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Sample records for parl cleaves human

  1. DutchParl: A corpus of parliamentary documents in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, M.; Schuth, A.

    2010-01-01

    A corpus called DutchParl is created which aims to contain all digitally available parliamentary documents written in the Dutch language. The first version of DutchParl contains documents from the parliaments of The Netherlands, Flanders and Belgium. The corpus is divided along three dimensions: per

  2. The major surface glycoprotein (gp63) from Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani cleaves CD4 molecules on human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, A S; Theander, T G; Hviid, L

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Leishmania major and L. donovani surface protease gp63 on surface markers on human T cells was studied using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Purified gp63 (63,000 m.w. glycoprotein) at concentrations above 10 micrograms/ml completely inhibited binding of six different anti-CD4......-expression of CD4, reaching 50% of the initial level after 72 h of incubation in medium. Preincubation of cells with live promastigotes showed an inhibitory effect on CD4 comparable to that seen with purified gp63. The binding of Abs directed against other surface markers present on human T-cells--CD2, CD3, CD5......, CD8, CD11A, CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CD58, TCR-alpha, TCR-gamma, and HLA DQ--was not inhibited by gp63. These data suggest that gp63, both in its purified form and in the form anchored to the parasite membrane, cleaves CD4 on human T cells. The cleavage of CD4 by the protease might play a role...

  3. The anti-tumor drug bleomycin preferentially cleaves at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-04-01

    The genome-wide pattern of DNA cleavage at transcription start sites (TSSs) for the anti-tumor drug bleomycin was examined in human HeLa cells using next-generation DNA sequencing. It was found that actively transcribed genes were preferentially cleaved compared with non-transcribed genes. The 143,600 identified human TSSs were split into non-transcribed genes (82,596) and transcribed genes (61,004) for HeLa cells. These transcribed genes were further split into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, and 80-100 % of expressed genes. The bleomycin cleavage pattern at highly transcribed gene TSSs was greatly enhanced compared with purified DNA and non-transcribed gene TSSs. The top 20 and 20-40 % quintiles had a very similar enhanced cleavage pattern, the 40-60 % quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80 and 80-100 % quintiles were close to the non-transcribed and purified DNA profiles. The pattern of bleomycin enhanced cleavage had peaks that were approximately 200 bp apart, and this indicated that bleomycin was identifying the presence of phased nucleosomes at TSSs. Hence bleomycin can be utilized to detect chromatin structures that are present at actively transcribed genes. In this study, for the first time, the pattern of DNA damage by a clinically utilized cancer chemotherapeutic agent was performed on a human genome-wide scale at the nucleotide level.

  4. Comment parle-t-on aux animaux?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    2018-01-01

    three prominent modalities for addressing a pet animal, and examines their pragmatical effects. These empirical findings allow to rethink bigger issues usually raised when human/animal relationships are concerned: animal agency, attribution of intention, and the fundamentals of mutual adjustment....

  5. Haemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteases and human ADAMs cleave LRP5/6, which disrupts cell-cell adhesions in vitro and induces haemorrhage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tadahiko; Sakon, Taketo; Nakazawa, Shiori; Nishioka, Asuka; Watanabe, Kohei; Matsumoto, Kaori; Akasaka, Mari; Shioi, Narumi; Sawada, Hitoshi; Araki, Satohiko

    2017-06-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are members of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family of proteins, as they possess similar domains. SVMPs are known to elicit snake venom-induced haemorrhage; however, the target proteins and cleavage sites are not known. In this work, we identified a target protein of vascular apoptosis-inducing protein 1 (VAP1), an SVMP, relevant to its ability to induce haemorrhage. VAP1 disrupted cell-cell adhesions by relocating VE-cadherin and γ-catenin from the cell-cell junction to the cytosol, without inducing proteolysis of VE-cadherin. The Wnt receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) are known to promote catenin relocation, and are rendered constitutively active in Wnt signalling by truncation. Thus, we examined whether VAP1 cleaves LRP5/6 to induce catenin relocation. Indeed, we found that VAP1 cleaved the extracellular region of LRP6 and LRP5. This cleavage removes four inhibitory β-propeller structures, resulting in activation of LRP5/6. Recombinant human ADAM8 and ADAM12 also cleaved LRP6 at the same site. An antibody against a peptide including the LRP6-cleavage site inhibited VAP1-induced VE-cadherin relocation and disruption of cell-cell adhesions in cultured cells, and blocked haemorrhage in mice in vivo. Intriguingly, animals resistant to the effects of haemorrhagic snake venom express variants of LRP5/6 that lack the VAP1-cleavage site, or low-density lipoprotein receptor domain class A domains involved in formation of the constitutively active form. The results validate LRP5/6 as physiological targets of ADAMs. Furthermore, they indicate that SVMP-induced cleavage of LRP5/6 causes disruption of cell-cell adhesion and haemorrhage, potentially opening new avenues for the treatment of snake bites. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Cathepsin D Specifically Cleaves the Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α, Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1β, and SLC That Are Expressed in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marlene; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Buri, Caroline; Langen, Hanno; Lis, Maddalena; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2003-01-01

    Cathepsin D (Cath-D) expression in human primary breast cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis. In search of a better understanding of the Cath-D substrates possibly involved in cancer invasiveness and metastasis, we investigated the potential interactions between this protease and chemokines. Here we report that purified Cath-D, as well as culture supernatants from the human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, selectively degrade macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (CCL3), MIP-1β (CCL4), and SLC (CCL21). Proteolysis was totally blocked by the protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and specificity of Cath-D cleavage was demonstrated using a large chemokine panel. Whereas MIP-1α and MIP-1β degradation was rapid and complete, cleavage of SLC was slow and not complete. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Cath-D cleaves the Leu58 to Trp59 bond of SLC producing two functionally inactive fragments. Analysis of Cath-D proteolysis of a series of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3/MIP-1β hybrids indicated that processing of MIP-1β might start by cleaving off amino acids located in the C-terminal domain. In situ hybridization studies revealed MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and Cath-D gene expression mainly in the stromal compartment of breast cancers whereas SLC transcripts were found in endothelial cells of capillaries and venules within the neoplastic tissues. Cath-D production in the breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of culture supernatants and cell lysates, was not affected by stimulation with chemokines such as interleukin-8 (CXCL8), SDF-1 (CXCL12), and SLC. These data suggest that inactivation of chemokines by Cath-D possibly influences regulatory mechanisms in the tumoral extracellular microenvironment that in turn may affect the generation of the antitumoral immune response, the migration of cancer cells, or both processes. PMID:12651610

  7. Stabilization of the soluble, cleaved, trimeric form of the envelope glycoprotein complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Vesanen, Mika; Schuelke, Norbert; Master, Aditi; Schiffner, Linnea; Kalyanaraman, Roopa; Paluch, Maciej; Berkhout, Ben; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Lu, Min; Moore, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex of human immunodeficiency virus type I has evolved a structure that is minimally immunogenic while retaining its natural function of receptor-mediated virus-cell fusion. The Env complex is trimeric; its six individual subunits (three gp120 and three gp41

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes Infection and the Human Proteome with a Special Focus on the Immunoglobulin G-cleaving Enzyme IdeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Christofer A Q; Järnum, Sofia; Winstedt, Lena; Kjellman, Christian; Björck, Lars; Linder, Adam; Malmström, Johan A

    2018-06-01

    Infectious diseases are characterized by a complex interplay between host and pathogen, but how these interactions impact the host proteome is unclear. Here we applied a combined mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to investigate how the human proteome is transiently modified by the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes , with a particular focus on bacterial cleavage of IgG in vivo In invasive diseases, S. pyogenes evokes a massive host response in blood, whereas superficial diseases are characterized by a local leakage of several blood plasma proteins at the site of infection including IgG. S. pyogenes produces IdeS, a protease cleaving IgG in the lower hinge region and we find highly effective IdeS-cleavage of IgG in samples from local IgG poor microenvironments. The results show that IdeS contributes to the adaptation of S. pyogenes to its normal ecological niches. Additionally, the work identifies novel clinical opportunities for in vivo pathogen detection. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Common variants in the PARL and PINK1 genes increase the risk to leprosy in Han Chinese from South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Feng, Jia-Qi; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-11-23

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. We hypothesized that mitochondrial genes PARL and PINK1 would confer risk to leprosy. Thirteen tag SNPs of PARL and PINK1 were analyzed in 3620 individuals with or without leprosy from China. We also sequenced the entire exons of PARL, PINK1 and PARK2 in 80 patients with a family history of leprosy by using the next generation sequencing technology (NGS). We found that PARL SNP rs12631031 conferred a risk to leprosy (P adjusted  = 0.019) and multibacillary leprosy (MB, P adjusted  = 0.020) at the allelic level. rs12631031 and rs7653061 in PARL were associated with leprosy and MB (dominant model, P adjusted  leprosy at the genotypic level (P adjusted  = 0.004). We confirmed that common variants in PARL and PINK1 were associated with leprosy in patients underwent NGS. Furthermore, PARL and PINK1 could physically interact with each other and were involved in the highly connected network formed by reported leprosy susceptibility genes. Together, our results showed that PARL and PINK1 genetic variants are associated with leprosy.

  10. Measurement of neutralizing serum antibodies of patients vaccinated with human papillomavirus L1 or L2-based immunogens using furin-cleaved HPV Pseudovirions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Wang

    Full Text Available Antibodies specific for neutralizing epitopes in either Human papillomavirus (HPV capsid protein L1 or L2 can mediate protection from viral challenge and thus their accurate and sensitive measurement at high throughput is likely informative for monitoring response to prophylactic vaccination. Here we compare measurement of L1 and L2-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera using the standard Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (L1-PBNA with the newer Furin-Cleaved Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (FC-PBNA, a modification of the L1-PBNA intended to improve sensitivity towards L2-specific neutralizing antibodies without compromising assay of L1-specific responses. For detection of L1-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera, the FC- PBNA and L1-PBNA assays showed similar sensitivity and a high level of correlation using WHO standard sera (n = 2, and sera from patients vaccinated with Gardasil (n = 30 or an experimental human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 L1 VLP vaccine (n = 70. The detection of L1-specific cross-neutralizing antibodies in these sera using pseudovirions of types phylogenetically-related to those targeted by the L1 virus-like particle (VLP vaccines was also consistent between the two assays. However, for sera from patients (n = 17 vaccinated with an L2-based immunogen (TA-CIN, the FC-PBNA was more sensitive than the L1-PBNA in detecting L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Further, the neutralizing antibody titers measured with the FC-PBNA correlated with those determined with the L2-PBNA, another modification of the L1-PBNA that spacio-temporally separates primary and secondary receptor engagement, as well as the protective titers measured using passive transfer studies in the murine genital-challenge model. In sum, the FC-PBNA provided sensitive measurement for both L1 VLP and L2-specific neutralizing antibody in human sera. Vaccination with TA-CIN elicits weak cross-protective antibody in a

  11. 77 FR 27245 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R3-R-2012-N069; FXRS1265030000S3-123-FF03R06000] Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN AGENCY: Fish and... plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge, NWR) for...

  12. Antioxidant activity of extracts from the bark of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murrary) Parl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng Gao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2006-01-01

    The bark of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl. was extracted with methanol and sequentially partitioned with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and deionized water. The antioxidant activities of the four extracts were evaluated using the DPPH• and ABTS+• methods. The total phenolic...

  13. Bromus carinatus Hook. et Arn. en Puccinellia distans (L.) Parl. in Midden-Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floristenclub Gelderse Vallei,

    1979-01-01

    The authors mention the occurrence of two grasses, Bromus carinatus Hook, et Arn. (fig. 1) and Puccinellia distans (L.) Parl. (fig. 2) in the central part of the Netherlands. The first is a naturalised adventitious plant, the other a species of saline habitats and is spreading through this part of

  14. Annotating N termini for the human proteome project: N termini and Nα-acetylation status differentiate stable cleaved protein species from degradation remnants in the human erythrocyte proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Philipp F; Huesgen, Pitter F; Nguyen, Karen; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as "missing", this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier .

  15. Processing sites in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag-Pro-Pol precursor are cleaved by the viral protease at different rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindquist Jeffrey N

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have examined the kinetics of processing of the HIV-1 Gag-Pro-Pol precursor in an in vitro assay with mature protease added in trans. The processing sites were cleaved at different rates to produce distinct intermediates. The initial cleavage occurred at the p2/NC site. Intermediate cleavages occurred at similar rates at the MA/CA and RT/IN sites, and to a lesser extent at sites upstream of RT. Late cleavages occurred at the sites flanking the protease (PR domain, suggesting sequestering of these sites. We observed paired intermediates indicative of half- cleavage of RT/RH site, suggesting that the RT domain in Gag-Pro-Pol was in a dimeric form under these assay conditions. These results clarify our understanding of the processing kinetics of the Gag-Pro-Pol precursor and suggest regulated cleavage. Our results further suggest that early dimerization of the PR and RT domains may serve as a regulatory element to influence the kinetics of processing within the Pol domain.

  16. Processing sites in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pro-Pol precursor are cleaved by the viral protease at different rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Steve C; Lindquist, Jeffrey N; Kaplan, Andrew H; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2005-11-01

    We have examined the kinetics of processing of the HIV-1 Gag-Pro-Pol precursor in an in vitro assay with mature protease added in trans. The processing sites were cleaved at different rates to produce distinct intermediates. The initial cleavage occurred at the p2/NC site. Intermediate cleavages occurred at similar rates at the MA/CA and RT/IN sites, and to a lesser extent at sites upstream of RT. Late cleavages occurred at the sites flanking the protease (PR) domain, suggesting sequestering of these sites. We observed paired intermediates indicative of half- cleavage of RT/RH site, suggesting that the RT domain in Gag-Pro-Pol was in a dimeric form under these assay conditions. These results clarify our understanding of the processing kinetics of the Gag-Pro-Pol precursor and suggest regulated cleavage. Our results further suggest that early dimerization of the PR and RT domains may serve as a regulatory element to influence the kinetics of processing within the Pol domain.

  17. Human adenovirus serotype 12 virion precursors pMu and pVI are cleaved at amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal sites that conform to the adenovirus 2 endoproteinase cleavage consensus sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, P; Anderson, C W

    1993-03-01

    The sequence of a 1158-base pair fragment of the human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) genome was determined. This segment encodes the precursors for virion components Mu and VI. Both Ad12 precursors contain two sequences that conform to a consensus sequence motif for cleavage by the endoproteinase of adenovirus 2 (Ad2). Analysis of the amino terminus of VI and of the peptide fragments found in Ad12 virions demonstrated that these sites are cleaved during Ad12 maturation. This observation suggests that the recognition motif for adenovirus endoproteinases is highly conserved among human serotypes. The adenovirus 2 endoproteinase polypeptide requires additional co-factors for activity (C. W. Anderson, Protein Expression Purif., 1993, 4, 8-15). Synthetic Ad12 or Ad2 pVI carboxy-terminal peptides each permitted efficient cleavage of an artificial endoproteinase substrate by recombinant Ad2 endoproteinase polypeptide.

  18. Fetzima (levomilnacipran), a drug for major depressive disorder as a dual inhibitor for human serotonin transporters and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Khan, Mahiuddin; Biswas, Deboshree; Hameed, Nida; Shakil, Shazi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological management of Major Depressive Disorder includes the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors which targets serotonin transporters (SERT) to increase the synaptic concentrations of serotonin. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) is responsible for amyloid β plaque formation. Hence it is an interesting target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. This study describes molecular interactions of a new Food and Drug Administration approved antidepressant drug named 'Fetzima' with BACE-1 and SERT. Fetzima is chemically known as levomilnacipran. The study has explored a possible link between the treatment of Depression and AD. 'Autodock 4.2' was used for docking study. The free energy of binding (ΔG) values for 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction and 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction were found to be -7.47 and -8.25 kcal/mol, respectively. Levomilnacipran was found to interact with S438, known to be the most important amino acid residue of serotonin binding site of SERT during 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction. In the case of 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction, levomilnacipran interacted with two very crucial aspartic acid residues of BACE-1, namely, D32 and D228. These residues are accountable for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and the subsequent formation of amyloid β plaques in AD brain. Hence, Fetzima (levomilnacipran) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of SERT and BACE-1 and expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against depression and AD. It is an established fact that development of AD is associated with Major Depressive Disorder. Therefore, the design of new BACE-1 inhibitors based on antidepressant drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial.

  19. 78 FR 3911 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN; Final Comprehensive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R3-R-2012-N259; FXRS1265030000-134-FF03R06000] Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN; Final Comprehensive... significant impact (FONSI) for the environmental assessment (EA) for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge...

  20. Pharmacognostic study of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Murr. Parl.: A drug used in Homoeopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Rathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacognostic profile of crude drug has a key role in standardization for quality, purity and drug identification. The present study deals with pharmacognostic evaluation of aerial part of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Murr. Parl. a drug used in homoeopathic system of medicine for diverse clinical uses such as terrible pain in stomach, tumors, keloid, warts and lipoma of thigh. The study includes collection, identification, macroscopy, microscopy and organoleptic characteristics of aerial part of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana. Anatomically the leaf is distinguishable into a layer of the epidermis followed by parenchymatous mesophyll and resin duct in the parenchymatous cortex. Powder microscopy shows the presence of epidermal cells, parenchymatous cells and tracheids. These observations may be used as pharmacopoeial standards for identification of Cha maecyparis lawsoniana.

  1. Improviser non verbalement pour l’apprentissage de la langue parlée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Chaîné

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Un texte réflexif sur la pratique de l'improvisation dans un contexte scolaire en vue d'apprendre la langue parlée. D'aucun penserait que l'improvisation verbale est le moyen par excellence pour faire l'apprentissage de la langue, mais l'expérience nous a fait découvrir la richesse de l'improvisation non-verbale suivie de prise de parole sur la pratique comme moyen privilégié. L'article est illustré d'un atelier d'improvisation-non verbale s'adressant à des enfants ou à des adolescents.

  2. Ni(ii) ions cleave and inactivate human alpha-1 antitrypsin hydrolytically, implicating nickel exposure as a contributing factor in pathologies related to antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezynfeld, Nina Ewa; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech; Frączyk, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    Human alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is an abundant serum protein present at a concentration of 1.0-1.5 g L(-1). AAT deficiency is a genetic disease that manifests with emphysema and liver cirrhosis due to the accumulation of a misfolded AAT mutant in hepatocytes. Lung AAT amount is inversely correlated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious and often deadly condition, with increasing frequency in the aging population. Exposure to cigarette smoke and products of fossil fuel combustion aggravates AAT deficiency and COPD according to mechanisms that are not fully understood. Taking into account that these fumes contain particles that can release nickel to human airways and skin, we decided to investigate interactions of AAT with Ni(ii) ions within the paradigm of Ni(ii)-dependent peptide bond hydrolysis. We studied AAT protein derived from human blood using HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. These studies were aided by spectroscopic experiments on model peptides. As a result, we identified three hydrolysis sites in AAT. Two of them are present in the N-terminal part of the molecule next to each other (before Thr-13 and Ser-14 residues) and effectively form one N-terminal cleavage site. The single C-terminal cleavage site is located before Ser-285. The N-terminal hydrolysis was more efficient than the C-terminal one, but both abolished the ability of AAT to inhibit trypsin in an additive manner. Nickel ions bound to hydrolysis products demonstrated an ability to generate ROS. These results implicate Ni(ii) exposure as a contributing factor in AAT-related pathologies.

  3. Plasmin cleaves fibrinogen and the human complement proteins C3b and C5 in the presence of Leptospira interrogans proteins: A new role of LigA and LigB in invasion and complement immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Pagotto, Ana Helena; Serrano, Solange Maria de Toledo; Abreu, Patricia Antonia Estima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-05-01

    Plasminogen is a single-chain glycoprotein found in human plasma as the inactive precursor of plasmin. When converted to proteolytically active plasmin, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation cascades, thus representing an important target for pathogenic microorganisms. Leptospira interrogans binds plasminogen, which is converted to active plasmin. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are surface exposed molecules that interact with extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, including proteins of the FH family and C4BP. In this work, we demonstrate that these multifunctional molecules also bind plasminogen through both N- and C-terminal domains. These interactions are dependent on lysine residues and are affected by ionic strength. Competition assays suggest that plasminogen does not share binding sites with C4BP or FH on Lig proteins at physiological molar ratios. Plasminogen bound to Lig proteins is converted to proteolytic active plasmin in the presence of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Lig-bound plasmin is able to cleave the physiological substrates fibrinogen and the complement proteins C3b and C5. Taken together, our data point to a new role of LigA and LigB in leptospiral invasion and complement immune evasion. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by these versatile proteins may contribute to Leptospira infection, favoring bacterial survival and dissemination inside the host. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Cleavage Luminescence from Cleaved Indium Phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Guang, Li

    2008-01-01

    We outline the experiments performed to gain further information about the structure and properties of cleaved InP surfaces. The experiments involved detecting the luminescence produced after cleaving thin InP plates within a high vacuum, by a process of converting the luminescence to an electrical signal which could be amplified and measured accurately. The experimental results show that the detected luminescence durations from cleaved InP are usually only about 10μs. It is believed that this time represents the time of travel of the crack with the actual recombination time being much shorter. Strong signals could also be picked up from cleaved InP in air

  5. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  6. A comparative immunogenicity study in rabbits of disulfide-stabilized, proteolytically cleaved, soluble trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp140, trimeric cleavage-defective gp140 and monomeric gp120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddows, Simon; Franti, Michael; Dey, Antu K.; Kirschner, Marc; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Fisch, Danielle C.; Ketas, Thomas; Yuste, Eloisa; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Klasse, Per Johan; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex, a homotrimer containing gp120 surface glycoprotein and gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein subunits, mediates the binding and fusion of the virus with susceptible target cells. The Env complex is the target for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and is the basis for vaccines intended to induce NAbs. Early generation vaccines based on monomeric gp120 subunits did not confer protection from infection; one alternative approach is therefore to make and evaluate soluble forms of the trimeric Env complex. We have directly compared the immunogenicity in rabbits of two forms of soluble trimeric Env and monomeric gp120 based on the sequence of HIV-1 JR-FL . Both protein-only and DNA-prime, protein-boost immunization formats were evaluated, DNA-priming having little or no influence on the outcome. One form of trimeric Env was made by disrupting the gp120-gp41 cleavage site by mutagenesis (gp140 UNC ), the other contains an intramolecular disulfide bond to stabilize the cleaved gp120 and gp41 moieties (SOSIP.R6 gp140). Among the three immunogens, SOSIP.R6 gp140 most frequently elicited neutralizing antibodies against the homologous, neutralization-resistant strain, HIV-1 JR-FL . All three proteins induced NAbs against more sensitive strains, but the breadth of activity against heterologous primary isolates was limited. When antibodies able to neutralize HIV-1 JR-FL were detected, antigen depletion studies showed they were not directed at the V3 region but were targeted at other, undefined gp120 and also non-gp120 epitopes

  7. Cleaved-edge-overgrowth nanogap electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, Sebastian M; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc, E-mail: m.tornow@tu-bs.de [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-02-11

    We present a method to fabricate multiple metal nanogap electrodes of tailored width and distance in parallel, on the cleaved plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The three-dimensional patterned structures are obtained by a combination of molecular-beam-epitaxial regrowth on a crystal facet, using the cleaved-edge-overgrowth (CEO) method, and subsequent wet selective etching and metallization steps. SEM and AFM studies reveal smooth and co-planar electrodes of width and distance of the order of 10 nm. Preliminary electrical characterization indicates electrical gap insulation in the 100 M{Omega} range with k{Omega} lead resistance. We propose our methodology to realize multiple electrode geometries that would allow investigation of the electrical conductivity of complex nanoscale objects such as branched organic molecules.

  8. Cleaved-edge-overgrowth nanogap electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Sebastian M; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2011-02-11

    We present a method to fabricate multiple metal nanogap electrodes of tailored width and distance in parallel, on the cleaved plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The three-dimensional patterned structures are obtained by a combination of molecular-beam-epitaxial regrowth on a crystal facet, using the cleaved-edge-overgrowth (CEO) method, and subsequent wet selective etching and metallization steps. SEM and AFM studies reveal smooth and co-planar electrodes of width and distance of the order of 10 nm. Preliminary electrical characterization indicates electrical gap insulation in the 100 MΩ range with kΩ lead resistance. We propose our methodology to realize multiple electrode geometries that would allow investigation of the electrical conductivity of complex nanoscale objects such as branched organic molecules.

  9. Bleomycin Can Cleave an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelbello, Alicia J; Disney, Matthew D

    2018-01-04

    Noncoding RNAs are pervasive in cells and contribute to diseases such as cancer. A question in biomedical research is whether noncoding RNAs are targets of medicines. Bleomycin is a natural product that cleaves DNA; however, it is known to cleave RNA in vitro. Herein, an in-depth analysis of the RNA cleavage preferences of bleomycin A5 is presented. Bleomycin A5 prefers to cleave RNAs with stretches of AU base pairs. Based on these preferences and bioinformatic analysis, the microRNA-10b hairpin precursor was identified as a potential substrate for bleomycin A5. Both in vitro and cellular experiments demonstrated cleavage. Importantly, chemical cleavage by bleomycin A5 in the microRNA-10b hairpin precursors occurred near the Drosha and Dicer enzymatic processing sites and led to destruction of the microRNA. Evidently, oncogenic noncoding RNAs can be considered targets of cancer medicines and might elicit their pharmacological effects by targeting noncoding RNA. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. ADAM 12-S cleaves IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 and is inhibited by TIMP-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Fox, J W; Murphy, G

    2000-01-01

    that it cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This result supports a role for ADAM 12-S in the degradation of IGFBP-3 in the blood of pregnant women. Furthermore, we tested for proteolysis of other members of the IGF binding protein family and found that ADAM 12-S cleaves IGFBP-5......ADAMs are a family of multidomain proteins having proteolytic and cell adhesion activities. We have previously shown that ADAM 12-S, the secreted soluble form of human ADAM 12, is a catalytically active protease. We now describe the purification of full-length recombinant ADAM 12-S and demonstrate...

  11. CleavPredict: A Platform for Reasoning about Matrix Metalloproteinases Proteolytic Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Kumar

    Full Text Available CleavPredict (http://cleavpredict.sanfordburnham.org is a Web server for substrate cleavage prediction for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. It is intended as a computational platform aiding the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict offers in silico prediction of cleavage sites specific for 11 human MMPs. The prediction method employs the MMP specific position weight matrices (PWMs derived from statistical analysis of high-throughput phage display experimental results. To augment the substrate cleavage prediction process, CleavPredict provides information about the structural features of potential cleavage sites that influence proteolysis. These include: secondary structure, disordered regions, transmembrane domains, and solvent accessibility. The server also provides information about subcellular location, co-localization, and co-expression of proteinase and potential substrates, along with experimentally determined positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, and posttranslational modification (PTM sites in substrates. All this information will provide the user with perspectives in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict is freely accessible, and there is no login required.

  12. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen.

  13. Aspartic protease activities of schistosomes cleave mammalian hemoglobins in a host-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficiency of digestion of hemoglobin from four mammalian species, human, cow, sheep, and horse by acidic extracts of mixed sex adults of Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni. Activity ascribable to aspartic protease(s from S. japonicum and S. mansoni cleaved human hemoglobin. In addition, aspartic protease activities from S. japonicum cleaved hemoglobin from bovine, sheep, and horse blood more efficiently than did the activity from extracts of S. mansoni. These findings support the hypothesis that substrate specificity of hemoglobin-degrading proteases employed by blood feeding helminth parasites influences parasite host species range; differences in amino acid sequences in key sites of the parasite proteases interact less or more efficiently with the hemoglobins of permissive or non-permissive hosts.

  14. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A new crystallization strategy: the presence of cleaved thioredoxin fusion is critical for crystallization of the estrogen nuclear receptor ligand binding domain in complex with synthetic ligands. This novel technique should be regarded as an interesting alternative for crystallization of difficult proteins. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins

  15. Graphene Visualizes the Ion Distribution on Air-Cleaved mica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Sotthewes, Kai; Siekman, Martin Herman; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of potassium (K+) ions on air-cleaved mica is important in many interfacial phenomena such as crystal growth, self-assembly and charge transfer on mica. However, due to experimental limitations to nondestructively probe single ions and ionic domains, their exact lateral organization

  16. UV laser cleaving of air-polymer structured fibre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canning, J.; Buckley, E.; Groothoff, N.; Luther-Davies, B.; Zagari, J.

    2002-01-01

    The demonstration of ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation technique for cleaving of air-polymer structure (APF) fiber was presented. ArF exciplex laser with an unstable resonator cavity with pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuations was used for the study. The thermal diffusion time across a 200 µm diameter

  17. Stable 293 T and CHO cell lines expressing cleaved, stable HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers for structural and vaccine studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Matthews, Katie; Kim, Helen J.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Golabek, Michael; de Los Reyes, Kevin; Korzun, Jacob; Yasmeen, Anila; Sanders, Rogier W.; Klasse, Per Johan; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Marozsan, Andre J.; Moore, John P.; Cupo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant soluble, cleaved HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A BG505 sequence are being studied structurally and tested as immunogens in animals. For these trimers to become a vaccine candidate for human trials, they would need to be made in appropriate

  18. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  19. Simple Room Temperature Method for Polymer Optical Fibre Cleaving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez-Rodriguez, David; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a new method to cleave polymer optical fibre. The most common way to cut a polymer optical fibre is chopping it with a razor blade; however, in this approach both the fibre and the blade must be preheated in order to turn the material ductile, and thus, prevent crazing...... of similar quality to those produced by more complex and expensive heated systems....

  20. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  1. Cleavings: Critical Losses in the Politics of Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Davidson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many of Emily Dickinson's best known poems deal with the loss of sight, based on her own experiences with temporary blindness in the mid 1860s, but they are less about the absence of sight than about how she experiences the limits of consciousness: "I could not see to see." She probed the loss of sensation for what it could teach her about what is most familiar—and thus invisible. Using poems by Emily Dickinson and recent work in cultural and queer theory, this essay explores the fine line between "gain" and "loss" in disability studies. Using the author's experience of sudden hearing loss, "Cleavings" argues that recent claims for "deaf gain" have vaunted possibilities of cultural inclusiveness to the exclusion of affective realms of frustration, loss, and failure that are seldom acknowledged experiences of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons. While endorsing the general thrust of deaf gain and its implications for the larger context of disability, "Cleavings" argues for a more critical understanding of loss in the politics of gain.

  2. Investigation of the Potential Health Benefits as Lipase Inhibitor and Antioxidant of Leopoldia comosa (L.) Parl.: Variability of Chemical Composition of Wild and Cultivated Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, Mariangela; La Grotteria, Stefania; Araniti, Fabrizio; Conforti, Filomena

    2017-09-01

    There is a great interest in the nutritional value of vegetables and fruits and how the habitat affects nutritive and biological properties. In vitro studies here reported were performed to evaluate the inhibitory activity of formulations from edible plant on pancreatic lipase. The aim of this study was also to evaluate the biovariability of L. comosa (L.) Parl. bulbs from Italy. The wild bulbs were compared with the same cultivated species that are commonly commercialized to identify samples with the best quality for a potential therapeutic application. Hydroalcoholic extract and polar fraction of wild bulbs showed a very important pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity, with IC 50 values of 0.166 ± 0.005 and 0.153 ± 0.005 mg/mL, respectively. In order to characterize the extracts, gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis was performed, revealing the predominance of palmitic acid. Phenolic and flavonoid composition was also evaluated. L. comosa extract obtained from wild bulbs demonstrated both antioxidant and anti-obesity activities that might be attributed to a wide range of present phenolic compounds.

  3. Joan Maragall com a lector i traductor dels fragments "Abans que surti el sol" i "De l'immaculat coneixement" d'Així parlà Zaratustra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Grünewald

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El plantejament de l’autocreació permanent del subjecte, la il∙lusió de l’esperit lliure i el desig de viure la totalitat de l’ésser no determinen només el nucli temàtic dels dos fragments d’Així parlà Zaratustra que Joan Maragall va traduir i publicar a finals de febrer de 1898, sinó que també palesen la configuració nietzscheana d’un lector total que s’oposa a l’hàbit del «coneixement pur» i que prioritza el valor epistèmic de la vivència. La traducció que Maragall va realitzar dels fragments «Abans que surti el sol» i «De l’immaculat coneixement» és un aprofundiment poètic del text de Nietzsche que revela una simpatia cap a l’estètica de l’escenari cosmològic. A més a més, com a intel∙lectual, Maragall reafirma en aquesta tria temàtica el seu rebuig de la raó abstracta i suggereix la imprecisió d’un etern esdevenir de l’home a través de les seves experiències.

  4. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hawley, Marilyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stockum, Phil B [STANFORD UNIV.; Manoharan, Hari C [STANFORD UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  5. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-01-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress–displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. (paper)

  6. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-05

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements.

  7. Laser fiber cleaving techniques: effects on tip morphology and power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassantachart, Janna M; Lightfoot, Michelle; Yeo, Alexander; Maldonado, Jonathan; Li, Roger; Alsyouf, Muhannad; Martin, Jacob; Lee, Michael; Olgin, Gaudencio; Baldwin, D Duane

    2015-01-01

    Proper cleaving of reusable laser fibers is needed to maintain optimal functionality. This study quantifies the effect of different cleaving tools on power output of the holmium laser fiber and demonstrates morphologic changes using microscopy. The uncleaved tips of new 272 μm reusable laser fibers were used to obtain baseline power transmission values at 3 W (0.6 J, 5 Hz). Power output for each of four cleaving techniques-11-blade scalpel, scribe pen cleaving tool, diamond cleaving wheel, and suture scissors-was measured in a single-blinded fashion. Dispersion of light from the fibers was compared with manufacturer specifications and rated as "ideal," "acceptable," or "unacceptable" by blinded reviewers. The fiber tips were also imaged using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Independent samples Kruskal-Wallis test and chi square were used for statistical analysis (αtrend that was highly significant (Ptrend as the power output results (P<0.001). Microscopy showed that the scribe pen produced small defects along the fiber cladding but maintained a smooth, flat core surface. The other cleaving techniques produced defects on both the core and cladding. Cleaving techniques produce a significant effect on the initial power transmitted by reusable laser fibers. The scribe pen cleaving tool produced the most consistent and highest average power output.

  8. Paul Perny y el aprendizaje de la lengua china: estudio del Dictionnaire français-latin-chinois de la langue mandarine parlée como parte de una obra didáctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Lee-Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper defends the idea that the Dictionnaire français-latin-chinois de la langue mandarine parlée (1869, written by French clergyman Paul Perny, represents a groundbreaking work within the French to Chinese multilingual lexicography based on its strong communicative stance. It outlines the relationship between Perny’s work and the sinological tradition initiated by the Jesuits in China, and further analyzes the dictionary’s organizational structure, in-cluding the nature of its lexical inventory. It is noteworthy that this dictionary features a large number of terms belonging to the Catholic religion, even though it is possible to identify a significant and systematic pres-ence of vocabulary specific to pagan Chi-nese tradition. The Dictionnaire français-latin-chinois de la langue mandarine parlée also stands out for including the vocabulary of modern Chinese along with numerous expressions and terms related to Chinese culture which enable a closer understanding of the Chinese cultural universe

  9. Cleaved beta 2-microglobulin partially attains a conformation that has amyloidogenic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Roepstorff, Peter; Melberg, Steen G

    2002-01-01

    )) that as a trimmed form (Lys(58) is removed) can be demonstrated in the circulation in patients with chronic disease. An unexpected electrophoretic heterogeneity of these two cleaved variants was demonstrated by capillary electrophoresis under physiological conditions. Each separated into a fast and a slow component...... with analysis of the differences in circular dichroism, the results suggest that beta(2)-microglobulin cleaved after Lys(58) readily adopts two equilibrium conformations under native conditions. In the cleaved and trimmed beta(2)-microglobulin that appears in vivo, the less populated conformation...

  10. Cleaving of TOPAS and PMMA microstructured polymer optical fibers: Core-shift and statistical quality optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated an electronically controlled polymer optical fiber cleaver, which uses a razor-blade guillotine and provides independent control of fiber temperature, blade temperature, and cleaving speed. To determine the optimum cleaving conditions of microstructured polymer optical fibers (m......POFs) with hexagonal hole structures we developed a program for cleaving quality optimization, which reads in a microscope image of the fiber end-facet and determines the core-shift and the statistics of the hole diameter, hole-to-hole pitch, hole ellipticity, and direction of major ellipse axis. For 125μm in diameter...

  11. Cleaved caspase-3 in lung epithelium of children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; van der Loos, Chris M.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Bos, Albert P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining in lung epithelial cells in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Observational study in sixteen children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar damage. SETTING: Pediatric

  12. Improved fabrication of HgI2 nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI 2 bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI 2 . A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI 2 weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI 2 nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful

  13. Caspase-cleaved tau exhibits rapid memory impairment associated with tau oligomers in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungDoo; Choi, Hyunwoo; Lee, WonJae; Park, Hyejin; Kam, Tae-In; Hong, Se-Hoon; Nah, Jihoon; Jung, Sunmin; Shin, Bora; Lee, Huikyong; Choi, Tae-Yong; Choo, Hyosun; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Choi, Se-Young; Kayed, Rakez; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases like AD, tau forms neurofibrillary tangles, composed of tau protein. In the AD brain, activated caspases cleave tau at the 421th Asp, generating a caspase-cleaved form of tau, TauC3. Although TauC3 is known to assemble rapidly into filaments in vitro, a role of TauC3 in vivo remains unclear. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse expressing human TauC3 using a neuron-specific promoter. In this mouse, we found that human TauC3 was expressed in the hippocampus and cortex. Interestingly, TauC3 mice showed drastic learning and spatial memory deficits and reduced synaptic density at a young age (2-3months). Notably, tau oligomers as well as tau aggregates were found in TauC3 mice showing memory deficits. Further, i.p. or i.c.v. injection with methylene blue or Congo red, inhibitors of tau aggregation in vitro, and i.p. injection with rapamycin significantly reduced the amounts of tau oligomers in the hippocampus, rescued spine density, and attenuated memory impairment in TauC3 mice. Together, these results suggest that TauC3 facilitates early memory impairment in transgenic mice accompanied with tau oligomer formation, providing insight into the role of TauC3 in the AD pathogenesis associated with tau oligomers and a useful AD model to test drug candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group

  16. Evaluation of full-length, cleaved and nitrosylated serum surfactant protein D as biomarkers for COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvoix, Annelyse; Miranda, Elena; Perez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    . Serum levels of SP-D are raised in individuals with COPD but there is no correlation between the serum level of SP-D and the severity of airflow obstruction. Serum SP-D is present in different forms that may have more utility as a biomarker for COPD. We report here the development of new monoclonal...... antibodies to full length and cleaved SP-D. We have assessed these and existing antibodies in 98 individuals with COPD recruited to the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) cohort. Our data show that neither monoclonal antibodies to full length nor cleaved SP...

  17. Intact and cleaved uPAR forms: diagnostic and prognostic value in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, M.G.; Lund, I.K.; Hoyer-Hansen, G.

    2008-01-01

    identified in tissue and body fluids. It is well-established, that the total amount of all uPAR forms is a strong prognostic marker in different types of cancer. Using immunoassays, measuring the individual uPAR forms, has revealed that the cleaved uPAR forms are even stronger prognostic markers and have...... diagnostic utility. This review will focus on the mechanism of uPAR cleavage and the functional consequences, as well as the clinical applicability of cleaved uPAR forms Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  18. An efficiently cleaved HIV-1 clade C Env selectively binds to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Boliar

    Full Text Available An ideal HIV-1 Env immunogen is expected to mimic the native trimeric conformation for inducing broadly neutralizing antibody responses. The native conformation is dependent on efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env. The clade B isolate, JRFL Env is efficiently cleaved when expressed on the cell surface. Here, for the first time, we report the identification of a native clade C Env, 4-2.J41 that is naturally and efficiently cleaved on the cell surface as confirmed by its biochemical and antigenic characteristics. In addition to binding to several conformation-dependent neutralizing antibodies, 4-2.J41 Env binds efficiently to the cleavage-dependent antibody PGT151; thus validating its native cleaved conformation. In contrast, 4-2.J41 Env occludes non-neutralizing epitopes. The cytoplasmic-tail of 4-2.J41 Env plays an important role in maintaining its conformation. Furthermore, codon optimization of 4-2.J41 Env sequence significantly increases its expression while retaining its native conformation. Since clade C of HIV-1 is the prevalent subtype, identification and characterization of this efficiently cleaved Env would provide a platform for rational immunogen design.

  19. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

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    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  20. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared...... the levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference...... in the levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  1. Cleaved-edge overgrowth of aligned quantum dots on strained layers of InGaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, D.; Lyon, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Strain aligned InAs quantum dots were grown on the cleaved edges of first growth samples containing strained In x Ga (1-x) As layers of varying thickness and indium fraction. The formation of the cleaved-edge quantum dots was observed by means of atomic force microscopy. 100% linear alignment of InAs quantum dots over the InGaAs strain layers of the first growth sample is demonstrated. Linear density of the aligned dots was found to depend on the properties of the underlying InGaAs strain layers. Vertical alignment of an additional InAs quantum dot layer over the buried, linearly aligned, initial dot layer was observed for thin GaAs spacer layers

  2. Specific immunoassays for detection of intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piironen, Timo; Laursen, Birgitte; Pass, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell surface receptor (uPAR) for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a strong prognostic marker in several types of cancer. uPA cleaves the three-domain protein uPAR(I-III) into two fragments: uPAR(I), which contains domain I; and uPAR(II-III), which contains domains II and III...... of the diagnostic and prognostic value of individual uPAR forms in cancer patients....

  3. Enzymes that cleave non-glycosidic ether bonds between lignins or derivatives thereof and saccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravit, Nancy G.; Schmidt, Katherine A.

    2017-10-24

    The patent application relates to isolated polypeptides that specifically cleave non-glycosidic ether bonds between lignins or derivatives thereof and saccharides, and to cDNAs encoding the polypeptides. The patent application also relates to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors and host cells comprising the cDNAs, as well as methods of producing and using the isolated polypeptides for treating pulp and biomass to increase soluble saccharide yield and enrich lignin fractions.

  4. UV laser-induced high resolution cleaving of Si wafers for micro-nano devices and polymeric waveguide characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casquel, R.; Holgado, M.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Zinoviev, K.; Fernandez-Sanchez, C.; Sanza, F.J.; Molpeceres, C.; Laguna, M.F.; Llobera, A.; Ocana, J.L.; Dominguez, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we propose a method for cleaving silicon-based photonic chips by using a laser based micromachining system, consisting of a ND:YVO 4 laser emitting at 355 nm in nanosecond pulse regime and a micropositioning system. The laser makes grooved marks placed at the desired locations and directions where cleaves have to be initiated, and after several processing steps, a crack appears and propagate along the crystallographic planes of the silicon wafer. This allows cleavage of the chips automatically and with high positioning accuracy, and provides polished vertical facets with better quality than the obtained with other cleaving process, which eases the optical characterization of photonic devices. This method has been found to be particularly useful when cleaving small-sized chips, where manual cleaving is hard to perform; and also for polymeric waveguides, whose facets get damaged or even destroyed with polishing or manual cleaving processing. Influence of length of the grooved line and speed of processing is studied for a variety of silicon chips. An application for cleaving and characterizing sol-gel waveguides is presented. The total amount of light coupled is higher than when using any other procedure.

  5. UV laser-induced high resolution cleaving of Si wafers for micro-nano devices and polymeric waveguide characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casquel, R., E-mail: rafael.casquel@upm.es [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Holgado, M.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Zinoviev, K.; Fernandez-Sanchez, C. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanza, F.J.; Molpeceres, C.; Laguna, M.F. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Llobera, A. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Dominguez, C. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose a method for cleaving silicon-based photonic chips by using a laser based micromachining system, consisting of a ND:YVO{sub 4} laser emitting at 355 nm in nanosecond pulse regime and a micropositioning system. The laser makes grooved marks placed at the desired locations and directions where cleaves have to be initiated, and after several processing steps, a crack appears and propagate along the crystallographic planes of the silicon wafer. This allows cleavage of the chips automatically and with high positioning accuracy, and provides polished vertical facets with better quality than the obtained with other cleaving process, which eases the optical characterization of photonic devices. This method has been found to be particularly useful when cleaving small-sized chips, where manual cleaving is hard to perform; and also for polymeric waveguides, whose facets get damaged or even destroyed with polishing or manual cleaving processing. Influence of length of the grooved line and speed of processing is studied for a variety of silicon chips. An application for cleaving and characterizing sol-gel waveguides is presented. The total amount of light coupled is higher than when using any other procedure.

  6. Evaluation of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and Cleaved Caspase-3 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Neurofibromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARIN S. CUNHA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To study the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, as well the presence of cleaved caspase-3 in neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x and the presence of cleaved caspase 3 were compared to clinicopathological features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and their impact on survival rates were also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The evaluation of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and cleaved caspase-3 was performed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in 28 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and 38 neurofibromas. Immunoquantification was performed by computerized digital image analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis is altered in neurofibromas and mainly in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. High levels of cleaved caspase-3 are more common in tumors with more aggressive histological features and it is associated with lower disease free survival of patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

  7. MMP-15 is upregulated in preeclampsia, but does not cleave endoglin to produce soluble endoglin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu'uhevaha J Kaitu'u-Lino

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major pregnancy complication, characterized by severe endothelial dysfunction, hypertension and maternal end-organ damage. Soluble endoglin is an anti-angiogenic protein released from placenta and thought to play a central role in causing the endothelial dysfunction and maternal organ injury seen in severe preeclampsia. We recently reported MMP-14 was the protease producing placentally-derived soluble endoglin by cleaving full-length endoglin present on the syncytiotrophoblast surface. This find identifies a specific drug target for severe preeclampsia; interfering with MMP-14 mediated cleavage of endoglin could decrease soluble endoglin production, ameliorating clinical disease. However, experimental MMP-14 inhibition alone only partially repressed soluble endoglin production, implying other proteases might have a role in producing soluble endoglin. Here we investigated whether MMP-15--phylogenetically the closest MMP relative to MMP-14 with 66% sequence similarity--also cleaves endoglin to produce soluble endoglin. MMP-15 was localized to the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta, the same site where endoglin was localized. Interestingly, it was significantly (p = 0.03 up-regulated in placentas from severe early-onset preeclamptic pregnancies (n = 8 compared to gestationally matched preterm controls (n = 8. However, siRNA knockdown of MMP-15 yielded no significant decrease of soluble endoglin production from either HUVECs or syncytialised BeWo cells in vitro. Importantly, concurrent siRNA knockdown of both MMP-14 and MMP-15 in HUVECS did not yield further decrease in soluble endoglin production compared to MMP-14 siRNA alone. We conclude MMP-15 is up-regulated in preeclampsia, but does not cleave endoglin to produce soluble endoglin.

