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Sample records for parkinson dementia syndromes

  1. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  2. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and dementia associated with Parkinson's disease: impact of age and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Oscar Schelp

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine correlations between age and metabolic disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. METHODS: This observational cross-sectional study included brief tests for dementia and the Mattis test. Signals of metabolic syndrome were evaluated. RESULTS: There was no significant effect from the presence of hypertension (OR=2.36 for patients under 65 years old and OR=0.64 for patients over 65, diabetes or hypercholesterolemia regarding occurrences of dementia associated with PD (24% of the patients. The study demonstrated that each year of age increased the estimated risk of dementia in PD patients by 9% (OR=1.09; 95%CI: 1.01-1.17. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence to correlate the presence of metabolic syndrome with the risk of dementia that was associated with PD. The study confirmed that dementia in PD is age dependent and not related to disease duration.

  4. Prevalence and characteristics of dementia in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarsland, Dag; Andersen, Kjeld; Larsen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown.......Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown....

  5. Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis with Parkinson Disease

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    ... AND TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION, DEMENTIA, AND PSYCHOSIS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common in people with Parkinson disease. These conditions can affect how people with ...

  6. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

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    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging.

  7. Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson`s disease and Parkinson`s syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zechovská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Author: Lenka Zechovská Institution: Rehabilitation Clinic, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové Title: Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome Supervisor: Mgr. Ivana Vondráková Number of pages: 115 Number of attachments: 8 Year of defence: 2013 Keywords: Parkinson's disease, basal ganglia, tremor, rigidity, hypokinesia Bachelor thesis deals with the problems of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome. The theoretical part includes the basal ganglia pathophysiolog...

  8. Demência na doença de Parkinson Dementia in Parkinsn's disease

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    Leonardo Caixeta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A presença de síndromes psiquiátricas, incluindo demência, associada a distúrbios motores tem sido cada vez mais reconhecida durante a última década, com destaque para o prejuízo cognitivo na doença de Parkinson idiopática. Esta revisão enfocará a epidemiologia, os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos diferenciais, mecanismos subjacentes e o tratamento da demência na doença de Parkinson idiopática. MÉTODO: Uma revisão da literatura dos estudos que investigaram a demência da doença de Parkinson idiopática foi realizada. RESULTADOS: A demência é altamente prevalente na doença de Parkinson idiopática. O protótipo da demência na doença de Parkinson idiopática consiste numa síndrome disexecutiva com comprometimento da atenção, funções executivas e, secundariamente, a memória. Neuroquimicamente, o déficit mais significativo parece ser colinérgico; a demência se correlaciona com a presença de corpos de Lewy corticais e límbicos. Evidências preliminares sugerem que os anticolinesterásicos podem ser efetivos na demência da doença de Parkinson idiopática. CONCLUSÕES: O prejuízo cognitivo na doença de Parkinson idiopática é associado a características próprias e é responsável por importante incapacidade nestes pacientes.OBJECTIVE: The concomitant presence of psychiatric syndromes, including dementia, with motor disturbance has been increasingly recognized during the last decade, with emphasis on cognitive impairment in idiopatic Parkinson's disease. This review will focus on the epidemiology, clinical aspects, differential diagnosis, underlying mechanisms and treatment of dementia in Parkinson's disease. METHOD: A literature review of the studies that investigated the dementia in Parkinson's disease was performed. RESULTS: Dementia is highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease. The prototype of dementia in Parkinson's disease is a dysexecutive syndrome with impaired attention, executive functions and

  9. Depression and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

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    Sinanović, Osman; Hudić, Josip; Zukić, Sanela; Kapidžić, Almasa; Zonić, Lejla; Vidović, Mirjana

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder causing not only motor dysfunction but also cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic and sensory disturbances. Depression is the most common psychiatric disturbance identified in patients with PD and has been shown to be more common in PD than in other chronic and disabling disorders, occurring in approximately 40% of PD patients. However, the prevalence and clinical features associated with depression in PD remain controversial. Dementia is increasingly recognized as a symptom associated with idiopathic PD, and is found in up to 40% of all patients suffering from that condition. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depressive and dementia symptoms in PD patients. The study included 35 consecutive patients with PD, 13 (37.4%) male and 22 (62.6%) female (mean age 62.9 ± 11.0, range 36-85 years), mean duration of disease 4.7 ± 2.9 (range 1-10) years, hospitalized during one year at Clinical Department of Neurology, Tuzla University Clinical Center, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used for assessment of cognitive deterioration and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression. Computerized tomography was performed in all patients. According to BDI scale, depressive symptoms were present in all 35 PD patients: minimal in 4 (11.4%), low in 7 (20%), moderate in 8 (22.8%), severe in 9 (25.4%) and extreme in 7 (20%) patients. On MMSE scale, 9 (25.4%) patients were free from cognitive deterioration and 26 (74.6%) patients had moderate to severe deterioration, but 21 (60%) patients (7 (33.33%) male and 14 (66.66%) female) had symptoms of dementia (MMSE score ≤ 23). Using MMSE scale, 8 (22.8%) patients were free from dementia and 27 (77.2%) patients had some cognitive deterioration. Very mild symptoms of dementia were found in 6 (25.9%) and overt features of dementia in 21 (74.1%) PD patients. So, out of 35 PD study patients, 21 (60%) (7 (33.3%) male and 14

  10. Office-Based Screening for Dementia in Parkinson Disease: The Montreal Parkinson Risk of Dementia Scale in 4 Longitudinal Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Benjamin K; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Anang, Julius B M; Nomura, Takashi; Rios-Romenets, Silvia; Nakashima, Kenji; Gagnon, Jean-François; Postuma, Ronald B

    2018-06-01

    Parkinson disease dementia dramatically increases mortality rates, patient expenditures, hospitalization risk, and caregiver burden. Currently, predicting Parkinson disease dementia risk is difficult, particularly in an office-based setting, without extensive biomarker testing. To appraise the predictive validity of the Montreal Parkinson Risk of Dementia Scale, an office-based screening tool consisting of 8 items that are simply assessed. This multicenter study (Montreal, Canada; Tottori, Japan; and Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative sites) used 4 diverse Parkinson disease cohorts with a prospective 4.4-year follow-up. A total of 717 patients with Parkinson disease were recruited between May 2005 and June 2016. Of these, 607 were dementia-free at baseline and followed-up for 1 year or more and so were included. The association of individual baseline scale variables with eventual dementia risk was calculated. Participants were then randomly split into cohorts to investigate weighting and determine the scale's optimal cutoff point. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated and correlations with selected biomarkers were investigated. Dementia, as defined by Movement Disorder Society level I criteria. Of the 607 patients (mean [SD] age, 63.4 [10.1]; 376 men [62%]), 70 (11.5%) converted to dementia. All 8 items of the Montreal Parkinson Risk of Dementia Scale independently predicted dementia development at the 5% significance level. The annual conversion rate to dementia in the high-risk group (score, >5) was 14.9% compared with 5.8% in the intermediate group (score, 4-5) and 0.6% in the low-risk group (score, 0-3). The weighting procedure conferred no significant advantage. Overall predictive validity by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.877 (95% CI, 0.829-0.924) across all cohorts. A cutoff of 4 or greater yielded a sensitivity of 77.1% (95% CI, 65.6-86.3) and a specificity of 87.2% (95% CI, 84.1-89.9), with a

  11. Dementia in Parkinson's disease: a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Baldivia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PD-D in a Brazilian sample adopting clinical and diagnostic procedures recommended by the Movement Disorders Society (MDS. Sixty-seven patients were consecutively submitted to neurological, neuropsychological and functional examinations. PD-D was established according to MDS clinical criteria (Level II and clinical procedures for PD-D (Level I and prevalence rate was compared between the levels adopted. Ten patients (14.9% were diagnosed as demented by Level I criteria whereas sixteen (23.8% were diagnosed based on Level II criteria. Level I criteria had low sensitivity in detecting PD-D (31.25%, but greater specificity (90.19. The PD-D group had significantly worse performance on all neuropsychological tests, were older (p<0.001, had an older age of onset ofdisease (p<0.01, had lower educational level (p<0.02 and had higher scores on functional scales. Current age (p=0.046 and Hoehn & Yahr score (p=0.048 were predictors for developing PD-D.

  12. Cerebral blood flow changes in Parkinson's disease associated with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derejko, M.; Lass, P.; Slawek, J.; Nyka, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Dementia is one of the main non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is diagnosed in about 30% of cases. Its aetiology remains unclear and contributing factors are controversial. Dementia may be more common in old patients with severe motor symptoms and mild cognitive impairment. Clinico-pathological studies show the association between dementia in PD and the age-related group of dementias, such as AD and VaD. A valuable aid in the assessment of dementia in PD is cerebral blood flow (CBF) brain SPECT scanning. It shows three different patterns of rCBF reduction, including frontal lobe hypoperfusion, iu Alzheimer-likel type of hypoperfusion and multiple, vascular defects. The heterogeneity of rCBF reduction may reflect the multifactorial pathophysiology of dementia in PD. It may result from concomitant AD pathology, cerebrovascular disease, destruction of nigro-striato-frontal projection or may be a distinct disease of different aetiology. (author)

  13. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways

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    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways James Kulig , Bruce ... rate, which can be dangerous. What is Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome? Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is ...

  14. COTARD SYNDROME IN SEMANTIC DEMENTIA

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    Mendez, Mario F.; Ramírez-Bermúdez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Background Semantic dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of meaning of words or concepts. semantic dementia can offer potential insights into the mechanisms of content-specific delusions. Objective The authors present a rare case of semantic dementia with Cotard syndrome, a delusion characterized by nihilism or self-negation. Method The semantic deficits and other features of semantic dementia were evaluated in relation to the patient's Cotard syndrome. Results Mrs. A developed the delusional belief that she was wasting and dying. This occurred after she lost knowledge for her somatic discomforts and sensations and for the organs that were the source of these sensations. Her nihilistic beliefs appeared to emerge from her misunderstanding of her somatic sensations. Conclusion This unique patient suggests that a mechanism for Cotard syndrome is difficulty interpreting the nature and source of internal pains and sensations. We propose that loss of semantic knowledge about one's own body may lead to the delusion of nihilism or death. PMID:22054629

  15. N-isopropyl-p-123I iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography study of Parkinson's disease with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hideaki; Udaka, Fukashi; Miyoshi, Takafumi; Hara, Narihiro; Tamura, Akiko; Oda, Masaya; Kubori, Tamotsu; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kameyama, Masakuni

    2005-01-01

    Intellectual deterioration occurs in 10-40% of patients with Parkinson's disease. However, there are many conflicting studies on its relation with brain perfusion and the nature of this dementing process remains controversial. The objective of this study was to compare cortical perfusion by SPECT using 123 I-IMP between Parkinson's disease patients with dementia and those without dementia and to investigate the correlation between dementia in Parkinson's disease and brain perfusion in various areas. Fifty-two cases of Parkinson's disease and 10 control cases were studied. The Parkinson's disease with dementia group included 30 cases and the Parkinson's disease without dementia group included 22 cases. By multiple logistic regression method, we demonstrated significant hypoperfusion in the occipital cortex in Parkinson's disease with dementia. The cause of dementia in Parkinson's disease may vary. We demonstrated that occipital hypoperfusion was closely correlated to dementia in Parkinson's disease compared to frontal, parietal and temporal perfusion. (author)

  16. Brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libus, P.; Stupalova, J.; Kuzelka, I.; Konrad, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Brain perfusion SPECT is used in differential diagnostics of dementia syndromes. First of all the aim is to distinguish vascular dementia from degenerative dementia and to differentiate dementia from delirium, psychiatric syndromes, depression and secondary dementia, which is important in relation to therapy. The purpose of our study was to detect significance of BP SPECT and include it into the diagnostic process in dementia syndromes. Materials and methods: 51 women and 63 men aged 55 - 88 were evaluated in the study. The patients correspond to the general criteria of dementia diagnosis. They were sent to the examination by neurological, internal and psychiatric departments and out-patient departments. All patients were examined by 99mTc ECD SPECT using a double head camera PRISM 200 VP with LEHR collimator. The scintigraphic data were evaluated by the visual and semiquantitative analysis. Results: It was established that most patients in our group had vascular dementia, while Alzheimer's disease was second. In other groups we found out dementia at strategic infarct location, e.g. in gyrus angularis in the dominant hemisphere, frontal temporal lobe dementia and alcoholic dementia. Twenty-four patients had a normal diagnosis. Fifteen of them had a somatic reason of the delirious state and were re-classified into pseudodementia. Nine patients were not diagnostically included and the examination will repeated in four months time. Conclusion: We have found out a good applicability of brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes diagnosis in our work. The best diagnosticable and most specific were the findings in multi-infarct dementia, Alzheimer's disease and frontal temporal lobe dementia. When vascular dementia is concerned we can even distinguish dementia at strategic infarction location, e.g. in thalamus, basal frontal telencefalon, in gyrus angularis of the dominant hemisphere, etc

  17. Genetic factors influencing frontostriatal dysfunction and the development of dementia in Parkinson's disease

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    Huertas, Ismael; Jesús, Silvia; García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Lojo, José Antonio; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodriguez, Juan Francisco; García-Solís, David; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The dual syndrome hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) establishes a dichotomy between a frontrostriatal dopamine-mediated syndrome, which leads to executive deficits, and a posterior cortical syndrome, which leads to dementia. Certain genes have been linked to these syndromes although the exact contribution is still controversial. The study’s objective was to investigate the role of APOE, MAPT, COMT, SNCA and GBA genes in the dual syndromes. We genotyped APOE (rs429358 and rs7412), MAPT (rs9468), COMT (rs4680) and SNCA (rs356219) risk polymorphisms and sequenced GBA in a cohort of 298 PD patients. The degree of dopaminergic depletion was investigated with [123I]FP-CIT SPECTs and the presence of dementia was ascertained with a long-term review based on established criteria. The association between genetic and imaging parameters was studied with linear regression, and the relationship with dementia onset with Cox regression. We found that APOE2 allele (Pput = 0.002; Pcau = 0.01), the minor allele 'G' in SNCA polymorphism (Pput = 0.02; Pcau = 0.006) and GBA deleterious variants in (Pput = 0.01; Pcau = 0.001) had a detrimental effect on striatal [123I]FP-CIT uptake in PD. Conversely, Met/Met carriers in COMT polymorphism had increased caudate uptake (Pcau = 0.03). The development of dementia was influenced by APOE4 allele (HR = 1.90; P = 0.03) and GBA deleterious variants (HR = 2.44; P = 0.01). Finally, we observed no role of MAPT locus in any of the syndromes. As a conclusion, APOE2, SNCA, COMT and GBA influence frontostriatal dysfunction whereas APOE4 and GBA influence the development of dementia, suggesting a double-edged role of GBA. The dichotomy of the dual syndromes may be driven by a broad dichotomy in these genetic factors. PMID:28399184

  18. Genetic factors influencing frontostriatal dysfunction and the development of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Huertas

    Full Text Available The dual syndrome hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD establishes a dichotomy between a frontrostriatal dopamine-mediated syndrome, which leads to executive deficits, and a posterior cortical syndrome, which leads to dementia. Certain genes have been linked to these syndromes although the exact contribution is still controversial. The study's objective was to investigate the role of APOE, MAPT, COMT, SNCA and GBA genes in the dual syndromes. We genotyped APOE (rs429358 and rs7412, MAPT (rs9468, COMT (rs4680 and SNCA (rs356219 risk polymorphisms and sequenced GBA in a cohort of 298 PD patients. The degree of dopaminergic depletion was investigated with [123I]FP-CIT SPECTs and the presence of dementia was ascertained with a long-term review based on established criteria. The association between genetic and imaging parameters was studied with linear regression, and the relationship with dementia onset with Cox regression. We found that APOE2 allele (Pput = 0.002; Pcau = 0.01, the minor allele 'G' in SNCA polymorphism (Pput = 0.02; Pcau = 0.006 and GBA deleterious variants in (Pput = 0.01; Pcau = 0.001 had a detrimental effect on striatal [123I]FP-CIT uptake in PD. Conversely, Met/Met carriers in COMT polymorphism had increased caudate uptake (Pcau = 0.03. The development of dementia was influenced by APOE4 allele (HR = 1.90; P = 0.03 and GBA deleterious variants (HR = 2.44; P = 0.01. Finally, we observed no role of MAPT locus in any of the syndromes. As a conclusion, APOE2, SNCA, COMT and GBA influence frontostriatal dysfunction whereas APOE4 and GBA influence the development of dementia, suggesting a double-edged role of GBA. The dichotomy of the dual syndromes may be driven by a broad dichotomy in these genetic factors.

  19. Clinical utility of FDG PET in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

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    Walker, Zuzana; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Garibotto, Valentina; Agosta, Federica; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-05-19

    There are no comprehensive guidelines for the use of FDG PET in the following three clinical scenarios: (1) diagnostic work-up of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) at risk of future cognitive decline, (2) discriminating idiopathic PD from progressive supranuclear palsy, and (3) identifying the underlying neuropathology in corticobasal syndrome. We therefore performed three literature searches and evaluated the selected studies for quality of design, risk of bias, inconsistency, imprecision, indirectness and effect size. Critical outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive/negative predictive value, area under the receiving operating characteristic curve, and positive/negative likelihood ratio of FDG PET in detecting the target condition. Using the Delphi method, a panel of seven experts voted for or against the use of FDG PET based on published evidence and expert opinion. Of 91 studies selected from the three literature searches, only four included an adequate quantitative assessment of the performance of FDG PET. The majority of studies lacked robust methodology due to lack of critical outcomes, inadequate gold standard and no head-to-head comparison with an appropriate reference standard. The panel recommended the use of FDG PET for all three clinical scenarios based on nonquantitative evidence of clinical utility. Despite widespread use of FDG PET in clinical practice and extensive research, there is still very limited good quality evidence for the use of FDG PET. However, in the opinion of the majority of the panellists, FDG PET is a clinically useful imaging biomarker for idiopathic PD and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

  20. Cushing's Syndrome and Steroid Dementia.

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    Bernini, Giampaolo; Tricò, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's Syndrome (CS) is associated with a specific spectrum of dementia-like symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, anxiety and mania, and neurocognitive alterations, like impairment of memory and concentration. This pattern of clinical complications, which significantly impair the health-related quality of life of CS patients, is sometimes referred to as "steroid dementia syndrome" (SDS). The SDS is the result of anatomical and functional anomalies in brain areas involved in the processing of emotion and cognition, which are only partially restored after the biochemical remission of the disease. Therefore, periodical neuropsychiatric evaluations are recommended in all CS patients, and a long-term follow-up is required after normalization of hypercortisolism. Recent evidences demonstrate that three classes of drugs (glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, steroidogenesis inhibitors, and pituitary tumor-targeted drugs), which are used for medical treatment of CS, can rapidly relief neuropsychiatric symptoms of SDS. Furthermore, several psychoactive medications have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of symptoms induced by the acute or chronic glucocosteroid administration. In this paper, a review of the current and future patents for the treatment and prevention of CS and SDS will be presented.

  1. Imaging biomarkers in Parkinson?s disease and Parkinsonian syndromes: current and emerging concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Usman; Compagnone, Jordana; Aviv, Richard I.; Strafella, Antonio P.; Black, Sandra E.; Lang, Anthony E.; Masellis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Two centuries ago in 1817, James Parkinson provided the first medical description of Parkinson?s disease, later refined by Jean-Martin Charcot in the mid-to-late 19th century to include the atypical parkinsonian variants (also termed, Parkinson-plus syndromes). Today, Parkinson?s disease represents the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with an estimated global prevalence of over 10 million. Conversely, atypical parkinsonian syndromes encompass a group of relatively heterogeneous d...

  2. Effects of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease Dementia : A Review of Clinical Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, Teus; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Aarsland, Dag; Barone, Paolo; Galvin, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Cognitive impairment and dementia are common features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) often have significant cholinergic defects, which may be treated with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs). The objective of this review was to consider available

  3. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in infants.

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    Hermosura, Tisha; Bradshaw, Wanda T

    2010-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a ventricular preexcitation that presents as supraventricular tachycardia. Health care professionals can attain optimal results in caring for infants with WPW syndrome by understanding both its pathophysiology and proper management to prevent and treat complications associated with it. This article reviews the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic modalities, assessment, and management of WPW syndrome.

  4. ‘Hummingbird’ Sign in a Patient with Guam Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianrong Yeo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 71-year-old male Chamorro patient from Guam who presented with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP-Richardson’s syndrome. Considering his strong family history of parkinsonism and a PSP phenotype, he was clinically diagnosed with Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed prominent midbrain atrophy with preserved pontine volume, forming the ‘hummingbird’ sign, which has not been described before in Guam PDC. Molecular analysis of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9orf72 showed only 6 GGGGCC repeats. We discuss the clinico-pathological similarities and differences between PSP and Guam PDC, and highlight the topography of neuropathological changes seen in Guam PDC to explain the appearance of the ‘hummingbird’ sign on MRI.

  5. Pleiotropic Effects of Variants in Dementia Genes in Parkinson Disease

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    Laura Ibanez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD increases dramatically with advancing age, approaching 80% in patients who survive 20 years with the disease. Increasing evidence suggests clinical, pathological and genetic overlap between Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia with PD. However, the contribution of the dementia-causing genes to PD risk, cognitive impairment and dementia in PD is not fully established.Objective: To assess the contribution of coding variants in Mendelian dementia-causing genes on the risk of developing PD and the effect on cognitive performance of PD patients.Methods: We analyzed the coding regions of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP, Presenilin 1 and 2 (PSEN1, PSEN2, and Granulin (GRN genes from 1,374 PD cases and 973 controls using pooled-DNA targeted sequence, human exome-chip and whole-exome sequencing (WES data by single variant and gene base (SKAT-O and burden tests analyses. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE or the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA. The effect of coding variants in dementia-causing genes on cognitive performance was tested by multiple regression analysis adjusting for gender, disease duration, age at dementia assessment, study site and APOE carrier status.Results: Known AD pathogenic mutations in the PSEN1 (p.A79V and PSEN2 (p.V148I genes were found in 0.3% of all PD patients. There was a significant burden of rare, likely damaging variants in the GRN and PSEN1 genes in PD patients when compared with frequencies in the European population from the ExAC database. Multiple regression analysis revealed that PD patients carrying rare variants in the APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and GRN genes exhibit lower cognitive tests scores than non-carrier PD patients (p = 2.0 × 10−4, independent of age at PD diagnosis, age at evaluation, APOE status or recruitment site.Conclusions: Pathogenic mutations in

  6. Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in dementia of Alzheimer, Parkinson and Lewy body types.

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    Perry, E K; Smith, C J; Court, J A; Perry, R H

    1990-01-01

    Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptor binding were measured in post mortem human brain tissue, using low (nM) concentrations of (3H)-nicotine to detect predominately the high affinity nicotinic site and (3H)-N-methylscopolamine in the presence and absence of 3 x 10(-4) M carbachol to measure both the low and high affinity agonist subtypes of the muscarinic receptor group. Consistent with most previous reports, the nicotinic but not muscarinic binding was reduced in the different forms of dementia associated with cortical cholinergic deficits, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and Down's syndrome (over 50 years). Analysis of (3H)-nicotine binding displaced by a range of carbachol concentrations (10(-9)-10(-3) M) indicated 2 binding sites for nicotine and that the high affinity rather than low affinity site was reduced in Alzheimer's disease. In all 3 cortical areas investigated (temporal, parietal and occipital) there were increases in the low affinity muscarinic site in Parkinson's disease and SDLT but not Alzheimer's disease or middle-aged Down's syndrome. This observation raised the question of whether the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (evident in the latter but not former 2 disorders) is incompatible with denervation-induced muscarinic supersensitivity in cholinoceptive neurons which include cortical pyramids generally affeted by tangle formation.

  7. Comparison with Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonism in dementia with lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo

    2002-01-01

    Dementia with lewy bodies (DLB) is recognized as a common cause of dementia in elderly people. It is characterized by Parkinsonism as well as fluctuation cognition and visual hallucination. It is not easy to differentiated DLB with Parkinsonism from Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared clinical features and I-123 IPT SPECT findings between two groups. Ten probable DLB patients and 15 PD patients were included. They were all matched for age (66.9±8.5) vs 65.8±8.5), education period (9.8±4.9 vs 9.1±4.5) and H and Y stage (2.9±0.8). Clinical features were scored. I-123 IPT SPECT were performed. The mean age of disease onset was seen more common in PD, but the severity of rigidity and bradykinesia was not significantly different. We found no significant difference of responsiveness to levodopa measured with decrement of UPDRS scores before and after treatment of levodopa. The mean disease duration reaching same H and Y stage was longer in PD than in DLB. The average K-MMSE score was significantly lower in DLB than in PD. The uptake ratio in the striatum in DLB was comparable to that in PD. In differentiating the two conditions the speed of disease progression and cognitive state were considered to be important. The level of dopamine transporter was not different between two diseases with same H and Y stage

  8. Parkinson's: a syndrome rather than a disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Nataliya; Padmakumar, C; Lewis, Simon J G; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2017-08-01

    Emerging concepts suggest that a multitude of pathology ranging from misfolding of alpha-synuclein to neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neurotransmitter driven alteration of brain neuronal networks lead to a syndrome that is commonly known as Parkinson's disease. The complex underlying pathology which may involve degeneration of non-dopaminergic pathways leads to the expression of a range of non-motor symptoms from the prodromal stage of Parkinson's to the palliative stage. Non-motor clinical subtypes, cognitive and non-cognitive, have now been proposed paving the way for possible subtype specific and non-motor treatments, a key unmet need currently. Natural history of these subtypes remains unclear and need to be defined. In addition to in vivo biomarkers which suggest variable involvement of the cholinergic and noradrenergic patterns of the Parkinson syndrome, abnormal alpha-synuclein accumulation have now been demonstrated in the gut, pancreas, heart, salivary glands, and skin suggesting that Parkinson's is a multi-organ disorder. The Parkinson's phenotype is thus not just a dopaminergic motor syndrome, but a dysfunctional multi-neurotransmitter pathway driven central and peripheral nervous system disorder that possibly ought to be considered a syndrome and not a disease.

  9. Overset Wolff-Parkinson-White-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Dalager, Søren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2010-01-01

    An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In this p......An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome...

  10. Genetic architecture of sporadic frontotemporal dementia and overlap with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Wang, Yunpeng; Vandrovcova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical, pathological and genetic overlap between sporadic frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been suggested; however, the relationship between these disorders is still not well understood. Here we evaluated genetic overlap between...

  11. I-123 IMP SPECT in Parkinson's disease; In relation to the presence or absence of dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, Keita; Tachibana, Kyudai; Sugita, Minoru [Hyogo Medical Coll., Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    To examine semiquantitatively regional cerebral blood flow, SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-(I-123)iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was undertaken in 17 patients with Parkinson's disease. Seven patients with Alzheimer's disease and 9 senile control subjects were also imaged for comparison. Both the Parkinson's disease group and the Alzheimer's disease group had a decreased uptake of I-123 IMP in the frontal lobe, in comparison with the control group. A remarkably decreased uptake was seen in the lateral and parietal lobes in the group of Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, as well as in the Alzheimer's disease group. A significantly decreased uptake was observed in the frontal lobe, lateral lobe, thalamus, and basal ganglia in the Parkinson's disease group, irrespective of the presence or absence of dementia. For Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, there was much more significant decrease in I-123 IMP uptake. The pattern of regional cerebral blood flow in the Alzheimer's disease group was analogous to that in the Parkinson's disease group associated with dementia. This supports the hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease may be somewhat involved in the occurrence of dementia for Parkinson's disease. (N.K.).

  12. Overset Wolff-Parkinson-White-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Dalager, Søren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2010-01-01

    An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome...

  13. SCOPA-Cognition Cutoff Value for Detection of Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaan, Dagmar; Jeukens-Visser, Martine; Van Laar, Teus; van Rooden, Stephanie M.; Van Zwet, Erik W.; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2011-01-01

    The SCOPA-Cognition is a reliable and valid test to evaluate cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease and is widely used in clinical and research settings. Recently, the Movement Disorder Society introduced criteria for Parkinson's disease dementia. The objective of the present study was to use

  14. Capgras' syndrome in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantz, Andrew G; Verghese, Joe

    2002-01-01

    We report the occurrence of Capgras' syndrome, or the delusion of doubles, in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies. The patient believed that several similar-looking impostors had replaced his wife of over 50 years. Uncharacteristically, he adopted a friendly attitude with these impostors. This unusual convivial reaction to the impostors may result from differential involvement of the dual visual pathways processing facial recognition and emotional responses to faces. The delusion resolved spontaneously, coincident with worsening of the dementia. In a retrospective chart review of 18 autopsy-confirmed cases of dementia with Lewy bodies, delusions were reported in 5 subjects (27.8%), of whom 1 had misidentification delusions much like Capgras' syndrome.

  15. Cognitive screening in Parkinson's disease: Comparison of the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA) with 3 other short scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, A-I; Calabrese, P; Kalbe, E; Kessler, J; Rossier, P

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive screening is crucial in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there is still a lack of short tools in French. In this study, we aimed to compare the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA) with the Mini Mental Parkinson (MMP), the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Clock Test in French-speaking patients. We also aimed to propose cut-off scores for cognitive impairment and dementia for the French language version of the PANDA. Fifty-one patients with PD took the PANDA, the MMSE, the MMP, and the Clock Test. They also underwent extensive neuropsychological testing by a neuropsychologist who was blinded to the above-mentioned screening test results. Patients were classified as either having normal cognition (n=15), mild cognitive impairment (n=20) or dementia (n=16). When compared with the three other screening tools, the PANDA exhibited the highest area under the curve (AUC) for both cognitive disorders and dementia. Using the cut-off scores proposed for the German version, the PANDA had 94% specificity and 100% sensitivity for dementia and 100% and 72%, respectively for cognitive disorders. In our study, the PANDA exhibited a higher discriminative power than the three other tests in detecting cognitive disorders and dementia. In PD patients, the PANDA should thus be considered for the detection of cognitive impairment in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenomenology and management of cognitive and behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease. Rise and logic of dementia in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Sokratis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An overview of studies on the issue of dementia in Parkinson's disease shows that, over time, there has been an evolution in the perception of the magnitude of the problem and of its nature. Dementia seems today to be part of the disease. This change in the understanding of the disease can be accounted for by various methodological problems and by difficulties, on one hand, in the definition of dementia and its differentiation from other conditions, and, on the other hand, in the diagnosis of the disease itself in individual cases. Optimal therapeutic strategies are also examined, either based on cholinesterase inhibitors or antiparkinsonian drugs and symptomatic measures.

  17. Episodic Memory in Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Dementia With Lewy Bodies/Parkinson Disease Dementia: Disentangling Retrieval From Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Alexandra; Routsis, Christopher; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G

    2016-01-01

    Differences in episodic memory performance in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)/Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) are inconsistent and task dependent. The inconsistencies may be attributed to the different tasks drawing on different memory processes. Few studies have examined episodic memory impairment in the above groups using memory tests that facilitate encoding, to distinguish memory deficits due to impairment of specific processes. We examined the memory performance of 106 AD patients, 51 FTD patients, 26 DLB/PDD patients, and 37 controls using the Five-Words Test, a 5-item memory test that facilitates encoding. The patient groups did not differ in modified Mini Mental State Examination scores. AD patients scored lowest on the Five-Words Test overall, and showed the greatest reduction from immediate total recall to delayed free recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly consolidation deficit. DLB/PDD patients showed the largest improvement from delayed free to delayed total recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly retrieval deficit. Deficits in both consolidation and retrieval underlie the memory impairment of the patients, to different extents, and contribute to the theoretical understanding of the nature of the memory impairment of the patient groups.

  18. Depression and synaptic zinc regulation in Alzheimer disease, dementia with lewy bodies, and Parkinson disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, David R; Vallortigara, Julie; Alghamdi, Amani; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Ballard, Clive; Thomas, Alan J; O'Brien, John T; Aarsland, Dag; Francis, Paul T

    2015-02-01

    Depression is a common symptom in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson disease dementia (PDD), and Alzheimer disease (AD), yet its molecular basis remains unclear and current antidepressants do not appear to be effective. Cerebral zinc has been implicated in depression and synaptic dysfunction. We investigated the relationship between synaptic zinc regulation (for which zinc transporter 3 [ZnT3] is responsible) and depression in a large clinicopathologic study. We examined brains from people with PDD (N = 29), DLB (N = 27), and AD (N = 15) and comparison subjects without depression or dementia (N = 24). Individuals were categorized according to the presence and severity of depression (on a scale of 0-3) based on standardized assessments during life (principally Neuropsychiatric Inventory). Western blotting was used to determine ZnT3 levels in Brodmann area 9 (BA9), and regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between ZnT3 and depression. Reductions in ZnT3 in BA9 were significantly associated with elevated depression scores in the study cohort (β = -0.351, df = 93, t = -3.318 p = 0.0004). This association remained when only individuals with DLB, PDD, and no dementia or depression were examined (β = -0.347, df = 78, t = -3.271, p = 0.002) or only individuals with AD and no dementia or depression were examined (β = -0.433, df = 37, t = -2.924, p = 0.006). Although decreased zinc levels have been implicated in the genesis of depression in animal models and in major depressive disorder in humans, this study provides the first evidence of a role for zinc in depression in people with dementia and highlights zinc metabolism as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mild cognitive impairment as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogland, Jeroen; Boel, Judith A; de Bie, Rob M A; Geskus, Ronald B; Schmand, Ben A; Dalrymple-Alford, John C; Marras, Connie; Adler, Charles H; Goldman, Jennifer G; Tröster, Alexander I; Burn, David J; Litvan, Irene; Geurtsen, Gert J

    2017-07-01

    The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society criteria for mild cognitive impairment in PD were recently formulated. The aim of this international study was to evaluate the predictive validity of the comprehensive (level II) version of these criteria by assessment of their contribution to the hazard of PD dementia. Individual patient data were selected from four separate studies on cognition in PD that provided information on demographics, motor examination, depression, neuropsychological examination suitable for application of level II criteria, and longitudinal follow-up for conversion to dementia. Survival analysis evaluated the predictive value of level II criteria for cognitive decline toward dementia as expressed by the relative hazard of dementia. A total of 467 patients were included. The analyses showed a clear contribution of impairment according to level II mild cognitive impairment criteria, age, and severity of PD motor symptoms to the hazard of dementia. There was a trend of increasing hazard of dementia with declining neuropsychological performance. This is the first large international study evaluating the predictive validity of level II mild cognitive impairment criteria for PD. The results showed a clear and unique contribution of classification according to level II criteria to the hazard of PD dementia. This finding supports their predictive validity and shows that they contribute important new information on the hazard of dementia, beyond known demographic and PD-specific factors of influence. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Comparing Clinical Profiles in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Farlow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD. Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog, Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10 and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d, similar if Results: Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47 and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58 were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23 and praxis (0.34 domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14 and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11 compared with patients with PDD. Conclusion: Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  1. Comparing clinical profiles in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Martin R; Schmitt, Frederick; Aarsland, Dag; Grossberg, George T; Somogyi, Monique; Meng, Xiangyi

    2013-01-01

    Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD). Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10) and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d), similar if <0.1]. Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47) and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58) were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23) and praxis (0.34) domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14) and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11) compared with patients with PDD. Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  2. Memantine improves attention and episodic memory in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesnes, Keith A; Aarsland, Dag; Ballard, Clive; Londos, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    In both dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), attentional dysfunction is a core clinical feature together with disrupted episodic memory. This study evaluated the cognitive effects of memantine in DLB and PDD using automated tests of attention and episodic memory. A randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, 24-week three centre trial of memantine (20 mg/day) was conducted in which tests of attention (simple and choice reaction time) and word recognition (immediate and delayed) from the CDR System were administered prior to dosing and again at 12 and 24 weeks. Although other results from this study have been published, the data from the CDR System tests were not included and are presented here for the first time. Data were available for 51 patients (21 DLB and 30 PDD). In both populations, memantine produced statistically significant medium to large effect sized improvements to choice reaction time, immediate and delayed word recognition. These are the first substantial improvements on cognitive tests of attention and episodic recognition memory identified with memantine in either DLB or PDD. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease with or without dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Ichiya, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Otsuka, Makoto; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Kato, Motohiro; Goto, Ikuo; Masuda, Kouji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1992-11-01

    By means of positron emission tomography, the cerebral glucose metabolism in 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia was compared with that in 9 patients without dementia, and that in 5 normal volunteers. The metabolic rates for glucose were measured by placing one hundred regions of interest. In the demented patients, cerebral glucose metabolism was diffusely decreased compared with that of the non-demented patients and the normal controls. The most significant decrease in glucose metabolism was observed in the angular gyrus (49.7% of the normal controls). The glucose metabolism in the cingulate, pre- and postcentral, occipital and subcortical regions was relatively spared (62.1 to 85.5% of the normal controls). In the patients without dementia, the glucose metabolism in each region was not significantly different from that in the normal controls. These results suggest that diffuse glucose hypometabolism in the cerebral cortex may correlate with that of patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia. (author).

  4. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K)

  5. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R; Calne, D B

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  6. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  7. Dementia syndrome and the onset of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Matsui, Hiroshige

    1988-01-01

    The present report is designed to make clear the mechanism of dementia syndrome and the onset area of the mind. The plan of the statistic studies with X-CT, MRI and PET to find out the focus of dementia in the cortex was an absolute failure. A large number of patients having infarction of varying numbers and sizes in the cortex was neuropsychologically normal. With MRI, quantitative changes of atrophy and destruction were observed in the amygdaloid and hippocampal system bilaterally in both multiinfarct dementia (MID) and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. With PET, the activity or excitability of the cortices was estimated by measuring the glucose utilization with 18 F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose in response to musical stimulation (a Japanese popular song entitled Sakura, Sakura=cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms) while having the eyes closed, (1) Not only normal volunteers but also with cases of MID and AD, the primary sensory and motor areas were stimulated. (2) In cases of MID and AD, the glucose utilization, was reduced drastically in the bilateral temporal and parietal association cortices. The impulses from all the primary sensory areas drain into the amygdala. Furthermore the impulses from the amygdala drain directly or indirectly into the hippocampus, and the impulses flow into the temporal cortex. Recognition may take place in this temporal cortex. Then, the impulses come to the parietal cortex. Conception may be completed there. Any damage to the amygdaloid and hippocampal system would result in abnormalities in memory, recognition, conception and various emotions. This is a possible mechanism of dementia syndrome. In view of this data the system also can be said to be the onset area of the mind. (author)

  8. Dementia syndrome and the onset of mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Matsui, Hiroshige

    1988-12-01

    The present report is designed to make clear the mechanism of dementia syndrome and the onset area of the mind. The plan of the statistic studies with X-CT, MRI and PET to find out the focus of dementia in the cortex was an absolute failure. A large number of patients having infarction of varying numbers and sizes in the cortex was neuropsychologically normal. With MRI, quantitative changes of atrophy and destruction were observed in the amygdaloid and hippocampal system bilaterally in both multiinfarct dementia (MID) and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. With PET, the activity or excitability of the cortices was estimated by measuring the glucose utilization with /sup 18/F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose in response to musical stimulation (a Japanese popular song entitled Sakura, Sakura=cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms) while having the eyes closed, (1) Not only normal volunteers but also with cases of MID and AD, the primary sensory and motor areas were stimulated. (2) In cases of MID and AD, the glucose utilization, was reduced drastically in the bilateral temporal and parietal association cortices. The impulses from all the primary sensory areas drain into the amygdala. Furthermore the impulses from the amygdala drain directly or indirectly into the hippocampus, and the impulses flow into the temporal cortex. Recognition may take place in this temporal cortex. Then, the impulses come to the parietal cortex. Conception may be completed there. Any damage to the amygdaloid and hippocampal system would result in abnormalities in memory, recognition, conception and various emotions. This is a possible mechanism of dementia syndrome. In view of this data the system also can be said to be the onset area of the mind. (author).

  9. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-27

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  10. The Brainstem Pathologies of Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Kay; Mahlke, Josefine; Siswanto, Sonny; Krueger, Reijko; Heinsen, Helmut; Auburger, Georg; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Grinberg, Lea T.; Wicht, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Rueb, Udo

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are among the human synucleinopathies, which show alpha-synuclein immunoreactive neuronal and/or glial aggregations and progressive neuronal loss in selected brain regions (eg, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, pedunculopontine

  11. Brain Connectivity Alterations Are Associated with the Development of Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Josie-Anne; McIntosh, Anthony R; Postuma, Ronald B; Kovacevic, Natasha; Latreille, Véronique; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Dementia affects a high proportion of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and poses a burden on caregivers and healthcare services. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a common nonevasive and nonexpensive technique that can easily be used in clinical settings to identify brain functional abnormalities. Only few studies had identified EEG abnormalities that can predict PD patients at higher risk for dementia. Brain connectivity EEG measures, such as multiscale entropy (MSE) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses, may be more informative and sensitive to brain alterations leading to dementia than previously used methods. This study followed 62 dementia-free PD patients for a mean of 3.4 years to identify cerebral alterations that are associated with dementia. Baseline resting state EEG of patients who developed dementia (N = 18) was compared to those of patients who remained dementia-free (N = 44) and of 37 healthy subjects. MSE and PLV analyses were performed. Partial least squares statistical analysis revealed group differences associated with the development of dementia. Patients who developed dementia showed higher signal complexity and lower PLVs in low frequencies (mainly in delta frequency) than patients who remained dementia-free and controls. Conversely, both patient groups showed lower signal variability and higher PLVs in high frequencies (mainly in gamma frequency) compared to controls, with the strongest effect in patients who developed dementia. These findings suggest that specific disruptions of brain communication can be measured before PD patients develop dementia, providing a new potential marker to identify patients at highest risk of developing dementia and who are the best candidates for neuroprotective trials.

  12. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Hindle, John V; Roberts, Julie; Lawrence, Catherine L; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015).

  13. Progressive supranuclear palsy presenting as primary lateral sclerosis but lacking parkinsonism, gaze palsy, aphasia, or dementia.

