar output via a 4-pin LEMO connector. The current document includes a more complete explanation of how to estimate the amount of moderation around a neutron-emitting source.

  8. Titanium gettering in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Grassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Campbell, G.

    1980-08-01

    The application of mild titanium gettering in the Doublet III tokamak has led to a significant improvement in the obtainable operating regimes and discharge parameters for all of the many plasma cross-sectional shapes studied. With gettering, low-Z impurities and radiated power are greatly reduced. The maximum line averaged electron density has increased 50% (anti n/sub e max/ approx. 1 x 10 20 /m 3 ), corresponding to a Murakami coefficient of nearly 6

  9. Improving Minuteman III Maintenance Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    the ground . Then figure out what your challenges are. We’ll have those” (Pappalardo, 2011). Another challenge facing the maintenance personnel...as assets aged as indicated by the pattern ‘B’ shown in Figure 2. With the increase in the mechanization of processes, more attention has been...concepts could be applied to the sustainment of the MM III as well as benefit its planned replacement, the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent (GBDS

  10. French participation to PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.

    1994-06-01

    The PISC III programme was set up in 1986 after the conclusions of the PISC II programme. The main objective was assessment of ISI procedures on few particular components or materials. France with IPSN, CEA/DTA, DCN INDRET, EDF, FRAMATOME and INTERCONTROLE decided to have an important participation in several of the eight actions. This paper describes shortly the key points of this participation and the consequences in France. (authors). 10 figs., 1 tab

  11. Basel III and Asset Securitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mpundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asset securitization via special purpose entities involves the process of transforming assets into securities that are issued to investors. These investors hold the rights to payments supported by the cash flows from an asset pool held by the said entity. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism by which low- and high-quality entities securitize low- and high-quality assets, respectively, into collateralized debt obligations. During the 2007–2009 financial crisis, asset securitization was seriously inhibited. In response to this, for instance, new Basel III capital and liquidity regulations were introduced. Here, we find that we can explicitly determine the transaction costs related to low-quality asset securitization. Also, in the case of dynamic and static multipliers, the effects of unexpected negative shocks such as rating downgrades on asset price and input, debt obligation price and output, and profit will be quantified. In this case, we note that Basel III has been designed to provide countercyclical capital buffers to negate procyclicality. Moreover, we will develop an illustrative example of low-quality asset securitization for subprime mortgages. Furthermore, numerical examples to illustrate the key results will be provided. In addition, connections between Basel III and asset securitization will be highlighted.

  12. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  13. A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of Insurance, and The National Committee on Quality Assurance: The Cost of Multi-Agency Oversight on Medicare+Choice Plans in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-12

    Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 1 Running Head: Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care A Comparison of the Audit and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of...Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 5 A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing

  14. Regulatory oversight report 2011 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne. ENSI ensures that the facilities comply with regulations and operate according to the law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials to and from nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of a national emergency structure. Building on the legislative framework, ENSI also formulates and updates its own guidelines. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2011, all five nuclear power reactors in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were operated safely and ENSI concluded that they had complied with their approved operating conditions. There were 27 reportable events in the nuclear power plants in Switzerland: 7 at Beznau, 5 at Goesgen, 11 at Leibstadt und 4 at Muehleberg. On the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 26 events as Level 0. One event, at the Muehleberg nuclear power plant, was rated as INES Level 1. This related to a potential blockage of the emergency water intake system in the event of extreme flooding. The operator BKW shut down the Muehleberg plant ahead of the scheduled maintenance date and upgraded the system. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2011, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with fuel assemblies and vitrified residue packages

  15. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  16. Rbs1, a new protein implicated in RNA polymerase III biogenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Małgorzata; Makała, Ewa; Płonka, Marta; Bazan, Rafał; Gewartowski, Kamil; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Boguta, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex assembly and its transport to the nucleus. We demonstrate that a missense cold-sensitive mutation, rpc128-1007, in the sequence encoding the C-terminal part of the second largest Pol III subunit, C128, affects the assembly and stability of the enzyme. The cellular levels and nuclear concentration of selected Pol III subunits were decreased in rpc128-1007 cells, and the association between Pol III subunits as evaluated by coimmunoprecipitation was also reduced. To identify the proteins involved in Pol III assembly, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the rpc128-1007 mutation and selected the Rbs1 gene, whose overexpression enhanced de novo tRNA transcription in rpc128-1007 cells, which correlated with increased stability, nuclear concentration, and interaction of Pol III subunits. The rpc128-1007 rbs1Δ double mutant shows a synthetic growth defect, indicating that rpc128-1007 and rbs1Δ function in parallel ways to negatively regulate Pol III assembly. Rbs1 physically interacts with a subset of Pol III subunits, AC19, AC40, and ABC27/Rpb5. Additionally, Rbs1 interacts with the Crm1 exportin and shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus. We postulate that Rbs1 binds to the Pol III complex or subcomplex and facilitates its translocation to the nucleus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Part two