  8. The Significance of Caspase-Cleaved Cytokeratin 18 in Pleural Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keu Sung; Chung, Joo Yang; Jung, Yun Jung; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Joo Hun; Sheen, Seung Soo; Lee, Kyi Beom

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis plays a role in the development of pleural effusion. Caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18, a marker for epithelial cell apoptosis, was evaluated in pleural effusion. Methods A total of 79 patients with pleural effusion were enrolled. The underlying causes were lung cancer (n=24), parapneumonic effusion (n=15), tuberculous effusion (n=28), and transudates (n=12). The levels of M30, an epitope of caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18, were measured in blood and pleural fluids using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay along with routine cellular and biochemical parameters. The expression of M30 was evaluated in the pleural tissues using immunohistochemistry for M30. Results The M30 levels in pleural fluid were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis (2,632.1±1,467.3 U/mL) than in patients with lung cancer (956.5±618.5 U/mL), parapneumonic effusion (689.9±413.6 U/mL), and transudates (273.6±144.5 U/mL; all peffusion from all other effusions was 0.93. In the immunohistochemical analysis of M30, all pathologic types of cancer cells showed moderate to high expression, and the epithelioid cells in granulomas showed high expression in tuberculous pleural tissues. Conclusion Caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 was most prominently observed in tuberculous pleural effusion and showed utility as a clinical marker. The main source of M30 was found to be the epithelioid cells of granulomas in tuberculous pleural tissues. PMID:24523813

  9. First principles calculations for the cleaved and annealed Ge(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Tosatti, E.; Selloni, A.

    1992-11-01

    We use ab initio Molecular Dynamics to study the structural and electronic properties of cleaved and annealed Ge(111) surfaces. New features emerge for both structures. For the (2x1) it is found that even though the stable state has a π-bonded chain structure, there are two isomers with the tilt angle of the chain in opposite directions. For the c(2x8) we find an asymmetry in the surface unit cell, in agreement with LEED experiments that show weak quarter-order spots. This inequivalence also produces a splitting of the rest atom and adatom dangling bond, which explains recent STM experiments. (author). 15 refs, 3 figs

  10. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  11. Toxin MqsR Cleaves Single-Stranded mRNA with Various 5 Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    either protein ORIGINAL RESEARCH Toxin MqsR cleaves single- stranded mRNA with various 5’ ends Nityananda Chowdhury1,*, Brian W. Kwan1,*, Louise C...in which a single 5′- GCU site was predicted to be single- stranded (ssRNA), double- stranded (dsRNA), in the loop of a stem - loop (slRNA), or in a...single- stranded 5′- GCU sites since cleavage was approximately 20- fold higher than cleavage seen with the 5′- GCU site in the stem - loop and

  12. Enzyme decorated drug carriers: Targeted swords to cleave and overcome the mucus barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Claudia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2018-01-15

    The use of mucus permeating drug carrier systems being able to overcome the mucus barrier can lead to a remarkable enhancement in bioavailability. One promising approach is the design of mucolytic enzyme decorated carrier systems (MECS). These systems include micro- and nanoparticles as well as self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) decorated with mucin cleaving enzymes such as papain (PAP) or bromelain (BRO). MECS are able to cross the mucus barrier in a comparatively efficient manner by cleaving mucus substructures in front of them on their way to the epithelium. Thereby these enzymes hydrolyze peptide bonds of mucus glycoproteins forming tiny holes or passages through the mucus. In various in vitro and in vivo studies MECS proved to be superior in their mucus permeating properties over nanocarriers without enzyme decoration. PAP decorated nanoparticles, for instance, remained 3h after oral administration to an even 2.5-fold higher extend in rat small intestine than the corresponding undecorated nanoparticles permeating the intestinal mucus gel layer to a much lower degree. As MECS break up the mucus network only locally without destroying its overall protective barrier function, even long term treatments with such systems seem feasible. Within this review article we address different drug carrier systems decorated with various types of enzymes, their particular pros and cons and potential applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-throughput purification of recombinant proteins using self-cleaving intein tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbaugh, M J; Shakalli Tang, M J; Wood, D W

    2017-01-01

    High throughput methods for recombinant protein production using E. coli typically involve the use of affinity tags for simple purification of the protein of interest. One drawback of these techniques is the occasional need for tag removal before study, which can be hard to predict. In this work, we demonstrate two high throughput purification methods for untagged protein targets based on simple and cost-effective self-cleaving intein tags. Two model proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase (βGal) and superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP), were purified using self-cleaving versions of the conventional chitin-binding domain (CBD) affinity tag and the nonchromatographic elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) precipitation tag in a 96-well filter plate format. Initial tests with shake flask cultures confirmed that the intein purification scheme could be scaled down, with >90% pure product generated in a single step using both methods. The scheme was then validated in a high throughput expression platform using 24-well plate cultures followed by purification in 96-well plates. For both tags and with both target proteins, the purified product was consistently obtained in a single-step, with low well-to-well and plate-to-plate variability. This simple method thus allows the reproducible production of highly pure untagged recombinant proteins in a convenient microtiter plate format. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-07-22

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo.

  15. Plasma thrombin-cleaved osteopontin elevation after carotid artery stenting in symptomatic ischemic stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Mie; Okura, Takafumi; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Tagawa, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Higaki, Jitsuo; Nose, Masato; Nakahara, Toshinori

    2012-01-01

    Atherothrombosis is the primary pathophysiology that underlies ischemic cerebral infarction. Osteopontin (OPN) is produced in atherosclerotic lesions and is cleaved by activated thrombin. We hypothesized that the rupture or damage of an unstable atherosclerotic plaque increases plasma levels of thrombin-cleaved OPN (trOPN). This study included 90 patients who received carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS), 23 patients with essential hypertension (EHT) and 10 patients who were treated with carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The CAS patient group included 36 patients that had pre- and post-operative blood tests, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using cerebral MRIs and estimated thrombus debris within the protection device. Immunohistochemistry of CEA specimens revealed that trOPN was detected around intra-plaque vessels. The highest tertile of plasma trOPN levels in CAS patients was higher than trOPN levels in EHT patients. Post-operative trOPN levels were significantly higher in symptomatic compared with asymptomatic patients (P=0.003). New ipsilateral DWI-positive patients revealed higher post-operative trOPN levels (P=0.003) and a higher grade of thrombi (P<0.001) than DWI-negative patients. TrOPN may be a novel biomarker that reflects the atherothrombotic status in ischemic stroke. (author)

  16. Locked nucleoside analogues expand the potential of DNAzymes to cleave structured RNA targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengel Jesper

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNAzymes cleave at predetermined sequences within RNA. A prerequisite for cleavage is that the DNAzyme can gain access to its target, and thus the DNAzyme must be capable of unfolding higher-order structures that are present in the RNA substrate. However, in many cases the RNA target sequence is hidden in a region that is too tightly structured to be accessed under physiological conditions by DNAzymes. Results We investigated how incorporation of LNA (locked nucleic acid monomers into DNAzymes improves their ability to gain access and cleave at highly-structured RNA targets. The binding arms of DNAzymes were varied in length and were substituted with up to three LNA and α-L-LNA monomers (forming LNAzymes. For one DNAzyme, the overall cleavage reaction proceeded fifty times faster after incorporation of two α-L-LNA monomers per binding arm (kobs increased from 0.014 min-1 to 0.78 min-1. Conclusion The data demonstrate how hydrolytic performance can be enhanced by design of LNAzymes, and indicate that there are optimal lengths for the binding arms and for the number of modified LNA monomers.

  17. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urša Pečar Fonović

    Full Text Available Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1-clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1.

  18. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1—clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1. PMID:26325675

  19. The role of gallium-67 tumour scintigraphy in patients with small, non-cleaved cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrock, D.; Lastoria, S.; Neumann, R.D.; Magrath, I.T.

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-four scintigraphic studies were performed in 34 patients (27 men, 7 women, age 17.3±7.7 years) with small, non-cleaved cell lymphoma who had follow-up for 3-96 months (mean 21.6±21.7 months). Whole-body scintigraphy was performed 48-72 h following i.v. injection of 370 MBq gallium-67 citrate. 'Gold standards' for truth determinations were surgery, autopsy, histology, axial X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and clinical follow-up. Overall, 181 of 234 studies were true negative. Eighty proven sites of disease had true positive 67 Ga uptake (in 21 patients/37 studies). Nineteen sites (in 12 patients/15 studies) were false positive. In addition, 31 benign lesions were detected and interpreted correctly in terms of non-malignancy. Ten lymphoma sites (in 6 patients/10 studies) were missed by scintigraphy. Overall, sensitivity of gallium scintigraphy was 89% when calculated by sites and 79% when calculated by studies. Corresponding specificities were 91% and 92%, respectively. Positive predictive values were 81% (sites) and 71% (studies), and negative predictive values 95% (sites and studies). Thus, gallium scintigraphy proved to be a sensitive and specific method for staging and follow-up in patients with small, non-cleaved cell lymphoma. (orig.)

  20. Expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 in tumorigenesis and prognosis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Feng Liu

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays a dual role in cancer development and malignancy. The role of apoptosis-related caspases in cancer remains controversial, particularly in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC. In this study, we examined the protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 on tissue microarrays consisting of samples from 246 OTSCC patients by immunohistochemistry. Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated that the protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 in tumor tissues were significantly higher compared to those in adjacent normal tissues (all p<0.001. The expression level of caspase-8 in tumors was elevated in patients with lymph node invasion. Moreover, positive expression of cleaved caspase-3 was associated with shorter disease-free survival (DFS in OTSCC patients with moderate differentiation and lymph node invasion. Combination of either positive cleaved caspase-3 or higher caspase-3 expression or both was associated with poor DFS. Interestingly, stratification analysis showed that co-expression levels of positive cleaved caspase-3 or/and higher caspase-3 were associated with better disease-specific survival in patients with advanced stages of the disease, such as large tumor size and lymph node invasion, whereas it was associated with poor DFS in OTSCC patients with moderate cell differentiation and small tumor size. Taken together, cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3/8/9 could be biomarkers for tumorigenesis in OTSCC patients. The co-expression level of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 might be a prognostic biomarker for OTSCC patients, particular in those patients with certain tumor stages and cell differentiation status.

  1. Enterovirus 71 contains a type I IRES element that functions when eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4G is cleaved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Sunnie R.; Sarnow, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a member of the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. Other members of this family utilize an unusual mechanism of translation initiation whereby ribosomes are recruited internally to the viral RNA by an internal ribosome site (IRES) located in their 5' noncoding regions (5' NCR). Using dicistronic reporter constructs, we demonstrate that the 5' NCRs of the 7423/MS/87 and BrCr strains of EV71 function as an IRES both in extracts and in cultured cells. Preincubation of translation extracts with purified coxsackievirus 2A protease cleaved elF4G, a component of the cap binding complex, resulting in a significant decrease in translation of capped mRNAs. In contrast, the translational efficiency of the EV71 IRES was enhanced under this condition, demonstrating that the EV71 IRES functions similar to other enterovirus IRES elements when components of the cap binding protein complex are cleaved. Finally, insertion of an upstream, out-of-frame start codon in the 5' NCR of the EV71 genome inhibited IRES activity, suggesting that EV71 can be classified as a type I IRES, in which ribosomes first bind upstream of the initiation codon and then scan the mRNA until an appropriate downstream AUG start codon is encountered and protein synthesis commences

  2. GPR107, a G-protein-coupled receptor essential for intoxication by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, localizes to the Golgi and is cleaved by furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafesse, Fikadu G; Guimaraes, Carla P; Maruyama, Takeshi; Carette, Jan E; Lory, Stephen; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-08-29

    A number of toxins, including exotoxin A (PE) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. PE kills by ADP-ribosylation of the translation elongation factor 2, but many of the host factors required for entry, membrane translocation, and intracellular transport remain to be elucidated. A genome-wide genetic screen in human KBM7 cells was performed to uncover host factors used by PE, several of which were confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing in a different cell type. Several proteins not previously implicated in the PE intoxication pathway were identified, including GPR107, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor. GPR107 localizes to the trans-Golgi network and is essential for retrograde transport. It is cleaved by the endoprotease furin, and a disulfide bond connects the two cleaved fragments. Compromising this association affects the function of GPR107. The N-terminal region of GPR107 is critical for its biological function. GPR107 might be one of the long-sought receptors that associates with G-proteins to regulate intracellular vesicular transport. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. ADAM13 Induces Cranial Neural Crest by Cleaving Class B Ephrins and Regulating Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The cranial neural crest (CNC) are multipotent embryonic cells that contribute to craniofacial structures and other cells and tissues of the vertebrate head. During embryogenesis, CNC is induced at the neural plate boundary through the interplay of several major signaling pathways. Here we report that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 is required for early induction of CNC in Xenopus. In both cultured cells and X. tropicalis embryos, membrane-bound Ephrins (Efns) B1 and B2 were identified as substrates for ADAM13. ADAM13 upregulates canonical Wnt signaling and early expression of the transcription factor snail2, whereas EfnB1 inhibits the canonical Wnt pathway and snail2 expression. We propose that by cleaving class B Efns, ADAM13 promotes canonical Wnt signaling and early CNC induction. PMID:20708595

  4. Granzyme A Cleaves a Mitochondrial Complex I Protein to Initiate Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinvalet, Denis; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Ferrini, Roger; Lieberman, Judy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The killer lymphocyte protease granzyme A (GzmA) triggers caspase-independent target cell death with morphological features of apoptosis. We previously showed that GzmA acts directly on mitochondria to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disrupt the transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) but does not permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. Mitochondrial damage is critical to GzmA-induced cell death since cells treated with superoxide scavengers are resistant to GzmA. Here we find that GzmA accesses the mitochondrial matrix to cleave the complex I protein NDUFS3, an iron-sulfur subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex I, after Lys56 to interfere with NADH oxidation and generate superoxide anions. Target cells expressing a cleavage site mutant of NDUFS3 are resistant to GzmA-mediated cell death but remain sensitive to GzmB. PMID:18485875

  5. An alternative picture of alkali-metal-mediated metallation: cleave and capture chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Robert E

    2013-05-21

    This perspective article takes an alternative look at alkali-metal-mediated chemistry (exchange of a relatively inert C-H bond for a more reactive C-metal bond by a multicomponent reagent usually containing an alkali metal and a less electropositive metal such as magnesium or zinc). It pictures that the cleavage of selected C-H bonds can be accompanied by the capturing of the generated anion by the multi (Lewis acid)-(Lewis base) character of the residue of the bimetallic base. In this way small atoms or molecules (hydrides, oxygen-based anions) as well as sensitive organic anions (of substituted aromatic compounds, ethers or alkenes) can be captured. Cleave and capture reactions which occur in special positions on the organic substrate are also included.

  6. Delayed K562 cell apoptosis promoted by cleaved LyGDI after 60Co γ-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Huali; Duan Weiming; Shao Yanyan; Xiao Hainan; Zhou Xinwen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the function and regulatory mechanism of LyGDI involved delayed cell death in the human K562 cells and HL-60 cells induced by 60 Co γ-rays. Methods: Erythrosine B cells staining was used to count the apoptosis rate. PI staining and flow cytometry were applied to check the cell cycle. The expression of LYGDI and Rac1 was resolved by Western blot by using monoclonal antibody of LyGDI and Rac1. The distribution of Rac1 protein in cells was observed with immunofluorescence by using the confocal microscope. Results: The K562 cells showed G 2 /M phase arrest and the percent age was 71.3%. The apoptosis rate was very low at early post-irradiation stage in the K562 cells. The apoptosis rate was 14% in the K562 cells at 24 h post-irradiation with 8 Gy of γ-rays, and delayed cell apoptosis was present. LyGDI was cleaved in the K562 cells irradiated by 4 Gy 60 Co γ-rays after 24 hours post-irradiation. The expression of Rac1 protein was not altered at all, but the distribution was changed in the irradiated cells while the Rac1 protein moved to cell membrane and a little in cell nucleus. The Rac1 was activated with the losing the binding affinity with the LyGDI. Conclusion: LyGDI could promote the delayed cell apoptosis, which is through the activation of the Rac1. (authors)

  7. Cleaving the Halqeh-ye-nur diamonds: a dynamic fracture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Colin; Martineau, Philip M; Khan, Rizwan U A; Field, John E; Fisher, David; Davies, Nick M; Samartseva, Julia V; Putterman, Seth J; Hird, Jonathan R

    2015-03-28

    The degree of surface roughness and clarity with which a surface in a brittle material can be formed via fracture is known to be related to the speed of the propagating crack. Cracks traversing a brittle material at low speed produce very smooth surfaces, while those propagating faster create less reflective and rough surfaces (Buehler MJ, Gao H. 2006 Nature 439, 307-310 (doi:10.1038/nature04408)). The elastic wave speeds (c(l)≈18 000 m s(-1), c(s)≈11 750 m s(-1)) in diamond are fast (Willmott GR, Field JE. 2006 Phil. Mag. 86, 4305-4318 (doi:10.1080/14786430500482336)) and present a particular problem in creating smooth surfaces during the cleaving of diamond-a routine operation in the fashioning of diamonds for gemstone purposes--as the waves are reflected from the boundaries of the material and can add a tensile component to the propagating crack tip causing the well-known cleavage steps observed on diamond surfaces (Field JE. 1971 Contemp. Phys. 12, 1-31 (doi:10.1080/00107517108205103); Field JE. 1979 Properties of diamond, 1st edn, Academic Press; Wilks EM. 1958 Phil. Mag. 3, 1074-1080 (doi:10.1080/14786435808237036)). Here we report an analysis of two diamonds, having large dimensions and high aspect ratio, which from a gemological analysis are shown to have been cleaved from the same 200 carat specimen. A methodology for their manufacture is calculated by an analysis of a model problem. This takes into account the effect of multiple reflections from the sample boundaries. It is suggested that the lapidary had an intuitive guide to how to apply the cleavage force in order to control the crack speed. In particular, it is shown that it is likely that this technique caused the fracture to propagate at a lower speed. The sacrifice of a large diamond with the intention of creating thin plates, rather than a faceted gemstone, demonstrates how symbolism and beliefs associated with gemstones have changed over the centuries (Harlow GE. 1998 The nature

  8. Design and kinetic analysis of hammerhead ribozyme and DNAzyme that specifically cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo-Hyung; Choi, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jae Hyun; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Oh, Sangtaek; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop the oligonucleotides to abolish an expression of TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA, which is a genetic aberration that causes the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), hammerhead ribozymes and deoxyoligoribozymes that can specifically cleave TEL-AML1 fusion RNA were designed. Constructs of the deoxyribozyme with an asymmetric substrate binding arm (Dz26) and the hammerhead ribozyme with a 4 nt-bulged substrate binding arm in the stem III (buRz28) were able to cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA specifically at sites close to the junction in vitro, without cleaving the normal TEL and AML1 RNA. Single-turnover kinetic analysis under enzyme-excess condition revealed that the buRz28 is superior to the Dz26 in terms of substrate binding and RNA-cleavage. In conjunction with current progress in a gene-delivery technology, the designed oligonucleotides that specifically cleave the TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA are hoped to be applicable for the treatment of ALL in vivo

  9. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  10. Disulphide linkage: To get cleaved or not? Bulk and nano copper based SERS of cystine

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J., Arathi; Seemesh, Bhaskar; Rajendra Kumar Reddy, G.; Suresh Kumar, P.; Ramanathan, V.

    2018-05-01

    Different nano-structures of noble metals have been the conventional substrates for carrying out Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). In this paper we examine electrodeposited copper (Cu) nano-structures on pencil graphite as novel substrate to carry out SERS measurements by considering L-cystine (Cys-Cys) (dimer of the amino acid cysteine) as the probe. The formation of monolayer of the probe molecule on the substrates was confirmed using cyclic voltammetric measurements. Mode of adsorption of Cys-Cys was observed to be different on bulk Cu (taken in the wire form) and nano-structured Cu on pencil graphite. Whereas in the former the disulphide bond of Cys-Cys remained intact, it got cleaved when Cys-Cys was adsorbed on electrodeposited copper indicating the activated nature of the nano-structure compared to bulk copper. Csbnd S stretching mode of vibration underwent blue shift in Cys-Cys adsorbed on Cu on pencil graphite vis-à-vis Cys-Cys adsorbed on Cu wire. Further evidence on the cleavage of the Csbnd S bond on an activated substrate was obtained by considering a bimetallic substrate comprising of silver on copper which was electrodeposited on pencil graphite. Our studies have demonstrated that nano-copper surface is an excellent substrate for SERS giving 200 μM as lower detection limit for Cys-Cys.

  11. Chemotherapy increases caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 in the serum of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulukaya, Engin; Karaagac, Esra; Ari, Ferda; Oral, Arzu Y.; Adim, Saduman B.; Tokullugil, Asuman H.; Evrensel, Türkkan

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is thought to be induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Therefore, the measurement of its amplitude may be a useful tool to predict the effectiveness of cancer treatment sooner than conventional methods do. In the study presented, apoptosis was assessed with an ELISA-based assay in which caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 (M30-antigen), a novel specific biomarker of apoptosis, is measured. Thirty seven patients with malignant (nonmetastatic and metastatic) breast cancer, 35 patients with benign breast disease, and 34 healthy subjects were studied. Cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of either fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) or epirubicin plus docetaxel (ED). Apoptosis was detected before chemotherapy, 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy in the malignant group. It was found that the baseline apoptosis level in either malignant but nonmetastatic group or benign group was not statistically different from that in the control group (p>0.05). However, it was statistically significantly higher in the metastatic group than that in the control group (p<0.05). Following the drug application, M30-antigen levels significantly increased at 24 h (p<0.05). The baseline M30-antigen levels increased about 3-times in patients showing tumor regression. M30-antigen level is increased after chemotherapy and its measurement may help clinicians to predict the effectiveness of chemotherapy sooner in breast cancer cases although confirmative larger trials are needed

  12. Protective Effects of Chlorella-Derived Peptide Against UVC-Induced Cytotoxicity through Inhibition of Caspase-3 Activity and Reduction of the Expression of Phosphorylated FADD and Cleaved PARP-1 in Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yuh Cherng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available UVC irradiation induces oxidative stress and leads to cell death through an apoptotic pathway. This apoptosis is caused by activation of caspase-3 and formation of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. In this study, the underlying mechanisms of Chlorella derived peptide (CDP activity against UVC-induced cytotoxicity were investigated. Human skin fibroblasts were treated with CDP, vitamin C, or vitamin E after UVC irradiation for a total energy of 15 J/cm2. After the UVC exposure, cell proliferation and caspase-3 activity were measured at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h later. Expression of phosphorylated FADD and cleaved PARP-1 were measured 16 h later. DNA damage (expressed as pyrimidine (6-4 pyrimidone photoproducts DNA concentration and fragmentation assay were performed 24 h after the UVC exposure. Results showed that UVC irradiation induced cytotoxicity in all groups except those treated with CDP. The caspase-3 activity in CDP-treated cells was inhibited from 12 h onward. Expression of phosphorylated FADD and cleaved PARP-1 were also reduced in CDP-treated cells. Moreover, UVC-induced DNA damage and fragmentation were also prevented by the CDP treatment. This study shows that treatment of CDP provides protective effects against UVC-induced cytotoxicity through the inhibition of caspase-3 activity and the reduction of phosphorylated FADD and cleaved PARP-1 expression.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle

  14. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Chishti, Athar H., E-mail: athar.chishti@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Programs in Physiology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  15. Poly(A-Specific Ribonuclease Mediates 3′-End Trimming of Argonaute2-Cleaved Precursor MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Yoda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are typically generated as ∼22-nucleotide double-stranded RNAs via the processing of precursor hairpins by the ribonuclease III enzyme Dicer, after which they are loaded into Argonaute (Ago proteins to form an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. However, the biogenesis of miR-451, an erythropoietic miRNA conserved in vertebrates, occurs independently of Dicer and instead requires cleavage of the 3′ arm of the pre-miR-451 precursor hairpin by Ago2. The 3′ end of the Ago2-cleaved pre-miR-451 intermediate is then trimmed to the mature length by an unknown nuclease. Here, using a classical chromatographic approach, we identified poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN as the enzyme responsible for the 3′–5′ exonucleolytic trimming of Ago2-cleaved pre-miR-451. Surprisingly, our data show that trimming of Ago2-cleaved precursor miRNAs is not essential for target silencing, indicating that RISC is functional with miRNAs longer than the mature length. Our findings define the maturation step in the miRNA biogenesis pathway that depends on Ago2-mediated cleavage.

  16. Lewis Acid Assisted Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Aryl Methyl Ethers by C−O Bond-Cleaving Alkylation: Prevention of Undesired β-Hydride Elimination

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian; Hsiao, Chien-Chi; Kalvet, Indrek; Leiendecker, Matthias; Guo, Lin; Schoenebeck, Franziska; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of trialkylaluminum reagents, diverse aryl methyl ethers can be transformed into valuable products by C-O bond-cleaving alkylation, for the first time without the limiting β-hydride elimination. This new nickel

  17. Enhanced discrimination of benign from malignant prostatic disease by selective measurements of cleaved forms of urokinase receptor in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piironen, Timo; Haese, Alexander; Huland, Hartwig

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) centers on measurements of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but current testing practices suffer from lack of specificity and generate many unnecessary prostate biopsies. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is present in blood...... in both intact and cleaved forms. Increased uPAR in blood is correlated with poor prognosis in various cancers, but uPAR has not been shown to be useful in PCa diagnostics. We assessed the ability of immunoassays for specific uPAR forms to discriminate PCa from benign conditions. METHODS: We measured...

  18. Effect of Cleaving Temperature on the Surface and Bulk Fermi Surface of Sr2RuO4 Investigated by High Resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shan-Yu; Zhang Wen-Tao; Weng Hong-Ming; Zhao Lin; Liu Hai-Yun; Jia Xiao-Wen; Liu Guo-Dong; Dong Xiao-Li; Zhang Jun; Dai Xi; Fang Zhong; Zhou Xing-Jiang; Mao Zhi-Qiang; Chen Chuang-Tian; Xu Zu-Yan

    2012-01-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements are carried out to systematically investigate the effect of cleaving temperature on the electronic structures and Fermi surfaces of Sr 2 RuO 4 . Unlike previous reports, which found that a high cleaving temperature can suppress the surface Fermi surface, we find that the surface Fermi surface remains obvious and strong in Sr 2 RuO 4 cleaved at high temperature, even at room temperature. This indicates that cleaving temperature is not a key effective factor in suppressing surface bands. On the other hand, the bulk bands can be enhanced in an aged surface of Sr 2 RuO 4 that has been cleaved and held for a long time. We have also carried out laser ARPES measurements on Sr 2 RuO 4 by using a vacuum ultra-violet laser (photon energy at 6.994 eV) and found an obvious enhancement of bulk bands even for samples cleaved at low temperature. This information is important for realizing an effective approach to manipulating and detecting the surface and bulk electronic structure of Sr 2 RuO 4 . In particular, the enhancement of bulk sensitivity, along with the super-high instrumental resolution of VUV laser ARPES, will be advantageous in investigating fine electronic structure and superconducting properties of Sr 2 RuO 4 in the future. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Immuno-detection of cleaved SNAP-25 from differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells provides a sensitive assay for determination of botulinum A toxin and antitoxin potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadirgi, G; Stickings, P; Rajagopal, S; Liu, Y; Sesardic, D

    2017-12-01

    Botulinum toxin type A is a causative agent of human botulism. Due to high toxicity and ease of production it is classified by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention as a category A bioterrorism agent. The same serotype, BoNT/A, is also the most widely used in pharmaceutical preparations for treatment of a diverse range of neuromuscular disorders. Traditionally, animals are used to confirm the presence and activity of toxin and to establish neutralizing capabilities of countermeasures in toxin neutralization tests. Cell based assays for BoNT/A have been reported as the most viable alternative to animal models, since they are capable of reflecting all key steps (binding, translocation, internalization and cleavage of intracellular substrate) involved in toxin activity. In this paper we report preliminary development of a simple immunochemical method for specifically detecting BoNT/A cleaved intracellular substrate, SNAP-25, in cell lysates of neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. The assay offers sensitivity of better than 0.1LD50/ml (3fM) which is not matched by other functional assays, including the mouse bioassay, and provides serotype specificity for quantitative detection of BoNT/A and anti-BoNT/A antitoxin. Subject to formal validation, the method described here could potentially be used as a substitute for the mouse bioassay to measure potency and consistency of therapeutic products. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21...

  1. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix me...

  2. Cleaved CD147 shed from the surface of malignant melanoma cells activates MMP2 produced by fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Miho; Higashi, Yuko; Fukushige, Tomoko; Baba, Naoko; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Su, Juan; Zeng, Weiqi; Chen, Xiang; Kanekura, Takuro

    2014-12-01

    Cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147)/basigin on the malignant tumor cell surface is critical for tumor proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis, and angiogenesis. CD147 expressed on malignant melanoma cells can induce tumor cell invasion by stimulating the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by surrounding fibroblasts. Membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes have attracted attention, as vehicles of functional molecules and their association with CD147 has been reported. Cleaved CD147 fragments released from tumor cells were reported to interact with fibroblasts. We investigated the intercellular mechanisms by which CD147 stimulates fibroblasts to induce MMP2 activity. CD147 was knocked-down using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The stimulatory effect of CD147 in cell culture supernatants, microvesicles, and exosomes on the enzymatic activity of MMP2 was examined by gelatin zymography. Supernatants from A375 control cells induced increased enzymatic activity of fibroblasts; such activity was significantly lower in CD147 knock-down cells. Cleaved CD147 plays a pivotal role in stimulating fibroblasts to induce MMP2 activity. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. The apoptogenic toxin AIP56 is a metalloprotease A-B toxin that cleaves NF-κb P65.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available AIP56 (apoptosis-inducing protein of 56 kDa is a major virulence factor of Photobacterium damselae piscicida (Phdp, a Gram-negative pathogen that causes septicemic infections, which are among the most threatening diseases in mariculture. The toxin triggers apoptosis of host macrophages and neutrophils through a process that, in vivo, culminates with secondary necrosis of the apoptotic cells contributing to the necrotic lesions observed in the diseased animals. Here, we show that AIP56 is a NF-κB p65-cleaving zinc-metalloprotease whose catalytic activity is required for the apoptogenic effect. Most of the bacterial effectors known to target NF-κB are type III secreted effectors. In contrast, we demonstrate that AIP56 is an A-B toxin capable of acting at distance, without requiring contact of the bacteria with the target cell. We also show that the N-terminal domain cleaves NF-κB at the Cys(39-Glu(40 peptide bond and that the C-terminal domain is involved in binding and internalization into the cytosol.

  4. An earthworm protease cleaving serum fibronectin and decreasing HBeAg in HepG2.2.15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-binding activity is one of the important functions of fibronectin (FN. It has been reported that a high concentration of FN in blood improves the transmission frequency of hepatitis viruses. Therefore, to investigate a protease that hydrolyzes FN rapidly is useful to decrease the FN concentration in blood and HBV infection. So far, however, no specific protease digesting FN in serum has been reported. Methods We employed a purified earthworm protease to digest serum proteins. The rapidly cleaved protein (FN was identified by MALDI-TOF MS and western blotting. The cleavage sites were determined by N-terminus amino acid residues sequencing. The protease was orally administrated to rats to investigate whether serum FN in vivo became decreased. The serum FN was determined by western blotting and ELISA. In cytological studies, the protease was added to the medium in the culture of HepG2.2.15 cells and then HBsAg and HBeAg were determined by ELISA. Results The protease purified from earthworm Eisenia fetida was found to function as a fibronectinase (FNase. The cleavage sites on FN by the FNase were at R and K, exhibiting a trypsin alkaline serine-like function. The earthworm fibronectinase (EFNase cleaved FN at four sites, R259, R1005, K1557 and R2039, among which the digested fragments at R259, K1557 and R2039 were related to the virus-binding activity as reported. The serum FN was significantly decreased when the earthworm fibronectinase was orally administrated to rats. The ELISA results showed that the secretion of HBeAg from HepG2.2.15 cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of the FNase. Conclusion The earthworm fibronectinase (EFNase cleaves FN much faster than the other proteins in serum, showing a potential to inhibit HBV infection through its suppressing the level of HBeAg. This suggests that EFNase is probably used as one of the candidates for the therapeutic agents to treat hepatitis virus infection.

  5. n- and p-type transport in (110) GaAs substrates, single- and double-cleave structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, S.F.

    2007-06-06

    In this work low-dimensional systems based on GaAs/AlGaAs are investigated with either holes (p-type) in two-dimensional (2D) systems or electrons (n-type) in one-dimensional (1D) systems as charge carriers. Two-dimensional hole systems (2DHS) are grown with molecular beam epitaxy both on (110) wafers and (1 anti 10) facets with the cleaved-edge overgrowth (CEO) method. We use Si as an acceptor by modulating the growth conditions to fabricate the 2DHS in single-interface heterojunction quantum wells. The mobility of the structures reaches up to 7.0 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2}/Vs along the [1 anti 10]-direction and 4.1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2}/Vs along the [001]-direction at a hole density of 1.2 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Effective values for anisotropic effective hole masses and scattering times are obtained. Inversion asymmetry induced spin splitting results in different spin densities, which yield beatings of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at low temperatures. In a perpendicular magnetic field the 2DHS is quantized into Landau levels, which depend nonlinearly on B due to a strong mixing of light- and heavy-holes. When the Landau levels anticross on the (110) facet, additional peaks appear within minima of the quantum Hall effect. Thermal activation measurements demonstrate a B-dependent energy gap consistent with such an anticrossing. In the second part of the thesis an electron quantum wire is fabricated with twofold cleaved-edge overgrowth. A variation of the conduction band energy in the substrate layers can directly transfer a potential modulation to the adjacent quantum wire. The concept of a transfer potential applied to a narrow two-dimensional system is demonstrated as a first step. Finally, in narrow quantum well samples a simple vertical quantum wire is successfully demonstrated and contacted at each end with n{sup +}-GaAs layers via two-dimensional (2D) leads. We characterize the 2D lead density and mobility for both cleave facets with four

  6. Bacillus anthracis Overcomes an Amino Acid Auxotrophy by Cleaving Host Serum Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, Austen; Swick, Michelle C.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Pomerantsev, Andrei; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria sustain an infection by acquiring nutrients from the host to support replication. The host sequesters these nutrients as a growth-restricting strategy, a concept termed “nutritional immunity.” Historically, the study of nutritional immunity has centered on iron uptake because many bacteria target hemoglobin, an abundant circulating protein, as an iron source. Left unresolved are the mechanisms that bacteria use to attain other nutrients from host sources, including amino acids. We employed a novel medium designed to mimic the chemical composition of human serum, and we show here that Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, proteolyzes human hemoglobin to liberate essential amino acids which enhance its growth. This property can be traced to the actions of InhA1, a secreted metalloprotease, and extends to at least three other serum proteins, including serum albumin. The results suggest that we must also consider proteolysis of key host proteins to be a way for bacterial pathogens to attain essential nutrients, and we provide an experimental framework to determine the host and bacterial factors involved in this process. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens acquire nutrients during infection are poorly understood. Here we used a novel defined medium that approximates the chemical composition of human blood serum, blood serum mimic (BSM), to better model the nutritional environment that pathogens encounter during bacteremia. Removing essential amino acids from BSM revealed that two of the most abundant proteins in blood—hemoglobin and serum albumin—can satiate the amino acid requirement for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. We further demonstrate that hemoglobin is proteolyzed by the secreted protease InhA1. These studies highlight that common blood proteins can be a nutrient source for bacteria. They also challenge the historical view that hemoglobin is solely an iron source for

  7. Intact and cleaved plasma soluble urokinase receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin with or without cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    ) in a ligand-independent manner. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether plasma soluble intact and cleaved uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) levels could identify a subpopulation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) where treatment with cetuximab would have a beneficial effect. Plasma samples were...... available from 453 patients treated in the NORDIC VII study. Patients were randomized between FLOX and FLOX + cetuximab. The levels of uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) were determined by time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We demonstrated that higher baseline plasma uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) levels were significantly...... with FLOX + cetuximab as compared to patients with KRAS wild-type and high levels of suPAR. These results thus support the preclinical findings and should be further tested in an independent clinical data set....

  8. Mapping of residues of fibrinogen cleaved by protease II of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis IMV B-7465

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Stohniy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The limited proteolysis of macromolecules allows obtaining the fragments that preserve the structure and functional properties of the whole molecule and could be used in the study of proteins structure and function. Proteases targeted to fibrinogen and fibrin are of interest as the tool for obtaining of functionally active fragments of fibrin(ogen and for the direct defibrination in vivo. That is why the aim of the present work was to study the proteolytic action of Protease II (PII purified from Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis IMV B-7465 on fibrinogen. Hydrolysis products of fibrinogen by PII were analysed by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions with further immunoprobing using the mouse monoclonal 1-5A (anti-Aα509-610 and ІІ-5С (anti-Aα20-78 antibodies. It was shown that PII cleaved preferentially the Aα-chain of fibrinogen splitting off the peptide with apparent molecular weight of 10 kDa that corresponded the C-terminal part of Aα-chain of fibrinogen molecule. MALDI-TOF analysis of hydrolysis of fibrinogen was performed using a Voyager-DE. Results analyzed by Data Explorer 4.0.0.0 allowed to detect the main peak occurring at mass/charge (M/Z ratio of 11 441 Da. According to “Peptide Mass Calculator” this peptide corresponded to fragment Аα505-610 of fibrinogen molecule. The result showed that PII cleaves the peptide bond AαAsp-Thr-Ala504-Ser505. Thus, PII can be used for the obtaining of unique fragments of fibrinogen molecule. As far as αC-domain contains numerous sites of fibrin intermolecular interactions we can consider PII as a prospective agent for their study and for the defibrination.

  9. Experimental and metabolic modeling evidence for a folate-cleaving side-activity of ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase (PanB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eThiaville

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahydrofolate (THF and its one-carbon derivatives, collectively termed folates, are essential cofact¬ors, but are inherently unstable. While it is clear that chemical oxidation can cleave folates or damage their pterin precursors, very little is known about enzymatic damage to these molec-ules or about whether the folate biosynthesis pathway responds adaptively to damage to its end-pro¬¬ducts. The presence of a duplication of the gene encoding the folate biosynthesis enzyme 6-hydr¬oxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (FolK in many sequenced bacterial gen-omes combined with a strong chromosomal clustering of the folK gene with panB, encoding the 5,10-methylene-THF-dependent enzyme ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, led us to infer that PanB has a side activity that cleaves 5,10-methylene-THF, yielding a pterin product that is recycled by FolK. Genetic and metabolic analyses of Escherichia coli strains showed that over-expression of PanB leads to accumulation of the likely folate cleavage product 6-hydroxy¬methyl-pterin and other pterins in cells and medium, and – unexpectedly – to a 46% increase in total fol-ate content. In silico modeling of the folate bio¬syn¬thesis pathway showed that these observations are consistent with the in vivo cleavage of 5,10-methylene-THF by a side-activity of PanB, with FolK-mediated recycling of the pterin cleavage product, and with regulation of folate biosynth-esis by folates or their damage products.

  10. Proteolytic degradation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) from head to toe: Identification of novel NPY-cleaving peptidases and potential drug interactions in CNS and Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Leona; Wolf, Raik; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Rossner, Steffen; Petersén, Åsa; Leavitt, Blair R; Kästner, Florian; Rothermundt, Matthias; Gärtner, Ulf-Torsten; Gündel, Daniel; Schlenzig, Dagmar; Frerker, Nadine; Schade, Jutta; Manhart, Susanne; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    The bioactivity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is either N-terminally modulated with respect to receptor selectivity by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4)-like enzymes or proteolytic degraded by neprilysin or meprins, thereby abrogating signal transduction. However, neither the subcellular nor the compartmental differentiation of these regulatory mechanisms is fully understood. Using mass spectrometry, selective inhibitors and histochemistry, studies across various cell types, body fluids, and tissues revealed that most frequently DP4-like enzymes, aminopeptidases P, secreted meprin-A (Mep-A), and cathepsin D (CTSD) rapidly hydrolyze NPY, depending on the cell type and tissue under study. Novel degradation of NPY by cathepsins B, D, L, G, S, and tissue kallikrein could also be identified. The expression of DP4, CTSD, and Mep-A at the median eminence indicates that the bioactivity of NPY is regulated by peptidases at the interphase between the periphery and the CNS. Detailed ex vivo studies on human sera and CSF samples recognized CTSD as the major NPY-cleaving enzyme in the CSF, whereas an additional C-terminal truncation by angiotensin-converting enzyme could be detected in serum. The latter finding hints to potential drug interaction between antidiabetic DP4 inhibitors and anti-hypertensive angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, while it ablates suspected hypertensive side effects of only antidiabetic DP4-inhibitors application. The bioactivity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is either N-terminally modulated with respect to receptor selectivity by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4)-like enzymes or proteolytic degraded by neprilysin or meprins, thereby abrogating signal transduction. However, neither the subcellular nor the compartmental differentiation of these regulatory mechanisms is fully understood. Using mass spectrometry, selective inhibitors and histochemistry, studies across various cell types, body fluids, and tissues revealed that most frequently DP4-like enzymes

  11. Discovery of the 3-Imino-1,2,4-thiadiazinane 1,1-Dioxide Derivative Verubecestat (MK-8931)–A β-Site Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleaving Enzyme 1 Inhibitor for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Jack D.; Li, Sarah W.; Brunskill, Andrew P.J.; Chen, Xia; Cox, Kathleen; Cumming, Jared N.; Forman, Mark; Gilbert, Eric J.; Hodgson, Robert A.; Hyde, Lynn A.; Jiang, Qin; Iserloh, Ulrich; Kazakevich, Irina; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Mei, Hong; Meredith, John; Misiaszek, Jeffrey; Orth, Peter; Rossiter, Lana M.; Slater, Meagan; Stone, Julie; Strickland, Corey O.; Voigt, Johannes H.; Wang, Ganfeng; Wang, Hongwu; Wu, Yusheng; Greenlee, William J.; Parker, Eric M.; Kennedy, Matthew E.; Stamford, Andrew W. (Merck)

    2016-12-08

    Verubecestat 3 (MK-8931), a diaryl amide-substituted 3-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazinane 1,1-dioxide derivative, is a high-affinity β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitor currently undergoing Phase 3 clinical evaluation for the treatment of mild to moderate and prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Although not selective over the closely related aspartyl protease BACE2, verubecestat has high selectivity for BACE1 over other key aspartyl proteases, notably cathepsin D, and profoundly lowers CSF and brain Aβ levels in rats and nonhuman primates and CSF Aβ levels in humans. In this annotation, we describe the discovery of 3, including design, validation, and selected SAR around the novel iminothiadiazinane dioxide core as well as aspects of its preclinical and Phase 1 clinical characterization.

  12. A Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus pUL33 Required To Release Monomeric Viral Genomes from Cleaved Concatemeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Dang, Xiaoqun; Baines, Joel D

    2017-10-15

    Monomeric herpesvirus DNA is cleaved from concatemers and inserted into preformed capsids through the actions of the viral terminase. The terminase of herpes simplex virus (HSV) is composed of three subunits encoded by U L 15, U L 28, and U L 33. The U L 33-encoded protein (pU L 33) interacts with pU L 28, but its precise role in the DNA cleavage and packaging reaction is unclear. To investigate the function of pU L 33, we generated a panel of recombinant viruses with either deletions or substitutions in the most conserved regions of U L 33 using a bacterial artificial chromosome system. Deletion of 11 amino acids (residues 50 to 60 or residues 110 to 120) precluded viral replication, whereas the truncation of the last 10 amino acids from the pU L 33 C terminus did not affect viral replication or the interaction of pU L 33 with pU L 28. Mutations that replaced the lysine at codon 110 and the arginine at codon 111 with alanine codons failed to replicate, and the pU L 33 mutant interacted with pU L 28 less efficiently. Interestingly, genomic termini of the large (L) and small (S) components were detected readily in cells infected with these mutants, indicating that concatemeric DNA was cleaved efficiently. However, the release of monomeric genomes as assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was greatly diminished, and DNA-containing capsids were not observed. These results suggest that pU L 33 is necessary for one of the two viral DNA cleavage events required to release individual genomes from concatemeric viral DNA. IMPORTANCE This paper shows a role for pU L 33 in one of the two DNA cleavage events required to release monomeric genomes from concatemeric viral DNA. This is the first time that such a phenotype has been observed and is the first identification of a function of this protein relevant to DNA packaging other than its interaction with other terminase components. Copyright © 2017 Yang et al.

  13. Serum levels of caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 and mortality are associated in severe septic patients: pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lorente

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is increased in sepsis. Cytokeratin 18 (CK-18, a protein of the intermediate filament group present in most epithelial and parenchymal cells, is cleaved by the action of caspases and released into the blood as caspase-cleaved CK (CCCK-18 during apoptosis. Circulating levels of CCCK-18 have scarcely been explored in septic patients. In one study with 101 severe septic patients, the authors reported higher serum CCCK-18 levels in non-survivors than in survivors; however, the sample size was too small to demonstrate an association between serum CCCK-18 levels and early mortality and whether they could be used as a biomarker to predict outcomes in septic patients. Thus, these were the objectives of this study with a large series of patients.We performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study in six Spanish Intensive Care Units with 224 severe septic patients. Blood samples were collected at the time that severe sepsis was diagnosed to determine serum levels of CCCK-18, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10. The end point was 30-day mortality.Non-surviving patients (n = 80 showed higher serum CCCK-18 levels (P391 u/L were associated with 30-day survival (Odds ratio = 2.687; 95% confidence interval = 1.449-4.983; P = 0.002, controlling for SOFA score, serum lactic acid levels and age. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that the risk of death in septic patients with serum CCCK-18 levels >391 u/L was higher than in patients with lower values (Hazard Ratio = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.96-4.84; P<0.001. Serum CCCK-18 levels were positively associated with serum levels of IL-6 and lactic acid, and with SOFA and APACHE scores.The major novel finding of our study, the largest cohort of septic patients providing data on circulating CCCK-18 levels, was that serum CCCK-18 levels are associated with mortality in severe septic patients.