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    Nagao, Shigeto; Yokota, Osamu; Nanba, Reiko; Takata, Hiroshi; Haraguchi, Takashi; Ishizu, Hideki; Ikeda, Chikako; Takeda, Naoya; Oshima, Etsuko; Sakane, Katsuaki; Terada, Seishi; Ihara, Yuetsu; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2012-12-15

    We report an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) that clinically showed only slowly progressive and symmetric upper motor neuron syndrome over a disease course of 12 years. A female patient initially exhibited dysarthria at the age of 65, followed by gait disturbance and dysphagia. Neurological examination at age 67 disclosed pseudobulbar palsy, spastic gait, hyperreflexia, and presence of bilateral Hoffmann and Babinski signs. However, muscle atrophy, weakness, evidence of denervation on electromyography, vertical gaze palsy, parkinsonism, gait freezing, aphasia, speech apraxia, or dementia was not noted throughout the course. She was clinically diagnosed as having motor neuron disease consistent with so-called primary lateral sclerosis. Pathological examination disclosed histopathological features of PSP, including argyrophilic and tau-positive tufted astrocytes, neurofibrillary tangles, coiled bodies, and thread-like processes in the motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus, and to a lesser degree, in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei. In addition, severe fibrillary gliosis was noted in the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tract, being consistent with upper motor neuron syndrome observed in this case. No TAR-DNA binding protein 43-positive lesion, FUS pathology, Bunina body, or Lewy body-like hyaline inclusion was noted in the motor cortex or lower motor neurons. These findings suggest that when tau pathology is prominent in the motor cortex but is minimal in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, a PSP case can lack all classic clinical features of PSP and show only slowly progressive upper motor syndrome, consistent with clinical picture of primary lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Limbic system, the main focus of dementia syndrome

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    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1990-01-01

    Alzheimer disease and multi-infarct dementia are two entirely different diseases producing almost the same abnormalities as dementia syndrome. The statistical studies with MRI to locate the focus of dementia syndrome in the neocortex was an absolute failure. With MRI there is drastic atrophy and destruction of the amygdala and hippocampus suggesting the limbic system as the focus of dementia syndrome. Destruction of the limbic system in particular amygdala and hippocampus produced the functional obstruction brought about by the marked reduction in the glucose utilization with PET in the bilateral temporal, parietal and occipital association cortices. Although this type constitutes only about 1/5 of all dementia patients. It is considered the fundamental type of dementia syndrome. Aside from this, there is a type wherein simultaneous and symmetrical reductions in glucose utilization of the frontal association cortex and the motor association cortex in the anterior part of the neocortex. This is referred to as type II. It constitutes about 4/5 of all dementia patients which is far more than type I. Based on these results, it is thought that limbic system is the main focus of dementia syndrome. (author)

  15. Plasma Biomarkers Differentiate Parkinson’s Disease From Atypical Parkinsonism Syndromes

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    Chin-Hsien Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Parkinson’s disease (PD has significant clinical overlaps with atypical parkinsonism syndromes (APS, which have a poorer treatment response and a more aggressive course than PD. We aimed to identify plasma biomarkers to differentiate PD from APS.Methods: Plasma samples (n = 204 were obtained from healthy controls and from patients with PD, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, corticobasal degeneration (CBD, or frontotemporal dementia (FTD with parkinsonism (FTD-P or without parkinsonism. We measured plasma levels of α-synuclein, total tau, p-Tau181, and amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42 by immunomagnetic reduction-based immunoassay.Results: Plasma α-synuclein level was significantly increased in patients with PD and APS when compared with controls and FTD without parkinsonism (p < 0.01. Total tau and p-Tau181 were significantly increased in all disease groups compared to controls, especially in patients with FTD (p < 0.01. A multivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that a cut-off value for Aβ42 multiplied by p-Tau181 for discriminating patients with FTD from patients with PD and APS was 92.66 (pg/ml2, with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.932. An α-synuclein cut-off of 0.1977 pg/ml could separate FTD-P from FTD without parkinsonism (AUC 0.947. In patients with predominant parkinsonism, an α-synuclein cut-off of 1.388 pg/ml differentiated patients with PD from those with APS (AUC 0.87.Conclusion: Our results suggest that integrated plasma biomarkers improve the differential diagnosis of PD from APS (PSP, CBD, DLB, and FTD-P.

  16. The impact of autonomic dysfunction on survival in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia.

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    Kajsa Stubendorff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autonomic dysfunction is a well-known feature in neurodegenerative dementias, especially common in α-synucleinopathies like dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia. The most common symptoms are orthostatic hypotension, incontinence and constipation, but its relevance in clinical practice is poorly understood. There are no earlier studies addressing the influence of autonomic dysfunction on clinical course and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of the three most common features of autonomic dysfunction and analyze how it affects survival. METHODS: Thirty patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia were included in this prospective, longitudinal follow-up study. Presence of incontinence and constipation was recorded at baseline. Blood pressure was measured at baseline, after 3 months and after 6 months according to standardized procedures, with 5 measurements during 10 minutes after rising. Orthostatic hypotension was defined using consensus definitions and persistent orthostatic hypotension was defined as 5 or more measurements with orthostatic hypotension. Difference in survival was analyzed 36 months after baseline. RESULTS: There was a high frequency of persistent orthostatic blood pressure (50%, constipation (30% and incontinence (30%. Patients with persistent orthostatic hypotension had a significantly shorter survival compared to those with no or non-persistent orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 4.47, p = 0.034. Patients with constipation and/or urinary incontinence, in addition to persistent orthostatic hypotension, had a poorer prognosis compared to those with isolated persistent orthostatic hypotension or no orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 6.370, p = 0.041. DISCUSSION: According to our findings, the identification of autonomic dysfunction seems to be of great importance in clinical practice, not only to

  17. Capgras syndrome in Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

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    Thaipisuttikul, Papan; Lobach, Iryna; Zweig, Yael; Gurnani, Ashita; Galvin, James E

    2013-05-01

    Capgras syndrome is characterized by the recurrent, transient belief that a person has been replaced by an identical imposter. We reviewed clinical characteristics of Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) patients with Capgras syndrome compared to those without Capgras. We identified 55 consecutive DLB patients (11 cases with Capgras syndrome (DLB-C) and 44 cases without evidence of Capgras (DLB). Semi-structured interviews with the patient and an informant, neurological exams, and neuropsychological testing were performed. Caregivers were assessed for caregiver burden and depression. Primary comparisons were made between DLB-C and DLB. Exploratory analyses using stepwise logistic regression and bootstrap analyses were performed to determine clinical features associated with Capgras. DLB-C patients experienced more visual hallucinations and self-reported anxiety, had higher scores on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and were less likely to be treated with cholinesterase inhibitors at time of initial evaluation. Extrapyramidal symptoms and depression were not associated with Capgras. Caregivers of DLB-C patients had higher caregiver burden. DLB-C was associated with self-reported anxiety (OR = 10.9; 95% CI = 2.6-47.6). In a bootstrap analysis, clinical findings that were predictors of Capgras included visual hallucinations (log(OR) = 18.3; 95% CI = 17.9-19.3) and anxiety (log(OR) = 2.9; 95% CI = 0.31-20.2). Our study suggests that Capgras syndrome is common in DLB and usually occurs in the presence of anxiety and visual hallucinations, suggesting related etiopathogenesis. Early appreciation of Capgras syndrome may afford the opportunity to alleviate caregiver burden and improve patient and caregiver outcomes.

  18. [The prevalence of Parkinson's disease, associated dementia, and depression in Dresden].

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    Riedel, O; Schneider, C; Klotsche, J; Reichmann, H; Storch, A; Wittchen, H-U

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently compounded by dementia and depression. Yet local total estimates on the prevalence of PD with dementia/depression are still lacking. These are socioeconomically important, especially for the eastern federal states in Germany due to the demographic structures. We conducted a two-staged total estimation in the area of Dresden. First, all local office-based neurologists, hospitals and retirement homes were asked to list their patients/residents with PD on a single study day. Then a random sample of patients/home residents was neuropsycholoigcally examined, including the Mini-mental-state exam and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Overall, 886 PD cases (95 % CI: 809 - 926) were estimated, of which 252 (95 % CI: 226 - 279) suffered from dementia and 216 (95 % CI: 191 - 242) from depression. Dementia rates increased by age with 13.8 % (≤ 65 years) to 40.2 % (≥ 76 years). Depression rates ranged from 23.3 % to 28.0 %. Overall, 20.6 % of all ambulatory treated PD patients and 85.7 % of all home residents with PD had dementia. The prevalence of PD in Dresden dovetails with previous reported estimates. Dementia and depression are frequent complications in outpatients as well as home residents with PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Astrocyte dysfunction following molybdenum-associated purine loading could initiate Parkinson's disease with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Christopher A

    2018-01-01

    Sporadic or idiopathic Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder with a worldwide distribution, a long pre-clinical latent period and a frequent association with dementia. The combination of molybdenum deficiency and purine ingestion could explain the movement disorder, the distribution, the latent period and the dementia association. Recent studies in sheep have shown that molybdenum deficiency enables some dietary purines to accumulate in the central nervous system. This causes astrocyte dysfunction, altered neuromodulation and eventually irreversible central nervous system disease. Humans and sheep share the ability to salvage purines and this ability places humans at risk when they ingest xanthosine, inosine, adenosine and guanosine. Adenosine ingestion in molybdenum-deficient humans will lead to adenosine loading and potentially a disturbance to the A2a adenosine receptors in the nigro-striatum. This could result in Parkinson's disease. Guanosine ingestion in molybdenum-deficient humans will lead to guanosine loading and potentially a disturbance to the guanosine receptors in the hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. This could result in dementia. The molybdenum content of the average daily diet in the United States is 0.07 ppm and in the United Kingdom 0.04 ppm. Central nervous system disease occurs in sheep at <0.04 ppm. Consistent with the role proposed for molybdenum deficiency in Parkinson's disease is the observation that affected individuals have elevated sulfur amino acid levels, depressed sulfate levels, and depressed uric acid levels. Likewise the geographical distribution of Parkinson's dementia complex on Guam corresponds with the distribution of molybdenum-deficient soils hence molybdenum-deficient food gardens on that island.

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Electrocardiogram

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    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with palpitations. The patient experienced these symptoms five times before in his life, but they had self-resolved with squatting or raising his arms. He denied chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, syncope, or pre-syncope symptoms. He denied any recent illnesses, cough, chest pain, drug use, or infections. Significant findings: The initial EKG showed wide complex, irregular tachycardia > 200 bpm (EKG 1. Given the possibility of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, procainamide was given to the patient. The patient’s heart rate responded and decreased to 120-140 bpm with narrowing of the QRS complex. A repeat EKG showed narrow complex tachycardia without P waves approximately 120 bpm (EKG 2. Once the procainamide infusion was complete, the patient had converted to sinus rhythm with a delta wave now apparent, consistent with WPW (EKG 3. Discussion: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a combination of the presence of a certain congenital accessory pathway (Bundle of Kent and episodes of tachyarrhythmia.1 The incidence is less than one percent of the general population,2 but it is associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death, making the diagnosis imperative. When examining a wide-based tachycardia, it is important to consider WPW when choosing medications for rate control or chemical cardioversion. The first EKG shows an example of atrial fibrillation with WPW. While procainamide blocks the accessory pathway, other drugs such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers can inhibit the AV node resulting in increased use of the accessory pathway. This can worsen the tachyarrhythmia and potentially lead to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, or asystole.

  1. Cortical serotonin-S2 receptor binding in Lewy body dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A V; Ferrier, I N; Morris, C M; Jabeen, S; Sahgal, A; McKeith, I G; Edwardson, J A; Perry, R H; Perry, E K

    1991-11-01

    The binding of the selective 5-HT2 antagonist [3H]ketanserin has been investigated in the temporal cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease (SDAT), Parkinson's disease (PD), senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and neuropathologically normal subjects (control). 5-HT2 binding was reduced in SDAT, PD with dementia and SDLT. SDAT showed a 5-HT2 receptor deficit across most of the cortical layers. A significant decrease in 5-HT2 binding in the deep cortical layers was found in those SDLT cases without hallucinations. SDLT cases with hallucinations only showed a deficit in one upper layer. There was a significant difference in cortical layers III and V between SDLT without hallucinations and SDLT with hallucinations. The results confirm an abnormality of serotonin binding in various forms of dementia and suggest that preservation of 5-HT2 receptor in the temporal cortex may differentiate hallucinating from non-hallucinating cases of SDLT.

  2. Italian version of the Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA): a useful instrument to detect cognitive impairments in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Riccardo; Bertella, Laura; Scarpina, Federica; Mauro, Alessandro; Portolani, Elisa; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently characterized by cognitive and affective dysfunctions. The "Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment" (PANDA) is a screening tool designed for the early detection of mild cognitive impairment as well as dementia in PD. The PANDA is already validated in German and in French. The aim of the present work was to provide normative data for the Italian-speaking population, Swiss regions included; moreover, the effectiveness of the PANDA compared to the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was tested. One-hundred and eleven PD patients with and without cognitive impairment and one-hundred and three matched healthy subjects participated at this study; all patients underwent an extensive neuropsychological evaluation. A PANDA total score of 13 appeared to be the most fitting cut-off with a sensitivity of 96.6% and a specificity of 82.2%; with the MMSE, the same value of sensitivity but with a specificity of 72,4% was reached only by adopting a cut-off of 28. Moreover, a PANDA range of 13-17 appeared to be suggestive for possible cognitive disturbance. The present work provides evidence for the effectiveness of the PANDA in evaluating cognitive deficits also in PD Italian-speaking patients, even when their pathological degree is still initial or very mild.

  3. Anaesthetic management of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome for hysterectomy

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    Sandeep Sahu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW is an uncommon cardiac disorder having an aberrant pathway between atria and ventricles. We are reporting a known case of WPW syndrome for hysterectomy under combined spinal epidural anaesthesia. Management of the present case is an important pearl to revisit management of WPW syndrome. The perioperative management should be tailored according to the nature of surgery and the clinical presentation of the patient.

  4. Assessing the dysexecutive syndrome in dementia.

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    Gansler, David A; Huey, Edward D; Pan, Jessica J; Wasserman, Eric; Grafman, Jordan H

    2017-03-01

    We compared performance on tests of dysexecutive behaviour (DB) and executive function (EF) in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). Patients diagnosed with bvFTD (n=124), PPA (n=34) and CBS (n=85) were recruited. EF was measured with the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (DKEFS: performance based), and DB was measured with the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe: caregiver-report based). Confirmatory factor analysis characterised the relationship between EF and DB, binary logistic regression evaluated the incremental diagnostic utility of the measures and neuroimaging data from 110 patients identified neural correlates. EF was lowest and DB was highest in bvFTD participants. EF and DB were distinct but related (r=-0.48). Measures correctly classified 89% of bvFTD from CBS patients and 93% of bvFTD from PPA patients-30% and 13% above base rates (59%, 80%), respectively. All modalities were useful in identifying CBS and PPA, whereas DB alone was useful for identifying bvFTD. EF was uniquely associated with caudal left dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral temporo-parietal cortices. DB was uniquely associated with the cingulate (R>L), right subcallosal and right anterior frontal cortex. EF and DB were associated with the rostral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally. EF and DB measures displayed criterion and construct validity, had incremental utility at low DB levels (CBS and PPA) and were associated with overlapping and distinct neural correlates. EF and DB procedures can conjointly provide useful diagnostic and descriptive information in identifying and ruling out the dysexecutive syndrome. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

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    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  6. Wolff-Parkinson-white syndrome mimics a conduction disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrakchi, S; Kammoun, I; Kachboura, S

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG), as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a "false positive" of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  7. The different faces of the p. A53T alpha-synuclein mutation: A screening of Greek patients with parkinsonism and/or dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breza, Marianthi; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Potagas, Constantin; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Paraskevas, George P; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Stefanis, Leonidas; Panas, Marios

    2018-04-13

    The p. A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene is a rare cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Although generally rare, it is particularly common in the Greek population due to a founder effect. A53T-positive PD patients often develop dementia during disease course and may very rarely present with dementia. We screened for the p. A53T SNCA mutation a total of 347 cases of Greek origin with parkinsonism and/or dementia, collected over 15 years at the Neurogenetics Unit, Eginition Hospital, University of Athens. Cases were classified into: "pure parkinsonism", "pure dementia" and "parkinsonism plus dementia". In total, 4 p. A53T SNCA mutation carriers were identified. All had autosomal dominant family history and early onset. Screening of the "pure parkinsonism" category revealed 2 cases with typical PD. The other two mutation carriers were identified in the "parkinsonism plus dementia" category. One had a diagnosis of PD dementia and the other of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Screening of patients with "pure dementia" failed to identify any further A53T-positive cases. Our results confirm that the p. A53T SNCA mutation is relatively common in Greek patients with PD or PD plus dementia, particularly in cases with early onset and/or autosomal dominant family history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Apathy in patients with Parkinson disease without dementia or depression: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Lozachmeur, Clément; Drapier, Sophie; Dondaine, Thibault; Péron, Julie; Travers, David; Sauleau, Paul; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Drapier, Dominique

    2012-09-11

    We sought to identify apathy metabolic bases in Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 45 patients with PD who were not clinically depressed (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] dementia (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [MDRS] >130) were assessed with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) and underwent a resting-state F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) scan. A motor assessment comprising the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) was conducted and total levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) was calculated. Imaging data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping. Age, LEDD, and MDRS scores were introduced as covariates. Positive correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebral metabolism in the right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 47), right middle frontal gyrus (BA 10), right cuneus (BA 18), and right anterior insula (BA 13). Negative correlations were observed between the AES score and cerebellar metabolism in the semilunar lobules bilaterally, within the posterior lobe. Using an AES score equal to or above 42 to define clinical apathy, prevalence in our patient group was 17.8%. The AES score was negatively correlated with the MDRS score and positively correlated with the "retardation" subscore of the MADRS. It was not correlated with either UPDRS III or LEDD. Results indicate that the frontal, temporal, and cerebellar areas known to be involved in reward, emotion, and cognition are also implicated in apathy in patients with PD without dementia or depression. Their roles in the etiopathology of apathy are discussed.

  9. Cuba's Strategy for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Bayard, Rodolfo I; Llibre-Rodríguez, Juan J; Fernández-Seco, Alberto; Borrego-Calzadilla, Carmen; Carrasco-García, Mayra R; Zayas-Llerena, Tania; Moreno-Carbonell, Carmen R; Reymond-Vasconcelos, Ana G

    2016-10-01

    Dementia is a great challenge to public health in Cuba due to its impact on society and families. Cuba's National Intervention Strategy for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Syndromes is designed to address this challenge. The Strategy includes working guidelines for primary and secondary care, education about rights of people with cognitive impairment, professional development, research, and health promotion and dementia prevention. An associated action plan, focused on primary care, includes proposals for creation of memory clinics, day centers and comprehensive rehabilitation services for cognitive stimulation. Short-term measures proposed include increasing early detection; creating a dementia morbidity and mortality registry; promoting professional training; providing support for families; and promoting basic and clinical research on dementia. Medium-term proposals aim to reduce dementia incidence and mortality by controlling risk factors and promoting healthy lifestyles, offering new treatment options and optimizing early detection. A set of indicators has been developed to evaluate strategy implementation. With this strategy, Cuba joins the small number of developing countries that have responded to WHO's call to improve care for patients with dementia and alleviate its impact on society and families. KEYWORDS Dementia, Alzheimer disease, aging, national health programs, social stigma, primary prevention, health promotion, civil rights, Cuba.

  10. The genetics of dementias. Part 1: Molecular basis of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17

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    Anna Kowalska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD, characterized by neurodegeneration mainly in the frontal and temporal lobes, accounts for ca. 10–15�0of all dementias. In 1892 the Czech-German neuropsychiatrist Arnold Pick reported the first case of FTD in a 71-year-old patient suffering from progressive dementia, memory disturbances, and aphasia associated with frontal and temporal lobe atrophy and the presence of neuronal inclusions. Later the inclusions were named Pick bodies. The neuropathological hallmark of FTD is very differentiated. In contrast to Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there are neither senile plaques nor neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of FTD patients. Frontotemporal dementias are tauopathies, a group of disorders caused by aberrant metabolism of tau protein, a family of proteins associated with microtubules (MAPT: macrotubule-associated tau protein. In the nervous system the protein stabilizes microtubules in neuronal axons and is thus responsible for crucial processes in neuron metabolism, such as signal transduction, plasticity, and intracellular transport. In the human brain, six isoforms are produced from the MAPT gene (chromosome 17 q21.2 by alternative mRNA splicing. The isoforms differ in the number of amino acids in the protein chain, the presence of three (3R tau type or four (4R tau type domains responsible for binding to microtubules, and one or two inserts containing from 29 to 58 amino acids. The isoforms are modified posttranslationally by hyperphosphorylation, glycation, or oxidation, which can change the protein’s properties and disturb its normal function. Altered metabolism of tau protein changes its interactions with tubulin, leading to destabilization of the microtubule structure and initiating the generation of toxic tau aggregates. The first mutations in the MAPT gene responsible for frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 were found in 1998. So far over 40 mutations in the MAPT

  11. Intraneuronal aluminum accumulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, D.P.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Garruto, R.M.; Yanagihara, R.T.; Gibbs, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry was used to analyze the elemental content of neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-bearing and NFT-free neurons within the Sommer's sector (H1 region) of the hippocampus in Guamanian Chamorros with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia and in neurologically normal controls. Preliminary data indicate prominent accumulation of aluminum within the nuclear region and perikaryal cytoplasm of NFT-bearing hippocampal neurons, regardless of the underlying neurological diagnosis. These findings further extend the association between intraneuronal aluminum and NFT formation and support the hypothesis that environmental factors are related to the neurodegenerative changes seen in the Chamorro population

  12. Pareidolia in Parkinson's disease without dementia: A positron emission tomography study.

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    Uchiyama, Makoto; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Yokoi, Kayoko; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Etsuro

    2015-06-01

    Pareidolia, which is a particular type of complex visual illusion, has been reported to be a phenomenon analogous to visual hallucinations in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. However, whether pareidolia is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) or whether there are common underlying mechanisms of these two types of visual misperceptions remains to be elucidated. A test to evoke pareidolia, the Pareidolia test, was administered to 53 patients with PD without dementia and 24 healthy controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the PD patients. PD patients without dementia produced a greater number of pareidolic illusions compared with the controls. Pareidolia was observed in all of the patients having visual hallucinations as well as a subset of those without visual hallucinations. The number of pareidolic illusions was correlated with hypometabolism in the bilateral temporal, parietal and occipital cortices. The index of visual hallucinations was correlated with hypometabolism in the left parietal cortex. A region associated with both pareidolia and visual hallucinations was found in the left parietal lobe. Our study suggests that PD patients without dementia experience pareidolia more frequently than healthy controls and that posterior cortical dysfunction could be a common neural mechanism of pareidolia and visual hallucinations. Pareidolia could represent subclinical hallucinations or a predisposition to visual hallucinations in Lewy body disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Demography, diagnostics, and medication in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia: data from the Swedish Dementia Quality Registry (SveDem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshtehnejad SM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad,1 Dorota Religa,2,3 Eric Westman,1 Dag Aarsland,2,4 Johan Lökk,1,3 Maria Eriksdotter1,3 1Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Centre for Age-Related Diseases, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway Introduction: Whether dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD should be considered as one entity or two distinct conditions is a matter of controversy. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of DLB and PDD patients using data from the Swedish Dementia Quality Registry (SveDem. Methods: SveDem is a national Web-based quality registry initiated to improve the quality of diagnostic workup, treatment, and care of patients with dementia across Sweden. Patients with newly diagnosed dementia of various types were registered in SveDem during the years 2007–2011. The current cross-sectional report is based on DLB (n = 487 and PDD (n = 297 patients. Demographic characteristics, diagnostic workup, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score, and medications were compared between DLB and PDD groups. Results: No gender differences were observed between the two study groups (P = 0.706. PDD patients were significantly younger than DLB patients at the time of diagnosis (74.8 versus 76.8 years, respectively; P < 0.001. A significantly higher prevalence of patients with MMSE score #24 were found in the PDD group (75.2% versus 67.6%; P = 0.030. The mean number of performed diagnostic modalities was significantly higher in the DLB group (4.9 ± 1.7 than in the PDD group (4.1 ± 1.6; P< 0.001. DLB patients were more likely than PDD patients to be treated with

  14. Caring for the Student with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenni, Patricia G.

    2009-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a cardiac condition in which an extra electrical pathway within the heart causes an abnormal increase in heart rate. It affects one to three people of every 1,000 people worldwide, occurring more often in males. Diagnosis usually occurs during young adulthood, so it is important for school nurses to be familiar…

  15. Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison oftwo techniques. u. o. VON OPPELL, R. N. SCOTT MILLAR, D. A. MILNE. TABLE!. Characteristics of WPW patients referred for surgical ablation of their aberrant atrioventricular pathways. Patient population and methods. We' retrospectively reviewed 19 ...

  16. CBF tomograms with [/sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO in patients with dementia (Alzheimer type and HIV) and Parkinson's disease--initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, D.C.; Ell, P.J.; Burns, A.; Philpot, M.; Levy, R.

    1988-01-01

    We present preliminary data on the utility of functional brain imaging with [99mTc]-d,l-HM-PAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the study of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), HIV-related dementia syndrome, and the on-off syndrome of Parkinson's disease. In comparison with a group of age-matched controls, the DAT patients revealed distinctive bilateral temporal and posterior parietal deficits, which correlate with detailed psychometric evaluation. Patients with amnesia as the main symptom (group A) showed bilateral mesial temporal lobe perfusion deficits (p less than 0.02). More severely affected patients (group B) with significant apraxia, aphasia, or agnosia exhibited patterns compatible with bilateral reduced perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex, as well as reduced perfusion to both temporal lobes, different from the patients of the control group (p less than 0.05). SPECT studies of HIV patients with no evidence of intracraneal space occupying pathology showed marked perfusion deficits. Patients with Parkinson's disease and the on-off syndrome studied during an on phase (under levodopa therapy) and on another occasion after withdrawal of levodopa (off) demonstrated a significant change in the uptake of [99mTc]-d,l-HM-PAO in the caudate nucleus (lower on off) and thalamus (higher on off). These findings justify the present interest in the functional evaluation of the brain of patients with dementia. [99mTc]-d,l-HM-PAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)/SPECT appear useful and highlight individual disorders of flow in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions

  17. CBF tomograms with (/sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO in patients with dementia (Alzheimer type and HIV) and Parkinson's disease--initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D.C.; Ell, P.J.; Burns, A.; Philpot, M.; Levy, R.

    1988-12-01

    We present preliminary data on the utility of functional brain imaging with (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the study of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), HIV-related dementia syndrome, and the on-off syndrome of Parkinson's disease. In comparison with a group of age-matched controls, the DAT patients revealed distinctive bilateral temporal and posterior parietal deficits, which correlate with detailed psychometric evaluation. Patients with amnesia as the main symptom (group A) showed bilateral mesial temporal lobe perfusion deficits (p less than 0.02). More severely affected patients (group B) with significant apraxia, aphasia, or agnosia exhibited patterns compatible with bilateral reduced perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex, as well as reduced perfusion to both temporal lobes, different from the patients of the control group (p less than 0.05). SPECT studies of HIV patients with no evidence of intracraneal space occupying pathology showed marked perfusion deficits. Patients with Parkinson's disease and the on-off syndrome studied during an on phase (under levodopa therapy) and on another occasion after withdrawal of levodopa (off) demonstrated a significant change in the uptake of (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO in the caudate nucleus (lower on off) and thalamus (higher on off). These findings justify the present interest in the functional evaluation of the brain of patients with dementia. (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)/SPECT appear useful and highlight individual disorders of flow in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

  18. Diagnosing Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Problems and Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis-Mark, Ruth E.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that people with Down syndrome are more likely than the general population to develop Alzheimer's dementia as they age. However, the diagnosis can be problematic in this population for a number of reasons. These include: the large intra-individual variability in cognitive functioning, the different diagnostic and…

  19. Can loss of the swallow tail sign help distinguish between Parkinson Disease and the Parkinson-Plus syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustwani, Christopher Sami; Korutz, Alexander William; Lester, Malisa Siri; Kianirad, Yasaman; Simuni, Tanya; Hijaz, Tarek Aref

    To determine if loss of the swallow tail sign (STS) can distinguish Parkinson Disease (PD) from the Parkinson-Plus syndromes. Twenty-five patients with PD, 21 with Parkinson-Plus syndromes, and 14 control patients were included. Presence of the STS was assessed. The STS was present in 79% of controls, statistically greater than the PD/Parkinson-Plus patients. There was no difference in the presence of the STS between the PD/Parkinson-Plus subgroups or when scanning at 1.5 T or 3 T. Loss of the STS could not distinguish between PD and Parkinson-Plus patients. The STS can be identified at both 1.5 T and 3 T. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rivastigmine in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia: an ADAS-cog factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Somogyi, Monique; Meng, Xiangyi

    2011-09-01

    Rivastigmine treatment is associated with significant improvements on the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Both AD and PDD are purported to have different profiles of cognitive impairment, which may respond differentially to rivastigmine treatment. This was a retrospective analysis of 3 randomized, double-blind, rivastigmine trial databases (Investigation of transDermal Exelon in ALzheimer's disease [IDEAL; AD], EXelon in PaRkinson's disEaSe dementia Study [EXPRESS; PDD], and Alzheimer's Disease with ENA 713 [ADENA; AD]). Factor analyses of the 11 baseline ADAS-cog items derived the same factors in the 2 diseases, that is, "memory" and "language". Rivastigmine-treated AD and PDD patients showed significant improvements (P < .0001 versus placebo) on both factors. For both AD and PDD, rivastigmine had a numerically greater effect on memory than language. Treatment effect sizes were numerically greater in PDD compared with AD. Rivastigmine treatment is associated with improvement in memory and language in AD and PDD. The numerically greater response in PDD is consistent with greater cholinergic deficits in this disease state.

  1. Sexuality in patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Gila; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Hassin-Baer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is common among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other dementias. Sexual functioning and well-being of patients with PD and their partners are affected by many factors, including motor disabilities, non-motor symptoms (e.g., autonomic dysfunction, sleep disturbances, mood disorders, cognitive abnormalities, pain, and sensory disorders), medication effects, and relationship issues. The common sexual problems are decreased desire, erectile dysfunction, difficulties in reaching orgasm, and sexual dissatisfaction. Hypersexuality is one of a broad range of impulse control disorders reported in PD, attributed to antiparkinsonian therapy, mainly dopamine agonists. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team may enable a significant management of hypersexuality. Data on SD in demented patients are scarce, mainly reporting reduced frequency of sex and erectile dysfunction. Treatment of SD is advised at an early stage. Behavioral problems, including inappropriate sexual behavior (ISB), are distressing for patients and their caregivers and may reflect the prevailing behavior accompanying dementia (disinhibition or apathy associated with hyposexuality). The neurobiologic basis of ISB is still only vaguely understood but assessment and intervention are recommended as soon as ISB is suspected. Management of ISB in dementia demands a thorough evaluation and understanding of the behavior, and can be treated by non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcortical grey matter changes in untreated, early stage Parkinson's disease without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Mi; Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Kim, Min-Jik; Jang, Ji-Wan; Suh, Sang-Il; Koh, Seong-Beom; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Previous MRI studies have investigated cortical or subcortical grey matter changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), yielding inconsistent findings between the studies. We therefore sought to determine whether focal cortical or subcortical grey matter changes may be present from the early disease stage. We recruited 49 untreated, early stage PD patients without dementia and 53 control subjects. Voxel-based morphometry was used to evaluate cortical grey matter changes, and automated volumetry and shape analysis were used to assess volume changes and shape deformation of the subcortical grey matter structures, respectively. Voxel-based morphometry showed neither reductions nor increases in grey matter volume in patients compared to controls. Compared to controls, PD patients had significant reductions in adjusted volumes of putamen, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus (corrected p grey matter and clinical variables representing disease duration and severity. Our results suggest that untreated, early stage PD without dementia is associated with volume reduction and shape deformation of subcortical grey matter, but not with cortical grey matter reduction. Our findings of structural changes in the posterolateral putamen and ventromedial putamen/nucleus accumbens could provide neuroanatomical basis for the involvement of motor and limbic striatum, further implicating motor and non-motor symptoms in PD, respectively. Early hippocampal involvement might be related to the risk for developing dementia in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromosome 13 dementia syndromes as models of neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiso, J.; Revesz, T.; Holton, J.

    2001-01-01

    Two hereditary conditions, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with amyloid deposition in the central nervous system and neurodegeneration. The two amyloid proteins, ABri and ADan, are degradation products of the same precursor molecule BriPP bearing......-terminus. Neurofibrillary tangles containing the classical paired helical filaments as well as neuritic components in many instances co-localize with the amyloid deposits. In both disorders, the pattern of hyperphosphorylatedtau immunoreactivity is almost indistinguishable from that seen in Alzheimer's disease....... These issues argue for the primary importance of the amyloid deposits in the mechanism(s) of neuronal cell loss. We propose FBD and FDD, the chromosome 13 dementia syndromes, as models to study the molecular basis of neurofibrillary degeneration, cell death and amyloid formation in the brain....

  4. Psychosocial therapy for Parkinson's-related dementia: study protocol for the INVEST randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sheree A; McDonald, Kathryn R; Vatter, Sabina; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith, Sarah; Silverdale, Monty A; Fu, Bo; Leroi, Iracema

    2017-06-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI-PD) or dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterised by motor and 'non-motor' symptoms which impact on quality of life. Treatment options are generally limited to pharmacological approaches. We developed a psychosocial intervention to improve cognition, quality of life and companion burden for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB. Here, we describe the protocol for a single-blind randomised controlled trial to assess feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of the intervention and to evaluate treatment implementation. The interaction among the intervention and selected outcome measures and the efficacy of this intervention in improving cognition for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB will also be explored. Dyads will be randomised into two treatment arms to receive either 'treatment as usual' (TAU) or cognitive stimulation therapy specifically adapted for Parkinson's-related dementias (CST-PD), involving 30 min sessions delivered at home by the study companion three times per week over 10 weeks. A mixed-methods approach will be used to collect data on the operational aspects of the trial and treatment implementation. This will involve diary keeping, telephone follow-ups, dyad checklists and researcher ratings. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising recruitment, acceptability and tolerance of the intervention, and treatment implementation. To pilot an outcome measure of efficacy, we will undertake an inferential analysis to test our hypothesis that compared with TAU, CST-PD improves cognition. Qualitative approaches using thematic analysis will also be applied. Our findings will inform a larger definitive trial. Ethical opinion was granted (REC reference: 15/YH/0531). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences. We will prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with PD and dementia. ISRCTN (ISRCTN11455062). © Article author

  5. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and PET imaging characteristics in patients with Parkinson-plus syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao ZHANG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the neuropsychiatric symptoms and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG PET imaging features of Parkinson-plus syndromes. Methods There were 8 patients with probable Parkinson-plus syndromes, including one case of multiple system atrophy-cerebellar predominant (MSA-C, 4 cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, one case of corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBD and 2 cases of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA were used to evaluate cognitive function, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI was used to evaluate neuropsychiatric behaviors, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-21 Items (HAMD-21 was used to evaluate the emotional state of patients. Results One MSA-C patient showed only anxiety. Four PSP patients showed different degrees of cognitive disorders, of whom 3 cases also presented obvious depression, anxiety, irritability and sleep disorders. One case of CBD showed dysfunction in executive function, visual spatial ability, verbal function, attention and orientation, as well as depression, anxiety, irritability and sleep disorders. Two cases of DLB were found unable to copy pentagon in MMSE chart or draw a circle in Clock Drawing Test (CDT, and they also presented hallucination, depression and indifference. As for the result of 18F-FDG PET, one MSA-C patient showed cerebellarglucose hypometabolism; 4 PSP patients showed hypometabolism in bilateral symmetrical frontal lobes, anterior cingulate gyrus and parietal lobe, especially in thalamus, basal ganglia region and brain stem; one case of CBD showed hypometabolism in right lateral fronto-temporo-parieto-occipital lobes, left lateral parietal lobe, bilateral cingulate gyri and precuneus; 2 cases of DLB showed hypometabolism in bilateral temporo-occipital lobes. Conclusions Patients with early Parkinson-plus syndromes are easily misdiagnosed as mental illness and delayed treatment, in addition, their

  6. Depression and Dementia in Aging Adults with Down Syndrome: A Case Study Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyunsook; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A case study of three adults (ages 46-47) with Down syndrome investigated the patterns of symptoms associated with depression and dementia. Characteristics that distinguish between dementia and depression in adults with Down syndrome are described. Periodic comprehensive assessment of adults with Down syndrome to detect functioning changes is…

  7. Evaluating rivastigmine in mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease dementia using ADAS-cog items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Frederick A; Aarsland, Dag; Brønnick, Kolbjørn S; Meng, Xiangyi; Tekin, Sibel; Olin, Jason T

    2010-08-01

    Rivastigmine has been shown to improve cognition in patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). To further explore the impact of anticholinesterase therapy on PDD, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) items were assessed in a retrospective analysis of a 24-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rivastigmine. Mean changes from baseline at week 24 were calculated for ADAS-cog item scores and for 3 cognitive domain scores. A total of 362 patients were randomized to 3 to 12 mg/d rivastigmine capsules and 179 to placebo. Patients with PDD receiving rivastigmine improved versus placebo on items: word recall, following commands, ideational praxis, remembering test instructions, and comprehension of spoken language (P ADAS-cog is sensitive to broad cognitive changes in PDD. Overall, rivastigmine was associated with improvements on individual cognitive items and general cognitive domains.

  8. Malignant vasovagal syndrome in two patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, N M; Bennett, D H

    2004-01-01

    The presence of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in patients presenting with syncope suggests that tachyarrhythmia may be the cause. However, the symptoms require careful evaluation. Two young patients presented with syncope and were found to have WPW syndrome on their ECG. In both patients symptoms were suggestive of vasovagal syncope. During tilt testing, both the patients developed their typical symptoms with a fall in blood pressure and heart rate confirming the diagnosis of malignant vasovagal syndrome. PMID:15020537

  9. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  10. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: Implications for an anaesthesiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Udaybhaskar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is an electrical conduction abnormality of the heart that can induce potentially fatal arrhythmias at intermittent intervals. The induction and maintenance of general anaesthesia for a patient with WPW syndrome are risky due to the triggering capability of arrhythmias by various drugs and instrumentation. We hereby present the case of a 28-year-old male with previous cardiac illness, admitted for neurosurgical procedure, with drug-controlled WPW syndrome. The pre-operative optimisation, intraoperative scrutiny and vigil, along with readiness of standby medications and defibrillator made the ingress and egress from general anaesthesia uneventful. Thus, the potential dangers of WPW syndrome can be circumvented with watchful preparedness and meticulous monitoring.

  11. Pilot study of a three-step diagnostic pathway for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia: screen, test and then diagnose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, S.H.M.; Sleegers, M.J.; Dautzenberg, P.LJ.; Bergen, F.S. van; Bruggen, J.P.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a three-step diagnostic model for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). METHODS: Prospective investigator-blinded study. We developed a screening questionnaire for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their caregivers. Further, patients were

  12. Coexistent Brugada Syndrome and Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: What is the Optimal Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jaiswal, MBBS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Coexistent Brugada syndrome and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is rare, and as such poses management challenges. The overlap of symptoms attributable to each condition, the timing of ventricular stimulation after accessory pathway ablation and the predictive value of programmed stimulation in Brugada syndrome are controversial. We describe a case of coexistent Brugada syndrome and WPW syndrome in a symptomatic young adult. We discuss our treatment approach and the existing literature along with the challenges in management of such cases.

  13. Cognitive profiling of Parkinson disease patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Facchini, Silvia; Formento-Dojot, Patrizia; Vallelunga, Annamaria; Pilleri, Manuela; Antonini, Angelo

    2014-04-01

    Prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) is variable because different classification criteria are applied and there is lack of consensus about neuropsychological tests and cut-off used for cognitive profiling. Given the important therapeutic consequences for patient management, we aimed at identifying suitable diagnostic cognitive tests and respective screening cut-off values for MCI and dementia in PD (PDD). We evaluated 105 PD patients using an extensive neuropsychological battery categorized as PD without cognitive impairment (PD-CNT) (35%), PD-MCI (47%) and PDD (18%) based on established criteria and calculated Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. We found different sensitivity and specificity among neuropsychological tests in detecting PD-MCI and PDD. In particular performance in attention/set shifting, verbal memory and language abilities, discriminated both PD-MCI and PDD from PD-CNT. Abilities involved mainly in semantic retrieval mechanisms discriminated PD-CNT from PD-MCI but also PD-MCI from PDD. Finally deficits in executive and visual-spatial abilities were only affected in PDD. Our data point to an independent and different load of each test in defining different PD cognitive statuses. These findings can help selection of appropriate cognitive batteries in longitudinal studies and definition of stage-specific therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct brain metabolic patterns separately associated with cognition, motor function, and aging in Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji Hyun; Katako, Audrey; Aljuaid, Maram; Goertzen, Andrew L; Borys, Andrew; Hobson, Douglas E; Kim, Seok Min; Lee, Chong Sik

    2017-12-01

    We explored whether patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) show a distinct spatial metabolic pattern that characterizes cognitive deficits in addition to motor dysfunction. Eighteen patients with PDD underwent 3 separate positron emission tomography sessions with [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (for glucose metabolism), fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (for dopamine transporter density) and Pittsburgh compound-B (for beta-amyloid load). We confirmed in PDD versus normal controls, overall hypometabolism in the posterior and prefrontal brain regions accompanied with hypermetabolism in subcortical structures and the cerebellar vermis. A multivariate network analysis then revealed 3 metabolic patterns that are separately associated with cognitive performance (p = 0.042), age (p = 0.042), and motor symptom severity (p = 0.039). The age-related pattern's association with aging was replicated in healthy controls (p = 0.047) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.002). The cognition-related pattern's association with cognitive performance was observed, with a trend-level of correlation, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (p = 0.084) but not in patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.974). We found no association with fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane and Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography with patients' cognitive performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prion disease resembling frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitrini Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical features of a familial prion disease with those of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17. BACKGROUND: Prion diseases are not usually considered in the differential diagnosis of FTDP-17, since familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, the most common inherited prion disease, often manifests as a rapidly progressive dementia. Conversely, FTDP-17 usually has an insidious onset in the fifth decade, with abnormal behavior and parkinsonian features. METHOD: We present the clinical features of 12 patients from a family with CJD associated with a point mutation at codon 183 of the prion protein gene. RESULTS: The mean age at onset was 44.0 ± 3.7; the duration of the symptoms until death ranged from two to nine years. Behavioral disturbances were the predominant presenting symptoms. Nine patients were first seen by psychiatrists. Eight patients manifested parkinsonian signs. CONCLUSION: These clinical features bear a considerable resemblance to those described in FTDP-17.

  16. A rivastigmine patch for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Winblad, Bengt

    2007-11-01

    Rivastigmine patch is the first transdermal treatment to be approved for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia in the USA and for AD in Europe. It provides smooth, continuous drug delivery, and has the potential to maintain rivastigmine concentrations within an optimal therapeutic window while avoiding the peaks and troughs associated with oral drug delivery. The target dose, rivastigmine 9.5 mg/24 h patch (a 10 cm(2) patch), is given once daily and requires a simple one-step dose titration to the therapeutic dose. In a 24-week study in 1195 AD patients, the rivastigmine 9.5 mg/24 h patch provided similar efficacy to the highest dose range of capsules, with approximately three-times fewer reports of nausea and vomiting. Patients in the 9.5 mg/24 h patch and 12 mg/day capsule groups evidenced significant improvements versus placebo on both primary outcome measures: the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale; and Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change; in addition to the following secondary outcome measures: Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living scale; Mini-Mental State Examination; and Trail Making Test Part A for assessment of attention, visual tracking and motor processing speed. Treatment differences on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Ten Point Clock-drawing Test did not reach statistical significance in this study. The patch may be the optimal way to treat dementia patients with rivastigmine.

  17. Quantitative Electroencephalography as a Diagnostic Tool for Alzheimer's Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Sabers, Anne; Kjaer, Troels W

    2015-01-01

    be used as a diagnostic marker for dementia. The aim of this study was to examine the value of qEEG in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia in patients with Down syndrome (DS). METHOD: The study included 21 patients with DS and mild-to-moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (DS-AD) and 16 age...

  18. A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF α-SYNUCLEIN PATHOLOGY IN FIFTEEN CASES OF DEMENTIA ASSOCIATED WITH PARKINSON DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Richard A.; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Campbell, Meghan C.; Hurth, Kyle M.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2013-01-01

    The α-synuclein-immunoreactive pathology of dementia associated with Parkinson disease (DPD) comprises Lewy bodies (LB), Lewy neurites (LN), and Lewy grains (LG). The densities of LB, LN, LG together with vacuoles, neurons, abnormally enlarged neurons (EN), and glial cell nuclei were measured in fifteen cases of DPD. Densities of LN and LG were up to 19 and 70 times those of LB respectively, depending on region. Densities were significantly greater in amygdala, entorhinal cortex (EC), and sec...