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Korsgaard, Anders

    2008-01-01

    A novel micro combined heat and power system and a dynamic model thereof were presented in part one of the publication. In the following, the control system and dynamic performance of the system are presented. The model is subjected to a measured consumption pattern of 25 Danish single family...... houses with measurements of heat, power and hot water consumption every 15th minute during one year. Three scenarios are analyzed ranging from heat following only (grid compensation for electricity) to heat and power following with net export of electricity during high and peak load hours. Average...

  18. Regulatory oversight report 2010 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    Acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, ENSI, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. This includes the five nuclear power plants (NPPs), the plant-based interim storage facilities, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen, the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the two universities of Basel and Lausanne, the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparation for a deep geologic repository for radioactive waste. Using inspections, surveillance meetings, reviews and analyses as well as reports from plant licensees, ENSI obtains the required overview of the safety of the nuclear facilities. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure. The legislative framework at the basis of the activity of ENSI specifies the criteria by which it evaluates the activities and plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI provides the public with information on particular events and observations relating to nuclear facilities. The five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 und 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were all operated safely in 2010. Last year, there were 39 notifiable events in Switzerland: 4 events affected both Beznau Units, 10 events the Goesgen NPP, 6 the Leibstadt NPP and 13 the Muehleberg NPP and 6 in other facilities. Based on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) of 0-7, ENSI rated 38 events as Level 0, and as INES Level 2 the event on 31 August 2010 during maintenance work at the Leibstadt NPP, where a diver was exposed to radiation in excess of the maximum annual exposure rate of 20 mSv. The ZWILAG at Wuerenlingen consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and the plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2010, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with spent

  19. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    from the radiation measurement technology through to aero-radiometry and the development of new radionuclide analytical methods. The ENSI involvement in the development of international norms is contributing to cross-border harmonisation of radiological protection methods. The projects in decommissioning and disposal include research into the Opalinus Clay as a host rock and the design and monitoring of a deep geological repository. Research is focussed into the development of gases and the coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes. With regard to the potential erosion of future glaciers, the project on climate modelling has provided a better understanding of atmospheric circulation during an ice age. Incidents in nuclear facilities provide information on weaknesses and on potential for improvements in all aspects of design and operation. The current report provides information on a selection of particularly instructive events in facilities outside Switzerland. They have been analysed in order to determine their relevance to Swiss nuclear facilities. Switzerland had introduced measures to prevent errors during maintenance shutdowns. By cooperating with international organisations and regulatory bodies, ENSI ensures that Switzerland remains abreast of developments in the field of nuclear safety. It has bilateral agreements with neighbour countries. The accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi continued to affect international cooperation. ENSI introduced concrete proposals for more binding obligations and greater transparency and a strengthening of international safety requirements. In the field of the European Union Stress Test, ENSI took part in the international review process completed in April 2012; it is supporting improvements to and a harmonisation of safety standards. Switzerland meets its obligations on the disposal of radioactive waste. The assessment emphasized several positive features such as the Sectoral Plan on the deep geological repositories

  20. Study of type III ELMs in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, R.; Saibene, G.; Horton, L. D.; Becoulet, M.; Budny, R.; Borba, D.; Chankin, A.; Conway, G. D.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.; Guenther, K.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Igithkanov, Y.; Loarte, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Pogutse, O.; Rapp, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of JET experiments aimed at studying the operational space of plasmas with a Type III ELMy edge, in terms of both local and global plasma parameters. In JET, the Type III ELMy regime has a wide operational space in the pedestal n(e)-T-e diagram, and Type III ELMs are

  1. Self-audit as part of a research governance framework for health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crammond, Bradley R; Parker, Anna V; Brooks, Megan; Skiba, Marina; McNeil, John J

    2011-03-21

    Clinical research is an area of increasing activity for hospitals, universities and research institutions, which requires formal governance and oversight to manage risks. Monitoring research practice should be a part of research governance activities. However, formal audits have proved time consuming for researchers and auditors. To increase attention to good research practice and screen for poor practice, the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine at Monash University and the Alfred Research and Ethics Unit in Melbourne have developed a brief self-audit tool for researchers. We evaluated the self-audit using a questionnaire for researchers. The results were positive, with most respondents believing that it promoted good research practice.