  14. Radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay, a new rapid test for neutralizing antibodies to intact and trypsin-cleaved poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovi, T.; Roivainen, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a new rapid test, the radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay (RACINA), for the determination of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. HeLa cells prelabeled with 51 Cr, [ 3 H]leucine, or, preferentially, with [ 3 H]uridine are used as sensitive quantitative indicators of residual infectious virus. Both suspensions and monolayer cultures of the indicator cells can be used. Neutralization of a fraction of a high-titer virus preparation can be scored after the first replication cycle at 8 to 10 h. By lowering the incubation temperature to 30 degree C, the completion of the cytolysis due to the first replication cycle of poliovirus was delayed beyond 21 h. This makes it possible to use the RACINA, unlike the standard microneutralization assay, for measuring antibodies to trypsin-cleaved polioviruses. The RACINA was found to be as sensitive as and more reproducible than the standard microneutralization assay in the measurement of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. The RACINA is a rapid and reliable test for neutralizing antibodies and in principle it may be applicable for quantitation of neutralizing antibodies to other cytolytic agents as well

  15. Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase cleaves N-glycans on a carboxypeptidase Y mutant during ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Akira; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is a pathway by which misfolded or improperly assembled proteins in the ER are directed to degradation. The cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a deglycosylating enzyme that cleaves N-glycans from misfolded glycoproteins during the ERAD process. The mutant form of yeast carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) is an ERAD model substrate that has been extensively studied in yeast. While a delay in the degradation of CPY* in yeast cells lacking the cytoplasmic PNGase (Png1 in yeast) was evident, the in vivo action of PNGase on CPY* has not been detected. We constructed new ERAD substrates derived from CPY*, bearing epitope tags at both N- and C-termini and examined the degradation intermediates observed in yeast cells with compromised proteasome activity. The occurrence of the PNGase-mediated deglycosylation of intact CPY* and its degradation intermediates was evident. A major endoproteolytic reaction on CPY* appears to occur between amino acid 400 and 404. The findings reported herein clearly indicate that PNGase indeed releases N-glycans from CPY* during the ERAD process in vivo. This report implies that the PNGase-mediated deglycosylation during the ERAD process may occur more abundantly than currently envisaged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic significance of circulating intact and cleaved forms of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in inoperable chemotherapy treated cholangiocarcinoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Christensen, I J; Lassen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High levels of intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in both tissue and blood are associated with poor survival in several cancer diseases. The prognostic significance of uPAR in cholangiocarcinoma is unknown. The aims of this study were...... to determine if pre-treatment serum levels of uPAR forms and a decrease in levels during chemotherapy are predictive of survival in patients with inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with inoperable cholangiocarcinoma were consecutively included in the training set (n=108). A test set......PAR(I-III)+uPAR(II-III) after 2cycles of chemotherapy was associated with poor survival (HR=1.79, 95% CI:1.08-2.97, p=0.023, n=57). This predictor, however, was not significant in the test set (p=0.21, 26 events in 27 patients). CONCLUSION: The baseline level of uPAR(I-III)+uPAR(II-III) is a predictor of survival in inoperable...

  17. TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Juliano, E-mail: jalves@gnf.org [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Wurdak, Heiko [Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Garay-Malpartida, Humberto M. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Lineu Prestes 1524, Sao Paulo, SP, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Harris, Jennifer L. [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Occhiucci, Joao M.; Belizario, Jose E. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Lineu Prestes 1524, Sao Paulo, SP, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Li, Jun, E-mail: jli2@gnf.org [Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2009-07-10

    Caspases are central players in proteolytic pathways that regulate cellular processes such as apoptosis and differentiation. To accelerate the discovery of novel caspase substrates we developed a method combining in silico screening and in vitro validation. With this approach, we identified TAF15 as a novel caspase substrate in a trial study. We find that TAF15 was specifically cleaved by caspases-3 and -7. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the consensus sequence {sup 106}DQPD/Y{sup 110} as the only site recognized by these caspases. Surprisingly, TAF15 was cleaved at more than one site in staurosporine-treated Jurkat cells. In addition, we generated two oncogenic TAF15-CIZ/NMP4-fused proteins which have been found in acute myeloid leukemia and demonstrate that caspases-3 and -7 cleave the fusion proteins at one single site. Broad application of this combination approach should expedite identification of novel caspase-interacting proteins and provide new insights into the regulation of caspase pathways leading to cell death in normal and cancer cells.

  18. Enterovirus 71 3C protease cleaves a novel target CstF-64 and inhibits cellular polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Feng Weng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of novel cellular proteins as substrates to viral proteases would provide a new insight into the mechanism of cell-virus interplay. Eight nuclear proteins as potential targets for enterovirus 71 (EV71 3C protease (3C(pro cleavages were identified by 2D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis. Of these proteins, CstF-64, which is a critical factor for 3' pre-mRNA processing in a cell nucleus, was selected for further study. A time-course study to monitor the expression levels of CstF-64 in EV71-infected cells also revealed that the reduction of CstF-64 during virus infection was correlated with the production of viral 3C(pro. CstF-64 was cleaved in vitro by 3C(pro but neither by mutant 3C(pro (in which the catalytic site was inactivated nor by another EV71 protease 2A(pro. Serial mutagenesis was performed in CstF-64, revealing that the 3C(pro cleavage sites are located at position 251 in the N-terminal P/G-rich domain and at multiple positions close to the C-terminus of CstF-64 (around position 500. An accumulation of unprocessed pre-mRNA and the depression of mature mRNA were observed in EV71-infected cells. An in vitro assay revealed the inhibition of the 3'-end pre-mRNA processing and polyadenylation in 3C(pro-treated nuclear extract, and this impairment was rescued by adding purified recombinant CstF-64 protein. In summing up the above results, we suggest that 3C(pro cleavage inactivates CstF-64 and impairs the host cell polyadenylation in vitro, as well as in virus-infected cells. This finding is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that a picornavirus protein affects the polyadenylation of host mRNA.

  19. Low CSF levels of both α-synuclein and the α-synuclein cleaving enzyme neurosin in patients with synucleinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Wennström

    Full Text Available Neurosin is a protease that in vitro degrades α-synuclein, the main constituent of Lewy bodies found in brains of patients with synucleinopathy including Parkinson's disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Several studies have reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of α-synuclein in synucleinopathy patients and recent data also proposes a significant role of α-synuclein in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. To investigate potential links between neurosin and its substrate α-synuclein in vivo we used a commercially available sandwich ELISA and an in-house developed direct ELISA to quantify CSF levels of α-synuclein and neurosin in patients diagnosed with DLB, PD and PD dementia (PDD versus AD patients and non-demented controls. We found that patients with synucleinopathy displayed lower CSF levels of neurosin and α-synuclein compared to controls and AD patients. In contrast, AD patients demonstrated significantly increased CSF α-synuclein but similar neurosin levels compared to non-demented controls. Further, CSF neurosin and α-synuclein concentrations were positively associated in controls, PD and PDD patients and both proteins were highly correlated to CSF levels of phosphorylated tau in all investigated groups. We observed no effect of gender or presence of the apolipoprotein Eε4 allele on neither neurosin or α-synuclein CSF levels. In concordance with the current literature our study demonstrates decreased CSF levels of α-synuclein in synucleinopathy patients versus AD patients and controls. Importantly, decreased α-synuclein levels in patients with synucleinopathy appear linked to low levels of the α-synuclein cleaving enzyme neurosin. In contrast, elevated levels of α-synuclein in AD patients were not related to any altered CSF neurosin levels. Thus, altered CSF levels of α-synuclein and neurosin in patients with synucleinopathy versus AD may not only mirror disease-specific neuropathological

  20. Elafin, an elastase-specific inhibitor, is cleaved by its cognate enzyme neutrophil elastase in sputum from individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2008-11-21

    Elafin is a neutrophil serine protease inhibitor expressed in lung and displaying anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. Previous studies demonstrated that some innate host defense molecules of the cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease airways are impaired due to increased proteolytic degradation observed during lung inflammation. In light of these findings, we thus focused on the status of elafin in CF lung. We showed in the present study that elafin is cleaved in sputum from individuals with CF. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-positive CF sputum, which was found to contain lower elafin levels and higher neutrophil elastase (NE) activity compared with P. aeruginosa-negative samples, was particularly effective in cleaving recombinant elafin. NE plays a pivotal role in the process as only NE inhibitors are able to inhibit elafin degradation. Further in vitro studies demonstrated that incubation of recombinant elafin with excess of NE leads to the rapid cleavage of the inhibitor. Two cleavage sites were identified at the N-terminal extremity of elafin (Val-5-Lys-6 and Val-9-Ser-10). Interestingly, purified fragments of the inhibitor (Lys-6-Gln-57 and Ser-10-Gln-57) were shown to still be active for inhibiting NE. However, NE in excess was shown to strongly diminish the ability of elafin to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its capacity to be immobilized by transglutamination. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is cleaved by its cognate enzyme NE present at excessive concentration in CF sputum and that P. aeruginosa infection promotes this effect. Such cleavage may have repercussions on the innate immune function of elafin.

  1. Lewis Acid Assisted Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Aryl Methyl Ethers by C−O Bond-Cleaving Alkylation: Prevention of Undesired β-Hydride Elimination

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian

    2016-04-10

    In the presence of trialkylaluminum reagents, diverse aryl methyl ethers can be transformed into valuable products by C-O bond-cleaving alkylation, for the first time without the limiting β-hydride elimination. This new nickel-catalyzed dealkoxylative alkylation method enables powerful orthogonal synthetic strategies for the transformation of a variety of naturally occurring and easily accessible anisole derivatives. The directing and/or activating properties of aromatic methoxy groups are utilized first, before they are replaced by alkyl chains in a subsequent coupling process.

  2. Profilicollis altmani (Perry, 1942 Van Cleave, 1947 (Acanthocephala en el Perú. Con notas sobre la infección experimental de mamiferos terrestres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tantaleán

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Entre los meses de enero y febrero de 2001, se hizo el estudio parasitológico de Emerita analoga Stimpson (Hippidae procedentes de la playa Bujama (Mala, Lima, encontrando que de 37 a 48% de ellos estaban infectados con cistacantos identificados como de Profilicollis altmani (Perry, 1942 Van Cleave, 1947. Estos cistacantos se inocularon en ratas, ratones, hamsters y un cachorro de perro, que resultaron todos infectados. Los parásitos se localizaron principalmente en la cavidad abdominal y/o adheridos a la mucosa del intestino delgado y grueso. El hombre puede infectarse con estos parásitos al ingerir E. analoga infectados.

  3. Variants of beta-microglobulin cleaved at lysine-58 retain the main conformational features of the native protein but are more conformationally heterogeneous and unstable at physiological temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mimmi, Maria C; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Pettirossi, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    -58 is removed. We find that the solution stability of both variants, especially of beta2-microglobulin from which lysine-58 is removed, is much reduced compared to wild-type beta2-microglobulin and is strongly dependent on temperature and protein concentration. 1H-NMR spectroscopy and amide hydrogen......Cleavage of the small amyloidogenic protein beta2-microglobulin after lysine-58 renders it more prone to unfolding and aggregation. This is important for dialysis-related beta2-microglobulin amyloidosis, since elevated levels of cleaved beta2-microglobulin may be found in the circulation...

  4. NuMA and nuclear lamins are cleaved during viral infection - inhibition of caspase activity prevents cleavage and rescues HeLa cells from measles virus-induced but not from rhinovirus 1B-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taimen, Pekka; Berghaell, Heidi; Vainionpaeae, Raija; Kallajoki, Markku

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear matrix is a structural framework of important nuclear processes. We studied the effect of two different types of viral infections on nuclear matrix. HeLa cells were infected with human rhinovirus 1B (HRV 1B) or measles virus (MV), and Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (NuMA) and lamins A/C and B were used as markers for internal nuclear matrix and peripheral nuclear lamina, respectively. We show that NuMA, lamins, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 are cleaved during viral infection in a virus family-specific manner suggesting that these viruses activate different sets of proteases. Morphologically, NuMA was excluded from the condensed chromatin, lamins showed a folded distribution, and both proteins finally remained around the nuclear fragments. A general caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-FMK) prevented the nuclear disintegration and the cleavage of the proteins studied. Interestingly, z-VAD-FMK rescued MV-infected but not HRV 1B-infected cells from cell death. These results show for the first time that NuMA and lamins are specific target proteins during virus-induced programmed cell death

  5. Blast exposure causes early and persistent aberrant phospho- and cleaved-tau expression in a murine model of mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bertrand R; Meabon, James S; Martin, Tobin J; Mourad, Pierre D; Bennett, Raymond; Kraemer, Brian C; Cernak, Ibolja; Petrie, Eric C; Emery, Michael J; Swenson, Erik R; Mayer, Cynthia; Mehic, Edin; Peskind, Elaine R; Cook, David G

    2013-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is considered the 'signature injury' of combat veterans that have served during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This prevalence of mTBI is due in part to the common exposure to high explosive blasts in combat zones. In addition to the threats of blunt impact trauma caused by flying objects and the head itself being propelled against objects, the primary blast overpressure (BOP) generated by high explosives is capable of injuring the brain. Compared to other means of causing TBI, the pathophysiology of mild-to-moderate BOP is less well understood. To study the consequences of BOP exposure in mice, we employed a well-established approach using a compressed gas-driven shock tube that recapitulates battlefield-relevant open-field BOP. We found that 24 hours post-blast a single mild BOP provoked elevation of multiple phospho- and cleaved-tau species in neurons, as well as elevating manganese superoxide-dismutase (MnSOD or SOD2) levels, a cellular response to oxidative stress. In hippocampus, aberrant tau species persisted for at least 30 days post-exposure, while SOD2 levels returned to sham control levels. These findings suggest that elevated phospho- and cleaved-tau species may be among the initiating pathologic processes induced by mild blast exposure. These findings may have important implications for efforts to prevent blast-induced insults to the brain from progressing into long-term neurodegenerative disease processes.

  6. γ-Secretase Modulators and Presenilin 1 Mutants Act Differently on Presenilin/γ-Secretase Function to Cleave Aβ42 and Aβ43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayasu Okochi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the mechanism by which the relative Aβ42(43 to total Aβ ratio is regulated is central to understanding Alzheimer disease (AD etiology; however, the mechanisms underlying changes in the Aβ42(43 ratio caused by familial mutations and γ-secretase modulators (GSMs are unclear. Here, we show in vitro and in living cells that presenilin (PS/γ-secretase cleaves Aβ42 into Aβ38, and Aβ43 into Aβ40 or Aβ38. Approximately 40% of Aβ38 is derived from Aβ43. Aβ42(43 cleavage is involved in the regulation of the Aβ42(43 ratio in living cells. GSMs increase the cleavage of PS/γ-secretase-bound Aβ42 (increase kcat and slow its dissociation from the enzyme (decrease kb, whereas PS1 mutants and inverse GSMs show the opposite effects. Therefore, we suggest a concept to describe the Aβ42(43 production process and propose how GSMs act, and we suggest that a loss of PS/γ-secretase function to cleave Aβ42(43 may initiate AD and might represent a therapeutic target.

  7. Prognostic Value of Serum Caspase-Cleaved Cytokeratin-18 Levels before Liver Transplantation for One-Year Survival of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lorente

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokeratin (CK-18 is the major intermediate filament protein in the liver and during hepatocyte apoptosis is cleaved by the action of caspases; the resulting fragments are released into the blood as caspase-cleaved cytokeratin (CCCK-18. Higher circulating levels of CCCK-18 have been found in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC than in healthy controls and than in cirrhotic patients. However, it is unknown whether serum CCCK-18 levels before liver transplantation (LT in patients with HCC could be used as a prognostic biomarker of one-year survival, and this was the objective of our study with 135 patients. At one year after LT, non-survivors showed higher serum CCCK-18 levels than survivors (p = 0.001. On binary logistic regression analysis, serum CCCK-18 levels >384 U/L were associated with death at one year (odds ratio = 19.801; 95% confidence interval = 5.301–73.972; p < 0.001 after controlling for deceased donor age. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve of serum CCCK-18 levels to predict death at one year was 77% (95% CI = 69%–84%; p < 0.001. The new finding of our study was that serum levels of CCCK-18 before LT in patients with HCC could be used as prognostic biomarker of survival.

  8. Prognostic Value of Serum Caspase-Cleaved Cytokeratin-18 Levels before Liver Transplantation for One-Year Survival of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Sergio T.; Sanz, Pablo; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Padilla, Javier; Díaz, Dácil; González, Antonio; Martín, María M.; Jiménez, Alejandro; Barrera, Manuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokeratin (CK)-18 is the major intermediate filament protein in the liver and during hepatocyte apoptosis is cleaved by the action of caspases; the resulting fragments are released into the blood as caspase-cleaved cytokeratin (CCCK)-18. Higher circulating levels of CCCK-18 have been found in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than in healthy controls and than in cirrhotic patients. However, it is unknown whether serum CCCK-18 levels before liver transplantation (LT) in patients with HCC could be used as a prognostic biomarker of one-year survival, and this was the objective of our study with 135 patients. At one year after LT, non-survivors showed higher serum CCCK-18 levels than survivors (p = 0.001). On binary logistic regression analysis, serum CCCK-18 levels >384 U/L were associated with death at one year (odds ratio = 19.801; 95% confidence interval = 5.301–73.972; p < 0.001) after controlling for deceased donor age. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of serum CCCK-18 levels to predict death at one year was 77% (95% CI = 69%–84%; p < 0.001). The new finding of our study was that serum levels of CCCK-18 before LT in patients with HCC could be used as prognostic biomarker of survival. PMID:27618033

  9. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel ring-cleaving enzyme (BoxCC) from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, Jasleen; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a novel ring-cleaving enzyme from B. xenovorans LB400 encoded by the benzoate-oxidation (box) pathway. The assimilation of aromatic compounds by microbial species requires specialized enzymes to cleave the thermodynamically stable ring. In the recently discovered benzoate-oxidation (box) pathway in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, this is accomplished by a novel dihydrodiol lyase (BoxC C ). Sequence analysis suggests that BoxC C is part of the crotonase superfamily but includes an additional uncharacterized region of approximately 115 residues that is predicted to mediate ring cleavage. Processing of X-ray diffraction data to 1.5 Å resolution revealed that BoxC C crystallized with two molecules in the asymmetric unit of the P2 1 2 1 2 1 space group, with a solvent content of 47% and a Matthews coefficient of 2.32 Å 3 Da −1 . Selenomethionine BoxC C has been purified and crystals are currently being refined for anomalous dispersion studies

  10. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p...

  11. Toxin-antitoxin loci as stress-response-elements: ChpAK/MazF and ChpBK cleave translated RNAs and are counteracted by tmRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.K.; Pedersen, K.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2003-01-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes encode toxin-antitoxin loci, often in multiple copies. In most cases, the function of these genes is not known. The chpA (mazEF) locus of Escherichia coli has been described as a cell killing module that induces bacterial apoptosis during nutritional stress. However, we...... found recently that ChpAK (MazF) does not confer cell killing but rather, induces a bacteriostatic condition from which the cells could be resuscitated. Results presented here yield a mechanistic explanation for the detrimental effect on cell growth exerted by ChpAK and the homologous ChpBK protein of E......AK cleaved tmRNA in its coding region. Thus, ChpAK and ChpBK inhibit translation by a mechanism very similar to that of E. coli RelE. On the basis of these results, we propose a model that integrates TA loci into general prokaryotic stress physiology....

  12. Rapid paracellular transmigration of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized epithelial cells without affecting TER: role of proteolytic-active HtrA cleaving E-cadherin but not fibronectin

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boehm, Manja

    2012-04-25

    AbstractBackgroundCampylobacter jejuni is one of the most important bacterial pathogens causing food-borne illness worldwide. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell entry by C. jejuni is considered the primary reason of damage to the intestinal tissue, but the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in this process are still widely unclear.ResultsIn the present study, we characterized the serine protease HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) of C. jejuni as a secreted virulence factor with important proteolytic functions. Infection studies and in vitro cleavage assays showed that C. jejuni’s HtrA triggers shedding of the extracellular E-cadherin NTF domain (90 kDa) of non-polarised INT-407 and polarized MKN-28 epithelial cells, but fibronectin was not cleaved as seen for H. pylori’s HtrA. Deletion of the htrA gene in C. jejuni or expression of a protease-deficient S197A point mutant did not lead to loss of flagella or reduced bacterial motility, but led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage and transmigration of the bacteria across polarized MKN-28 cell layers. Unlike other highly invasive pathogens, transmigration across polarized cells by wild-type C. jejuni is highly efficient and is achieved within a few minutes of infection. Interestingly, E-cadherin cleavage by C. jejuni occurs in a limited fashion and transmigration required the intact flagella as well as HtrA protease activity, but does not reduce transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria or Neisseria.ConclusionThese results suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is involved in rapid crossing of the epithelial barrier by C. jejuni via a very specific mechanism using the paracellular route to reach basolateral surfaces, but does not cleave the fibronectin receptor which is necessary for cell entry.

  13. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity

  14. Rapid paracellular transmigration of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized epithelial cells without affecting TER: role of proteolytic-active HtrA cleaving E-cadherin but not fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Manja; Hoy, Benjamin; Rohde, Manfred; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Bæk, Kristoffer T; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Brøndsted, Lone; Wessler, Silja; Backert, Steffen

    2012-04-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most important bacterial pathogens causing food-borne illness worldwide. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell entry by C. jejuni is considered the primary reason of damage to the intestinal tissue, but the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in this process are still widely unclear. In the present study, we characterized the serine protease HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) of C. jejuni as a secreted virulence factor with important proteolytic functions. Infection studies and in vitro cleavage assays showed that C. jejuni's HtrA triggers shedding of the extracellular E-cadherin NTF domain (90 kDa) of non-polarised INT-407 and polarized MKN-28 epithelial cells, but fibronectin was not cleaved as seen for H. pylori's HtrA. Deletion of the htrA gene in C. jejuni or expression of a protease-deficient S197A point mutant did not lead to loss of flagella or reduced bacterial motility, but led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage and transmigration of the bacteria across polarized MKN-28 cell layers. Unlike other highly invasive pathogens, transmigration across polarized cells by wild-type C. jejuni is highly efficient and is achieved within a few minutes of infection. Interestingly, E-cadherin cleavage by C. jejuni occurs in a limited fashion and transmigration required the intact flagella as well as HtrA protease activity, but does not reduce transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria or Neisseria. These results suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is involved in rapid crossing of the epithelial barrier by C. jejuni via a very specific mechanism using the paracellular route to reach basolateral surfaces, but does not cleave the fibronectin receptor which is necessary for cell entry.

  15. New Concept of the Biosynthesis of 4-Alkyl-L-proline Precursors of Lincomycin, Hormaomycin and Pyrrolobenzodiazepines: Could a γ-Glutamyltransferase Cleave the C-C Bond?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eJiraskova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Structurally different and functionally diverse natural compounds – antitumour agents pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines, bacterial hormone hormaomycin and lincosamide antibiotic lincomycin – share a common building unit, 4-alkyl-L-proline derivative (APD. APDs arise from L-tyrosine through a special biosynthetic pathway. Its generally accepted scheme, however, did not comply with current state of knowledge. Based on gene inactivation experiments and in vitro functional tests with recombinant enzymes, we designed a new APD biosynthetic scheme for the model of lincomycin biosynthesis. In the new scheme at least one characteristic in each of five final biosynthetic steps has been changed: the order of reactions, assignment of enzymes and/or reaction mechanisms. First, we demonstrate that LmbW methylates a different substrate than previously assumed. Second, we propose a unique reaction mechanism for the next step, in which a putative γ-glutamyltransferase LmbA indirectly cleaves off the oxalyl residue by transient attachment of glutamate to LmbW product. This unprecedented mechanism would represent the first example of the C-C bond cleavage catalyzed by a γ-glutamyltransferase, i.e., an enzyme that appears unsuitable for such activity. Finally, the inactivation experiments show that LmbX is an isomerase indicating that it transforms its substrate into a compound suitable for reduction by LmbY, thereby facilitating its subsequent complete conversion to APD 4-propyl-L-proline. Elucidation of the APD biosynthesis has long time resisted mainly due to the apparent absence of relevant C-C bond cleaving enzymatic activity. Our proposal aims to unblock this situation not only for lincomycin biosynthesis, but generally for all above mentioned groups of bioactive natural products with biotechnological potential.

  16. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikado, Hideto [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Laboratory of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, BioMedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takai, Toshiro, E-mail: t-takai@juntendo.ac.jp [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  17. Substrate-Triggered Formation and Remarkable Stability of the C-H-Cleaving Chloroferryl Intermediate in the Aliphatic Halogenase, SyrB2†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Megan L.; Krest, Courtney M.; Barr, Eric W.; Vaillancourt, Frédéric H.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Green, Michael T.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Aliphatic halogenases activate O2, cleave α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to CO2 and succinate, and form haloferryl [X-Fe(IV)=O; X = Cl, Br] complexes that cleave aliphatic C-H bonds to install halogens during the biosynthesis of natural products by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). For the related αKG-dependent dioxygenases, it has been shown that reaction of the Fe(II) cofactor with O2 to form the C-H-cleaving ferryl complex is “triggered” by binding of the target substrate. In this study, we have tested for and defined structural determinants of substrate triggering (ST) in the halogenase, SyrB2, from the syringomycin E biosynthetic NRPS of Pseudomonas syringae B301D. As for other halogen ases, the substrate of SyrB2 is complex, consisting of l-Thr tethered via thioester linkage to a covalently bound phosphopantetheine (PPant) cofactor of a carrier protein, SyrB1. Without an appended amino acid, SyrB1 does not trigger formation of the chloroferryl intermediate state in SyrB2, even in the presence of free l-Thr or its analogues, but SyrB1 charged either by l-Thr or by any of several non-native amino acids does trigger the reaction by as much as 8,000-fold (for l-Thr-S-SyrB1). Triggering efficacy is sensitive to the structures of both the amino acid and the carrier protein, being diminished by 5–20-fold when the native l-Thr is replaced by another amino acid and by ∼ 40-fold when SyrB1 is replaced by a heterologous carrier protein, CytC2. The directing effect of the carrier protein and consequent tolerance for profound modifications to the target amino acid allow the chloroferryl state to be formed in the presence of substrates that perturb the ratio of its two putative coordination isomers, lack the target C-H bond (l-Ala-S-SyrB1), or contain a C-H bond of enhanced strength (l-cyclopropylglycyl-S-SyrB1). For the latter two cases, the SyrB2 chloroferryl state so formed exhibits unprecedented stability (t1/2 = 30 – 110 min at 0 °C), can be trapped in

  18. Increased soluble serum markers caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18, histones, and ST2 indicate apoptotic turnover and chronic immune response in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Stefan; Lambers, Christopher; Pollreisz, Andreas; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Lichtenauer, Michael; Mangold, Andreas; Niederpold, Tina; Hacker, Andreas; Lang, György; Dworschak, Martin; Vukovich, Thomas; Gerner, Christopher; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a worldwide burden and a major cause of death. The disease is accompanied by chronic inflammation and increased cellular turnover that is partly due to an overwhelming induction of apoptosis. In this study, we hypothesized that systemic markers of apoptosis are altered in patients with mild-to-severe COPD. A total number of 64 patients and controls were enrolled in the study. Lung function parameters of all groups (nonsmoker, healthy smoker, COPD GOLD I&II, COPD GOLD III&IV) were evaluated at the time of inclusion. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to quantify protein levels in serum samples. Serum contents of apoptotic end-products caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 and histone-associated-DNA-fragments were increased in patients with COPD, whereas anti-inflammatory soluble ST2 showed a peak in patients with COPD I&II (P=0.031) compared to healthy smokers. Levels of pro-inflammatory caspase-1/ ICE correlated significantly with the number of pack years (R=0.337; P=0.007). Our results indicate a systemic release of apoptosis-specific proteins as markers for increased cellular turnover accompanied by progression of COPD. Furthermore, soluble ST2 seems to have a critical role in the anti-inflammatory regulatory mechanism at early stages of the disease.

  19. Identification of restriction endonuclease with potential ability to cleave the HSV-2 genome: Inherent potential for biosynthetic versus live recombinant microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes Simplex virus types 1 and 2 are enveloped viruses with a linear dsDNA genome of ~120–200 kb. Genital infection with HSV-2 has been denoted as a major risk factor for acquisition and transmission of HIV-1. Developing biomedical strategies for HSV-2 prevention is thus a central strategy in reducing global HIV-1 prevalence. This paper details the protocol for the isolation of restriction endunucleases (REases with potent activity against the HSV-2 genome and models two biomedical interventions for preventing HSV-2. Methods and Results Using the whole genome of HSV-2, 289 REases and the bioinformatics software Webcutter2; we searched for potential recognition sites by way of genome wide palindromics. REase application in HSV-2 biomedical therapy was modeled concomitantly. Of the 289 enzymes analyzed; 77(26.6% had potential to cleave the HSV-2 genome in > 100 but 400 but Conclusion Viral genome slicing by way of these bacterially- derived R-M enzymatic peptides may have therapeutic potential in HSV-2 infection; a cofactor for HIV-1 acquisition and transmission.

  20. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and high-resolution melting (HRM) markers from the chloroplast genome of Glycyrrhiza species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Sung, Jwakyung; Hong, Chi-Eun; Raveendar, Sebastin; Bang, Kyong-Hwan; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2018-05-01

    Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza glabra ) is an important medicinal crop often used as health foods or medicine worldwide. The molecular genetics of licorice is under scarce owing to lack of molecular markers. Here, we have developed cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and high-resolution melting (HRM) markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by comparing the chloroplast genomes of two Glycyrrhiza species ( G. glabra and G. lepidota ). The CAPS and HRM markers were tested for diversity analysis with 24 Glycyrrhiza accessions. The restriction profiles generated with CAPS markers classified the accessions (2-4 genotypes) and melting curves (2-3) were obtained from the HRM markers. The number of alleles and major allele frequency were 2-6 and 0.31-0.92, respectively. The genetic distance and polymorphism information content values were 0.16-0.76 and 0.15-0.72, respectively. The phylogenetic relationships among the 24 accessions were estimated using a dendrogram, which classified them into four clades. Except clade III, the remaining three clades included the same species, confirming interspecies genetic correlation. These 18 CAPS and HRM markers might be helpful for genetic diversity assessment and rapid identification of licorice species.

  1. Potential anti-cholinesterase and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitory activities of cornuside and gallotannins from Cornus officinalis fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Himanshu Kumar; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Tanaka, Takashi; Jung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jae Sue

    2017-07-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors are promising agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we examined the inhibitory activity of seven compounds isolated from the fruits of Cornus officinalis, cornuside, polymeric proanthocyanidins, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose, tellimagrandin I, tellimagrandin II, and isoterchebin, against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and BACE1. All of the compounds displayed concentration-dependent in vitro inhibitory activity toward the ChEs and BACE1. Among them, tellimagrandin II exhibited the best inhibitory activity toward ChEs, whereas the best BACE1 inhibitor was 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose. Isoterchebin and polymeric proanthocyanidins were also significant ChE inhibitors. The kinetic and docking studies demonstrated that all compounds interacted with both the catalytic active sites and the peripheral anionic sites of the ChEs and BACE1. Tellimagrandin II, isoterchebin, and the polymeric proanthocyanidins exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. In conclusion, we identified significant ChE and BACE1 inhibitors from Corni Fructus that could have value as new multi-targeted compounds for anti-AD agents.

  2. The putative endoglucanase PcGH61D from Phanerochaete chrysosporium is a metal-dependent oxidative enzyme that cleaves cellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørge Westereng

    Full Text Available Many fungi growing on plant biomass produce proteins currently classified as glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61, some of which are known to act synergistically with cellulases. In this study we show that PcGH61D, the gene product of an open reading frame in the genome of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, is an enzyme that cleaves cellulose using a metal-dependent oxidative mechanism that leads to generation of aldonic acids. The activity of this enzyme and its beneficial effect on the efficiency of classical cellulases are stimulated by the presence of electron donors. Experiments with reduced cellulose confirmed the oxidative nature of the reaction catalyzed by PcGH61D and indicated that the enzyme may be capable of penetrating into the substrate. Considering the abundance of GH61-encoding genes in fungi and genes encoding their functional bacterial homologues currently classified as carbohydrate binding modules family 33 (CBM33, this enzyme activity is likely to turn out as a major determinant of microbial biomass-degrading efficiency.

  3. von Willebrand factor and its cleaving protease ADAMTS13 balance in coronary artery vessels: Lessons learned from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Nuccia; Cantoni, Silvia; Panzeri, Francesco; Sacco, Alice; Rusconi, Chiara; Stucchi, Miriam; Oliva, Fabrizio; Cattaneo, Marco

    2017-07-01

    Deficiency of the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease ADAMTS13 is central to the pathophysiology of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a microangiopathic syndrome that presents as an acute medical emergency. In this review we will explore the evidence of a two-way relationship between TTP and ACS. Moreover, we will review the evidence emerged from epidemiological studies of an inverse relationship between the plasma levels of ADAMTS13 and the risk of ACS. Pubmed, MEDLINE and EMBASE, CINHAL, COCHRANE and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception to January 2017. The search yielded 43 studies representing 23 unique patient cases, 5 case series, 5 cohort studies and 10 case-control studies. Most ACS cases developing in the setting of TTP resolved with standard treatment of the underlying microangiopathy, with only a few requiring coronary invasive management. Antiplatelet therapy was not usually prescribed and all of the currently used P2Y 12 were felt to be a potential trigger for a TTP-like syndrome, although our review revealed that the occurrence of TTP in patients treated with new P2Y 12 antagonists is rare. Most studies confirmed the inverse association among ADAMTS13 levels and ACS. The heart is a definite target organ in TTP. The clinical spectrum of its involvement is probably influenced by local factors that add on to the systemic deficiency characteristic of TTP. It follows that patients with TTP should be carefully monitored for ACS events, especially when multiple risk factors for coronary disease exist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The mismatch repair and meiotic recombination endonuclease Mlh1-Mlh3 is activated by polymer formation and can cleave DNA substrates in trans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Carol M; Ni, Xiaodan; White, Martin A; Ortega, Joaquin; Surtees, Jennifer A; Alani, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Crossing over between homologs is initiated in meiotic prophase by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks that occur throughout the genome. In the major interference-responsive crossover pathway in baker's yeast, these breaks are resected to form 3' single-strand tails that participate in a homology search, ultimately forming double Holliday junctions (dHJs) that primarily include both homologs. These dHJs are resolved by endonuclease activity to form exclusively crossovers, which are critical for proper homolog segregation in Meiosis I. Recent genetic, biochemical, and molecular studies in yeast are consistent with the hypothesis of Mlh1-Mlh3 DNA mismatch repair complex acting as the major endonuclease activity that resolves dHJs into crossovers. However, the mechanism by which the Mlh1-Mlh3 endonuclease is activated is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that Mlh1-Mlh3 does not behave like a structure-specific endonuclease but forms polymers required to generate nicks in DNA. This conclusion is supported by DNA binding studies performed with different-sized substrates that contain or lack polymerization barriers and endonuclease assays performed with varying ratios of endonuclease-deficient and endonuclease-proficient Mlh1-Mlh3. In addition, Mlh1-Mlh3 can generate religatable double-strand breaks and form an active nucleoprotein complex that can nick DNA substrates in trans. Together these observations argue that Mlh1-Mlh3 may not act like a canonical, RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvase and support a novel model in which Mlh1-Mlh3 is loaded onto DNA to form an activated polymer that cleaves DNA.

  5. Allergenic proteases cleave the chemokine CX3CL1 directly from the surface of airway epithelium and augment the effect of rhinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxham, M; Smart, D E; Bedke, N J; Smithers, N P; Filippi, I; Blume, C; Swindle, E J; Tariq, K; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T; Davies, D E

    2018-03-01

    CX3CL1 has been implicated in allergen-induced airway CD4 + T-lymphocyte recruitment in asthma. As epidemiological evidence supports a viral infection-allergen synergy in asthma exacerbations, we postulated that rhinovirus (RV) infection in the presence of allergen augments epithelial CX3CL1 release. Fully differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cultures were pretreated apically with house dust mite (HDM) extract and infected with rhinovirus-16 (RV16). CX3CL1 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting, and shedding mechanisms assessed using inhibitors, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) agonist, and recombinant CX3CL1-expressing HEK293T cells. Basolateral CX3CL1 release was unaffected by HDM but stimulated by RV16; inhibition by fluticasone or GM6001 implicated nuclear factor-κB and ADAM (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase) sheddases. Conversely, apical CX3CL1 shedding was stimulated by HDM and augmented by RV16. Although fluticasone or GM6001 reduced RV16+HDM-induced apical CX3CL1 release, heat inactivation or cysteine protease inhibition completely blocked CX3CL1 shedding. The HDM effect was via enzymatic cleavage of CX3CL1, not PAR-2 activation, yielding a product mitogenic for smooth muscle cells. Extracts of Alternaria fungus caused similar CX3CL1 shedding. We have identified a novel mechanism whereby allergenic proteases cleave CX3CL1 from the apical epithelial surface to yield a biologically active product. RV16 infection augmented HDM-induced CX3CL1 shedding-this may contribute to synergy between allergen exposure and RV infection in triggering asthma exacerbations and airway remodeling.

  6. 3' fragment of miR173-programmed RISC-cleaved RNA is protected from degradation in a complex with RISC and SGS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Manabu; Iki, Taichiro; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Miyashita, Kyoko; Poethig, R Scott; Habu, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2013-03-05

    trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) are plant-specific endogenous siRNAs produced via a unique pathway whose first step is the microRNA (miRNA)-programmed RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-mediated cleavage of tasiRNA gene (TAS) transcripts. One of the products is subsequently transformed into tasiRNAs by a pathway that requires several factors including SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 (SGS3) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6. Here, using in vitro assembled ARGONAUTE (AGO)1-RISCs, we show that SGS3 is recruited onto RISCs only when they bind target RNA. Following cleavage by miRNA173 (miR173)-programmed RISC, SGS3 was found in complexes containing cleaved TAS2 RNA and RISC. The 3' cleavage fragment (the source of tasiRNAs) was protected from degradation in this complex. Depletion of SGS3 did not affect TAS2 RNA cleavage by miR173-programmed RISC, but did affect the stability of the 3' cleavage fragment. When the 3' nucleotide of 22-nt miR173 was deleted or the corresponding nucleotide in TAS2 RNA was mutated, the complex was not observed and the 3' cleavage fragment was degraded. Importantly, these changes in miR173 or TAS2 RNA are known to lead to a loss of tasiRNA production in vivo. These results suggest that (i) SGS3 associates with AGO1-RISC via the double-stranded RNA formed by the 3'-terminal nucleotides of 22-nt miR173 and corresponding target RNA, which probably protrudes from the AGO1-RISC molecular surface, (ii) SGS3 protects the 3' cleavage fragment of TAS2 RNA from degradation, and (iii) the observed SGS3-dependent stabilization of the 3' fragment of TAS2 RNA is key to tasiRNA production.

  7. NM23-H2 may play an indirect role in transcriptional activation of c-myc gene expression but does not cleave the nuclease hypersensitive element III1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Carey, Steven S.; Zuohe, Song; Gokhale, Vijay M.; Hu, Xiaohui; Murata, Lauren B.; Maes, Estelle M.; Weichsel, Andrzej; Sun, Daekyu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Montfort, William R.; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    The formation of G-quadruplex structures within the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III 1 region of the c-myc promoter and the ability of these structures to repress c-myc transcription have been well established. However, just how these extremely stable DNA secondary structures are transformed to activate c-myc transcription is still unknown. NM23-H2/nucleoside diphosphate kinase B has been recognized as an activator of c-myc transcription via interactions with the NHE III 1 region of the c-myc gene promoter. Through the use of RNA interference, we confirmed the transcriptional regulatory role of NM23-H2. In addition, we find that further purification of NM23-H2 results in loss of the previously identified DNA strand cleavage activity, but retention of its DNA binding activity. NM23-H2 binds to both single-stranded guanine- and cytosine-rich strands of the c-myc NHE III 1 and, to a lesser extent, to a random single-stranded DNA template. However, it does not bind to or cleave the NHE III 1 in duplex form. Significantly, potassium ions and compounds that stabilize the G-quadruplex and i-motif structures have an inhibitory effect on NM23-H2 DNA-binding activity. Mutation of Arg 88 to Ala 88 (R88A) reduced both DNA and nucleotide binding but had minimal effect on the NM23-H2 crystal structure. On the basis of these data and molecular modeling studies, we have proposed a stepwise trapping-out of the NHE III 1 region in a single-stranded form, thus allowing single-stranded transcription factors to bind and activate c-myc transcription. Furthermore, this model provides a rationale for how the stabilization of the G-quadruplex or i-motif structures formed within the c-myc gene promoter region can inhibit NM23-H2 from activating c-myc gene expression.

  8. 3′ fragment of miR173-programmed RISC-cleaved RNA is protected from degradation in a complex with RISC and SGS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Manabu; Iki, Taichiro; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Miyashita, Kyoko; Poethig, R. Scott; Habu, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) are plant-specific endogenous siRNAs produced via a unique pathway whose first step is the microRNA (miRNA)-programmed RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)–mediated cleavage of tasiRNA gene (TAS) transcripts. One of the products is subsequently transformed into tasiRNAs by a pathway that requires several factors including SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 (SGS3) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6. Here, using in vitro assembled ARGONAUTE (AGO)1–RISCs, we show that SGS3 is recruited onto RISCs only when they bind target RNA. Following cleavage by miRNA173 (miR173)-programmed RISC, SGS3 was found in complexes containing cleaved TAS2 RNA and RISC. The 3′ cleavage fragment (the source of tasiRNAs) was protected from degradation in this complex. Depletion of SGS3 did not affect TAS2 RNA cleavage by miR173-programmed RISC, but did affect the stability of the 3′ cleavage fragment. When the 3′ nucleotide of 22-nt miR173 was deleted or the corresponding nucleotide in TAS2 RNA was mutated, the complex was not observed and the 3′ cleavage fragment was degraded. Importantly, these changes in miR173 or TAS2 RNA are known to lead to a loss of tasiRNA production in vivo. These results suggest that (i) SGS3 associates with AGO1–RISC via the double-stranded RNA formed by the 3′-terminal nucleotides of 22-nt miR173 and corresponding target RNA, which probably protrudes from the AGO1–RISC molecular surface, (ii) SGS3 protects the 3′ cleavage fragment of TAS2 RNA from degradation, and (iii) the observed SGS3-dependent stabilization of the 3′ fragment of TAS2 RNA is key to tasiRNA production. PMID:23417299

  9. Cleavage of influenza RNA by using a human PUF-based artificial RNA-binding protein–staphylococcal nuclease hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Kento; Masaoka, Keisuke; Fujita, Yusuke; Morisada, Ryosuke; Mori, Koichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Sera, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Various viruses infect animals and humans and cause a variety of diseases, including cancer. However, effective methodologies to prevent virus infection have not yet been established. Therefore, development of technologies to inactivate viruses is highly desired. We have already demonstrated that cleavage of a DNA virus genome was effective to prevent its replication. Here, we expanded this methodology to RNA viruses. In the present study, we used staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) instead of the PIN domain (PilT N-terminus) of human SMG6 as an RNA-cleavage domain and fused the SNase to a human Pumilio/fem-3 binding factor (PUF)-based artificial RNA-binding protein to construct an artificial RNA restriction enzyme with enhanced RNA-cleavage rates for influenzavirus. The resulting SNase-fusion nuclease cleaved influenza RNA at rates 120-fold greater than the corresponding PIN-fusion nuclease. The cleaving ability of the PIN-fusion nuclease was not improved even though the linker moiety between the PUF and RNA-cleavage domain was changed. Gel shift assays revealed that the RNA-binding properties of the PUF derivative used was not as good as wild type PUF. Improvement of the binding properties or the design method will allow the SNase-fusion nuclease to cleave an RNA target in mammalian animal cells and/or organisms. - Highlights: • A novel RNA restriction enzyme using SNase was developed tor cleave viral RNA. • Our enzyme cleaved influenza RNA with rates >120-fold higher rates a PIN-fusion one. • Our artificial enzyme with the L5 linker showed the highest RNA cleavage rate. • Our artificial enzyme site-selectively cleaved influenza RNA in vitro.

  10. Lifestyle influences human sperm functional quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mnica Ferreira; Joana Vieira Silva; Vladimiro Silva; Antnio Barros; Margarida Fardilha

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the impact of acute lifestyle changes on human sperm functional quality.Methods:In the academic festivities week, young and apparently healthy male students who voluntarily submit themselves to acute lifestyle alterations(among the potentially important variations are increase in alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco consumption and circadian rhythm shifts) were used as a model system.Sperm samples were obtained before and after the academic week and compared by traditional semen analysis(n=54) and also tested for cleavedPolyADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) protein, an apoptotic marker(n=35).Results:Acute lifestyle changes that occurred during the academic week festivities(the study model) resulted both in a significant reduction in sperm quality, assessed by basic semen analysis(decrease in sperm concentration, total number of spermatozoa, progressive and non-progressive motility and increase in sperm morphological abnormalities) and by an increase in the expression of the apoptotic marker, cleavedPARP, in the ejaculate.Conclusions:Acute lifestyle changes have clear deleterious effects on sperm quality.We propose cleavedPARP as a novel molecular marker, valuable for assessing spermquality in parallel with the basic semen analysis method.