  19. A syndrome of epilepsy, dementia, and amelogenesis imperfecta: genetic and clinical features.

    OpenAIRE

    Christodoulou, J; Hall, R K; Menahem, S; Hopkins, I J; Rogers, J G

    1988-01-01

    A family is described with six members affected by a syndrome of epilepsy, dementia, and amelogenesis imperfecta (Kohlschütter's syndrome). An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is established for this disorder.

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gene and Cell Therapies Expert Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease ... Lobo: Música en vivo con Lobo! Dealing with Dementia Hallucinations and Parkinson's with Dr. Friedman CareMAP: Putting ...

  1. [Syndrome of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and nocturia in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodel, M R; Ukraintseva, Yu V; Yakhno, N N

    Parasomnia, a syndrome of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is a common non-motor impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The relationship between RBD with other symptoms of PD affecting night sleep, in particular, nocturia, is understudied. An aim of the study was to determine the symptoms related to night sleep disturbances in PD patients with RBD and assess the dynamics of these disturbances with the disease progression taking into account RBD onset. One hundred and forty patients (72 male and 68 female) with PD without dementia (mean age 61.98±0.79 years, PD stage - 2.35±0.05, duration 5.82±90.65 years) were examined. Motor disorders were assessed with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), sleep disturbances and frequent night urinations were evaluated with the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS). The diagnosis of probable RBD was based on reports of patients or their relatives on the dream-related motor activity and vocalization. Quality-of-life was evaluated with the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Patients were followed up after 2.5 years. Probable RBD was diagnosed in 46.43% of patients, including 30.77%, who developed the syndrome before the manifestation of motor symptoms, 16.92% patients with simultaneous development of RBD and motor symptoms and 52.31% with RBD development >2 years after motor disorders. Patients with RBD differed from those without parasomnia by the higher severity of nocturia. After 2.5 years of follow-up, the severity of disease was greater in patients with RBD assessed by UPDRS, quality-of-life indices, severity of nocturia and episodes of nocturia. The highest frequency of episodes of nocturia was noted in patients with early onset of RBD before the manifestation of motor symptoms. RBD in patients with PD is associated with the rapid progress of nocturia, higher degree of worsening of daily activities and deterioration of quality of life. The relationship between RBD

  2. Threatening auditory hallucinations and Cotard syndrome in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Stewart A; Molho, Eric S

    2004-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are commonly reported in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). In particular, patients experience nonthreatening visual hallucinations that can occur with insight (so called hallucinosis) or without. Auditory hallucinations are uncommon, and schizophrenialike symptoms such as pejorative and threatening auditory hallucinations and delusions that are persecutory, referential, somatic, religious, or grandiose have rarely been reported. The authors present 2 PD patients who experienced threatening auditory hallucinations, without visual hallucinations, and schizophrenialike delusions with detailed description of the clinical phenomenology including 1 patient with Cotard syndrome.

  3. Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised is accurate for detecting dementia in Parkinson's disease patients with low educational level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Bassetti, Elida Maria; Oliveira, Maira Okada; Kuark, Roberta Gomes Borges; Estevam, Nathercia Marinho; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease dementia is a challenge in clinical settings. A comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation is time-consuming and expensive; brief instruments for cognitive evaluation must be easier to administer and provide a reliable classification. To study the validity of the Brazilian version of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) for the cognitive assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with heterogeneous educational level. Patients were evaluated according to the diagnostic procedures recommended by the Movement Disorder Society (MDS) as the gold standard for the diagnosis of dementia in PD. We studied 70 idiopathic PD patients, with a mean (SD) age of 64.1 (9.3) years and mean disease duration of 7.7 (5.3) years and educational level of 5.9 years, matched for education and age to controls. Twenty-seven patients fulfilled MDS clinical criteria for PD dementia. Mean scores on the ACE-R were 54.7 (12.8) points for patients with PD dementia, 76 (9.9) for PD patients without dementia and 79.7 (1.8) points for healthy controls. The area under the receiver operating curve, taking the MDS diagnostic procedures as a reference, was 0.93 [95% CI, 0.87-0.98; p<0.001] for ACE-R. The optimal cut-off value for ACE-R was ≤72 points [sensitivity 90%; specificity 85%; Kappa concordance (K) 0.79]. ACE-R appears to be a valid tool for dementia evaluation in PD patients with heterogeneous educational level, displaying good correlation with clinical criteria and diagnostic procedures of the MDS.

  4. Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised is accurate for detecting dementia in Parkinson's disease patients with low educational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila Guimarães Rocha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease dementia is a challenge in clinical settings. A comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation is time-consuming and expensive; brief instruments for cognitive evaluation must be easier to administer and provide a reliable classification. Objective: To study the validity of the Brazilian version of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R for the cognitive assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD patients with heterogeneous educational level. Methods: Patients were evaluated according to the diagnostic procedures recommended by the Movement Disorder Society (MDS as the gold standard for the diagnosis of dementia in PD. Results: We studied 70 idiopathic PD patients, with a mean (SD age of 64.1 (9.3 years and mean disease duration of 7.7 (5.3 years and educational level of 5.9 years, matched for education and age to controls. Twenty-seven patients fulfilled MDS clinical criteria for PD dementia. Mean scores on the ACE-R were 54.7 (12.8 points for patients with PD dementia, 76 (9.9 for PD patients without dementia and 79.7 (1.8 points for healthy controls. The area under the receiver operating curve, taking the MDS diagnostic procedures as a reference, was 0.93 [95% CI, 0.87-0.98; p<0.001] for ACE-R. The optimal cut-off value for ACE-R was ≤72 points [sensitivity 90%; specificity 85%; Kappa concordance (K 0.79]. Conclusion: ACE-R appears to be a valid tool for dementia evaluation in PD patients with heterogeneous educational level, displaying good correlation with clinical criteria and diagnostic procedures of the MDS.

  5. Efficacy of rivastigmine for cognitive symptoms in Parkinson disease with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz, Amy C; Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Woodruff, Bryan K; Wellik, Kay E; Caselli, Richard J; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Adler, Charles H; Caviness, John N; Wingerchuk, Dean M

    2009-07-01

    Impairment of multiple neurotransmitter networks, including acetylcholine, may contribute to the cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD). Therefore, cholinesterase inhibitors might improve cognitive function in PDD. On the other hand, enhancing cholinergic function could plausibly worsen features of parkinsonism. To determine if oral cholinesterase inhibitors improve measures of cognitive outcome and are tolerated by people with PDD. We addressed the question through the development of a critically appraised topic. Participants included consultant and resident neurologists, clinical epidemiologists, a medical librarian, and behavioral neurology and movement disorder specialists. Participants began with a structured clinical question, devised search strategies, compiled the best evidence, performed a critical appraisal, summarized the evidence, provided commentary, and declared bottom-line conclusions. A randomized controlled trial (n = 541) showed that, compared with placebo, rivastigmine (mean, 8.6 mg/d) significantly improved scores on 2 coprimary cognitive outcome scales in PDD, including the Alzheimer disease Cooperative Study-Clinician's Global Impression of Change. When dichotomized to evaluate clinically significant benefit (moderate or marked improvement), this outcome was not significant (risk difference = 5.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.6 to 12.1). The number needed to treat (NNT) to avoid clinically significant worsening of cognition was 10 (95% CI = 6-28). The NNT for the combined outcome of either achieving clinically significant benefit or avoiding significant worsening was 7. The numbers needed to harm for cholinergic side effects were 9 (95% CI = 5-24) for parkinsonian symptoms and 11 (95% CI = 6-32) for rivastigmine discontinuation due to any side effect. Rivastigmine therapy for PDD is associated with significant tradeoffs in efficacy and adverse effects. Carefully monitored trials of rivastigmine may

  6. What can the treatment of Parkinson's disease learn from dementia care; applying a bio-psycho-social approach to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Grant

    2017-12-01

    Within contemporary medical practice, Parkinson's disease (PD) is treated using a biomedical, neurological approach, which although bringing numerous benefits can struggle to engage with how people with PD experience the disease. A bio-psycho-social approach has not yet been established in PD; however, bio-psycho-social approaches adopted within dementia care practice could bring significant benefit to PD care. This paper summarises existing bio-psycho-social models of dementia care and explores how these models could also usefully be applied to care for PD. Specifically, this paper adapts the bio-psycho-social model for dementia developed by Spector and Orrell (), to suggest a bio-psycho-social model, which could be used to inform routine care in PD. Drawing on the biopsychosocial model of Dementia put forward by Spector and Orrell (), this paper explores the application of a bio-psycho-social model of PD. This model conceptualises PD as a trajectory, in which several interrelated fixed and tractable factors influence both PD's symptomology and the various biological and psychosocial challenges individuals will face as their disease progresses. Using an individual case study, this paper then illustrates how such a model can assist clinicians in identifying suitable interventions for people living with PD. This model concludes by discussing how a bio-psycho-social model could be used as a tool in PD's routine care. The model also encourages the development of a theoretical and practical framework for the future development of the role of the PD specialist nurse within routine practice. A biopsychosocial approach to Parkinson's Disease provides an opportunity to move towards a holistic model of care practice which addresses a wider range of factors affecting people living with PD. The paper puts forward a framework through which PD care practice can move towards a biopsychosocial perspective. PD specialist nurses are particularly well placed to adopt such a model

  7. Fluctuating Cotard syndrome in a patient with advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla, Paolo; Cannas, Antonino; Orofino, Gianni; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Nonmotor fluctuations of psychiatric symptoms in patients suffering from Parkinson disease (PD) represent a very disabling condition, which may seriously interfere with the quality of life of patients and caregivers. In this regard, these disturbances are present with a higher frequency in advanced PD patients with associated motor complications and can appear both in "on" and in "off" period. Here we report on a case of fluctuating Cotard syndrome clearly related to "wearing-off" deterioration and responsive to levodopa treatment in a patient affected by advanced PD. A 76-year-old woman presented with a 13-year history of PD. Her caregivers reported that, in the last 2 months, she has developed a sudden onset of nihilistic delusion (Cotard syndrome), mainly during the "wearing-off" condition and associated with end of dose dyskinesias and akathisia.As Cotard syndrome clearly improved with the administration of levodopa, the patient was successfully treated changing the levodopa schedule with the shortening of intervals between levodopa intakes in small doses. Both the appearance of the Cotard syndrome in this patient during the "off" state and the subsequent improvement of psychotic symptoms after levodopa administration strongly suggest an important correlation with the dopaminergic dysregulation.This finding suggests that dopaminergic deficit might play a key factor in the development of Cotard syndrome.

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  9. Mini-mental Parkinson (MMP) as a dementia screening test: comparison with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    As populations age, screening instruments for cognitive impairment and dementia will become of increasing importance in clinical practice. Mini-Mental Parkinson (MMP), a derivative of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), was originally described as a cognitive screening instrument for use in Parkinson's disease. Its item content addresses some of the acknowledged shortcomings of the MMSE. Pragmatic use of MMP in general cognitive clinics has not previously been examined. To compare the performance of two scales, Mini-Mental Parkinson (MMP) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), as cognitive screening instruments for dementia in a memory clinic population. MMP was administered prospectively to 201 consecutive new patient referrals independent of other tests used to establish dementia diagnosis according to standard diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV). Diagnostic utility of MMP for dementia was measured and compared with MMSE. MMP proved easy to use and acceptable to patients. Optimal test accuracy (0.86) was at MMP cutoff of ≤ 17/32, with sensitivity 0.51, specificity 0.97, positive predictive value 0.83, negative predictive value 0.87, and area under Receiver Operating Characteristic curve 0.89. Using a higher cutoff (≤ 29/32), MMP sensitivity was 1.00 with specificity 0.70. MMP scores correlated with MMSE (r = 0.93) and diagnostic agreement was high (κ = 0.85). MMP is a useful screening instrument in the memory clinic setting, with patients who fall below the designated cutoff requiring further investigation to ascertain a cause for their cognitive impairment.

  10. Cognitive Profiles of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Hildebrandt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD are associated with severe cognitive decline, but it is still unclear to what extent they become functionally more similar over time. Methods: We compared amnestic mild cognitively impaired (aMCI; n = 29 patients to mild cognitively impaired (MCI PD patients (n = 25, and patients with AD (n = 34 to patients with PD dementia (PDD; n = 15 with respect to cognitive functioning and mood. Results: aMCI patients were impaired in episodic memory, while MCI PD patients showed deficits in visuoconstruction and attention. AD and PDD patients showed comparable deficits on tests for language, attention and visuoconstruction. However, unlike PDD patients but similar to aMCI patients, AD patients showed a characteristic memory impairment, especially commission errors on recognition tasks, whereas PDD patients scored higher on the depressive mood questionnaire. Conclusions: In advanced stages of both diseases, the pattern of functional deficits associated with parietal and temporal lobe functions (attention, visuoconstruction and language is similar. However, specific differences, already present in the early stage (recognition errors in AD, associated with mediobasal temporal lobe functioning, and depressed mood in PDD, associated with non-motor basal ganglia loops, are also observed in the late stage.

  11. Correlation between pathology and neuromelanin MR imaging in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitao, Shinichiro; Fujii, Shinya; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide; Matsusue, Eiji; Kato, Shinsuke; Ito, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Direct correlation between neuropathological findings and postmortem neuromelanin MR imaging (NmMRI) was performed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to clarify the pathological background of the signal changes in normal, Parkinson's disease (PD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) cases. NmMRI of 10 % formalin-fixed autopsied midbrains was performed in three cases (normal control, DLB, and PD) with a 3T imaging system, using a 3D gradient echo T1-weighted sequence with a magnetization transfer contrast pulse. Neuropathological examinations of the midbrains were performed, and the density of neuromelanin-positive neurons (number per square millimeter) was determined. The extent of iron deposition in the midbrain was also evaluated using ferritin immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we directly correlated the contrast signal ratio in the SNc and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons. Diffuse hyperintense areas in the SNc reflected well-preserved neuromelanin-containing neurons in the normal control case, whereas an iso-intense area in the SNc showed severe loss of neuromelanin-containing neurons in the DLB and PD cases. Increased signal intensity in the SNc was apparently not influenced by iron deposition. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between signal intensity and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons was seen in the SNc. Based on the direct correlation between postportem NmMRI and neuropathological findings, signal intensity in the SNc is closely related to the quantity of neuromelanin-containing neurons but is not influenced by iron deposition. (orig.)

  12. The effects of cognitive reserve and lifestyle on cognition and dementia in Parkinson's disease--a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, John V; Hurt, Catherine S; Burn, David J; Brown, Richard G; Samuel, Mike; Wilson, Kenneth C; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve theory seeks to explain the observed mismatch between the degree of brain pathology and clinical manifestations. Early-life education, midlife social and occupational activities and later-life cognitive and social interactions are associated with a more favourable cognitive trajectory in older people. Previous studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested a possible role for the effects of cognitive reserve, but further research into different proxies for cognitive reserve and longitudinal studies is required. This study examined the effects of cognitive lifestyle on cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of cognition and dementia severity in people with PD. Baseline assessments of cognition, and of clinical, social and demographic information, were completed by 525 participants with PD. Cognitive assessments were completed by 323 participants at 4-year follow-up. Cognition was assessed using the measures of global cognition dementia severity. Cross-sectional and longitudinal serial analyses of covariance for cognition and binomial regression for dementia were performed. Higher educational level, socio-economic status and recent social engagement were associated with better cross-sectional global cognition. In those with normal cognition at baseline, higher educational level was associated with better global cognition after 4 years. Increasing age and low levels of a measure of recent social engagement were associated with an increased risk of dementia. Higher cognitive reserve has a beneficial effect on performance on cognitive tests and a limited effect on cognitive decline and dementia risk in PD. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. [Dementia and depression determine care dependency in Parkinson's disease: analysis of 1,449 outpatients receiving nursing care in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, O; Dodel, R; Deuschl, G; Förstl, H; Henn, F; Heuser, I; Oertel, W; Reichmann, H; Riederer, P; Trenkwalder, C; Wittchen, H U

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently accompanied by dementia or depression which can aggravate the clinical picture of the disease and increase the risk of care dependency (CD). Little is known about the associations between PD, these neuropsychiatric comorbidities and CD in outpatients. A nationwide sample of outpatients (n=1,449) was examined by office-based neurologists (n=315) comprising the documentation of the general, neurological status and the degree of CD. The dementia status was clinically rated according to the established DSM-IV criteria. Depression was screened with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Overall, 18.3% of all patients were care dependent. Even after adjustment for PD severity, patients with depression (OR=2.8; 95% CI 1.8-4.3), dementia (OR=2.7; 95% CI 1.8-4.1) or both (OR=3.9; 95% CI 2.5-60,0) were at higher risk for CD than patients without dementia or depression. Patients aged ≥76 years were fourfold more likely to be care dependent than patients aged ≤65 years (OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.3-5.5). Across all age groups, patients with depression featured the highest increments (from 11.9 to 42.0%). The risk for CD is substantially elevated in outpatients with PD when further neuropsychiatric symptoms are present. The data suggest that depression contributes equally to disability as does dementia.

  14. [Dementias: impact on the family and prevention of caregivers' syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater Mateu, M P; López Cortacans, G

    1998-11-01

    This article deals with the impact dementia can cause in a family in our modern society, an impact which often leads to a crisis or a rupture in a family. Due to the evolution in family structure in Spain over the last few decades, as evidenced by separations, divorces, reconstructed families, a descent in birth rate, and especially by women joining the work force, the possibilities for traditional family care of the elderly have become complicated and have been reduced, which leads to a tremendous physical and psychological wear on the person who takes on the largest part of this care, the so-called main caretaker, usually a woman. In consequence to this situation, dysfunctional behaviors may develop in this caretaker which, if not treated, may early or later on develop into the caretaker syndrome. The effects of this syndrome include subjective ones such as emotional suffering and objective ones such as a loss of health. This article presents a proposal for action by nurses acting out of primary health care centers which leads to a series of measures providing containing methods and formal support structures, in other words prevention, for the family and especially for the main caretaker of patients suffering from dementia.

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, Frontal Assessment Battery and Mini Mental State Examination for diagnosing dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszás, B; Kovács, N; Balás, I; Kállai, J; Aschermann, Z; Kerekes, Z; Komoly, S; Nagy, F; Janszky, J; Lucza, T; Karádi, K

    2012-06-01

    Among the non-motor features of Parkinson's disease (PD), cognitive impairment is one of the most troublesome problems. Highly sensitive and specific screening instruments for detecting dementia in PD (PDD) are required in the clinical practice. In our study we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of different neuropsychological tests (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination, ACE; Frontal Assessment Battery, FAB and Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, MDRS) in 73 Parkinson's disease patients without depression. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, these screening instruments were tested against the recently established clinical diagnostic criteria of PDD. Best cut-off score for ACE to identify PDD was 80 points (sensitivity = 74.0%, specificity = 78.1%). For FAB the most optimal cut-off value was 12 points (sensitivity = 66.3%, specificity = 72.2%); whereas for MDRS it was 125 points (sensitivity = 89.8%, specificity = 98.3%). Among the examined test batteries, MDRS had the best clinicometric profile for detecting PDD. Although the types of applied screening instruments might differ from movement disorder clinic to clinic within a country, determination of the most specific and sensitive test for the given population remains to be an important task. Our results demonstrated that the specificity and sensitivity of MDRS was better than those of ACE, FAB and MMSE in Hungary. However, further studies with larger sample size and more uniform criteria for participation are required to determine the most suitable screening instrument for cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The characteristics of autonomic nervous system disorders in burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewicz, Magdalena; Mendak, Magdalena; Konopka, Tomasz; Koziorowska-Gawron, Ewa; Budrewicz, Sławomir

    2012-01-01

    To conduct a clinical electrophysiologic evaluation of autonomic nervous system functions in patients with burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease and estimate the type and intensity of the autonomic dysfunction. The study involved 83 subjects-33 with burning mouth syndrome, 20 with Parkinson disease, and 30 controls. The BMS group included 27 women and 6 men (median age, 60.0 years), and the Parkinson disease group included 15 women and 5 men (median age, 66.5 years). In the control group, there were 20 women and 10 men (median age, 59.0 years). All patients were subjected to autonomic nervous system testing. In addition to the Low autonomic disorder questionnaire, heart rate variability (HRV), deep breathing (exhalation/inspiration [E/I] ratio), and sympathetic skin response (SSR) tests were performed in all cases. Parametric and nonparametric tests (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Scheffe tests) were used in the statistical analysis. The mean values for HRV and E/I ratios were significantly lower in the burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease groups. Significant prolongation of SSR latency in the foot was revealed in both burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease patients, and lowering of the SSR amplitude occurred in only the Parkinson disease group. The autonomic questionnaire score was significantly higher in burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease patients than in the control subjects, with the Parkinson disease group having the highest scores. In patients with burning mouth syndrome, a significant impairment of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems was found but sympathetic/parasympathetic balance was preserved. The incidence and intensity of autonomic nervous system dysfunction was similar in patients with burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease, which may suggest some similarity in their pathogeneses.

  17. Limbic system, the main focus of dementia syndrome; A study with MRI and PET

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    Matsuzawa, Taiju [Morinosato Hospital, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    Alzheimer disease and multi-infarct dementia are two entirely different diseases producing almost the same abnormalities as dementia syndrome. The statistical studies with MRI to locate the focus of dementia syndrome in the neocortex was an absolute failure. With MRI there is drastic atrophy and destruction of the amygdala and hippocampus suggesting the limbic system as the focus of dementia syndrome. Destruction of the limbic system in particular amygdala and hippocampus produced the functional obstruction brought about by the marked reduction in the glucose utilization with PET in the bilateral temporal, parietal and occipital association cortices. Although this type constitutes only about 1/5 of all dementia patients. It is considered the fundamental type of dementia syndrome. Aside from this, there is a type wherein simultaneous and symmetrical reductions in glucose utilization of the frontal association cortex and the motor association cortex in the anterior part of the neocortex. This is referred to as type II. It constitutes about 4/5 of all dementia patients which is far more than type I. Based on these results, it is thought that limbic system is the main focus of dementia syndrome. (author).

  18. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with cleft lip and palate: A rare, previously unreported association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kannan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, also called Pre Excitation Syndrome, is characterized by an extra pathway that conducts the electrical impulses from the atria to the ventricles without the normal delay. We are reporting a case of WPW syndrome with a cleft lip and palate, which is a rare association and previously unreported in literature.

  19. The Distinct Cognitive Syndromes of Parkinson's Disease: 5 Year Follow-Up of the CamPaIGN Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Evans, Jonathan R.; Goris, An; Foltynie, Thomas; Ban, Maria; Robbins, Trevor W.; Brayne, Carol; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Barker, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease, with important social and economic implications. Factors influencing their evolution remain unclear but are crucial to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. We have investigated the development of cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson's disease using a longitudinal…

  20. Goal-orientated cognitive rehabilitation for dementias associated with Parkinson's disease-A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, John V; Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Roberts, Julie; Brand, Andrew; Hoare, Zoe; Martyr, Anthony; Clare, Linda

    2018-05-01

    To examine the appropriateness and feasibility of cognitive rehabilitation for people with dementias associated with Parkinson's in a pilot randomised controlled study. This was a single-blind pilot randomised controlled trial of goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for dementias associated with Parkinson's. After goal setting, participants were randomised to cognitive rehabilitation (n = 10), relaxation therapy (n = 10), or treatment-as-usual (n = 9). Primary outcomes were ratings of goal attainment and satisfaction with goal attainment. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, mood, cognition, health status, everyday functioning, and carers' ratings of goal attainment and their own quality of life and stress levels. Assessments were at 2 and 6 months following randomisation. At 2 months, cognitive rehabilitation was superior to treatment-as-usual and relaxation therapy for the primary outcomes of self-rated goal attainment (d = 1.63 and d = 1.82, respectively) and self-rated satisfaction with goal attainment (d = 2.04 and d = 1.84). At 6 months, cognitive rehabilitation remained superior to treatment-as-usual (d = 1.36) and relaxation therapy (d = 1.77) for self-rated goal attainment. Cognitive rehabilitation was superior to treatment as usual and/or relaxation therapy in a number of secondary outcomes at 2 months (mood, self-efficacy, social domain of quality of life, carers' ratings of participants' goal attainment) and at 6 months (delayed recall, health status, quality of life, carer ratings of participants' goal attainment). Carers receiving cognitive rehabilitation reported better quality of life, health status, and lower stress than those allocated to treatment-as-usual. Cognitive rehabilitation is feasible and potentially effective for dementias associated with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease Demência e transtorno cognitivo leve em pacientes com doença de Parkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Maria Almeida Souza Tedrus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to assess the occurrence of cognitive impairment in 32 individuals (average age: 67.2 years old with Parkinson' disease (PD. Procedures: clinical-neurological assessment; modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale (HYS; standard neuropsychological battery of CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer' Disease; Pfeffer questionnaire; and Clinical Dementia Rating. A comparison was made with a control group (CG, consisting of 26 individuals with similar age and educational level but without cognitive impairment. The PD patients showed an inferior performance in the CERAD battery when compared to the CG. Three PD sub-groups were characterised according to cognition: no cognitive impairment - 15 cases; mild cognitive impairment - 10; dementia - 7 cases. There was a significant association between motor disability (HYS and the occurrence of dementia. Dementia and mild cognitive impairment frequently occur in PD patients and should be investigated in a routine way.O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a ocorrência de déficits cognitivos em 32 indivíduos (idade média: 67,2 anos com doença de Parkinson (DP. Procedimentos: avaliação clínico-neurológica, escala de Hoehn and Yahr modificada (EHY, bateria neurospicológica do CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer' Disease, questionário de Pfeffer e escore clínico da demência (Clinical Dementia Rating. Foi feita comparação com grupo controle (GC de 26 indivíduos sem declínio cognitivo, com idade e nível educacional similares. Os pacientes com DP tiveram desempenho inferior na bateria CERAD, quando comparados ao do GC. Foram caracterizados 3 subgrupos com PD segundo a cognição: sem déficits cognitivos - 15 casos; transtorno cognitivo leve - 10; demência - 7 casos. Houve associação entre comprometimento motor e ocorrência de demência. Demência e transtorno cognitivo leve são freqüentes em pacientes com DP e devem ser

  2. Characterisation of three-dimensional mapping in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with septal aneurysmal dyskinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Seigo; Muneuchi, Jun; Origuchi, Hideki

    2018-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and aneurysmal septal dyskinesis underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the accessory pathways. Before radiofrequency catheter ablation, the activation wavefront arose from the aneurysmal septum, whereas the propagation of the left ventricle was normalised after radiofrequency catheter ablation. These findings demonstrate the importance of the electro-mechanical interaction in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and ventricular dysfunction.

  3. The use of echocardiography in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Shuraih, Mossaab; Nagueh, Sherif F

    2012-04-01

    Endocardial mapping and radiofrequency catheter ablation are well established modalities for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome associated with tachyarrhythmias. However, the electrophysiologic techniques are invasive, require radiation exposure, and lack spatial resolution of cardiac structures. A variety of echocardiographic techniques have been investigated as a non-invasive alternative for accessory pathway localization. Conventional M-mode echocardiography can detect the fine premature wall motion abnormalities associated with WPW syndrome. However, it is unable to identify the exact site of accessory pathway with sufficient accuracy. 2D, 2D-guided M-mode, and 2D phase analysis techniques are limited by image quality and endocardial border definition. Various modalities of tissue Doppler echocardiography significantly increase the accuracy of left-sided accessory pathway localization to 80-90% even in patients with poor acoustic window. However, right-sided pathways remain a diagnostic challenge. Strain echocardiography by speckle tracking has recently been evaluated and appears promising. Different cardiac abnormalities have been detected by echocardiography in WPW patients. Patients with WPW syndrome and tachyarrhythmias have impaired systolic and diastolic function which improves after radiofrequency ablation. Echocardiography is useful in identifying patient with accessory pathway-associated left ventricular dyssynchrony and dysfunction who may benefit from ablation therapy. Transesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography have been used to guide ablation procedure. Ablation-related complications detected by routine echocardiography are infrequent, rarely clinically relevant, and of limited value.

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  5. Phase analysis in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who underwent surgical division of the accessory conduction pathway (ACP) were studied by gated blood pool studies and phase analyses. All of 11 patients with right cardiac type (R-type) had abnormal initial phase in the right ventricle (RV), while 10 out of 14 patients with left cardiac type (L-type) had initial phase in the left ventricle (LV). However, in 4 L-type patients, there were no significant differences in the initiation of both ventricular contractions. In 10 patients who had radionuclide studies before and after surgical division of the ACP, the ventricular contraction patterns were apparently changed and the abnormal wall motions induced by the presence of ACPs disappeared. These observations indicate that the abnormal initial contraction is associated with pre-excitation of WPW syndrome. Sensitivities to identify the side of preexcitation were 100% (11/11) for R-type and 71% (10/14) for L-type. However, regarding the detection of the precise site of ACP, the agreement was 48% (12/25). Therefore, as a method of preoperative study, it seemed difficult to identify the precise localization of the ACP by phase analysis alone. Phase analysis provided interesting informations and was useful for evaluating patients with WPW syndrome before and after surgery. (author)

  6. Characterization of Burning Mouth Syndrome in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenfant, David; Rompré, Pierre H; Rei, Nathalie; Jodoin, Nicolas; Soland, Valerie Lynn; Rey, Veronica; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Rascol, Olivier; Blanchet, Pierre J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in a Parkinson's disease (PD) population through a self-administered, custom-made survey. A total of 218 surveys were collected during regular outpatient visits at two Movement Disorders Clinics in Montreal (Canada) and Toulouse (France) to gather information about pain experience, PD-related symptoms, and oral and general health. A neurologist confirmed the diagnosis of PD, drug treatment, Hoehn-Yahr stage, and Schwab & England Activity of Daily Living score. Data between groups were compared using the independent samples Mann-Whitney U test and two-sided exact Fisher test. Data from 203 surveys were analyzed. BMS was reported by eight subjects (seven females and one male), resulting in a prevalence of 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1-7.8). Five participants with chronic nonburning oral pain were excluded. PD severity and levodopa equivalent daily dose did not differ between non-BMS and BMS participants. Mean poor oral health index was higher in BMS compared to non-BMS subjects (49.0 vs 32.2 points, P syndrome. This survey yielded a low prevalence of BMS in PD patients, indicating no strong link between the two conditions. An augmenting effect such as that resulting from drug treatment in restless legs syndrome or sensory neuropathy cannot be excluded.

  7. Antihypertensive agents and risk of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dementia: a population-based prospective study (NEDICES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Benito-León, Julián; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in antihypertensive agents, especially calcium channel blockers, has been sparked by the notion that these medications may be neuroprotective. A modest literature, with mixed results, has examined whether these medications might lower the odds or risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) or dementia. There are no data for essential tremor (ET). To examine the association between antihypertensive use (defined broadly and by individual subclasses) and ET, PD and dementia. For each disorder, we used cross-sectional data (association with prevalent disease) and prospective data (association with incident disease). Prospective population-based study in Spain enrolling 5,278 participants at baseline. Use of antihypertensive medications (aside from beta-blockers) was similar in prevalent ET cases and controls. Baseline use of antihypertensive agents was not associated with reduced risk of incident ET. Antihypertensive medication use was not associated with prevalent or incident PD. Calcium channel blocker use was marginally reduced in prevalent dementia cases (OR(adjusted) = 0.63, p = 0.06) but was not associated with reduced risk of incident dementia (RR(adjusted) = 1.02, p = 0.95). We did not find evidence of a protective effect of antihypertensive medications in these three neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Sex differences in progression to mild cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Johnson, Catherine O; Fish, Brian; Quinn, Joseph F; Chung, Kathryn A; Peterson-Hiller, Amie L; Rosenthal, Liana S; Dawson, Ted M; Albert, Marilyn S; Hu, Shu-Ching; Mata, Ignacio F; Leverenz, James B; Poston, Kathleen L; Montine, Thomas J; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Edwards, Karen L

    2018-05-01

    Identification of factors associated with progression of cognitive symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is important for treatment planning, clinical care, and design of future clinical trials. The current study sought to identify whether prediction of cognitive progression is aided by examining baseline cognitive features, and whether this differs according to stage of cognitive disease. Participants with PD in the Pacific Udall Center Clinical Consortium who had longitudinal data available and were nondemented at baseline were included in the study (n = 418). Logistic and Cox regression models were utilized to examine the relationship between cognitive, demographic, and clinical variables with risk and time to progression from no cognitive impairment to mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) or dementia (PDD), and from PD-MCI to PDD. Processing speed (OR = 1.05, p = 0.009) and working memory (OR = 1.01, p = 0.03) were associated with conversion to PDD among those with PD-MCI at baseline, over and above demographic variables. Conversely, the primary predictive factor in the transition from no cognitive impairment to PD-MCI or PDD was male sex (OR = 4.47, p = 0.004), and males progressed more rapidly than females (p = 0.01). Further, among females with shorter disease duration, progression was slower than for their male counterparts, and poor baseline performance on semantic verbal fluency was associated with shorter time to cognitive impairment in females but not in males. This study provides evidence for sex differences in the progression to cognitive impairment in PD, while specific cognitive features become more important indicators of progression with impending conversion to PDD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A prospective 20-year longitudinal follow-up of dementia in persons with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, M; McCallion, P; Reilly, E; Dunne, P; Carroll, R; Mulryan, N

    2017-09-01

    To examine dementia characteristics, age at onset and associated co-morbidities in persons with Down syndrome. A total of 77 people with Down syndrome aged 35 years and older were followed up from 1996 to 2015. The diagnosis of dementia was established using the modified ICD 10 Criteria and a combination of objective and informant-based tests. Cognitive tests included the Test for Severe Impairment and the Down Syndrome Mental Status Examination; adaptive behaviour was measured using the Daily Living Skills Questionnaire, and data from the Dementia Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities have been available since 2005. Over the 20-year period, 97.4% (75 of 77) persons developed dementia with a mean age of dementia diagnosis of 55 years (SD = 7.1, median = 56 years). Clinical dementia was associated with cognitive and function decline and seizure activity. Risk for dementia increased from 23% in those aged 50 years to 80% in those aged 65 years and above. There were no differences by level of ID. The previously reported high risk levels for dementia among people with Down syndrome were confirmed in this data as was the relationship with late onset epilepsy. The value of the instruments utilised in tracking decline and helping to confirm diagnosis is further highlighted. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dementia in Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Nitrini

    Full Text Available Abstract Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a cause of movement disorders and cognitive decline which has probably been underdiagnosed, especially if its prevalence proves similar to those of progressive supranuclear palsy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with action tremor, gait ataxia and forgetfulness. There was a family history of tremor and dementia, and one of the patient's grandsons was mentally deficient. Neuropsychological evaluation disclosed a frontal network syndrome. MRI showed hyperintensity of both middle cerebellar peduncles, a major diagnostic hallmark of FXTAS. Genetic testing revealed premutation of the FMR1 gene with an expanded (CGG90 repeat. The diagnosis of FXTAS is important for genetic counseling because the daughters of the affected individuals are at high risk of having offspring with fragile X syndrome. Tremors and cognitive decline should raise the diagnostic hypothesis of FXTAS, which MRI may subsequently reinforce, while the detection of the FMR1 premutation can confirm the condition.

  11. How to maintain the oral health of a child with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroniatis, Tsampikos; Ortu, Eleonora; Marchili, Nicola; Giannoni, Mario; Marzo, Giuseppe; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-09-30

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most important disorders of the heart conduction system. It is caused by the presence of an abnormal accessory electrical conduction pathway between the atria and the ventricles. In the present report, we describe the correct oral health management of a 12-year-old Caucasian girl with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We successfully undertook the dental care of a girl with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, which we describe here.

  12. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve ...

  13. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continue to look for new genes that may be responsible for the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Several research projects hope to identify dementia biomarkers (measurable biological signs ...

  14. Lymphocyte concanavalin A capping: a similarity between Down's syndrome and early onset primary degenerative dementia.

    OpenAIRE

    Duijndam-van den Berge, M; Goekoop, J G

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocyte capping with concanavalin A was studied in adult patients with Down's syndrome and aged patients with primary degenerative dementia. In both disorders a decreased capping was found as compared with age-matched and clinically relevant control groups. Colchicine had a strong enhancing effect on capping in Down's syndrome. In primary degenerative dementia the enhancing effect of colchicine was restricted to a subgroup of patients with onset of the dementing illness before the age of 8...

  15. Rett syndrome: an overlooked diagnosis in women with stereotypic hand movements, psychomotor retardation, Parkinsonism, and dystonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cochen, Valérie; Sangla, Sophie; Bienvenu, Thierry; Roubergue, Anne; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Vidaihet, Marie

    2007-02-15

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder resulting in profound psychomotor retardation. It is usually diagnosed by a pediatrician or pediatric neurologist. Adult neurologists may, therefore, overlook the possibility of Rett syndrome in women with psychomotor retardation of unknown etiology. We report the case of a woman diagnosed with Rett syndrome at age 49 years. This report emphasizes the diagnostic value of movement disorders, including hand stereotypies, Parkinsonism, and dystonia, in adults with Rett syndrome.

  16. A three dimensional anatomical view of oscillatory resting-state activity and functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease related dementia: An MEG study using atlas-based beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.M.; Stam, C.J.; Bosboom, J.L.W.; Berendse, H.W.; Hillebrand, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) related dementia (PDD) develops in up to 80% of PD patients. The present study was performed to further unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms by applying a new analysis approach that uses an atlas-based MEG beamformer to provide a detailed anatomical mapping

  17. Lewy body dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Korbo, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia share the same pathophysiology. Together they are called Lewy body dementias and are the second most common type of dementia. Lewy body dementias receive little attention, and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal...

  18. Dementia and severity of parkinsonism determines the handicap of patients in late-stage Parkinson's disease: the Barcelona-Lisbon cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M; Marti, M J; Sampaio, C; Ferreira, J J; Valldeoriola, F; Rosa, M M; Tolosa, E

    2015-02-01

    Handicap has not been explored as a patient-centred outcome measure in Parkinson's disease (PD). The clinical features and medication use in late stages of PD (LS-PD) were reported previously. Handicap, medical conditions, use of healthcare resources and the impact of LS-PD upon caregivers were characterized in a cross-sectional study of LS-PD stages 4 or 5 of Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y). Handicap was measured using the London Handicap Scale (LHS: 0, maximal handicap; 1, no handicap). The mean LHS score in 50 patients was 0.33 (SD ±0.15). The presence of dementia, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part I score and the H&Y stage in 'off' independently predicted the LHS score (adjusted R(2) = 0.62; P = 0.000). Comorbidities and past medical conditions were frequent. Thirty-five patients lived at their house. Forty-five received unpaid care. Mean visits to the family doctor in the preceding 6 months were 2.2 (SD ±3.0) and to a neurologist 1.7 (SD ±1.0). Use of other health resources was low. Unpaid caregivers spent much time with patients and reported a high burden. Handicap could be measured in LS-PD and the LHS was easily completed by patients and caregivers. The high handicap in our cohort was mostly driven by the presence of dementia, behavioural complaints and the severity of non-dopaminergic motor features. Patients visited doctors infrequently and made low use of health resources, whilst unpaid caregivers reported a high burden. © 2014 EAN.

  19. Late onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down syndrome and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapia Verri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific forms of epilepsy may be found at various ages in Down Syndrome (DS and a sharp increase in the incidence of epilepsy with age has been documented. A specific type of myoclonic epilepsy associated with cognitive decline has been reported as “senile myoclonic epilepsy” or “late onset myoclonic epilepsy in DS” (LOMEDS. We report a new case of LOMEDS, documented by clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and psychometric assessment (DSDS and DMR. MF, male, affected by DS, was referred in 2004 at 40 years of age; he had no personal or familial history of epilepsy. Since one year, the patient presented cognitive deterioration, characterized by regression of language abilities, loss of memory, and loss of sphincters control. A brain TC showed mild brainstem and sub-cortical atrophy. In 2006, myoclonic jerks involving upper limbs occurred mainly after awakening. EEG showed a low voltage 8 Hz background activity with diffuse slow activity, intermingled with spikes or polyspikes, persisting during NREM sleep. MF was initially treated with clonazepam and after with topiramate, resulting in partial seizures control. MRI (2008 demonstrated diffuse brain atrophy, associated with marked ventricular enlargement. At the psychometric evaluation, onset of dementia was evident late in 2004, with transition to the middle stage in 2006. Last assessment (2009 showed the clinical signs of a late stage of deterioration, with loss of verbal abilities and autonomous ambulation. Using levetiracetam till 2,000 mg/die, myoclonic jerks decreased but are still present every day after awakening. On the EEG slow and poorly organized background activity with bilateral polyspike-wave discharges was recorded. Therefore, we documented a parallel progression of dementia and myoclonic epilepsy in a DS subject.

  20. Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Incidental EKG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Assaf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 38-year-old male presents to the emergency department for a minor trauma evaluation after falling off a bicycle at a moderate rate of speed. The patient was not wearing a helmet when he hit his head with unknown loss of consciousness. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST exam and head computed tomography (CT were negative. Routine electrocardiogram (ECG showed sinus rhythm with pre-excitation indicative of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome (WPW. The patient confirmed a previous diagnosis of WPW, but had not previously followed up with a cardiologist. Significant findings: The ECG shows slurred up-stroking of the QRS complexes characteristic of a delta wave. The PR interval is normal; however, the QT interval is greater than 110ms. Discussion: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome (WPW is a frequently encountered macro-reentrant arrhythmia characterized by a shortened PR interval less than 120ms, prolonged QRS greater than 120ms with an up-stroking QRS complex (delta wave, and occasional ST abnormalities.1 The incidence is reported to be 0.9%-3% of the general population and most diagnoses are made on routine EKGs.2,3 WPW is thought to be caused by abnormalities of conduction through the accessory pathway, also known as the Bundle of Kent, causing premature excitation of the ventricles. The complications from WPW are supraventricular tachycardia, atrial arrhythmias, and ventricular fibrillation leading to sudden cardiac death.3 Approximately 40-50% of patients who die from sudden cardiac arrest associated with WPW were previously asymptomatic.4 Unfortunately, it is agreed that approximately 50% of patients with WPW are asymptomatic and unaware of their diagnosis.5 The definitive treatment for WPW is radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA. However, it comes with a low risk of complications including arrhythmias and death.6 For asymptomatic WPW, children are at the highest risk for ventricular arrhythmias while

  1. Progression of dopaminergic degeneration in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with and without dementia assessed using 123I-FP-CIT SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloby, Sean J.; McKeith, Ian G.; O'Brien, John T.; Williams, E. David; Burn, David J.; Lloyd, Jim J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the rate of progression of nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss in subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD with dementia (PDD) using serial 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. We hypothesised that striatal rates of decline in patients would be greater than in controls, and that DLB and PDD would show similar rates, reflecting the similarity in neurobiological mechanisms of dopaminergic loss between the two disorders. We studied 20 patients with DLB, 20 with PD, 15 with PDD and 22 healthy age-matched controls. Semi-automated region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed on both baseline and repeat scans for each subject and mean striatal uptake ratios (caudate, anterior and posterior putamen) were calculated. Rates of decline in striatal binding between groups were assessed using ANCOVA. Significant differences between patients and controls were observed in caudate (DLB, PD, PDD, p≤0.01), anterior putamen (DLB, PDD, p≤0.05; PD, p=0.07) and posterior putamen (DLB, PD, PDD, p<0.006). Rates of decline were similar between DLB, PD and PDD. (orig.)