  2. Toxic and hazardous chemicals, Title III and communities: An outreach manual for community groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, C.; Arkin, E.B.; McCallum, D.

    1989-09-01

    The manual was prepared for State and local government officials, local emergency planning committee (LEPCs), and other community groups that want to make Title III work. It is intended as a practical guide for those who have little or no previous experience in the field of communication, whose time must be snatched from home and office, and whose resources are limited. The manual has three major sections: Part I discusses planning, which is vital to the success of a communication program; Part II suggests ways to get and keep people involved, especially important because Title III affects so many different sectors of the community; Part III, a how-to-do-it section, talks about specific tasks, such as giving a speech or writing a press release. Appendices include a detailed explanation of the law, a glossary, a list of recent studies related to Title III communications, a list of educational materials, and a list of State contacts

  3. Sparkle/PM3 for the modeling of europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2009-01-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes. The validation procedure was carried out using only high quality crystallographic structures, for a total of ninety-six Eu(III) complexes, seventy Gd(III) complexes, and forty-two Tb(III) complexes. The Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is: 0.080 A for Eu(III); 0.063 A for Gd(III); and 0.070 A for Tb(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.082 A, 0.061 A, and 0.068 A respectively, indicating they are all comparable parameterizations. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective core potential full geometry optimization calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Finally, we report a preliminary attempt to show that Sparkle/PM3 geometry predictions are reliable. For one of the Eu(III) complexes, BAFZEO, we created hundreds of different input geometries by randomly varying the distances and angles of the ligands to the central Eu(III) ion, which were all subsequently fully optimized. A significant trend was unveiled, indicating that more accurate local minima geometries cluster at lower total energies, thus reinforcing the validity of sparkle model calculations. (author)

  4. Europium (III) and americium (III) stability constants with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) complexes with a humic acid extracted from a lake-bottom sediment were measured using a solvent extraction system. The organic extractant was di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid in toluene while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO 4 ). Aqueous humic acid concentrations were monitored by measuring uv-visible absorbances at approx.= 380 nm. The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid was determined by direct potentiometric titration to be 3.86 +- 0.03 meq/g. The humic acid displayed typical characteristics of a polyelectrolyte - the apparent pKsub(a), as well as the calculated metal ion stability constants increased as the degree of ionization (α) increased. The binding data required a fit of two stability constants, β 1 and β 2 , such that for Eu, log β 1 = 8.86 α + 4.39, log β 2 = 3.55 α + 11.06 while for Am, log β 1 = 10.58 α + 3.84, log β 2 = 5.32 α + 10.42. With hydroxide, carbonate, and humate as competing ligands, the humate complex associated with the β 1 constant is calculated to be the dominant species for the trivalent actinides and lanthanides under conditions present in natural waters. (orig.)

  5. Regulatory oversight report 2012 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) and the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) and at the University of Basel. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in the relevant facilities. It ensures that the facilities comply with the regulations and operate as required by law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation. It formulates and updates its own guidelines which stipulate the criteria for evaluating the current activities and future plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI produces regular reports on its regulatory activities and nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear facilities. It fulfils its statutory obligation to provide the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2012, the five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were all operated safely. 34 events were reported; on the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 33 events as Level 0 and 1 as Level 1. ENSI evaluates the safety of each nuclear power plant as part of a systematic safety evaluation taking account of both reportable events and other findings, in particular the results of more than 400 inspections conducted by ENSI during 2012. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and an incineration/melting plant. At the end of 2012, the cask storage hall contained 40 transport/storage casks

  6. Regulatory oversight report 2016 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    ENSI, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, assesses and monitors safety in the Swiss nuclear facilities. These include the five nuclear power plants: Beznau Units 1 and 2 (KKB1 and KKB2), Muehleberg (KKM), Goesgen (KKG) and Leibstadt (KKL), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) in Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel (UniB) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, checks, analyses and the reporting of the operators of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. It ensures that they operate as required by law. ENSI's regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and preparations for a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure that would be activated in the event of a serious incident at a nuclear facility in Switzerland. ENSI reports periodically on its supervisory activities. It informs the public about special events and findings in the nuclear installations. All five nuclear power plants in Switzerland operated safely during the past year. Nuclear safety at all plants in operation was rated as good or satisfactory. In 2016, there were 31 reportable events at the nuclear power plants. 30 events were rated Level 0 (event of no or low safety significance) on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) and one was rated Level 1 (anomaly) at KKL. Zwilag consists of several interim storage buildings, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2016, the cask storage hall contained 56 transport/storage casks with spent fuel assemblies and vitrified residue