  11. Analysis of Apoptosis in Ultraviolet-Induced Sea Cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) Melting Using Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl-Transferase-Mediated dUTP Nick End-Labeling Assay and Cleaved Caspase-3 Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-Feng; Gao, Rong-Chun; Wu, Hai-Tao; Li, Peng-Fei; Hu, Xian-Shu; Zhou, Da-Yong; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-04

    The sea cucumber body wall melting phenomenon occurs under certain circumstances, and the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study investigated the apoptosis in the ultraviolet (UV)-induced sea cucumber melting phenomenon. Fresh sea cucumbers (Stichopus japonicus) were exposed to UV radiation for half an hour at an intensity of 0.056 mW/cm(2) and then held at room temperature for melting development. The samples were histologically processed into formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The apoptosis of samples was analyzed with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. The emergence of TUNEL-positive cells speeds up between 0.5 and 2 h after UV irradiation. Cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were obviously detected in sample tissues immediately after the UV irradiation. These results demonstrated that sea cucumber melting induced by UV irradiation was triggered by the activation of caspase-3 followed by DNA fragmentation in sea cucumber tissue, which was attributed to apoptosis but was not a consequence of autolysis activity.

  12. Magnetotransport measurements on AFM structured two-dimensional electron gases on cleaved edges of GaAs/AlGaAs; Magnetotransportmessungen an AFM-strukturierten zweidimensionalen Elektronengasen auf GaAs/AlGaAs-Spaltkanten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinwald, Elisabeth

    2009-06-25

    In this thesis a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) on a (110) cleavage plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure was produced by means of cleaved edge overgrowth (CEO) and modulated in two dimensions. The 2DEG was modulated in one direction by a superlattice of the subjacent GaAs/AlGaAs(001) heterostructure. A second modulation, perpendicular to the first was realized by local anodic oxidation (LAO) with an atomic force microscope (AFM). For the process of LAO an electric voltage is applied between the tip of the AFM and the surface of the GaAs. The natural water film on the surface acts as electrolyte so that the GaAs surface is locally oxidized underneath the AFM tip. This oxide leads to a band bending so that the 2DEG underneath the oxide is locally depleted. On these systems magnetotransport measurements revealed that it is actually possible to modulate 2DEGs on a sufficient large area by local anodic oxidation. On the cleaved surfaces the influence of the two dimensional modulation on the electron gas has been demonstrated. (orig.)

  13. A highly active endo-levanase BT1760 of a dominant mammalian gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron cleaves not only various bacterial levans, but also levan of timothy grass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardo, Karin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Vija, Heiki

    2017-01-01

    of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, its mutant Asp300Asn, levansucrases of Zymomonas mobilis, Erwinia herbicola, Halomonas smyrnensis as well as on levan isolated from timothy grass. For the first time a plant levan is shown as a perfect substrate for an endo-fructanase of a human gut bacterium. BT1760 degraded...... levans to FOS with degree of polymerization from 2 to 13. At optimal reaction conditions up to 1 g of FOS were produced per 1 mg of BT1760 protein. Low molecular weight (grass levan and levan synthesized from sucrose by the Lsc3Asp300Asn, were degraded most rapidly...... whilst levan produced by Lsc3 from raffinose least rapidly. BT1760 catalyzed finely at human body temperature (37°C) and in moderately acidic environment (pH 5-6) that is typical for the gut lumen. According to differential scanning fluorimetry, the Tm of the endo-levanase was 51.5°C. All tested levans...

  14. Human IgG is produced in a pro-form that requires clipping of C-terminal lysines for maximal complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Bremer, E. T. J.; Beurskens, F. J.; Voorhorst, M.

    2015-01-01

    Human IgG is produced with C-terminal lysines that are cleaved off in circulation. The function of this modification was unknown and generally thought not to affect antibody function. We recently reported that efficient C1q binding and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) requires IgG hexameri...

  15. Cloning, expression and characterization of a mammalian Nudix hydrolase-like enzyme that cleaves the pyrophosphate bond of UDP-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Toshihiro; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Muñoz, Francisco José; Akazawa, Takashi; Hong, Kyoung Su; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2003-03-01

    A distinct UDP-glucose (UDPG) pyrophosphatase (UGPPase, EC 3.6.1.45) has been characterized using pig kidney ( Sus scrofa ). This enzyme hydrolyses UDPG, the precursor molecule of numerous glycosylation reactions in animals, to produce glucose 1-phosphate (G1P) and UMP. Sequence analyses of the purified enzyme revealed that, similar to the case of a nucleotide-sugar hydrolase controlling the intracellular levels of ADP-glucose linked to glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli [Moreno-Bruna, Baroja-Fernández, Muñoz, Bastarrica-Berasategui, Zandueta-Criado, Rodri;guez-López, Lasa, Akazawa and Pozueta-Romero (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 8128-8132], UGPPase appears to be a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated Nudix hydrolases. A complete cDNA of the UGPPase-encoding gene, designated UGPP, was isolated from a human thyroid cDNA library and expressed in E. coli. The resulting cells accumulated a protein that showed kinetic properties identical to those of pig UGPPase.

  16. The thioredoxin reductase--Thioredoxin redox system cleaves the interchain disulphide bond of botulinum neurotoxins on the cytosolic surface of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Lista, Florigio; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are Janus toxins, as they are at the same time the most deadly substances known and one of the safest drugs used in human therapy. They specifically block neurotransmission at peripheral nerves through the proteolysis of SNARE proteins, i.e. the essential proteins which are the core of the neuroexocytosis machinery. Even if BoNTs are traditionally known as seven main serotypes, their actual number is much higher as each serotype exists in many different subtypes, with individual biological properties and little antigenic relations. Since BoNTs can be used as biological weapons, and the only currently available therapy is based on immunological approaches, the existence of so many different subtypes is a major safety problem. Nevertheless, all BoNT isoforms are structurally similar and intoxicate peripheral nerve endings via a conserved mechanism. They consist of two chains linked by a unique disulphide bond which must be reduced to enable their toxicity. We found that thioredoxin 1 and its reductase compose the cell redox system responsible for this reduction, and its inhibition via specific chemicals significantly reduces BoNTs activity, in vitro as well as in vivo. Such molecules can be considered as lead compounds for the development of pan-inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Le Francais parle en situation minoritaire: Volume I (French Spoken in Minority Situations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeon, Raymond; And Others

    A previous study indicated localities in which students speak French most of the time, localities where they speak it only sometimes, and one locality between the two extremes. The study reported here was of students in three localities belonging to the groups just mentioned, namely, Cornwall, Pembroke, and North Bay. It revealed that students who…

  18. The role of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the cytotoxic T lymphocyte reaction and in the secretion of N alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester-serine esterase by human T cell clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchard, D.; Aubry, J. P.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1989-01-01

    Human T cell clones contain enzymes that can cleave the substrate N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester (BLT). All CTL clones tested in this study secreted BLT-serine esterase activity, whereas only one of three tested non-cytolytic T cell clones secreted this enzymatic activity upon

  19. The Golgi-Localized γ-Ear-Containing ARF-Binding (GGA Proteins Alter Amyloid-β Precursor Protein (APP Processing through Interaction of Their GAE Domain with the Beta-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern von Einem

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP by beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is the initial step in the production of amyloid beta (Aβ, which accumulates in senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Essential for this cleavage is the transport and sorting of both proteins through endosomal/Golgi compartments. Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding (GGA proteins have striking cargo-sorting functions in these pathways. Recently, GGA1 and GGA3 were shown to interact with BACE1, to be expressed in neurons, and to be decreased in AD brain, whereas little is known about GGA2. Since GGA1 impacts Aβ generation by confining APP to the Golgi and perinuclear compartments, we tested whether all GGAs modulate BACE1 and APP transport and processing. We observed decreased levels of secreted APP alpha (sAPPα, sAPPβ, and Aβ upon GGA overexpression, which could be reverted by knockdown. GGA-BACE1 co-immunoprecipitation was impaired upon GGA-GAE but not VHS domain deletion. Autoinhibition of the GGA1-VHS domain was irrelevant for BACE1 interaction. Our data suggest that all three GGAs affect APP processing via the GGA-GAE domain.

  20. Development of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and a CAPS-based genetic linkage map in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsum. and Nakai) constructed using whole-genome re-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Qianglong; Luan, Feishi; Davis, Angela R; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-03-01

    Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers are useful tools for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study detected and converted SNP sites into CAPS markers based on high-throughput re-sequencing data in watermelon, for linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Two inbred lines, Cream of Saskatchewan (COS) and LSW-177 had been re-sequenced and analyzed by Perl self-compiled script for CAPS marker development. 88.7% and 78.5% of the assembled sequences of the two parental materials could map to the reference watermelon genome, respectively. Comparative assembled genome data analysis provided 225,693 and 19,268 SNPs and indels between the two materials. 532 pairs of CAPS markers were designed with 16 restriction enzymes, among which 271 pairs of primers gave distinct bands of the expected length and polymorphic bands, via PCR and enzyme digestion, with a polymorphic rate of 50.94%. Using the new CAPS markers, an initial CAPS-based genetic linkage map was constructed with the F2 population, spanning 1836.51 cM with 11 linkage groups and 301 markers. 12 QTLs were detected related to fruit flesh color, length, width, shape index, and brix content. These newly CAPS markers will be a valuable resource for breeding programs and genetic studies of watermelon.

  1. Altered endoribonuclease activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 variants identified in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Cheol Kim

    Full Text Available Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is the major mammalian enzyme in the DNA base excision repair pathway and cleaves the DNA phosphodiester backbone immediately 5' to abasic sites. APE1 also has 3'-5' DNA exonuclease and 3' DNA phosphodiesterase activities, and regulates transcription factor DNA binding through its redox regulatory function. The human APE1 has recently been shown to endonucleolytically cleave single-stranded regions of RNA. Towards understanding the biological significance of the endoribonuclease activity of APE1, we examined eight different amino acid substitution variants of APE1 previously identified in the human population. Our study shows that six APE1 variants, D148E, Q51H, I64V, G241R, R237A, and G306A, exhibit a 76-85% reduction in endoribonuclease activity against a specific coding region of the c-myc RNA, yet fully retain the ability to cleave apurinic/apyrimidinic DNA. We found that two APE1 variants, L104R and E126D, exhibit a unique RNase inhibitor-resistant endoribonuclease activity, where the proteins cleave c-myc RNA 3' of specific single-stranded guanosine residues. Expression of L104R and E126D APE1 variants in bacterial Origami cells leads to a 60-80% reduction in colony formation and a 1.5-fold increase in cell doubling time, whereas the other variants, which exhibit diminished endoribonuclease activity, had no effect. These data indicate that two human APE1 variants exhibit a unique endoribonuclease activity, which correlates with their ability to induce cytotoxicity or slow down growth in bacterial cells and supports the notion of their biological functionality.

  2. Activation and amplification of c-Ki-ras in a chemically induced transplantable human pancreas carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, I.; Maheshwari, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that carcinogenesis is associated with the stepwise activation of oncogenes. The c-Ki-ras oncogene has been demonstrated in several human solid tumors and is shown to be amplified in tumor cell lines. The authors have probed endonuclease cleaved human pancreas (HP) DNAs and DNAs from an in vitro induced transplantable human pancreas carcinoma (HP-T1) for the presence and/or amplification of c-Ki-ras oncogene. The DNAs were cleaved with BamHI, BgIII, EcoRI, HhaI, HinfI, KpnI, PSTI, PvuII, SaII, SstI, TaqI or XbaI and were subjected to Southern blot analysis using 32 P-labelled EcoRI fragments from HiHi3 clone. The hybridization profiles were similar in both DNAs when digested with BamHI, BgIII, HinfI, KpnI, SaII, SstI, or TaqI. The EcoRI cleaved DNAs from HP and HP-T1 revealed two hybridizing fragments of 6.8 and 3.0 kbp. The 3.0 kbp fragments in DNA from HP-T1 showed more than a 100 folds enhancement as compared to that of HP. The 6.8 hybridizing fragments also appeared 10 fold greater in HP-T1 DNA. Similar enhancements were also present in HP-T1 DNA cleaved with PstI and PvuII. Preliminary results from comparison of poly(A) + RNAs, prepared from total HP and HP-T1 RNAs, by Northern blot analysis using the same probe reflect similar enhancement in RNA from transplantable pancreas carcinoma

  3. Janice VanCleave's World: Trapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCleave, Janice

    2000-01-01

    Introduces young children to the safe study of insects and promotes respect for the study specimen. Children craft insects out of marshmallows, toothpicks, and cardboard and practice using a clear plastic cup to collect and observe insects through a magnifying lens. With their new skills, they can move on to studying real insects. (PVD)

  4. Energy enough to cleave the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodwell, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The author attempts to summarize the series of detailed presentations now available in this special BioScience issue. Old perspectives are supplemented by new insights. The old perspective deals with the effects of blast, heat, and ionizing radiation in the immediate vicinity of the bursts. The new insights point to global or hemispheric changes, climatic changes that may persist for months to years; the effect of these climatic changes alone could be profound, quite apart from the devastation wrought by blast, heat, ionizing radiation, and their interactions and sequelae

  5. 1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, inhibited human cancer cell growth more potently than sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Cui-Rong; Song, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Rui-Qi; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Li, Wen-Bao; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2014-04-01

    1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, is a derivative of indazole diarylurea. We evaluated the activity of 1082-39 against human cancer cell growth. Its effects and mechanisms of action were then compared with those of sorafenib. The experiments were performed in human melanoma M21 cells. Cell viability was estimated by using the colorimetric assay. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay was used to recognize the apoptotic cells. Further analysis of the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) was performed by the JC-1 fluorescence probe staining. The levels of apoptotic proteins and kinases related to cancer proliferation were determined by western blotting assay. 1082-39 possessed the activity against cancer cell proliferation with time- and dose-dependent manner. 1082-39 induced M21 cell to apoptosis, showing the increase of annexin V-FITC/PI staining cells, the MMP collapse and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria. Western blotting analysis showed the activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway, showing the increase of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP. Statistical analysis suggested that 1082-39 possessed greater activities than sorafenib in the inhibition of M21 proliferation and induction of apoptosis. These effects of 1082-39 might arise from its activity of regulation the PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. 1082-39 is a promising candidate compound which could develop as a potent anticancer agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. First demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid and plasma A beta lowering with oral administration of a beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Holahan, Marie A; Colussi, Dennis; Crouthamel, Ming-Chih; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Ellis, Joan; Espeseth, Amy; Gates, Adam T; Graham, Samuel L; Gregro, Allison R; Hazuda, Daria; Hochman, Jerome H; Holloway, Katharine; Jin, Lixia; Kahana, Jason; Lai, Ming-tain; Lineberger, Janet; McGaughey, Georgia; Moore, Keith P; Nantermet, Philippe; Pietrak, Beth; Price, Eric A; Rajapakse, Hemaka; Stauffer, Shaun; Steinbeiser, Melissa A; Seabrook, Guy; Selnick, Harold G; Shi, Xiao-Ping; Stanton, Matthew G; Swestock, John; Tugusheva, Katherine; Tyler, Keala X; Vacca, Joseph P; Wong, Jacky; Wu, Guoxin; Xu, Min; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Simon, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    beta-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 cleavage of amyloid precursor protein is an essential step in the generation of the potentially neurotoxic and amyloidogenic A beta 42 peptides in Alzheimer's disease. Although previous mouse studies have shown brain A beta lowering after BACE1 inhibition, extension of such studies to nonhuman primates or man was precluded by poor potency, brain penetration, and pharmacokinetics of available inhibitors. In this study, a novel tertiary carbinamine BACE1 inhibitor, tertiary carbinamine (TC)-1, was assessed in a unique cisterna magna ported rhesus monkey model, where the temporal dynamics of A beta in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma could be evaluated. TC-1, a potent inhibitor (IC(50) approximately 0.4 nM), has excellent passive membrane permeability, low susceptibility to P-glycoprotein transport, and lowered brain A beta levels in a mouse model. Intravenous infusion of TC-1 led to a significant but transient lowering of CSF and plasma A beta levels in conscious rhesus monkeys because it underwent CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. Oral codosing of TC-1 with ritonavir, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, twice daily over 3.5 days in rhesus monkeys led to sustained plasma TC-1 exposure and a significant and sustained reduction in CSF sAPP beta, A beta 40, A beta 42, and plasma A beta 40 levels. CSF A beta 42 lowering showed an EC(50) of approximately 20 nM with respect to the CSF [TC-1] levels, demonstrating excellent concordance with its potency in a cell-based assay. These results demonstrate the first in vivo proof of concept of CSF A beta lowering after oral administration of a BACE1 inhibitor in a nonhuman primate.

  7. The Triple Roles of Glutathione for a DNA-Cleaving DNAzyme and Development of a Fluorescent Glutathione/Cu2+-Dependent DNAzyme Sensor for Detection of Cu2+ in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijin; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Guiying; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Rui, Hongyue; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Jiacui; Jiang, Dazhi

    2017-03-24

    Pistol-like DNAzyme (PLDz) is an oxidative DNA-cleaving catalytic DNA with ascorbic acid as cofactor. Herein, glutathione was induced into the reaction system to maintain reduced ascorbic acid levels for higher efficient cleavage. However, data indicated that glutathione played triple roles in PLDz-catalyzed reactions. Glutathione alone had no effect on PLDz, and showed inhibitory effect on ascorbic acid-induced PLDz catalysis, but exhibited stimulating effect on Cu 2+ -promoted self-cleavage of PLDz. Further analysis of the effect of glutathione/Cu 2+ on PLDz indicated that H 2 O 2 played a key role in PLDz catalysis. Finally, we developed a fluorescent Cu 2+ sensor (PL-Cu 1.0) based on the relationship between glutathione/Cu 2+ and catalytic activity of PLDz. The fluorescent intensity showed a linear response toward the logarithm concentration of Cu 2+ over the range from 80 nM to 30 μM, with a detection limit of 21.1 nM. PL-Cu 1.0 provided only detection of Cu 2+ over other divalent metal ions. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ could not interfere with Cu 2+ detection even at a 1000-fold concentration. We further applied PL-Cu 1.0 for Cu 2+ detection in tap and bottled water. Water stored in copper taps overnight had relatively high Cu 2+ concentrations, with a maximum 22.3 μM. Trace Cu 2+ (52.2 nM) in deep spring was detected among the tested bottled water. Therefore, PL-Cu 1.0 is feasible to detect Cu 2+ in drinking water, with a practical application.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Substrate Binding Pockets and Their Re-Engineering for Human SNAP-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Litschko, Christa; Müller, Carina; Thiel, Nadine; Galli, Thierry; Eichner, Timo; Binz, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent bacterial proteins that block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAREs (soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). However, their serotype A (BoNT/A) that cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa) has also been an established pharmaceutical for treatment of medical conditions that rely on hyperactivity of cholinergic nerve terminals for 25 years. The expansion of its use to a variety of further medical conditions associated with hypersecretion components is prevented partly because the involved SNARE isoforms are not cleaved. Therefore, we examined by mutational analyses the reason for the resistance of human SNAP-23, an isoform of SNAP-25. We show that replacement of 10 SNAP-23 residues with their SNAP-25 counterparts effects SNAP-25-like cleavability. Conversely, transfer of each of the replaced SNAP-23 residues to SNAP-25 drastically decreased the cleavability of SNAP-25. By means of the existing SNAP-25-toxin co-crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulations, and corroborative mutagenesis studies, the appropriate binding pockets for these residues in BoNT/A were characterized. Systematic mutagenesis of two major BoNT/A binding pockets was conducted in order to adapt these pockets to corresponding amino acids of human SNAP-23. Human SNAP-23 cleaving mutants were isolated using a newly established yeast-based screening system. This method may be useful for engineering novel BoNT/A pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases that rely on SNAP-23-mediated hypersecretion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interfacial effects of the Cu{sub 2}O nano-dots decorated Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods array and its photocatalytic activity for cleaving organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, X.P. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, J.S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of New Haven, 300 Boston Post Road, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Xu, H.M.; Chen, W.X.; Hu, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, G.L., E-mail: glchen@zstu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} rods were grown on plasma treated Ti foil. • Cu{sub 2}O QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of nanorods. • Ti/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Cu{sub 2}O exhibited visible light photocatalytic activity with KHSO{sub 5}. • Degradation mechanism was supported by ESR technique and radical scavenger tests. • The heterojunction was highly stable even after recycling many times. - Abstract: A heterogeneous nanocomposite catalyst constructed by the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods decorated with the Cu{sub 2}O quantum dots (QDs) were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method followed by an oxidation-reduction processing. The fabricated Cu{sub 2}O/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite was characterized by the SEM, TEM, XPS, XRD, UV–vis and PL, and the (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) facets of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} were exposed. Compared with the original Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods with an average diameter of 350 nm, a substantial decrease in the band gap was observed after doping the nanorods with the Cu{sub 2}O QDs (average diameter of 5 nm). Such a dramatic decrease in the band gap indicated a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activities under visible light. The methylene blue (MB) dye and the phenol were used as model organic pollutants, and the Cu{sub 2}O/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite catalyst exhibited both high catalytic activity and good recycling stability. The catalytic activities of the Cu{sub 2}O/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/potassium monopersulfate triple salt (PMS) system for cleaving the MB and the phenol were dependent on the dosages of the Cu{sub 2}O QDs, and the calculated degradation rates achieved by 7.0 wt% Cu{sub 2}O/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite catalyst were about 11.3 and 1.8 times than that of the pristine Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorod catalyst for the MB and the phenol, respectively. The reactive species of ·O{sub 2}{sup −} and the holes were determined to be the main active species for the phenol photocatalytic

  10. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood.The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content during CR.The observed increase in

  11. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  12. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.

    1987-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120

  13. The human otubain2-ubiquitin structure provides insights into the cleavage specificity of poly-ubiquitin-linkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Altun

    Full Text Available Ovarian tumor domain containing proteases cleave ubiquitin (Ub and ubiquitin-like polypeptides from proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of human otubain 2 (OTUB2 in complex with a ubiquitin-based covalent inhibitor, Ub-Br2. The ubiquitin binding mode is oriented differently to how viral otubains (vOTUs bind ubiquitin/ISG15, and more similar to yeast and mammalian OTUs. In contrast to OTUB1 which has exclusive specificity towards Lys48 poly-ubiquitin chains, OTUB2 cleaves different poly-Ub linked chains. N-terminal tail swapping experiments between OTUB1 and OTUB2 revealed how the N-terminal structural motifs in OTUB1 contribute to modulating enzyme activity and Ub-chain selectivity, a trait not observed in OTUB2, supporting the notion that OTUB2 may affect a different spectrum of substrates in Ub-dependent pathways.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    and contamination by other B12 binders. We tested the use of recombinant plants for large-scale production of pathogen-free human recombinant IF. Human IF was successfully expressed in the recombinant plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Extract from fresh plants possessed high B12-binding capacity corresponding to 70 mg......Intrinsic factor (IF) is the gastric protein that promotes the intestinal uptake of vitamin B12. Gastric IF from animal sources is used in diagnostic tests and in vitamin pills. However, administration of animal IF to humans becomes disadvantageous because of possible pathogenic transmission...... IF per 1 kg wet weight. The dried plants still retained 60% of the IF activity. The purified IF preparation consisted of a 50-kDa glycosylated protein with the N-terminal sequence of mature IF. Approximately one-third of the protein was cleaved at the internal site em leader PSNP downward arrow GPGP...

  16. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2009-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  17. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Sun, Xiaofang, E-mail: xiaofangsun@hotmail.com [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2009-04-24

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  18. Von willebrand factor cleaving protease activity in the physiopathology of microangiopathic disorders Detección de la actividad de la proteasa que cliva al factor von Willebrand en la patofisiología de las microangiopatías

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Amaral

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (VWFCP modulates the von Willebrand factor (VWF multimeric size in normal plasma. VWFCP activity levels are decreased in different physiological and pathologic situations. Different techniques have been developed to unfold the purified VWF (perfusion at high shear rate, dialysis against urea in nitrocellulose filters, to detect the VWFCP activity on it (multimeric analysis of VWF, collagen binding to VWF assay and to use the patient plasma both as the source of the enzyme and substrate. In this paper we compared the above mentioned methods with new ones: normal plasma dialyzed on membranes instead of purified VWF, dialysis of the samples against urea in tubing instead of nitrocellulose filters, and sonicated plasma to remove the endogenous VWF. The perfusion assay and detection by multimeric analysis showed a limit of detection (25% of VWFCP activity. Dialysis against urea in both supports and detection by multimeric analysis, showed a better limit of detection (3%, but the recovery of the samples was not as efficient in nitrocellulose filters as it was in tubing. The detection by collagen binding to VWF has more advantages because it allows to analyze more samples than the multimeric analysis does in the same assay. The dialysis of plasma by membranes to obtain the source of exogenous VWF requires no complex equipment. The method, which uses patient plasma as the source of the enzyme and substrate, was inapplicable in our experience because the values could not be interpolated in the reference curve.La proteasa que cliva al factor von Willebrand (VWFCP controla el tamaño multimérico del factor von Willebrand (VWF en plasma normal. Sus niveles se encuentran disminuidos en diferentes situaciones fisiológicas y patológicas. Diferentes técnicas se desarrollaron para desplegar al VWF purificado (perfusión a alta fuerza de cizallamiento, diálisis contra urea en filtros de nitrocelulosa, para detectar

  19. Adrenal hormones in human follicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimena, P; Castilla, J A; Peran, F; Ramirez, J P; Vergara, F; Molina, R; Vergara, F; Herruzo, A

    1992-11-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adrenal hormones may affect gonadal function. To assess the role of some adrenal hormones in human follicular fluid and their relationship with the ability of the oocyte to be fertilized and then to cleave in vitro, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were measured in follicular fluid obtained at the time of oocyte recovery for in vitro fertilization from cycles stimulated by clomiphene citrate, human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. Thirty-six follicular fluid containing mature oocyte-corona-cumulus complexes and free of visible blood contamination were included in this study. There was no significant difference in follicular fluid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentration between follicles with oocytes which did or did not fertilize (5.1 +/- 1.1 vs 5.8 +/- 2.0 mumol/l). However, follicular fluid from follicles whose oocytes were not fertilized had levels of cortisol significantly higher than those in follicular fluid from follicles containing successfully fertilized oocytes (406.0 +/- 75.9 vs 339.2 +/- 37.0 nmol/l; p < 0.005). No significant correlations were found between rates of embryo cleavage and cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone levels in follicular fluid. We conclude that cortisol levels in follicular fluid may provide an index of fertilization outcome, at least in stimulated cycles by clomiphene citrate, human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin.

  20. Balanced secretion of anti-CEA x anti-CD3 diabody chains using the 2A self-cleaving peptide maximizes diabody assembly and tumor-specific cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Kasper; Compte, Marta; Alanes, Natalia Nuñez del Prado

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically engineered human cells secreting bispecific T cell engagers has shown encouraging therapeutic effects in preclinical models of cancer. However, reducing the toxicity and improving the effectiveness of this emerging immunotherapeutic strategy will be critical to it...

  1. Human leukocyte and porcine pancreatic elastase: X-ray crystal structures, mechanism, substrate specificity, and mechanism-based inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, W.; Meyer, E. Jr.; Powers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The serine protease family of enzymes is one of the most widely studied group of enzymes, as evidenced by the fact that more crystal structures are available for individuals of this superfamily than for any other homologous group of enzymes. These enzymes contain a conserved triad of catalytic residues including Ser-195, His-57, and Asp-102. The active-site serine is very nucleophilic, and serine proteases are inhibited by specific serine protease reagents such as diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP), phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. Elastases are a group of proteases that possess the ability to cleave the important connective tissue protein elastin. Elastin has the unique property of elastic recoil, is widely distributed in vertebrate tissue, and is particularly abundant in the lungs, arteries, skin, and ligaments. Human neutrophil elastase and pancreatic elastase are two major serine proteases that cleave elastin. Neutrophil elastase is found in the dense granules of polymorphonuclear leukycytes and is essential for phagocytosis and defense against infection by invading microorganisms. Pancreatic elastase is stored as an inactive zymogen in the pancreas and is secreted into the intestines where it becomes activated by trypsin and then participates in digestion. Both elastases cleave substrates at peptide bonds where the P 1 residue is an amino acid residue with a small alkyl side chain

  2. Clonal variation of DNA repair in a human glioma cell line This study was supported by the Cancer Research Campaign and the Bob Champion Cancer Trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Simon; McMillan, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    Clonal heterogeneity in response to ionizing radiation was found for a human glioma cell line, IN859. The authors have investigated the most sensitive clone, the most resistant clone and the parent line for differences in DNA repair fidelity using the method of plasmid reconstitution. Significant differences in repair fidelity were found between the two clones, and between the sensitive clone and the parent line. The resistant clone and the parent lines showed the greater repair fidelity. A comparison of two different restriction enzymes, which cleave the plasmid with blunt or cohesive-ended double-strand breaks, did not reveal differences in repair fidelity. Equal numbers of plasmids were integrated in each cell line, but the sensitive clone showed a higher frequency of misrepair of cleaved plasmid. Misrepair was characterized by partial or complete loss of sequence at the site of plasmid cleavage. It is concluded that the radiosensitive clone exhibits increased misrepair. (author). 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  4. Effect of Flavopiridol on Radiation-induced Apoptosis of Human Laryngeal and Lung Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suzy; Kwon, Eun Kyung; Lee, B. S.; Lee, Seung Hee; Park, B. S.; Wu, Hong Gyun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the flavopiridol effect on radiation-induced apoptosis and expression of apoptosisrelated genes of human laryngeal and lung cancer cells. Materials and Methods: A human laryngeal cancer cell line, AMC-HN3 and a human lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460, were used in the study. The cells were divided into four groups according to the type of treatment: 1) control groups; 2) cells that were only irradiated; 3) cells treated only with flavopiridol; 4) cells treated with flavopiridol and radiation simultaneously. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy of X-rays using a 4 MV linear accelerator. Flavopiridol was administered to the media at a concentration of 100 nM for 24 hours. We compared the fraction of apoptotic cells of each group 24 hours after the initiation of treatment. The fraction of apoptotic cells was detected by measurement of the sub-G1 fractions from a flow cytometric analysis. The expression of apoptosis-regulating genes, including cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), p53, p21, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated Akt (protein kinase B) were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: The sub-G1 fraction of cells was significantly increased in the combination treatment group, as compared to cells exposed to radiation alone or flavopiridol alone. Western blotting also showed an increased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression in cells of the combination treatment group, as compared with cells exposed to radiation alone or flavopiridol alone. Treatment with flavopiridol down regulated cyclin D1 expression of both cell lines but its effect on p53 and p21 expression was different according to each individual cell line. Flavopiridol did not affect the expression of phophorylated Akt in both cell lines. Conclusion: Treatment with flavopiridol increased radiation-induced apoptosis of both the human laryngeal and lung cancer cell lines. Flavopiridol effects on p53 and p21 expression were different according

  5. 3-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a novel combretastatin A-4 analog, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis by disrupting tubulin polymerization in human cervical HeLa cells and fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Guo, Dandan; Jiang, Xuewei; Guan, Qi; Qi, Huan; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Zengqiang; Yang, Fushan; Zhang, Weige; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-02-05

    Microtubule is a popular target for anticancer drugs. In this study, we describe the effect 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a newly synthesized analog of combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), showing a strong time- and dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. We demonstrated that the growth inhibitory effects of G-1103 in HeLa and HT-1080 cells were associated with microtubule depolymerization and proved that G-1103 acted as microtubule destabilizing agent. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that G-1103 treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in a time-dependent manner with subsequent apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of cdc25c and up-regulation of cyclin B1 was related with G2/M arrest in HeLa and HT-1080 cells treatment with G-1103. In addition, G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis was mainly associated with death receptor pathway. However, G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8, Bax and cleaved caspase-9 expression and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis was associated with both mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Taken together, all the data demonstrated that G-1103 exhibited its antitumor activity through disrupting the microtubule assembly, causing cell cycle arrest and consequently inducing apoptosis in HeLa and HT-1080 cells. Therefore, the novel compound G-1103 is a promising microtubule inhibitor that has great potentials for therapeutic treatment of various malignancies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  7. Radiation protective effect of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) on human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Y.; Okumura, K.; Terashima, S.; Sakakura, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of 5-Gy radiation on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the radiosensitivity of five human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines (SAS, Ca9-22, TT, BSC-OF and IS-FOM). In all of the cell lines, HIF-1α was expressed in mRNA, and radiation had no influence on gene transcription. The number of apoptotic cells increased 72 h after irradiation in cell lines SAS, Ca9-22 and TT cells, indicating low transcriptional levels of HIF-1α, and the levels of non-cleaved caspase-3, an executioner of apoptosis, and non-cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a marker of DNA damage early in apoptosis, decreased simultaneously. Conversely, radiation failed to induce apoptosis or to decrease expression of non-cleaved caspase-3 and PARP in cell-lines BSC-OF and IS-FOM cells that expressed high levels of HIF-1α. BSC-OF and IS-FOM cells exhibited high migratory capacity. When CoCl 2 was present in the medium, HIF-1α expression increased along with the survival of Ca9-22 cells after radiation exposure. These results suggest that OSCC cells expressing high levels of HIF-1α are resistant to radiation. HIF-1α can be used to control the short term radiosensitivity of cells. (authors)

  8. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-12-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p2 site, however, was cleaved approximately 20-fold faster when the adjacent downstream p2/NC site was blocked from cleavage or when the p2 domain of Gag was deleted. These results suggest that the presence of a C-terminal p2 tail on processing intermediates slows cleavage at the upstream CA/p2 site. We also found that lower pH selectively accelerated cleavage of the CA/p2 processing site in the full-length precursor and as a peptide primarily by a sequence-based mechanism rather than by a change in protein conformation. Deletion of the p2 domain of Gag results in released virions that are less infectious despite the presence of the processed final products of Gag. These findings suggest that the p2 domain of HIV-1 Gag regulates the rate of cleavage at the CA/p2 processing site during sequential processing in vitro and in infected cells and that p2 may function in the proper assembly of virions.

  9. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  10. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  11. Secreted osteopontin is highly polymerized in human airways and fragmented in asthmatic airway secretions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Arjomandi

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a member of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING family and a cytokine with diverse biologic roles. OPN undergoes extensive post-translational modifications, including polymerization and proteolytic fragmentation, which alters its biologic activity. Recent studies suggest that OPN may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma.To determine whether secreted OPN (sOPN is polymerized in human airways and whether it is qualitatively different in asthma, we used immunoblotting to examine sOPN in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid samples from 12 healthy and 21 asthmatic subjects (and in sputum samples from 27 healthy and 21 asthmatic subjects. All asthmatic subjects had mild to moderate asthma and abstained from corticosteroids during the study. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between airway sOPN and cellular inflammation.We found that sOPN in BAL fluid and sputum exists in polymeric, monomeric, and cleaved forms, with most of it in polymeric form. Compared to healthy subjects, asthmatic subjects had proportionately less polymeric sOPN and more monomeric and cleaved sOPN. Polymeric sOPN in BAL fluid was associated with increased alveolar macrophage counts in airways in all subjects.These results suggest that sOPN in human airways (1 undergoes extensive post-translational modification by polymerization and proteolytic fragmentation, (2 is more fragmented and less polymerized in subjects with mild to moderate asthma, and (3 may contribute to recruitment or survival of alveolar macrophages.

  12. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  13. Genetics of human sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, James E.

    1994-07-01

    the major human health effects of solar and artificial UV light occur from the UVB and UVC wavelength ranges and involve a variety of short-term and long-term deleterious changes to the skin and eyes. the more important initial damage to cellular macromolecules involves dimerization of adjacent pyrimidines in DNA to produce cyclobutane pyrimidine dimes, (6-4) pyrimidine- pyrimidone, and (6-4) dewar photoproducts. these photoproducts can be repaired by a genetically regulated enzyme system (nucleotide excision repair) which removes oligonucleotides 29-30 nucleotides long that contain the photoproducts, and synthesizes replacement patches. At least a dozen gene products are involved in the process of recognizing photoproducts in DNA, altering local DNA helicity and cleaving the polynucleotide chain at defined positions either side of a photoproduct. Hereditary mutations in many of these genes are recognized in the human genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). Several of the gene products have other functions involving the regulation of gene transcription which accounts for the complex clinical presentation of repair deficient diseases that involve sensitivity of the skin and eyes to UV light, increased solar carcinogenesis (in XP), demyelination, and ganglial calcification (in CS), hair abnormalities (in TTD), and developmental and neurological abnormalities

  14. Proglucagon processing in porcine and human pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Bersani, M; Johnsen, A H

    1994-01-01

    In the pancreas proglucagon (PG), a peptide precursor of 160 amino acids is cleaved to produce glucagon and a 30-amino acid N-terminal flanking peptide, but the fate of the C-terminal flanking peptide (99 amino acids) is incompletely known. We subjected acid ethanol extracts of human and porcine...... pancreases to gel filtration and analyzed the fractions with specific radioimmunoassays for the following regions of proglucagon: PG 62-69, PG 72-81, PG 78-87, PG 98-107 amide, PG 126-134, and PG 149-158. Based on these assays and successive purifications by high performance liquid chromatography we isolated...... PG 72-158 = 9971) was isolated from human pancreas together with small amounts of a peptide corresponding to PG 72-107 amide. Thus, the pancreatic processing of the C-terminal flanking peptide in proglucagon includes the formation of equimolar (to glucagon) amounts of PG 64-69 and PG 72-158 (major...

  15. Nuclear pore complex protein mediated nuclear localization of dicer protein in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Ando

    Full Text Available Human DICER1 protein cleaves double-stranded RNA into small sizes, a crucial step in production of single-stranded RNAs which are mediating factors of cytoplasmic RNA interference. Here, we clearly demonstrate that human DICER1 protein localizes not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleoplasm. We also find that human DICER1 protein associates with the NUP153 protein, one component of the nuclear pore complex. This association is detected predominantly in the cytoplasm but is also clearly distinguishable at the nuclear periphery. Additional characterization of the NUP153-DICER1 association suggests NUP153 plays a crucial role in the nuclear localization of the DICER1 protein.

  16. Human engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Hwan; Park, Bum; Gang, Yeong Sik; Gal, Won Mo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Choe, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Dae Sung

    2006-07-01

    This book mentions human engineering, which deals with introduction of human engineering, Man-Machine system like system design, and analysis and evaluation of Man-Machine system, data processing and data input, display, system control of man, human mistake and reliability, human measurement and design of working place, human working, hand tool and manual material handling, condition of working circumstance, working management, working analysis, motion analysis working measurement, and working improvement and design in human engineering.

  17. New structural analogues of curcumin exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen, Ling; Hutzen, Brian; Ball, Sarah; DeAngelis, Stephanie; Chen, Chun-Liang; Fuchs, James R; Li, Chenglong; Li, Pui-Kai; Lin, Jiayuh

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed for colorectal carcinoma. Curcumin, the active component and yellow pigment of turmeric, has been reported to have several anti-cancer activities including anti-proliferation, anti-invasion, and anti-angiogenesis. Clinical trials have suggested that curcumin may serve as a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for colorectal cancer. We compared the inhibitory effects of curcumin and novel structural analogues, GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12, in three independent human colorectal cancer cell lines, SW480, HT-29, and HCT116. MTT cell viability assay was used to examine the cell viability/proliferation and western blots were used to determine the level of PARP cleavages. Half-Maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) were calculated using Sigma Plot 9.0 software. Curcumin inhibited cell viability in all three of the human colorectal cancer cell lines studied with IC 50 values ranging between 10.26 μM and 13.31 μM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 were more potent than curcumin in the inhibition of cell viability in these three human colorectal cancer cell lines with IC 50 values ranging between 0.51 μM and 4.48 μM. In addition, FLLL-11 and FLLL-12 exhibit low toxicity to WI-38 normal human lung fibroblasts with an IC-50 value greater than 1,000 μM. GO-Y030, FLLL-11, and FLLL-12 are also more potent than curcumin in the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 in all three human colorectal cancer cell lines studied. The results indicate that the three curcumin analogues studied exhibit more potent inhibitory activity than curcumin in human colorectal cancer cells. Thus, they may have translational potential as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents for colorectal carcinoma

  18. Urine exosomes from healthy and hypertensive pregnancies display elevated level of - α-subunit and cleaved - α- and γ-subunits of the epithelial sodium channel--ENaC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maria Ravn; Frederiksen-Møller, Britta; Langkilde, Rikke Zachar

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, suppression of plasma renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, and impaired urine sodium excretion. Aberrantly filtered plasmin in urine may activate proteolytically the γ-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and promote Na+ reabsorption...... aldosterone was higher in pregnancy compared to non-pregnancy, and the urine Na/K ratio was lower in preeclampsia compared to healthy pregnancy. Exosome markers ALIX and AQP-2 were stably associated with exosomes across groups. Exosomal α-ENaC-subunit migrated at 75 kDa and dominantly at 50 k......Da and was significantly elevated in pregnancy. In human kidney cortex tissue and two of four pelvis catheter urine, ~90-100 kDa full-length γ-ENaC was detected while no full-length γ-ENaC but 75, 60, and 37 kDa variants dominated in voided urine exosomes. There was no difference in γ-ENaC protein abundances between...

  19. The Processed Amino-Terminal Fragment of Human TLR7 Acts as a Chaperone To Direct Human TLR7 into Endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Dawn; Booth, Sarah; Waithe, Dominic; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    TLR7 mediates innate immune responses to viral RNA in endocytic compartments. Mouse and human (h)TLR7 undergo proteolytic cleavage, resulting in the generation of a C-terminal fragment that accumulates in endosomes and associates with the signaling adaptor MyD88 upon receptor triggering by TLR7 agonists. Although mouse TLR7 is cleaved in endosomes by acidic proteases, hTLR7 processing can occur at neutral pH throughout the secretory pathway through the activity of furin-like proprotein convertases. However, the mechanisms by which cleaved hTLR7 reaches the endosomal compartment remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that, after hTLR7 proteolytic processing, the liberated amino (N)-terminal fragment remains bound to the C terminus through disulfide bonds and provides key trafficking information that ensures correct delivery of the complex to endosomal compartments. In the absence of the N-terminal fragment, the C-terminal fragment is redirected to the cell surface, where it is functionally inactive. Our data reveal a novel role for the N terminus of hTLR7 as a molecular chaperone that provides processed hTLR7 with the correct targeting instructions to reach the endosomal compartment, hence ensuring its biological activity and preventing inadvertent cell surface responses to self-RNA. PMID:25917086

  20. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards

  1. Spiegelzymes® mirror-image hammerhead ribozymes and mirror-image DNAzymes, an alternative to siRNAs and microRNAs to cleave mRNAs in vivo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Wyszko

    Full Text Available With the discovery of small non-coding RNA (ncRNA molecules as regulators for cellular processes, it became intriguing to develop technologies by which these regulators can be applied in molecular biology and molecular medicine. The application of ncRNAs has significantly increased our knowledge about the regulation and functions of a number of proteins in the cell. It is surprising that similar successes in applying these small ncRNAs in biotechnology and molecular medicine have so far been very limited. The reasons for these observations may lie in the high complexity in which these RNA regulators function in the cells and problems with their delivery, stability and specificity. Recently, we have described mirror-image hammerhead ribozymes and DNAzymes (Spiegelzymes® which can sequence-specifically hydrolyse mirror-image nucleic acids, such as our mirror-image aptamers (Spiegelmers discovered earlier. In this paper, we show for the first time that Spiegelzymes are capable of recognising complementary enantiomeric substrates (D-nucleic acids, and that they efficiently hydrolyse them at submillimolar magnesium concentrations and at physiologically relevant conditions. The Spiegelzymes are very stable in human sera, and do not require any protein factors for their function. They have the additional advantages of being non-toxic and non-immunogenic. The Spiegelzymes can be used for RNA silencing and also as therapeutic and diagnostic tools in medicine. We performed extensive three-dimensional molecular modelling experiments with mirror-image hammerhead ribozymes and DNAzymes interacting with D-RNA targets. We propose a model in which L/D-double helix structures can be formed by natural Watson-Crick base pairs, but where the nucleosides of one of the two strands will occur in an anticlinal conformation. Interestingly enough, the duplexes (L-RNA/D-RNA and L-DNA/D-RNA in these models can show either right- or left-handedness. This is a very new

  2. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts and techniques of human reliability have been developed and are used mostly in probabilistic risk assessment. For this, the major application of human reliability assessment has been to identify the human errors which have a significant effect on the overall safety of the system and to quantify the probability of their occurrence. Some of the major issues within human reliability studies are reviewed and it is shown how these are applied to the assessment of human failures in systems. This is done under the following headings; models of human performance used in human reliability assessment, the nature of human error, classification of errors in man-machine systems, practical aspects, human reliability modelling in complex situations, quantification and examination of human reliability, judgement based approaches, holistic techniques and decision analytic approaches. (UK)

  3. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  4. Human niche, human behaviour, human nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Agustin

    2017-10-06

    The concept of a 'human nature' or 'human natures' retains a central role in theorizing about the human experience. In Homo sapiens it is clear that we have a suite of capacities generated via our evolutionary past, and present, and a flexible capacity to create and sustain particular kinds of cultures and to be shaped by them. Regardless of whether we label these capacities 'human natures' or not, humans occupy a distinctive niche and an evolutionary approach to examining it is critical. At present we are faced with a few different narratives as to exactly what such an evolutionary approach entails. There is a need for a robust and dynamic theoretical toolkit in order to develop a richer, and more nuanced, understanding of the cognitively sophisticated genus Homo and the diverse sorts of niches humans constructed and occupied across the Pleistocene, Holocene, and into the Anthropocene. Here I review current evolutionary approaches to 'human nature', arguing that we benefit from re-framing our investigations via the concept of the human niche and in the context of the extended evolutionary synthesis (EES). While not a replacement of standard evolutionary approaches, this is an expansion and enhancement of our toolkit. I offer brief examples from human evolution in support of these assertions.