  2. Combined Analysis of CSF Tau, Aβ42, Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% in Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bibl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the diagnostic value of CSF Aβ42/tau versus low Aβ1–42% and high Aβ1–40ox% levels for differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, respectively. CSF of 45 patients with AD, 15 with DLB, 21 with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD, and 40 nondemented disease controls (NDC was analyzed by Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot and ELISAs (Aβ42 and tau. Aβ42/tau lacked specificity in discriminating AD from DLB and PDD. Best discriminating biomarkers were Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% for AD and DLB, respectively. AD and DLB could be differentiated by both Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% with an accuracy of 80% at minimum. Thus, we consider Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% to be useful biomarkers for AD and DLB, respectively. We propose further studies on the integration of Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% into conventional assay formats. Moreover, future studies should investigate the combination of Aβ1–40ox% and CSF alpha-synuclein for the diagnosis of DLB.

  3. Quantitative neuropathological study of Alzheimer-type pathology in the hippocampus: comparison of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, senile dementia of Lewy body type, Parkinson's disease and non-demented elderly control patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, P; Irving, D; MacArthur, F; Perry, R H

    1991-12-01

    A Lewy body dementing syndrome in the elderly has been recently described and designated senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) on the basis of a distinct clinicopathological profile. The pathological changes seen in SDLT include the presence of cortical Lewy bodies (LB) frequently, but not invariably, associated with senile plaque (SP) formation. Whilst neocortical neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) are sparse or absent, a proportion of these cases show involvement of the temporal archicortex by lesions comprising Alzheimer-type pathology (ATP, i.e. NFT, SP and granulovacuolar degeneration [GVD]). Thus the relationship between SDLT and senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) is complex and controversial. In this study quantitative neuropathology was used to compare the intensity and distribution of ATP in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of 53 patients from 3 disease groups (SDLT, SDAT, Parkinson's disease (PD)) and a group of neurologically and mentally normal elderly control patients. For most brain areas examined the extent of ATP between the patient groups followed the trend SDAT greater than SDLT greater than PD greater than control. Statistical comparison of these groups revealed significant differences between the mean densities of NFT, SP and GVD although individual cases showed considerable variability. These results confirm additional pathological differences between SDAT and SDLT regarding the intensity of involvement of the temporal archicortex by ATP. Many patients with Lewy body disorders (LBdis) show a predisposition to develop ATP albeit in a more restricted distribution (e.g. low or absent neocortical NFT) and at lower densities than is found in SDAT. Some cases of SDLT show minimal SP and NFT formation in both neocortex and archicortex supporting previously published data distinguishing this group from Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging differentiates vascular parkinsonism from parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin in elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deverdun, Jérémy [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Clinique du Parc, Castelnau-le-Lez (France); Cabello-Aguilar, Simon [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); I2FH, Institut d’Imagerie Fonctionnelle Humaine, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, CHRU de, Montpellier (France); Maury, Florence [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Molino, François [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS UMR 5221 - Université Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle, UMR 5203 - INSERM U661 - Université Montpellier II - Université, Montpellier I (France); Charif, Mahmoud [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Leboucq, Nicolas [Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); Ayrignac, Xavier; Labauge, Pierre [Department of Neurology, Montpellier University Hospital Center, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier (France); and others

    2014-11-15

    Background and Purpose: The etiologic diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is of particular importance when considering syndromes of vascular or degenerative origin. The purpose of this study is to find differences in the white-matter architecture between those two groups in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were prospectively included (multiple-system atrophy, n = 5; Parkinson's disease, n = 15; progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 9; vascular parkinsonism, n = 6), with a mean age of 76 years. Patients with multiple-system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease were grouped as having parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. Brain MRIs included diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy and mean-diffusivity maps were spatially normalized, and group analyses between parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin and vascular parkinsonism were performed using a voxel-based approach. Results: Statistical parametric-mapping analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data showed decreased fractional anisotropy value in internal capsules bilaterally in patients with vascular parkinsonism compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin (p = 0.001) and showed a lower mean diffusivity in the white matter of the left superior parietal lobule (p = 0.01). Fractional anisotropy values were found decreased in the middle cerebellar peduncles in multiple-system atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. The mean diffusivity was increased in those regions for these subgroups. Conclusion: Clinically defined vascular parkinsonism was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in the deep white matter (internal capsules) compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. These findings are consistent with previously published neuropathological data.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging differentiates vascular parkinsonism from parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin in elderly subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deverdun, Jérémy; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Maury, Florence; Molino, François; Charif, Mahmoud; Leboucq, Nicolas; Ayrignac, Xavier; Labauge, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The etiologic diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is of particular importance when considering syndromes of vascular or degenerative origin. The purpose of this study is to find differences in the white-matter architecture between those two groups in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were prospectively included (multiple-system atrophy, n = 5; Parkinson's disease, n = 15; progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 9; vascular parkinsonism, n = 6), with a mean age of 76 years. Patients with multiple-system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease were grouped as having parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. Brain MRIs included diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy and mean-diffusivity maps were spatially normalized, and group analyses between parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin and vascular parkinsonism were performed using a voxel-based approach. Results: Statistical parametric-mapping analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data showed decreased fractional anisotropy value in internal capsules bilaterally in patients with vascular parkinsonism compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin (p = 0.001) and showed a lower mean diffusivity in the white matter of the left superior parietal lobule (p = 0.01). Fractional anisotropy values were found decreased in the middle cerebellar peduncles in multiple-system atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. The mean diffusivity was increased in those regions for these subgroups. Conclusion: Clinically defined vascular parkinsonism was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy in the deep white matter (internal capsules) compared to parkinsonian syndromes of degenerative origin. These findings are consistent with previously published neuropathological data

  6. Medical image of the week: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hook C

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 38-year-old man developed sustained rapid heart rate while rock climbing. The patient reported that he had experienced rare bouts of self-limited palpitations in the past. Blood pressure on arrival to the emergency department was 112/ 65 mm Hg. The patient’s initial EKG demonstrated a regular, narrow complex supraventricular tachycardia, with a rate of 232 (Figure 1. Intravenous adenosine was administered with no change in his rate or rhythm. The patient then received amiodarone by intravenous bolus, with subsequent conversion to sinus rhythm (Figure 2. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is a congenital cardiac condition present in approximately 0.15% of the general population. WPW is characterized by the abnormal presence of conduction tissue that creates an accessory atrioventricular pathway and thus potentiates reentrant tachycardia (1. The classic resting EKG findings in WPW are: a shortened PR interval (less than 0.12 seconds, an indistinct initial upslope of the QRS complex (known as the …

  7. Electrophysiological evaluation of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembilla-Perrot, Beatrice

    2002-01-01

    Sudden death might complicate the follow-up of symptomatic patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and might be the first event in patients with asymptomatic WPW. The risk of sudden death is increased in some clinical situations. Generally, the noninvasive studies are unable to predict the risk of sudden death correctly . The electrophysiological study is the best means to detect the risk of sudden death and to evaluate the nature of symptoms. Methods used to define the prognosis of WPW are well-defined. At first the maximal rate of conduction through the accessory pathway is evaluated; programmed atrial stimulation using 1 and 2 extrastimuli delivered at different cycle lengths is then used to determine the accessory pathway refractory period and to induce a supraventricular tachycardia. These methods should be performed in the control state and repeated in adrenergic situations either during exercise test or more simply during a perfusion of small doses of isoproterenol. The induction of an atrial fibrillation with rapid conduction through the accessory pathway (> 240/min in control state, > 300/min after isoproterenol) is the sign of a form of WPW at risk of sudden death. PMID:16951730

  8. Electrophysiological evaluation of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Brembilla-Perrot

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death might complicate the follow-up of symptomatic patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW and might be the first event in patients with asymptomatic WPW. The risk of sudden death is increased in some clinical situations. Generally, the noninvasive studies are unable to predict the risk of sudden death correctly . The electrophysiological study is the best means to detect the risk of sudden death and to evaluate the nature of symptoms. Methods used to define the prognosis of WPW are well-defined. At first the maximal rate of conduction through the accessory pathway is evaluated; programmed atrial stimulation using 1 and 2 extrastimuli delivered at different cycle lengths is then used to determine the accessory pathway refractory period and to induce a supraventricular tachycardia. These methods should be performed in the control state and repeated in adrenergic situations either during exercise test or more simply during a perfusion of small doses of isoproterenol. The induction of an atrial fibrillation with rapid conduction through the accessory pathway (> 240/min in control state, > 300/min after isoproterenol is the sign of a form of WPW at risk of sudden death.

  9. ɑ-Synuclein strains and seeding in Parkinson's disease, incidental Lewy body disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelaerts, W; Bousset, L; Baekelandt, V; Melki, R

    2018-04-27

    Several age-related neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the deposition of aberrantly folded endogenous proteins. These proteins have prion-like propagation and amplification properties but so far appear nontransmissible between individuals. Because of the features they share with the prion protein, PrP, the characteristics of pathogenic protein aggregates in several progressive brain disorders, including different types of Lewy body diseases (LBDs), such as Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), have been actively investigated. Even though the pleomorphic nature of these syndromes might suggest different underlying causes, ɑ-synuclein (ɑSyn) appears to play an important role in this heterogeneous group of diseases (the synucleinopathies). An attractive hypothesis is that different types of ɑSyn protein assemblies have a unique and causative role in distinct synucleinopathies. We will discuss the recent research progress on ɑSyn assemblies involved in PD, MSA and DLB; their behavior as strains; current spreading hypotheses; their ability to seed centrally and peripherally; and their implication for disease pathogenesis.

  10. Down Syndrome and Dementia: Is Depression a Confounder for Accurate Diagnosis and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Stuart; Hussain, Rafat; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The past century has seen a dramatic improvement in the life expectancy of people with Down syndrome. However, research has shown that individuals with Down syndrome now have an increased likelihood of early onset dementia. They are more likely than their mainstream peers to experience other significant co-morbidities including mental health…

  11. The Role of Insulin/IGF-1/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling in Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dementia, a condition that frequently afflicts patients in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, results in decreased quality of life and survival time. Nevertheless, the pathological mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD are not completely understood. The symptoms characteristic of PDD may be the result of functional and structural deficiencies. The present study implicates the accumulation of Lewy bodies in the cortex and limbic system as a potent trigger in the development of PDD. In addition, significant Alzheimer-type pathologies, including amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and NFTs, are observed in almost half of PDD patients. Interestingly, links between PDD pathogenesis and the mechanisms underlying the development of insulin resistance have begun to emerge. Furthermore, previous studies have demonstrated that insulin treatment reduces amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and normalizes the production and functionality of dopamine and ameliorates motor impairments in 6-OHDA-induced rat PD models. GSK3β, a downstream substrate of PI3K/Akt signaling following induction by insulin and IGF-1, exerts an influence on AD and PD physiopathology. The genetic overexpression of GSK3β in cortex and hippocampus results in signs of neurodegeneration and spatial learning deficits in in vivo models (Lucas et al., 2001, whereas its inhibition results in improvements in cognitive impairment in these rodents, including AD and PD. Accordingly, insulin- or IGF-1-activated PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling may be involved in PDD pathogenesis, at least in the pathology of PD-type + AD-type.

  12. Differentiating Aging among Adults with Down Syndrome and Comorbid Dementia or Psychopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Esbensen, Anna J.; Johnson, Emily Boshkoff; Amaral, Joseph L.; Tan, Christine M.; Macks, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Differences were examined between three groups of adults with Down syndrome in their behavioral presentation, social life/activities, health, and support needs. We compared those with comorbid dementia, with comorbid psychopathology, and with no comorbid conditions. Adults with comorbid dementia were more likely to be older, have lower functional abilities, have worse health and more health conditions, and need more support in self-care. Adults with comorbid psychopathology were more likely t...

  13. Clinical and pathological study on early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    [ 123 I] Meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy has been used to evaluate postganglionic cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart diseases and some neurological disorders. To see clinical usefulness of MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from related movement disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD), we performed MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in patients with these disorders. Cardiac uptake of MIBG is specifically reduced in PD and DLB, and this imaging approach is a sensitive diagnostic tool that possibly differentiates PD and DLB from related movement disorders and AD. To see pathological basis of the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease, we immunohistichemically examined cardiac tissues from patients with PD, DLB, related movement disorders and AD using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phosphorylated neurofilament (NF). Not only TH- but also NF-immunoreactive (ir) axons in the epicardial nerve fascicles were markedly decreased in Lewy body disease, namely cardiac sympathetic denervation, which accounts for the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease. Patients with PD and DLB have Lewy bodies (LBs) in the nervous system, whereas patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, parkin-associated PD and AD have no LBs in the nervous system. Even in patients with MSA, cardiac sympathetic denervation was associated with the presence of LBs. Therefore, cardiac sympathetic denervation is closely related to the presence of LBs in a wide range of neurodegenerative processes. Taken together, we conclude that the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG is a potential biomarker for the presence of LBs. Because α-synuclein is one of the key molecules in the pathogenesis of PD, we further investigate how α-synuclein aggregates are involved in degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nerve in PD. We

  14. Conversion between mini-mental state examination, montreal cognitive assessment, and dementia rating scale-2 scores in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenoven, Inger; Aarsland, Dag; Hurtig, Howard; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Duda, John E; Rick, Jacqueline; Chahine, Lama M; Dahodwala, Nabila; Trojanowski, John Q; Roalf, David R; Moberg, Paul J; Weintraub, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the earliest, most common, and most disabling non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, routine screening of global cognitive abilities is important for the optimal management of PD patients. Few global cognitive screening instruments have been developed for or validated in PD patients. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Dementia Rating Scale-2 (DRS-2) have been used extensively for cognitive screening in both clinical and research settings. Determining how to convert the scores between instruments would facilitate the longitudinal assessment of cognition in clinical settings and the comparison and synthesis of cognitive data in multicenter and longitudinal cohort studies. The primary aim of this study was to apply a simple and reliable algorithm for the conversion of MoCA to MMSE scores in PD patients. A secondary aim was to apply this algorithm for the conversion of DRS-2 to both MMSE and MoCA scores. The cognitive performance of a convenience sample of 360 patients with idiopathic PD was assessed by at least two of these cognitive screening instruments. We then developed conversion scores between the MMSE, MoCA, and DRS-2 using equipercentile equating and log-linear smoothing. The conversion score tables reported here enable direct and easy comparison of three routinely used cognitive screening assessments in PD patients. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Glucocerebrosidase mutations and neuropsychiatric phenotypes in Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementias: Review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Byron; Bell, Emily; Johar, Iskandar; Francis, Paul; Ballard, Clive; Aarsland, Dag

    2018-03-01

    Heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are a major genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Recently, there has been a considerable focus on the relationship between GBA mutations and emergence of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptoms in these diseases. Here, we review the literature in this area, with a particular focus, including meta-analysis, on the key neuropsychiatric symptoms of cognitive impairment, psychosis, and depression in Parkinson's disease. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that GBA mutations are associated with a 2.4-fold increased risk of cognitive impairment. In addition, our novel meta-analyses of psychosis and depression showed a 1.8- and 2.2-fold increased risk respectively associated with GBA mutations, although due to possible bias and heterogeneity the depression findings should be interpreted with caution. While the precise mechanisms which increase susceptibility to neurodegeneration in GBA carriers are not known, evidence of greater cortical Lewy body pathology, reduced patterns of cortical activation, and hippocampal pathology in animal models are all consistent with a direct effect of GBA mutations on these symptoms. Extension of this work in DLB and individuals without neurodegeneration will be important in further characterizing how GBA mutations increase risk for PD and DLB and influence disease course. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poor judgment and loss of ability to recognize danger Using the wrong word, not pronouncing words correctly, ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  17. Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction in undiagnosed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessie G; Zhu, Dennis W

    2014-05-01

    Atrial flutter with 1:1 atrioventricular conduction via an accessory pathway is an uncommon presentation of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome not previously reported in the emergency medicine literature. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, a form of ventricular preexcitation sometimes initially seen and diagnosed in the emergency department (ED), can present with varied tachydysrhythmias for which certain treatments are contraindicated. For instance, atrial fibrillation with preexcited conduction needs specific consideration of medication choice to avoid potential degeneration into ventricular fibrillation. We describe an adult female presenting with a very rapid, regular wide complex tachycardia successfully cardioverted in the ED followed by a normal electrocardiogram (ECG). Electrophysiology study confirmed atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction and revealed an accessory pathway consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, despite lack of ECG findings of preexcitation during sinus rhythm. Why should an emergency physician be aware of this? Ventricular tachycardia must be the first consideration in patients with regular wide complex tachycardia. However, clinicians should consider atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction related to an accessory pathway when treating patients with the triad of very rapid rate (>250 beats/min), wide QRS complex, and regular rhythm, especially when considering pharmacologic treatment. Emergency physicians also should be aware of electrocardiographically concealed accessory pathways, and that lack of delta waves does not rule out preexcitation syndromes such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gene and Cell Therapies Expert Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease ... 1 What Is Patient-Centered Care? Dealing with Dementia CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life What Are Some ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, ... Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  20. Increased aluminum content in the spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam and in the Kii Peninsula of Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakayama, Ikuro; Yoshida, Sohei [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan); Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Koichi

    1994-07-01

    Aluminum content in the lumbar spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) and Parkinsonism-dementia(PD) in the Kii Peninsula of Japan and in the island of Guam was measured using a particle induced X-ray emission analysis. We demonstrated that aluminum content was increased in the spinal cord of patients with ALS in two foci of the western Pacific, indicating aluminum to be a important factor in the process of spinal motor neuron degeneration. (author).

  1. Increased aluminum content in the spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam and in the Kii Peninsula of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakayama, Ikuro; Yoshida, Sohei; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Koichi.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum content in the lumbar spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) and Parkinsonism-dementia(PD) in the Kii Peninsula of Japan and in the island of Guam was measured using a particle induced X-ray emission analysis. We demonstrated that aluminum content was increased in the spinal cord of patients with ALS in two foci of the western Pacific, indicating aluminum to be a important factor in the process of spinal motor neuron degeneration. (author)

  2. Alternating Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with attack of angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangiafico, R.A.; Petralito, A.; Grimaldi, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    In a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and an inferior-posterior bypass tract, transient restoration of normal conduction occurred during an attack of angina. The ECG pattern of inferior posterior ischemia was present when the conduction was normal. Thallium scintigraphy showed a reversible posterolateral perfusion defect. The possible mechanisms for production of intermittent preexcitation are discussed

  3. Role of atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular conduction (including Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome) in sudden death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Tweel, I. van der; Herbschleb, J.N.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Robles de Medina, E.O.

    A short refractory period of the accessory pathway is considered a major threat for sudden death in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrial fibrillation. RR interval and QRS signal analysis together with signal analysis of a bipolar high right atrial electrogram were obtained in six

  4. Alternating Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with attack of angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiafico, R.A.; Petralito, A.; Grimaldi, D.R. (Univ. of Catania (Italy))

    1990-07-01

    In a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and an inferior-posterior bypass tract, transient restoration of normal conduction occurred during an attack of angina. The ECG pattern of inferior posterior ischemia was present when the conduction was normal. Thallium scintigraphy showed a reversible posterolateral perfusion defect. The possible mechanisms for production of intermittent preexcitation are discussed.

  5. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.; Hiroki, T.; Ohshima, F.; Arakawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide

  6. Sudden death in a young competitive athlete with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedermann, C. J.; Becker, A. E.; Hopferwieser, T.; Mühlberger, V.; Knapp, E.

    1987-01-01

    The case history is documented of a young competitive athlete known to have the electrocardiographic pattern of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, but considered asymptomatic. On that basis competitive sport was not proscribed. In retrospect, he had experienced occasional tachycardias which were of

  7. SAFETY OF AMIODARONE USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH WOLFF-PARKINSON-WHITE SYNDROME AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kuzhel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is one of the basic antiarrhytmic drugs for atrial fibrillation treatment. However application of amiodarone in patients with atrial fibrillation and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome can induce ventricular fibrillation. Amiodarone usage in these patients should be accompanied by readiness for performance of resuscitation. This is confirmed by clinical case presentation.

  8. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.; Hiroki, T.; Ohshima, F.; Arakawa, K. (Fukuoka Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide.

  9. Syndrome and Phenomenon of Wolff — Parkinson — White in Children (Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the data on the history of the discovery and study of the phenomenon and syndrome Wolff — Parkinson — White (WPW. The features of the anatomy and electrophysiology of additional ways, mechanisms of attacks of atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia in WPW syndrome are considered. The role of the standard ECG, methods for topical analysis of additional atrioventricular connections and non-invasive electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of this disease is shown.

  10. Post-cueing deficits with maintained cueing benefits in patients with Parkinson's disease dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eGräber

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD internal cueing mechanisms are impaired leading to symptoms such as like hypokinesia. However external cues can improve movement execution by using cortical resources. These cortical processes can be affected by cognitive decline in dementia.It is still unclear how dementia in PD influences external cueing. We investigated a group of 25 PD patients with dementia (PDD and 25 non-demented PD patients (PDnD matched by age, sex and disease duration in a simple reaction time (SRT task using an additional acoustic cue. PDD patients benefited from the additional cue in similar magnitude as did PDnD patients. However, withdrawal of the cue led to a significantly increased reaction time in the PDD group compared to the PDnD patients. Our results indicate that even PDD patients can benefit from strategies using external cue presentation but the process of cognitive worsening can reduce the effect when cues are withdrawn.

  11. Is There a Characteristic Clinical Profile for Patients with Dementia and Sundown Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo Sevilla, David; Carreras Rodríguez, María Teresa; Heredia Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández Sánchez, Marisa; Vivancos Mora, José Aurelio; Gago-Veiga, Ana Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Sundown syndrome (SS) is the onset or worsening of behavioral symptoms in the evening in patients with dementia. To identify the differential clinical profile of patients with dementia who present SS. A cross-sectional, case-control observational study was conducted by retrospectively reviewing the medical records of patients with dementia in a specialized Memory Unit. We compared the characteristics of patients with and without SS, including sociodemographic variables, etiology, and severity of the dementia, behavioral symptoms, sleep disorders (considering insomnia and hypersomnia), other diseases and treatments employed. We identified the factors related to SS and conducted a logistic regression analysis to establish a predictive nomogram. Of the 216 study patients with dementia, 41 (19%) had SS. There was a predominance of women (2.4:1), advanced age (p = 0.0001), dependence (p patients with dementia, with a predictive capacity of 80.1%. In our study, age, a higher score on the GDS, and the presence of insomnia or hypersomnia are differential clinical characteristics of patients with SS. We defined a nomogram that helps predicting the occurrence of SS in patients with dementia.

  12. Mild Cognitive Impairment as a Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, Jeroen; Boel, Judith A.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Geskus, Ronald B.; Schmand, Ben A.; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.; Marras, Connie; Adler, Charles H.; Goldman, Jennifer G.; Tröster, Alexander I.; Burn, David J.; Litvan, Irene; Geurtsen, Gert J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society criteria for mild cognitive impairment in PD were recently formulated. Objectives: The aim of this international study was to evaluate the predictive validity of the comprehensive (level II) version of these criteria by assessment

  13. Slowing of oscillatory brain activity is a stable characteristic of Parkinson's disease without dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, D.; Bosboom, JL; Deijen, J.B.; Wolters, E.C.M.J.; Berendse, H.W.; Stam, L.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive changes in resting-state oscillatory brain activity have recently been demonstrated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in moderately advanced, non-demented Parkinson's disease patients relative to age-matched controls. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset and evolution

  14. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of motor fluctuations and non-motor predominance with cerebrospinal τ and Aβ as well as dementia-risk in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreanu, Raluca; Cerquera, Sonia Catalina; Martí, María José; Ríos, José; Sánchez-Gómez, Almudena; Cámara, Ana; Fernández, Manel; Compta, Yaroslau

    2017-02-15

    Experimental, neuropathological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies support τ and amyloid-β (Aβ) relevance in Parkinson's disease (PD) related dementia. Lesser motor fluctuations (MFs) and non-motor features have also been related to PD-dementia. Yet, little is known about the association of MFs and non-motor symptoms with CSF τ and Aβ in PD. We hypothesized that lesser MFs and non-motor predominance are related to these CSF markers and dementia-risk in PD. We studied 58 PD patients (dementia at baseline, n=21; dementia at 18-months, n=35) in whom CSF Aβ and τ had been determined with ELISA techniques. MFs and a number of non-motor symptoms (apathy, anxiety, irritability, depression, visual hallucinations, spatial disorientation, memory complaints) over disease course were dichotomized as absent-mild vs. moderate-severe by retrospective clinical chart review blind to CSF findings. Non-motor predominance was defined as ≥3 non-motor symptoms (after the cohort-median of non-motor symptoms per patient) with ≥2 being moderate-severe and ≥1 having been present from onset, with all these being more disabling overall than motor features. Cross-sectionally, CSF biomarkers were non-parametrically compared according to dichotomized MFs and non-motor predominance. Longitudinally, dementia was the outcome (dependent variable), CSF markers, MFs and non-motor predominance were the predictors (independent variables), and potential modifiers as age, sex, and memory complaints were the covariates in binary regression models. Absent-mild MFs were associated with higher CSF τ markers and shorter time-to-dementia, while non-motor predominance and decreasing CSF Aβ independently increased longitudinal dementia-risk. In summary, absent-mild MFs, non-motor predominance and CSF τ and Aβ might define endophenotypes related to the timing or risk of dementia in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used extensively to characterize motor system pathophysiology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other forms of dementia, as well to monitor the effects of certain pharmacological agents. Among the studies focusing on motor cortical excitability measures, the most consistent finding is a significant reduction of short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) in AD and other forms of dementia in which the cholinergic system is affected, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. SAI evaluation may thus provide a reliable biomarker of cortical cholinergic dysfunction in dementias. Moreover, most TMS studies have demonstrated cortical hyperexcitability and asymptomatic motor cortex functional reorganization in the early stages of the disease. Integrated approaches utilizing TMS together with high-density EEG have indicated impaired cortical plasticity and functional connectivity across different neural networks in AD. Paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity has also been found to be abnormal in patients with AD. The development of novel noninvasive methods of brain stimulation, in particular repetitive TMS (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), has increased the interest in neuromodulatory techniques as potential therapeutic tools for cognitive rehabilitation in AD. Preliminary studies have revealed that rTMS and tDCS can induce beneficial effects on specific cognitive functions in AD. Future studies are warranted to replicate and extend the initial findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk Factors for Dementia in People with Down Syndrome: Issues in Assessment and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Alick; Beail, Nigel

    2004-01-01

    It has been clearly established that there is an increased incidence of early onset dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) in people who have Down syndrome. There are variations in the age of onset of the clinical signs of DAT, which may be accounted for by different risk factors. In this review we examined the evidence that different biological and…

  17. "It's All Changed:" Carers' Experiences of Caring for Adults Who Have Down's Syndrome and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Jones, Aled

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative interview study was undertaken to determine the information and support needs of carers of adults who have Down's syndrome and dementia. The data were analysed thematically. Carers' information and support needs were seen to change at pre-diagnosis, diagnosis and post-diagnosis. Helping carers to manage the changing nature of the…

  18. Behavioural Excesses and Deficits Associated with Dementia in Adults Who Have Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Kalsy, Sunny; McQuillan, Sharna; Hall, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Background: Informant-based assessment of behavioural change and difference in dementia in Down syndrome can aid diagnosis and inform service delivery. To date few studies have examined the impact of different types of behavioural change. Methods: The Assessment for Adults with Developmental Disabilities (AADS), developed for this study, assesses…

  19. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in a Term Infant Presenting With Cardiopulmonary Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeffler, Christina D; Krenek, Michele E; Brand, M Colleen

    2016-02-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a congenital abnormality of the cardiac conduction system caused by the presence of an abnormal accessory electrical pathway between the atria and the ventricles. This can result in intermittent tachyarrhythmias such as supraventricular tachycardia. In rare occasions, sudden death may occur from atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular conduction. Supraventricular tachycardia typically has a sudden onset and offset, classified as a paroxysmal arrhythmia. Because of the variable occurrence, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome may go undiagnosed in the immediate newborn period. To highlight arrhythmia as a possible cause of sudden decompensation in infants. The clinical presentation of this infant is complex and a number of potential diagnoses were considered. Preexcitation on electrocardiogram resulted in the diagnosis of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Nurses caring for infants should be alert to tachycardia and irregularities of the heart rate, including those in the prenatal history, and should report them for evaluation. While all parents should be taught to watch for signs of illness, parents of infants with Wolff-Parkinson-White have additional learning needs, including recognizing early signs and symptoms of heart failure.

  20. Multiple Cardiac Rhabdomyomas, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, and Tuberous Sclerosis: An Infrequent Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Cabanes, Elena; Lacambra Blasco, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac rhabdomyomas are benign cardiac tumours and are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. They are often asymptomatic with spontaneus regresion but can cause heart failure, arrhythmias, and obstruction. There have also been a few isolated reports of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis and the great majority has been detected in patients with concomitant rhabdomyomas. We report a 12-day-old infant girl with tuberous sclerosis who presented with intraparietal and intracavitary rhabdomyomas with a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). She represents one of the few published cases of WPW syndrome and tuberous sclerosis and particularly interesting because of intramural rhabdomyomas regression with persistent intracavitary rhabdomyomas after two years of followup. PMID:25328743

  1. Multiple Cardiac Rhabdomyomas, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, and Tuberous Sclerosis: An Infrequent Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Castilla Cabanes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rhabdomyomas are benign cardiac tumours and are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. They are often asymptomatic with spontaneus regresion but can cause heart failure, arrhythmias, and obstruction. There have also been a few isolated reports of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis and the great majority has been detected in patients with concomitant rhabdomyomas. We report a 12-day-old infant girl with tuberous sclerosis who presented with intraparietal and intracavitary rhabdomyomas with a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW. She represents one of the few published cases of WPW syndrome and tuberous sclerosis and particularly interesting because of intramural rhabdomyomas regression with persistent intracavitary rhabdomyomas after two years of followup.

  2. Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with intermittent pre-excitation under subarachnoid block for urological surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is one of the pre-excitation syndromes in which activation of an accessory atrioventricular (AV conduction pathway leads to bypass the AV node and cause earlier ventricular activation than the normal pathway. We report a patient with intermittent WPW syndrome who repeatedly manifested pre-excitation after subarachnoid block.

  3. Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with intermittent pre-excitation under subarachnoid block for urological surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rakesh; Sinha, Renu; Nishad, PK

    2011-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is one of the pre-excitation syndromes in which activation of an accessory atrioventricular (AV) conduction pathway leads to bypass the AV node and cause earlier ventricular activation than the normal pathway. We report a patient with intermittent WPW syndrome who repeatedly manifested pre-excitation after subarachnoid block. PMID:21712875

  4. Parkinson's disease : The syndrome, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by a slowly expanding degeneration of neurons particularly in the mesencephalon. The causes are unknown although risk factors in the genetic and toxic domain are being discovered. An important pathophysiological feature in PD is the loss of part of the

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Davis AM, Drago F, Janousek J, Klein GJ, Law IH, Morady FJ, Paul T, Perry JC, Sanatani S, Tanel RE. PACES/HRS expert consensus statement on the management of the asymptomatic young patient with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, ventricular preexcitation) electrocardiographic pattern: developed in ...

  6. Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rob; Radhakrishnan, Raghavakurup

    2012-09-10

    Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins.

  7. Association of metabolic syndrome and change in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leehey, Maureen; Luo, Sheng; Sharma, Saloni; Wills, Anne-Marie A; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Wong, Pei Shieen; Simon, David K; Schneider, Jay; Zhang, Yunxi; Pérez, Adriana; Dhall, Rohit; Christine, Chadwick W; Singer, Carlos; Cambi, Franca; Boyd, James T

    2017-10-24

    To explore the association between metabolic syndrome and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores and, secondarily, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). This is a secondary analysis of data from 1,022 of 1,741 participants of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Clinical Trials in Parkinson Disease Long-Term Study 1, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of creatine. Participants were categorized as having or not having metabolic syndrome on the basis of modified criteria from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. Those who had the same metabolic syndrome status at consecutive annual visits were included. The change in UPDRS and SDMT scores from randomization to 3 years was compared in participants with and without metabolic syndrome. Participants with metabolic syndrome (n = 396) compared to those without (n = 626) were older (mean [SD] 63.9 [8.1] vs 59.9 [9.4] years; p metabolic syndrome experienced an additional 0.6- (0.2) unit annual increase in total UPDRS ( p = 0.02) and 0.5- (0.2) unit increase in motor UPDRS ( p = 0.01) scores compared with participants without metabolic syndrome. There was no difference in the change in SDMT scores. Persons with Parkinson disease meeting modified criteria for metabolic syndrome experienced a greater increase in total UPDRS scores over time, mainly as a result of increases in motor scores, compared to those who did not. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding. NCT00449865. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To use...

  9. Correlation between pathology and neuromelanin MR imaging in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitao, Shinichiro; Fujii, Shinya; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori (Japan); Matsusue, Eiji [Tottori Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tottori, Tottori (Japan); Kato, Shinsuke [Tottori University, Division of Neuropathology, Department of Brain and Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Ito, Hisao [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Direct correlation between neuropathological findings and postmortem neuromelanin MR imaging (NmMRI) was performed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to clarify the pathological background of the signal changes in normal, Parkinson's disease (PD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) cases. NmMRI of 10 % formalin-fixed autopsied midbrains was performed in three cases (normal control, DLB, and PD) with a 3T imaging system, using a 3D gradient echo T1-weighted sequence with a magnetization transfer contrast pulse. Neuropathological examinations of the midbrains were performed, and the density of neuromelanin-positive neurons (number per square millimeter) was determined. The extent of iron deposition in the midbrain was also evaluated using ferritin immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we directly correlated the contrast signal ratio in the SNc and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons. Diffuse hyperintense areas in the SNc reflected well-preserved neuromelanin-containing neurons in the normal control case, whereas an iso-intense area in the SNc showed severe loss of neuromelanin-containing neurons in the DLB and PD cases. Increased signal intensity in the SNc was apparently not influenced by iron deposition. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between signal intensity and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons was seen in the SNc. Based on the direct correlation between postportem NmMRI and neuropathological findings, signal intensity in the SNc is closely related to the quantity of neuromelanin-containing neurons but is not influenced by iron deposition. (orig.)

  10. Parkinson-dementia complex and development of a new stable isotope dilution assay for BMAA detection in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay, we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain.

  11. [Case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following open heart surgery for thoracic aortic aneurysm with parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Maiko; Sakamoto, Mik; Shindo, Yuki; Ando, Yumi; Tateda, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    An 80-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease was scheduled for open heart surgery to repair thoracic aortic aneurysm. Parkinson's symptoms were normally treated using oral levodopa (200 mg), selegiline-hydrochloride (5 mg), bromocriptine-mesilate (2 mg), and amantadine-hydrochloride (200 mg) daily. On the day before surgery, levodopa 50mg was infused intravenously. Another 25 mg of levodopa was infused immediately after surgery. Twenty hours later, the patient developed tremors, heyperventilation, but no obvious muscle rigidity. Two days after surgery, the patient exhibited high fever, hydropoiesis, elevated creatine kinase, and a rise in blood leukocytes. She was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. She was intubated, and received dantrolene sodium. Symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome disappeared on the fourth postoperative day. The stress of open heart surgery, specifically extracorporeal circulation and concomitant dilution of levodopa, triggered neuroleptic malignant syndrome in this patient. Parkinson's patients require higher doses of levodopa prior to surgery to compensate and prevent neuroleptic malignant syndrome after surgery.

  12. New Perspective on Parkinsonism in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyung Park

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the second most common type of presenile dementia. Three clinical prototypes have been defined; behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and motor neuron disease may possess clinical and pathological characteristics that overlap with FTD, and it is possible that they may all belong to the same clinicopathological spectrum. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is a clinicopathological syndrome that encompasses a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Owing to the advancement in the field of molecular genetics, diagnostic imaging, and pathology, FTLD has been the focus of great interest. Nevertheless, parkinsonism in FTLD has received relatively less attention. Parkinsonism is found in approximately 20–30% of patients in FTLD. Furthermore, parkinsonism can be seen in all FTLD subtypes, and some patients with familial and sporadic FTLD can present with prominent parkinsonism. Therefore, there is a need to understand parkinsonism in FTLD in order to obtain a better understanding of the disease. With regard to the clinical characteristics, the akinetic rigid type of parkinsonism has predominantly been described. Parkinsonism is frequently observed in familial FTD, more specifically, in FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q (FTDP-17. The genes associated with parkinsonism are microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT, progranulin (GRN or PGRN, and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72 repeat expansion. The neural substrate of parkinsonism remains to be unveiled. Dopamine transporter (DAT imaging revealed decreased uptake of DAT, and imaging findings indicated atrophic changes of the basal ganglia. Parkinsonism can be an important feature in FTLD and, therefore, increased attention is needed on the subject.

  13. Diagnosis, assessment and management of delusional jealousy in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Giulio; Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Berti, Caterina; Romano, Anna; Del Dotto, Paolo; Lucetti, Claudio; Ceravolo, Roberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may present delusional jealousy (DJ). In a previous cross-sectional prevalence study we identified 15 cognitively preserved and five demented PD patients with DJ. The current study aimed at evaluating their clinical (motor and non-motor) characteristics and the pharmacological treatments associated with DJ, and its subsequent pharmacological management. Patients were assessed by neurologists and psychiatrists using the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Efficacy of DJ management was evaluated in follow-up visits. All patients were in therapy with dopamine agonists. A subgroup of five cognitively preserved patients developed DJ after a short period of treatment of therapy with dopamine agonists, while other patients developed DJ after a longer period of dopaminergic treatment. Psychiatric comorbidities were common in cognitively preserved and in demented patients. The pharmacological management included the interruption of dopamine agonists in two patients and the reduction of dopamine agonist dose plus the use of antipsychotics in other patients. These clinical data suggest that the management of medicated PD patients should include investigation for the presence of DJ and the evaluation of clinical characteristics potentially relevant to the prevention or the early recognition of delusions.

  14. Cerebral perfusion scintigraphy and the exploration of dementia syndromes: An illustration with five clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, K.; Perdrisot, R.; Habert, M.O.

    2007-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence suggests that individuals with higher education level have a reduced risk of developing dementia. Because cognitive reserve and its compensation mechanisms may modulate the clinical expression in neuro-degenerative pathology, it is important to study subjects who present mild cognitive disturbance with functional imaging. The cerebral SPECT has been used to determine regional uptake of radiotracer into the brain of patients with cognitive impairment. These abnormalities of blood flow were correlated with cognitive impairment. The cerebral SPECT is also useful to investigate preclinical dementia and to predict the evolution of cognitive disturbance. This article, reports some technical and semeiological notions and illustrate with five clinical cases the scintigraphic aspect of some dementia syndrome. (authors)

  15. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Leroi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms commonly complicate Parkinson’s disease (PD, however the presence of such symptoms in mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI specifically has not yet been well described. The objective of this study was to examine and compare the prevalence and profile of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with PD-MCI (n = 48 to those with PD and no cognitive impairment (PD-NC, n = 54 and to those with dementia in PD (PDD, n = 25. PD-MCI and PDD were defined using specific consensus criteria, and neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed with the 12-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. Self-rated apathy, depression, and anxiety rating scales were also administered. Over 79% of all participants reported at least one neuropsychiatric symptom in the past month. The proportion in each group who had total NPI scores of ≥4 (“clinically significant” was as follows: PD-NC, 64.8%; PD-MCI, 62%; PDD 76%. Apathy was reported in almost 50% of those with PD-MCI and PDD, and it was an important neuropsychiatric symptom differentiating PD-MCI from PD-NC. Psychosis (hallucinations and delusions increased from 12.9% in PD-NC group; 16.7% in PD-MCI group; and 48% in PDD group. Identifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD-MCI may have implications for ascertaining conversion to dementia in PD.

  16. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  17. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a single exercise stress test might be misleading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavitabar, Arash; Silver, Eric S; Liberman, Leonardo

    2017-05-01

    Risk stratification of patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome for sudden death is a complex process, particularly in understanding the utility of the repeat exercise stress test. We report a case of an 18-year-old patient who was found to have a high-risk pathway by both invasive and exercise stress testing after an initial exercise stress test showing beat-to-beat loss of pre-excitation.

  18. Noninvasive risk stratification for sudden death in asymptomatic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novella, John; DeBiasi, Ralph M; Coplan, Neil L; Suri, Ranji; Keller, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the first clinical manifestation of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a well-documented, although rare occurrence. The incidence of SCD in patients with WPW ranges from 0% to 0.39% annually. Controversy exists regarding risk stratification for patients with preexcitation on surface electrocardiogram (ECG), particularly in those who are asymptomatic. This article focuses on the role of risk stratification using exercise and pharmacologic testing in patients with WPW pattern on ECG.

  19. A Rare Case of Parkinson's Disease with Severe Neck Pain Owing to Crowned Dens Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Teruyuki Takahashi; Masato Tamura; Keiichi Osabe; Takashi Tamiya; Kenji Miki; Mai Yamaguchi; Kanno Akira; Satoshi Kamei; Toshiaki Takasu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain is regarded as one of the most common nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, musculoskeletal pain has been reported as the most common type of PD-associated pain. Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Case Presentation: This report describes the case of an 87-year-old woman who had severe bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, gait disturbance and nec...

  20. Natural history of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome diagnosed in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole; Irving, Claire; Webber, Steven; Beerman, Lee; Arora, Gaurav

    2013-10-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome carries a risk for symptomatic arrhythmias and sudden death. The aim of this study was to examine the natural history of patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome diagnosed in childhood followed longitudinally at a single institution. The study population consisted of 446 patients. The median age of diagnosis was 7 years, and 61% were male. Associated heart disease was present in 40 patients (9%). Modes of presentation included supraventricular tachycardia (38%), palpitations (22%), chest pain (5%), syncope (4%), atrial fibrillation (0.4%), sudden death (0.2%), and incidental findings (26%); data were unavailable in 4%. During the study period, a total of 243 patients (54%) had supraventricular tachycardia, and 7 patients (1.6%) had atrial fibrillation. Of patients who presented at ≤3 months of age, 35% had resolution of manifest preexcitation compared with 5.8% who presented at >3 months of age (p Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome diagnosed in childhood, 64% had symptoms at presentation, and an additional 20% developed symptoms during follow-up. There were 6 sudden deaths (1.3%), with an overall incidence of 1.1 per 1,000 patient-years in patients with structurally normal hearts and 27 per 1,000 patient-years in patients with associated heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome concomitant with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation associated with inferior early repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naohiko; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Hara, Masahide; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2012-01-01

    We encountered a 39-year-old man with documented ventricular fibrillation (VF). His ECGs showed intermittent Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pattern. During electrophysiological study, no ventricular preexcitation was observed. An accessory pathway located at the posterior mitral annulus was identified, and successfully eliminated by radiofrequency catheter ablation. VF was not induced. His ECGs in the absence of delta waves demonstrated early repolarization in the inferior leads. This case raises the possibility that patients with manifest WPW syndrome may have an arrhythmogenic substrate associated with early repolarization, and the characteristic J waves can be masked by the presence of ventricular preexcitation.

  2. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome, addiction and behavioral changes in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merims, Doron; Giladi, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Degeneration of the dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease and longstanding exposure to dopaminergic drugs may cause reward system malfunction. This may manifest as addiction to l-dopa and behavioral disturbances associated with the impulse control system. These disturbances include: gambling, excessive spending (shopping), hypersexuality and binge eating. We included one such patient's personal story to emphasize the devastating consequences of these potentially reversible phenomena: the patient describes in his own words how gambling induced by an exposure dopamine agonist therapy significantly worsened his disease-related difficulties.