  7. DESY III, the new proton injector for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmie, G.; Maidment, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a 7.5 GeV/c proton synchrotron, DESY III, which will form part of the injector chain for HERA /1/ is described. Features of the latice and brief details of sub-systems are presented. A selection of parameters and expected time schedule for the accelerator which is at present under construction at the DESY laboratory, Hamburg, are given

  8. Recent results for Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-π 0 's D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to Kππ is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs

  9. Charm physics at BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yifang

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of J/Ψ and the τ lepton in 70's, the study of τ-charm physics became very active: several dedicated e + e - colliders were built and tremendous progress were obtained. In this paper, the main reasoning,the content and the characteristics of the τ-charm physics study are discussed, together with the scientific motivations and the latest results of the recently completed upgrade of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC II) and the new Beijing Spectrometer (BES III). (authors)

  10. The Mark III vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 μm at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 μm using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  11. Isothiocyanato complexes of Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III) and Ho(III) with 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, A; Singh, V K

    1982-01-01

    Six-coordinated complexes of the type (Ln(PyBzH)/sub 2/NCS.H/sub 2/O) (NCS)/sub 2/.nH/sub 2/O/mC/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH (Ln = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III) and Ho(III), n=1-2; m=1) have been prepared from Ln(NCS)/sub 6//sup 3 -/. The room temperature magnetic moment values confirm the terpositive state of the lanthanide ions. Infrared spectra suggest the N-coordination of thiocyanate group. Electronic spectral studies of Tb(III), Dy(III) and Ho(III) complexes have been made in terms of LSJ term energies. 13 refs.

  12. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-04-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process for transforming traditional III-V materials based electronics into flexible one. The thesis reports releasing 200 nm of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) from 200 nm GaAs / 300 nm Aluminum Arsenide (AlAs) stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes that contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelengths) observed. Fabrication of metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAPs) on GaAs is followed by releasing it to have devices on flexible 200 nm GaAs. Similarly, flexible GaSb and InP fabrication process is also reported to transform traditional electronics into large-area flexible electronics.

  13. (segunda parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Oliva-Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo es la continuación de otro anterior (Oliva, 2004, ambos dedicados al estudio de la importancia del pensamiento analógico en la construcción histórica de la noción de fuerza gravitatoria y del modelo de Sistema Solar. En aquella ocasión analizamos dicho papel durante el período comprendido desde las antiguas civilizaciones hasta llegar a la revolución copernicana con científicos como Copérnico, Gilbert, Kepler o el propio Galileo. En esta segunda parte, se continúa con algunos de los razonamientos analógicos proporcionados desde la vertiente mecanicista, capitaneada por Descartes y desde la tradición subsiguiente que se desarrolló en línea con la utilización del método de la analogía como criterio argumentativo (Huyghens, Hooke, Bernoulli, etc.. Dedicamos asimismo un capítulo aparte a la figura de Newton, quien continúa con dicha tradición en su intento de explicar la naturaleza de la gravitación. Finalmente se procede, a modo de síntesis, a realizar una clasificación de distintos tipos de razonamientos analógicos aportados en el desarrollo histórico en torno a estos temas, estudiando el papel científico y divulgativo de cada uno

  14. Comparison of the Canadian and US Laws, Regulations, Policies, and Systems of Oversight for Animals in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gilly; Locke, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The Canadian and United States' approaches to oversight of animals in research are both based on the "3Rs" principles outlined in Russell and Burch's classic text, The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique. Each country seeks to protect the welfare of animals, while permitting the legitimate goals of scientific research to be attained according to the legal principles, cultures, and strengths and constraints of their jurisprudential and societal traditions. Canada is one of the most decentralized federations in the world, and regulation of activities is based to a great extent on custom and practice. The United States is more hierarchical and, at least with respect to laws governing animal research, more centralized. Accordingly, the Canadian approach is rooted in the concepts of social contracts, with a greater emphasis on guidance and policy and less reliance on legislation. No federal (national) direct legislation of laboratory animal welfare exists, although the federal government uses its criminal and spending authorities to shape behavior. The central feature of the Canadian system is the Canadian Council on Animal Care, which was formed to support universities and government departments involved in animal-based science. Animal care committees play a central role in implementing the guidelines and policies in facilities that carry out animal research. The United States has enacted two federal (national) laws applicable to animals in research. The Animal Welfare Act is a more traditional, command-and-control law that gives authority to the US Department of Agriculture to promulgate regulations, inspect facilities, and enforce violations. The Health Research Extension Act, which amended the US Public Health Services (PHS) Act, applies to any activity conducted or supported by the PHS, including research efforts supported by the US National Institutes of Health. It is largely nonregulatory and establishes a system of assurances and policies that covered