  5. The antigen-binding fragment of human gamma immunoglobulin prevents amyloid β-peptide folding into β-sheet to form oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Guivernau, Biuse; Bonet, Jaume; Puig, Marta; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palomer, Ernest; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Altafaj, Xavier; Tajes, Marta; Puig-Pijoan, Albert; Vicente, Rubén; Oliva, Baldomero; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) plays a leading role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) physiopathology. Even though monomeric forms of Aβ are harmless to cells, Aβ can aggregate into β-sheet oligomers and fibrils, which are both neurotoxic. Therefore, one of the main therapeutic approaches to cure or delay AD onset and progression is targeting Aβ aggregation. In the present study, we show that a pool of human gamma immunoglobulins (IgG) protected cortical neurons from the challenge with Aβ oligomers, as assayed by MTT reduction, caspase-3 activation and cytoskeleton integrity. In addition, we report the inhibitory effect of IgG on Aβ aggregation, as shown by Thioflavin T assay, size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy. Similar results were obtained with Palivizumab, a human anti-sincitial virus antibody. In order to dissect the important domains, we cleaved the pool of human IgG with papain to obtain Fab and Fc fragments. Using these cleaved fragments, we functionally identified Fab as the immunoglobulin fragment inhibiting Aβ aggregation, a result that was further confirmed by an in silico structural model. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools show a highly conserved structure able to bind amyloid in the Fab region. Overall, our data strongly support the inhibitory effect of human IgG on Aβ aggregation and its neuroprotective role. PMID:28467807

  6. Activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monkovic, D.D.; Tracy, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    The activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin was studied by functional assessment of cofactor activity and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polycarylamide gel electrophoresis followed by either autoradiography of 125 I-labeled factor V activation products or Western blot analyses of unlabeled factor V activation products. Cofactor activity was measured by the ability of the factor V/Va peptides to support the activation of prothrombin. The factor Xa catalyzed cleavage of factor V was observed to be time, phospholipid, and calcium ion dependent, yielding a cofactor with activity equal to that of thrombin-activated factor V (factor Va). The cleavage pattern differed markedly from the one observed in the bovine system. The factor Xa activated factor V subunits expressing cofactor activity were isolated and found to consist of peptides of M r 220,000 and 105,000. Although thrombin cleaved the M r 220,000 peptide to yield peptides previously shown to be products of thrombin activation, cofactor activity did not increase. N-Terminal sequence analysis confirmed that both factor Xa and thrombin cleave factor V at the same bond to generate the M r 220,000 peptide. The factor Xa dependent functional assessment of 125 I-labeled factor V coupled with densitometric analyses of the cleavage products indicated that the cofactor activity of factor Xa activated factor V closely paralleled the appearance of the M r 220,000 peptide. The data indicate that factor Xa is as efficient an enzyme toward factor V as thrombin

  7. Human heme oxygenase oxidation of 5- and 15-phenylhemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Niemevz, Fernando; Lad, Latesh; Huang, Liusheng; Alvarez, Diego E; Buldain, Graciela; Poulos, Thomas L; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2004-10-08

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. Previous work indicated that electrophilic addition of the terminal oxygen of the ferric hydroperoxo complex to the alpha-meso-carbon gives 5-hydroxyheme. Earlier efforts to block this reaction with a 5-methyl substituent failed, as the reaction still gave biliverdin IXalpha. Surprisingly, a 15-methyl substituent caused exclusive cleavage at the gamma-meso-rather than at the normal, unsubstituted alpha-meso-carbon. No CO was formed in these reactions, but the fragment cleaved from the porphyrin eluded identification. We report here that hHO-1 cleaves 5-phenylheme to biliverdin IXalpha and oxidizes 15-phenylheme at the alpha-meso position to give 10-phenylbiliverdin IXalpha. The fragment extruded in the oxidation of 5-phenylheme is benzoic acid, one oxygen of which comes from O2 and the other from water. The 2.29- and 2.11-A crystal structures of the hHO-1 complexes with 1- and 15-phenylheme, respectively, show clear electron density for both the 5- and 15-phenyl rings in both molecules of the asymmetric unit. The overall structure of 15-phenylheme-hHO-1 is similar to that of heme-hHO-1 except for small changes in distal residues 141-150 and in the proximal Lys18 and Lys22. In the 5-phenylheme-hHO-1 structure, the phenyl-substituted heme occupies the same position as heme in the heme-HO-1 complex but the 5-phenyl substituent disrupts the rigid hydrophobic wall of residues Met34, Phe214, and residues 26-42 near the alpha-meso carbon. The results provide independent support for an electrophilic oxidation mechanism and support a role for stereochemical control of the reaction regiospecificity.

  8. Hidden layers of human small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Mari; Takahashi, Yukari

    2008-01-01

    small RNA have focused on miRNA and/or siRNA rather than on the exploration of additional classes of RNAs. RESULTS: Here, we explored human small RNAs by unbiased sequencing of RNAs with sizes of 19-40 nt. We provide substantial evidences for the existence of independent classes of small RNAs. Our data......BACKGROUND: Small RNA attracts increasing interest based on the discovery of RNA silencing and the rapid progress of our understanding of these phenomena. Although recent studies suggest the possible existence of yet undiscovered types of small RNAs in higher organisms, many studies to profile...... shows that well-characterized non-coding RNA, such as tRNA, snoRNA, and snRNA are cleaved at sites specific to the class of ncRNA. In particular, tRNA cleavage is regulated depending on tRNA type and tissue expression. We also found small RNAs mapped to genomic regions that are transcribed in both...

  9. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senior, BW; Batten, MR; Kilian, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were const...... constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases....

  10. The heterocyclic ring fission and dehydroxylation of catechins and related compounds by Eubacterium sp. strain SDG-2, a human intestinal bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Q; Meselhy, M R; Li, Y; Nakamura, N; Min, B S; Qin, G W; Hattori, M

    2001-12-01

    A human intestinal bacterium, Eubacterium (E.) sp. strain SDG-2, was tested for its ability to metabolize various (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols and their 3-O-gallates. This bacterium cleaved the C-ring of (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols to give 1,3-diphenylpropan-2-ol derivatives, but not their 3-O-gallates. Furthermore, E. sp. strain SDG-2 had the ability of p-dehydroxylation in the B-ring of (3R)-flavan-3-ols, such as (-)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, but not of (3S)-flavan-3-ols, such as (+)-catechin and (+)-epicatechin.

  11. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-AAG suppresses growth and induces apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Zheng, Zhichao; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Gu, Xiaohu; Yang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells. Cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution were measured by the MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Induction of apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and Hoechst staining. The expressions of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bcl-2, Survivin, and Cyclin B1 were detected by Western blot analysis. The activity of caspase-3 was also examined. We found that 17-AAG inhibited cell growth and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CCA cells together with the down-regulation of Bcl-2, Survivin and Cyclin B1, and the up-regulation of cleaved PARP. Moreover, increased caspase-3 activity was also observed in CCA cells treated with 17-AAG. In conclusion, our data suggest that the inhibition of HSP90 function by 17-AAG may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human CCA.

  12. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  13. Human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, S.; Neill, R.; Williams, R.; Bauser, M.; Channell, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper focused on the possible approaches to evaluating the impacts of human intrusion on nuclear waste disposal. Several major issues were reviewed. First, it was noted that human intrusion could be addressed either quantitatively through performance assessments or qualitatively through design requirements. Second, it was decided that it was impossible to construct a complete set of possible future human intrusion scenarios. Third, the question of when the effect of possible human intrusion should be considered, before or after site selection was reviewed. Finally, the time frame over which human intrusion should be considered was discussed

  14. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation...... will ask and try to answer. The mobile phone and its devices are depicted as being able to make a unique human presence, interaction, and affect. The medium, the technology is a necessary helper to get towards this very special and lost humanity. Without the technology, no special humanity - soul....... The paper will investigate how technology, humanity, affects, and synaesthesia are presented and combined with examples from everyday aesthetics, e.g. early computer tv-commercial, net-commercial for mobile phones. Technology and affects point, is the conclusion, towards a forgotten pre-human and not he...

  15. NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of human proinsulin and prohormone processing intermediates with application to endopeptidase recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.A.; Frank, B.H.; Heiney, R.; Pekar, A.; Khait, I.; Neuringer, L.J.; Shoelson, S.E.

    1990-01-01

    The proinsulin-insulin system provides a general model for the proteolytic processing of polypeptide hormones. Two proinsulin-specific endopeptidases have been defined, a type I activity that cleaves the B-chain/C-peptide junction (Arg 31 -Arg 32 ) and a type II activity that cleaves the C-peptide/A-chain junction (Lys 64 -Arg 65 ). These endopeptidases are specific for their respective dibasic target sites; not all such dibasic sites are cleaved, however, and studies of mutant proinsulins have demonstrated that additional sequence or structural features are involved in determining substrate specificity. To define structural elements required for endopeptidase recognition, the authors have undertaken comparative 1 H NMR and photochemical dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of human proinsulin, insulin, and split proinsulin analogues as models or prohormone processing intermediates. The overall conformation of proinsulin is observed to be similar to that of insulin, and the connecting peptide is largely unstructured. In the 1 H NMR spectrum of proinsulin significant variation is observed in the line widths of insulin-specific amide resonances, reflecting exchange among conformational substrates; similar exchange is observed in insulin and is not damped by the connecting peptide. The aromatic 1 H NMR resonances of proinsulin are assigned by analogy to the spectrum of insulin, and assignments are verified by chemical modification. These results suggest that a stable local structure is formed at the CA junction, which influences insulin-specific packing interactions. They propose that this structure (designated the CA knuckle) provides a recognition element for type II proinsulin endopeptidase

  16. Human Parvoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. PMID:27806994

  17. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  18. Psoralens cleave pBR322 DNA under ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, J.; Xinsheng Chen; Wang, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    Supercoiled (SC) pBR322 was used to probe the recent claim that 5-geranoxylpsoralen (5-GOP) did not photoreact with DNA. Contrary to expectations, 5-GOP was found to damage DNA in the presence of UV-A through two competing pathways; (a) single strand breaks, identified by the conversion of supercoiled into open circular and linear DNA, and (b) cross-linking, revealed by the fluence-dependent decrease in the extent of denaturation of the double stranded supercoiled DNA to single stranded circular DNA. In addition, a fluence-dependent modification reduced the ability of the restriction enzyme EcoR I to linearize the photosensitized DNA, and alkali-labile lesions were generated. Psoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, and 8-methoxypsoralen, which are well-known to undergo cycloaddition to DNA, had a more pronounced effect on supercoiled DNA. Single strand breaks occurred more readily than with 5-GOP, and the surviving SC form remaining had reduced electrophoretic mobility in agarose gels. In all cases, the DNA damage was more prominent when oxygen was absent. (author)

  19. Palmitoylated APP Forms Dimers, Cleaved by BACE1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available A major rate-limiting step for Aβ generation and deposition in Alzheimer's disease brains is BACE1-mediated cleavage (β-cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. We previously reported that APP undergoes palmitoylation at two cysteine residues (Cys186 and Cys187 in the E1-ectodomain. 8-10% of total APP is palmitoylated in vitro and in vivo. Palmitoylated APP (palAPP shows greater preference for β-cleavage than total APP in detergent resistant lipid rafts. Protein palmitoylation is known to promote protein dimerization. Since dimerization of APP at its E1-ectodomain results in elevated BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP, we have now investigated whether palmitoylation of APP affects its dimerization and whether this leads to elevated β-cleavage of the protein. Here we report that over 90% of palAPP is dimerized while only ~20% of total APP forms dimers. PalAPP-dimers are predominantly cis-oriented while total APP dimerizes in both cis- and trans-orientation. PalAPP forms dimers 4.5-times more efficiently than total APP. Overexpression of the palmitoylating enzymes DHHC7 and DHHC21 that increase palAPP levels and Aβ release, also increased APP dimerization in cells. Conversely, inhibition of APP palmitoylation by pharmacological inhibitors reduced APP-dimerization in coimmunoprecipitation and FLIM/FRET assays. Finally, in vitro BACE1-activity assays demonstrate that palmitoylation-dependent dimerization of APP promotes β-cleavage of APP in lipid-rich detergent resistant cell membranes (DRMs, when compared to total APP. Most importantly, generation of sAPPβ-sAPPβ dimers is dependent on APP-palmitoylation while total sAPPβ generation is not. Since BACE1 shows preference for palAPP dimers over total APP, palAPP dimers may serve as novel targets for effective β-cleavage inhibitors of APP as opposed to BACE1 inhibitors.

  20. Organometallic Methods for Forming and Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stig Holden

    with concomitant C-C bond formation was studied with a number of Grignard reagents. The transformation was performed in a sealed vial by heating to about 160 °C in an aluminum block or at 180 °C in a microwave oven. Good yields of the product alcohols were obtained with allyl- and benzylmagnesium halides when...

  1. Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest......, transcription initiation, and site specific cleavage of nucleic acids....

  2. Human disc degeneration is associated with increased MMP 7 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maitre, C L; Freemont, A J; Hoyland, J A

    2006-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, normal matrix synthesis decreases and degradation of disc matrix increases. A number of proteases that are increased during disc degeneration are thought to be involved in its pathogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP 7) (Matrilysin, PUMP-1) is known to cleave the major matrix molecules found within the IVD, i.e., the proteoglycan aggrecan and collagen type II. To date, however, it is not known how its expression changes with degeneration or its exact location. We investigated the localization of MMP 7 in human, histologically graded, nondegenerate, degenerated and prolapsed discs to ascertain whether MMP 7 is up-regulated during disc degeneration. Samples of human IVD tissue were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin, and sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to score the degree of morphological degeneration. Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize MMP 7 in 41 human IVDs with varying degrees of degeneration. We found that the chondrocyte-like cells of the nucleus pulposus and inner annulus fibrosus were MMP 7 immunopositive; little immunopositivity was observed in the outer annulus. Nondegenerate discs showed few immunopositive cells. A significant increase in the proportion of MMP 7 immunopositive cells was seen in the nucleus pulposus of discs classified as showing intermediate levels of degeneration and a further increase was seen in discs with severe degeneration. Prolapsed discs showed more MMP 7 immunopositive cells compared to nondegenerated discs, but fewer than those seen in cases of severe degeneration.

  3. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Deng, Yubin; Zeng, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. -- Graphical abstract: Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cells apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •It has been observed that LPS insult significantly increased apoptosis in A549 cells. •Both Akt and ERK signaling are critical adapter molecules to mediate the ghrelin-mediated proliferative effect. •Ghrelin may have a therapeutic effect in the prevention of LPS-induced apoptosis.

  4. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia [Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Deng, Yubin, E-mail: dengyub@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Research Center of Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zeng, Mian, E-mail: zengmian2004@163.com [Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. -- Graphical abstract: Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cells apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •It has been observed that LPS insult significantly increased apoptosis in A549 cells. •Both Akt and ERK signaling are critical adapter molecules to mediate the ghrelin-mediated proliferative effect. •Ghrelin may have a therapeutic effect in the prevention of LPS-induced apoptosis.

  5. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  6. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct homini...

  7. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  8. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  9. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  10. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    , and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting...

  11. Human Computation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  12. Effects of exogenous IL-37 on the biological characteristics of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the chemotaxis of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hua; Zhou, Bi-Yun; Wu, Guo-Cai; Liao, De-Quan; Li, Jing; Liang, Si-Si; Wu, Xian-Jin; Xu, Jun-Fa; Chen, Yong-Hua; Di, Xiao-Qing; Lin, Qiong-Yan

    2018-02-14

    This study aims to investigate the effects of exogenous interleukin (IL)-37 on the biological characteristics of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the chemotaxis of regulatory T (Treg) cells. After isolating the CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells from the peripheral blood, flow cytometry was used to detect the purity of the Treg cells. A549 cells were divided into blank (no transfection), empty plasmid (transfection with pIRES2-EGFP empty plasmid) or IL-37 group (transfection with pIRES2-EGFP-IL-37 plasmid). RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of IL-37 and ELISA to determine IL-37 and MMP-9 expressions. Western blotting was applied to detect the protein expressions of PCNA, Ki-67, Cyclin D1, CDK4, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9. MTT assay, flow cytometry, scratch test and transwell assay were performed to detect cell proliferation, cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion. Effect of exogenous IL-37 on the chemotaxis of Treg cells was measured through transwell assay. Xenograft models in nude mice were eastablished to detect the impact of IL-37 on A549 cells. The IL-37 group had a higher IL-37 expression, cell apoptosis in the early stage and percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase than the blank and empty plasmid groups. The IL-37 group had a lower MMP-9 expression, optical density (OD), percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases, migration, invasion and chemotaxis of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ Treg cells. The xenograft volume and weight of nude mice in the IL-37 group were lower than those in the blank and empty plasmid groups. Compared with the blank and empty plasmid groups, the IL-37 group had significantly reduced expression of PCNA, Ki-67, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 but elevated expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9. Therefore, exogenous IL-37 inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as well as the chemotaxis of Treg cells while promoting the apoptosis of A549 cells.

  13. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.; Joudeh, L.; Huang, X.; Takahashi, Masateru; Hamdan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  14. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  15. The current state of knowledge on operational sanitation measures to lower risk of Phytophthora ramorum spread and the need for further study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yana Valachovic; Dave Rizzo; Brendan Twieg

    2013-01-01

    We are working to evaluate risks associated with human spread of the sudden oak death (SOD) pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, to currently uninfested areas in California. Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl.) root disease (POC RD), caused by Phytophthora lateralis, has brought...

  16. Human expunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  17. Human Cloning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Judith A; Williams, Erin D

    2006-01-01

    .... Scientists in other labs, including Harvard University and the University of California at San Francisco, intend to produce cloned human embryos in order to derive stem cells for medical research...

  18. Human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, María Pía; Mulder, Maximilian; Gilman, Robert H.; Smits, Henk L.

    2007-01-01

    Human brucellosis still presents scientists and clinicians with several challenges, such as the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of Brucella spp, the identification of markers for disease severity, progression, and treatment response, and the development of improved treatment regimens.

  19. Anatomical variation of human thoracic rib in dry bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nalini Konkani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ribs are essential structure of osseous thorax and provide information that aids in the interpretation of radiologic images. The purpose of this study to investigate variations in thoracic rib and its morphological & clinical importance. So, In present study attempted to find out additional intercostal spaces due to bifurcation of ribs, less intercostal space due to fusion of ribs, variation of the normal ribs like, gap in the rib, fusion of one rib to another at a shaft of rib. Congenital abnormalities of the ribs are usually asymptomatic, often discovered incidentally on chest X-ray. Effects of this neuroskeletal anomaly can include respiratory difficulties and neurological limitations.Material & Method: The study was carried out in Bone Store of Department of Anatomy, B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Study was carried out on 500 human dried ribs. And the variations in the ribs are studied. We got variation in the human ribs and studied. Result : Variations were seen like out of 500 ribs, Bifid rib having two ends 9(1.8%, rib having bifid space 2(0.4%, fusion rib at the level of shaft 1(0.2%, fusion of first rib and second rib 1(0.2%,first rib having two ends 1(0.2%. Conclusion: Bifid rib is an anatomical variant where the sternal end of the rib is cleaved into two. So we can rule out mesodermal abnormalities, parenchymal lung disease, chest wall tumor or costal fracture.

  20. Metabolites of alectinib in human: their identification and pharmacological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Sato-Nakai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two metabolites (M4 and M1b in plasma and four metabolites (M4, M6, M1a and M1b in faeces were detected through the human ADME study following a single oral administration of [14C]alectinib, a small-molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, to healthy subjects. In the present study, M1a and M1b, which chemical structures had not been identified prior to the human ADME study, were identified as isomers of a carboxylate metabolite oxidatively cleaved at the morpholine ring. In faeces, M4 and M1b were the main metabolites, which shows that the biotransformation to M4 and M1b represents two main metabolic pathways for alectinib. In plasma, M4 was a major metabolite and M1b was a minor metabolite. The contribution to in vivo pharmacological activity of these circulating metabolites was assessed from their in vitro pharmacological activity and plasma protein binding. M4 had a similar cancer cell growth inhibitory activity and plasma protein binding to that of alectinib, suggesting its contribution to the antitumor activity of alectinib, whereas the pharmacological activity of M1b was insignificant.

  1. Human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, Cornelia W

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available risk of deaths and injuries by drowning in floods and migration- related health effects. • Increased migration, which can result in human suffering, human rights violations, conflicts and political instability. • Loss of property and livelihoods.... The vulnerability of settlements in southern Africa is impacted by various and complex socio-economic processes related to the cultural, political and institutional contexts and demographic pressure, as well as specific high-risk zones susceptible to flash floods...

  2. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA). A team of scientists headed by Alison Murdoch at the University of Newcastle received permission...not yet reported success in isolating stem cells from a cloned human embryo. A research team headed by Ian Wilmut at the University of Edinburgh...research group, headed by Douglas Melton and Kevin Eggan, submitted their proposal to a Harvard committee composed of ethicists, scientists and public

  3. Exogenous fatty acid binding protein 4 promotes human prostate cancer cell progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Hisanori; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Oha, Mina; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found that obesity is associated with malignant grade and mortality in prostate cancer. Several adipokines have been implicated as putative mediating factors between obesity and prostate cancer. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), a member of the cytoplasmic fatty acid binding protein multigene family, was recently identified as a novel adipokine. Although FABP4 is released from adipocytes and mean circulating concentrations of FABP4 are linked with obesity, effects of exogenous FABP4 on prostate cancer progression are unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of exogenous FABP4 on human prostate cancer cell progression. FABP4 treatment promoted serum-induced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro. Furthermore, oleic acid promoted prostate cancer cell invasion only if FABP4 was present in the medium. These promoting effects were reduced by FABP4 inhibitor, which inhibits FABP4 binding to fatty acids. Immunostaining for FABP4 showed that exogenous FABP4 was taken up into DU145 cells in three-dimensional culture. In mice, treatment with FABP4 inhibitor reduced the subcutaneous growth and lung metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of apoptotic cells, positive for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, was increased in subcutaneous tumors of FABP4 inhibitor-treated mice, as compared with control mice. These results suggest that exogenous FABP4 might promote human prostate cancer cell progression by binding with fatty acids. Additionally, exogenous FABP4 activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, independently of binding to fatty acids. Thus, FABP4 might be a key molecule to understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity-prostate cancer progression link. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Complex carbohydrate utilization by the healthy human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi L Cantarel

    Full Text Available The various ecological habitats in the human body provide microbes a wide array of nutrient sources and survival challenges. Advances in technology such as DNA sequencing have allowed a deeper perspective into the molecular function of the human microbiota than has been achievable in the past. Here we aimed to examine the enzymes that cleave complex carbohydrates (CAZymes in the human microbiome in order to determine (i whether the CAZyme profiles of bacterial genomes are more similar within body sites or bacterial families and (ii the sugar degradation and utilization capabilities of microbial communities inhabiting various human habitats. Upon examination of 493 bacterial references genomes from 12 human habitats, we found that sugar degradation capabilities of taxa are more similar to others in the same bacterial family than to those inhabiting the same habitat. Yet, the analysis of 520 metagenomic samples from five major body sites show that even when the community composition varies the CAZyme profiles are very similar within a body site, suggesting that the observed functional profile and microbial habitation have adapted to the local carbohydrate composition. When broad sugar utilization was compared within the five major body sites, the gastrointestinal track contained the highest potential for total sugar degradation, while dextran and peptidoglycan degradation were highest in oral and vaginal sites respectively. Our analysis suggests that the carbohydrate composition of each body site has a profound influence and probably constitutes one of the major driving forces that shapes the community composition and therefore the CAZyme profile of the local microbial communities, which in turn reflects the microbiome fitness to a body site.

  5. Human Secretory IgM Antibodies Activate Human Complement and Offer Protection at Mucosal Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, T E; Emilsen, S; Sandin, R H; Granerud, B K; Bratlie, D; Ihle, O; Sandlie, I

    2017-01-01

    IgM molecules circulate in serum as large polymers, mainly pentamers, which can be transported by the poly-Ig receptor (pIgR) across epithelial cells to mucosal surfaces and released as secretory IgM (SIgM). The mucosal SIgM molecules have non-covalently attached secretory component (SC), which is the extracellular part of pIgR which is cleaved from the epithelial cell membrane. Serum IgM antibodies do not contain SC and have previously been shown to make a conformational change from 'a star' to a 'staple' conformation upon reaction with antigens on a cell surface, enabling them to activate complement. However, it is not clear whether SIgM similarly can induce complement activation. To clarify this issue, we constructed recombinant chimeric (mouse/human) IgM antibodies against hapten 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenacetyl (NIP) and in addition studied polyclonal IgM formed after immunization with a meningococcal group B vaccine. The monoclonal and polyclonal IgM molecules were purified by affinity chromatography on a column containing human SC in order to isolate joining-chain (J-chain) containing IgM, followed by addition of excess amounts of soluble SC to create SIgM (IgM J+ SC+). These SIgM preparations were tested for complement activation ability and shown to be nearly as active as the parental IgM J+ molecules. Thus, SIgM may offer protection against pathogens at mucosal surface by complement-mediated cell lysis or by phagocytosis mediated by complement receptors present on effector cells on mucosa. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  6. Human cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of human cognition encompasses the study of all mental phenomena, from the receipt and interpretation of sensory information to the final control of the motor system in the performance of action. The cognitive scientist examines all intermediary processes, including thought, decision making, and memory and including the effects of motivation, states of arousal and stress, the study of language, and the effects of social factors. The field therefore ranges over an enormous territory, covering all that is known or that should be known about human behavior. It is not possible to summarize the current state of knowledge about cognition with any great confidence that we know the correct answer about any aspect of the work. Nontheless, models provide good characterizations of certain aspects of the data and situations. Even if these models should prove to be incorrect, they do provide good approximate descriptions of people's behavior in some situations, and these approximations will still apply even when the underlying theories have changed. A quick description is provided of models within a number of areas of human cognition and skill and some general theoretical frameworks with which to view human cognition. The frameworks are qualitative descriptions that provide a way to view the development of more detailed, quantitative models and, most important, a way of thinking about human performance and skill

  7. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation. © 2017 Goldfarb and Cech; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Comparison between human serum and Albuminar-20 (TM) supplement for in-vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staessen, C; Van den Abbeel, E; Carlé, M; Khan, I; Devroey, P; Van Steirteghem, A C

    1990-04-01

    Patient or fetal cord serum is commonly used as a protein supplement to culture media used in in-vitro fertilization (IVF). To eliminate the variability and possible hazards related to the use of human serum, a well-defined protein supplement, Albuminar-20 (Armour Pharmaceutical Cy) was evaluated as a substitute for serum. Prior to its application in the human, Earle's culture media supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) bovine serum albumin, 8% (v/v) decomplemented patient serum or 2.25% (v/v) Albuminar-20 were compared in a mouse bioassay. For the three different conditions, the percentages of blastocysts formed after 120 h in-vitro culture were respectively 91.2, 85.2 and 87.8% (NS). In the human IVF, a controlled comparison was performed from October to December 1988, between Earle's medium supplemented with patients' serum or Albuminar-20. When oocytes and spermatozoa were cultured in these two media, the fertilization rates were similar, 58.9% in human serum versus 59.4% in Albuminar-20. After further culture, the morphological quality of the cleaved embryos was better in the embryos cultured in Albuminar-20. The higher pregnancy rate in Albuminar-20 was correlated with the better morphological appearance of the embryos and their more advanced cleavage stage at the time of transfer. Therefore, Albuminar-20 can be considered as a suitable protein supplement in human IVF.

  9. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  10. Presence of fucosyl residues on the oligosaccharide antennae of membrane glycopeptides of human neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santer, U.V.; Glick, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Fucosyl residues linked alpha 1 leads to 3 or 4 to N-acetylglucosamine were found in large amounts on glycopeptides from the membranes of human tumor cells of neurectodermal origin but not on membrane glycopeptides from human fibroblasts. The fucosyl residues were detected by release of radioactive fucose from the glycopeptides with an almond alpha-L-fucosidase specific for fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3(4)-N-acetylglucosamine. In other studies, the linkage was shown to be alpha 1 leads to 3 by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Glycopeptides containing these fucosyl residues from four human neuroblastoma cell lines were defined by binding to immobilized lectins. In addition, the glycopeptides from one human neuroblastoma cell line, CHP-134, were further characterized by enzyme degradation and columns calibrated for size and charge. The antennary position of fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine on the glycopeptides was demonstrated by the use of exoglycosidases and endoglycosidase D, since complete degradation to yield fucosyl-N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine was obtained only after treatment with almond alpha-L-fucosidase prior to the sequential degradation. Fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine was present on most size and charge classes of membrane glycopeptides and therefore was not limited to a few glycoproteins. Since the almond alpha-L-fucosidase cleaves fucosyl residues from glycoproteins, the physiological effects of the increased specific fucosylation on human tumors of neurectodermal origin can be examined

  11. Expression of human ferredoxin and assembly of the [2Fe-2S] center in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, V.M.; Vickery, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding human ferredoxin, a mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] protein, was introduced into Escherichia coli by using an expression vector based on the approach of Nagai and Thogersen. Expression was under control of the λP L promoter and resulted in production of ferredoxin as a cleavable fusion protein with an amino-terminal fragment derived from bacteriophage λcII protein. The fusion protein was isolated from the soluble fraction of induced cells and was specifically cleaved to yield mature recombinant ferredoxin. The recombinant protein was shown to be identical in size to ferredoxin isolated from human placenta (13,546 Da) by NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and partial amino acid sequencing. E. coli cells expressing human ferredoxin were brown in color, and absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the purified recombinant protein established that the [2Fe-2S]center was assembled and incorporated into ferredoxin in vivo. Recombinant ferredoxin was active in steroid hydroxylations when reconstituted with cytochromes P-450 sec and P-450 11β and exhibited rates comparable to those observed for ferredoxin isolated from human placenta. This expression system should be useful in production of native and structurally altered forms of human ferredoxin for studies of ferredoxin structure and function

  12. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the [3H]DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells

  13. Beyond Humanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant) is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer t...

  14. Human mast cell neutral proteases generate modified LDL particles with increased proteoglycan binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaninka, Katariina; Nguyen, Su Duy; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Plihtari, Riia; Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Kovanen, Petri T; Öörni, Katariina

    2018-04-13

    Subendothelial interaction of LDL with extracellular matrix drives atherogenesis. This interaction can be strengthened by proteolytic modification of LDL. Mast cells (MCs) are present in atherosclerotic lesions, and upon activation, they degranulate and release a variety of neutral proteases. Here we studied the ability of MC proteases to cleave apoB-100 of LDL and affect the binding of LDL to proteoglycans. Mature human MCs were differentiated from human peripheral blood-derived CD34 + progenitors in vitro and activated with calcium ionophore to generate MC-conditioned medium. LDL was incubated in the MC-conditioned medium or with individual MC proteases, and the binding of native and modified LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans or to human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo was determined. MC proteases in atherosclerotic human coronary artery lesions were detected by immunofluorescence and qPCR. Activated human MCs released the neutral proteases tryptase, chymase, carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G, and granzyme B. Of these, cathepsin G degraded most efficiently apoB-100, induced LDL fusion, and enhanced binding of LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans and human atherosclerotic lesions ex vivo. Double immunofluoresence staining of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries for tryptase and cathepsin G indicated that lesional MCs contain cathepsin G. In the lesions, expression of cathepsin G correlated with the expression of tryptase and chymase, but not with that of neutrophil proteinase 3. The present study suggests that cathepsin G in human atherosclerotic lesions is largely derived from MCs and that activated MCs may contribute to atherogenesis by enhancing LDL retention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of EGFR transactivation in preventing apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2004-08-01

    To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa-infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis. Bacterial infection of HCECs induces

  16. Role of EGFR Transactivation in Preventing Apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa–Infected Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)–mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). METHODS Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. RESULTS P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa–infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase–mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis

  17. ABT-263 induces G1/G0-phase arrest, apoptosis and autophagy in human esophageal cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Huan; Que, Fu-Chang; Gu, Chun-Ping; Zhong, De-Sheng; Zhou, Dan; Kong, Yi; Yu, Le; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2017-12-01

    Both the anti- and pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are regulated by a conserved Bcl-2 homology (BH3) domain. ABT-263 (Navitoclax), a novel BH3 mimetic and orally bioavailable Bcl-2 family inhibitor with high affinity for Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 and Bcl-w has entered clinical trials for cancer treatment. But the anticancer mechanisms of ABT-263 have not been fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the effects of ABT-263 on human esophageal cancer cells in vitro and to explore its anticancer mechanisms. Treatment with ABT-263 dose-dependently suppressed the viability of 3 human esophageal cancer cells with IC 50 values of 10.7±1.4, 7.1±1.5 and 8.2±1.6 μmol/L, in EC109, HKESC-2 and CaES-17 cells, respectively. ABT-263 (5-20 μmol/L) dose-dependently induced G 1 /G 0 -phase arrest in the 3 cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis evidenced by increased the Annexin V-positive cell population and elevated levels of cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 9 and PARP. We further demonstrated that ABT-263 treatment markedly increased the expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and phospho-Rb (retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein) (Ser780) proteins that contributed to the G 1 /G 0 -phase arrest. Knockdown of p21 Waf1/Cip1 attenuated ABT-263-induced G 1 /G 0 -phase arrest. Moreover, ABT-263 treatment enhanced pro-survival autophagy, shown as the increased LC3-II levels and decreased p62 levels, which counteracted its anticancer activity. Our results suggest that ABT-263 exerts cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on human esophageal cancer cells in vitro and enhances pro-survival autophagy, which counteracts its anticancer activity.

  18. Human Parechoviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Harvala, Heli; Midgley, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Infections with human parechoviruses (HPeV) are highly prevalent, particularly in neonates, where they may cause substantial morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of HPeV infection is often indistinguishable from that of enterovirus (EV) infection and may vary from mild disease...

  19. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  20. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  1. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  2. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...

  3. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  4. Human Rights and Human Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Javadi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly explores some theories of Human Rights justification and then assents to the theory that Human Rights is based on justified moral values. In order to justify moral values, Aristotle’s approach called “Function Argument” is reviewed. Propounding this argument, the writer attempts to show that all analysis of human identity will directly contribute to the man’s view of his rights. Not only Human rights is really determined by human function or human distinguishing characteristic i.e. human identity, but in the world of knowledge the proper method to know human rights is to know human being himself. n cloning violates man’s rights due to two reasons: damage of human identity and violation of the right to be unique. Attempting to clarify the nature of human cloning, this article examines the aspects to be claimed to violate human rights and evaluates the strength of the reasons for this claim. این مقاله پس از بررسی اجمالی برخی از نظریه‌های توجیه حقوق بشر، نظریة ابتنای آن بر ارزش‌های اخلاقی موجّه را می‌پذیرد. دربارة چگونگی توجیه ارزش اخلاقی، رویکرد ارسطو که به «برهان ارگن» موسوم است، مورد بحث و بررسی قرار می‌گیرد. مؤلف با طرح این برهان می‌کوشد نشان دهد ارائه هرگونه تحلیل از هویت انسان در نگرش آدمی به حقوق خود تأثیر مستقیم خواهد گذاشت. حقوق آدمی نه فقط از ناحیة کارویژه یا فصل ممیز وی (هویت انسان تعیّن واقعی می‌گیرد، بلکه در عالم معرفت هم راه درست شناخت حقوق بشر، شناخت خود انسان است.

  5. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  6. Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodi; Veesler, David; Campbell, Melody G; Barry, Mary E; Asturias, Francisco J; Barry, Michael A; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-05-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause acute respiratory, ocular, and gastroenteric diseases and are also frequently used as gene and vaccine delivery vectors. Unlike the archetype human adenovirus C5 (HAdV-C5), human adenovirus D26 (HAdV-D26) belongs to species-D HAdVs, which target different cellular receptors, and is differentially recognized by immune surveillance mechanisms. HAdV-D26 is being championed as a lower seroprevalent vaccine and oncolytic vector in preclinical and human clinical studies. To understand the molecular basis for their distinct biological properties and independently validate the structures of minor proteins, we determined the first structure of species-D HAdV at 3.7 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. All the hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs), including HVR1, have been identified and exhibit a distinct organization compared to those of HAdV-C5. Despite the differences in the arrangement of helices in the coiled-coil structures, protein IX molecules form a continuous hexagonal network on the capsid exterior. In addition to the structurally conserved region (3 to 300) of IIIa, we identified an extra helical domain comprising residues 314 to 390 that further stabilizes the vertex region. Multiple (two to three) copies of the cleaved amino-terminal fragment of protein VI (pVIn) are observed in each hexon cavity, suggesting that there could be ≥480 copies of VI present in HAdV-D26. In addition, a localized asymmetric reconstruction of the vertex region provides new details of the three-pronged "claw hold" of the trimeric fiber and its interactions with the penton base. These observations resolve the previous conflicting assignments of the minor proteins and suggest the likely conservation of their organization across different HAdVs.

  7. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  8. Human Face as human single identity

    OpenAIRE

    Warnars, Spits

    2014-01-01

    Human face as a physical human recognition can be used as a unique identity for computer to recognize human by transforming human face with face algorithm as simple text number which can be primary key for human. Human face as single identity for human will be done by making a huge and large world centre human face database, where the human face around the world will be recorded from time to time and from generation to generation. Architecture database will be divided become human face image ...

  9. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  10. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, H.

    1992-01-01

    This book resulted from the activity of Task Force 4.2 - 'Human Reliability'. This group was established on February 27th, 1986, at the plenary meeting of the Technical Reliability Committee of VDI, within the framework of the joint committee of VDI on industrial systems technology - GIS. It is composed of representatives of industry, representatives of research institutes, of technical control boards and universities, whose job it is to study how man fits into the technical side of the world of work and to optimize this interaction. In a total of 17 sessions, information from the part of ergonomy dealing with human reliability in using technical systems at work was exchanged, and different methods for its evaluation were examined and analyzed. The outcome of this work was systematized and compiled in this book. (orig.) [de

  11. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  12. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Chen-Ming; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Pei; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Liu, Shih-Chia; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  13. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  14. Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Shumin; Tian, Xingsong; Ruan, Yongwei; Liu, Yuantao; Bian, Dezhi; Ma, Chunyan; Yu, Chunxiao; Feng, Mei; Wang, Furong; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-treated thyrocytes through two caspase pathways. ► Diosgenin inhibits FLIP and activates caspase-8 in FAS related-pathway. ► Diosgenin increases ROS, regulates the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in mitochondrial pathway. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a growth factor of the thyroid that has been shown in our previous study to possess proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in FRTL-5 cell lines through the upregulation of cyclin D and Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1-converting enzyme (FLICE)-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Diosgenin, a natural steroid sapogenin from plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cell lines, with the exception of thyroid cells. In this report, we investigated the apoptotic effect and mechanism of diosgenin in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes. Primary human thyrocytes were preincubated with or without IGF-1 for 24 h and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of diosgenin for different times. We found that diosgenin induced apoptosis in human thyrocytes pretreated with IGF-1 in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of caspase cascades. Moreover, diosgenin inhibited FLIP and activated caspase-8 in the FAS-related apoptotic pathway. Diosgenin increased the production of ROS, regulated the balance of Bax and Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. These results indicate that diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways.

  15. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) induces apoptosis and alters metabolic enzyme activity in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Abby C.; Helliwell, Rachel J.A.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Paxton, James W.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Tingle, Malcolm D.

    2003-01-01

    The anti-HIV drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the drug of choice for preventing maternal-fetal HIV transmission during pregnancy. Our aim was to assess the cytotoxic effects of AZT on human placenta in vitro. The mechanisms of AZT-induced effects were investigated using JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and primary explant cultures from term and first-trimester human placentas. Cytotoxicity measures included trypan blue exclusion, MTT, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Apoptosis was measured with an antibody specific to cleaved caspase-3 and by rescue of cells by the general caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK. The effect of AZT on the activities of glutathione-S-transferase, β-glucuronidase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, and CYP reductase (CYPR) in the placenta was assessed using biochemical assays and immunoblotting. AZT increased ROS levels, decreased cellular proliferation rates, was toxic to mitochondria, and initiated cell death by a caspase-dependent mechanism in the human placenta in vitro. In the absence of serum, the effects of AZT were amplified in all the models used. AZT also increased the amounts of activity of GST, β-glucuronidase, and CYP1A, whereas UGT and CYPR were decreased. We conclude that AZT causes apoptosis in the placenta and alters metabolizing enzymes in human placental cells. These findings have implications for the safe administration of AZT in pregnancy with respect to the maintenance of integrity of the maternal-fetal barrier

  16. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  17. Protective Effect of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. Extracts against Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronpirin, Chalinee; Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activity of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. and their biological effect on human keratinocytes affected by the ultraviolet B (UVB), a major cause of cell damage and skin cancer through induction of DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. The richest antioxidant activity was found in ethanol fraction of M. indica (21.32 ± 0.66 mg QE/g dry weight), while the lowest one was found in aqueous fractions of M. indica and C. nucifera (1.76 ± 2.10 and 1.65 ± 0.38 mg QE/g dry weight, respectively). Ethanol and aqueous fractions of A. carambola (250 µg/mL) significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in UVB-treated group was significantly greater than that in untreated group. Both fractions of A. carambola (50, 100, and 250 µg/mL) significantly decreased the expression of cleaved caspase 3. Regarding the induction of DNA repair, ethanol (100 and 250 µg/mL) and aqueous (50, 100 and 250 µg/mL) fractions of A. carambola significantly decreased the percentage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Taken together, our results suggest that both fractions of A. carambola may be potentially developed for dermal applications. PMID:27057195

  18. Lanatoside C inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through attenuating Wnt/β-catenin/c-Myc signaling pathway in human gastric cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yudong; Yu, Kaikai; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Depeng; Shi, Chaoji; Ding, Yunhe; Hong, Duo; Zhang, Dan; He, Huiqiong; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Sun, Shuyang; Qian, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Gastric cancer is the third common cause of cancer mortality in the world with poor prognosis and high recurrence due to lack of effective medicines. Our studies revealed that lanatoside C, a FDA-approved cardiac glycoside, had an anti-proliferation effect on different human cancer cell lines (MKN-45; SGC-7901; HN4; MCF-7; HepG2) and gastric cell lines MKN-45 and SGC-7901 were the most sensitive cell lines to lanatoside C. MKN-45 cells treated with lanatoside C showed cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and inhibition of cell migration. Meanwhile, upregulation of cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP and downregulation of Bcl-xl were accompanied with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Lanatoside C inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling with downregulation of c-Myc, while overexpression of c-Myc reversed the anti-tumor effect of lanatoside C, confirming that c-Myc is a key drug target of lanatoside C. Furthermore, we discovered that lanatoside C prompted c-Myc degradation in proteasome-ubiquitin pathway with attenuating the binding of USP28 to c-Myc. These findings indicate that lanatoside C targeted c-Myc ubiquitination to inhibit MKN-45 proliferation and support the potential value of lanatoside C as a chemotherapeutic candidate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective Effect of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. Extracts against Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronpirin, Chalinee; Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activity of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. and their biological effect on human keratinocytes affected by the ultraviolet B (UVB), a major cause of cell damage and skin cancer through induction of DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. The richest antioxidant activity was found in ethanol fraction of M. indica (21.32 ± 0.66 mg QE/g dry weight), while the lowest one was found in aqueous fractions of M. indica and C. nucifera (1.76 ± 2.10 and 1.65 ± 0.38 mg QE/g dry weight, respectively). Ethanol and aqueous fractions of A. carambola (250 µg/mL) significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in UVB-treated group was significantly greater than that in untreated group. Both fractions of A. carambola (50, 100, and 250 µg/mL) significantly decreased the expression of cleaved caspase 3. Regarding the induction of DNA repair, ethanol (100 and 250 µg/mL) and aqueous (50, 100 and 250 µg/mL) fractions of A. carambola significantly decreased the percentage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Taken together, our results suggest that both fractions of A. carambola may be potentially developed for dermal applications.

  20. Protective Effect of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. Extracts against Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalinee Ronpirin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activity of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. and their biological effect on human keratinocytes affected by the ultraviolet B (UVB, a major cause of cell damage and skin cancer through induction of DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. The richest antioxidant activity was found in ethanol fraction of M. indica (21.32 ± 0.66 mg QE/g dry weight, while the lowest one was found in aqueous fractions of M. indica and C. nucifera (1.76 ± 2.10 and 1.65 ± 0.38 mg QE/g dry weight, respectively. Ethanol and aqueous fractions of A. carambola (250 µg/mL significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in UVB-treated group was significantly greater than that in untreated group. Both fractions of A. carambola (50, 100, and 250 µg/mL significantly decreased the expression of cleaved caspase 3. Regarding the induction of DNA repair, ethanol (100 and 250 µg/mL and aqueous (50, 100 and 250 µg/mL fractions of A. carambola significantly decreased the percentage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD. Taken together, our results suggest that both fractions of A. carambola may be potentially developed for dermal applications.

  1. Structural insights into central hypertension regulation by human aminopeptidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-08-30

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3' subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors.

  2. Structural Insights into Central Hypertension Regulation by Human Aminopeptidase A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3′ subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors. PMID:23888046

  3. A Human XPC Protein Interactome—A Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Lubin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER is responsible for identifying and removing bulky adducts from non-transcribed DNA that result from damaging agents such as UV radiation and cisplatin. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC is one of the essential damage recognition proteins of the GG-NER pathway and its dysfunction results in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, a disorder involving photosensitivity and a predisposition to cancer. To better understand the identification of DNA damage by XPC in the context of chromatin and the role of XPC in the pathogenesis of XP, we characterized the interactome of XPC using a high throughput yeast two-hybrid screening. Our screening showed 49 novel interactors of XPC involved in DNA repair and replication, proteolysis and post-translational modifications, transcription regulation, signal transduction, and metabolism. Importantly, we validated the XPC-OTUD4 interaction by co-IP and provided evidence that OTUD4 knockdown in human cells indeed affects the levels of ubiquitinated XPC, supporting a hypothesis that the OTUD4 deubiquitinase is involved in XPC recycling by cleaving the ubiquitin moiety. This high-throughput characterization of the XPC interactome provides a resource for future exploration and suggests that XPC may have many uncharacterized cellular functions.

  4. Carbohydrate linked organotin(IV) complexes as human topoisomerase Iα inhibitor and their antiproliferative effects against the human carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rais Ahmad; Yadav, Shipra; Hussain, Zahid; Arjmand, Farukh; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2014-02-14

    Dimethyltin(IV) complexes with ethanolamine (1) and biologically significant N-glycosides (2 and 3) were designed and synthesized. The structural elucidation of complexes 1-3 was done using elemental and spectroscopic methods; in addition, complex 1 was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The in vitro DNA binding profile of complexes 2 and 3 was carried out by employing different biophysical methods to ascertain the feasibility of glycosylated complexes. Further, the cleaving ability of 2 and 3 was investigated by the agarose gel electrophoretic mobility assay with supercoiled pBR322 DNA, and demonstrated significantly good nuclease activity. Furthermore, both the complexes exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity of human Topo I at lower concentration than standard drugs. Computer-aided molecular docking techniques were used to ascertain the mode and mechanism of action towards the molecular target DNA and Topo I. The cytotoxicity of 2 and 3 against human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7) was evaluated, which revealed significant regression in cancerous cells as compared with the standard drug. The antiproliferative activities of 2 and 3 were tested against human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7), and results showed significantly good activity. Additionally, to validate the remarkable antiproliferative activity of complexes 2 and 3, specific regulatory gene expression (MMP-2 and TGF-β) was obtained by real time PCR.