  3. Is Apolipoprotein E4 an Important Risk Factor for Dementia in Persons with Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohn, Troy T; McCarty, Katie L; Love, Julia E; Head, Elizabeth

    2014-12-08

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability and is characterized by a number of behavioral as well as cognitive symptoms. Triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 has been considered as the main cause of Down syndrome. Due to the location of the amyloid precursor protein on chromosome 21, many of the neuropathological features of early-onset Alzheimer's disease including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are also present in Down syndrome patients who are either demented or nondemented. Significant advances in medical treatment have increased longevity in people with Down syndrome resulting in an increased population that may be subjected to many of the same risk factors as those with Alzheimer's disease. It is well established that harboring one or both apolipoprotein E4 alleles greatly increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, whether apolipoprotein E4 contributes to an earlier onset of dementia or increased mortality in Down syndrome patients is still a matter of debate. The purpose of this mini review is to provide an updated assessment on apolipoprotein E4 status and risk potential of developing dementia and mortality associated with Down syndrome.

  4. Neocortical concentrations of neuropeptides in senile dementia of the Alzheimer and Lewy body type: comparison with Parkinson's disease and severity correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, A; Perry, E K; Perry, R H; Jabeen, S; Fairbairn, A F; McKeith, I G; Ferrier, I N

    1991-02-15

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), somatostatin (SRIF), and arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay in the temporal and occipital cortices in postmortem brain from patients clinically and neuropathologically diagnosed as senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), and Parkinson's disease (PD) and from neurologically normal controls. The concentration of temporal and occipital neocortical CRH was diminished in both SDAT and SDLT compared to control values, whereas SRIF was reduced only in temporal cortex in both these conditions. In contrast, the concentrations of both CRH and SRIF were unaltered in PD. The concentrations of AVP in SDLT, SDAT, and PD were similar to those found in the control groups. The decrement in SRIF, but not CRH, was found to be correlated with some indices of severity of illness in SDAT; a similar but nonsignificant trend for SRIF was observed in SDLT.

  5. Magnetisation transfer measurements of the subcortical grey and white matter in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia and in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, H.; Asano, T.; Sakurai, H.; Takasaki, M.; Shindo, H.; Abe, K.

    2001-01-01

    We measured the magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in the subcortical grey and white matter of 11 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia, six with PD with dementia (PDD), six with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 12 elderly control subjects to assess regional differences in structural brain damage. There were no significant differences in MTR in any region between PD and controls. However, patients with PDD had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical white matter, including the frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum than the controls, whereas PSP had significantly lower MTR in the subcortical grey matter, including the putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus, in addition to the subcortical white matter. This suggests that regional patterns of structural brain damage can be detected using the magnetisation transfer technique. Measurement of MTR in the subcortical grey and white matter may be useful in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. MR tomography in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and Parkinson plus syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hierholzer, J.; Schrag, A.; Cordes, M.; Sander, B.; Schelosky, L.; Harisch, C.; Venz, S.; Keske, U.; Maeurer, J.; Poewe, W.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    To define characteristic MR-findings in patients with clinically typical extrapyramidal movement disorders. 15 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 9 with multisystem atrophy (MSA), and 6 with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) underwent MRI using a 1.5 T. Magnetom unit. Two investigators analysed the images with special regard to global and/or focal atrophy and to changes in signal intensity of the CNS in the consensus mode. Normal images of 10 subjects served as controls to patient's images. In all patients with PSP and MSA characteristic pathological findings on MRI were observed including regional changes within the extrapyramidal nuclei. In contrast all patients with PD had an unremarkable MRI study of the CNS. MRI enables us to define characteristic morphological changes of the brain in patients with extrapyramidal movement disorders. Early recognition of these findings avoids misdiagnoses in patients who are difficult to diagnose. (orig.) [de

  7. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: lessons learnt and lessons remaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D Woodrow; Cohen, Mitchell I

    2017-01-01

    The Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern refers to the electrocardiographic appearance in sinus rhythm, wherein an accessory atrioventricular pathway abbreviates the P-R interval and causes a slurring of the QRS upslope - the "delta wave". It may be asymptomatic or it may be associated with orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia; however, rarely, even in children, it is associated with sudden death due to ventricular fibrillation resulting from a rapid response by the accessory pathway to atrial fibrillation, which itself seems to result from orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia. Historically, patients at risk for sudden death were characterised by the presence of symptoms and a shortest pre- excited R-R interval during induced atrial fibrillation Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern and availability of catheter ablation, there has been a need to identify risk among asymptomatic patients. Recent guidelines recommend invasive evaluation for such patients where pre-excitation clearly does not disappear during exercise testing. This strategy has a high negative predictive value only. The accuracy of this approach is under continued investigation, especially in light of other considerations: Patients having intermittent pre-excitation, once thought to be at minimal risk may not be, and the role of isoproterenol in risk assessment.

  8. A quantitative study of α-synuclein pathology in fifteen cases of dementia associated with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A; Kotzbauer, Paul T; Perlmutter, Joel S; Campbell, Meghan C; Hurth, Kyle M; Schmidt, Robert E; Cairns, Nigel J

    2014-02-01

    The α-synuclein-immunoreactive pathology of dementia associated with Parkinson disease (DPD) comprises Lewy bodies (LB), Lewy neurites (LN), and Lewy grains (LG). The densities of LB, LN, LG together with vacuoles, neurons, abnormally enlarged neurons (EN), and glial cell nuclei were measured in fifteen cases of DPD. Densities of LN and LG were up to 19 and 70 times those of LB, respectively, depending on region. Densities were significantly greater in amygdala, entorhinal cortex (EC), and sectors CA2/CA3 of the hippocampus, whereas middle frontal gyrus, sector CA1, and dentate gyrus were least affected. Low densities of vacuoles and EN were recorded in most regions. There were differences in the numerical density of neurons between regions, but no statistical difference between patients and controls. In the cortex, the density of LB and vacuoles was similar in upper and lower laminae, while the densities of LN and LG were greater in upper cortex. The densities of LB, LN, and LG were positively correlated. Principal components analysis suggested that DPD cases were heterogeneous with pathology primarily affecting either hippocampus or cortex. The data suggest in DPD: (1) ratio of LN and LG to LB varies between regions, (2) low densities of vacuoles and EN are present in most brain regions, (3) degeneration occurs across cortical laminae, upper laminae being particularly affected, (4) LB, LN and LG may represent degeneration of the same neurons, and (5) disease heterogeneity may result from variation in anatomical pathway affected by cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein.

  9. A placebo-controlled study of memantine (Ebixa) in dementia of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustembegović, Avdo; Kundurović, Zlata; Sapcanin, Aida; Sofic, Emin

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the responses of 16 patients to preliminarily explore the spectrum of effectiveness and tolerability of the memantine, and NMDA antagonist, in the treatment of dementia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In this study, for the first time in dementia of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, the response to memantine was assessed. 16 patients with median age of 64 years and median body weight of 77 kg were treated with memantine 10 mg twice daily for up to 28 weeks. Clinical global impressions (CGI), and Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) were performed during the treatment period (after 2, 4, and 28 weeks). Efficacy measures also included the ADCS-Activities of Daily Living scale (ADCS-ADL). At 28 weeks, the ADCS-ADL showed significantly less deterioration in memantine treated patients compared with placebo (-2.3 compared with -4.3: p = 0.005). The results of MMSE demonstrate a significant and clinically relevant benefit for memantine relative to placebo as shown by positive outcomes in cognitive and functional assessments. Memantine (10 mg) was safe and well tolerated. The preliminarily findings of this study with 16 patients suggested that memantine is effective in the treatment of dementia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  10. Parkinsonism in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS): revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Yang, Jin-Chen; Hall, Deborah A; Leehey, Maureen A; Tassone, Flora; Olichney, John M; Hagerman, Randi J; Zhang, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Parkinsonian features have been used as a minor diagnostic criterion for fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). However, prior studies have examined parkinsonism (defined as having bradykinesia with at least rest tremor or postural instability) mostly in premutation carriers without a diagnosis of FXTAS. The current study was intended to elaborate this important aspect of the FXTAS spectrum, and to quantify the relationships between parkinsonism, FXTAS clinical staging and genetic/molecular measures. Thirty eight (38) FXTAS patients and 10 age-matched normal controls underwent a detailed neurological examination that included all but one item (i.e. rigidity) of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The FXTAS patient group displayed substantially higher prevalence of parkinsonian features including body bradykinesia (57%) and rest tremor (26%), compared to the control group. Furthermore, parkinsonism was identified in 29% of FXTAS patients. Across all patients, body bradykinesia scores significantly correlated with FXTAS clinical stage, FMR1 mRNA level, and ataxic gait of cerebellar origin, while postural instability was associated with intention tremor. Parkinsonian features in FXTAS appear to be characterized as bradykinesia concurrent with cerebellar gait ataxia, postural instability accompanied by intention tremor, and frequent rest tremor, representing distinctive patterns that highlight the need for further clinical studies including genetic testing for the FMR1 premutation. The association between FMR1 mRNA level and bradykinesia implicates pathophysiological mechanisms which may link FMR1 mRNA toxicity, dopamine deficiency and parkinsonism in FXTAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracorporeal life support for cardiac arrest in a 13-year-old girl caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-10-01

    Generally, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome presents good prognosis. However, several case reports demonstrated malignant arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death as WPW syndrome's first presentation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using extracorporeal life support is a therapeutic option in refractory cardiac arrest. We present a WPW syndrome patient who had sudden cardiac arrest as the first presentation of the disease and treated it using extracorporeal life support with good neurologic outcome.

  12. Imaging biomarkers in Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonian syndromes: current and emerging concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Usman; Compagnone, Jordana; Aviv, Richard I; Strafella, Antonio P; Black, Sandra E; Lang, Anthony E; Masellis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Two centuries ago in 1817, James Parkinson provided the first medical description of Parkinson's disease, later refined by Jean-Martin Charcot in the mid-to-late 19th century to include the atypical parkinsonian variants (also termed, Parkinson-plus syndromes). Today, Parkinson's disease represents the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with an estimated global prevalence of over 10 million. Conversely, atypical parkinsonian syndromes encompass a group of relatively heterogeneous disorders that may share some clinical features with Parkinson's disease, but are uncommon distinct clinicopathological diseases. Decades of scientific advancements have vastly improved our understanding of these disorders, including improvements in in vivo imaging for biomarker identification. Multimodal imaging for the visualization of structural and functional brain changes is especially important, as it allows a 'window' into the underlying pathophysiological abnormalities. In this article, we first present an overview of the cardinal clinical and neuropathological features of, 1) synucleinopathies: Parkinson's disease and other Lewy body spectrum disorders, as well as multiple system atrophy, and 2) tauopathies: progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. A comprehensive presentation of well-established and emerging imaging biomarkers for each disorder are then discussed. Biomarkers for the following imaging modalities are reviewed: 1) structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using T1, T2, and susceptibility-weighted sequences for volumetric and voxel-based morphometric analyses, as well as MRI derived visual signatures, 2) diffusion tensor MRI for the assessment of white matter tract injury and microstructural integrity, 3) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantifying proton-containing brain metabolites, 4) single photon emission computed tomography for the evaluation of nigrostriatal integrity (as assessed by presynaptic dopamine

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy-induced Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Shingo; Yoshino, Aihide; Takase, Bonpei; Kuwahara, Tatsuro; Tatsuzawa, Yasutaka; Nomura, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by premature ventricular excitation due to the presence of an abnormal accessory pathway. Electrocardiography (ECG) of patients with WPW syndrome portrays a short PR interval and a wide QRS interval with a delta wave. Herein, we report the case of a patient with schizophrenia who developed a wide QRS interval with a delta wave immediately following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Initially, the delta wave disappeared within 2 days after ECT. However, the duration of the delta wave increased exponentially to 4 months when ECT was repeated. Although the patient's cardiocirculatory dynamics remained normal, we continued to monitor her ECG until the delta wave disappeared because WPW syndrome can lead to serious arrhythmia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sugammadex Use in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sevtap Hekimoğlu; Öztekin, İlhan; Kuzucuoğlu, Aytuna; Aslanoğlu, Ayça

    2015-07-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a disease associated with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular pre-excitation or atrial fibrillation. WPW is characterized by an aberrant electrical conduction pathway between atria and ventricles. The major anesthetic problem connected with WPW syndrome is the risk of tachyarrhythmias due to accessory pathway. Therefore, it has been proposed that the aim of anesthetic management should be the avoidance of tachyarrhythmia and sympathetic stimulation. Sugammadex was administered as a neuromuscular reversal agent in this case. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of sugammadex use in a patient with WPW. This report presents a case of general anesthesia management in a patient with WPW syndrome. We think that it is appropriate to use sugammadex to reverse rocuronium for the prevention of sudden hemodynamic changes in patients with WPW who underwent general anesthesia.

  15. Phase analysis of regional and global ventricular contraction patterns in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Ichikawa, Takehiko

    1989-01-01

    Multigated blood pool scintigraphy was performed in 20 normal subjects and 39 patients with various intraventricular conduction abnormalities, including 25 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Cardiac imaging was performed in the modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique, and left lateral projections. In WPW syndrome, early contraction sites which were not seen in normal subjects were detected at the ventricular base in phase images. These anomalous early contraction sites disappeared after successful suppression of conduction through an accessory pathway by intravenous procainamide. These sites are believed to correspond to the location of the bundle of Kent and were consistent with the electrocardiographic findings. Phase mapping is a suitable noninvasive method to locate the position of the bundle of Kent and evaluate the ventricular contraction pattern in WPW syndrome and other intraventricular conduction abnormalities. (author)

  16. Sugammadex Use in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevtap Hekimoğlu Şahin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is a disease associated with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular pre-excitation or atrial fibrillation. WPW is characterized by an aberrant electrical conduction pathway between atria and ventricles. Case Report: The major anesthetic problem connected with WPW syndrome is the risk of tachyarrhythmias due to accessory pathway. Therefore, it has been proposed that the aim of anesthetic management should be the avoidance of tachyarrhythmia and sympathetic stimulation. Sugammadex was administered as a neuromuscular reversal agent in this case. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of sugammadex use in a patient with WPW. This report presents a case of general anesthesia management in a patient with WPW syndrome. Conclusion: We think that it is appropriate to use sugammadex to reverse rocuronium for the prevention of sudden hemodynamic changes in patients with WPW who underwent general anesthesia.

  17. The use of sugammadex in a pregnant patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Turker; Saracoglu, Ayten; Sener, Sibel; Bezen, Olgac

    2016-09-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a rare pre-excitation syndrome which develops when atrioventricular conduction occurs through a pathologic accessory pathway known as the bundle of Kent instead of atrioventricular node, hence resulting in tachycardia. Patients with WPW syndrome may experience various symptoms arising from mild-to-moderate chest disease, palpitations, hypotension, and severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction. These patients are most often symptomatic because of cardiac arrhythmias. In this case report, we present an uneventful anesthetic management of a pregnant patient with WPW syndrome undergoing cesarean delivery. A 23-year-old American Society of Anesthesiologists class 2 pregnant patient was diagnosed with WPW syndrome. Her preoperative 12-lead electrocardiogram showed a sinus rhythm at 82 beats per minute, a delta wave, and a short PR interval. After an uneventful surgery, sugammadex 2mg/kg was administered as a reversal agent instead of neostigmine. Then she was discharged to her obstetrics service. Serious hemodynamic disorders may occur in patients with WPW syndrome due to development of fatal arrhythmias. Neostigmine used as a reversal agent in general anesthesia can trigger such fatal arrhythmias by leading changes in cardiac conduction. We believe that sugammadex, which is safely used in many areas in the scope of clinical practice, can be also used for patients diagnosed with WPW syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Case of Morvan Syndrome Mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis With Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Brin; Maddali, Manoj; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Morvan syndrome is a rare autoimmune/paraneoplastic disorder involving antibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel complex. It is defined by subacute encephalopathy, neuromuscular hyperexcitability, dysautonomia, and sleep disturbance. It may present a diagnostic dilemma when trying to differentiate from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with frontotemporal dementia. A 76-year-old man with a history of untreated prostate adenocarcinoma was evaluated for subacute cognitive decline, diffuse muscle cramps, and hyponatremia. MRI demonstrated atrophy most prominent in the frontal and temporal regions. Electromyography (EMG) demonstrated diffuse myokymia/neuromyotonia. Polysomnography lacked REM and N3 sleep. Paraneoplastic panel detected antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel complex (CASPR2 subtype). It is difficult to differentiate between Morvan syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with frontotemporal dementia with examination and neuroimaging alone. There may be a link between Morvan syndrome and prostate adenocarcinoma which could help with screening/diagnosis. The authors found that laboratory and neurophysiological tests are indispensable in diagnosing and treating Morvan syndrome.

  19. Mutation of Mitochondrial DNA G13513A Presenting with Leigh Syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA G13513A, encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS and Leigh syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome and optic atrophy were reported in a high proportion of patients with this mutation. We report an 18-month-old girl, with an 11-month history of psychomotor regression who was diagnosed with WPW syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, in association with Leigh syndrome. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10, thiamine and carnitine prevented further regression in gross motor function but the patient's heart function deteriorated and dilated cardiomyopathy developed 11 months later. She was found to have a mutation of mtDNA G13513A. We suggest that mtDNA G13513A mutation is an important factor in patients with Leigh syndrome associated with WPW syndrome and/or optic atrophy, and serial heart function monitoring by echocardiography is recommended in this group of patients.

  20. An Intron 7 Polymorphism in APP Affects the Age of Onset of Dementia in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available People with Down syndrome (DS develop Alzheimer's disease (AD with an early age of onset. A tetranucleotide repeat, attt5−8, in intron 7 of the amyloid precursor protein has been associated with the age of onset of AD in DS in a preliminary study. The authors examine the impact of this polymorphism in a larger cohort of individuals with DS. Adults with DS were genotyped for attt5−8 and APOE. The results were analysed with respect to the age of onset of dementia. The presence of three copies of the six-repeat allele resulted in onset of dementia seven years earlier than in the presence of other genotypes. Further study is essential to elucidate the mechanism by which this polymorphism functions, with an exciting opportunity to identify novel treatment targets relevant for people with DS and AD.

  1. Differentiating fasciculoventricular pathway from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome by electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tsugutoshi; Nakamura, Yoshihide; Yoshida, Shuichiro; Yoshida, Yoko; Shintaku, Haruo

    2014-04-01

    In school-based cardiovascular screening programs in Japan, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is diagnosed based on the presence of an electrocardiographic (ECG) delta wave without differentiation from the fasciculoventricular pathway (FVP), although the risk of sudden death is associated only with the former. The purpose of this study was to differentiate FVP patients among children diagnosed with WPW syndrome by ECG. Children who were diagnosed with WPW syndrome through school screening between April 2006 and March 2008 and had QRS width ≤120 ms were included. Patients with asthma and/or coronary heart disease were excluded. FVP and WPW syndrome were differentiated based on ECG responses to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) injection. Age, PR interval, QRS width, and Rosenbaum classification were compared among patients. Thirty patients (median age 12.7 years, range 6.5-15.7 years) participated in the study. FVP was diagnosed in 23 patients (76.7%), and WPW syndrome in 7 (23.3%). In Rosenbaum type A patients, all six patients had WPW syndrome, whereas FVP was diagnosed in 23 of 24 and WPW syndrome was diagnosed in 1 of 24 of type B patients. Age, PR interval, and QRS width were not significantly different between the two conditions. ATP stress test was reliable in differentiating FVP from WPW syndrome. Although FVP is considered rare, the results of our study indicate that many WPW syndrome patients with QRS width ≤120 ms may actually have FVP. Patients categorized as type B are more likely to have FVP, whereas type A patients are most likely to have WPW syndrome. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Published by Heart Rhythm Society All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal Anaesthesia is Safe in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Undergoing Evacuation of Molar Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviseti, Pravalika; Pujari, Vinayak S

    2016-02-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an uncommon cardiac condition where there is an abnormal band of atrial tissue connecting atria and ventricles which can electrically bypass atrioventricular node. The anaesthetic management in these patients is challenging as life threatening complications can occur perioperatively like paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation. Also, regional anaesthetic technique like subarachnoid block is a safe and cost effective alternative to general anaesthesia as it avoids polypharmacy. We report the successful anaesthetic management of Wolff Parkinson White syndrome in a primi with hydatiform mole posted for suction and evacuation.

  3. There is no Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, William J

    2008-06-01

    The term Parkinson disease defines a specific clinical condition characterized by a typical history and characteristic signs. This review examines the historical evolution of the concept of Parkinson disease and how the misunderstanding of Parkinson disease may be hindering clinical research trials. It is proposed that this syndrome be called Parkinson diseases or parkinsonism type 1 through infinity.

  4. Demência na doença de Parkinson: avaliação crítica da literatura Dementia in Parkinson's disease: a critical review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Abreu e Lima Pamplona

    1996-12-01

    momento, não reconhece agentes eficazes.In the last 30 years, Parkinson's disease has been object of great progress. The majority of patients reaches a longer life with quality because of the modern therapeutic approach. However, dementia that can occur in the evolutive process, has its neuropathology not completelly defined until now. There are lesions in the basal ganglia, in the ventral area of the mesencephalic tegmentum, in the thalamus, in the substantia nigra and in the frontal cortex. The presence of Lewy bodies in the cortex is associated with dementia, in the same way that the anatomopathological features of Alzheimer's disease, in many cases. Dementia should have a multifactorial basis. Different types of neurotransmitters, like serotonin, acetylcholine and dopamine, or even hormones, like Cortisol, may be altered in a great number of demented parkinsonians. Depression, found in up to 40% of patients, have been related as a risk factor for dementia, present approximatelly in 25% of cases. Studies in this area are still conflicting, with some confirming the relation among depression, cortical atrophy, hypercortisolemia and Parkinson's disease. Neuropsychologic studies show that the dementia in Parkinson's disease is of subcortical type. It is also known that parkinsonians, even those without cognitive deficiencies clinically significant, present deficits if submitted to more detailed neuropsychological tests. It is assumed, so, that cognitive impairments are intrinsic to the disease, varying its expression among patients. Dementia shall be diagnosed based on the criteria established in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders of the American Psychiatry Association, as well as computed tomography and magnetic resonance. For treatment, parkinsonian dementia does not recognize efficacious agents until now.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... con todos los presentadores Dealing with Dementia Why Dance for PD? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for ... Is the Helpline? Unconditional Love How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 2 What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Is Patient-Centered Care? Hallucinations and Delusions Dealing with Dementia CareMAP: Medicamentos ...

  7. Anaesthetic management of a case of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitri D Kabade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fibroid uterus with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in a 48-year-old female, posted for elective hysterectomy. Patient gave history of short recurrent episodes of palpitation and electrocardiograph confirmed the diagnosis of WPW syndrome. The anaesthetic management of these patients is challenging as they are known to develop life threatening tachyarrhythmia like paroxysmal supra-ventricular tachycardia (PSVT and atrial fibrillation (AF. Epidural anaesthesia is preferred compared to general anaesthesia to avoid polypharmacy, noxious stimuli of laryngoscopy and intubation. To deal with perioperative complications like PSVT and AF, anti-arrhythmic drugs like adenosine, beta blockers and defibrillator should be kept ready. Perioperative monitoring is essential as patients can develop complications.

  8. Depression masquerading as chest pain in a patient with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabushi, Rajashree; Agarwal, Anil; Gautam, Sujeet K S; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Wolff Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome is a condition in which there is an aberrant conduction pathway between the atria and ventricles, resulting in tachycardia. A 42-year-old patient, who was treated for WPW syndrome previously, presented with chronic somatic pain. With her cardiac condition in mind, she was thoroughly worked up for a recurrence of disease. As part of routine screening of all patients at our pain clinic, she was found to have severe depression as per the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ–9) criteria. After ruling out sinister causes, she was treated for depression using oral Duloxetine and counselling. This led to resolution of symptoms, and improved her mood and functional capability. This case highlights the use of psychological screening tools and diligent examination in scenarios as confusing as the one presented here. Addressing the psychological aspects of pain and adopting a holistic approach are as important as treatment of the primary pathology. PMID:27738505

  9. Effect of atrial pacing on phase analysis in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magosaki, Nobuhisa; Hiroe, Michiaki; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Etsuko; Horie, Toshinobu; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kondo, Mizuka; Hirosawa, Koshichiro

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis of ECG-gated radionuclide ventriculography was performed during sinus rhythm and atrial pacing for 11 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. During sinus rhythm, phase analysis demonstrated abnormal early-emptying segments reflecting preexcitation in six of the 11 patients. In the remaining five patients, the precise site of abnormal early-emptying could not be detected. Atrial pacing increased the degree of pre-exicitation, and abnormal early-emptying segments became clear in all patients. Our study demonstrated the utility of atrial pacing in performing phase analysis for patients with the WPW syndrome. Seven patients had abnormal early-emptying segments; four of them with ECG type A, in the left ventricle, and three of them with ECG type B, in the right ventricle. These results were consistent with results of the body surface and electrophysiologic mapping. In patients with posterior septal accessory pathways, phase analysis suggested probable laterality of the accessory pathway. (author)

  10. Duplication of 20p12.3 associated with familial Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kimberly I; Anderson, Jacqueline; Levy, Philip T; Cole, F Sessions; Silva, Jennifer N A; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is caused by preexcitation of the ventricular myocardium via an accessory pathway which increases the risk for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The condition is often sporadic and of unknown etiology in the majority of cases. Autosomal dominant inheritance and association with congenital heart defects or ventricular hypertrophy were described. Microdeletions of 20p12.3 have been associated with WPW syndrome with either cognitive dysfunction or Alagille syndrome. Here, we describe the association of 20p12.3 duplication with WPW syndrome in a patient who presented with non-immune hydrops. Her paternal uncle carries the duplication and has attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and electrocardiographic findings consistent with WPW. The 769 kb duplication was detected by the Affymetrix Whole Genome-Human SNP Array 6.0 and encompasses two genes and the first two exons of a third gene. We discuss the potential role of the genes in the duplicated region in the pathogenesis of WPW and possible neurobehavioral abnormalities. Our data provide additional support for a significant role of 20p12.3 chromosomal rearrangements in the etiology of WPW syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Accuracy of algorithms to predict accessory pathway location in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Christopher; Vogel, Melanie; Lord, Stephen; Abrams, Dominic; Bourke, John; Rees, Philip; Rosenthal, Eric

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy in predicting pathway location in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome for each of seven published algorithms. ECGs from 100 consecutive children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome undergoing electrophysiological study were analysed by six investigators using seven published algorithms, six of which had been developed in adult patients. Accuracy and concordance of predictions were adjusted for the number of pathway locations. Accessory pathways were left-sided in 49, septal in 20 and right-sided in 31 children. Overall accuracy of prediction was 30-49% for the exact location and 61-68% including adjacent locations. Concordance between investigators varied between 41% and 86%. No algorithm was better at predicting septal pathways (accuracy 5-35%, improving to 40-78% including adjacent locations), but one was significantly worse. Predictive accuracy was 24-53% for the exact location of right-sided pathways (50-71% including adjacent locations) and 32-55% for the exact location of left-sided pathways (58-73% including adjacent locations). All algorithms were less accurate in our hands than in other authors' own assessment. None performed well in identifying midseptal or right anteroseptal accessory pathway locations.

  12. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis: an Uncommon Coincidence that can Cause Severe Hemodynamic Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Taha Alper

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of rheumatic mitral stenosis and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a rare situation. In this case, we are reporting an 72-year-old man presenting with multi-organ failure due to the this combination and successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation during preexcitated atrial fibrillation.

  13. Digital 3D reconstruction of two parahissian accessory bundles in a case of Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffen, C.; Schaepman, M.E.; Hardmeier, T.; Schweitzer, W.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of digitized histological serial sections of the cardiac conduction system yielded two accessory pathways in a case of a 24-day-old male infant who died after a short period of illness with ECG findings of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. In infants, the differential

  14. Probable association of tachyarrhythmia with nebulized albuterol in a child with previously subclinical wolff Parkinson white syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Maseland, M.; Smal, J.; Reimer, A.; van Setten, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 2-year-old asthmatic boy with atrioventricular (AV)-reentry tachycardia following albuterol inhalation, who was later diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score for this adverse event was 7, indicating that

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis: an Uncommon Coincidence that can Cause Severe Hemodynamic Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Ahmet Taha; Hasdemir, Hakan; Akyol, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    The combination of rheumatic mitral stenosis and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a rare situation. In this case, we are reporting an 72-year-old man presenting with multi-organ failure due to the this combination and successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation during preexcitated atrial fibrillation. PMID:18982140

  16. [Behavioral impairments in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Kenichi

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral impairments in parkinsonian patients include agitation, hypersexuality, stereotypic movement, pathological gambling, abuse of antiparkinsonian drugs, REM sleep behavioral disorder, and restless legs syndrome. Dementia, psychoses, and emotional disorders, such as depression and anxiety/panic disorder, also impair behavior. Symptoms may be produced by dysfunction of the central nervous system, medication, and/or the psychosocial problems associated with Parkinson's disease. Treatment therefore should be based on the cause of the symptoms seen. In some cases, the reduction or change of antiparkinsonian drugs, or both, may be effective. Treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, including motor fluctuations, may reduce the risk of panic attacks being evoked in the 'off' period. Use of antidepressants, sedatives, and neuroleptics may often be effective. Physicians should identify the causes of the symptoms of behavioral impairment and select appropriate treatments.

  17. Functional Neuroimaging in Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Papma (Janne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDementia refers to a clinical syndrome of cognitive deterioration and difficulty in the performance of activities of daily living. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), followed by vascular dementia (VaD) at old age and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) at young

  18. Embodying Emotional Disorders: New Hypotheses about Possible Emotional Consequences of Motor Disorders in Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mermillod, Martial; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Jalenques, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Niedenthal, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS) lead to important motor disorders among patients such as possible facial amimia in PD and tics in Tourette's syndrome. Under the grounded cognition framework that shows the importance of motor embodiment in emotional feeling (Niedenthal, 2007), both types of pathology with motor symptoms should be sufficient to induce potential impairments for these patients when recognizing emotional facial expressions (EFE). In this opinion paper, we des...

  19. Imaging dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  20. Imaging dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M.

    2001-01-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  1. Effectiveness of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression and Cotard’s Syndrome in a Patient with Frontotemporal Lobe Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of psychogeriatrics, the differential diagnosis of depression and dementia, as well as the treatment of depression and comorbid dementia, is an important issue. In this paper, the authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with Cotard’s syndrome and frontotemporal dementia (FTD who was admitted to a psychiatric hospital with delusions of negation accompanied by depressive symptoms. Pharmacotherapy over a 2-year hospitalization was unsuccessful, and she was subsequently transferred to our university hospital. A total of 18 sessions of electroconvulsive therapy released her from psychomotor inhibition, appetite loss, and Cotard’s delusions. The indication for electroconvulsive therapy in patients with dementia is discussed.

  2. Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaudhuri, K. Ray

    2009-01-01

    ... dysfunction of Parkinson's disease 95 Daisy L. Whitehead and Richard. G. Brown 9 Depression, anxiety and apathy in Parkinson's disease 107 David A. Gallagher and Anette Schrag 10 Dementia in Pa...

  3. Automatic extraction of the cingulum bundle in diffusion tensor tract-specific analysis. Feasibility study in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kenji; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Yuichi; Ino, Kenji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kamagata, Koji; Yasmin, Hasina; Aoki, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Tract-specific analysis (TSA) measures diffusion parameters along a specific fiber that has been extracted by fiber tracking using manual regions of interest (ROIs), but TSA is limited by its requirement for manual operation, poor reproducibility, and high time consumption. We aimed to develop a fully automated extraction method for the cingulum bundle (CB) and to apply the method to TSA in neurobehavioral disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We introduce the voxel classification (VC) and auto diffusion tensor fiber-tracking (AFT) methods of extraction. The VC method directly extracts the CB, skipping the fiber-tracking step, whereas the AFT method uses fiber tracking from automatically selected ROIs. We compared the results of VC and AFT to those obtained by manual diffusion tensor fiber tracking (MFT) performed by 3 operators. We quantified the Jaccard similarity index among the 3 methods in data from 20 subjects (10 normal controls [NC] and 10 patients with Parkinson's disease dementia [PDD]). We used all 3 extraction methods (VC, AFT, and MFT) to calculate the fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the anterior and posterior CB for 15 NC subjects, 15 with PD, and 15 with PDD. The Jaccard index between results of AFT and MFT, 0.72, was similar to the inter-operator Jaccard index of MFT. However, the Jaccard indices between VC and MFT and between VC and AFT were lower. Consequently, the VC method classified among 3 different groups (NC, PD, and PDD), whereas the others classified only 2 different groups (NC, PD or PDD). For TSA in Parkinson's disease, the VC method can be more useful than the AFT and MFT methods for extracting the CB. In addition, the results of patient data analysis suggest that a reduction of FA in the posterior CB may represent a useful biological index for monitoring PD and PDD. (author)

  4. PRKAG3 polymorphisms associated with sporadic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome among a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Ken-Pen; Yuh, Yeong-Seng; Huang, Shih-Hui; Hsiao, Hsiang-Chiang; Wu, Huang-Wei; Chien, Jen-Hung; Chen, Bo-Hau; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chien, Kuang-Jen; Ger, Luo-Ping

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether mutation in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) subunit genes (PRKAG3-230) is associated with sporadic, isolated Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. This study consisted of 87 patients with symptomatic WPW syndrome and 93 healthy controls. PRKAG3-230 genotypes were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Genotype and allele frequencies of PRKAG3-230 between patients with WPW syndrome and healthy controls were ascertained using chi-square test or Fisher exact test when appropriate. PRKAG3-230 were genotyped in 87 patients (53 men and 34 women; age=24.4±18.0 years) with WPW syndrome and 93 healthy controls (57 men and 36 women; age=16.8±4.2 years). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age and sex. The patients with CG and CG+CC genotypes had a significantly increased risk of WPW syndrome compared with those with GG genotype [odds ratio (OR)=1.99, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.01-3.89, p=0.045; OR=1.99, 95% CI=1.04-3.78, p=0.037, respectively]. The allelic types were not associated with the risk of WPW syndrome. The patients with manifest type with CG and CG+CC genotypes had a significantly increased risk of WPW syndrome compared with those with GG genotype (OR=2.86, 95% CI=1.16-7.05, p=0.022; OR=2.84, 95% CI=1.19-6.80, p=0.019, respectively). The patients with right-side accessory pathways with CG and CG+CC genotypes had a significantly increased risk of WPW syndrome compared with those with GG genotype (OR=3.07, 95% CI=1.25-7.51, p=0.014; OR=2.84, 95% CI=1.19-6.80, p=0.019, respectively). The allelic types were not associated with the risk of WPW types and locations. This study shows that PRKAG3-230 may be associated with sporadic WPW syndrome among a Taiwanese population. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the role of mutations in AMPK subunit genes other than PRKAG3-230 in sporadic WPW syndrome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  5. Lewy body dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Korbo, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia share the same pathophysiology. Together they are called Lewy body dementias and are the second most common type of dementia. Lewy body dementias receive little attention, and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal...... management. In this article, diagnostic criteria combined with imaging and other biomarkers as well as current treatment recommendations are summarized, and some of the challenges for the future are outlined. Refinement of diagnosis and clarification of the pathogenesis are required in search for disease...

  6. Embodying Emotional Disorders: New Hypotheses about Possible Emotional Consequences of Motor Disorders in Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod, Martial; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Jalenques, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Niedenthal, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS) lead to important motor disorders among patients such as possible facial amimia in PD and tics in Tourette's syndrome. Under the grounded cognition framework that shows the importance of motor embodiment in emotional feeling (Niedenthal, 2007), both types of pathology with motor symptoms should be sufficient to induce potential impairments for these patients when recognizing emotional facial expressions (EFE). In this opinion paper, we describe a theoretical framework that assumes potential emotional disorders in Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome based on motor disorders characterizing these two pathologies. We also review different methodological barriers in previous experimental designs that could enable the identification of emotional facial expressions despite emotional disorders in PD and TS.

  7. Anosognosia for cognitive and behavioral symptoms in Parkinson's disease with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment: Frequency and neuropsychological/neuropsychiatric correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfei, Maria Donata; Assogna, Francesca; Pellicano, Clelia; Pontieri, Francesco Ernesto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2018-04-17

    Anosognosia is a multidimensional phenomenon with detrimental effects on patients' illness course, therapy compliance and quality of life. We aimed at investigating anosognosia for cognitive and behavioral symptoms in Parkinson's Disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) and, for the first time, in PD with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI-PD). Community dwelling subjects (47 mild PDD, 136 multidomain MCI-PD (mdMCI-PD), 5 single domain MCI-PD (sdMCI-PD), and 197 PD without cognitive impairment (noCI-PD) were enrolled in a cross-sectional design study. All the subjects were administered the Anosognosia Questionnaire for Dementia, the Mental Deterioration Battery and a number of neuropsychiatric inventories. A diagnosis of anosognosia was made in 36% of patients with mild PDD and 16% with mdMCI-PD, whether it was negligible in sdMCI-PD and noCI-PD. Higher severity of anosognosia for cognitive impairment was also found in PDD and in mdMCI-PD. SdMCI-PD had the lower severity of anosognosia for cognitive impairment. Higher anosognosia for cognitive impairment was associated to lower depression in noCI-PD (r = -0.227, p = 0.0013) and mdMCI-PD (r = -0.266, p = 0.0016), and to reduced hedonic tone in noCI-PD (r = -0.191, p = 0.0071). Greater anosognosia was associated to lower executive performances in PDD (r = 0.424, p = 0.0074). Anosognosia for non-motor symptoms is frequent in PD patients with mild dementia or mdMCI. Results confirm the role of neuropsychiatric characteristics in anosognosia also in PD, the high prevalence of anosognosia in neurodegenerative illnesses and suggest a common pathogenic path for anosognosia in different neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Down Syndrome (BPSD-DS) Scale : Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathology in Down Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Alain D; Sacco, Silvia; Carfi, Angelo; Benejam, Bessy; Vermeiren, Yannick; Beugelsdijk, Gonny; Schippers, Mieke; Hassefras, Lyanne; Eleveld, José; Grefelman, Sharina; Fopma, Roelie; Bomer-Veenboer, Monique; Boti, Mariángeles; Oosterling, G Danielle E; Scholten, Esther; Tollenaere, Marleen; Checkley, Laura; Strydom, André; Van Goethem, Gert; Onder, Graziano; Blesa, Rafael; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Coppus, Antonia M W; Rebillat, Anne-Sophie; Fortea, Juan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2018-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are prone to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are core features, but have not been comprehensively evaluated in DS. In a European multidisciplinary study, the novel Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of

  9. [Evaluation of the radiofrequency ablation effectiveness in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, I B; Ardashev, A V; Ardashev, V N; Voronkov, Iu I; Sharoĭko, M V; Akimova, O S

    2012-01-01

    A one-year prospective study involved 22 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and 20 healthy people. Means age of patients was 34.3 +/- 16.3 years. All 22 patients were successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of additional pathways. RFA effectiveness was evaluated with the help of clinical questionnaire, data of ECG, EchoCG, heart rate variability (HRV), frequency response and nonlinear dynamics. Cardiac rhythm disturbances were verified using Holter monitoring applied to all patients. Positive clinical effect was achieved in all the WPW patients, as RFA arrested cardiac arrhythmias completely. Holter monitoring did not register cardiac disturbances which points to high RFA effectiveness in WPW patients. HRV, frequency response and nonlinear dynamics reassumed their normal patterns.

  10. Toxic adenoma of the thyroid gland and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naço, M; Çeliku, E; Llukaçaj, A; Shehaj, J; Kameniku, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with toxic adenoma scheduled for surgery right lobectomy and isthmectomy of thyroid gland. During the examination before surgery, patient was diagnosed for the first time as having with Wolff – Parkinson – White (WPW) syndrome. In the operating room, after the induction of anesthesia, the electrocardiogram showed wide QRS complex tachycardia with a rate of 180 beats/min, which was diagnosed as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The patient was treated immediately with antiarrhythmic drugs: adenosine iv three times (at doses of 6 mg, 12mg, 12mg bolus) and esmolol iv twice (at doses 28.5 mg). This approach resulted in disappearance of the delta wave and tachycardia for the whole surgery period. In this case report we discuss the role of induction of anesthesia and presence of toxic adenoma in a patient with WPW. PMID:19561784

  11. Is isoproterenol really required during electrophysiological study in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauriah, Maheshwar; Cismaru, Gabriel; Sellal, Jean-Marc; De Chillou, Christian; Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the results of electrophysiological study (EPS) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and spontaneous adverse clinical presentation and determined whether isoproterenol added incremental value. EPS was performed in 63 patients with WPW and adverse clinical presentation at baseline. EPS was repeated after infusion of isoproterenol in 37 patients, including 25 without criteria for a malignant form at baseline. Atrioventricular orthodromic tachycardia was induced 44%, antidromic tachycardia in 11%, atrial fibrillation (AF) in 68% at baseline. At baseline EPS, criteria for a malignant form (AF induction and shortest CL <250 ms) were noted in 60%; tachycardia was not inducible in 16%. All the patients met the criteria for a malignant form after isoproterenol. EPS at baseline missed 16% of patients at risk of life-threatening arrhythmias who had no inducible tachyarrhythmia and 40% without classical criteria for malignant form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Restless legs syndrome in Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and biochemical correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Machado Guerreiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological disorder that responds to dopaminergic drugs, indicating a common pathophysiology with Parkinson's disease (PD. The prevalence of RLS was estimated in a group of PD patients and its clinical and biochemical characteristics were analysed. Forty-eight patients with PD were evaluated into two groups, with and without RLS. Clinical characteristics assessed in both groups were age, gender, duration of PD, Hoehn and Yahr, and Schwab and England scales. Laboratory variables such as hemoglobin, s-iron, s-ferritin and creatinine were obtained. The prevalence of RLS was 18.75%. No significant differences regarding clinical variables and biochemical parameters were observed. The high prevalence of RLS found in PD patients suggests the concept of a common etiological link and it seems that secondary causes did not play a central role in the pathophysiology of RLS in this group of parkinsonian patients.

  13. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Exercise testing in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: what is its value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili, M; Vahidshahi, K; Aarabi-Moghaddam, M Y; Rao, J Y; Brugada, P

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of exercise testing for predicting accessory pathway characteristics in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The study enrolled 37 children with WPW syndrome and candidates for invasive electrophysiologic study (EPS). Exercise testing was performed for all the study participants before the invasive study. Data from the invasive EPS were compared with findings from the exercise testing. The sudden disappearance of the delta (Δ) wave was seen in 10 cases (27 %). No significant correlation was found between the Δ wave disappearance and the antegrade effective refractory period of the accessory pathway (AERP-AP) or the shortest pre-excited RR interval (SPERRI). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of Δ wave disappearance, based on AERP-AP as gold standard, were respectively 29.4, 80, 71.4, and 40 %. The corresponding values with SPERRI as the gold standard were respectively 23.8, 71.4, 71.4 and 23.8 %. Exercise testing has a medium to low rate of accuracy in detecting low-risk WPW syndrome patients in the pediatric age group.