  15. Oversight framework over oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer: comparative analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk case under South Korean bioethics law and U.S. guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang's potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices while the Guidelines recommend politically-independent, decentralized oversight bodies including a special review body for human embryonic stem cell research at an institutional level and that the Guidelines would have provided more vigorous protection for the women who had undergone oocyte procurement for Hwang's research than the Act. We also suggest additional regulations to protect those who provide oocytes for research in South Korea.

  16. Formation constants of Sm(III), Dy(III), Gd(III), Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes of tridentate schiff base, 2-[(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-methylene) amino] phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omprakash, K.L.; Chandra Pal, A.V.; Reddy, M.L.N.

    1982-01-01

    A new tridentate schiff base, 2- (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-methylene)amino phenol derived from benzimididazole-2-carbo-xaldehyde and 2-aminophenol has been synthesised and characterised by spectral and analytical data. Proton-ligand formation constants of the schiff base and metal-ligand formation constants of its complexes with Sm(III), Dy(III), Gd(III), Nd(III) and Pr(III) have been determined potentiometrically in 50% (v/v) aqueous dioxane at an ionic strength of 0.1M (NaClO 4 ) and at 25deg C using the Irving-Rossotti titration technique. The order of stability constants (logβ 2 ) is found to be Sm(III)>Dy(III)>Gd(III)>Pr(III)>Nd(III). (author)

  17. Formation constants of Sm(III), Dy(III), Gd(III), Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes of tridentate schiff base, 2-((1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-methylene) amino) phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omprakash, K L; Chandra Pal, A V; Reddy, M L.N. [Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1982-03-01

    A new tridentate schiff base, 2- (1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-methylene)amino phenol derived from benzimididazole-2-carbo-xaldehyde and 2-aminophenol has been synthesised and characterised by spectral and analytical data. Proton-ligand formation constants of the schiff base and metal-ligand formation constants of its complexes with Sm(III), Dy(III), Gd(III), Nd(III) and Pr(III) have been determined potentiometrically in 50% (v/v) aqueous dioxane at an ionic strength of 0.1M (NaClO/sub 4/) and at 25deg C using the Irving-Rossotti titration technique. The order of stability constants (log..beta../sub 2/) is found to be Sm(III)>Dy(III)>Gd(III)>Pr(III)>Nd(III).

  18. Market Oversight Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Maarten Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Big business plays cat & mouse with market regulators. Market participants try to avoid the competitive pressures that the regulators are working to keep up. Only if the latter play these games at least as cleverly as the former can we reap all the fruits of competition. A case in point is the

  19. Market oversight games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Big business plays cat & mouse with market regulators. Market participants try to avoid the competitive pressures that the regulators are working to keep up. Only if the latter play these games at least as cleverly as the former can we reap all the fruits of competition. A case in point is the

  20. Doublet III neutral beam multi-stream command language system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Garcia, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A multi-stream command language system was developed to provide control of the dual source neutral beam injectors on the Doublet III experiment at GA Technologies Inc. The Neutral Beam command language system consists of three parts: compiler, sequencer, and interactive task. The command language, which was derived from the Doublet III tokamak command language, POPS, is compiled, using a recursive descent compiler, into reverse polish notation instructions which then can be executed by the sequencer task. The interactive task accepts operator commands via a keyboard. The interactive task directs the operation of three input streams, creating commands which are then executed by the sequencer. The streams correspond to the two sources within a Doublet III neutral beam, plus an interactive stream. The sequencer multiplexes the execution of instructions from these three streams. The instructions include reads and writes to an operator terminal, arithmetic computations, intrinsic functions such as CAMAC input and output, and logical instructions. The neutral beam command language system was implemented using Modular Computer Systems (ModComp) Pascal and consists of two tasks running on a ModComp Classic IV computer. The two tasks, the interactive and the sequencer, run independently and communicate using shared memory regions. The compiler runs as an overlay to the interactive task when so directed by operator commands. The system is succesfully being used to operate the three neutral beams on Doublet III