  5. BIOLOGY OF HUMAN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    membrane of the eyes, mouth, or nose and possibly through the ... transmembrane anchor near the C terminus. It is cleaved into two ... immunity induced by previous strains (Hall, 2001). Fluctuations in the .... isolation, and other serological techniques. Antigen .... Respiratory syncytial virus in B.N. fields, D.M. Knipe and.

  6. Biologic activities of recombinant human-beta-defensin-4 toward cultured human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerashchenko, O L; Zhuravel, E V; Skachkova, O V; Khranovska, N N; Filonenko, V V; Pogrebnoy, P V; Soldatkina, M A

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was in vitro analysis of biological activity of recombinant human beta-defensin-4 (rec-hBD-4). hBD-4 cDNA was cloned into pGEX-2T vector, and recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. To purify soluble fusion GST-hBD-4 protein, affinity chromatography was applied. Rec-hBD-4 was cleaved from the fusion protein with thrombin, and purified by reverse phase chromatography on Sep-Pack C18. Effects of rec-hBD-4 on proliferation, viability, cell cycle distribution, substrate-independent growth, and mobility of cultured human cancer cells of A431, A549, and TPC-1 lines were analyzed by direct cell counting technique, MTT assay, flow cytofluorometry, colony forming assay in semi-soft medium, and wound healing assay. Rec-hBD-4 was expressed in bacterial cells as GST-hBD-4 fusion protein, and purified by routine 3-step procedure (affine chromatography on glutathione-agarose, cleavage of fusion protein by thrombin, and reverse phase chromatography). Analysis of in vitro activity of rec-hBD-4 toward three human cancer cell lines has demonstrated that the defensin is capable to affect cell behaviour in concentration-dependent manner. In 1-100 nM concentrations rec-hBD-4 significantly stimulates cancer cell proliferation and viability, and promotes cell cycle progression through G2/M checkpoint, greatly enhances colony-forming activity and mobility of the cells. Treatment of the cells with 500 nM of rec-hBD-4 resulted in opposite effects: significant suppression of cell proliferation and viability, blockage of cell cycle in G1/S checkpoint, significant inhibition of cell migration and colony forming activity. Recombinant human beta-defensin-4 is biologically active peptide capable to cause oppositely directed effects toward biologic features of cancer cells in vitro dependent on its concentration.

  7. Inhibition of human lymphocyte proliferation and cleavage of interleukin-2 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Kharazmi, A; Pedersen, B K

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease (AP) and elastase (ELA) on human lymphocyte function. AP at 50 micrograms/ml and ELA at 12 micrograms/ml caused a 50% inhibition of phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation. There was no difference...... in the effect of proteases on CD4- and CD8-positive cells. To determine the effect of proteases on interleukin-2 (IL-2)-induced cell proliferation, the proteases and IL-2 were added to the IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cell line. AP and ELA inhibited the proliferation of these cells. When IL-2 was added in excess......, the inhibition was partly reversed. ELA at 10 micrograms/ml cleaved IL-2, as judged by size chromatography of a reaction mixture containing 125I-labeled IL-2 and the proteases. The ELA-digested IL-2 exhibited a reduced binding capacity to IL-2 receptors on the lymphocytes. Furthermore, treatment...

  8. De quels ingénieurs parle-t-on ? Situation et trajectoires des ingénieurs des grandes écoles. Le cas du Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Vermeren

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cet article est consacré au cas des « ingénieurs de conception » marocains, formés la plupart du temps dans les grandes écoles françaises. Cette fraction des ingénieurs marocains (dont la majorité est formée dans les écoles d'ingénieurs du Maroc n'est pas loin de constituer une véritable aristocratie de fonction. Ce phénomène illustre la structure sociale très inégalitaire du Maroc et la stratification opérée par la monarchie (le Makhzen pour sélectionner ses élites, qui sont aujourd'hui des élites à la fois technocratiques et sociales. Cette domination des « technocrates » sur l'appareil d'Etat marocain, analysée ici à travers des publics étudiants de grandes écoles, s'accompagne de l'émergence d'une contre-élite sociale de contestation. Les écoles d'ingénieurs de second rang, peuplées par les éléments des classes moyennes, ont été le premier terreau des mouvements islamistes en milieu universitaire. Elles produisent aujourd'hui une contre-élite politique et sociale qui piétine aux portes du vrai pouvoir.

  9. Cultural Resources Investigations of the Upper Minnesota River (639) Project, Deuel and Grant Counties, South Dakota, and Lac Qui Parle and Yellow Medicine Counties, Minnesota,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Riparia riparia Bank Swallow Megaceryle alcyon Belted Kingfisher Bartramia longicauda Upland Sandpiper -32- Name Common Name * Charadrius vociferus...Smooth sumac Toxicodendron radicans Poison ivy Acer negundo Box elder Parthenocissus vitacea Woodbine Vitis riparia Riverbank grape Tilia americana...within the Prairie-Lakes region are generally located in close proximity to a variety of environmental zones (e.g., upland prairie, slope forest

  10. Evaluación de procedencias de Pinus greggii Engelm. ex Parl. en plantaciones de la Mixteca Oaxaqueña

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Velasco, Vicente Arturo; Enríquez-del Valle, José Raymundo; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Gerardo; Campos-Ángeles, Gisela Virginia; Gómez-Cárdenas, Martín; García-García, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Se evaluaron 13 procedencias de Pinus greggii en dos plantaciones de siete años de edad establecidas en 1997 en Tlacotepec Plumas y Magdalena Zahuatlán en la Mixteca de Oaxaca. El diseño experimental fue de bloques completos aleatorios con arreglo factorial 2 x 13 (localidades por procedencias). La unidad experimental constó de nueve individuos y se tuvieron 12 repeticiones. Los árboles de las 13 procedencias ubicados en Tlacotepec Plumas y Magdalena Zahuatlán tuvieron en promedio 4.7 y 3.7 m...

  11. « L’urne ne parle pas » : multipartismes et mobilisations électorales des liens sociaux (Mali, Maasina)

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Si les élections africaines n’apparaissent pas, au premier abord, être « comme les autres », c’est à cause de l’apparente originalité du processus électoral lui-même (on évoque alors les thèmes de la contrainte, de l’irrégularité et de la fraude, de la violence) et de celle des motivations des électeurs (on évoque alors les thèmes des votes « communautaires », « clientélistes » ou « marchands »). Cette vision stéréotypée, qui ne définit son objet que par un contraste péjoratif avec les électi...

  12. Introduction: Digital Humanities, Public Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Christie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available NANO: New American Notes Online: An Interdisciplinary Academic Journal for Big Ideas in a Small World. This special issue shows how both public and digital humanities research can be rendered more persuasive through engagement with cultures beyond the academy. More specifically, the aim of this special issue is to demonstrate how investments in technologies and computation are not necessarily antithetical to investments in critical theory and social justice.

  13. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of cDNA for human β-glucuronidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, A.; Kyle, J.W.; Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report here the cDNA sequence for human placental β-glucuronidase (β-D-glucuronoside glucuronosohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.31) and demonstrate expression of the human enzyme in transfected COS cells. They also sequenced a partial cDNA clone from human fibroblasts that contained a 153-base-pair deletion within the coding sequence and found a second type of cDNA clone from placenta that contained the same deletion. Nuclease S1 mapping studies demonstrated two types of mRNAs in human placenta that corresponded to the two types of cDNA clones isolated. The NH 2 -terminal amino acid sequence determined for human spleen β-glucuronidase agreed with that inferred from the DNA sequence of the two placental clones, beginning at amino acid 23, suggesting a cleaved signal sequence of 22 amino acids. When transfected into COS cells, plasmids containing either placental clone expressed an immunoprecipitable protein that contained N-linked oligosaccharides as evidenced by sensitivity to endoglycosidase F. However, only transfection with the clone containing the 153-base-pair segment led to expression of human β-glucuronidase activity. These studies provide the sequence for the full-length cDNA for human β-glucuronidase, demonstrate the existence of two populations of mRNA for β-glucuronidase in human placenta, only one of which specifies a catalytically active enzyme, and illustrate the importance of expression studies in verifying that a cDNA is functionally full-length

  15. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  16. Production and characterization of soluble human TNFRI-Fc and human HO-1(HMOX1) transgenic pigs by using the F2A peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sol Ji; Cho, Bumrae; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Hwajung; Kang, Jung Taek; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Su Jin; Yeom, Hye Jung; Moon, Joonho; Lee, Eun Mi; Choi, Ji Yei; Hong, Ju Ho; Jang, Goo; Hwang, Joing-Ik; Yang, Jaeseok; Lee, Byeong Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2014-06-01

    Generation of transgenic pigs for xenotransplantation is one of the most promising technologies for resolving organ shortages. Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1/HMOX1) can protect transplanted organs by its strong anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Soluble human TNFRI-Fc (shTNFRI-Fc) can inhibit the binding of human TNF-α (hTNF-α) to TNF receptors on porcine cells, and thereby, prevent hTNF-α-mediated inflammation and apoptosis. Herein, we successfully generated shTNFRI-Fc-F2A-HA-hHO-1 transgenic (TG) pigs expressing both shTNFRI-Fc and hemagglutinin-tagged-human heme oxygenase-1 (HA-hHO-1) by using an F2A self-cleaving peptide. shTNFRI-Fc and HA-hHO-1 transgenes containing the F2A peptide were constructed under the control of the CAG promoter. Transgene insertion and copy number in the genome of transgenic pigs was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analysis. Expressions of shTNFRI-Fc and HA-hHO-1 in TG pigs were confirmed using PCR, RT-PCR, western blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry. shTNFRI-Fc and HA-hHO-1 were expressed in various organs, including the heart, lung, and spleen. ELISA assays detected shTNFRI-Fc in the sera of TG pigs. For functional analysis, fibroblasts isolated from a shTNFRI-Fc-F2A-HA-hHO-1 TG pig (i.e., #14; 1 × 10(5) cells) were cultured with hTNF-α (20 ng/mL) and cycloheximide (10 μg/mL). The viability of shTNFRI-Fc-F2A-HA-hHO-1 TG pig fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of the wild type (wild type vs. shTNFRI-Fc-F2A-HA-hHO-1 TG at 24 h, 31.6 ± 3.2 vs. 60.4 ± 8.3 %, respectively; p hHO-1 TG pig fibroblasts was lower than that of the wild type pig fibroblasts (wild type vs. shTNFRI-Fc-F2A-HA-hHO-1 TG at 12 h, 812,452 ± 113,078 RLU vs. 88,240 ± 10,438 RLU, respectively; p hHO-1 TG pigs generated by the F2A self-cleaving peptide express both shTNFRI-Fc and HA-hHO-1 molecules, which provides protection against oxidative and inflammatory injury

  17. Humanized mouse models: Application to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryoji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ito, Mamoru

    2018-05-01

    Humanized mice are superior to rodents for preclinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of drug candidates using human cells or tissues. During the past decade, humanized mouse technology has been greatly advanced by the establishment of novel platforms of genetically modified immunodeficient mice. Several human diseases can be recapitulated using humanized mice due to the improved engraftment and differentiation capacity of human cells or tissues. In this review, we discuss current advanced humanized mouse models that recapitulate human diseases including cancer, allergy, and graft-versus-host disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In the menstrual cycle, the mid-cycle surge of gonadotropins (both luteinising hormone [LH] and follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]) signals the initiation of the periovulatory interval, during which the follicle augments progesterone production and begins to luteinise, ultimately leading to the r......In the menstrual cycle, the mid-cycle surge of gonadotropins (both luteinising hormone [LH] and follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]) signals the initiation of the periovulatory interval, during which the follicle augments progesterone production and begins to luteinise, ultimately leading...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  19. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heljasvaara, Ritva; Nyberg, Pia; Luostarinen, Jani; Parikka, Mataleena; Heikkilae, Pia; Rehn, Marko; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2005-01-01

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis

  20. HIV-1 incorporates and proteolytically processes human NDR1 and NDR2 serine-threonine kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A.; Engelman, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode two related serine-threonine kinases, nuclear Dbf2 related (NDR)1 and NDR2, which are homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf2 kinase. Recently, a yeast genetic screen implicated the Dbf2 kinase in Ty1 retrotransposition. Since several virion-incorporated kinases regulate the infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we speculated that the human NDR1 and NDR2 kinases might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Here we show that the NDR1 and NDR2 kinases were incorporated into HIV-1 particles. Furthermore, NDR1 and NDR2 were cleaved by the HIV-1 protease (PR), both within virions and within producer cells. Truncation at the PR cleavage site altered NDR2 subcellular localization and inhibited NDR1 and NDR2 enzymatic activity. These studies identify two new virion-associated host cell enzymes and suggest a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 alters the intracellular environment of human cells

  1. Streptococcus sanguinis as an opportunistic bacteria in human oral cavity: Adherence, colonization, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Tjaturina Pramesti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus sanguinis (formerly S. sanguis is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe,  nonmotile , normal  inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and  a member of  the viridans group of streptococci. Among the streptococcus, S. sanguinis is a  primary colonizer in the human tooth surface or it is recognize as a ‘pioneer’ by forming dental plaque. The aim of this paper is to review the role of Streptococcus sanguinis  in the adherence to and  invasion of  human tissues.  S. sanguinis  has been reported  that it is associated  with healthy  tooth  surfaces  but not with caries. S. sanguinis  tend to involved in an interspecies interactions with Streptococcus mutans, which is known as  competition/coexistence within dental biofilm.  In their colonization, this bacteria used enzyme sortase A (SrtA to cleave  LPXTG-containing proteins sequence and  anchored  the  cell wall, while virulence factors  in infective endocarditis  involved housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions.

  2. How members of the human gut microbiota overcome the sulfation problem posed by glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmell, Alan; Lowe, Elisabeth C; Baslé, Arnaud; Firbank, Susan J; Ndeh, Didier A; Murray, Heath; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Czjzek, Mirjam; Gilbert, Harry J; Bolam, David N

    2017-07-03

    The human microbiota, which plays an important role in health and disease, uses complex carbohydrates as a major source of nutrients. Utilization hierarchy indicates that the host glycosaminoglycans heparin (Hep) and heparan sulfate (HS) are high-priority carbohydrates for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron , a prominent member of the human microbiota. The sulfation patterns of these glycosaminoglycans are highly variable, which presents a significant enzymatic challenge to the polysaccharide lyases and sulfatases that mediate degradation. It is possible that the bacterium recruits lyases with highly plastic specificities and expresses a repertoire of enzymes that target substructures of the glycosaminoglycans with variable sulfation or that the glycans are desulfated before cleavage by the lyases. To distinguish between these mechanisms, the components of the B. thetaiotaomicron Hep/HS degrading apparatus were analyzed. The data showed that the bacterium expressed a single-surface endo-acting lyase that cleaved HS, reflecting its higher molecular weight compared with Hep. Both Hep and HS oligosaccharides imported into the periplasm were degraded by a repertoire of lyases, with each enzyme displaying specificity for substructures within these glycosaminoglycans that display a different degree of sulfation. Furthermore, the crystal structures of a key surface glycan binding protein, which is able to bind both Hep and HS, and periplasmic sulfatases reveal the major specificity determinants for these proteins. The locus described here is highly conserved within the human gut Bacteroides , indicating that the model developed is of generic relevance to this important microbial community.

  3. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  4. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  5. Managing the Human in Human Brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Susan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The physical and social realities, mental biases and limitations of being human differentiate human brands from others. It is their very humanness that introduces risk while generating the ability for enhanced returns. Four particular human characteristics can create imbalance or inconsistency between the person and the brand: mortality, hubris, unpredictability and social embeddedness. None of these qualities manifest in traditional non-human brands, and all of them present risks requiring active managerial attention. Rather than treating humans as brands and making humans into brands for sale in the commercial marketplace, our framework forces a focus on keeping a balance between the person and the personified object.

  6. Human cloning and human dignity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Eslami

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Catholic Church and most of Muslims believe that human cloning is in contrast with human rights. They argue that applying Somatic Nuclear Transfer Technique or so-called cloning to humans is against human dignity. Their main reason is that the cloned person would be a copy or shadow of another person and lack his or her identity and uniqueness. They also argue that in the process of cloning human beings would be treated as laboratory mice. This article tries to evaluate this kind of argumentation and shows that the "human dignity" expression in the relevant writings is vague and has been used inappropriately. مسیحیان و برخی از مسلمانان استدلال می‌کنند که کاربست تکنیک شبیه‌سازی ناقض کرامت انسانی است. این دلیل خود به صورت‌های مختلفی بیان می‌شود، مانند آنکه انسان موضوع آزمایش‌های علمی قرار می‌گیرد و با او مانند حیوانات رفتار می‌شود. گاه نیز تغییر نحوة تولید مثل، مایة نقض کرامت انسانی قلمداد می‌گردد و گاه به مسئلة از بین رفتن هویت فردی اشاره می‌شود. نگارنده در دو قسمت، دیدگاه مسیحیان و مسلمانان را در این باره نقل و تحلیل کرده است و کوشیده است نشان دهد که استناد به مفهوم کرامت انسانی در این جا مبهم و ناگویاست و مخالفان کوشش دقیقی در جهت تبیین دلیل خود به عمل نیاورده‌اند.

  7. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    overgangen fra trykkekultur til digital kultur. For det første problemstillingen omkring digitalisering af litterær kulturarv med fokus på kodning og tagging af teksten samt organisering i hypertekststrukturer. For det andet reorganiseringen af det digitale dokument i dataelementer og database. For det......Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH......, der betragter DH som forbundet med "making" og "building" af digitale objekter og former. Dette kan også karakteriseres som DH som praktisk-produktiv vending. Artiklen har valgt tre typer af digitalisering. De er valgt ud fra, at de skal repræsentere forskellige måder at håndtere digitaliseringen på...

  8. Molecular cloning of human protein 4.2: A major component of the erythrocyte membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, L.A.; Chien, Shu; Lambert, K.; Chang, Longsheng; Bliss, S.A.; Bouhassira, E.E.; Nagel, R.L.; Schwartz, R.S.; Rybicki, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Protein 4.2 (P4.2) comprises ∼5% of the protein mass of human erythrocyte (RBC) membranes. Anemia occurs in patients with RBCs deficient in P4.2, suggesting a role for this protein in maintaining RBC stability and integrity. The authors now report the molecular cloning and characterization of human RBC P4.2 cDNAs. By immunoscreening a human reticulocyte cDNA library and by using the polymerase chain reaction, two cDNA sequences of 2.4 and 2.5 kilobases (kb) were obtained. These cDNAs differ only by a 90-base-air insert in the longer isoform located three codons downstream from the putative initiation site. The 2.4- and 2.5-kb cDNAs predict proteins of ∼77 and ∼80 kDa, respectively, and the authenticity was confirmed by sequence identity with 46 amino acids of three cyanogen bromide-cleaved peptides of P4.2. Northern blot analysis detected a major 2.4-kb RNA species in reticulocytes. Isolation of two P4.2 cDNAs implies existence of specific regulation of P4.2 expression in human RBCs. Human RBC P4.2 has significant homology with human factor XIII subunit a and guinea pig liver transglutaminase. Sequence alignment of P4.2 with these two transglutaminases, however, revealed that P4.2 lacks the critical cysteine residue required for the enzymatic crosslinking of substrates

  9. Peptidome analysis of human skim milk in term and preterm milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Jun; Cui, Xian-wei; Zhang, Jun; Fu, Zi-yi; Guo, Xi-rong; Sun, Li-Zhou; Ji, Chen-bo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from human milk. •Analysis of the extracts by LC–MS/MS resulted in the detection of 1000–3000 peptide-like features. •419 Peptides were identified by LC–MS/MS from 34 proteins. •Isotope dimethyl labeling analysis revealed 41 peptides differentially expressed. -- Abstract: The abundant proteins in human milk have been well characterized and are known to provide nutritional, protective, and developmental advantages to both term and preterm infants. Due to the difficulties associated with detection technology of the peptides, the expression of the peptides present in human milk is not known widely. In recent years, peptidome analysis has received increasing attention. In this report, the analysis of endogenous peptides in human milk was done by mass spectrometry. A method was also developed by our researchers, which can be used in the extraction of peptide from human milk. Analysis of the extracts by LC–MS/MS resulted in the detection of 1000–3000 Da peptide-like features. Out of these, 419 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The identified peptides were found to originate from 34 proteins, of which several have been reported. Analysis of the peptides’ cleavage sites showed that the peptides are cleaved with regulations. This may reflect the protease activity and distribution in human body, and also represent the biological state of the tissue and provide a fresh source for biomarker discovery. Isotope dimethyl labeling analysis was also used to test the effects of premature delivery on milk protein composition in this study. Differences in peptides expression between breast milk in term milk (38–41 weeks gestation) and preterm milk (28–32 weeks gestation) were investigated in this study. 41 Peptides in these two groups were found expressed differently. 23 Peptides were present at higher levels in preterm milk, and 18 were present at higher levels in term milk

  10. Murine but not human basophil undergoes cell-specific proteolysis of a major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Liu

    Full Text Available Basophil has been implicated in anti-parasite defense, allergy and in polarizing T(H2 response. Mouse model has been commonly used to study basophil function although the difference between human and mouse basophils is underappreciated. As an essential chaperone for multiple Toll-like receptors and integrins in the endoplasmic reticulum, gp96 also participates in general protein homeostasis and in the ER unfolded protein response to ensure cell survival during stress. The roles of gp96 in basophil development are unknown.We genetically delete gp96 in mice and examined the expression of gp96 in basophils by Western blot and flow cytometry. We compared the expression pattern of gp96 between human and mouse basophils.We found that gp96 was dispensable for murine basophil development. Moreover, gp96 was cleaved by serine protease(s in murine but not human basophils leading to accumulation of a nun-functional N-terminal ∼50 kDa fragment and striking induction of the unfolded protein response. The alteration of gp96 was unique to basophils and was not observed in any other cell types including mast cells. We also demonstrated that the ectopic expression of a mouse-specific tryptase mMCP11 does not lead to gp96 cleavage in human basophils.Our study revealed a remarkable biochemical event of gp96 silencing in murine but not human basophils, highlighting the need for caution in using mouse models to infer the function of basophils in human immune response. Our study also reveals a novel mechanism of shutting down gp96 post-translationally in regulating its function.

  11. Murine but not human basophil undergoes cell-specific proteolysis of a major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Staron, Matthew; Li, Zihai

    2012-01-01

    Basophil has been implicated in anti-parasite defense, allergy and in polarizing T(H)2 response. Mouse model has been commonly used to study basophil function although the difference between human and mouse basophils is underappreciated. As an essential chaperone for multiple Toll-like receptors and integrins in the endoplasmic reticulum, gp96 also participates in general protein homeostasis and in the ER unfolded protein response to ensure cell survival during stress. The roles of gp96 in basophil development are unknown. We genetically delete gp96 in mice and examined the expression of gp96 in basophils by Western blot and flow cytometry. We compared the expression pattern of gp96 between human and mouse basophils. We found that gp96 was dispensable for murine basophil development. Moreover, gp96 was cleaved by serine protease(s) in murine but not human basophils leading to accumulation of a nun-functional N-terminal ∼50 kDa fragment and striking induction of the unfolded protein response. The alteration of gp96 was unique to basophils and was not observed in any other cell types including mast cells. We also demonstrated that the ectopic expression of a mouse-specific tryptase mMCP11 does not lead to gp96 cleavage in human basophils. Our study revealed a remarkable biochemical event of gp96 silencing in murine but not human basophils, highlighting the need for caution in using mouse models to infer the function of basophils in human immune response. Our study also reveals a novel mechanism of shutting down gp96 post-translationally in regulating its function.

  12. Peptidome analysis of human skim milk in term and preterm milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jun; Cui, Xian-wei [Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Medical Institute, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Hospital (China); Zhang, Jun [Department of Pediatric Center, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Fu, Zi-yi [Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Medical Institute, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Hospital (China); Guo, Xi-rong [Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Medical Institute, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Hospital (China); Institute of Pediatrics, Nanjing Medical University (China); Sun, Li-Zhou, E-mail: lizhou_sun121@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Ji, Chen-bo, E-mail: chenboji@njmu.edu.cn [Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Medical Institute, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Hospital (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from human milk. •Analysis of the extracts by LC–MS/MS resulted in the detection of 1000–3000 peptide-like features. •419 Peptides were identified by LC–MS/MS from 34 proteins. •Isotope dimethyl labeling analysis revealed 41 peptides differentially expressed. -- Abstract: The abundant proteins in human milk have been well characterized and are known to provide nutritional, protective, and developmental advantages to both term and preterm infants. Due to the difficulties associated with detection technology of the peptides, the expression of the peptides present in human milk is not known widely. In recent years, peptidome analysis has received increasing attention. In this report, the analysis of endogenous peptides in human milk was done by mass spectrometry. A method was also developed by our researchers, which can be used in the extraction of peptide from human milk. Analysis of the extracts by LC–MS/MS resulted in the detection of 1000–3000 Da peptide-like features. Out of these, 419 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The identified peptides were found to originate from 34 proteins, of which several have been reported. Analysis of the peptides’ cleavage sites showed that the peptides are cleaved with regulations. This may reflect the protease activity and distribution in human body, and also represent the biological state of the tissue and provide a fresh source for biomarker discovery. Isotope dimethyl labeling analysis was also used to test the effects of premature delivery on milk protein composition in this study. Differences in peptides expression between breast milk in term milk (38–41 weeks gestation) and preterm milk (28–32 weeks gestation) were investigated in this study. 41 Peptides in these two groups were found expressed differently. 23 Peptides were present at higher levels in preterm milk, and 18 were present at higher levels in term milk.

  13. Radiosequence analysis of the human progestin receptor charged with [3H]promegestone. A comparison with the glucocorticoid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemstedt, P.E.B.; Berkenstam, A.; Joernvall, H.G.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    Partially purified preparations of the human progestin receptor and the human and rat glucocorticoid receptor proteins were covalently charged with the synthetic progestin, [ 3 H]promegestone, by photoaffinity labeling. After labeling, the denaturated protein was cleaved and the mixture of peptides subjected to radiosequence analysis as previously described for the rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. The radioactivity labels identified, corresponded to Met-759 and Met-909 after photoaffinity labeling of the human progestin receptor, and Met-622 and Cys-754 after labeling of the rat glucocorticoid receptor. The residues labeled in the glucocorticoid receptor are the same as those previously reported to bind triamcinolone actonide. The corresponding residues were also labeled in the human glucocorticoid receptor. Met-759 of the progestin receptor and Met-622 of the rat glucocorticoid receptor are positioned within a segment with an overall high degree of sequence similarity and are equivalent. However, Met-909 (progestin receptor) and Cys-754 (glucocorticoid receptor) do not occur within equivalent segments of the two proteins. Thus, although the two classes of steroid hormone share a common structure within the A-ring, there are subtle differences in their interaction with the two separate receptor proteins

  14. A short synthetic peptide fragment of human C2ORF40 has therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chaoyang [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Zhang, Pengju [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Jiang, Anli [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Mao, Jian-Hua [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Guangwei [Shandong Univ. School of Medicine, Jinan (China)

    2017-03-30

    C2ORF40 encodes a secreted protein which is cleaved to generate soluble peptides by proteolytic processing and this process is believed to be necessary for C2ORF40 to exert cell type specific biological activity. Here, we reported a short mimic peptide of human C2ORF40 acts potential therapeutic efficacy in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We synthesized a short peptide of human C2ORF40, named C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment and assessed its biological function on cancer cell growth, migration and tumorigenesis. Cell growth assay showed that C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly suppressed cell proliferation of breast and lung cancer cells. Moreover, C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this peptide suppressed tumorigenesis in breast tumor xenograft model. Cell cycle assay indicated that the C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment suppressed the growth of tumor cells through inducing mitotic phase arrest. In conclusion, our results firstly suggested that this short synthetic peptide of human C2ORF40 may be a candidate tumor therapeutic agent.

  15. Modern Human Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Byeong Yong; Lee Dong Kyeong

    2005-08-01

    These are the titles of each chapter. They are as in the following; design of human-centerdness, human machine system, information processing process, sense of human, user interface, elements of human body, vital dynamics, measurement of reaction of human body, estimation and management of working environment, mental characteristic of human, human error, group, organization and leadership, safety supervision, process analysis, time studying, work sampling, work factor and methods time measurement, introduction of muscular skeletal disease and program of preventive management.

  16. Modern Human Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Byeong Yong; Lee Dong Kyeong

    2005-08-15

    These are the titles of each chapter. They are as in the following; design of human-centerdness, human machine system, information processing process, sense of human, user interface, elements of human body, vital dynamics, measurement of reaction of human body, estimation and management of working environment, mental characteristic of human, human error, group, organization and leadership, safety supervision, process analysis, time studying, work sampling, work factor and methods time measurement, introduction of muscular skeletal disease and program of preventive management.

  17. Human periodontal ligament stem cells secretome from multiple sclerosis patients suppresses NALP3 inflammasome activation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Diomede, Francesca; Bramanti, Placido; Trubiani, Oriana; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Research in recent years has largely explored the immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their secretory products, called “secretome,” in the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases. Here, we examined whether such immunosuppressive effects might be elicited due to inflammasome inactivation. To this end, we treated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice model of multiple sclerosis (MS) with the conditioned medium or purified exosomes/microvesicles (EMVs) obtained from relapsing-remitting-MS patients human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) and investigated the regulation of NALP3 inflammasome. We noticed enhanced expression of NALP3, Cleaved Caspase 1, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-18 in EAE mouse spinal cord. Conversely, hPDLSCs-conditioned medium and EMVs significantly blocked NALP3 inflammasome activation and provided protection from EAE. Reduction in NALP3, Cleaved Caspase 1, IL-1β, and IL-18 level was noticed in conditioned medium and EMVs-treated EAE mice. Pro-inflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were elevated in EAE, while hPDLSCs-conditioned medium and EMVs treatment reduced their expression and increased IκB-α expression. Characterization of hPDLSCs-conditioned medium showed substantial level of anti-inflammatory IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and stromal cell–derived factor 1α (SDF-1α). We propose that the immunosuppressive role of hPDLSCs-derived conditioned medium and EMVs in EAE mice may partly attribute to the presence of soluble immunomodulatory factors, NALP3 inflammasome inactivation, and NF-κB reduction. PMID:28764573

  18. GMP-140 binds to a glycoprotein receptor on human neutrophils: Evidence for a lectin-like interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K.L.; Varki, A.; McEver, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    GMP-140 is a rapidly inducible receptor for neutrophils and monocytes expressed on activated platelets and endothelial cells. It is a member of the selectin family of lectin-like cell surface molecules that mediate leukocyte adhesion. We used a radioligand binding assay to characterize the interaction of purified GMP-140 with human neutrophils. Unstimulated neutrophils rapidly bound [125I]GMP-140 at 4 degrees C, reaching equilibrium in 10-15 min. Binding was Ca2+ dependent, reversible, and saturable at 3-6 nM free GMP-140 with half-maximal binding at approximately 1.5 nM. Receptor density and apparent affinity were not altered when neutrophils were stimulated with 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Treatment of neutrophils with proteases abolished specific binding of [125I]GMP-140. Binding was also diminished when neutrophils were treated with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae, which cleaves alpha 2-3-, alpha 2-6-, and alpha 2-8-linked sialic acids, or from Newcastle disease virus, which cleaves only alpha 2-3- and alpha 2-8-linked sialic acids. Binding was not inhibited by an mAb to the abundant myeloid oligosaccharide, Lex (CD15), or by the neoglycoproteins Lex-BSA and sialyl-Lex-BSA. We conclude that neutrophils constitutively express a glycoprotein receptor for GMP-140, which contains sialic acid residues that are essential for function. These findings support the concept that GMP-140 interacts with leukocytes by a lectin-like mechanism

  19. Inhibition of Tumor Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A tumor growth model of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells in nude mice was employed to investigate the antitumor activity of the total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE in vivo. Several biochemical assays including hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were performed to elucidate the mechanism of action of total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE. The results showed that TFAE effectively inhibited the tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice and had no significant effect on body weight, blood system, and functions of liver and kidney. Expression levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 remarkably increased while the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF were suppressed by TFAE. These results suggested that the antitumor potential of TFEA was implied by the apoptosis of tumor cells and the inhibition of angiogenesis in tumor tissue.

  20. An enzymatic deglycosylation scheme enabling identification of core fucosylated N-glycans and O-glycosylation site mapping of human plasma proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Matthiesen, R.; Elortza, F.

    2007-01-01

    and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase) are also included. The two strategies were here applied to identify 103 N-glycosylation sites in the Cohn IV fraction of human plasma. In addition, Endo D/H digestion uniquely enabled identification of 23 fucosylated N-glycosylation sites. Several O-glycosylated peptides......, thereby reducing the complexity and facilitating glycosylation site determinations. Here, we have used two different enzymatic deglycosylation strategies for N-glycosylation site analysis. (1) Removal of entire N-glycan chains by peptide- N-glycosidase (PNGase) digestion, with concomitant deamidation...... of the released asparagine residue. The reaction is carried out in H218O to facilitate identification of the formerly glycosylated peptide by incorporatation of 18O into the formed aspartic acid residue. (2) Digestion with two endo-β- N-acetylglucosaminidases (Endo D and Endo H) that cleave the glycosidic bond...

  1. Identification of the IGF-1 processing product human Ec/rodent Eb peptide in various tissues: Evidence for its differential regulation after exercise-induced muscle damage in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, George; Philippou, Anastassios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a pleiotropic factor expressed in various tissues and plays a critical role in skeletal muscle physiology. Alternative splicing of the IGF-1 gene gives rise to different precursor polypeptides (isoforms) which could undergo post-translational cleavage, generating the common mature IGF-1 peptide and different carboxyl terminal extension (E-) peptides, with the fate of the latter being, so far, unknown. The objective if this study was to identify the IGF-1Ec forms or processing product(s), other than mature IGF-1, generated in different human and rodent tissues and particularly in human skeletal muscle after exercise-induced damage. Protein lysates from a wide range of human and rodent tissues were immunoblotted with a rabbit anti-human Ec polyclonal antibody raised against the last 24 amino acids of the C-terminal of the Ec peptide. This antibody can recognize the Ec peptide, both as part of IGF-1Ec and alone, and also the corresponding rodent forms, due to the high homology that the human Ec shares with the rodent Eb. We were able to confirm, for the first time, that the human Ec peptide and its rodent homologous Eb peptide are produced simultaneously with their precursor protein (pro-IGF-1Ec/Eb) in vivo, in a wide range of tissues (e.g. muscle, liver, heart). Proprotein convertase furin digestion of human muscle and liver protein lysates confirmed that the higher molecular form, pro-IGF-1Ec, can be cleaved to produce the free Ec peptide. Furthermore, initial evidence is provided that Ec peptide is differentially regulated during the process of muscle regeneration after exercise-induced damage in humans. The findings of this study possibly imply that the post-translational modification of the IGF-1Ec pro-peptide may regulate the bioavailability and activity of the processing product(s). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. HUMANISM OF ANTROPOCENTRISM AND ANTROPOCENTRISM WITHOUT HUMANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Shilovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to the distinction of humanism and anthropocentrism which is based on the parity of the person and being. Genetic communication of humanism and anthropocentrism and their historical break comes to light.

  3. Superintelligence, Humans, and War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Recent studies of the human mind debunk the myth that humans only use 10-20 percent of the human mind. A healthy human mind uses up to 90 percent...way. They will eat what is in front of them to satiate their appetite not knowing if there is anymore food for the future. Humans can predict

  4. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  5. Comprehensive Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Human Plasma Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Dong Huey; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-04

    While human plasma serves as a great source for disease diagnosis, low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteome (mass spectrometry to analyze the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples pooled from three healthy controls (HCs) without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. The LMW proteoforms were first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC 3.0. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with post-translational modifications and single amino acid variations, were identified. From additional comparative analysis of plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion between HCs and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients via top-down approach, tens of LMW proteoforms, including platelet factor 4, were found to show >1.5-fold changes between the plasma samples of HCs and CRC patients, and six of the LMW proteins were verified by Western blot analysis.

  6. Discovery of intramolecular trans-sialidases in human gut microbiota suggests novel mechanisms of mucosal adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailford, Louise E.; Owen, C. David; Walshaw, John; Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Hardy-Goddard, Jemma; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; de Vos, Willem M.; Taylor, Garry L.; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    The gastrointestinal mucus layer is colonized by a dense community of microbes catabolizing dietary and host carbohydrates during their expansion in the gut. Alterations in mucosal carbohydrate availability impact on the composition of microbial species. Ruminococcus gnavus is a commensal anaerobe present in the gastrointestinal tract of >90% of humans and overrepresented in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Using a combination of genomics, enzymology and crystallography, we show that the mucin-degrader R. gnavus ATCC 29149 strain produces an intramolecular trans-sialidase (IT-sialidase) that cleaves off terminal α2-3-linked sialic acid from glycoproteins, releasing 2,7-anhydro-Neu5Ac instead of sialic acid. Evidence of IT-sialidases in human metagenomes indicates that this enzyme occurs in healthy subjects but is more prevalent in IBD metagenomes. Our results uncover a previously unrecognized enzymatic activity in the gut microbiota, which may contribute to the adaptation of intestinal bacteria to the mucosal environment in health and disease.

  7. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  8. Functional and structural characterization of recombinant dermcidin-1L, a human antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yuping; Peng Yifei; Zuo Yi; Li Jun; Huang Jing; Wang Linfa; Wu Zirong

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides from human skin are an important component of the innate immune response and play a key role as a first line of defense against infections. One such peptide is the recently discovered dermcidin-1L. To better understand its mechanism and to further investigate its antimicrobial spectrum, recombinant dermcidin-1L was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and purified by affinity chromatography. The fusion protein was cleaved by factor Xa protease to produce recombinant dermcidin-1L. Antimicrobial and hemolytic assays demonstrated that dermcidin-1L displayed microbicidal activity against several opportunistic nosocomial pathogens, but no hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes even at concentrations up to 100 μM. Structural studies performed by circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of dermcidin-1L was very flexible, and both α-helix and β-sheet structures might be required for the antimicrobial activity. Our results confirmed previous findings indicating that dermcidin-1L could have promising therapeutic potentials and shed new light on the structure-function relationship of dermcidin-1L

  9. Human factor H-related protein 2 (CFHR2 regulates complement activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes U Eberhardt

    Full Text Available Mutations and deletions within the human CFHR gene cluster on chromosome 1 are associated with diseases, such as dense deposit disease, CFHR nephropathy or age-related macular degeneration. Resulting mutant CFHR proteins can affect complement regulation. Here we identify human CFHR2 as a novel alternative pathway complement regulator that inhibits the C3 alternative pathway convertase and terminal pathway assembly. CFHR2 is composed of four short consensus repeat domains (SCRs. Two CFHR2 molecules form a dimer through their N-terminal SCRs, and each of the two C-terminal ends can bind C3b. C3b bound CFHR2 still allows C3 convertase formation but the CFHR2 bound convertases do not cleave the substrate C3. Interestingly CFHR2 hardly competes off factor H from C3b. Thus CFHR2 likely acts in concert with factor H, as CFHR2 inhibits convertases while simultaneously allowing factor H assisted degradation by factor I.

  10. Selective radiolabeling and isolation of the hydrophobic membrane-binding domain of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.L.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrophobic, membrane-binding domain of purified human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was labeled with the photoactivated reagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine. The radiolabel was incorporated when the enzyme was prepared in detergent-free aggregates, in detergent micelles, or in phospholipid liposomes, but the highest percentage of labeling occurred in the detergent-free aggregates. Papain digestion of the enzyme released the hydrophobic domain, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate or gel exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the label was localized exclusively in the cleaved hydrophobic domain fragment. This fragment was purified in a three-step procedure. Digestion was conducted with papain attached to Sepharose CL-4B, and the supernatant was adsorbed to acridinium affinity resin to remove the hydrophilic enzyme fragment. The nonretained fragment associated with Triton X-100 micelles was then chromatographed on Sepharose CL-6B, and finally detergent was removed by chromatography on Sephadex LH-60 in an ethanol-formic acid solvent. The fragment exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 3100 on the Sephadex LH-60 column when compared with peptide standards. However, amino acid analysis of the purified fragment revealed only 1 mol each of histidine and glycine per mole of fragment in contrast to the 25-30 mole of amino acids expected on the basis of the molecular weight estimate. This result suggests a novel non-amino acid structure for the hydrophobic domain of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase

  11. Flavonoids and Tannins from Smilax china L. Rhizome Induce Apoptosis Via Mitochondrial Pathway and MDM2-p53 Signaling in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, San; Yang, Yanfang; Liu, Dan; Luo, Yan; Ye, Xiaochuan; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Song; Wu, Hezhen; Wang, Yuhang; Hu, Qiwei; You, Pengtao

    2017-01-01

    In vitro evidence indicates that Smilax china L. rhizome (SCR) can inhibit cell proliferation. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the effects in vitro of SCR extracts on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Our results showed that A549 cell growth was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with SCR extracts. Total flavonoids and total tannins from SCR induced A549 apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, as shown by our flow cytometry analysis, which was consistent with the alterations in nuclear morphology we observed. In addition, the total apoptotic rate induced by total tannins was higher than the rate induced by total flavonoids at the same dose. Cleaved-caspase-3 protein levels in A549 cells after treatment with total flavonoids or total tannins were increased in a dose-dependent manner, followed by the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9, finally triggering to PARP cleavage. Furthermore, total flavonoids and total tannins increased the expression of Bax, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, and promoted cytochrome [Formula: see text] release. Moreover, MDM2 and p-MDM2 proteins were decreased, while p53 and p-p53 proteins were increased, both in a dose-dependent manner, after A549 treatment with total flavonoids and total tannins. Finally, cleaved-caspase-3 protein levels in the total flavonoids or total tannins-treated H1299 (p53 null) and p53-knockdown A549 cells were increased. Our results indicated that total flavonoids and total tannins from SCR exerted a remarkable effect in reducing A549 growth through their action on mitochondrial pathway and disruption of MDM2-p53 balance. Hence, our findings demonstrated a potential application of total flavonoids and total tannins from SCR in the treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  12. Dual effect of insulin resistance and cadmium on human granulosa cells - In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belani, Muskaan, E-mail: muskaanbelani@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, Gujarat, India. (India); Shah, Preeti, E-mail: preeti.shah@novaivifertility.com [Nova IVI Fertility, Behind Xavier' s Ladies Hostel, 108, Swastik Society Rd., Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 390009, Gujarat, India. (India); Banker, Manish, E-mail: manish.banker@novaivifertility.com [Nova IVI Fertility, Behind Xavier' s Ladies Hostel, 108, Swastik Society Rd., Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 390009, Gujarat, India. (India); Gupta, Sarita, E-mail: saritagupta9@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, Gujarat, India. (India)

    2016-12-15

    Combined exposure of cadmium (Cd) and insulin resistance (IR) might be responsible for subfertility. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cd in vitro in IR human granulosa cells. Isolated human granulosa cells from control and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) follicular fluid samples were confirmed for IR by decrease in protein expression of insulin receptor-β. Control and IR human granulosa cells were then incubated with or without 32 μM Cd. The combined effect of IR with 32 μM Cd in granulosa cells demonstrated significant decrease in expression of StAR, CYP11A1, CYP19A1, 17β-HSD, 3β-HSD, FSH-R and LH-R. Decrease was also observed in progesterone and estradiol concentrations as compared to control. Additionally, increase in protein expression of cleaved PARP-F2, active caspase-3 and a positive staining for Annexin V and PI indicated apoptosis as the mode of increased cell death ultimately leading to decreased steroidogenesis, as observed through the combined exposure. Taken together the results suggest decrease in steroidogenesis ultimately leading to abnormal development of the follicle thus compromising fertility at the level of preconception. - Highlights: • Protein expression of INSR-β in granulosa cells to differentiate PCOS-IR and NIR • Cd and IR together decrease steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells in vitro. • Cd and IR increase human granulosa cell death by increase in apoptosis. • Environment and life style are set to hamper pregnancies at preconception level.

  13. Dual effect of insulin resistance and cadmium on human granulosa cells - In vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belani, Muskaan; Shah, Preeti; Banker, Manish; Gupta, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Combined exposure of cadmium (Cd) and insulin resistance (IR) might be responsible for subfertility. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cd in vitro in IR human granulosa cells. Isolated human granulosa cells from control and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) follicular fluid samples were confirmed for IR by decrease in protein expression of insulin receptor-β. Control and IR human granulosa cells were then incubated with or without 32 μM Cd. The combined effect of IR with 32 μM Cd in granulosa cells demonstrated significant decrease in expression of StAR, CYP11A1, CYP19A1, 17β-HSD, 3β-HSD, FSH-R and LH-R. Decrease was also observed in progesterone and estradiol concentrations as compared to control. Additionally, increase in protein expression of cleaved PARP-F2, active caspase-3 and a positive staining for Annexin V and PI indicated apoptosis as the mode of increased cell death ultimately leading to decreased steroidogenesis, as observed through the combined exposure. Taken together the results suggest decrease in steroidogenesis ultimately leading to abnormal development of the follicle thus compromising fertility at the level of preconception. - Highlights: • Protein expression of INSR-β in granulosa cells to differentiate PCOS-IR and NIR • Cd and IR together decrease steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells in vitro. • Cd and IR increase human granulosa cell death by increase in apoptosis. • Environment and life style are set to hamper pregnancies at preconception level.