  15. Accessory pathway location affects brain natriuretic peptide level in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Yosuke; Kumagai, Koji; Naito, Shigeto; Nakamura, Kohki; Minami, Kentaro; Nakano, Masahiro; Sasaki, Takehito; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Oshima, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the accessory pathway location and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. We divided 102 WPW syndrome patients with normal left ventricular systolic function into four groups: those with manifest right (MR, n = 14), manifest septal (MS, n = 11), manifest left (ML, n = 30), and concealed (C, n = 47) accessory pathways. BNP level and electrophysiological properties, including difference in timing of the ventricular electrogram between the His bundle area and the distal coronary sinus area (His-CS delay), which indicate intraventricular dyssynchrony, were compared. BNP levels (pg/dl) were higher in the MR and MS groups than in the ML and C groups (MR, 64 ± 58; MS, 55 ± 45; ML, 17 ± 15; C, 25 ± 21; P syndrome patients with normal cardiac function.

  16. POLYMORPHISMS OF ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE GENE AS PREDICTORS OF WOLFF-PARKINSON-WHITE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Matyushin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The discovery of new genetic predictors of cardiovascular diseases can be used in predicting and diagnosing latent forms of the disease. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW occurs in all age groups  and detected in 1-30 people per 10000, it manifests mainly in young age (on average 20 years, and the risk of sudden cardiac death is higher than in general population.Aim. To study the relationship of WPW syndrome with the polymorphism of endothelial nitric synthase gene (NOS3, and to identify genetic predictors of this syndrome.Material and methods. The study included 51 people with ECG proven WPW syndrome and 153 people with no cardiovascular disease. The patients were divided into subgroups according to sex: 21 women, 30 men. All patients underwent a standard cardiac examination (anamnesis, electrocardiography, echocardiography, bicycle ergometry, transesophageal electrical stimulation of the atria, Holter monitoring and blood was taken for molecular genetic testing of DNA.Results. The results showed a statistically significant prevalence of rare genotype 4b\\4b NOS3 gene in the control group of women (16.3%; р<0.05 compared with women from the main group, who did not have this genotype, while there was significant prevalence of genotype 4a\\4a in the main group of women (81.0%; р<0.05 compared with women from the control group.  In men this prevalence was not found.Conclusion. The presence of genotype 4b\\4b NOS3 gene reduces the likelihood of WPW syndrome and its symptoms in females. In men,  this prevalence is not found, presumably, in connection with some mechanisms of hormonal regulation. The results can be used in the genetic prediction of the course of the disease.

  17. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  18. FDG PET imaging dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia

  19. Malnutrition is associated with dementia severity and geriatric syndromes in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Demet; Büyükkoyuncu Pekel, Nilüfer; Kiliç, Ahmet Kasim; Tolgay, Elif Nalan; Tufan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to screen for malnutrition and geriatric syndromes and seek their associations in patients with AD. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) tests were applied. Mean daily oral fluid intake was assessed according to patients' and relatives' declarations. Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 79 ± 7.4 years were included. Most of the patients had mild or moderate dementia. Malnutrition was associated with increased rates of hospitalization and falls, dysphagia, insomnia, agitation, delusions, hallucinations, immobility, and incontinence. A daily fluid intake of immobility, falls, and increased hospitalization risk in these patients. Daily oral fluid intake may be a practical tool in the screening of malnutrition.

  20. Early repolarization in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: prevalence and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumaki, Koichi; Nishida, Kunihiro; Iwamoto, Jotaro; Nakatani, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Tamotsu; Tsuneda, Takayuki; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sakabe, Masao; Fujiki, Akira

    2011-08-01

    Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) with early repolarization (ER) has recently been reported; however, ER is a common finding in healthy subjects and is also found sporadically in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The present study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of ER in patients with WPW syndrome. One hundred and eleven patients with WPW syndrome were studied retrospectively. Early repolarization was defined as QRS slurring or notching with J-point elevation ≥ 1 mm. The prevalence of ER was determined before and after successful catheter ablation. Before ablation, ER was found in 35 of 75 patients with a left free wall, 6 of 23 with a right free wall, and 7 of 13 with a septal accessory pathway (48 of 111, 43% as a whole). Early repolarization was always observed in leads with positive deflection of the initial part of the delta wave. After successful ablation of accessory pathways, ER was preserved in 28 (25%), disappeared in 20 (18%), and newly developed in 8 (7%) patients. In the remaining 55 (50%) patients, ER was not observed either before or after ablation. In patients with persistent ER, the amplitude and width of ER were significantly decreased 3-7 days after the ablation (1.7 ± 0.7 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6 mm, P syndrome, ER could be partly related to early depolarization through the accessory pathway. However, persistent ER and new ER appearing after the ablation were frequently found. Therefore, in these patients, mechanisms other than early depolarization may be involved in the genesis of ER.

  1. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Ventricular Hypertrophy in a Brazilian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steld, Lenises de Paula; Campuzano, Oscar; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Moura de Barros Zamorano, Mabel; Sousa Matos, Selma; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-07-10

    BACKGROUND PRKAG2 syndrome diagnosis is already well-defined as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), ventricular hypertrophy (VH) due to glycogen accumulation, and conduction system disease (CSD). Because of its rarity, there is a lack of literature focused on the treatment. The present study aimed to describe appropriate strategies for the treatment of affected family members with PRKAG2 syndrome with a long follow-up period. CASE REPORT We studied 60 selected individuals from 84 family members (32 males, 53.3%) (mean age 27±16 years). Patients with WPW and/or VH were placed in a group of 18 individuals, in which 11 (61.1%) had VH and WPW, 6 (33.3%) had isolated WPW, and 1 (5.6%) had isolated VH. Palpitations occurred in 16 patients (88.9%), chest pain in 11 (61.1%), dizziness in 13 (72.2%), syncope in 15 (83.3%), and dyspnea in 13 (72%). Sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurred in 2 (11.1%), and 2 patients with cardiac arrest (CA) had asystole and pre-excited atrial flutter-fibrillation (AFL and AF) as the documented mechanism. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and learning/language disabilities with delayed development were observed. Genetic analysis identified a new missense pathogenic variant (p.K290I) in the PRKAG2 gene. Cardiac histopathology demonstrated the predominance of vacuoles containing glycogen derivative and fibrosis. The treatment was based on hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) control, antiarrhythmic drugs (AD), anticoagulation, and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RCA). Six patients (33.3%) underwent pacemaker implantation (PM). CONCLUSIONS The present study describes the clinical treatment for a rare cardiac syndrome caused by a PRKAG2 mutation.

  2. Electroversion in treatment of arrhythmia in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Peng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】We report electroversion in treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF and atrioventricular nodal reentry ta-chycardia (AVNRT in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury. At first, the pa-tient sustained respiratory failure and weak cough reflex, thereafter repeated bronchoscopy was used to aspirate the sputum as well as control the pneumonia, which resulted in arrhythmia (AF and AVNRT. Two doses of intravenous amiodarone failed to correct the arrhythmia. After restora-tion of sinus rhythm by electroversion, he was successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation and discharged from the intensive care unit without recurrent arrhythmia. Key words: Arrhythmia, cardiac; Atrial fibrillation; Electric countershock; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; Spinal cord injuries

  3. Noninvasive Localization of Accessory Pathways in Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome by Three-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, Tomoko; Seo, Yoshihiro; Igarashi, Miyako; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Machino-Ohtsuka, Tomoko; Ogawa, Kojiro; Kuroki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nogami, Akihiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a noninvasive isochrone activation imaging (AI) system with 3-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking echocardiography (STE), which allows visualization of the wavefront image of mechanical propagation of the accessory pathway (ACP) in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Patients with manifest Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome were imaged in 3D-STE AI mode, which quantified the time from QRS onset to regional endocardial deformation. In 2 patients with left- and right-side ACP, we confirmed that intraoperative contact endocardial electric mapping and the 3D-STE AI system showed comparable images pre- and postablation. In normal heart assessment by 3D-echo AI, the earliest activation sites were found at the attachment of the papillary muscles in the left ventricle and midseptum in the right ventricle, and none showed earliest activation at the peri-atrioventricular valve annuli. An analyzer who was unaware of the clinical information assessed 39 ACP locations in 38 Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome patients using 3D-STE. All showed abnormal perimitral or tricuspid annular activations, and the location of 34 ACP (87%) showed agreement with the successful ablation sites within a 2-o'clock range. Especially for left free wall ACP, 17/18 (94%) showed consistency with the ablation site within a 2 o'clock range. Among 15 ACP at the ventricular septum, 9 (60%) showed early local activation in both right and left sides of the septum. Isochrone AI with 3D-STE may be a promising noninvasive imaging tool to assess cardiac synchronized activation in normal hearts and detect abnormal breakthrough of mechanical activation from both atrioventricular annuli in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A core avenue for transcultural research on dementia: on the cross-linguistic generalization of language-related effects in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Noelia; Ibáñez, Agustín; Muñoz, Edinson; García, Adolfo M

    2018-06-01

    Language is a key source of cross-cultural variability, which may have both subtle and major effects on neurocognition. However, this issue has been largely overlooked in two flourishing lines of research assessing the relationship between language-related neural systems and dementia. This paper assesses the limitations of the evidence on (i) the neuroprotective effects of bilingualism in Alzheimer's disease and (ii) specific language deficits as markers of Parkinson's disease. First, we outline the rationale behind each line of research. Second, we review available evidence and discuss the potential impact of cross-linguistic factors. Third, we outline ideas to foster progress in both fields and, with it, in cross-cultural neuroscience at large. On the one hand, studies on bilingualism suggest that sustained use of more than one language may protect against Alzheimer's disease symptoms. On the other hand, insights from the embodied cognition framework point to syntactic and action-verb deficits as early (and even preclinical) markers of Parkinson's disease. However, both fields share a key limitation that lies at the heart of cultural neuroscience: the issue of cross-linguistic generalizability. Relevant evidence for both research trends comes from only a handful of (mostly Indo-European) languages, which are far from capturing the full scope of structural and typological diversity of the linguistic landscape worldwide. This raises questions on the external validity of reported findings. Greater collaboration between linguistic typology and cognitive neuroscience seems crucial as a first step to assess the impact of transcultural differences on language-related effects across neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Topaloglu, Serkan; Aras, Dursun

    2008-01-01

    Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:18379660

  6. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Cay

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation.

  7. Local cerebral metabolic rate of /sup 11/C-L-Methionine in early stages of dementia, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustany, P; Henry, J F; de Rotrou, J; Signoret, J L; Ziegler, M; Zarifian, E; Soussaline, F; Comar, D

    1983-06-01

    A dynamic three-compartment model of methionine metabolism in brain was applied in human patients using /sup 11/C-L-methionine and positron emission tomography (P.E.T). Psychometric evaluations of demented patients were correlated with a significant diminution of protein synthesis in the frontal area. This diminution was lower in ebephrenic patients (-17%) but was consistent with the results obtained with /sup 18/F glucose. No significant abnormality was detected in patients with Parkinson disease.

  8. Local cerebral metabolic rate of 11C-L-Methionine in early stages of dementia, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustany, P.; Henry, J.F.; de Rotrou, J.; Signoret, J.L.; Ziegler, M.; Zarifian, E.; Soussaline, F.; Comar, D.

    1983-06-01

    A dynamic three-compartment model of methionine metabolism in brain was applied in human patients using 11 C-L-Methionine and positron emission tomography (P.E.T). Psychometric evaluations of demented patients were correlated with a significant diminution of protein synthesis in the frontal area. This diminution was lower in ebephrenic patients (-17%) but was consistent with the results obtained with 18 F glucose. No significant abnormality was detected in patients with Parkinson disease

  9. Regional brain amyloid-β accumulation associates with domain-specific cognitive performance in Parkinson disease without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Rizwan S; Xie, Sharon X; Chen, Yin J; Rick, Jacqueline; Gross, Rachel G; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Hurtig, Howard I; Siderowf, Andrew D; Dubroff, Jacob G; Weintraub, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease patients develop clinically significant cognitive impairment at variable times over their disease course, which is often preceded by milder deficits in memory, visuo-spatial, and executive domains. The significance of amyloid-β accumulation to these problems is unclear. We hypothesized that amyloid-β PET imaging by 18F-florbetapir, a radiotracer that detects fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposits, would identify subjects with global cognitive impairment or poor performance in individual cognitive domains in non-demented Parkinson disease patients. We assessed 61 non-demented Parkinson disease patients with detailed cognitive assessments and 18F-florbetapir PET brain imaging. Scans were interpreted qualitatively (positive or negative) by two independent nuclear medicine physicians blinded to clinical data, and quantitatively by a novel volume-weighted method. The presence of mild cognitive impairment was determined through an expert consensus process using Level 1 criteria from the Movement Disorder Society. Nineteen participants (31.2%) were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and the remainder had normal cognition. Qualitative 18F-florbetapir PET imaging was positive in 15 participants (24.6%). Increasing age and presence of an APOE ε4 allele were associated with higher composite 18F-florbetapir binding. In multivariable models, an abnormal 18F-florbetapir scan by expert rating was not associated with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. However, 18F-florbetapir retention values in the posterior cingulate gyrus inversely correlated with verbal memory performance. Retention values in the frontal cortex, precuneus, and anterior cingulate gyrus retention values inversely correlated with naming performance. Regional cortical amyloid-β amyloid, as measured by 18F-florbetapir PET, may be a biomarker of specific cognitive deficits in non-demented Parkinson disease patients.

  10. Regional brain amyloid-β accumulation associates with domain-specific cognitive performance in Parkinson disease without dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan S Akhtar

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease patients develop clinically significant cognitive impairment at variable times over their disease course, which is often preceded by milder deficits in memory, visuo-spatial, and executive domains. The significance of amyloid-β accumulation to these problems is unclear. We hypothesized that amyloid-β PET imaging by 18F-florbetapir, a radiotracer that detects fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposits, would identify subjects with global cognitive impairment or poor performance in individual cognitive domains in non-demented Parkinson disease patients. We assessed 61 non-demented Parkinson disease patients with detailed cognitive assessments and 18F-florbetapir PET brain imaging. Scans were interpreted qualitatively (positive or negative by two independent nuclear medicine physicians blinded to clinical data, and quantitatively by a novel volume-weighted method. The presence of mild cognitive impairment was determined through an expert consensus process using Level 1 criteria from the Movement Disorder Society. Nineteen participants (31.2% were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and the remainder had normal cognition. Qualitative 18F-florbetapir PET imaging was positive in 15 participants (24.6%. Increasing age and presence of an APOE ε4 allele were associated with higher composite 18F-florbetapir binding. In multivariable models, an abnormal 18F-florbetapir scan by expert rating was not associated with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. However, 18F-florbetapir retention values in the posterior cingulate gyrus inversely correlated with verbal memory performance. Retention values in the frontal cortex, precuneus, and anterior cingulate gyrus retention values inversely correlated with naming performance. Regional cortical amyloid-β amyloid, as measured by 18F-florbetapir PET, may be a biomarker of specific cognitive deficits in non-demented Parkinson disease patients.

  11. Cognitive and motor symptoms in dementia: focus on dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; Kaufer, Daniel I

    2002-09-01

    To describe the clinical syndrome called dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and highlight its common and unique characteristics with respect to diagnosis and management. Review of the scientific literature including psychiatric literature, reports of clinical trials, and clinical practice guidelines. DLB is a clinical and histopathologic disease, which is second only to Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a cause of dementia in older adults. The clinical syndrome of DLB includes cognitive and motor deterioration reminiscent of symptoms associated with AD and Parkinson's disease (PD) respectively. The late life intersection of cognitive and motor symptoms can present significant challenges in the primary care setting. Recognizing key features of common neurodegenerative disorders is essential to accurately diagnosing and appropriately treating the growing population of older adults who suffer from AD, PD, and DLB.

  12. Spontaneous Transition of Double Tachycardias with Atrial Fusion in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongmin; Lee, Myung-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Among patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) can coexist in a single patient. Direct transition of both tachycardias is rare; however, it can occur after premature atrial or ventricular activity if the cycle lengths of the two tachycardias are similar. Furthermore, persistent atrial activation by an accessory pathway (AP) located outside of the AV node during ongoing AVNRT is also rare. This article describes a case of uncommon atrial activation by an AP during AVNRT and gradual transition of the two supraventricular tachycardias without any preceding atrial or ventricular activity in a patient with preexcitation syndrome.

  13. Allgrove syndrome: an Egyptian family with two affected siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola H. Gebril

    2013-11-15

    Nov 15, 2013 ... The neurological symptoms are variable and may affect the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system [4,5]. Seri- ous reported neurological manifestations include dementia,. Wernicke's encephalopathy [6], optic atrophy, cerebellar atax- ia, and Parkinsonism [7]. The syndrome has been mapped to ...

  14. Electrophysiological effects of desflurane in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, H; Oda, Y; Yoshida, Y; Suzuki, T; Shimada, M; Nishikawa, K

    2018-02-01

    We hypothesized that, compared with propofol, desflurane prolongs the antegrade accessory pathway effective refractory period (APERP) in children undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In this randomized crossover study, children aged 4.1-16.1 years undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for WPW syndrome were randomly divided into four groups according to the concentration of desflurane and anesthetics used in the first and the second electrophysiological studies (EPS). After induction of general anesthesia with propofol and tracheal intubation, they received one of the following regimens: 0.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) desflurane (first EPS) and propofol (second EPS) (Des0.5-Prop group, n = 8); propofol (first EPS) and 0.5 MAC desflurane (second EPS) (Prop-Des0.5 group, n = 9); 1 MAC desflurane (first EPS) and propofol (second EPS) (Des1.0-Prop group, n = 10); propofol (first EPS) and 1 MAC desflurane (second EPS) (Prop-Des1.0 group, n = 9). Radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed upon completion of EPS. Sample size was determined to detect a difference in the APERP. Desflurane at 1.0 MAC significantly prolonged the APERP compared with propofol, but did not affect the sinoatrial conduction time, atrio-His interval or atrioventricular node effective refractory period. Supraventricular tachycardia was induced in all children receiving propofol, but not induced in 1 and 4 children receiving 0.5 MAC and 1.0 MAC desflurane, respectively. Desflurane enhances the refractoriness and may block the electrical conduction of the atrioventricular accessory pathway, and is therefore not suitable for use in children undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for WPW syndrome. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Down Syndrome (BPSD-DS) Scale: Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathology in Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Alain D; Sacco, Silvia; Carfi, Angelo; Benejam, Bessy; Vermeiren, Yannick; Beugelsdijk, Gonny; Schippers, Mieke; Hassefras, Lyanne; Eleveld, José; Grefelman, Sharina; Fopma, Roelie; Bomer-Veenboer, Monique; Boti, Mariángeles; Oosterling, G Danielle E; Scholten, Esther; Tollenaere, Marleen; Checkley, Laura; Strydom, André; Van Goethem, Gert; Onder, Graziano; Blesa, Rafael; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Coppus, Antonia M W; Rebillat, Anne-Sophie; Fortea, Juan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2018-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are prone to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are core features, but have not been comprehensively evaluated in DS. In a European multidisciplinary study, the novel Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Down Syndrome (BPSD-DS) scale was developed to identify frequency and severity of behavioral changes taking account of life-long characteristic behavior. 83 behavioral items in 12 clinically defined sections were evaluated. The central aim was to identify items that change in relation to the dementia status, and thus may differentiate between diagnostic groups. Structured interviews were conducted with informants of persons with DS without dementia (DS, n = 149), with questionable dementia (DS+Q, n = 65), and with diagnosed dementia (DS+AD, n = 67). First exploratory data suggest promising interrater, test-retest, and internal consistency reliability measures. Concerning item relevance, group comparisons revealed pronounced increases in frequency and severity in items of anxiety, sleep disturbances, agitation & stereotypical behavior, aggression, apathy, depressive symptoms, and eating/drinking behavior. The proportion of individuals presenting an increase was highest in DS+AD, intermediate in DS+Q, and lowest in DS. Interestingly, among DS+Q individuals, a substantial proportion already presented increased anxiety, sleep disturbances, apathy, and depressive symptoms, suggesting that these changes occur early in the course of AD. Future efforts should optimize the scale based on current results and clinical experiences, and further study applicability, reliability, and validity. Future application of the scale in daily care may aid caregivers to understand changes, and contribute to timely interventions and adaptation of caregiving.

  16. The Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Down Syndrome (BPSD-DS) Scale: Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathology in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Alain D.; Sacco, Silvia; Carfi, Angelo; Benejam, Bessy; Vermeiren, Yannick; Beugelsdijk, Gonny; Schippers, Mieke; Hassefras, Lyanne; Eleveld, José; Grefelman, Sharina; Fopma, Roelie; Bomer-Veenboer, Monique; Boti, Mariángeles; Oosterling, G. Danielle E.; Scholten, Esther; Tollenaere, Marleen; Checkley, Laura; Strydom, André; Van Goethem, Gert; Onder, Graziano; Blesa, Rafael; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Coppus, Antonia M.W.; Rebillat, Anne-Sophie; Fortea, Juan; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2018-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are prone to develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are core features, but have not been comprehensively evaluated in DS. In a European multidisciplinary study, the novel Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Down Syndrome (BPSD-DS) scale was developed to identify frequency and severity of behavioral changes taking account of life-long characteristic behavior. 83 behavioral items in 12 clinically defined sections were evaluated. The central aim was to identify items that change in relation to the dementia status, and thus may differentiate between diagnostic groups. Structured interviews were conducted with informants of persons with DS without dementia (DS, n = 149), with questionable dementia (DS+Q, n = 65), and with diagnosed dementia (DS+AD, n = 67). First exploratory data suggest promising interrater, test-retest, and internal consistency reliability measures. Concerning item relevance, group comparisons revealed pronounced increases in frequency and severity in items of anxiety, sleep disturbances, agitation & stereotypical behavior, aggression, apathy, depressive symptoms, and eating/drinking behavior. The proportion of individuals presenting an increase was highest in DS+AD, intermediate in DS+Q, and lowest in DS. Interestingly, among DS+Q individuals, a substantial proportion already presented increased anxiety, sleep disturbances, apathy, and depressive symptoms, suggesting that these changes occur early in the course of AD. Future efforts should optimize the scale based on current results and clinical experiences, and further study applicability, reliability, and validity. Future application of the scale in daily care may aid caregivers to understand changes, and contribute to timely interventions and adaptation of caregiving. PMID:29689719

  17. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Expanding spectrum of contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) autoimmunity-syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannoth, Sudheeran; Nambiar, Vivek; Gopinath, Siby; Anandakuttan, Anandkumar; Mathai, Annamma; Rajan, Parvathy Kanjiramana

    2018-03-01

    Contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) antibodies are originally associated with Morvan's syndrome and peripheral nerve hyper excitability. Our objective was to study retrospectively the clinical spectrum of CASPR2 antibody-positive patients in our hospital. This is a retrospective observational study. Patients treated at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences from May 2013 to April 2016, who were tested positive for CASPR2 antibodies, were included. A total of 1584 samples were tested in the neuroimmunology laboratory during the study period for voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) and CASPR2 antibodies. Thirty-four were positive for LGI1, 13 were positive for CASPR2, and 7 were for both (total 54-3.4% positivity). Of these 54 cases, 11 were treated in our hospital. Seven were positive for LGI1, three for CASPR2, and one for both. The patient who had both CASPR2 and LGI1 antibody positive had Morvan's syndrome. One patient with CASPR2 had neuromyotonia. The other patient was admitted with status epilepticus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. The third patient had encephalopathy and myoclonus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. Two of them underwent siddha treatment for other ailments prior to the onset of the disease for other ailments. Our short series shows the expanding spectrum of CASPR2 autoimmunity. Syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia is an important manifestation of CASPR2 autoimmunity where we can offer a definitive treatment.

  19. Thyroid storm in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Luebbert, Jeffrey J; Rosen, Stephen G

    2015-12-15

    A 44-year-old woman with no medical history presented to the emergency department with a 2 h history of sudden onset chest pressure, palpitations, diaphoresis and shortness of breath. She reported a 90-pound unintentional weight loss, increased appetite, irritability, night sweats and palpitations for 2 months. Physical examination revealed a heart rate (HR) of 269 bpm and a blood pressure of 116/94 mm Hg. Her ECG revealed a wide-complex tachycardia with right bundle branch morphology and an HR of 265 bpm. Intravenous adenosine was administered with resolution of the arrhythmia and symptoms. Her subsequent ECG revealed sinus tachycardia with δ waves, which was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Laboratory findings confirmed thyroid storm and treatment began with intravenous hydrocortisone, methimazole, metoprolol, amiodarone and iodine drops. Graves' disease was confirmed based on the presence of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. The patient underwent successful WPW accessory tract ablation 6 weeks after initial presentation. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. A family with Parkinsonism, essential tremor, restless legs syndrome, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Stoessl, A J; Kuriakose, R; Lash, J L; Searcy, J A; Strongosky, A J; Vilariño-Güell, C; Farrer, M J; Ross, O A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2011-05-10

    Previous epidemiologic and genetic studies have suggested a link between Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). We describe the clinical, PET, and pathologic characteristics of an extensive kindred from Arkansas with hereditary PD, ET, and RLS. The pedigree contains 138 individuals. Sixty-five family members were examined neurologically up to 3 times from 2004 to 2010. Clinical data were collected from medical records and questionnaires. Genetic studies were performed. Five family members underwent multitracer PET. Two individuals with PD were examined postmortem. Eleven family members had PD with generally mild and slowly progressive symptoms. Age at onset was between 39 and 74 years (mean 59.1, SD 13.4). All individuals treated with l-dopa responded positively. Postural or action tremor was present in 6 individuals with PD, and in 19 additional family members. Fifteen persons reported symptoms of RLS. PET showed reduced presynaptic dopamine function typical of sporadic PD in a patient with PD and ET, but not in persons with ET or RLS. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant for PD and RLS. No known pathogenic mutation in PD-related genes was found. Fourteen of the family members with PD, ET, or RLS had depression. Neuropathologic examination revealed pallidonigral pigment spheroid degeneration with ubiquitin-positive axonal spheroids, TDP43-positive pathology in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and brainstem, and only sparse Lewy bodies. Familial forms of PD, ET, RLS, and depression occur in this family. The genetic cause remains to be elucidated.

  1. Surgical treatment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: epicardial approach without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, A; Pagani, F; Vigano, M

    1993-03-01

    Epicardial dissection without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was performed in 88 patients (56 males and 32 females, mean age 31.9 years). With intraoperative epicardial mapping, 101 accessory pathways were detected, with multiple pathways in 11 patients. CPB was avoided in all but one patient due to frequent onset of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate. Surgical ablation was successful in 86 patients (97.6%). Three patients required multiple surgical procedures because of persistence of conduction along a component of the original pathway. All but two patients were discharged without antiarrhythmic medication; these two patients were given quinidine therapy because of atrial fibrillation, but had normal early and late electrophysiological studies. Surgical ablation of Kent bundles by the epicardial approach for the treatment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome can be achieved without the use of CPB. Optimal and steady exposure of the area are mandatory for the procedure, and dissection is eased by avoidance of heparin required for CPB.

  2. Atrial fibrillation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: role of pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derejko, Paweł; Szumowski, Lukasz Jan; Sanders, Prashanthan; Krupa, Wojciech; Bodalski, Robert; Orczykowski, Michał; Urbanek, Piotr; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Lim, Han S; Lau, Dennis H; Kuśnierz, Jacek; Walczak, Franciszek

    2012-03-01

    We aimed to characterize electrophysiological properties of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and atrial fibrillation (AF), and to compare them to those in patients with WPW without AF. A total of 31 patients (mean age 40 ± 15 years, 23 males) with WPW were recruited: 16 patients with (AF group) and 15 without (controls) a history of AF. The basic electrophysiological (EPS) and echocardiographic data were not different between the 2 groups. Effective refractory periods (ERPs) of PVs were significantly shorter in the AF group compared to controls: left superior (LS) PV ERP 185±29 versus 230 ± 24 ms, P = 0.001; left inferior PV ERP 198 ± 25 versus 219 ± 26 ms, P = 0.04; right superior (RS) PV ERP 207 ± 25 versus 236 ± 19 ms, P = 0.001; right inferior PV ERP 208 ± 30 versus 240 ± 19 ms, P = 0.003. Maximal veno-atrial conduction delay (i.e., the maximal prolongation of interval from stimulus delivered at PV ostia to proximal coronary sinus after extrastimulus compared to the basic drive cycle) was longer in the AF group when pacing from LSPV (69.3 ± 37.9 vs 32.6 ± 16.1 ms, P = 0.01) and RSPV (74.1 ± 25.9 vs 50.2 ± 26.5 ms, P = 0.04). During EPS, AF was induced more often in the AF group (n = 7) compared to controls (n = 1; P = 0.04). Follow-up revealed that AF recurred in 3 patients in the AF group and none of the controls. Patients with WPW syndrome and AF have shorter ERPs of PVs and greater maximal veno-atrial conduction delay compared to patients with WPW without AF. These findings suggest a potential role of PVs in the development of AF in patients with WPW. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cognitive impairment of dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, L. D.; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of cognitive and emotional abilities of sufficient severity to infer with social or occupational functioning, or both. Although the causes of dementia and characteristics are not always fully understood, it is understood that it is not a natural part of aging. Definitive diagnosis of dementia is made only through the autopsy and although the diagnosis of probable or possible dementia is complex is achieved by the intervention of several ...

  4. Correlative study of the brain CT and clinical features of patients with Down's syndrome in three clinical stages of Alzheimer type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Keiko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Yanagisawa, Nobuo.

    1995-01-01

    Patients with Down's syndrome often develop Alzheimer type neuropathological changes as well as dementia of the Alzheimer type after the age of 40. We studied brain CT findings in relation to three clinical stages of Alzheimer type dementia in 11 patients with Down's syndrome aged from 17 to 55 years. In addition, 123 I-IMP-SPECT was studied in 4 of these patients. Dementia of the Alzheimer type was present in 9 patients; 5 patients were in the early stage, 2 were in the progressive stage, and the other 2 were in the end stage. The earliest CT finding was enlargement of the suprasellar cistern, which indicated atrophy of the medial temporal lobe including the hippocampus and amygdala. This finding was not present in non-demented individuals with Down's syndrome. Moreover, CT scans showed that brain atrophy progressed to the temporal, frontal lobe, and then generalized cerebral cortices, which correlated clinically with the severity of dementia. Studies of 123 I-IMP-SPECT in two patients with mild dementia revealed abnormally decreased isotope uptake in the temporal and posterior parietal regions. We suggest to measure the size of the suprasellar cistern in CT and SPECT scans for early detection and diagnosis of mild dementia of the Alzheimer type in patients with Down's syndrome. (author)

  5. Eletrencefalograma digital com mapeamento em demência de Alzheimer e doença de Parkinson: estudo prospectivo controlado Digital EEG with brain mapping in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease: a prospective controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos C. Sandmann

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o intuito de estudar a atividade eletrencefalográfica em vigilia da demência senil de tipo Alzheimer (DA e da doença de Parkinson (DP foi iniciado estudo prospectivo e controlado. Foram comparados 6 pacientes com DA e 11 pacientes com DP, com um grupo controle composto por 12 pacientes com depressão maior crônica leve a moderada (DSM-III-R, 1987. Nos três grupos, através de análise espectral, foi obtida a mediana da frequência da energia da atividade dominante posterior. O grupo controle apresentou atividade posterior com frequência de 8,79 ± 0,52 (m±dp. No grupo com DA este valor foi 6,65 ± 0,80 (m±dp e no grupo com DP 7,69± 1,39 (m±dp. A hipótese experimental de que pacientes com DA e DP diferem dos controles em relação à atividade de fundo (definida como anormal sendo In order to evaluate the EEG activity during wakefulness in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, a prospective controlled study was performed. We compared 6 AD and 11 PD patients with a control group of 12 patients with mild to moderate major chronic depression (DSM-III-R 1987. The median of the frequencies and the power of the posterior dominant activity was obtained in the three groups using spectral analysis. The posterior activity had a frequency of 8.79±0.52 (mean±sd in the contrc group, 6.65+0.80 (mean+sd in the AD group and 7.69+1.39 (mean±sd in the PD group. The experimental hypothesis that patients with AD and PD differ from controls in relation to the background activity (defined a abnormal <8 was confirmed by the chi square test (p=0.0l and the t test showed that the mean of the frequency of the posterior power was significantly lower in AD (p=0.01 and PD (p=0.05 patients, compared with the controls. The results indicate that this abnormality could be correlated with the degree of cortical damage and natural history of these disorders.

  6. Phase analysis of regional and global ventricular contraction patterns in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Assessment by radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Ichikawa, Takehiko and others

    1989-04-01

    Multigated blood pool scintigraphy was performed in 20 normal subjects and 39 patients with various intraventricular conduction abnormalities, including 25 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Cardiac imaging was performed in the modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique, and left lateral projections. In WPW syndrome, early contraction sites which were not seen in normal subjects were detected at the ventricular base in phase images. These anomalous early contraction sites disappeared after successful suppression of conduction through an accessory pathway by intravenous procainamide. These sites are believed to correspond to the location of the bundle of Kent and were consistent with the electrocardiographic findings. Phase mapping is a suitable noninvasive method to locate the position of the bundle of Kent and evaluate the ventricular contraction pattern in WPW syndrome and other intraventricular conduction abnormalities. (author).

  7. Probable Association of Tachyarrhythmia With Nebulized Albuterol in a Child With Previously Subclinical Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroesen, Michiel; Maseland, Machiel; Smal, Jaime; Reimer, Annet; van Setten, Petra

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 2-year-old asthmatic boy with atrioventricular (AV)-reentry tachycardia following albuterol inhalation, who was later diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score for this adverse event was 7, indicating that the association between his AV-reentry tachycardia and inhalation of albuterol is probable. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that shows the potential arrhythmogenic effects of albuterol in a child with WPW syndrome. We urge clinicians to be aware of this potentially life-threatening adverse effect and to closely monitor these patients when they need beta-adrenergic drugs in case of emergency. Furthermore, this report highlights the dilemma regarding the safe treatment of pediatric patients with both asthma and WPW syndrome. PMID:23118663

  8. Effect of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation on Quality of Life in Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokhrukh Erkaboev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is one of several disorders of the conduction system of the heart that are commonly referred to as pre-excitation syndromes. As the syndrome significantly reduces the patients’ quality of life (QoL, the purpose of the current study was to compare QoL scores in patients with WPW syndrome before and after a radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA procedure. To assess the patients’ QoL, the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey was used. Immediate and long-term outcomes of radiofrequency catheter ablation were analyzed in 60 patients diagnosed with WPW syndrome, 41(68.3% men and 19(31.7% women. As compared with the controls (28 apparently healthy persons, patients with WPW syndrome before RFA experienced significant reduction in both physical and mental health components. RFA was found effective in 93.3% of patients with WPW syndrome. At 3 months after RFA, patients showed significant improvement in both physical (13.5% and mental (17.2% health components; at 12 months, QoL parameters reached those of the controls.

  9. [123I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) and SPET in the diagnostics of Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonian syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielowski, K.; Szalus, B.; Pietrzykowski, J.; Brodacki, B.; Kotowicz, J.; Skrobowska, E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of study was to verify the diagnostic value of the radiopharmaceutic [ 123I ]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) in functional imaging of the presynaptical dopaminergic system in patients with Parkison's disease and parkinsonian syndromes: multiple system atrophy, orthostatic hypotonia Shy-Drager, essential tremor. That pilot study group consisted of 8 patients in which either preliminary diagnosis or suspicion of Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndrome or multiple system atrophy was set. Imaging of the brain with SPET (dual head detector Varicam Elscint) and MRI were performed. The radiopharmaceutic [ 123I ] FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) was administered intravenously in the dose 145 -148 MBq. SPET images were reconstructed by filtered backprojection with the use of Butterworth filter. The images were inspected visually. Images from SPET and MRI were superimposed by means of the workstation Hermes (Nucklear Diagnostic) with designatad regions interest (ROI) in the striatum and occipital cortex in order to assess semiquantitatively the binding of dopamine transporter. In the group of 8 patients evaluated with the use of [ 123I ]FP-CIT DaTSCAN four had normal results, and four - abnormal. The preliminary diagnosis was sustained in 3/8 of patients (including Parkinson's disease in two patients and multiple system atrophy in one patient). In the remainig 5 patients the preliminary diagnosis was changed, namely: in 2 cases the essential tremor was diagnosed, in 1 case - Parkinson's disease, in 1 case - orthostaic Sky-Drager, and in 1 case - despite the tremor of the upper limbs - results were normal. In all 8 patients the tracer proved to be useful in the confirmation of clinical diagnosis, especially in the differentiation between the essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. In the case of multiple system atrophy the imaging revealed significant loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Such loss was observed also in the cases of Parkinson's disease affecting the posterior parts of the

  10. Longitudinal characterization of two siblings with frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 associated with the S305N tau mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeve, Bradley F; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W; Waclawik, Andrew J; Murrell, Jill R; Hermann, Bruce; Jack, Clifford R; Shiung, Maria M; Smith, Glenn E; Nair, Anil R; Lindor, Noralane; Koppikar, Vinaya; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2005-04-01

    The background to this study began with the reporting of two Japanese kindreds with the S305N tau mutation. Although the pathological findings in the autopsied cases were well characterized, only limited ante-mortem data were presented. In this study, longitudinal characterization was carried out in two siblings of European ancestry found to have frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) through comprehensive neurobehavioural examinations and other scales at approximate 6-month intervals. Scales included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Short Test of Mental Status, modified motor subtest of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, detailed neuropsychological testing, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume were measured from serial MRI studies. All members of the kindred underwent molecular genetic analyses to elucidate the mechanism of inheritance. The missense mutation in tau, S305N, was detected in the proband (onset age 30), who has undergone serial evaluations for almost 4 years. Her older sister (onset age 36) was subsequently found to have the same mutation, and has undergone serial evaluations for 2 years. This mutation is absent in both parents and the only other sibling, and non-paternity was excluded by additional analyses. The siblings have exhibited cognitive and behavioural features typical of FTDP-17, which have proved challenging to manage despite aggressive pharmacological and behavioural therapies. The proband's sister has demonstrated an atypical profile of impairment on neuropsychological testing. Both siblings have developed striking atrophy of the anterior part of temporal lobes and moderate atrophy of the dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortical regions, which in both cases is relatively symmetrical. The annualized changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume, respectively, were -35.2 ml/year (3.23% decrease per year) and +20.75 ml/year (16

  11. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

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    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  12. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism

  13. Ventricular fibrillation development following atrial fibrillation after the ingestion of sildenaphil in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Izgu, Ibrahim; Aktas, Halil; Dogan, Pinar; Dogan, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Complications in the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome could cause different clinical conditions by inducing different arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of these arrhythmias and is important as it causes life-threatening arrhythmias. It is known that some drugs, underlying cardiac diseases, and the number of accessory pathways, cause a predisposition to this condition. In the current report, we presented a patient with WPW who was admitted to the emergency department with AF, wide QRS and a rapid ventricular response that progressed to ventricular fibrillation.

  14. Malignant arrhythmia as the first manifestation of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a case with minimal preexcitation on electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, B; Alper, A T

    2013-09-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is defined as the presence of an accessory atrioventricular pathway which is manifested as delta waves and short PR interval on electrocardiography (ECG). However, some WPW cases do not have typical findings on ECG and may remain undiagnosed unless palpitations occur. Sudden cardiac death may be the first manifestation of WPW and develops mostly secondary to degeneration of atrial fibrillation into ventricular fibrillation. In this report, we present a case of undiagnosed WPW with minimal preexcitation on ECG and who suffered an episode of malignant arrhythmia as the first manifestation of the disease.

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with an unroofed coronary sinus without persistent left superior vena cava treated with catheter cryoablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Catanchin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary sinus anomalies are rare congenital defects which are usually coexistent with a persistent left superior vena cava and may be associated with cardiac arrhythmias. We report an unroofed coronary sinus without persistent left superior vena cava diagnosed during a catheter ablation procedure for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Diagnostic and therapeutic options and outcomes are discussed. This condition is of relevance to electrophysiologists performing catheter-based procedures, as well as cardiologists implanting coronary sinus pacing leads, who may encounter this anomaly in their practice.

  16. Current strategy for treatment of patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and asymptomatic preexcitation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Dagres, Nikolaos; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    network, covering 20 countries answered the survey questions. All centres were high-volume ablation centres. A younger person with asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) pattern has a higher likelihood of being risk-stratified or receiving ablation therapy compared with an older subject. Two...... of responding centres (61-69%) report that their country lack national guidelines dealing with clinical strategies related to WPW. There is a need for national guidelines dealing with clinical strategy in patients with WPW syndrome. Older individuals with asymptomatic WPW pattern have a higher risk...

  17. Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Within the Neck of a Coronary Sinus Diverticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung-Won; Kim, Dong-Bin; Kwon, Bum-Jun; Cho, Eun-Joo; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Jin, Seung-Won; Oh, Yong-Seog; Lee, Man-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2009-01-01

    Posteroseptal accessory pathways are often associated with coronary sinus diverticula. These diverticula contain myocardial coats which serve as a bypass tract. We report a 54-year-old woman who underwent radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The surface electrocardiography (ECG) demonstrated pre-excitation, indicating a posteroseptal accessory pathway. A catheter ablation via a transaortic approach failed to ablate the accessory pathway. Coronary sinus venography revealed the presence of a diverticulum near the ostium. An electrogram in the neck of the diverticulum showed the coronary sinus myocardial extension potential, which was successfully ablated by delivery of RF energy. PMID:19949625

  18. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: a large cohort observation study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Huei-Huang; Yeh, San-Jou; Tsai, Wen-Pin; Wang, Chin-Man; Chen, Ji Yih

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the associations of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We conducted a retrospective cohort study by reviewing the medical records of 1503 consecutive AS patients diagnosed at a tertiary medical center. The clinical and electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics of 641 AS patients having 12-lead ECG available were further analyzed in a precise manner. Among the 641 AS patients with 12-lead ECG available for detecting cardiac abnormalities, 14 were identified as having PSVT, including 3 with WPW syndrome and 1 having a WPW (ventricular preexcitation) ECG pattern. A higher proportion of AS patients presented with PSVT (21.8/1000) compared with a general population-based study (2.25/1000). Also, AS patients demonstrated a higher prevalence of WPW syndrome or WPW pattern (6.24/1000) than found in general population-based studies (0.9 to 1.5/1000). Ankylosing spondylitis patients with PSVT or WPW syndrome had significantly higher rates of peripheral arthritis (78.6%; P = 0.002), acute anterior uveitis (64.3%; P = 0.003), bamboo spine (64.3%; P = 0.001), and other cardiovascular disorders (85.7%; P syndrome. Detailed ECG and electrophysiological examinations are required for early detection of PSVT and WPW syndrome for prompt resolution of potentially life-threatening complications in all AS patients, especially those presenting with the symptoms of palpitation, dizziness, dyspnea, or syncope. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Members of the emergency medical team may have difficulty diagnosing rapid atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koźluk, Edward; Timler, Dariusz; Zyśko, Dorota; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Grzebieniak, Tomasz; Gajek, Jacek; Gałązkowski, Robert; Fedorowski, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is potentially life-threatening as it may deteriorate into ventricular fibrillation. The aim of this study was to assess whether the emergency medical team members are able to diagnose AF with a rapid ventricular response due to the presence of atrioventricular bypass tract in WPW syndrome. The study group consisted of 316 participants attending a national congress of emergency medicine. A total of 196 questionnaires regarding recognition and management of cardiac arrhythmias were distributed. The assessed part presented a clinical scenario with a young hemodynamically stable man who had a 12-lead electrocardiogram performed in the past with signs of pre-excitation, and who presented to the emergency team with an irregular broad QRS-complex tachycardia. A total of 71 questionnaires were filled in. Only one responder recognized AF due to WPW syndrome, while 5 other responders recognized WPW syndrome and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia or broad QRS-complex tachycardia. About 20% of participants did not select any diagnosis, pointing out a method of treatment only. The most common diagnosis found in the survey was ventricular tachycardia/broad QRS-complex tachycardia marked by approximately a half of the participants. Nearly 18% of participants recognized WPW syndrome, whereas AF was recognized by less than 10% of participants. Members of emergency medical teams have limited skills for recognizing WPW syndrome with rapid AF, and ventricular tachycardia is the most frequent incorrect diagnosis.

  20. Bundle branch block after ablation for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenmayor A, Abdel J; Rodríguez S, Yenny A

    2013-09-20

    Bundle branch block (BBB) is a difficult diagnosis in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). We investigated the clinical implications of BBB that appears after performing an accessory pathway (AP) ablation. We studied 199 patients with WPW who were submitted to AP ablation. Thirty (15%) exhibited BBB after the ablation. Twenty-two patients had right BBB and 8 had left BBB. Thirteen patients had right-sided AP and 17 had left-sided AP. They were compared with 82 similar patients without BBB after the AP ablation. Among the patients with BBB, 86.66% showed delays in the middle part of the QRS in the ECG recorded before ablation vs. 18.29% of the patients without BBB (p<0.05) (sensitivity 86%, specificity 81%, positive predictive value 67% and negative predictive value 93%). Forty-four percent of the patients with BBB had BBB morphology during orthodromic tachycardia vs. 10% of the patients without BBB (p<0.05) (sensitivity 44%, specificity 89%, positive predictive value 57% and negative predictive value 82%). No relationship was found between AP location and the site of the BBB. Ejection fraction was normal before (0.61 ± 0.03) and upon completion of follow-up (0.61 ± 0.07). BBB disappeared in 95.3% of the patients. Delays in the middle portion of the QRS may predict BBB after AP ablation. BBB after performing AP ablation is frequent, transient, benign, and not related to either the ablation lesion location or progression to structural heart disease. BBB after AP ablation may be related to cardiac memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intermittent versus Persistent Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in Children: Electrophysiologic Properties and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiger, Michelle E; McCanta, Anthony C; Tong, Suhong; Schaffer, Michael; Runciman, Martin; Collins, Kathryn K

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is considered to have a lower risk of sudden death. Fewer data exist regarding electrophysiologic (EP) characteristics and the natural history of intermittent WPW in children. All patients with WPW age 1-18 years at a single institution (1996-2013) were reviewed. Patients with intermittent preexcitation were compared to those with loss of preexcitation on Holter/exercise testing and those with persistent preexcitation. High-risk accessory pathway (AP) was defined as AP effective refractory period (APERP), block cycle length, or shortest preexcited RR interval during atrial fibrillation ≤250 ms. A total of 295 patients were included: 226 (76.6%) persistent, 39 (13.2%) intermittent, and 30 (10.2%) loss of preexcitation Holter/exercise. There were no differences in symptoms between groups. Median interquartile range APERP was significantly longer in intermittent WPW (380 [320, 488] ms vs 320 [300, 350] ms persistent, 310 [290, 330] ms loss of preexcitation Holter/exercise; P = 0.0008). At baseline, there was no difference between groups in frequency of high-risk pathways. However, when isoproterenol values were included, high-risk pathways were more frequent among patients with loss of preexcitation on Holter/exercise (54% vs 16% persistent, 11% intermittent; P = 0.005). There was one death in a patient with loss of preexcitation on exercise testing, no EP study, and prior drug use. A second patient with persistent WPW and APERP 270 ms required resuscitation following a methadone overdose. Intermittent preexcitation in children does not connote a lower risk AP by EP criteria or reduced symptoms. The low number of pediatric WPW patients who develop preexcited atrial fibrillation or sudden death warrants larger studies to investigate these outcomes. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Tachydysrhythmia treatment and adverse events in patients with wolff-Parkinson-white syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelman, Jeffrey N; Marill, Keith A; Adler, Jonathan N

    2014-09-01

    Current guidelines recommend avoiding atrioventricular-nodal blocking agents (AVNB) when treating tachydysrhythmias in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) patients. We investigated medications selected and resulting outcomes for patients with tachydysrhythmias and WPW. In this single-center retrospective cohort study, we searched a hospital-wide database for the following inclusion criteria: WPW, tachycardia, and intravenous antidysrhythmics. The composite outcome of adverse events was acceleration of tachycardia, new hypotension, new malignant dysrhythmia, and cardioversion. The difference in binomial proportions of patients meeting the composite outcome after AVNB or non-AVNB (NAVNB) treatment was calculated after dividing the groups by QRS duration. A random-effects mixed linear analysis was performed to analyze the vital sign response. The initial database search yielded 1158 patient visits, with 60 meeting inclusion criteria. Patients' median age was 52.5 years; 53% were male, 43% presented in wide complex tachycardia (WCT), with 75% in atrial fibrillation (AF) or flutter. AVNBs were administered in 42 (70%) patient visits. For those patients with WCT in AF, the difference in proportions of patients meeting the composite outcome after AVNBs vs. NAVNBs treatment was an increase of 3% (95% confidence interval [CI] -39%-49%), and for those with narrow complex AF it was a decrease of 13% (95% CI -37%-81%). No instances of malignant dysrhythmia occurred. Mixed linear analysis showed no statistically significant effects on heart rate, though suggested a trend toward increasing heart rate after AVNB in wide complex AF. In this sample of WPW-associated tachydysrhythmia patients, many were treated with AVNBs. The composite outcome was similarly met after use of either AVNB or NAVNB, and no malignant dysrhythmias were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in the era of catheter ablation: insights from a registry study of 2169 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, Carlo; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Manguso, Francesco; Saviano, Massimo; Baldi, Mario; Pappone, Alessia; Ciaccio, Cristiano; Giannelli, Luigi; Ionescu, Bogdan; Petretta, Andrea; Vitale, Raffaele; Cuko, Amarild; Calovic, Zarko; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Moscatiello, Mario; Tavazzi, Luigi; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2014-09-02

    The management of Wolff-Parkinson-White is based on the distinction between asymptomatic and symptomatic presentations, but evidence is limited in the asymptomatic population. The Wolff-Parkinson-White registry was an 8-year prospective study of either symptomatic or asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White patients referred to our Arrhythmology Department for evaluation or ablation. Inclusion criteria were a baseline electrophysiological testing with or without radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA). Primary end points were the percentage of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation (VF) or potentially malignant arrhythmias and risk factors. Among 2169 enrolled patients, 1001 (550 asymptomatic) did not undergo RFA (no-RFA group) and 1168 (206 asymptomatic) underwent ablation (RFA group). There were no differences in clinical and electrophysiological characteristics between the 2 groups except for symptoms. In the no-RFA group, VF occurred in 1.5% of patients, virtually exclusively (13 of 15) in children (median age, 11 years), and was associated with a short accessory pathway antegrade refractory period (PParkinson-White syndrome essentially depends on intrinsic electrophysiological properties of AP rather than on symptoms. RFA performed during the same procedure after electrophysiological testing is of benefit in improving the long-term outcomes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Phase 2 clinical study of 123I-IBF, a dopamine D2 receptor imaging agent, to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety in Parkinson's disease and Parkinson syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    A Phase 2 multicenter trial of 123 I-IBF, (S)-5-iodo-7-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl] carboxamido-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran, was conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy and safety in 158 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or Parkinson syndromes (PS). SPECT data were acquired at two hours (2H-SPECT), after intravenous injection of 123 I-IBF (167 MBq). Additional SPECT scan at three hours (3H-SPECT) and dynamic SPECT scan at most until one hour were performed when possible. No severe side effects due to 123 I-IBF injection were observed. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for discriminating PS from PD using the striatal specific binding count-to-frontal cortex count ratio (St/Fc-1) in 3H-SPECT were 72.7%, 81.0% and 78.1% in 64 clinically definite cases (i.e., typical cases), respectively. The putamen-to-caudate ratios were significantly lower in striatonigral degeneration compared with those in PD. The contralateral-to-ipsilateral ratios against the symptomatic side of tremor and/or rigidity in the patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr I) were significantly higher than the left-to-right ratios in the normal controls. St/Fc-1 in 3H-SPECT was significantly lower in the patients showing a poor response to levodopa than in those showing a good response. The dopamine D 2 receptor binding potential (k 3 /k 4 ), obtained by dynamic SPECT based on compartment model analysis, correlated well with the striatal specific binding count-to-occipital cortex count ratio. These results suggest that 123 I-IBF is a promising agent for differential diagnosis and pathophysiological evaluation of PD and PS. (author)

  5. Global and Regional Left Ventricular Contractile Impairment In Patients With Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Jacob

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess regional systolic function and global contractile function in patients with WPW Syndrome.Method: Eleven cases with manifest Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in sinus rhythm were compared to 11 age matched controls. 2D strain analysis was performed and peak segmental radial strain (pRS values obtained from basal ventricular parasternal short-axis images (70 ± 5 frames/sec using a dedicated software package. Heterogeneity of radial strain pattern in six circumferential basal left ventricular segments was measured in terms of standard deviations of peak RS (SDpRS or range (difference between maximum and minimum peak RS i.e. RangepRS. Spectral Doppler (continuous wave measurements were acquired through the left ventricular outflow tract to determine Pre Ejection Period (PEP, Left Ventricular Ejection Time (LVET and measures of left ventricular systolic performance. Results: LV segmental radial strain was profoundly heterogeneous in WPW cases in contrast to fairly homogenous strain pattern in normal subjects. Wide SDpRS values 17.5 ± 8.9 vs 3.3 ± 1.4, p<0.001 and RangepRS 42.7 ± 20.8 vs.8.5 ± 3.6 , p<0.001 were observed among WPW and healthy subjects respectively. PEP (132.4 ± 14.7 vs 4.7 ± 0.5ms, p<0.001 and corrected PEP (76.1 ± 8.0 vs 2.7 ± 0.4ms, p<0.001 were significantly longer in WPW patients compared to controls. The PEP/LVET ratio was also significantly greater in WPW cohort (0.49 ± 0.04 vs. 0.28 ± 0.05, p <0.001 suggesting global systolic dysfunction. Conclusion: Patients with manifest preexcitation (predominantly those with right-sided pathways have regional and global contractile dysfunction resulting from aberrant impulse propagation inherent to the preexcited state.

  6. Lewy body dementia--clinical, pathological and neurochemical interconnections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R; McKeith, I; Perry, E

    1997-01-01

    Senile dementia of Lewy body type or Lewy body dementia (SDLT or LBD) is defined as a Lewy body associated disease presenting in the elderly primarily with dementia with variable extrapyramidal disorder. Characteristic clinical symptoms include fluctuating cognitive impairment, psychotic features such as hallucinations and a particular sensitivity to neuroleptic medication. Although apolipoprotein e4 allele is increased 2-3 fold in SDLT (as in Alzheimer's disease) and beta-amyloidosis occurs in most cases, the most robust neurobiological correlate of the dementia so far identified appears to be extensive cholinergic deficits in the neocortex. This is consistent with previously reported correlations between cortical cholinergic activity and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. There is also a significant interaction between the density of limbic cortical Lewy bodies and dementia in both SDLT and PD, although the cortical neuronal population affected remains to be identified. Cortical Lewy body density is positively correlated with the age of disease onset in PD and SDLT. This may account for the increased incidence of psychiatric syndromes, as opposed to extrapyramidal disorder in Lewy body disease with advancing age as may age-related loss of cholinergic activity in cortical areas such as the hippocampus.

  7. Nature and Extent of Person Recognition Impairments Associated with Capgras Syndrome in Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M. Fiacconi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Capgras Syndrome (CS adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the ‘mirror image’ of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Lewy Body Dementia (DLB who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic responding, to the extent that the potential role of interoceptive awareness in overt judgments is taken into account.

  8. Computerized method for arm movement assessment in Parkinson's disease and cerebellar syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Olivera

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical setting, the symptoms of the impaired motor behavior in patients with different neurological diseases are identified by classical tests incorporated in clinical neurological examination. New computerized methods for objective motor assessment have been recently suggested in the literature. We developed computerized method for assessment and evaluation of arm movement in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD in early phase and in patients with cerebellar syndrome. Method is based on automatic acquisition of hand coordinates during drawing of line and circle, and offline analysis of kinematic parameters (time duration, path length, mean and maximal velocity, velocity profile, and precision. Clinical application is in recognition and follow-up of the impaired kinematic parameters, specific for these two groups of patients. AIM We propose computerized method that consists of two motor tasks: Task 1- drawing a line defined with end points; and Task 2 - drawing a circle defined by referential model. The first task was rather simple with defined direction, and the second included continuous change of the direction that required permanent adjustment. The aim was to detect which kinematic parameters were particularly different in PD and in patients with cerebellar syndrome in relation to healthy controls, and then to apply this method as an additional instrument in clinical evaluation. METHODS Hand trajectories were assessed during simple self-paced 1 point-to-point movement-Task 1; and 2 circle-Task 2, by cordless magnetic mouse in a hand on digitizing board (Drawing board III, 305x457 mm, GTCO Cal Comp Inc. The subjects were seated in a relaxed manner on the chair adjusted to the table height, and instructed not to correct drawn line during performance of a task. The first session was for practicing the tests only, and in the next session, the subjects repeated 5 times each task. All sessions were videotaped with CCD camera. Testing

  9. Phase analysis in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with surgically proven accessory conduction pathways: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Taki, J.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who underwent surgical division of the accessory conduction pathway (ACP) were studied by gated blood-pool scintigraphy. In each case, a functional image of the phase was generated, based on the fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform. The location of the ACP was confirmed by electrophysiologic study, epicardial mapping, and surgery. Phase analysis identified the side of preexcitation correctly in 16 out of 20 patients with WPW syndrome with a delta wave. All patients with right-cardiac type (N=9) had initial contraction in the right ventricle (RV). In patients with left-cardiac type (N=10), six had initial movement in the left ventricle (LV); but in the other four the ACPs in the anterior or lateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) could not be detected. In patients with multiple ACPs (N=2), one right-cardiac type had initial contraction in the RV, while in the other (with an intermittent WPW syndrome) the ACP was not detected. These observations indicate that abnormal wall motion is associated with the conduction anomalies of the WPW syndrome. We conclude that phase analysis can correctly identify the side of initial contraction in the WPW syndrome before and after surgery. However, as a method of preoperative study, it seems difficult to determine the precise site of the ACP by phase analysis alone

  10. Phase analysis in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with surgically proven accessory conduction pathways: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Taki, J.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who underwent surgical division of the accessory conduction pathway (ACP) were studied by gated blood-pool scintigraphy. In each case, a functional image of the phase was generated, based on the fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform. The location of the ACP was confirmed by electrophysiologic study, epicardial mapping, and surgery. Phase analysis identified the side of preexcitation correctly in 16 out of 20 patients with WPW syndrome with a delta wave. All patients with right-cardiac type (N=9) had initial contraction in the right ventricle (RV). In patients with left-cardiac type (N=10), six had initial movement in the left ventricle (LV); but in the other four the ACPs in the anterior or lateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) could not be detected. In patients with multiple ACPs (N=2), one right-cardiac type had initial contraction in the RV, while in the other (with an intermittent WPW syndrome) the ACP was not detected. These observations indicate that abnormal wall motion is associated with the conduction anomalies of the WPW syndrome. We conclude that phase analysis can correctly identify the side of initial contraction in the WPW syndrome before and after surgery. However, as a method of preoperative study, it seems difficult to determine the precise site of the ACP by phase analysis alone.

  11. Utility of Exercise Testing and Adenosine Response for Risk Assessment in Children with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, Yakup; Ozturk, Erkut; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Unsal, Serkan; Carus, Hayat; Tola, Hasan Tahsin; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Guzeltas, Alper

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the correlation between noninvasive testing (exercise stress testing [EST] and adenosine responsiveness of accessory pathway [AP] ) and invasive electrophysiology study (EPS) for assessment antegrade conduction of the AP in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. This prospective, observational study enrolled 40 children (58% male children, median age of 13 years, and median weight of 47.5 kg) with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Conduction through the AP to a cycle length of ≤250 ms was considered rapid or high-risk; otherwise, patients were nonrapid or low-risk. The sudden disappearance of the delta-wave was seen in 10 cases (25%) during EST. Accessory pathway was found to be high-risk in 13 cases (13/40, 32.5%) while the accessory path was identified as low-risk in 27 cases; however, six patients (15%) had blocked AP conduction with adenosine during EPS. Low-risk classification by EST alone to identify patients with nonrapid conduction in baseline EPS had a specificity of 93% and a positive predictive value of 90% (accuracy 54%). Blocked AP conduction with adenosine as a marker of nonrapid baseline AP conduction had a specificity of 93% and a positive predictive value of 84%. Finally, AP was adenosine nonresponsive in the majority of patients (28/30, 93%) with persistent delta-waves, 40% of those who had a sudden disappearance of delta-waves had an adenosine-responsive AP (P value: .028). Abrupt loss of preexcitation during EST and blocked AP conduction with adenosine had high specificity and positive predictive value for nonrapid and low-risk antegrade conduction during baseline invasive EPS. Successful risk stratification of pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White is possible through the use of EST and the adenosine responsiveness of AP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparison of the accuracy of three algorithms in predicting accessory pathways among adult Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maden, Orhan; Balci, Kevser Gülcihan; Selcuk, Mehmet Timur; Balci, Mustafa Mücahit; Açar, Burak; Unal, Sefa; Kara, Meryem; Selcuk, Hatice

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of three algorithms in predicting accessory pathway locations in adult patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in Turkish population. A total of 207 adult patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The most preexcited 12-lead electrocardiogram in sinus rhythm was used for analysis. Two investigators blinded to the patient data used three algorithms for prediction of accessory pathway location. Among all locations, 48.5% were left-sided, 44% were right-sided, and 7.5% were located in the midseptum or anteroseptum. When only exact locations were accepted as match, predictive accuracy for Chiang was 71.5%, 72.4% for d'Avila, and 71.5% for Arruda. The percentage of predictive accuracy of all algorithms did not differ between the algorithms (p = 1.000; p = 0.875; p = 0.885, respectively). The best algorithm for prediction of right-sided, left-sided, and anteroseptal and midseptal accessory pathways was Arruda (p algorithms were similar in predicting accessory pathway location and the predicted accuracy was lower than previously reported by their authors. However, according to the accessory pathway site, the algorithm designed by Arruda et al. showed better predictions than the other algorithms and using this algorithm may provide advantages before a planned ablation.

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MAPC - Parkinson- Pasion, Positivismo y Participacion” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ... el Sueño, Parte 2 Dealing with Dementia CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life Is Compulsive Behavior a Side ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios en el Pensamiento y ... 2 CareMAP: Getting Dressed CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 2 ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? Adolfo ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease? How Is It Treated? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's ... Dealing with Dementia Unconditional Love CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part 1 CareMAP: The Caregiving Journey When and ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Cambios en el ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  17. Use of phase images in radionuclide ventriculography for topical diagnosis of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and sources of abnormal rhythms in the ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostroumov, E.N.; Sergienko, V.B.; Golitsin, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the mapping of various types of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias by using phase images of radionuclide ventriculograms as compared to 12 leads and electrophysiological studies. Phase images are a highly informative method that supplements an electrophysiological study in the topical diagnosis of abnormal tracts and ventricular arrhythmias

  18. Risco de quedas em idosos com doença de Parkinson e demência de Alzheimer: um estudo transversal Risk of falls among elderly people with Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's dementia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Christofoletti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o risco de quedas entre idosos com doença de Parkinson (DP, demência de Alzheimer (DA e saudáveis (controle. Além disso, pretendeu-se analisar as relações do risco de quedas com declínio cognitivo e com nível de atividade física. MÉTODO: vinte idosos, sendo sete com DP (69,57 ± 2,40 anos, seis com DA (77,5 ± 2,32 anos e sete saudáveis (74,71 ± 2,58 anos, foram avaliados por meio dos seguintes instrumentos: Escala de Equilíbrio Funcional de Berg (EEFB, Timed Up and Go test (TUG, Mini-Exame do Estado Mental (MEEM e Questionário Baecke Modificado para Idosos (QBMI. RESULTADOS: O teste de Kruskal-Wallis apontou diferença significativa entre os grupos, tanto em relação à EEFB (KW=9,67, pOBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of falls among elderly people with Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's dementia (AD and among healthy peers (controls. In addition, the aim was to analyze relationships between risk of falls and cognitive decay and between risk of falls and physical activity. METHOD: Twenty subjects were assessed: seven with PD (69.57 ± 2.40 years, six with AD (77.5 ± 2.32 years and seven healthy peers (74.71 ± 2.58 years. The following instruments were used: Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Timed Up and Go test (TUG, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Modified Baecke Questionnaire for Older Adults (MBQOA. RESULTS: The Kruskal-Wallis (KW test indicated significant differences between the groups, relating to BBS (KW = 9.67, p<0.01 and TUG (KW = 9.14, p<0.01, for time expended, and KW = 10.04, p<0.01, for number of steps. Bonferroni post-hoc pairs analysis showed that balance was highly compromised in the AD group, such that lower MMSE values were observed. The PD group was characterized by presenting higher levels of physical activity. Spearman's test produced low correlations between MMSE and BBS (r s=0.59; MMSE and TUG (r s=-0.52 and r s=-0.62; MBQOA and BBS (r s=0.54; and MBQOA and TUG (r s=-0.39 and r s=-0

  19. Utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination--Revised for the diagnosis of dementia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpening, Zoe; Cordato, Nicholas J; Hepner, Ilana J; Lucas, Sara K; Lindley, Richard I

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination--Revised (ACE-R) as a screening tool for dementia. Prospective audit of 122 patients (82 with dementia, 40 with no dementia) referred to a Sydney cognition clinic. An ACE-R cut-off score of 84/100 provided an optimal balance of sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (0.85, 0.80 and 0.90, respectively) in identifying patients with dementia. In our sample, the ACE-R was a superior dementia screening tool to the Mini-Mental State Examination in patients with higher levels of education (≥ 10 years of formal schooling), but not in patients with lower levels of education. Patients misclassified by the instrument had evidence of high levels of education, focal executive dysfunction, medical comorbidities, significant vascular disease and polypharmacology. The ACE-R is a useful screening tool for detecting the presence of dementia in a cognition clinic setting. Caution may be warranted in some patient populations. © 2010 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2010 ACOTA.

  20. Síndrome de Horner após cirurgia estereotáxica para doença de Parkinson Horner syndrome after stereotactic Parkinson's surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz A. Rogano

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos estudo de dez pacientes com doença de Parkison, que foram submetidos a procedimentos ablativos estereotáxicos percutâneos e que desenvolveram síndrome de Horner ipsilateral imediatamente após a lesão. Sete pacientes foram submetidos a palidotomia, dois a subtalamotomia (campotomia de Forel e talamotomia e um paciente a subtalamotomia. Sete desenvolveram miose e os dez desenvolveram semiptose ipsilateral à lesão. A ocorrência da síndrome de Horner resulta possivelmente de lesão de fibras simpáticas entre o hipotálamo, campo de Forel e tálamo.We present ten patients with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic ablative radiofrequency procedures. Seven patients underwent pallidotomy, two subthalamotomy and VIM, and one subthalamotomy. Seven developed miosis and all semiptosis ipsilateral immediately after the procedure. The occurrence of Horner's syndrome is probably due to the lesion of sympathetic fibers among hypothalamus, Forel's field and thalamus after the stereotactic procedure.

  1. [Cardioversion for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia during lung surgery in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Hirofumi; Inoda, Ayako; Miura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Yoko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) that occurred during video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. A 59-year-old man with lung cancer was scheduled for VATS lobectomy under general anesthesia. After inserting a thoracic epidural catheter, general anesthesia was induced with intravenous administration of propofol. Anesthesia was maintained with inhalation of desfurane in an air/oxygen mixture and intravenous infusion of remifentanil. Recurrent PSVT occurred three times, and the last episode of PSVT continued for 50 minutes regardless of administration of antiarrhythmic drugs. Synchronized electric shock via adhesive electrode pads on the patient's chest successfully converted PSVT back to normal sinus rhythm. The remaining course and postoperative period were uneventful. An electrophysiological study performed after hospital discharge detected concealed WPW syndrome, which had contributed to the development of atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia. Concealed WPW syndrome is a rare, but critical complication that could possibly cause lethal atrial tachyarrhythmias during the perioperative period. In the present case, cardioversion using adhesive electrode pads briefly terminated PSVT in a patient with concealed WPW syndrome.

  2. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  3. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM...

  4. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies are characterizing the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson's disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and/or permethrin (PM...

  5. Cognitive impairment in early-stage non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Helle Cecilie Viekilde; Løkkegaard, A; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) are common. PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing PDD. Knowledge of cognition in early-stages PD is essential in understanding and predicting the dementia process....

  6. Markers of impaired motor and cognitive volition in Parkinson's disease: Correlates of dopamine dysregulation syndrome, impulse control disorder, and dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jared T; Perepezko, Kate; Rosenthal, Liana S; Mills, Kelly A; Pantelyat, Alexander; Mari, Zoltan; Tochen, Laura; Bang, Jee Yun; Gudavalli, Medha; Yoritomo, Nadine; Butala, Ankur; Bakker, Catherine C; Johnson, Vanessa; Moukheiber, Emile; Dawson, Ted M; Pontone, Gregory M

    2018-02-01

    Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be associated with both motoric (e.g., dyskinesias) and neuropsychiatric adverse effects. Examples of the latter include Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome (DDS) and impulse control disorder (ICD), which are separate but related behavioral/psychiatric complications of treatment in PD. Dysregulation of volition characterizes both dyskinesias and DDS/ICD; thus, we analyzed potential disease-related correlates in a large PD cohort. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 654 participants collected through the NINDS Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program. DDS/ICD symptoms and dyskinesias were assessed using the Movement Disorders Society (revised) Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Potential associated variables were selected from PD-validated or PD-specific scales of neuropsychiatric or motoric status. Multivariable models with DDS/ICD or dyskinesia presence outcomes were produced with backward stepwise regression to identify factors independently associated with DDS/ICD and/or dyskinesias. Fifty-three (8.1%) participants endorsed DDS and/or ICD symptoms and 150 (22.9%) were dyskinetic. In multivariable analysis, psychosis was independently associated with both dyskinesias (p = 0.006) and DDS/ICD (p < 0.001). Unpredictable motor fluctuations (p = 0.026) and depression (p = 0.023) were also associated with DDS/ICD; female sex (p = 0.025), low tremor score (p = 0.001) and high akinesia-rigidity score (p < 0.001) were associated with dyskinesias. Our findings suggest that psychosis may be an important marker of impaired volition across motor and cognitive domains. Unpredictable motor fluctuations, psychosis, and depression may together comprise a phenotypic profile of patients at increased risk for DDS/ICD. Similarly, dyskinetic PD patients should be closely monitored for psychotic symptoms and treated appropriately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dementia in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, Ahmad I.; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.; Sulaiti, Essa M.

    2004-01-01

    Dementia is the major public health problem among the elderly in developed countries and a growing problem in the underdeveloped countries. There are no published data on dementia in any of the Arab countries. The aim of this study was to determine the different subtypes of dementia among Qataris. A retrospective and prospective ongoing hospital based study in which all medical records of the patients with diagnosis of dementia seen at the Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar, between June 1997 and June 2003, whether inpatient and outpatient were reviewed. Dementia was defined according to diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM) IV criteria. Those who had dementia were evaluated by a psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist and a geriatrician. All had brain computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or both and routine blood test. Finally, they were classified into sub-types according to the cause of dementia. One of 300 patients, 134 fulfilled the inclusion criteria, most of them were illiterate, married and non-smokers. Among those dementia sub-types were: Alzheimer disease (AD) 39 (29%), vascular dementia (VaD) 30 (22%), mixed AD and VaD 20 (15%) and Parkinson's disease with dementia due to other medical conditions. Our stidy showed that AD is more prevalent than VaD. It also showed that patients and their families seek medical help late due to to the general belief among the public that forgetfulness and other associated cognitive impairment are part of normal aging process. The emergence of new drugs and advancement in prevention of cerebrovascular diseases make early diagnosis of dementia sub-type important. A community based study to show the real prevalence and incidence of sub-types of dementia is highly indicated. These data are necessory for planning and setting up community services and health care programs for demented patients. (author)

  8. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  9. Language and Dementia: Neuropsychological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kempler, Daniel; Goral, Mira

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent evidence for the relationship between extralinguistic cognitive and language abilities in dementia. A survey of data from investigations of three dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia) reveals that, more often than not, deterioration of conceptual organization appears associated with lexical impairments, whereas impairments in executive function are associated with sentence- and discourse-level deficits. These ...

  10. Usefulness of severe cardiac sympathetic dysfunction to predict the occurrence of rapid atrial fibrillation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Asano, Taku; Suyama, Jumpei; Tanno, Kaoru; Namiki, Atsuo; Shinozuka, Akira; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) can be a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia when it conducts rapidly through the accessory pathway, which was not predicted by the noninvasive method. We evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity for predicting the occurrence of AF in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy was performed under stable sinus rhythm conditions at rest syndrome than in the normal control group, and in the 15 patients with AF induced during EPS than in the 30 patients without AF (p syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethnopharmacological Approaches for Dementia Therapy and Significance of Natural Products and Herbal Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Tewari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a clinical syndrome wherein gradual decline of mental and cognitive capabilities of an afflicted person takes place. Dementia is associated with various risk factors and conditions such as insufficient cerebral blood supply, toxin exposure, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, and often coexisting with some neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Huntington's disease (HD, and Parkinson's disease (PD. Although there are well-established (semi-synthetic drugs currently used for the management of AD and AD-associated dementia, most of them have several adverse effects. Thus, traditional medicine provides various plant-derived lead molecules that may be useful for further medical research. Herein we review the worldwide use of ethnomedicinal plants in dementia treatment. We have explored a number of recognized databases by using keywords and phrases such as “dementia”, “Alzheimer's,” “traditional medicine,” “ethnopharmacology,” “ethnobotany,” “herbs,” “medicinal plants” or other relevant terms, and summarized 90 medicinal plants that are traditionally used to treat dementia. Moreover, we highlight five medicinal plants or plant genera of prime importance and discuss the physiological effects, as well as the mechanism of action of their major bioactive compounds. Furthermore, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and dementia is also discussed. We conclude that several drugs of plant origin may serve as promising therapeutics for the treatment of dementia, however, pivotal evidence for their therapeutic efficacy in advanced clinical studies is still lacking.

  12. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates.

  13. Successful ablation of a right atrium-axillary ventricular accessory pathway associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Long, Deyong; Dong, Jianzeng; Tao, Ling; Ma, Changsheng

    2017-12-01

    We report a case of a patient with right axillary ventricular. Similar congenital anomaly of the right atrium was reported as "right appendage diverticulum or right atrial diverticulum." However, this independent chamber has its own annulus, synchronizes with the right ventricular, and generates large ventricular potential. Under the guidance of the CARTO mapping system (Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, USA), a right atrioventricular accessory pathway associated with type B Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was ablated successfully. This pathway was close to the annulus of the axillary ventricular. The patient remained free of arrhythmia at 1-year follow-up. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates

  15. Phase analysis in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Correlations to surgically confirmed accessory conduction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    1983-09-01

    Twenty-five patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who underwent surgical division of the accessory conduction pathway (ACP) were studied by gated blood pool studies and phase analyses. All of 11 patients with right cardiac type (R-type) had abnormal initial phase in the right ventricle (RV), while 10 out of 14 patients with left cardiac type (L-type) had initial phase in the left ventricle (LV). However, in 4 L-type patients, there were no significant differences in the initiation of both ventricular contractions. In 10 patients who had radionuclide studies before and after surgical division of the ACP, the ventricular contraction patterns were apparently changed and the abnormal wall motions induced by the presence of ACPs disappeared. These observations indicate that the abnormal initial contraction is associated with pre-excitation of WPW syndrome. Sensitivities to identify the side of preexcitation were 100% (11/11) for R-type and 71% (10/14) for L-type. However, regarding the detection of the precise site of ACP, the agreement was 48% (12/25). Therefore, as a method of preoperative study, it seemed difficult to identify the precise localization of the ACP by phase analysis alone. Phase analysis provided interesting informations and was useful for evaluating patients with WPW syndrome before and after surgery. (author).

  16. Amiodarone and Catheter Ablation as Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy for Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Soo In; Kang, I-Seok; Lee, Heung Jae

    2013-01-01

    Preexcitation by accessory pathways (APs) is known to cause dyssynchrony of the ventricle, related to ventricular dysfunction. Correction of ventricular dyssynchrony can improve heart failure in cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP) with preexcitation. Here, we report the first case of a child with DCMP and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome treated with amiodarone and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in Korea. A 7-year-old boy, who suffered from DCMP and WPW syndrome, showed improved left ventricular function and clinical functional class after treatment with amiodarone to eliminate preexcitation. QRS duration and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were inversely correlated with amiodarone dosage. After confirming the reduction of preexcitation effects in DCMP, successful RFCA of the right anterior AP resulted in LVEF improvement, along with the disappearance of preexcitation. Our findings suggest that ventricular dyssynchrony, caused by preexcitation in DCMP with WPW syndrome, can worsen ventricular function and amiodarone, as well as RFCA, which should be considered as a treatment option, even in young children. PMID:23407697

  17. Dural arteriovenous fistula as a treatable dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enofe, Ikponmwosa; Thacker, Ike; Shamim, Sadat

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a chronic loss of neurocognitive function that is progressive and irreversible. Although rare, dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) could present with a rapid decline in neurocognitive function with or without Parkinson-like symptoms. DAVFs represent a potentially treatable and reversible cause of dementia. Here, we report the case of an elderly woman diagnosed with a DAVF after presenting with new-onset seizures, deteriorating neurocognitive function, and Parkinson-like symptoms.

  18. Should We Refer for a Dementia Assessment? A Checklist to Help Know when to Be Concerned about Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome and Other Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwham, Sarah; McBrien, Judith; Broom, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a simple screening checklist to help carers and professionals know when to make a referral for a dementia assessment. A checklist was completed for all new referrals to a dementia service for people with intellectual disabilities. The obtained scores were compared to the diagnostic outcome of a comprehensive…

  19. Patterns of Performance on the Modified Cued Recall Test in Spanish Adults With Down Syndrome With and Without Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benejam, Bessy; Fortea, Juan; Molina-López, Rafael; Videla, Sebastià

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of memory decline in people with intellectual disability (ID) is more difficult than in the general population, due to a lack of appropriate instruments and to preexisting cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to describe performance of healthy adults with Down syndrome (healthy-DS; prospectively cohort) on a Spanish version of the modified Cued Recall Test (mCRT). We also recruited retrospectively a cohort of DS subjects with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (DS-DAT). Healthy-DS obtained higher scores on free recall and total score than DS-DAT. Age was the main factor associated with decreasing mCRT scores. The mCRT was useful in DS subjects with ID at the upper end of the spectrum or ID in the middle range of the spectrum, and discriminated well between DS subjects with and without DAT.

  20. I-123 IMP SPECT in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Keita; Tachibana, Kyudai; Sugita, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    To examine semiquantitatively regional cerebral blood flow, SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-[I-123]iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was undertaken in 17 patients with Parkinson's disease. Seven patients with Alzheimer's disease and 9 senile control subjects were also imaged for comparison. Both the Parkinson's disease group and the Alzheimer's disease group had a decreased uptake of I-123 IMP in the frontal lobe, in comparison with the control group. A remarkably decreased uptake was seen in the lateral and parietal lobes in the group of Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, as well as in the Alzheimer's disease group. A significantly decreased uptake was observed in the frontal lobe, lateral lobe, thalamus, and basal ganglia in the Parkinson's disease group, irrespective of the presence or absence of dementia. For Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, there was much more significant decrease in I-123 IMP uptake. The pattern of regional cerebral blood flow in the Alzheimer's disease group was analogous to that in the Parkinson's disease group associated with dementia. This supports the hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease may be somewhat involved in the occurrence of dementia for Parkinson's disease. (N.K.)

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with complete auriculoventricular block. A strange association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Franco J; Montana, Paula A; Vesga, Carlos; Miranda Antonio; Citelli Jose E; Negrete Alberto; Gil, Efrain

    2007-01-01

    A 22 years old male patient is admitted for a syncope episode. An electrocardiogram shows a Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern and signs of auricular overload with left ventricular hypertrophy and complete auriculoventricular block. The transthoracic echocardiogram is compatible with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. An electrophysiological study is carried out, finding pre-excitation through an accessory way and infra-His auriculoventricular block. An ablation is performed and a bicameral pacemaker is implanted

  2. Síndrome de Wolff-Parkinson-White associada a comunicação interatrial tipo seio venoso Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and the sinus venosus atrial septal defect association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lopes Moraes

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A associação de comunicação interatrial (CIA tipo seio venoso com síndrome de Wolff Parkinson White (WPW é muito rara e ainda não descrita na literatura médica especializada. Descreve-se o caso de uma jovem portadora dessa associação de patologias tratada com ablação da via acessória por radiofreqüência, seguida de correção cirúrgica do defeito do septo interatrial.The Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW and sinus venosus atrial septal defect (ASD association is very rare and not yet reported in the literature. It is the main basis for this case report.

  3. Physiological Expression of AMPKγ2RG Mutation Causes Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Induces Kidney Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Mudgett, John; Bou-About, Ghina; Champy, Marie-France; Jacobs, Hugues; Monassier, Laurent; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Sorg, Tania; Herault, Yann; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Lu, Ku; Feng, Wen; Wang, Hongwu; Ma, Li-Jun; Askew, Roger; Erion, Mark D; Kelley, David E; Myers, Robert W; Li, Cai; Guan, Hong-Ping

    2016-11-04

    Mutations of the AMP-activated kinase gamma 2 subunit (AMPKγ2), N488I (AMPKγ2 NI ) and R531G (AMPKγ2 RG ), are associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, a cardiac disorder characterized by ventricular pre-excitation in humans. Cardiac-specific transgenic overexpression of human AMPKγ2 NI or AMPKγ2 RG leads to constitutive AMPK activation and the WPW phenotype in mice. However, overexpression of these mutant proteins also caused profound, non-physiological increase in cardiac glycogen, which might abnormally alter the true phenotype. To investigate whether physiological levels of AMPKγ2 NI or AMPKγ2 RG mutation cause WPW syndrome and metabolic changes in other organs, we generated two knock-in mouse lines on the C57BL/6N background harboring mutations of human AMPKγ2 NI and AMPKγ2 RG , respectively. Similar to the reported phenotypes of mice overexpressing AMPKγ2 NI or AMPKγ2 RG in the heart, both lines developed WPW syndrome and cardiac hypertrophy; however, these effects were independent of cardiac glycogen accumulation. Compared with AMPKγ2 WT mice, AMPKγ2 NI and AMPKγ2 RG mice exhibited reduced body weight, fat mass, and liver steatosis when fed with a high fat diet (HFD). Surprisingly, AMPKγ2 RG but not AMPKγ2 NI mice fed with an HFD exhibited severe kidney injury characterized by glycogen accumulation, inflammation, apoptosis, cyst formation, and impaired renal function. These results demonstrate that expression of AMPKγ2 NI and AMPKγ2 RG mutations at physiological levels can induce beneficial metabolic effects but that this is accompanied by WPW syndrome. Our data also reveal an unexpected effect of AMPKγ2 RG in the kidney, linking lifelong constitutive activation of AMPK to a potential risk for kidney dysfunction in the context of an HFD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Physiological Expression of AMPKγ2RG Mutation Causes Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Induces Kidney Injury in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Mudgett, John; Bou-About, Ghina; Champy, Marie-France; Jacobs, Hugues; Monassier, Laurent; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Sorg, Tania; Herault, Yann; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Lu, Ku; Feng, Wen; Wang, Hongwu; Ma, Li-Jun; Askew, Roger; Erion, Mark D.; Kelley, David E.; Myers, Robert W.; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the AMP-activated kinase gamma 2 subunit (AMPKγ2), N488I (AMPKγ2NI) and R531G (AMPKγ2RG), are associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, a cardiac disorder characterized by ventricular pre-excitation in humans. Cardiac-specific transgenic overexpression of human AMPKγ2NI or AMPKγ2RG leads to constitutive AMPK activation and the WPW phenotype in mice. However, overexpression of these mutant proteins also caused profound, non-physiological increase in cardiac glycogen, which might abnormally alter the true phenotype. To investigate whether physiological levels of AMPKγ2NI or AMPKγ2RG mutation cause WPW syndrome and metabolic changes in other organs, we generated two knock-in mouse lines on the C57BL/6N background harboring mutations of human AMPKγ2NI and AMPKγ2RG, respectively. Similar to the reported phenotypes of mice overexpressing AMPKγ2NI or AMPKγ2RG in the heart, both lines developed WPW syndrome and cardiac hypertrophy; however, these effects were independent of cardiac glycogen accumulation. Compared with AMPKγ2WT mice, AMPKγ2NI and AMPKγ2RG mice exhibited reduced body weight, fat mass, and liver steatosis when fed with a high fat diet (HFD). Surprisingly, AMPKγ2RG but not AMPKγ2NI mice fed with an HFD exhibited severe kidney injury characterized by glycogen accumulation, inflammation, apoptosis, cyst formation, and impaired renal function. These results demonstrate that expression of AMPKγ2NI and AMPKγ2RG mutations at physiological levels can induce beneficial metabolic effects but that this is accompanied by WPW syndrome. Our data also reveal an unexpected effect of AMPKγ2RG in the kidney, linking lifelong constitutive activation of AMPK to a potential risk for kidney dysfunction in the context of an HFD. PMID:27621313

  5. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview

    OpenAIRE

    Mohandas, E.; Rajmohan, V.

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is t...

  6. Depression associated with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzmann, H; Qazi, A

    2015-06-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common disorders in old age. Depression is frequent in dementia, causing distress, reducing the quality of life, exacerbating cognitive and functional impairment and increasing caregiver stress. Even mild levels of depression can significantly add to the functional impairment of dementia patients and the severity of psychopathological and neurological impairments increases with increasing severity of depression. Depressive symptoms may be both a risk factor for, as well as a prodrome of dementia. Major depressive syndrome of Alzheimer's disease may be among the most common mood disorders of older adults. Treating depression is therefore a key clinical priority to improve the quality of life both of people with dementia as well as their carergivers. Nonpharmacological approaches and watchful waiting should be attempted first in patients who present with mild to moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression or depression not able to be managed through nonpharmacological means, antidepressant therapy should be considered.

  7. Parametric imaging of experimentally simulated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome conduction abnormalities in dogs: a concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weismueller, P.H.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Roth, J.; Bitter, F.; Stauch, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the diagnostic potential of phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for localizing accessory bundles in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, 24 experimental runs were performed in three open chest instrumented dogs. After a baseline study, WPW syndrome was simulated by stimulation at seven different sites around the base of the ventricles, and RNV's were obtained. Subsequent data processing including Fourier transformation allowed the localization of the site of the first inward motion of the ventricles by an isophasic wave display. In sinus rhythm, the septum contracted first. During ectopic premature ventricular stimulation by triggering the atrial signal, the phase scan was altered only when the stimulus was applied earlier than 20 ms before the expected QRS complex during sinus rhythm. During stimulation with fixed frequency, only the left lateral positions of the premature stimulation were detected by phase analysis with a sensitivity of 86%. Neither the antero- or posteroseptal nor the right ventricular premature contraction pattern could be exactly localized.