  14. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  15. Human factors in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, J.W.; Brown, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Human Factors concept is a focused effort directed at those activities which require human involvement. Training is, by its nature, an activity totally dependent on the Human Factor. This paper identifies several concerns significant to training situations and discusses how Human Factor awareness can increase the quality of learning. Psychology in the training arena is applied Human Factors. Training is a method of communication represented by sender, medium, and receiver. Two-thirds of this communications model involves the human element directly

  16. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  17. Notch activation is dispensable for D, L-sulforaphane-mediated inhibition of human prostate cancer cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ryeong Hahm

    Full Text Available D, L-Sulforaphane (SFN, a synthetic racemic analog of broccoli constituent L-sulforaphane, is a highly promising cancer chemopreventive agent with in vivo efficacy against chemically-induced as well as oncogene-driven cancer in preclinical rodent models. Cancer chemopreventive effect of SFN is characterized by G(2/M phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, and inhibition of cell migration and invasion. Moreover, SFN inhibits multiple oncogenic signaling pathways often hyperactive in human cancers, including nuclear factor-κB, Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and androgen receptor. The present study was designed to determine the role of Notch signaling, which is constitutively active in many human cancers, in anticancer effects of SFN using prostate cancer cells as a model. Exposure of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3, LNCaP, and/or LNCaP-C4-2B to SFN as well as its naturally-occurring thio-, sulfinyl-, and sulfonyl-analogs resulted in cleavage (activation of Notch1, Notch2, and Notch4, which was accompanied by a decrease in levels of full-length Notch forms especially at the 16- and 24-hour time points. The SFN-mediated cleavage of Notch isoforms was associated with its transcriptional activation as evidenced by RBP-Jk-, HES-1A/B- and HEY-1 luciferase reporter assays. Migration of PC-3 and LNCaP cells was decreased significantly by RNA interference of Notch1 and Notch2, but not Notch4. Furthermore, SFN-mediated inhibition of PC-3 and LNCaP cell migration was only marginally affected by knockdown of Notch1 and Notch2. Strikingly, SFN administration to Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate transgenic mice failed to increase levels of cleaved Notch1, cleaved Notch2, and HES-1 proteins in vivo in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, well-differentiated carcinoma or poorly-differentiated prostate cancer lesions. These results indicate that Notch activation is largely dispensable for SFN-mediated inhibition of cell

  18. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.

    1988-01-01

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin

  19. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  20. Salivary Proteome Patterns Affecting Human Salt Taste Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Theresa; Grondinger, Freya; Dunkel, Andreas; Meng, Chen; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2017-10-25

    To investigate the role of perireceptor events in inter-individual variability in salt taste sensitivity, 31 volunteers were monitored in their detection functions for sodium chloride (NaCl) and classified into sensitive (0.6-1.7 mmol/L), medium-sensitive (1.8-6.9 mmol/L), and nonsensitive (7.0-11.2 mmol/L) subjects. Chemosensory intervention of NaCl-sensitive (S + ) and nonsensitive (S - ) panellists with potassium chloride, ammonium chloride, and sodium gluconate showed the salt taste sensitivity to be specific for NaCl. As no significant differences were found between S + and S - subjects in salivary sodium and protein content, salivary proteome differences and their stimulus-induced dynamic changes were analyzed by tryptic digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Differences in the salivary proteome between S + and S - subjects were found primarily in resting saliva and were largely independent of the dynamic alterations observed upon salt stimulation. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of key proteins, i.e., immunoglobulin heavy constant y1, myeloblastin, cathepsin G, and kallikrein, revealed significantly increased serine-type endopeptidase activity for the S + group, while the S - group exhibited augmented cysteine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity by increased abundances in lipocalin-1 and cystatin-D, -S, and -SN, respectively. As proteases have been suggested to facilitate transepithelial sodium transport by cleaving the y-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and protease inhibitors have been shown to reduce ENaC-mediated sodium transport, the differentially modulated proteolytic activity patterns observed in vivo for S + and S - subjects show evidence of them playing a crucial role in affecting human NaCl sensitivity.

  1. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook

    2012-01-01

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy

  2. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  3. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm(2) UVB; 1.53 J/cm(2) UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  4. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I, dihydrotanshinone (DHT, tanshinone IIA (T-II-A and cryptotanshinone (CT] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1 with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA. The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities was significantly attenuated in DHT

  5. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-09-29

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets.

  6. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  7. Proteomic analysis of human skin treated with larval schistosome peptidases reveals distinct invasion strategies among species of blood flukes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts.Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays.This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts.

  8. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  9. Thrombin impairs human endometrial endothelial angiogenesis; implications for progestin-only contraceptive-induced abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, John P; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A; Semerci, Nihan; Huang, S Joseph; Arlier, Sefa; Larsen, Kellie; Fadda, Paolo; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J

    2017-06-01

    Progestin-only contraceptives induce abnormal uterine bleeding, accompanied by prothrombin leakage from dilated endometrial microvessels and increased thrombin generation by human endometrial stromal cell (HESC)-expressed tissue factor. Initial studies of the thrombin-treated HESC secretome identified elevated levels of cleaved chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), impairing pericyte-endothelial interactions. Thus, we investigated direct and CSPG4-mediated effects of thrombin in eliciting abnormal uterine bleeding by disrupting endometrial angiogenesis. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) evaluated conditioned medium supernatant and cell lysates from control versus thrombin-treated HESCs. Pre- and post-Depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)-administered endometria were immunostained for CSPG4. Proliferation, apoptosis and tube formation were assessed in human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) incubated with recombinant human (rh)-CSPG4 or thrombin or both. Thrombin induced CSPG4 protein expression in cultured HESCs as detected by mass spectrometry and ELISA (pabnormal uterine bleeding in DMPA users. Mass spectrometry analysis identified several HESC-secreted proteins regulated by thrombin. Therapeutic agents blocking angiogenic effects of thrombin in HESCs can prevent or minimize progestin-only contraceptive-induced abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Inhibition of Human Cytomegalovirus pUL89 Terminase Subunit Blocks Virus Replication and Genome Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mao, Lili; Kankanala, Jayakanth; Wang, Zhengqiang; Geraghty, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    The human cytomegalovirus terminase complex cleaves concatemeric genomic DNA into unit lengths during genome packaging and particle assembly. This process is an attractive drug target because cleavage of concatemeric DNA is not required in mammalian cell DNA replication, indicating that drugs targeting the terminase complex could be safe and selective. One component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex, pUL89, provides the endonucleolytic activity for genome cleavage, and the domain responsible is reported to have an RNase H-like fold. We hypothesize that the pUL89 endonuclease activity is inhibited by known RNase H inhibitors. Using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format as a screening assay, we found that a hydroxypyridonecarboxylic acid compound, previously reported to be an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus RNase H, inhibited pUL89 endonuclease activity at low-micromolar concentrations. Further characterization revealed that this pUL89 endonuclease inhibitor blocked human cytomegalovirus replication at a relatively late time point, similarly to other reported terminase complex inhibitors. Importantly, this inhibitor also prevented the cleavage of viral genomic DNA in infected cells. Taken together, these results substantiate our pharmacophore hypothesis and validate our ligand-based approach toward identifying novel inhibitors of pUL89 endonuclease. Human cytomegalovirus infection in individuals lacking a fully functioning immune system, such as newborns and transplant patients, can have severe and debilitating consequences. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-human cytomegalovirus drugs mainly target the viral polymerase, and resistance to these drugs has appeared. Therefore, anti-human cytomegalovirus drugs from novel targets are needed for use instead of, or in combination with, current polymerase inhibitors. pUL89 is a viral ATPase and endonuclease and is an attractive target for anti-human cytomegalovirus

  11. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  12. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  13. Human factor reliability program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoblochova, L.

    2017-01-01

    The human factor's reliability program was at Slovenske elektrarne, a.s. (SE) nuclear power plants. introduced as one of the components Initiatives of Excellent Performance in 2011. The initiative's goal was to increase the reliability of both people and facilities, in response to 3 major areas of improvement - Need for improvement of the results, Troubleshooting support, Supporting the achievement of the company's goals. The human agent's reliability program is in practice included: - Tools to prevent human error; - Managerial observation and coaching; - Human factor analysis; -Quick information about the event with a human agent; -Human reliability timeline and performance indicators; - Basic, periodic and extraordinary training in human factor reliability(authors)

  14. Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Shumin [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Hospital Affiliated to Shandong Traditional Chinese Medicine University, Jinan 250011 (China); Institute of Endocrinology, Shandong Academy of Clinical Medicine, Jinan 250021 (China); Tian, Xingsong; Ruan, Yongwei [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Liu, Yuantao [The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Bian, Dezhi [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Jining Medical College, Jining 272013 (China); Ma, Chunyan [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Yu, Chunxiao [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Institute of Endocrinology, Shandong Academy of Clinical Medicine, Jinan 250021 (China); Feng, Mei [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Furong [Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan 250011 (China); Gao, Ling [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Institute of Endocrinology, Shandong Academy of Clinical Medicine, Jinan 250021 (China); Zhao, Jia-jun, E-mail: jjzhao@medmail.com.cn [Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Institute of Endocrinology, Shandong Academy of Clinical Medicine, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-treated thyrocytes through two caspase pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin inhibits FLIP and activates caspase-8 in FAS related-pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin increases ROS, regulates the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in mitochondrial pathway. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a growth factor of the thyroid that has been shown in our previous study to possess proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in FRTL-5 cell lines through the upregulation of cyclin D and Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1-converting enzyme (FLICE)-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Diosgenin, a natural steroid sapogenin from plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cell lines, with the exception of thyroid cells. In this report, we investigated the apoptotic effect and mechanism of diosgenin in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes. Primary human thyrocytes were preincubated with or without IGF-1 for 24 h and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of diosgenin for different times. We found that diosgenin induced apoptosis in human thyrocytes pretreated with IGF-1 in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of caspase cascades. Moreover, diosgenin inhibited FLIP and activated caspase-8 in the FAS-related apoptotic pathway. Diosgenin increased the production of ROS, regulated the balance of Bax and Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. These results indicate that diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways.

  15. Humanization and characterization of an anti-ricin neutralization monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Gang Hu

    Full Text Available Ricin is regarded as a high terrorist risk for the public due to its high toxicity and ease of production. Currently, there is no therapeutic or vaccine available against ricin. D9, a murine monoclonal antibody developed previously in our laboratory, can strongly neutralize ricin and is therefore a good candidate for humanization. Humanization of D9 variable regions was achieved by a complementarity-determining region grafting approach. The humanized D9 (hD9 variable regions were further grafted onto human heavy and light chain constant regions to assemble the complete antibody gene. A foot-and-mouth-disease virus-derived 2A self-processing sequence was introduced between heavy and light chain DNA sequences to cleave the recombinant protein into a functional full-length antibody molecule from a single open reading frame driven by a single promoter in an adenoviral vector. After expression in mammalian cells and purification, the hD9 was demonstrated to have equimolar expression of the full-length antibody heavy and light chains. More importantly, the hD9 exhibited high affinity to ricin with K(D of 1.63 nM, comparable to its parental murine D9 (2.55 nM. In a mouse model, intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of hD9, at a low dose of 5 µg per mouse, 4 hours after the i.p. challenge with 5×LD50 ricin was found to rescue 100% of the mice. In addition, administered 6 hours post-challenge, hD9 could still rescue 50% of the mice. The hD9 has the potential to be used for prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against ricin poisoning.

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of Epstein-Barr virus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Nok-Hei Mickey; Ho, Chau-Ha; Ho, Ting-Hin; Lei, Ting; Deng, Wen; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a highly efficient and powerful tool for RNA-guided editing of the cellular genome. Whether CRISPR/Cas9 can also cleave the genome of DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergo episomal replication in human cells, remains to be established. Here, we reported on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome in human cells. Two guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used to direct a targeted deletion of 558 bp in the promoter region of BART (BamHI A rightward transcript) which encodes viral microRNAs (miRNAs). Targeted editing was achieved in several human epithelial cell lines latently infected with EBV, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma C666-1 cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome was efficient. A recombinant virus with the desired deletion was obtained after puromycin selection of cells expressing Cas9 and gRNAs. No off-target cleavage was found by deep sequencing. The loss of BART miRNA expression and activity was verified, supporting the BART promoter as the major promoter of BART RNA. Although CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the multicopy episome of EBV in infected HEK293 cells was mostly incomplete, viruses could be recovered and introduced into other cells at low m.o.i. Recombinant viruses with an edited genome could be further isolated through single-cell sorting. Finally, a DsRed selectable marker was successfully introduced into the EBV genome during the course of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing. Taken together, our work provided not only the first genetic evidence that the BART promoter drives the expression of the BART transcript, but also a new and efficient method for targeted editing of EBV genome in human cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Laboratory techniques for human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Selmo; Sales, Liana; Sampaio, Marcos A C

    2002-01-01

    This review is concerned with laboratory techniques needed for assisted conception, particularly the handling of gametes and embryos. Such methods are being increasingly refined. Successive stages of fertilization and embryogenesis require especial care, and often involve the use of micromanipulative methods for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Embryologists must take responsibility for gamete collection and preparation, and for deciding on the means of insemination or ICSI. Embryos must be assessed in culture, during the 1-cell, cleaving and morula/blastocyst stages, and classified according to quality. Co-culture methods may be necessary. The best embryos for transfer must be selected and loaded into the transfer catheter. Embryos not transferred must be cryopreserved, which demands the correct application of current methods of media preparation, seeding and the correct speed for cooling and warming. Before too long, methods of detecting abnormal embryos and avoiding their transfer may become widespread.

  18. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  19. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,…

  20. Human algorithmic stability and human Rademacher complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahdat, Mehrnoosh; Oneto, L.; Ghio, A; Anguita, D.; Funk, M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    In Machine Learning (ML), the learning process of an algo- rithm given a set of evidences is studied via complexity measures. The way towards using ML complexity measures in the Human Learning (HL) domain has been paved by a previous study, which introduced Human Rademacher Complexity (HRC): in this

  1. Human errors and mistakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1993-01-01

    Human errors have a major contribution to the risks for industrial accidents. Accidents have provided important lesson making it possible to build safer systems. In avoiding human errors it is necessary to adapt the systems to their operators. The complexity of modern industrial systems is however increasing the danger of system accidents. Models of the human operator have been proposed, but the models are not able to give accurate predictions of human performance. Human errors can never be eliminated, but their frequency can be decreased by systematic efforts. The paper gives a brief summary of research in human error and it concludes with suggestions for further work. (orig.)

  2. Defense Human Resources Activity > PERSEREC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Defense Human Resources Activity Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Defense Human Resources Activity U.S. Department of Defense Defense Human Resources Activity Overview

  3. Jaceosidin Induces Apoptosis in Human Ovary Cancer Cells through Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Lv

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the antiproliferation effect of Jaceosidin (4′, 5, 7-trihydroxy-3′, 6-dimethoxyflavone isolated from the herb of Artemisia vestita Wall on several human cancer cell lines. Jaceosidin significantly reduced the proliferation of CAOV-3, SKOV-3, HeLa, and PC3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A time-dependent inhibition was also observed in CAOV-3 cells by Jaceosidin. By flow cytometric analysis, we found that Jaceosidin treatment resulted in an increased apoptosis in CAOV-3 cells. The cells treated with Jaceosidin exhibited a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Jaceosidin also increased the level of cleaved caspase-9 and induced the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, while caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK significantly reversed the proapoptotic effect of Jaceosidin in CAOV-3 cells. Moreover, Jaceosidin elevated the level of cytochrome c in cytosol. These findings suggest that the anticancer effect of Jaceosidin may be contributed by an induction of apoptosis involving cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol.

  4. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Edaravone protects against hyperosmolarity-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in primary human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Li

    Full Text Available An increase in the osmolarity of tears induced by excessive evaporation of the aqueous tear phase is a major pathological mechanism behind dry eye. Exposure of epithelial cells on the surface of the human eye to hyperosmolarity leads to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. Edaravone, a hydroxyl radical scavenging agent, is clinically used to reduce neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In this study, we found that treatment with hyperosmotic media at 400 and 450 mOsM increased the levels of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative damage, which were ameliorated by edaravone treatment in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that edaravone could improve mitochondrial function in HCEpiCs by increasing the levels of ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential. MTT and LDH assays indicated that edaravone could attenuate hyperosmolarity-induced cell death. It was found that edaravone prevented apoptosis by decreasing the level of cleaved caspase-3, and attenuating the release of cytochrome C. Mechanistically, we found that edaravone augmented the expression of Nrf2 and its target genes, such as HO-1, GPx-1, and GCLC.

  6. Edaravone protects against hyperosmolarity-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in primary human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Liu, Haifeng; Zeng, Wei; Wei, Jing

    2017-01-01

    An increase in the osmolarity of tears induced by excessive evaporation of the aqueous tear phase is a major pathological mechanism behind dry eye. Exposure of epithelial cells on the surface of the human eye to hyperosmolarity leads to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. Edaravone, a hydroxyl radical scavenging agent, is clinically used to reduce neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In this study, we found that treatment with hyperosmotic media at 400 and 450 mOsM increased the levels of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative damage, which were ameliorated by edaravone treatment in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that edaravone could improve mitochondrial function in HCEpiCs by increasing the levels of ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential. MTT and LDH assays indicated that edaravone could attenuate hyperosmolarity-induced cell death. It was found that edaravone prevented apoptosis by decreasing the level of cleaved caspase-3, and attenuating the release of cytochrome C. Mechanistically, we found that edaravone augmented the expression of Nrf2 and its target genes, such as HO-1, GPx-1, and GCLC.

  7. Echinacoside Induces Apoptosis in Human SW480 Colorectal Cancer Cells by Induction of Oxidative DNA Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Dong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinacoside is a natural compound with potent reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging and anti-oxidative bioactivities, which protect cells from oxidative damages. As cancer cells are often under intense oxidative stress, we therefore tested if Echinacoside treatment would promote cancer development. Surprisingly, we found that Echinacoside significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of a panel of cancer cell lines. Treatment of the human SW480 cancer cells with Echinacoside resulted in marked apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, together with a significant increase in active caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK blocker CDKN1B (p21. Interestingly, immunocytochemistry examination of drug-treated cancer cells revealed that Echinacoside caused a significant increase of intracellular oxidized guanine, 8-oxoG, and dramatic upregulation of the double-strand DNA break (DSB-binding protein 53BP1, suggesting that Echinacoside induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SW480 cancer cells via induction of oxidative DNA damages. These results establish Echinacoside as a novel chemical scaffold for development of anticancer drugs.

  8. Engineered aggregation inhibitor fusion for production of highly amyloidogenic human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecka, Ewa Agnieszka; Gremer, Lothar; Schiefer, Stephanie; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is the major component of pancreatic amyloid deposits in type 2 diabetes. The structural conversion of IAPP from a monomeric state into amyloid assemblies is the subject of intense research. Recombinant production of IAPP is, however, difficult due to its extreme aggregation propensity. Here we describe a novel strategy for expression of IAPP in Escherichia coli, based on an engineered protein tag, which sequesters IAPP monomers and prevents IAPP aggregation. The IAPP-binding protein HI18 was selected by phage display from a β-wrapin library. Fusion of HI18 to IAPP enabled the soluble expression of the construct. IAPP was cleaved from the fusion construct and purified to homogeneity with a yield of 3mg of isotopically labeled peptide per liter of culture. In the monomeric state, IAPP was largely disordered as evidenced by far-UV CD and liquid-state NMR spectroscopy but competent to form amyloid fibrils according to atomic force microscopy. These results demonstrate the ability of the engineered β-wrapin HI18 for shielding the hydrophobic sequence of IAPP during expression and purification. Fusion of aggregation-inhibiting β-wrapins is a suitable approach for the recombinant production of aggregation-prone proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Musa paradisiaca inflorescence induces human colon cancer cell death by modulating cascades of transcriptional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K B, Arun; Madhavan, Aravind; T R, Reshmitha; Thomas, Sithara; Nisha, P

    2018-01-24

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death, and diet plays an important role in the etiology of CRC. Traditional medical practitioners in many South Asian countries use plantain inflorescence to treat various gastro-intestinal ailments. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effects of extracts of inflorescence of Musa paradisiaca against HT29 human colon cancer cells and elucidate the mechanism of these effects by studying the modulation of cascades of transcriptional events. In vitro assays depicted that methanol extract of Musa paradisiaca inflorescence (PIMET) was cytotoxic to HT29 cells. PIMET induced DNA damage and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Expression studies showed that PIMET pretreatment upregulates pro-apoptotic Bcl2 and downregulates anti-apoptotic Bax proteins. Different assays showed that the deregulation of pro/antiapoptotic proteins reduces the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production; moreover, it enhances cytochrome c release, which triggers the apoptotic pathway, and further cleaves caspase 3 and PARP proteins, resulting in apoptosis. Changes in the protein expression profile of HT29 cells after PIMET treatment were analyzed using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. PIMET treatment significantly altered the expression of HT29 protein; interestingly, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein was also downregulated. Alteration in the expression of this protein has significant effects, leading to HT29 cell death.

  10. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... verts the potentially toxic Hcy to cysteine (Cys). Under nor- mal physiological conditions, nearly half of the Hcy con- sumed is cleaved in this way ..... studied the relationship between the genotypes and plasma total Hcy levels and found that individuals with 16/17 and. 17/18 genotypes had a significantly ...

  11. Synthesis and characterization of Cu(II)-based anticancer chemotherapeutic agent targeting topoisomerase Iα: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 cleavage, molecular docking studies and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-03-03

    New metal-based anticancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates [Cu(phen)L](NO₃)₂ (1) and [Zn(phen)L](NO₃)₂ (2) were synthesized from ligand L (derived from pharmacophore scaffold barbituric acid and pyrazole). In vitro DNA binding studies of the L, 1 and 2 were carried out by various biophysical techniques revealing electrostatic mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via oxidative pathway and recognizes major groove of DNA double helix. The molecular docking study was carried out to ascertain the mode of action towards the molecular target DNA and enzymes. The complex 1 exhibited remarkably good anticancer activity on a panel of human cancer cell lines (GI₅₀ values < 10 μg/ml), and to elucidate the mechanism of cancer inhibition, Topo-I enzymatic activity was carried out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating human genetic diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    This book assesses the scientific value and merit of research on human genetic differences--including a collection of DNA samples that represents the whole of human genetic diversity--and the ethical...

  13. Human Exposure and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ROE is divided into 5 themes: Air, Water, Land, Human Exposure and Health and Ecological Condition. From these themes, the report indicators address fundamental questions that the ROE attempts to answer. For human health there are 3 questions.

  14. ECONOMICS OF HUMAN RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA - JULIETA JOSAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze human resources in terms of quantitative and qualitative side with special focus on the human capital accumulation influence. The paper examines the human resources trough human capital accumulation in terms of modern theory of human resources, educational capital, health, unemployment and migration. The findings presented in this work are based on theoretical economy publications and data collected from research materials. Sources of information include: documents from organizations - the EUROSTAT, INSSE - studies from publications, books, periodicals, and the Internet. The paper describes and analyzes human resources characteristics, human resource capacities, social and economic benefits of human capital accumulation based on economy, and the government plans and policies on health, education and labor market.

  15. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  16. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español In Chamorro In Urdu In Vietnamese HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  17. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  18. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  19. Human Use Index (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  20. Human Use Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  1. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ∼ 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (∼ 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected

  2. A novel human ex vivo model for the analysis of molecular events during lung cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Dagmar S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC causes most of cancer related deaths in humans and is characterized by poor prognosis regarding efficiency of chemotherapeutical treatment and long-term survival of the patients. The purpose of the present study was the development of a human ex vivo tissue culture model and the analysis of the effects of conventional chemotherapy, which then can serve as a tool to test new chemotherapeutical regimens in NSCLC. Methods In a short-term tissue culture model designated STST (Short-Term Stimulation of Tissues in combination with the novel *HOPE-fixation and paraffin embedding method we examined the responsiveness of 41 human NSCLC tissue specimens to the individual cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, vinorelbine or gemcitabine. Viability was analyzed by LIFE/DEAD assay, TUNEL-staining and colorimetric MTT assay. Expression of Ki-67 protein and of BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine uptake as markers for proliferation and of cleaved (activated effector caspase-3 as indicator of late phase apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Transcription of caspase-3 was analyzed by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine caspase-3 in human cancer cell lines. Results Viability, proliferation and apoptosis of the tissues were moderately affected by cultivation. In human breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and human cell lines (CPC-N, HEK proliferative capacity was clearly reduced by all 3 chemotherapeutic agents in a very similar manner. Cleavage of caspase-3 was induced in the chemo-sensitive types of cancer (breast cancer, SCLC. Drug-induced effects in human NSCLC tissues were less evident than in the chemo-sensitive tumors with more pronounced effects in adenocarcinomas as compared to squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusion Although there was high heterogeneity among the individual tumor tissue responses as expected, we clearly demonstrate specific multiple drug-induced effects simultaneously. Thus, STST

  3. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Computer Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Human Computer Music Performance (HCMP) is the study of music performance by live human performers and real-time computer-based performers. One goal of HCMP is to create a highly autonomous artificial performer that can fill the role of a human, especially in a popular music setting. This will require advances in automated music listening and understanding, new representations for music, techniques for music synchronization, real-time human-computer communication, music generation, sound synt...

  5. cDNA cloning of rat and human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Y.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    MCAD is one of three mitochondrial flavoenzymes which catalyze the first step in the β-oxidation of straight chain fatty acids. It is a tetramer with a subunit Mr of 45 kDa. MCAD is synthesized in the cytosol as a 49 kDa precursor polypeptide (pMCAD), imported into mitochondria, and cleaved to the mature form. Genetic deficiency of MCAD causes recurrent episodes of hypoglycemic coma accompanied by medium chain dicarboxylic aciduria. Employing a novel approach, the authors now report isolation of partial rat and human cDNA clones encoding pMCAD. mRNA encoding pMCAD was purified to near homogeneity by polysome immunoadsorption using polyclonal monospecific antibody. Single-stranded [ 32 P]labeled cDNA probe was synthesized using the enriched mRNA as template, and was used to screen directly 16,000 colonies from a total rat liver cDNA library constructed in pBR322. One clone (600 bp) was detected by in situ hybridization. Hybrid-selected translation with this cDNA yielded a 49 kDa polypeptide indistinguishable in size from rat pMCAD and immunoprecipitable with anti-MCAD antibody. Using the rat cDNA as probe, 43,000 colonies from a human liver cDNA library were screened. Four identical positive clones (400 bp) were isolated and positively identified by hybrid-selected translation and immunoprecipitation. The sizes of rat and human mRNAs encoding pMCAD were 2.2 kb and 2.4 kb, respectively, as determined by Northern blotting

  6. High-level production of human interleukin-10 fusions in tobacco cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldis, Angelo; Ahmad, Adil; Reid, Alexandra; McGarvey, Brian; Brandle, Jim; Ma, Shengwu; Jevnikar, Anthony; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2013-01-01

    The production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants has made much progress in recent years with the development of transient expression systems, transplastomic technology and humanizing glycosylation patterns in plants. However, the first therapeutic proteins approved for administration to humans and animals were made in plant cell suspensions for reasons of containment, rapid scale-up and lack of toxic contaminants. In this study, we have investigated the production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) in tobacco BY-2 cell suspension and evaluated the effect of an elastin-like polypeptide tag (ELP) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag on IL-10 accumulation. We report the highest accumulation levels of hIL-10 obtained with any stable plant expression system using the ELP fusion strategy. Although IL-10-ELP has cytokine activity, its activity is reduced compared to unfused IL-10, likely caused by interference of ELP with folding of IL-10. Green fluorescent protein has no effect on IL-10 accumulation, but examining the trafficking of IL-10-GFP over the cell culture cycle revealed fluorescence in the vacuole during the stationary phase of the culture growth cycle. Analysis of isolated vacuoles indicated that GFP alone is found in vacuoles, while the full-size fusion remains in the whole-cell extract. This indicates that GFP is cleaved off prior to its trafficking to the vacuole. On the other hand, IL-10-GFP-ELP remains mostly in the ER and accumulates to high levels. Protein bodies were observed at the end of the culture cycle and are thought to arise as a consequence of high levels of accumulation in the ER. PMID:23297698

  7. Cathepsin H indirectly regulates morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) in various human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnik, Matija; Jevnikar, Zala; Mirkovic, Bojana; Janes, Damjan; Zidar, Nace; Kikelj, Danijel; Kos, Janko

    2011-01-01

    Background Cathepsin H is a cysteine protease considered to play a major role in tumor progression, however, its precise function in tumorigenesis is unclear. Cathepsin H was recently proposed to be involved in processing of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) in mice. In order to clarify whether cathepsin H also regulates BMP-4 in humans, its impact on BMP-4 expression, processing and degradation was investigated in prostate cancer (PC-3), osteosarcoma (HOS) and pro-monocytic (U937) human cell lines. Materials and methods BMP-4 expression was founded to be regulated by cathepsin H using PCR array technology and confirmed by real time PCR. Immunoassays including Western blot and confocal microscopy were used to evaluate the influence of cathepsin H on BMP-4 processing. Results In contrast to HOS, the expression of BMP-4 mRNA in U937 and PC3 cells was significantly decreased by cathepsin H. The different regulation of BMP-4 synthesis could be associated with the absence of the mature 28 kDa cathepsin H form in HOS cells, where only the intermediate 30 kDa form was observed. No co-localization of BMP-4 and cathepsin H was observed in human cell lines and the multistep processing of BMP-4 was not altered in the presence of specific cathepsin H inhibitor. Isolated cathepsin H does not cleave mature recombinant BMP-4, neither with its amino- nor its endopeptidase activity. Conclusions Our results exclude direct proteolytic processing of BMP-4 by cathepsin H, however, they provide support for its involvement in the regulation of BMP-4 expression. PMID:22933963

  8. The Adhesion of Lactobacillus salivarius REN to a Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line Requires S-layer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Sang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-03-10

    Lactobacillus salivarius REN, a novel probiotic isolated from Chinese centenarians, can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently colonize the host. We show here that the surface-layer protein choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of L. salivarius REN was involved in adherence to the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. Adhesion of a cbpA deletion mutant was significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type, suggesting that CbpA acts as an adhesin that mediates the interaction between the bacterium and its host. To identify the molecular mechanism of adhesion, we determined the crystal structure of a truncated form of CbpA that is likely involved in binding to its cell-surface receptor. The crystal structure identified CbpA as a peptidase of the M23 family whose members harbor a zinc-dependent catalytic site. Therefore, we propose that CbpA acts as a multifunctional surface protein that cleaves the host extracellular matrix and participates in adherence. Moreover, we identified enolase as the CbpA receptor on the surface of HT-29 cells. The present study reveals a new class of surface-layer proteins as well as the molecular mechanism that may contribute to the ability of L. salivarius REN to colonize the human gut.

  9. HSP90 Inhibitors, Geldanamycin and Radicicol, Enhance Fisetin-Induced Cytotoxicity via Induction of Apoptosis in Human Colonic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shun Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We revealed the cytotoxic effect of the flavonoid, fisetin (FIS, on human COLO205 colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the HSP90 inhibitors, geldanamycin (GA and radicicol (RAD. Compared to FIS treatment alone of COLO205 cells, GA and RAD significantly enhanced FIS-induced cytotoxicity, increased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and the PAPR protein, and produced a greater density of DNA ladder formation. GA and RAD also reduced the MMPs with induction of caspase-9 protein cleavage in FIS-treated COLO205 cells. Increased caspase-3 and -9 activities were detected in COLO205 cells treated with FIS+GA or FIS+RAD, and the intensity of DNA ladder formation induced by FIS+GA was reduced by adding the caspase-3 inhibitor, DEVD-FMK. A decrease in Bcl-2 but not Bcl-XL or Bax protein by FIS+GA or FIS+RAD was identified in COLO205 cells by Western blotting. A reduction in p53 protein with increased ubiquitin-tagged proteins was observed in COLO205 cells treated with FIS+GA or FIS+RAD. Furthermore, GA and RAD reduced the stability of the p53 protein in COLO205 cells under FIS stimulation. The evidence supports HSP90 inhibitors possibly sensitizing human colon cancer cells to FIS-induced apoptosis, and treating colon cancer by combining HSP90 inhibitors with FIS deserves further in vivo study.

  10. Humanities Review Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humanities Review Journal is published in June and December by Humanities Research Forum. The Journal publishes original, well-researched papers, review essays, interviews, resume, and commentaries, which offer new insights into the various disciplines in the Humanities. The focus is on issues about Africa.

  11. Humanity at the Edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.; Gjødsbøl, Iben M.; Dam, Mie S.

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of anthropology and the social sciences lies a notion of human existence according to which humans and animals share the basic need for food, but only humans have the capacity for morality. Based on fieldwork in a pig laboratory, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a dementia ...

  12. Human Document Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jeroen; Abelmann, Leon; Manz, A; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2012-01-01

    “The Human Document Project‿ is a project which tries to answer all of the questions related to preserving information about the human race for tens of generations of humans to come or maybe even for a future intelligence which can emerge in the coming thousands of years. This document mainly

  13. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths…

  14. A Human Rights Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  15. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  16. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  17. Salmon and human thrombin differentially regulate radicular pain, glial-induced inflammation and spinal neuronal excitability through protease-activated receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenell R Smith

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a major problem with common causes including disc herniation and spondylosis that compress the spinal nerve roots. Cervical nerve root compression in the rat produces sustained behavioral hypersensitivity, due in part to the early upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the sustained hyperexcitability of neurons in the spinal cord and degeneration in the injured nerve root. Through its activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, mammalian thrombin can enhance pain and inflammation; yet at lower concentrations it is also capable of transiently attenuating pain which suggests that PAR1 activation rate may affect pain maintenance. Interestingly, salmon-derived fibrin, which contains salmon thrombin, attenuates nerve root-induced pain and inflammation, but the mechanisms of action leading to its analgesia are unknown. This study evaluates the effects of salmon thrombin on nerve root-mediated pain, axonal degeneration in the root, spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and inflammation compared to its human counterpart in the context of their enzymatic capabilities towards coagulation substrates and PAR1. Salmon thrombin significantly reduces behavioral sensitivity, preserves neuronal myelination, reduces macrophage infiltration in the injured nerve root and significantly decreases spinal neuronal hyperexcitability after painful root compression in the rat; whereas human thrombin has no effect. Unlike salmon thrombin, human thrombin upregulates the transcription of IL-1β and TNF-α and the secretion of IL-6 by cortical cultures. Salmon and human thrombins cleave human fibrinogen-derived peptides and form clots with fibrinogen with similar enzymatic activities, but salmon thrombin retains a higher enzymatic activity towards coagulation substrates in the presence of antithrombin III and hirudin compared to human thrombin. Conversely, salmon thrombin activates a PAR1-derived peptide more weakly than human thrombin. These

  18. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    The article puts forward an aesthetic and psychoanalytic analysis of Titian's painting, The Flaying of Marsyas, arguing that the painting is a reflection on the human subject as a being constituted by skin and by a core of non-humanity. The analysis is partly an answer to Melanie Hart's (2007) ar...... of the 'Muselmann', and Anton Ehrenzweig's psychoanalytic theory of artistic creation. Whereas Hart is focusing on form and colour, I also turn my attention towards the texture of the painting....

  19. Universe, human immortality and future human evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This book debates the universe, the development of new technologies in the 21st century and the future of the human race. Dr Bolonkin shows that a human soul is only the information in a person's head. He offers a new unique method for re-writing the main brain information in chips without any damage to the human brain. This is the scientific prediction of the non-biological (electronic) civilization and immortality of the human being. Such a prognosis is predicated upon a new law, discovered by the author, for the development of complex systems. According to this law, every self-copying system tends to be more complex than the previous system, provided that all external conditions remain the same. The consequences are disastrous: humanity will be replaced by a new civilization created by intellectual robots (which Dr Bolonkin refers to as "E-humans" and "E-beings"). These creatures, whose intellectual and mechanical abilities will far exceed those of man, will require neither food nor oxygen to sustain their...

  20. Modeling Human Leukemia Immunotherapy in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The currently available human tumor xenograft models permit modeling of human cancers in vivo, but in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a humanized mouse (hu-mouse model made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue plus hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a leukemia-associated fusion gene MLL-AF9. In addition to normal human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution as seen in non-leukemic hu-mice, these hu-mice showed spontaneous development of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, which was transplantable to secondary recipients with an autologous human immune system. Using this model, we show that lymphopenia markedly improves the antitumor efficacy of recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI, a GVHD-free immunotherapy that induces antitumor responses in association with rejection of donor chimerism in mixed allogeneic chimeras. Our data demonstrate the potential of this leukemic hu-mouse model in modeling leukemia immunotherapy, and suggest that RLI may offer a safe treatment option for leukemia patients with severe lymphopenia.

  1. Rethinking medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  2. [Human factors in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovici, M; Trentzsch, H; Prückner, S

    2017-01-01

    The concept of human factors is commonly used in the context of patient safety and medical errors, all too often ambiguously. In actual fact, the term comprises a wide range of meanings from human-machine interfaces through human performance and limitations up to the point of working process design; however, human factors prevail as a substantial cause of error in complex systems. This article presents the full range of the term human factors from the (emergency) medical perspective. Based on the so-called Swiss cheese model by Reason, we explain the different types of error, what promotes their emergence and on which level of the model error prevention can be initiated.

  3. Integrated Environmental Modelling: Human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  4. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Helena Antoniassi da Silva

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV and the human metapneumovírus (hMPV are main etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARI. The ARI is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide.  hRSV and hMPV are members of the Paramyxoviridae. They are enveloped, non-segmented viruses, with negative-sense single stranded genomes. Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV is the best characterized agent viral of this group, associated with respiratory diseases in lower respiratory tract. Recently, a new human pathogen belonging to the subfamily Pneumovirinae was identified, the human metapneumovirus (hMPV, which is structurally similar to the hRSV, in genomic organization, viral structure, antigenicity and clinical symptoms.  The subfamily Pneumovirinae contains two genera: genus Pneumovirus contains hRSV, the bovine (bRSV, as well as the ovine and caprine respiratory syncytial virus and pneumonia virus of mice, the second genus Metapneumovirus, consists of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV. In this work, we present a brief narrative review of the literature on important aspects of the biology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of infections by two respiratory viruses.

  5. Human α2-HS-glycoprotein: the A and B chains with a connecting sequence are encoded by a single mRNA transcript

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Bowman, B.H.; Yang, F.

    1987-01-01

    The α 2 -HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is a plasma protein reported to play roles in bone mineralization and in the immune response. It is composed of two subunits, the A and B chains. Recombinant plasmids containing human cDNA AHSG have been isolated by screening an adult human liver library with a mixed oligonucleotide probe. The cDNA clones containing AHSG inserts span approximately 1.5 kilobase pairs and include the entire AHSG coding sequence, demonstrating that the A and B chains are encoded by a single mRNA transcript. The cDNA sequence predicts an 18-amino-acid signal peptide, followed by the A-chain sequence of AHSG. A heretofore unseen connecting sequence of 40 amino acids was deduced between the A- and B-chain sequences. The connecting sequence demonstrates the unique amino acid doublets and collagen triplets found in the A and B chains; it is not homologous with other reported amino acid sequences. The connecting sequence may be cleaved in a posttranslational step by limited proteolysis before mature AHSG is released into the circulation or may vary in its presence because of alternative processing. The AHSG cDNA was utilized for mapping the AHSG gene to the 3q21→qter region of human chromosome 3. The availability of the AHSG cDNA clone will facilitate the analysis of its genetic control and gene expression during development and bone formation

  6. Bursty human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview on emergent bursty patterns in the dynamics of human behaviour. It presents common and alternative understanding of the investigated phenomena, and points out open questions worthy of further investigations. The book is structured as follows. In the introduction the authors discuss the motivation of the field, describe bursty phenomena in case of human behaviour, and relate it to other disciplines. The second chapter addresses the measures commonly used to characterise heterogeneous signals, bursty human dynamics, temporal paths, and correlated behaviour. These definitions are first introduced to set the basis for the discussion of the third chapter about the observations of bursty human patterns in the dynamics of individuals, dyadic interactions, and collective behaviour. The subsequent fourth chapter discusses the models of bursty human dynamics. Various mechanisms have been proposed about the source of the heterogeneities in human dynamics, which leads to the in...

  7. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  8. Managing human performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.; LaRhette, R.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluating human error or human performance problems and correcting the root causes can help preclude recurrence. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), working with several members and participant utilities in an extended pilot program, has developed a nonpunitive program designed to identify, evaluate, and correct situations that cause human performance errors. The program is called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). Its primary goal is to improve human reliability in overall nuclear plant operations by reducing human error through correction of the conditions that cause the errors. Workers at participating nuclear utilities are encouraged to report their errors and a specially trained plant coordinator investigates and recommends actions to correct the root causes of these errors

  9. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  10. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Helena Antoniassi da Silva; Fernando Rosado Spilki; Adriana Gut Lopes Riccetto; Emilio Elias Baracat; Clarice Weis Arns

    2009-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and the human metapneumovírus (hMPV) are main etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARI). The ARI is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide.  hRSV and hMPV are members of the Paramyxoviridae. They are enveloped, non-segmented viruses, with negative-sense single stranded genomes. Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the best characterized agent viral of this group, associated with respiratory diseases in...

  11. Human intrusion: New ideas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Inadvertent human intrusion has been an issue for the disposal of solid radioactive waste for many years. This paper discusses proposals for an approach for evaluating the radiological significance of human intrusion as put forward by ICRP with contribution from work at IAEA. The approach focuses on the consequences of the intrusion. Protective actions could, however, include steps to reduce the probability of human intrusion as well as the consequences. (author)

  12. Human reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, E.M.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a treatment of human reliability analysis incorporating an introduction to probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power generating stations. They treat the subject according to the framework established for general systems theory. Draws upon reliability analysis, psychology, human factors engineering, and statistics, integrating elements of these fields within a systems framework. Provides a history of human reliability analysis, and includes examples of the application of the systems approach

  13. The human genome project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worton, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is a massive international research project, costing 3 to 5 billion dollars and expected to take 15 years, which will identify the all the genes in the human genome - i.e. the complete sequence of bases in human DNA. The prize will be the ability to identify genes causing or predisposing to disease, and in some cases the development of gene therapy, but this new knowledge will raise important ethical issues

  14. Modern Human Capital Management

    OpenAIRE

    Feldberger, Madita

    2008-01-01

    Title: Modern Human Capital Management Seminar date: 30th of May 2008 Course: Master thesis in Business Administration, 15 ECTS Authors: Madita Feldberger Supervisor: Lars Svensson Keywords: Human capital, SWOT Analysis, Strategic Map, Balanced Scorecard Research Problem: Despite of the success of Human Capital Management (HCM) in research it did not arrive yet in the HR departments of many companies. Numerous firms even have problems to set their strategic goals with focus on HR. The HR Bala...

  15. Options for human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauser, M.; Williams, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses options for dealing with human intrusion in terms of performance requirements and repository siting and design requirements. Options are presented, along with the advantages and disadvantages of certain approaches. At the conclusion, a conceptual approach is offered emphasizing both the minimization of subjective judgements concerning future human activity, and specification of repository requirements to minimize the likelihood of human intrusion and any resulting, harmful effects should intrusion occur

  16. Human Engineering Procedures Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Research Laboratory AFETR Air Force Eastern Test Range AFFTC Air Force Flight Test Center AFHRL Air Force Human Resources Laboratory AFR Air Force...performance requirements through the most effective use of man’s performance capability. 13 Human Engineering is one of five elements in the Human...applied judiciously and tailored to fit * the program or program phase and the acquisition strategy to achieve cost effective acquisition and life cycle

  17. Human babesiosis: Recent discoveries

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Sanja M.; Kranjčić-Zec Ivana F.; Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina S.; Džamić Aleksandar M.; Radonjić Ivana V.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Babesiosis is caused by intraerythrocytic parasites of the genus Babesia, which is a common animal infection worldwide. This protozoa requires both a competent vertebrate and a nonvertebrate host (Ixodes sp. etc.) to maintain the transmission cycle. Human babesiosis Human babesiosis is predominantly caused by Babesia microti (rodent-borne piroplasm, an emerging zoonosis in humans in North America) and by Babesia divergens (bovine pathogen, in Europe). Occasionally, infection in A...

  18. Dogs catch human yawns

    OpenAIRE

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary f...

  19. Human Performance Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Biochemistry:Improvements in energy metabolism, muscular strength and endurance capacity have a basis in biochemical and molecular adaptations within the human body....

  20. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  1. Human Capital Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, Ellen E

    2007-01-01

    ...: To provide an agile, adaptive, integrated, and innovative defense intelligence workforce through a deliberate process identifying, implementing, and directing human capital organizational, doctrinal...

  2. Human microRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors show significantly different biological patterns: from functions to targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which play essential roles in many important biological processes. Therefore, their dysfunction is associated with a variety of human diseases, including cancer. Increasing evidence shows that miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, and although there is great interest in research into these cancer-associated miRNAs, little is known about them. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of putative human miRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors. We found that miRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors clearly show different patterns in function, evolutionary rate, expression, chromosome distribution, molecule size, free energy, transcription factors, and targets. For example, miRNA oncogenes are located mainly in the amplified regions in human cancers, whereas miRNA tumor suppressors are located mainly in the deleted regions. miRNA oncogenes tend to cleave target mRNAs more frequently than miRNA tumor suppressors. These results indicate that these two types of cancer-associated miRNAs play different roles in cancer formation and development. Moreover, the patterns identified here can discriminate novel miRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors with a high degree of accuracy. This study represents the first large-scale bioinformatic analysis of human miRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Our findings provide help for not only understanding of miRNAs in cancer but also for the specific identification of novel miRNAs as miRNA oncogenes and tumor suppressors. In addition, the data presented in this study will be valuable for the study of both miRNAs and cancer.

  3. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  4. Challenges for Virtual Humans in Human Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Ruttkay, Z.M.; Huang, T; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.

    The vision of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) presumes a plethora of embedded services and devices that all endeavor to support humans in their daily activities as unobtrusively as possible. Hardware gets distributed throughout the environment, occupying even the fabric of our clothing. The environment

  5. Effect of remifentanil on mitochondrial oxygen consumption of cultured human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Djafarzadeh

    Full Text Available During sepsis, liver dysfunction is common, and failure of mitochondria to effectively couple oxygen consumption with energy production has been described. In addition to sepsis, pharmacological agents used to treat septic patients may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. This study addressed the hypothesis that remifentanil interacts with hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and their isolated mitochondria were exposed to remifentanil, with or without further exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured by high-resolution respirometry, Caspase-3 protein levels by Western blotting, and cytokine levels by ELISA. Inhibitory κBα (IκBα phosphorylation, measurement of the cellular ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells were analysed using commercial ELISA kits. Maximal cellular respiration increased after one hour of incubation with remifentanil, and phosphorylation of IκBα occurred, denoting stimulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. The effect on cellular respiration was not present at 2, 4, 8 or 16 hours of incubation. Remifentanil increased the isolated mitochondrial respiratory control ratio of complex-I-dependent respiration without interfering with maximal respiration. Preincubation with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone prevented a remifentanil-induced increase in cellular respiration. Remifentanil at 10× higher concentrations than therapeutic reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content without uncoupling oxygen consumption and basal respiration levels. TNF-α exposure reduced respiration of complex-I, -II and -IV, an effect which was prevented by prior remifentanil incubation. Furthermore, prior remifentanil incubation prevented TNF-α-induced IL-6 release of HepG2 cells, and attenuated fragmentation of pro-caspase-3 into cleaved active caspase 3 (an early marker of apoptosis. Our data suggest that

  6. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Methods Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53 and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53. RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. Results BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G0/G1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45, or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28 gastric cancer cells. Conclusions The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies.

  7. Involvement of ER stress and activation of apoptotic pathways in fisetin induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N; Lall, Rahul K; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Haidar, Omar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of malignant melanoma remains poor in spite of recent advances in therapeutic strategies for the deadly disease. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid is currently being investigated for its growth inhibitory properties in various cancer models. We previously showed that fisetin inhibited melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we evaluated the molecular basis of fisetin induced cytotoxicity in metastatic human melanoma cells. Fisetin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in highly aggressive A375 and 451Lu human melanoma cells, as revealed by up-regulation of ER stress markers including IRE1α, XBP1s, ATF4 and GRP78. Time course analysis indicated that the ER stress was associated with activation of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Fisetin treated 2-D melanoma cultures displayed autophagic response concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Prolonged treatment (16days) with fisetin in a 3-D reconstituted melanoma model resulted in inhibition of melanoma progression with significant apoptosis, as evidenced by increased staining of cleaved Caspase-3 in the treated constructs. However, no difference in the expression of autophagic marker LC-3 was noted between treated and control groups. Fisetin treatment to 2-D melanoma cultures resulted in phosphorylation and activation of the multifunctional AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including autophagy and apoptosis. Silencing of AMPK failed to prevent cell death indicating that fisetin induced cytotoxicity is mediated through both AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Taken together, our studies confirm apoptosis as the primary mechanism through which fisetin inhibits melanoma cell growth and that activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways contributes to fisetin induced cytotoxicity.

  8. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Qiang-Song; Zheng, Li-Duan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei

    2004-01-01

    BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer) is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53) and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53). RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G 0 /G 1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45), or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28) gastric cancer cells. The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies

  9. Human breast tissue disposition and bioactivity of limonene in women with early stage breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica A.; Lang, Julie E.; Ley, Michele; Nagle, Ray; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Cordova, Catherine; Waer, Amy; Chow, H.-H. Sherry

    2013-01-01

    Limonene is a bioactive food component found in citrus peel oil that has demonstrated chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in preclinical studies. We conducted an open label pilot clinical study to determine the human breast tissue disposition of limonene and its associated bioactivity. We recruited forty-three women with newly diagnosed operable breast cancer electing to undergo surgical excision to take 2 grams of limonene daily for 2 – 6 weeks before surgery. Blood and breast tissue were collected to determine drug/metabolite concentrations and limonene-induced changes in systemic and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk or carcinogenesis. Limonene was found to preferentially concentrate in the breast tissue, reaching high tissue concentration (mean=41.3 μg/g tissue) while the major active circulating metabolite, perillic acid, did not concentrate in the breast tissue. Limonene intervention resulted in a 22% reduction in cyclin D1 expression (P=0.002) in tumor tissue but minimal changes in tissue Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 expression. No significant changes in serum leptin, adiponectin, TGF-β1, IGFBP-3 and IL-6 levels were observed following limonene intervention. There was a small but statistically significant post-intervention increase in IGF-1 levels. We conclude that limonene distributed extensively to human breast tissue and reduced breast tumor cyclin D1 expression that may lead to cell cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation. Further placebo-controlled clinical trials and translational research are warranted to establish limonene’s role for breast cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23554130

  10. Human breast tissue disposition and bioactivity of limonene in women with early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica A; Lang, Julie E; Ley, Michele; Nagle, Ray; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Cordova, Catherine; Waer, Amy; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2013-06-01

    Limonene is a bioactive food component found in citrus peel oil that has shown chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in preclinical studies. We conducted an open-label pilot clinical study to determine the human breast tissue disposition of limonene and its associated bioactivity. We recruited 43 women with newly diagnosed operable breast cancer electing to undergo surgical excision to take 2 grams of limonene daily for two to six weeks before surgery. Blood and breast tissue were collected to determine drug/metabolite concentrations and limonene-induced changes in systemic and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk or carcinogenesis. Limonene was found to preferentially concentrate in the breast tissue, reaching high tissue concentration (mean = 41.3 μg/g tissue), whereas the major active circulating metabolite, perillic acid, did not concentrate in the breast tissue. Limonene intervention resulted in a 22% reduction in cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.002) in tumor tissue but minimal changes in tissue Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. No significant changes in serum leptin, adiponectin, TGF-β1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed following limonene intervention. There was a small but statistically significant postintervention increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. We conclude that limonene distributed extensively to human breast tissue and reduced breast tumor cyclin D1 expression that may lead to cell-cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, placebo-controlled clinical trials and translational research are warranted to establish limonene's role for breast cancer prevention or treatment.

  11. Lentivirus-Mediated Knockdown of Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis through MAPK Pathways in Human Retinoblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chang

    Full Text Available To explore expression and function of astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1 in human retinoblastoma (RB.The expression of AEG-1 in histological sections of human RBs and in RB cell lines was examined using immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR and Western blotting respectively. We knocked down AEG-1 gene levels by AEG-1-siRNA lentivirus transfection of human RB cell lines SO-RB50 and Y79, and using an MTT assay, we assessed the role of AEG-1 on RB cell proliferation. The biological significance of lentivirus transfection induced AEG-1 down-regulation was examined by assessing the apoptosis rate in the transfected RB cells by Annexin V-APC staining and flow cytometry. We additionally measured the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved-caspase-3 and caspase-3, and the phosphorylation and non-phosphorylation alternation of MAPKs.AEG-1 expression was detected to be strongly positive in the histological slides of 35 out of 54 (65% patients with RB. AEG-1 expression increased significantly (P<0.05 with tumor stage. In the RB cell lines SO-RB50, Y79 and WERI-RB1 as compared with retinal pigment epithelium cells, expression of AEG-1 mRNA and AEG-1 protein was significantly higher. In AEG-1-siRNA lentivirus transfected cell cultures as compared with negative control lentivirus transfected cell cultures, levels of AEG-1 mRNA and of AEG-1 protein (P<0.05 and cell growth rates (P<0.01 were significantly lower, and apoptosis rate (P<0.001, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved-caspase-3 protein level were significantly increased. The P-ERK/ERK ratio was significantly decreased in the AEG-1-siRNA lentivirus transfected cell lines.Expression of AEG-1 was associated with RB, in histological slides of patients and in cell culture experiments. Lentivirus transfection induced knockdown of AEG-1 had a tumor suppressive effect, potentially by tumor cell apoptosis induction through inhibition of ERK.

  12. Silencing of B7-H4 suppresses the tumorigenicity of the MGC-803 human gastric cancer cell line and promotes cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghui; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chao; Yang, Lina

    2018-04-01

    B7-H4 is a transmembrane protein which is a member of the B7 superfamily. It is overexpressed in various types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, the effects of B7-H4 on the tumorigenicity of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been fully explored. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of B7-H4 on the tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. For this purpose, B7-H4 expression in gastric cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The effects of B7-H4 on the biological behavior of the MGC-803 human gastric cancer cell line were examined by Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Moreover, the expression levels of apoptotic markers, such as cleaved caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑9, Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that a high expression of B7-H4 was found in about 41.8% of tissues obtained from patients with gastric cancer. Comparative analysis revealed that B7-H4 expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. The results of CCK-8 assay, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining assay and TUNEL assay all demonstrated that the silencing of B7-H4 by small interfering RNA decreased cell proliferation, suppressed cell motility, and induced cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis of MGC-803 human gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the results of western blot analysis indicated that the downregulation of B7-H4 induced the apoptosis of the MGC-803 cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway through the activation of caspase‑3 and caspase‑9, and by altering the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in a manner that favored apoptosis. Based on the findings on human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803, the

  13. Human trafficking in Germany: strengthening victim's human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Follmar-Otto, Petra; Rabe, Heike

    2009-01-01

    The first study - "A human rights approach against human trafficking - International obligations and the status of implementation in Germany" - analyses how the prohibition of human trafficking and the resulting state obligations are anchored in human rights. The more recent specialised international agreements on human trafficking and law-making in the European Union are then presented. The emphasis is on the Council of Europe Convention, which professes to treat human trafficking in a human...

  14. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century

  15. Rationality in Human Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Megan K; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-01-01

    It long has been appreciated that humans behave irrationally in economic decisions under risk: they fail to objectively consider uncertainty, costs, and rewards and instead exhibit risk-seeking or risk-averse behavior. We hypothesize that poor estimates of motor variability (influenced by motor task) and distorted probability weighting (influenced by relevant emotional processes) contribute to characteristic irrationality in human movement decisions.

  16. Human-centred Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bason, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Design approaches are now being applied all over the world as a powerful approach to innovating public policies and services. Christian Bason, author of Leading public design: Discovering human-centred governance, argues that by bringing design methods into play, public managers can lead change...... with citizens at the centre, and discover a new model for steering public organisations: human-centred governance....

  17. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and

  18. Incorporating Human Interindividual Biotransformation ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protection of sensitive individuals within a population dictates that measures other than central tendencies be employed to estimate risk. The refinement of human health risk assessments for chemicals metabolized by the liver to reflect data on human variability can be accomplished through (1) the characterization of enzyme expression in large banks of human liver samples, (2) the employment of appropriate techniques for the quantification and extrapolation of metabolic rates derived in vitro, and (3) the judicious application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. While in vitro measurements of specific biochemical reactions from multiple human samples can yield qualitatively valuable data on human variance, such measures must be put into the perspective of the intact human to yield the most valuable predictions of metabolic differences among humans. For quantitative metabolism data to be the most valuable in risk assessment, they must be tied to human anatomy and physiology, and the impact of their variance evaluated under real exposure scenarios. For chemicals metabolized in the liver, the concentration of parent chemical in the liver represents the substrate concentration in the MichaelisMenten description of metabolism. Metabolic constants derived in vitro may be extrapolated to the intact liver, when appropriate conditions are met. Metabolic capacity Vmax; the maximal rate of the reaction) can be scaled directly to the concentration

  19. Human Powered Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  20. Kinship and Human Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergendorff, Steen

    This book offers a exiting new explanation of human evolution. Based on insight from Anthropology is shows that human became 'cultured' beings capable of symbolic thought by developing rasting kinship based between groups that could not other wise survive in the harah climate condition during...

  1. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  2. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  3. Global Journal of Humanities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Global Journal of Humanities is aimed at promoting reasearch in all areas of Humanities including philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, history, fine/applied arts, theater arts, architecture, etc. Visit the Global Journal Series website here: http://www.globaljournalseries.com/ ...

  4. Evaluating the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  5. Human gliomas contain morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogenous...

  6. Human Resource Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Centering on strategic objective of reform and development,CIAE formulated its objectives in human resource construction for the 13th Five-year Plan period,and achieved new apparent progress in human resource construction in 2015.1 Implementation of"LONGMA Project"

  7. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  8. Biodemography of human ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W

    2010-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems...

  9. Human Intestinal Spirochaetosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Human intestinal spirochaetosis is a condition of the colon that is characterized by the presence of spirochaetes attached to the mucosal cells of the colon. These spirochaetes belong to the family Brachyspiraceae and two species are known to occur in humans: Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira

  10. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    , which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...

  11. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  12. Introduction to human factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems

  13. Teaching Human Rights Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    The international community has developed a system of human rights law relevant to many areas of legal encounter, which American law schools have been slow to incorporate into curricula. Teaching human rights law provides an opportunity for law schools to enrich the learning process and contribute creatively to the respect for rights in society.…

  14. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  15. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  16. Urbanization and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihr, A.

    Urban governance on the basis of human rights can help to set up problem solving mechanisms to guarantee social peace, economic growth and political participation.If states both integrate more in international or regional human rights regime and give more autonomy to urban governments and local

  17. The Human Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

     Bent Fausing  "The Humane Technology", abstract (for The Two Cultures: Balancing Choices and Effects Oxford University July 20-26, 2008). The paper will investigate the use of technology in everyday aesthetics such as TV-commercials for mobile phones for Nokia, which slogan is, as it is well known......, "Nokia - connecting people". Which function does this technology get in narratives, images, interactions and affects here?      The mobile phone and its digital camera are depicted as being able to make a unique human presence and interaction. The medium, the technology is a necessary helper to get...... towards this very special and lost humanity. Without the technology, no special humanity is the prophecy. This personification or anthropomorphism is important for the branding of new technology. The technology is seen as creating a technotranscendens towards a more qualified humanity, which is in contact...

  18. Human gliomas contain morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogeno...... of the solutions used in the study nor was it present as a residual material in blank HPLC runs. CONCLUSIONS: Morphine is present in human gliomas, suggesting that it may exert an action that effects tumour physiology/pathology.......BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogenous...

  19. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  20. UN human rights council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Mlrjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the structure, mechanisms, practices and perspectives of the Human Rights Council, the UN body that, at universal level is the most important body in this area. Introductory section provides for a brief overview of the origins of human rights and the work of the Commission on Human Rights, in whose jurisdiction were questions of human rights before the establishment of the Council. After the introductory section the author gives an analysis of the structure, objectives, mandate and main procedures for the protection of human rights within the united Nations. In the final section the authorpoints out the advantages of this authority and criticism addressed to it, with emphasis on the possibility and the need for its reform.

  1. Waste - the human factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Waste is a human concept, referring to things that have no use to human beings and arising entirely from human activities. It is the useless residue of any human process that affects the economy or environment. The changes brought about by the industrial revolution are enormous; fossil fuels, not just photosynthesis, now provide energy and wastes at rates far exceeding the capacity of the ecosystem to absorb or recycle. Three major problems face the Planet: accelerated population growth, accelerated use of resources for energy and industry, and the disproportionate use of resources and waste between the northern and southern parts of the Planet. Knowledge and science are in a position to provide both human creativity and the directed technology to take remedial action and rediscover harmony between nature and mankind. Only social and political will is lacking

  2. Managing human performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strucic, M.; Kavsek, D.

    2004-01-01

    Human performance remains a significant factor for management attention not only from a reactor safety perspective, but also from a financial one. Recent significant events analysis shows that human errors are still dominant causes and contributors to them. An analysis of significant events in nuclear industry occurred through 15-years period revealed that three of four significant events were triggered by human error, although the number of events have dropped by more than a factor of four. A number of human performance breakdowns occurred in the application of errorprevention techniques. These included a lack of pre-job briefs, inadequate turnover of tasks, ineffective use of peer checking, inadequate procedure adherence, and failure to apply a questioning attitude when unexpected changes were encountered in the task. Attempts by the industry to improve human performance have traditionally focused at the worker level. However, human error occurs within the context of the organization, which can either foster or resist human error. The greatest room for improvement lies not only in the continued improvement of front-line worker performance but more so in the identification and elimination of weaknesses in the organizational and managerial domains that contributes to worker performance at the job site. Based on mentioned analysis, other industrial sources and own operating experience, NPP Krsko is paying more attention to improve human performance among own as well as contractor workers. Through series of programs and activities, such as Reactivity Management Program, Safety Culture Program, Self-assessment Program, Corrective Action Program, Plant Performance Monitoring Program, developed in last few years, and through new procedures, written guides and publications, training and management efforts, number of human errors is going to be reduced. Involvement of higher levels of NPP Krsko organization in promotion and use of Human Performance techniques is

  3. Existence of a soluble form of CD50 (intercellular adhesion molecule-3) produced upon human lymphocyte activation. Present in normal human serum and levels are increased in the serum of systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino-Otín, M R; Viñas, O; de la Fuente, M A; Juan, M; Font, J; Torradeflot, M; Pallarés, L; Lozano, F; Alberola-Ila, J; Martorell, J

    1995-03-15

    CD50 (ICAM-3) is a leukocyte differentiation Ag expressed almost exclusively on hemopoietic cells, with a key role in the first steps of immune response. To develop a specific sandwich ELISA to detect a soluble CD50 form (sCD50), two different mAbs (140-11 and 101-1D2) recognizing non-overlapping epitopes were used. sCD50 was detected in the supernatant of stimulated PBMCs, with the highest levels after CD3 triggering. Simultaneously, the CD50 surface expression diminished during the first 24 h. sCD50 isolated from culture supernatant and analyzed by immunoblotting showed an apparent m.w. of 95 kDa, slightly smaller than the membrane form. These data, together with Northern blot kinetics analysis, suggest that sCD50 is cleaved from cell membrane. Furthermore, we detect sCD50 in normal human sera and higher levels in sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, especially in those in active phase. The sCD50 levels showed a positive correlation with sCD27 levels (r = 0.4213; p = 0.0026). Detection of sCD50, both after in vitro CD3 triggering of PBMCs and increased in SLE sera, suggests that sCD50 could be used as a marker of lymphocyte stimulation.

  4. Digital Human Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The development of models to represent human characteristics and behaviors in human factors is broad and general. The term "model" can refer to any metaphor to represent any aspect of the human; it is generally used in research to mean a mathematical tool for the simulation (often in software, which makes the simulation digital) of some aspect of human performance and for the prediction of future outcomes. This section is restricted to the application of human models in physical design, e.g., in human factors engineering. This design effort is typically human interface design, and the digital models used are anthropometric. That is, they are visual models that are the physical shape of humans and that have the capabilities and constraints of humans of a selected population. They are distinct from the avatars used in the entertainment industry (movies, video games, and the like) in precisely that regard: as models, they are created through the application of data on humans, and they are used to predict human response; body stresses workspaces. DHM enable iterative evaluation of a large number of concepts and support rapid analysis, as compared with use of physical mockups. They can be used to evaluate feasibility of escape of a suited astronaut from a damaged vehicle, before launch or after an abort (England, et al., 2012). Throughout most of human spaceflight, little attention has been paid to worksite design for ground workers. As a result of repeated damage to the Space Shuttle which adversely affected flight safety, DHM analyses of ground assembly and maintenance have been developed over the last five years for the design of new flight systems (Stambolian, 2012, Dischinger and Dunn Jackson, 2014). The intent of these analyses is to assure the design supports the work of the ground crew personnel and thereby protect the launch vehicle. They help the analyst address basic human factors engineering questions: can a worker reach the task site from the work platform

  5. Human Milk Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Human factors information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.; DiPalo, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plant safety is dependent upon human performance related to plant operations. To provide improvements in human performance, data collection and assessment play key roles. This paper reports on the Human factors Information System (HFIS) which is designed to meet the needs of the human factors specialists of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These specialists identify personnel errors and provide guidance designed to prevent such errors. HFIS is a simple and modular system designed for use on a personal computer. It is designed to contain four separate modules that provide information indicative of program or function effectiveness as well as safety-related human performance based on programmatic and performance data. These modules include the Human Factors Status module; the Regulatory Programs module; the Licensee Event Report module; and the Operator Requalification Performance module. Information form these modules can either be used separately or can be combined due to the integrated nature of the system. HFIS has the capability, therefore, to provide insights into those areas of human factors that can reduce the probability of events caused by personnel error at nuclear power plants and promote the health and safety of the public. This information system concept can be applied to other industries as well as the nuclear industry

  7. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Versatile, Predictable, and Donor-Free Gene Knockout in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongliang; Hui, Yi; Shi, Lei; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Chi, Liankai; Fan, Beibei; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Yang; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yiran; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-09-13

    Loss-of-function studies in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) require efficient methodologies for lesion of genes of interest. Here, we introduce a donor-free paired gRNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 knockout strategy (paired-KO) for efficient and rapid gene ablation in hPSCs. Through paired-KO, we succeeded in targeting all genes of interest with high biallelic targeting efficiencies. More importantly, during paired-KO, the cleaved DNA was repaired mostly through direct end joining without insertions/deletions (precise ligation), and thus makes the lesion product predictable. The paired-KO remained highly efficient for one-step targeting of multiple genes and was also efficient for targeting of microRNA, while for long non-coding RNA over 8 kb, cleavage of a short fragment of the core promoter region was sufficient to eradicate downstream gene transcription. This work suggests that the paired-KO strategy is a simple and robust system for loss-of-function studies for both coding and non-coding genes in hPSCs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human acid β-glucosidase: isolation and amino acid sequence of a peptide containing the catalytic site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinur, T.; Osiecki, K.M.; Legler, G.; Gatt, S.; Desnick, R.J.; Grabowski, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Human acid β-glucosidase (D-glucosyl-N-acylsphingosine glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.45) cleaves the glucosidic bonds of glucosylceramide and synthetic β-glucosides. The deficient activity of this hydrolase is the enzymatic defect in the subtypes and variants of Gaucher disease, the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease. To isolate and characterize the catalytic site of the normal enzyme, brominated 3 H-labeled conduritol B epoxide ( 3 H-Br-CBE), which inhibits the enzyme by binding covalently to this site, was used as an affinity label. Under optimal conditions 1 mol of 3 H-Br-CBE bound to 1 mol of pure enzyme protein, indicating the presence of a single catalytic site per enzyme subunit. After V 8 protease digestion of the 3 H-Br-CBE-labeled homogeneous enzyme, three radiolabeled peptides, designated peptide A, B, or C, were resolved by reverse-phase HPLC. The partial amino acid sequence (37 residues) of peptide A (M/sub r/, 5000) was determined. The sequence of this peptide, which contained the catalytic site, had exact homology to the sequence near the carboxyl terminus of the protein, as predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the full-length cDNA encoding acid β-glucosidase

  9. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer

  10. Human recombinant beta-secretase immobilized enzyme reactor for fast hits' selection and characterization from a virtual screening library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Angela; Mancini, Francesca; Cosconati, Sandro; Marinelli, Luciana; La Pietra, Valeria; Novellino, Ettore; Andrisano, Vincenza

    2013-01-25

    In the present work, a human recombinant BACE1 immobilized enzyme reactor (hrBACE1-IMER) has been applied for the sensitive fast screening of 38 compounds selected through a virtual screening approach. HrBACE1-IMER was inserted into a liquid chromatograph coupled with a fluorescent detector. A fluorogenic peptide substrate (M-2420), containing the β-secretase site of the Swedish mutation of APP, was injected and cleaved in the on-line HPLC-hrBACE1-IMER system, giving rise to the fluorescent product. The compounds of the library were tested for their ability to inhibit BACE1 in the immobilized format and to reduce the area related to the chromatographic peak of the fluorescent enzymatic product. The results were validated in solution by using two different FRET methods. Due to the efficient virtual screening methodology, more than fifty percent of the selected compounds showed a measurable inhibitory activity. One of the most active compound (a bis-indanone derivative) was characterized in terms of IC(50) and K(i) determination on the hrBACE1-IMER. Thus, the hrBACE1-IMER has been confirmed as a valid tool for the throughput screening of different chemical entities with potency lower than 30μM for the fast hits' selection and for mode of action determination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  12. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haixi [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Ren, Guosheng [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Endocrine and breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xu, Yongzhu [Chongqing Health Service Center, Chongqing 400020 (China); Zhou, Xiangyang [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: xiangtx1@gmail.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  13. Cordycepin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line H1975 via Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris with notable anticancer activity. Though the prominent inhibitory activity was reported in different kinds of cancer cell lines, the concrete mechanisms remain elusive. It was reported that cordycepin could be converted into tri-phosphates in vivo to confuse a number of enzymes and interfere the normal cell function. For the inhibitory mechanism of EGFR inhibitors and the structure similarity of ATP and tri-phosphated cordycepin, human lung cancer cell line H1975 was employed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cordycepin. The results showed that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that H1975 cells could be arrested at the G0/G1 phase after cordycepin treatment. The expression levels of apoptosis-related protein Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 and phosphorylated expression levels of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 were all decreased compared with the control group stimulated with EGF. However, the protein expression levels of proapoptotic protein Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were increased. These results implied that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via the EGFR signaling pathway. Our results indicated that there was potential to seek a novel EGFR inhibitor from cordycepin and its chemical derivatives.

  14. Genetics of human hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Human hydrocephalus is a common medical condition that is characterized by abnormalities in the flow or resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in ventricular dilatation. Human hydrocephalus can be classified into two clinical forms, congenital and acquired. Hydrocephalus is one of the complex and multifactorial neurological disorders. A growing body of evidence indicates that genetic factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. An understanding of the genetic components and mechanism of this complex disorder may offer us significant insights into the molecular etiology of impaired brain development and an accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in cerebral compartments during the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. Genetic studies in animal models have started to open the way for understanding the underlying pathology of hydrocephalus. At least 43 mutants/loci linked to hereditary hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models and humans. Up to date, 9 genes associated with hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models. In contrast, only one such gene has been identified in humans. Most of known hydrocephalus gene products are the important cytokines, growth factors or related molecules in the cellular signal pathways during early brain development. The current molecular genetic evidence from animal models indicate that in the early development stage, impaired and abnormal brain development caused by abnormal cellular signaling and functioning, all these cellular and developmental events would eventually lead to the congenital hydrocephalus. Owing to our very primitive knowledge of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus, it is difficult to evaluate whether data gained from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. Initiation of a large population genetics study in humans will certainly provide invaluable information about the molecular and cellular etiology and the developmental mechanisms of human

  15. Human Power Empirically Explored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-18

    Harvesting energy from the users' muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are convenient and can be environmentally and economically beneficial. This work provides insight into the knowledge required to design human-powered energy systems in consumer products from a scientific perspective. It shows the developments of human-powered products from the first introduction of the BayGen Freeplay radio in 1995 till current products and provides an overview and analysis of 211 human-powered products currently on the market. Although human power is generally perceived as beneficial for the environment, this thesis shows that achieving environmental benefit is only feasible when the environmental impact of additional materials in the energy conversion system is well balanced with the energy demands of the products functionality. User testing with existing products showed a preference for speeds in the range of 70 to 190 rpm for crank lengths from 32 to 95 mm. The muscular input power varied from 5 to 21 W. The analysis of twenty graduation projects from the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering in the field of human-powered products, offers an interesting set of additional practice based design recommendations. The knowledge based approach of human power is very powerful to support the design of human-powered products. There is substantial potential for improvements in the domains energy conversion, ergonomics and environment. This makes that human power, when applied properly, is environmentally and economically competitive over a wider range of applications than thought previously.

  16. Ex vivo culture of human fetal gonads: manipulation of meiosis signalling by retinoic acid treatment disrupts testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J E; Perlman, S; Lundvall, L; Mitchell, R T; Juul, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2015-10-01

    What are the effects of experimentally manipulating meiosis signalling by addition of retinoic acid (RA) in cultured human fetal gonads? RA-treatment accelerated meiotic entry in cultured fetal ovary samples, while addition of RA resulted in a dysgenetic gonadal phenotype in fetal testis cultures. One of the first manifestations of sex differentiation is the initiation of meiosis in fetal ovaries. In contrast, meiotic entry is actively prevented in the fetal testis at this developmental time-point. It has previously been shown that RA-treatment mediates initiation of meiosis in human fetal ovary ex vivo. This was a controlled ex vivo study of human fetal gonads treated with RA in 'hanging-drop' tissue cultures. The applied experimental set-up preserves germ cell-somatic niche interactions and the investigated outcomes included tissue integrity and morphology, cell proliferation and survival and the expression of markers of meiosis and sex differentiation. Tissue from 24 first trimester human fetuses was included in this study, all from elective terminations at gestational week (GW) 7-12. Gonads were cultured for 2 weeks with and without addition of 1 µM RA. Samples were subsequently formalin-fixed and investigated by immunohistochemistry and cell counting. Proteins investigated and quantified included; octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), transcription factor AP-2 gamma (AP2γ) (embryonic germ cell markers), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (immature Sertoli cell markers), COUP transcription factor 2 (COUP-TFII) (marker of interstitial cells), forkhead box L2 (FOXL2) (granulosa cell marker), H2A histone family, member X (γH2AX) (meiosis marker), doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 1 (DMRT1) (meiosis regulator), cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), cleaved Caspase 3 (apoptosis markers) and Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67) (proliferation marker). Also, proliferation was determined using a 5'-bromo-2

  17. Human dignity and bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By opening the field of bioethics followed a new wave of intense debate on the theological, philosophical and legal significance of the concept of human dignity . Exactly ten years ago (December 2003 American bioethicist Ruth Maclin has proposed to divest ourselves of the concept of human dignity because it is vague, useless and redundant and that, without any loss, we can replace it by the ethical principle of personal autonomy. Her article was followed by harsh reactions and opposite views. What is this term in so broad, almost inflationary and opposite use is not a reason to deprive him, but, on the contrary, it shows how important it is and that it should be determined at least outline. As universal values and general concept, the human dignity has no pre-defined and narrow, precise meaning. It is more an evaluation horizon, the guiding principle and regulatory ideas that must constantly define and codify by many guaranted human rights and fundamental freedoms. As generic notion of each reasonable law, it is their foundation and a common denominator, legitimising basis of natural but also of positive law. As intrinsic and static value which means the humaneness, the humanity it is absolute, inherent to every human being without distinction and conditioning, as a unique and unrepeatable creation. In this meaning, the dignity is the obligation and limitation of the state, society and each of us. As an ethical and dynamic category, it is not given to us, but it is assign to us, and it is not in us, but always before us, as a guide of our actions in accordance with virtues, to treat ourselves, each other and the nature in a human way. The century in which we live is named the century of molecular biology and genetic engineering because of the enormous potential but also risks to human dignity. Because of that human dignity has become a central principle in all international documents relating to the human genome, genetics and bioethics, adopted

  18. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  19. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  1. Avian and human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broor, Shobha; Bharaj, Preeti

    2007-04-01

    Pneumovirus infection remains a significant problem for both human and veterinary medicine. Both avian pneumovirus (aMPV, Turkey rhinotracheitis virus) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are pathogens of birds and humans, which are associated with respiratory tract infections. Based on their different genomic organization and low level of nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity with paramyxoviruses in the genus Pneumovirus, aMPV and hMPV have been classified into a new genus referred to as Metapneumovirus. The advancement of our understanding of pneumovirus biology and pathogenesis of pneumovirus disease in specific natural hosts can provide us with strategies for vaccine formulations and combined antiviral and immunomodulatory therapies.

  2. Cleave to the Black’: expressions of Ethiopianism in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Reavis Price

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Describes the development of Ethiopianism, and illustrates its ideological and thematic content and manifestations, especially focusing on Jamaica, while also referring to the US and South Africa. First, the author outlines the content of Ethiopianism, describing how it is pro-black, contests white hegemony, colonialism, poverty and oppression, looks at Africa, and points at black people's redemption. Therefore the Bible is reread, Africa (Ethiopia the holy land, and God considered black. He discusses Ethiopianism's early origins in the slavery period, and how it could take political as well as non-political, mental forms. Author points at the 1865 Morant Bay Rebellion as the vital link in developing Ethiopianism in Jamaica, and then describes 3 groups/movements embodying the movement: the influence of the preacher Bedward and his teachings against black oppression, Marcus Garvey's teachings and activities for black progress, and the first Rastafarians between 1930 and 1938, who were in part influenced by Bedward and Garvey.

  3. A natural fast-cleaving branching ribozyme from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria pringsheimi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yunjia; Nielsen, Henrik; Birgisdottir, Asa Birna

    2011-01-01

    The GIR1 branching ribozyme constitutes a separate class of naturally occurring ribozymes. Most studies have been performed with the single GIR1 known from the myxomycete Didymium iridis whereas the large number of GIR1s found in the amoeboflagellate Naegleria has remained largely uncharacterized....... Here, we investigate ribozyme cleavage properties of a collection of Naegleria GIR1 ribozymes and define the variant from N. pringsheimi as a suitable model due to its superior activity in vitro. We identify the minimal ribozyme by deletion analysis applying a new RNase R based assay for the branching...

  4. Genomics and radical mediated DNA damage: major differences between ionizing radiation and DNA-cleaving enediynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, J.P.; Begley, T.J.; Samson, L.D.; Dedon, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    While the evidence is strong for radical-mediated oxidative processes in the pathophysiology of cancer and aging, the mechanisms by which cells respond to oxidative stress have eluded definition. To this end, we have undertaken genomic studies comparing the response of S. cerevisiae to DNA-specific oxidizing agents, the enediynes calicheamicin (CAL), esperamicin (ESP), and neocarzinostatin (NCS), and the non-specific gamma-radiation (RAD). While RAD results in relatively indiscriminate oxidation of cellular molecules, the enediynes are highly specific to DNA and produce damage by a common mechanism involving radical-mediated oxidation of deoxyribose. Transcriptional profiling in response to these agents (80% survival; 15 min exposure; Affymetrix) revealed unexpected differences between RAD and the enediynes and among the three enediynes. Only 2 genes responded in common to all agents, while 9 genes were regulated in common for the 3 enediynes (no DNA repair genes altered in common). The limited common gene expression changes for the 3 enediynes may result from differences in deoxyribose oxidation chemistry, DNA and chromatin targets or the proportions of single- and double-strand DNA lesions. RAD produced a more robust response than the enediynes, altering expression of 195 and 52 genes by more than 2- and 5-fold, respectively, compared to 16-44 and *2 genes, respectively, for the enediynes. This suggests that the transcriptional response varies in intensity according to the number of cellular features affected by the toxin. Genes showing the strongest up-regulation with RAD: ribonucleotide reductase, multidrug resistance, DS break repair/RAD51, GSH transferase; strongly reduced gene expression: TEL1 (damage signaling), NAT2 (acetyltransferase). Genomic phenotyping studies, using a subset of the Research Genetics deletion library, revealed that loss of apn1, the major AP endonuclease, caused resistance to NCS, possibly due to reduced formation of protein-DNA cross-links at NCS-induced deoxyribonolactones. Loss of snf2, a chromatin remodeling protein related to lung cancer prognosis, caused strong resistance to both NCS and CAL, as did loss of rnr3, a gene up-regulated 20-fold by RAD

  5. BID is cleaved by caspase-8 within a native complex on the mitochondrial membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schug, Z. T.; Gonzalvez, F.; Houtkooper, R. H.; Vaz, F. M.; Gottlieb, E.

    2011-01-01

    Caspase-8 stably inserts into the mitochondrial outer membrane during extrinsic apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-8 enrichment on the mitochondria impairs caspase-8 activation and prevents apoptosis. However, the function of active caspase-8 on the mitochondrial membrane remains unknown. In this

  6. Characterization of member of DUF1888 protein family, self-cleaving and self-assembling endopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Bargassa, Monireh; Hamilton, John E; Cunningham, Mark A; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure of SO1698 protein from Shewanella oneidensis was determined by a SAD method and refined to 1.57 Å. The structure is a β sandwich that unexpectedly consists of two polypeptides; the N-terminal fragment includes residues 1-116, and the C-terminal one includes residues 117-125. Electron density also displayed the Lys-98 side chain covalently linked to Asp-116. The putative active site residues involved in self-cleavage were identified; point mutants were produced and characterized structurally and in a biochemical assay. Numerical simulations utilizing molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum/classical calculations suggest a mechanism involving activation of a water molecule coordinated by a catalytic aspartic acid.

  7. Characterization of Member of DUF1888 Protein Family, Self-cleaving and Self-assembling Endopeptidase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Bargassa, Monireh; Hamilton, John E.; Cunningham, Mark A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of SO1698 protein from Shewanella oneidensis was determined by a SAD method and refined to 1.57 Å. The structure is a β sandwich that unexpectedly consists of two polypeptides; the N-terminal fragment includes residues 1–116, and the C-terminal one includes residues 117–125. Electron density also displayed the Lys-98 side chain covalently linked to Asp-116. The putative active site residues involved in self-cleavage were identified; point mutants were produced and characterized structurally and in a biochemical assay. Numerical simulations utilizing molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum/classical calculations suggest a mechanism involving activation of a water molecule coordinated by a catalytic aspartic acid. PMID:22493430

  8. Profilicollis botulus (Van Cleave, 1916) from diving ducks and shore crabs of British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, H L

    1989-02-01

    Adults of Profilicollis botulus were found in 6 species of diving ducks in British Columbia including 3 new hosts: common goldeneye, Bucephala clangula (L.); Barrow's goldeneye, B. islandica (Gmelin); and greater scaup, Aythya marila (L.). The identification of the species was verified by the examination of co-types and specimens from eider ducks, Somateria mollissima (L.), from Scotland and oldsquaw, Clangula hyemalis (L.), from New Brunswick. Cystacanths from the hairy shore crab, Hemigrapsus oregonensis (Dana), were similar in morphology to those from Carcinus maenas (L.) from Scotland.

  9. Photochemical cleaving of allochthonous organic-metal complexes contributes to phosphorus immobilization in surface waters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porcal, Petr; Frejlachová, K.; Kopáček, Jiří; Nedoma, Jiří; Šavrdová, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, JAN (2017), s. 374-381 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09721S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : photodegradation * dom * phosphorus * aluminum * iron Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  10. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ADAM13 Induces Cranial Neural Crest by Cleaving Class B Ephrins and Regulating Wnt Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) are multipotent embryonic cells that contribute to craniofacial structures and other cells and tissues of the vertebrate head. During embryogenesis, CNC is induced at the neural plate boundary through the interplay of several major signaling pathways. Here we report that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 is required for early induction of CNC in Xenopus. In both cultured cells and X. tropicalis embryos, membrane-bound Ephrins (Efns) B1 and B2 were identif...

  12. ADAM 12 cleaves extracellular matrix proteins and correlates with cancer status and stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Roopali; Wewer, Ulla M; Zurakowski, David

    2004-01-01

    -Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Four peptides were identified that spanned the amino acid sequence of ADAM 12. Immunoblot analysis using ADAM 12-specific antibodies detected an approximately 68-k......Da band identified as the mature form of ADAM 12. To characterize catalytic properties of ADAM 12, full-length ADAM 12-S was expressed in COS-7 cells and purified. Substrate specificity studies demonstrated that ADAM 12-S degrades gelatin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin but not type I collagen...... or casein. Gelatinase activity of ADAM 12 was completely abrogated by zinc chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA and was partially inhibited by the hydroxamate inhibitor Marimastat. Endogenous matrix metalloprotease inhibitor TIMP-3 inhibited activity. To validate our initial identification of this enzyme...

  13. Always cleave up your mess: targeting collagen degradation to treat tissue fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKleroy, William; Lee, Ting-Hein

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a vexing clinical problem with no proven therapeutic options. In the normal lung there is continuous collagen synthesis and collagen degradation, and these two processes are precisely balanced to maintain normal tissue architecture. With lung injury there is an increase in the rate of both collagen production and collagen degradation. The increase in collagen degradation is critical in preventing the formation of permanent scar tissue each time the lung is exposed to injury. In pulmonary fibrosis, collagen degradation does not keep pace with collagen production, resulting in extracellular accumulation of fibrillar collagen. Collagen degradation occurs through both extracellular and intracellular pathways. The extracellular pathway involves cleavage of collagen fibrils by proteolytic enzyme including the metalloproteinases. The less-well-described intracellular pathway involves binding and uptake of collagen fragments by fibroblasts and macrophages for lysosomal degradation. The relationship between these two pathways and their relevance to the development of fibrosis is complex. Fibrosis in the lung, liver, and skin has been associated with an impaired degradative environment. Much of the current scientific effort in fibrosis is focused on understanding the pathways that regulate increased collagen production. However, recent reports suggest an important role for collagen turnover and degradation in regulating the severity of tissue fibrosis. The objective of this review is to evaluate the roles of the extracellular and intracellular collagen degradation pathways in the development of fibrosis and to examine whether pulmonary fibrosis can be viewed as a disease of impaired matrix degradation rather than a disease of increased matrix production. PMID:23564511

  14. Physicochemical, antioxidant, DNA cleaving properties and antimicrobial activity of fisetin-copper chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodyga-Chruscińska, Elżbieta; Pilo, Maria; Zucca, Antonio; Garribba, Eugenio; Klewicka, Elżbieta; Rowińska-Żyrek, Magdalena; Symonowicz, Marzena; Chrusciński, Longin; Cheshchevik, Vitalij T

    2018-03-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) metal chelates are of interest as this plant polyphenol has revealed broad prospects for its use as natural medicine in the treatment of various diseases. Metal interactions may change or enhance fisetin biological properties so understanding fisetin metal chelation is important for its application not only in medicine but also as a food additive in nutritional supplements. This work was aimed to determine and characterize copper complexes formed in different pH range at applying various metal/ligand ratios. Fisetin and Cu(II)-fisetin complexes were characterized by potentiometric titrations, UV-Vis (Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy), EPR, ESI-MS, FTIR and cyclic voltammetry. Their effects on DNA were investigated by using circular dichroism, spectrofluorimetry and gel electrophoresis methods. The copper complex with the ratio of Cu(II)/fisetin 1/2 exhibited significant DNA cleavage activity, followed by complete degradation of DNA. The influence of copper(II) ions on antioxidant activity of fisetin in vitro has been studied using DPPH, ABTS and mitochondrial assays. The results have pointed out that fisetin or copper complexes can behave both as antioxidants or pro-oxidants. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds has been investigated towards several bacteria and fungi. The copper complex of Cu(II)/fisetin 1/2 ratio showed higher antagonistic activity against bacteria comparing to the ligand and it revealed a promising antifungal activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Murine Antibody Responses to Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimers Are Highly Restricted in Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Joyce K.; Crampton, Jordan C.; Cupo, Albert; Ketas, Thomas; van Gils, Marit J.; Sliepen, Kwinten; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Deresa, Isaiah; Stanfield, Robyn; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Crotty, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Generating neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of many current HIV-1 vaccine efforts. To be of practical value, these nAbs must be both potent and cross-reactive in order to be capable of preventing the transmission of the highly diverse and generally neutralization resistant (Tier-2)

  16. Unfolding, aggregation, and seeded amyloid formation of lysine-58-cleaved beta(2)-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Rozlosnik, N.

    2005-01-01

    . Using amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry, we show that Delta K58-beta(2)m has increased unfolding rates compared to wt-beta(2)m and that unfolding is highly temperature dependent. The unfolding rate is I order of magnitude faster in Delta K58-beta(2)M than in wt-beta(2)m...... in the circulation of dialysis patients. This beta(2)M variant, Delta K58-beta(2)m, is a disulfide-linked two-chain molecule consisting of amino acid residues 1-57 and 59-99 of intact beta(2)m, and we here demonstrate and characterize its decreased conformational stability as compared to wild-type (wt) beta(2)M...

  17. Mutation analysis and clinical implications of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, K.F.H.; Schiphorst, R.H.M.; Allford, S.; Karpman, D.; Etzioni, A.; Brichard, B.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Monnens, L.A.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pentad of thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, mild renal dysfunction, neurologic signs, and fever, classically characterizes the syndrome of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). TTP usually occurs in adults as an acquired form but a congenital form in children has also been

  18. An unusual diphosphatase from the PhnP family cleaves reactive FAD photoproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Li, Qiang; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2018-01-11

    Flavins are notoriously photolabile, but while the photoproducts derived from the iso -alloxazine ring are well known the other photoproducts are not. In the case of FAD, typically the main cellular flavin, the other photoproducts are predicted to include four- and five-carbon sugars linked to ADP. These FAD photoproducts were shown to be potent glycating agents, more so than ADP-ribose. Such toxic compounds would require disposal via an ADP-sugar diphosphatase or other route. Comparative analysis of bacterial genomes uncovered a candidate disposal gene that is chromosomally clustered with genes for FAD synthesis or transport and is predicted to encode a protein of the PhnP cyclic phosphodiesterase family. The representative PhnP family enzyme from Koribacter versatilis (here named Fpd, F AD p hotoproduct d iphosphatase) was found to have high, Mn 2+ -dependent diphosphatase activity against FAD photoproducts, FAD, and ADP-ribose, but almost no phosphodiesterase activity against riboflavin 4',5'-cyclic phosphate, a chemical breakdown product of FAD. To provide a structural basis of the unique Fpd activity, the crystal structure of K. versatilis Fpd was determined. The results place Fpd in the broad metallo-β-lactamase-like family of hydrolases, a diverse family commonly using two metals for hydrolytic catalysis. The active site of Fpd contains two Mn 2+ ions and a bound phosphate, consistent with a diphosphatase mechanism. Our results characterize the first PhnP family member that is a diphosphatase rather than a cyclic phosphodiesterase and suggest its involvement in a cellular damage-control system that efficiently hydrolyzes the reactive, ADP-ribose-like products of FAD photodegradation. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Caspase cleaved presenilin-1 is part of active gamma-secretase complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Camilla A; Popescu, Bogdan O; Laudon, Hanna

    2006-01-01

    , and Abeta is believed to be central for the molecular pathogenesis of AD. Apoptosis has been implicated as one of the mechanisms behind the neuronal cell loss seen in AD. We have studied preservation and activity of the gamma-secretase complex during apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed...

  20. Characterization of the protease activity that cleaves the extracellular domain of β-dystroglycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Di; Saito, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuko; Nakamura, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) complex, composed of αDG and βDG, provides a link between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cortical cytoskeleton. Although the proteolytic processing of βDG was reported in various physiological and pathological conditions, its exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue using the cell culture system of rat schwannoma cell line RT4. We found that the culture medium of RT4 cells was enriched with the protease activity that degrades the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of βDG specifically. This activity was suppressed by the inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, but not by the inhibitors of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Zymography and RT-PCR analysis showed that RT4 cells secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 into the culture medium. Finally, active MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymes degraded the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of βDG. These results indicate (1) that RT4 cells secrete the protease activity that degrades the extracellular domain of βDG specifically and (2) that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may be involved in this process