  8. Parametric imaging of experimentally simulated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome conduction abnormalities in dogs: a concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weismueller, P.H.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Roth, J.; Bitter, F.; Stauch, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the diagnostic potential of phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for localizing accessory bundles in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, 24 experimental runs were performed in three open chest instrumented dogs. After a baseline study, WPW syndrome was simulated by stimulation at seven different sites around the base of the ventricles, and RNV's were obtained. Subsequent data processing including Fourier transformation allowed the localization of the site of the first inward motion of the ventricles by an isophasic wave display. In sinus rhythm, the septum contracted first. During ectopic premature ventricular stimulation by triggering the atrial signal, the phase scan was altered only when the stimulus was applied earlier than 20 ms before the expected QRS complex during sinus rhythm. During stimulation with fixed frequency, only the left lateral positions of the premature stimulation were detected by phase analysis with a sensitivity of 86%. Neither the antero- or posteroseptal nor the right ventricular premature contraction pattern could be exactly localized

  9. Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indo, Toshikatsu

    1986-01-01

    Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between 64 cases with Parkinson's disease and 25 cases with vascular Parkinsonism was carried out. The rate of abnormality of CT scan findings, either ventricular dilatation or widening of sulci, in vascular Parkinsonism was strikingly high compared with Parkinson's disease. Patients could be divided into three groups according to the degree of overall abnormalities of CT scan findings (group A: markedly abnormal, group B: mildly abnormal, group C: normal). Incidences of group A were 9.4 % in Parkinson's disease and 52 % in vascular Parkinsonism, whereas those of group C were 56 % in the former and 28 % in the latter. All patients of group A were over 65 years of age in Parkinson's disease, but one-third of patients in group A were under 59 years of age in vascular Parkinsonism. Moreover, in vascular Parkinsonism, the level of disability was directly proportional to the abnormality of CT scan findings. The rate of predementia and dementia classified by Hasegawa's intelligence scale was 12.5 % in Parkinson's disease and 48 % in vascular Parkinsonism. No difference was found between the mean values of intelligence scale and background factors in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, the mean value was significantly low in proportion to the poverty of L-dopa effect in vascular Parkinsonism. From these results, the abnormality of CT scan findings and intellectual impairment were probably related to the cerebral pathological process in vascular Parkinsonism, but these relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  10. Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indo, Toshikatsu

    1986-01-01

    Comparative study of CT scan findings and intellectual function between 64 cases with Parkinson's disease and 25 cases with vascular Parkinsonism was carried out. The rate of abnormality of CT scan findings, either ventricular dilatation or widening of sulci, in vascular Parkinsonism was strikingly high compared with Parkinson's disease. Patients could be divided into three groups according to the degree of overall abnormalities of CT scan findings (group A: markedly abnormal, group B: mildly abnormal, group C: normal). Incidences of group A were 9.4 % in Parkinson's disease and 52 % in vascular Parkinsonism, whereas those of group C were 56 % in the former and 28 % in the latter. All patients of group A were over 65 years of age in Parkinson's disease, but one-third of patients in group A were under 59 years of age in vascular Parkinsonism. Moreover, in vascular Parkinsonism, the level of disability was directly proportional to the abnormality of CT scan findings. The rate of predementia and dementia classified by Hasegawa's intelligence scale was 12.5 % in Parkinson's disease and 48 % in vascular Parkinsonism. No difference was found between the mean values of intelligence scale and background factors in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, the mean value was significantly low in proportion to the poverty of L-dopa effect in vascular Parkinsonism. From these results, the abnormality of CT scan findings and intellectual impairment were probably related to the cerebral pathological process in vascular Parkinsonism, but these relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Rapid recovery from congestive heart failure following successful radiofrequency catheter ablation in a patient with late onset of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodogawa, Kenji; Ono, Norihiko; Seino, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted because of palpitations and dyspnea. A 12-lead electrocardiogram showed irregular wide QRS complex tachycardia with a slur at the initial portion of the QRS complex. He had preexisting long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but early excitation syndrome had never been noted. Chest X-ray showed heart enlargement and pulmonary congestion. He was diagnosed with late onset of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and congestive heart failure was probably caused by rapid ventricular response of atrial fibrillation through the accessory pathway. Emergency catheter ablation for the accessory pathway was undertaken, and heart failure was dramatically improved.

  12. Dementia: role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva-Kozarova, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: This presentation will focus on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of dementia and related diseases. We will discuss the following subjects: 1. Systematic assessment of MR in dementia 2. MR protocol for dementia 3. Typical findings in the most common dementia syndrome Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) 4. Short overview of neurodegenerative disorders which may be associated with dementia. The role of neuroimaging in dementia nowadays extends to support the diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative disorders. It is a challenge to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Early diagnosis includes recognition of predementia conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Neuroimaging may also be used to assess disease progression and is adopted in current trials investigating MCI and AD. An MR-study of a patient suspected of having dementia must be assessed in a standardized way. First of all, treatable diseases like subdural hematomas, tumors and hydrocephalus need to be excluded. Next we should look for signs of specific dementias such as: Alzheimer's disease (AD): medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and parietal atrophy. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD): (asymmetric) frontal lobe atrophy and atrophy of the temporal pole. Vascular Dementia (VaD): global atrophy, diffuse white matter lesions, lacunas and 'strategic infarcts' (infarcts in regions that are involved in cognitive function). Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): in contrast to other forms of dementia usually no specific abnormalities. So when we study the MR images we should score in a systematic way for global atrophy, focal atrophy and for vascular disease (i.e. infarcts, white matter lesions, lacunas)

  13. An Overview of Phytotherapeutic Approach in Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Syndrome & Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Narendra Singh; B. R. Pandey; Pankaj Verma

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of the dementia which occurs among older people above the age of 60 years. The Alzheimer’s disease once considered a rare disorder and it is now seen as a major public health problem that is seriously affecting millions of older people and their families world over. The incidence of AD ranges from 1 to 4 percent of the population per year rising from its lowest level at ages 65 to 70 years to rates that may approach 6 percent for those over the a...

  14. Differentiating between visual hallucination-free dementia with Lewy bodies and corticobasal syndrome on the basis of neuropsychology and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Misch, Michael R; Mitchell, Sara; Francis, Philip L; Sherborn, Kayla; Meradje, Katayoun; McNeely, Alicia A; Honjo, Kie; Zhao, Jiali; Scott, Christopher JM; Caldwell, Curtis B; Ehrlich, Lisa; Shammi, Prathiba; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Bilbao, Juan M; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS) are atypical parkinsonian disorders with fronto-subcortical and posterior cognitive dysfunction as common features. While visual hallucinations are a good predictor of Lewy body pathology and are rare in CBS, they are not exhibited in all cases of DLB. Given the clinical overlap between these disorders, neuropsychological and imaging markers may aid in distinguishing these entities. Methods Prospectively recruited ca...

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in young people, from childhood to young adulthood: relationships between age and clinical and electrophysiological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hae Jung; Ju, Hwang Young; Hyun, Myung Chul; Lee, Sang Bum

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the characteristics of electrophysiologic studies (EPS) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in subjects aged less than 30 years with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, particularly pediatric patients under 18 years of age, based on our experience. Methods Two hundred and one consecutive patients with WPW syndrome were recruited and divided to 3 groups according to age: group 1, 6 to 17 years; group 2, 18 to 29 years; and group 3, 30 to 60 years. The clinical, electrophysiological, and therapeutic data for these patients were evaluated by a retrospective medical record review. Results A total of 73 (36%) of these patients were syndrome. Therefore, when EPS and RFA are performed in children and adolescence with WPW syndrome, we recommend that these characteristics be considered. PMID:22323907

  16. Caregiver burden of Mexican dementia patients: the role of dysexecutive syndrome, sleep disorders, schooling and caregiver depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carrasco, Óscar; Guerra-Silla, María de Guadalupe; Torres-Arreola, Laura Del Pilar; García-Peña, Carmen; Escamilla-Jiménez, Cristopher Isaac; González-González, César

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accelerated growth of the elderly population, reconfiguration of families and member roles, and the increase of mental disorders, it is necessary to investigate the effects of this set of factors on the caregivers of patients with dementia in Mexico. Mental disorders of individuals have a negative impact on their physical and emotional quality of life, leading to greater dependence and making the caring experience a heavy burden. Several studies (none in Mexico) have used either the characteristics of the patient or caregiver to determine the burden, but few studies have included both profiles within a single study. The objective of the present study was to analyze the characteristics of the patients and caregivers associated with caregiver burden. A multicenter study was carried out in six health institutions located in Mexico City, including 175 patients (and their caregivers) diagnosed with different types of dementia. We used the Spanish Caregiver Burden Screen. Descriptive analysis and logistic regressions were used to estimate the effect of the covariates on the caregiver burden. The results showed that patient variables have a greater impact on caregiver burden than caregiver-associated variables. Dysexecutive syndrome, sleep disorders, schooling and caregiver depression are associated with a higher level of caregiver burden. Caregiver burden is a complex phenomenon. The results of the present study showed the need to implement multifactorial interventions targeting the caregiver to reduce the burden, strengthen the skills for patient management to avoid depression, improve patient health, and diminish functional dependence and future hospitalization. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Cardiac memory in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: noninvasive imaging of activation and repolarization before and after catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subham; Rhee, Edward K; Avari, Jennifer N; Woodard, Pamela K; Rudy, Yoram

    2008-08-26

    Cardiac memory refers to a change in ventricular repolarization induced by and persisting for minutes to months after cessation of a period of altered ventricular activation (eg, resulting from pacing or preexcitation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). ECG imaging (ECGI) is a novel imaging modality for noninvasive electroanatomic mapping of epicardial activation and repolarization. Fourteen pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and no other congenital disease, were imaged with ECGI a day before and 45 minutes, 1 week, and 1 month after successful catheter ablation. ECGI determined that preexcitation sites were consistent with sites of successful ablation in all cases to within a 1-hour arc of each atrioventricular annulus. In the preexcited rhythm, activation-recovery interval (ARI) was the longest (349+/-6 ms) in the area of preexcitation leading to high average base-to-apex ARI dispersion of 95+/-9 ms (normal is approximately 40 ms). The ARI dispersion remained the same 45 minutes after ablation, although the activation sequence was restored to normal. ARI dispersion was still high (79+/-9 ms) 1 week later and returned to normal (45+/-6 ms) 1 month after ablation. The study demonstrates that ECGI can noninvasively localize ventricular insertion sites of accessory pathways to guide ablation and evaluate its outcome in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White is associated with high ARI dispersion in the preexcited rhythm that persists after ablation and gradually returns to normal over a period of 1 month, demonstrating the presence of cardiac memory. The 1-month time course is consistent with transcriptional reprogramming and remodeling of ion channels.

  18. Primary caregivers' awareness and perception of early-onset dementia conditions in adolescents and young and middle-aged adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Wen-Xiu; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Fu-Gong; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Chou, Yu-Ching

    2014-09-01

    The present study aims to investigate the onset of dementia conditions using the Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID) scale and to identify the possible factors associated with DSQIID scores in people with Down syndrome (DS). The study population was recruited from the voluntary registry members of the Republic of China Foundation for Persons with Down syndrome; primary caregivers provided DSQIID information on 196 adolescents and adults with DS (aged 15-48 years) who were entered into the database and analyzed using SPSS 20.0 software. The results described the distribution of early-onset dementia conditions in 53 adolescents and adults with DS, and 2.6% of the subjects with DS had possible dementia (DSQIID score ≧ 20). Univariate analyses found that older age (p=0.001) and comorbid conditions (p=0.003) were significantly associated with DSQIID scores. Older subjects were more likely to have higher DSQIID scores than were younger age groups after ANOVA and Scheffe's tests. Lastly, a multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age (p<0.01), severe disability level (p<0.05) and comorbid condition (p<0.01) significantly explained 13% of the variation in DSQIID scores after adjusting for the factors of gender, education level and multiple disabilities in adolescents and adults with DS. The study highlights that future research should focus on the occurrence of dementia in people with DS and on identifying its influencing factors based on sound measurements, to initiate appropriate healthy aging policies for this group of people. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of malignant arrhythmias in initially symptomatic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: results of a prospective long-term electrophysiological follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, Carlo; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Manguso, Francesco; Baldi, Mario; Pappone, Alessia; Petretta, Andrea; Vitale, Raffaele; Saviano, Massimo; Ciaccio, Cristiano; Giannelli, Luigi; Calovic, Zarko; Tavazzi, Luigi; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-07

    The available amount of detailed long-term data in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is limited, and no prospective electrophysiological studies looking at predictors of malignant arrhythmia are available. Among 8575 symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White patients with atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia referred for electrophysiological test, 369 (mean age, 23±12.5 years) declined catheter ablation and were followed up. The primary end point of the study was to evaluate over a 5-year follow-up the predictors and characteristics of patients who develop malignant arrhythmias. After a mean follow-up of 42.1±10 months, malignant arrhythmias developed in 29 patients (mean age, 13.9±5.6 years; 26 male), resulting in presyncope/syncope (25 patients), hemodynamic collapse (3 patients), or cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation (1 patient). Of the remaining 340 patients, 168 (mean age, 34.2±9.0 years) remained asymptomatic up to 5 years, and 172 (mean age, 13.6±5.1 years) had benign recurrence, including sustained atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (132 patients) or atrial fibrillation (40 patients). Compared with the group with no malignant arrhythmias, the group with malignant arrhythmias showed shorter accessory-pathway effective refractory period (PWolff-Parkinson-White syndrome generally have a good outcome, and predictors of malignant arrhythmias are similar to those reported for asymptomatic patients with ventricular pre-excitation.

  20. Cerebral perfusion scintigraphy and the exploration of dementia syndromes: An illustration with five clinical cases; Scintigraphie cerebrale de perfusion et exploration des syndromes dementiels: illustration a l'aide de cinq cas cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, K.; Perdrisot, R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Poitiers, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 86 - Poitiers (France); Habert, M.O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-02-15

    The epidemiological evidence suggests that individuals with higher education level have a reduced risk of developing dementia. Because cognitive reserve and its compensation mechanisms may modulate the clinical expression in neuro-degenerative pathology, it is important to study subjects who present mild cognitive disturbance with functional imaging. The cerebral SPECT has been used to determine regional uptake of radiotracer into the brain of patients with cognitive impairment. These abnormalities of blood flow were correlated with cognitive impairment. The cerebral SPECT is also useful to investigate preclinical dementia and to predict the evolution of cognitive disturbance. This article, reports some technical and semeiological notions and illustrate with five clinical cases the scintigraphic aspect of some dementia syndrome. (authors)

  1. [Artistic creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellal, François; Musacchio, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Artistic creativity can be defined as the ability to produce both innovative and esthetic works. Though most dementias result in a loss of instrumental functions and a deterioration in artistic production, for some established artists, dementia, most often Alzheimer's disease, changed their style and technique but preserved their creativity and prolific artistic drive. Moreover, in some cases, mainly frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, and very occasionally strokes, the disease may favour the emergence of de novo artistic talent. This phenomenon has been conceptualized as a paradoxical facilitation, a disinhibition of brain areas devoted to visuospatial processing, greater freedom in a patient who becomes less bound by social conventions, enhancement of motivation and pleasure, etc. These neurological cases provide an opportunity to shed some light on the roots of artistic creation.

  2. Dyssynchronous Ventricular Activation in Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A Risk Factor for Development of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udink ten Cate, Floris EA; Wiesner, Nathalie; Trieschmann, Uwe; Khalil, Markus; Sreeram, Narayanswami

    2010-01-01

    A subset of children and adults with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome develop dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Although DCM may occur in symptomatic WPW patients with sustained tachyarrhythmias, emerging evidence suggests that significant left ventricular dysfunction may arise in WPW in the absence of incessant tachyarrhythmias. An invariable electrophysiological feature in this non-tachyarrhythmia type of DCM is the presence of a right-sided septal or paraseptal accessory pathway. It is thought that premature ventricular activation over these accessory pathways induces septal wall motion abnormalities and ventricular dyssynchrony. LV dyssynchrony induces cellular and structural ventricular remodelling, which may have detrimental effects on cardiac performance. This review summarizes recent evidence for development of DCM in asymptomatic patients with WPW, discusses its pathogenesis, clinical presentation, management and treatment. The prognosis of accessory pathway-induced DCM is excellent. LV dysfunction reverses following catheter ablation of the accessory pathway, suggesting an association between DCM and ventricular preexcitation. Accessory pathway-induced DCM should be suspected in all patients presenting with heart failure and overt ventricular preexcitation, in whom no cause for their DCM can be found. PMID:20552060

  3. Renal Failure in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Presenting as Catatonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Catatonia, originally described by Karl Kahlbaum in 1874, may be regarded as a set of clinical features found in a subtype of schizophrenia, but the syndrome may also stem from organic causes including vascular parkinsonism, brain masses, globus pallidus lesions, metabolic derangements, and pharmacologic agents, especially first generation antipsychotics. Catatonia may include paratonia, waxy flexibility (cerea flexibilitas), stupor, mutism, echolalia, and catalepsy (abnormal posturing). A case of catatonia as a result of acute renal failure in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies is described. This patient recovered after intravenous fluid administration and reinstitution of the atypical dopamine receptor blocking agent quetiapine, but benzodiazepines and amantadine are additional possible treatments. Recognition of organic causes of catatonia leads to timely treatment and resolution of the syndrome. PMID:23466522

  4. Renal Failure in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Presenting as Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fekete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia, originally described by Karl Kahlbaum in 1874, may be regarded as a set of clinical features found in a subtype of schizophrenia, but the syndrome may also stem from organic causes including vascular parkinsonism, brain masses, globus pallidus lesions, metabolic derangements, and pharmacologic agents, especially first generation antipsychotics. Catatonia may include paratonia, waxy flexibility (cerea flexibilitas, stupor, mutism, echolalia, and catalepsy (abnormal posturing. A case of catatonia as a result of acute renal failure in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies is described. This patient recovered after intravenous fluid administration and reinstitution of the atypical dopamine receptor blocking agent quetiapine, but benzodiazepines and amantadine are additional possible treatments. Recognition of organic causes of catatonia leads to timely treatment and resolution of the syndrome.

  5. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome: the detection of delta wave in an electrocardiogram (ECG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamat, Hassan Adam; Jacquir, Sabir; Khalil, Cliff; Laurent, Gabriel; Binczak, Stephane

    2016-08-01

    The delta wave remains an important indicator to diagnose the WPW syndrome. In this paper, a new method of detection of delta wave in an ECG signal is proposed. Firstly, using the continuous wavelet transform, the P wave, the QRS complex and the T wave are detected, then their durations are computed after determination of the boundary location (onsets and offsets of the P, QRS and T waves). Secondly, the PR duration, the QRS duration and the upstroke of the QRS complex are used to determine the presence or absence of the delta wave. This algorithm has been tested on the Physionel database (ptbdb) in order to evaluate its robustness. It has been applied to clinical signals from patients affected by WPW syndrome. This method can provide assistance to practitioners in order to detect the WPW syndrome.

  6. Cortical correlates of affective syndrome in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís T. Hayata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD are prevalent, however their relationship with patterns of cortical atrophy is not fully known. Objectives To compare cortical atrophy’s patterns between AD patients and healthy controls; to verify correlations between neuropsychiatric syndromes and cortical atrophy. Method 33 AD patients were examined by Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. Patients and 29 controls underwent a 3T MRI scanning. We considered four NPI syndromes: affective, apathy, hyperactivity and psychosis. Correlations between structural imaging and neuropsychiatric scores were performed by Freesurfer. Results were significant with a p-value < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Patients exhibited atrophy in entorhinal cortices, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, and precuneus bilaterally. There was correlation between affective syndrome and cortical thickness in right frontal structures, insula and temporal pole. Conclusion Cortical thickness measures revealed atrophy in mild AD. Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with atrophy of right frontal, temporal and insular cortices.

  7. Cognitive Profiles on the Severe Impairment Battery Are Similar in Alzheimer Disease and Down Syndrome With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Malcolm B; Doran, Eric; Phelan, Michael; Lott, Ira T

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has revealed similarities in the neuropathology, clinical presentation, and risk factors between persons with Alzheimer disease from the general population (GP-AD) and those with Down syndrome (DS-AD). Less is known, however, about the extent of similarities and differences in the cognitive profiles of these 2 populations. Fifty-one moderate to severely demented GP-AD and 59 DS-AD individuals participated in this study which compared the cognitive profiles of these 2 populations on the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB), controlling for sex as well as level of functional ability using a modified version of the Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale. Overall, the neuropsychological profiles of the higher-functioning individuals within the DS-AD and advanced GP-AD groups, as represented by mean difference scores on the SIB as a whole and across the 9 separate cognitive domains, were very similar to one another after adjusting for sex and functional impairment. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly compare the cognitive profiles of these 2 populations on the SIB. Findings suggest that the underlying dementia in GP-AD and DS-AD may have corresponding and parallel effects on cognition.

  8. Destructive, multifocal squamous-cell carcinoma nodules on the cheecks and neck of an elderly woman with a dementia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Marigliano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Squamous-cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer. It can develop on normal skin, actinic keratoses, leukoplakia, and burn scars. The tumor is characterized by remarkable variability at the macroscopic and histopathologic levels. Case report: A 93-year-old woman was admitted to nursing home with a diagnosis of dementia syndrome and squamous cell nodular carcinoma on cheeks and neck region. The physical examination revealed firm, black excrescences with irregular surfaces over both cheekbones, which were roughly the size of hazelnuts. Similar nodules were present with ulcers on other areas of the face. The patient was admitted to the day hospital twice for wide excision of the tumors in the zygomatic region. Later, the neck tumors were removed, and the wound was repaired with a rotation flap after careful control of bleeding. For the latter surgery, the patient was hospitalized for a few days in a geriatric ward to ensure optimal medical care and psychological support. The histological examination revealed ulcerated, well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma that extended down to the subcutaneous layer. Shortly after surgery, she returned to the nursing home to resume rehabilitation and group therapy.

  9. Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Infants and Children with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in the Absence of Tachyarrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are rarely attributable to sustained or incessant tachyarrhythmias in infants and children with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. However, several recent reports suggested that significant LV dysfunction may develop in WPW syndrome in the absence of tachyarrhythmias. It is assumed that an asynchronous ventricular activation over the accessory pathway, especially right-sided, induces septal wall motion abnormalities, ventricular remodeling and ventricular dysfunction. The prognosis of DCM associated with asymptomatic WPW is excellent. Loss of ventricular pre-excitation results in mechanical resynchronization and reverse remodeling where LV function recovers completely. The reversible nature of LV dysfunction after loss of ventricular pre-excitation supports the causal relationship between LV dysfunction and ventricular pre-excitation. This review summarizes recent clinical and electrophysiological evidence for development of LV dysfunction or DCM in asymptomatic WPW syndrome, and discusses the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:23323117

  10. Parkinson disease and positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1984-10-01

    Physiopathologic investigations of Parkinson disease and parkinsonian syndrome using positron tomography are briefly reviewed: study of cerebral blood flow and metabolism; effects of L-DOPA; study of dopaminergic receptors and of 18 F-Fluoro-L-DOPA incorporation [fr

  11. Ageing and Dementia in a Longitudinal Study of a Cohort with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Janet; Collins, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: A population sample of people with Down syndrome has been studied from infancy and has now been followed up again at age 47 years. Methods: Intelligence and language skills were tested and daily living skills assessed. Memory/cognitive deterioration was examined using two test instruments. Results: Scores on verbal tests of…

  12. Differential Classification of Dementia

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    E. Mohr

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of biological markers, dementia classification remains complex both in terms of characterization as well as early detection of the presence or absence of dementing symptoms, particularly in diseases with possible secondary dementia. An empirical, statistical approach using neuropsychological measures was therefore developed to distinguish demented from non-demented patients and to identify differential patterns of cognitive dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease. Age-scaled neurobehavioral test results (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Revised and Wechsler Memory Scale from Alzheimer's (AD and Huntington's (HD patients, matched for intellectual disability, as well as normal controls were used to derive a classification formula. Stepwise discriminant analysis accurately (99% correct distinguished controls from demented patients, and separated the two patient groups (79% correct. Variables discriminating between HD and AD patient groups consisted of complex psychomotor tasks, visuospatial function, attention and memory. The reliability of the classification formula was demonstrated with a new, independent sample of AD and HD patients which yielded virtually identical results (classification accuracy for dementia: 96%; AD versus HD: 78%. To validate the formula, the discriminant function was applied to Parkinson's (PD patients, 38% of whom were classified as demented. The validity of the classification was demonstrated by significant PD subgroup differences on measures of dementia not included in the discriminant function. Moreover, a majority of demented PD patients (65% were classified as having an HD-like pattern of cognitive deficits, in line with previous reports of the subcortical nature of PD dementia. This approach may thus be useful in classifying presence or absence of dementia and in discriminating between dementia subtypes in cases of secondary or coincidental dementia.

  13. The utility of cerebral blood flow imaging in patients with the unique syndrome of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Nagamachi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Mituyama, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients presenting with progressive dementia coupled with motor neuron disease underwent brain SPECT using N-isopropyl-p iodine-123-iodoamphetamine [( 123 I]IMP). The characteristic clinical features of progressive dementia and motor neuron disease were noted. IMP SPECT also revealed reduced uptake in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions, with no reduction of uptake in the parietal, parietal-occipital regions. We conclude that IMP SPECT has potential for the evaluation of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease

  14. [(11)C]PIB-, [(18)F]FDG-PET and MRI imaging in patients with Parkinson's disease with and without dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Pekka; Scheinin, Noora; Aalto, Sargo

    2010-01-01

    and controls, and hippocampal atrophy was associated with impaired memory. This cross-sectional data suggests that development of dementia in PD is associated with extensive spread of hypometabolism beyond the occipital cortex, and with hippocampal and frontal atrophy but not beta-amyloid deposition consistent...... impairment and dementia in PD. We performed a neuropsychological evaluation, structural brain MRI, [(18)F]FDG PET and [(11)C]PIB PET in 19 PD patients [eight non-demented (PD), eleven demented (PDD)] and 24 healthy elderly volunteers. [(11)C]PIB region-to-cerebellum ratios did not differ significantly...... between the groups in any brain region (p > 0.05). PDD patients showed impaired glucose metabolism in cortical brain regions and this reduction was associated with the degree of cognitive impairment. PDD patients had more atrophy both in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex compared with PD patients...

  15. Gated blood-pool SPECT assessment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndromes before and after radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways; Evaluation fonctionnelle par tomographie cavitaire du syndrome de Wolff-Parkinson-White, avant et apres traitement par radiofrequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontemps, L.; Ben Brahim, H.; Kraiem, T.; Chevalier, P.; Kirkorian, G.; Touboul, P.; Itti, R. [Hopital Cardiologique de Lyon, 69 (France)

    1997-08-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of accessory pathways in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is supposed to be less aggressive than fulguration while providing excellent results. The aims of our study were therefore the evaluation of the functional results of this therapy in terms of left or right ejection fractions and its effects on the contraction synchronism between both ventricular chambers, derived from bi-ventricular Fourier phase histograms. A consecutive series of 44 patients has been investigated within 48 hours before and after RF therapy: 14 patients had right sided WPW and 30 patients left sided WPW. Only patients for whom RF treatment was considered as a success have been included in the study. Gated blood pool tomography has been performed in order to localize the site of pre-excitation and to build-up the phase histograms for both ventricles, and planar gated imaging has been used for right and left ejection fraction determination. Functional results demonstrate the absence of deleterious effect of RF on ventricular contraction and rather a slight increase of ejection fractions, with a more statistically significant difference for left WPW (LVEF = 62.2 % before RF vs 64.4 % after RF; p = 0.02) than for right WPW (RVEF = 36.3 % before RF vs 39.7 after RF; p = 0.16). Phase analysis, on the contrary, show only significant differences for right WPW, with a noticeable decrease of the pre-excitation (left-to-right phase difference 14.4 deg before RF vs 7.5 deg after RF; p = 0.03) and a significant reduction of the right ventricular phase dispersion (right phase standard deviation 26.5 deg before RF vs 19.0 deg after RF; p = 0.03). For left WPW no measurable differences can be demonstrated in the basal state and it is suggested to use stimulation techniques in order to enhance the competition between the normal and accessory conduction pathways. (authors). 17 refs.

  16. Mutation in GM2A Leads to a Progressive Chorea-Dementia Syndrome

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    Mustafa A. Salih

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of many cases of childhood-onset chorea remains undetermined, although advances in genomics are revealing both new disease-associated genes and variant phenotypes associated with known genes. Methods: We report a Saudi family with a neurodegenerative course dominated by progressive chorea and dementia in whom we performed homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous missense mutation in GM2A within a prominent block of homozygosity. This mutation is predicted to impair protein function. Discussion: Although discovered more than two decades ago, to date, only five patients with this rare form of GM2 gangliosidosis have been reported. The phenotype of previously described GM2A patients has been typified by onset in infancy, profound hypotonia and impaired volitional movement, intractable seizures, hyperacusis, and a macular cherry red spot. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of GM2A mutation-positive gangliosidosis to include generalized chorea without macular findings or hyperacusis and highlight how mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes may present in unexpected ways.

  17. Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome in young men presenting with palpitation: the pattern of delta waves in predicting location of accessory pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryanti Cahyaningtias

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Palpitation is a common presenting symptom in the emergency department. Wolf-Parkinson White (WPW syndrome is a cardiac conduction disorder that may present with palpitation and lead to sudden cardiac death. WPW could be detected by  electrocardiogram (ECG. In this case report, we present two young male patients with WPW syndrome admitted to our hospital with history of repeated and progressive palpitation. ECG of the first patient revealed supraventricular tachycardia which converted to sinus rhythm after propanolol treatment. ECG showed sinus rhythm with delta wave in lead II,III,aVF, V1 suggesting the presence of accessory pathway (AP in left lateral wall. Electrophysiology study confirmed the presence of AP and radio frequency catheter ablation was successfully done resulted in disappearance of delta on outpatient clinic ECG. Patient has no symptom and he do not have to take medication. ECG of the second patient revealed supraventricular tachycardia with abberancy. After amiodarone infusion, ECG showed sinus rhythm with delta wave in lead I,II,aVL suggesting the presence of accessory pathway in anteroseptal wall. Electrophysiology study and catheter ablation did not perform for this patient because of financial problem, however amidarone has to be taken regularly to prevent the recurrence of supraventricular tachycardia. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:298-301Keywords: ECG, palpitation, supraventricular tachycardia, Wolf- Parkinson White syndrome

  18. Anaesthetic management of a case of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabade, Savitri D; Sheikh, Safiya; Periyadka, Bhavya

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of fibroid uterus with Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW) syndrome in a 48-year-old female, posted for elective hysterectomy. Patient gave history of short recurrent episodes of palpitation and electrocardiograph confirmed the diagnosis of WPW syndrome. The anaesthetic management of these patients is challenging as they are known to develop life threatening tachyarrhythmia like paroxysmal supra-ventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and atrial fibrillation (AF). Epidural anaesthesia is preferred compared to general anaesthesia to avoid polypharmacy, noxious stimuli of laryngoscopy and intubation. To deal with perioperative complications like PSVT and AF, anti-arrhythmic drugs like adenosine, beta blockers and defibrillator should be kept ready. Perioperative monitoring is essential as patients can develop complications. PMID:22013256

  19. Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome with a slight elevation of creatine-kinase levels and respiratory failure in a patient with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Li Wei,1,2 Yinghui Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome (NMLS is a rare but catastrophic complication of drug treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD. Sudden withdrawal and abrupt reduction of antiparkinsonian drugs are major risk factors. Just as its name suggests, the clinical features of NMLS are similar to neuroleptic malignant syndrome, which is a dangerous adverse response to antipsychotic drugs. Both of these conditions can present with hyperthermia, marked muscle rigidity, altered consciousness, autonomic dysfunction, and elevated serum creatine-kinase (CK levels. However, we describe a special NMLS case with a slight elevation of CK levels and respiratory failure in the full course of her treatment. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with a 4-years history of Parkinson's disease, presented with hyperthermia and severe muscular rigidity. During the course of her treatment, her maximum temperature was extremely high (above 41°C. At the beginning, the diagnosis of NMLS secondary to dopamine decrease was difficult to make, because her initial blood examination revealed that her serum CK levels were mildly elevated and decreased to normal range rapidly. Although antiparkinsonian drugs and supportive treatment were applied, the patient developed an acute respiratory failure in the early course of treatment. This case report highlights that when confronted with Parkinson's patients with high body temperature and muscle rigidity, NMLS should be taken into consideration even if there is no CK elevation. Likewise, the need for supportive care is essential, because its complications are severe, even such as respiratory failure. Keywords: antiparkinsonian drugs, creatine kinase, parkinsonism–hyperpyrexia syndrome, respiratory failure

  20. Abnormal perfusion on myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Cha, Kwang Soo; Han, Seung Ho; Park, Tae Ho; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal myocardial perfusion may be caused by ventricular preexcitation, but its location, extent, severity and correlation with accessory pathway (AP) are not established. We evaluated perfusion patterns on myocardial perfusion SPECT and location of AP in patients with WPW (Wolff-Parkison-White) syndrome. Adenosine Tc-99m MIBI or Tl-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed in 11 patients with WPW syndrome. Perfusion defects (PD) were compared to AP location based on ECT with Fitzpatrick's algorithm of electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation. Patients had atypical chest discomfort or no symptom. Risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) was below 0.1 in 11 patients using the nomogram to estimate the probability of CAD. Coronary angiography was performed in 4 patients(mid-LAD 50% in one, normal in others). In 4 patients, AP localization was done by electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Small to large extent (11.0 ± 8.5%, range:3 ∼ 35%) and mild to moderate severity (-71 ± 42.7%, range:-217 ∼ -39%) of reversible (n=9) or fixed (n=1) perfusion defects were noted. One patients with right free wall (right lateral) AP showed normal. PD locations were variable following the location of AP. One patient with left lateral wall AP was followed 6 weeks after RFCA and showed significantly decreased PD on SPECT with successful ablation. Myocardial perfusion defect showed variable extent, severity and location in patients with WPW syndrome. Abnormal perfusion defect showed in most of all patients, but if did not seem to be correlated specifically with location of accessory pathway and coronary artery disease. Therefore myocardial perfusion SPECT should be interpreted carefully in patients with WPW syndrome

  1. Abnormal perfusion on myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Cha, Kwang Soo; Han, Seung Ho; Park, Tae Ho; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Abnormal myocardial perfusion may be caused by ventricular preexcitation, but its location, extent, severity and correlation with accessory pathway (AP) are not established. We evaluated perfusion patterns on myocardial perfusion SPECT and location of AP in patients with WPW (Wolff-Parkison-White) syndrome. Adenosine Tc-99m MIBI or Tl-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT was performed in 11 patients with WPW syndrome. Perfusion defects (PD) were compared to AP location based on ECT with Fitzpatrick's algorithm of electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation. Patients had atypical chest discomfort or no symptom. Risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) was below 0.1 in 11 patients using the nomogram to estimate the probability of CAD. Coronary angiography was performed in 4 patients(mid-LAD 50% in one, normal in others). In 4 patients, AP localization was done by electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Small to large extent (11.0 {+-} 8.5%, range:3 {approx} 35%) and mild to moderate severity (-71 {+-} 42.7%, range:-217 {approx} -39%) of reversible (n=9) or fixed (n=1) perfusion defects were noted. One patients with right free wall (right lateral) AP showed normal. PD locations were variable following the location of AP. One patient with left lateral wall AP was followed 6 weeks after RFCA and showed significantly decreased PD on SPECT with successful ablation. Myocardial perfusion defect showed variable extent, severity and location in patients with WPW syndrome. Abnormal perfusion defect showed in most of all patients, but if did not seem to be correlated specifically with location of accessory pathway and coronary artery disease. Therefore myocardial perfusion SPECT should be interpreted carefully in patients with WPW syndrome.

  2. [Clinical demonstrations: Heart rupture in acute myocardial infarct. Infectious endocarditis. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nager, F

    1984-12-08

    This clinical demonstration includes three topics of clinical cardiology: myocardial rupture in acute myocardial infarction, infective endocarditis, and WPW-syndrome with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In the first part three cases with septal perforation or papillary muscle rupture are demonstrated. Our experience with myocardial rupture (free wall, septum, papillary muscle) during the last six years is summarized with special reference to the significance and the differential diagnosis of systolic regurgitant murmurs after myocardial infarction. Special features of acute mitral incompetence (papillary muscle dysfunction) in myocardial infarction are outlined and diagnostic guidelines for differentiation between septal perforation and papillary muscle rupture are discussed. In the second part two patients with aortic (e.g. mitral) valve rupture in the course of infective endocarditis are presented. The synoptic comparison of these two patients is related to the results of our own clinical studies on the changing pattern of infective endocarditis (epidemiologically, clinically) during the last three decades. The clinical picture of acute aortic valve rupture is outlined and the bedside signs indicating catastrophic complications of infective endocarditis are summarized. In the third part the odyssey of a patient with WPW-syndrome and consecutive paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is described. Progress in electrophysiological analysis of the re-entry circles in preexcitation syndromes is outlined.

  3. Tc-99m-bicisate (ECD)-brain-SPECT in rapidly progressive dementia; Hirn-SPECT mit Tc-99m-Bicisat (ECD) bei rasch progredientem dementiellen Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marienhagen, J.; Eilles, C. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Weingaertner, U.; Blaha, L. [Bezirkskrankenhaus Mainkofen (Germany). Psychiatrische Klinik; Zerr, I.; Poser, S. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie

    1999-07-01

    We present a 61-year-old male patient with progressive dementia. A brain SPECT with Tc-99m-bicisate was performed for confirmation of clinically suspected Alzheimer-dementia. At the time of the SPECT-investigation marked apraxia and aphasia besides severe dementia were present. Electrophysiological as well as anatomical neuroimaging findings showed non-diagnostic alterations. SPECT revealed distinct perfusion defects, which made Alzheimer Dementia unlikely. The further course of the patient was determined by rapidly progressive deterioration with development of akinetic mutism. Thereafter, increased levels of neuron-specific enolase as well as 14-3-3 proteins were found in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF). The patient finally died with signs of cerebral decortication. Due to the clinical course and the CSF-findings the patient's final diagnosis was Creutzfeld-Jakob-disease, nevertheless no autopsy was performed. The presented case report underscores the clinical utility of perfusion brain SPECT in the differential diagnosis of dementias. (orig.) [German] Wir berichten ueber einen 61jaehrigen Patienten mit progredientem dementiellen Syndrom, der unter der Verdachtsdiagnose einer Demenz vom Alzheimer-Typ (DAT) zur Hirn-SPECT-Untersuchung mit TC-99m-Bicisat (ECD) vorgestellt wurde. Zum Untersuchungszeitpunkt bestanden neben dem Vollbild einer Demenz eine ausgepraegte Apraxie und Aphasie bei unspezifischen Veraenderungen im EEG sowie der neuroradiologischen Bildgebung. In der Hirn-SPECT-Untersuchung fanden sich fuer eine DAT untypische ausgedehnte, vorwiegend rechtshemisphaerische Perfusionsstoerungen. Im weiteren Verlauf rasche Progredienz des Krankheitsbildes mit Entwicklung eines akinetischen Mutismus sowie Nachweis erhoehter Werte der neuronspezifischen Enolase und des 14-3-3-Proteins im Liquor. Der Patient verstarb schliesslich unter dem Bild einer Decortication. Aufgrund des klinischen Verlaufs sowie der Liquorbefunde wurde, da eine autoptische Befundsicherung

  4. Methodological study of radionuclide tomographic phase analysis in localization of accessory conduction pathway in patients with wolff-parkinson-white syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo Jinshan; Zhu Junren; Li Zhishan

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the methodology of tomographic phase analysis to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented. We analyzed the major factors that affect image reconstruction, selection of tomographic planes and phase analysis, also discussed the key step for reconstruction short-axial section that parallel and closest to the level of atrio-ventricular rings. Of five patients undergoing this procedure prior to surgery, tomographic phase analysis correctly identified the site of ACP confirmed by epicardial mapping in all of the five patients. Our results suggest this approach to be an objective, clear and correct one for localizing ACP

  5. Anesthetic management for surgical repair of Ebstein′s anomaly along with coexistent Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a patient with severe mitral stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Prabhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebstein′s anomaly (EA is the most common cause of congenital tricuspid regurgitation. The associated anomalies commonly seen are atrial septal defect or patent foramen ovale and accessory conduction pathways. Its association with coexisting mitral stenosis (MS has uncommonly been described. The hemodynamic consequences and anesthetic implications, of a combination of EA and rheumatic MS, have not so far been discussed in the literature. We report successful anesthetic management of a repair of EA and mitral valve replacement in a patient with coexisting Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome.

  6. A comparison of substantia nigra T1 hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease dementia, Alzheimer's disease and age-matched controls: Volumetric analysis of neuromelanin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Ju Yeon; Yun, Won Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Ki Chang; Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases.

  7. Tomographic phase analysis to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Tonami, N.; Taki, J.; Nanbu, I.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis has been applied to Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP); however, there was a limitation to estimate the precise location of ACP by planar phase analysis. In this study, the authors applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography. Twelve patients with WPW who underwent epicardial mapping and surgical division of ACP were studied by both of gated emission computed tomography (GECT) and routine gated blood pool study (GBPS). The GBPS was performed with Tc-99m red blood cells in multiple projections; modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique and/or left lateral views. In GECT, short axial, horizontal and vertical long axial blood pool images were reconstructed. Phase analysis was performed using fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform in both GECT and GBPS images, and abnormal initial contractions on both the planar and tomographic phase analysis were compared with the location of surgically confirmed ACPs. In planar phase analysis, abnormal initial phase was identified in 7 out of 12 (58%) patients, while in tomographic phase analysis, the localization of ACP was predicted in 11 out of 12 (92%) patients. Tomographic phase analysis is superior to planar phase images in 8 out of 12 patients to estimate the location of ACP. Phase analysis by GECT can avoid overlap of blood pool in cardiac chambers and has advantage to identify the propagation of phase three-dimensionally. Tomographic phase analysis is a good adjunctive method for patients with WPW to estimate the site of ACP

  8. Phase mapping of radionuclide gated biventriculograms in patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guludec, D.; Bourguignon, M.; Sebag, C.; Valette, H.; Sirinelli, A.; Davy, J.M.; Syrota, A.; Motte, G.

    1987-01-01

    Accuracy of Fourier phase mapping of radionuclide gated biventriculograms in detecting the origin of abnormal ventricular activation was studied during ventricular tachycardia or preexcitation. Group I included six patients suffering from clinical recurrent VT; 3 gated blood pool studies were acquired for each patient: during sinus rhythm, right ventricular pacing, and induced sustained VT-Group II included seven patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and recurrent paroxysmal tachycardia; 3 gated blood pool studies were acquired for each patient: during sinus rhythm, right atrial pacing and orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia. Each acquisition lasted 5 min, in 30 degrees-40 degrees left anterior oblique projection. In Group I, the Fourier phase mapping was consistent with QRS morphology and axis during VT (5/6), except in one patient with LV aneurysm and LBBB electrical pattern during VT. Origin of VT on phase mapping was located in the right ventricle (n = 2) or in left ventricle (n = 4), at the border of wall motion abnormalities each time they existed (5/6). In Group II, the phase advance correlated with the location of the accessory pathway determined by ECG and endocardial mapping (n = 6) and per-operative epicardial mapping (n = 1). Discrimination between anterior and posterior localization of paraseptal pathways and location of intermittent preexcitation was not possible. We conclude that Fourier phase mapping is an accurate method for locating the origin of VT and determining its etiology. It can help locate the site of ventricular preexcitation in patients with only one accessory pathway; its accuracy in locating multiple accessory pathways remains unknown.

  9. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.; Guibourg, H.; Camps, J.; Perosio, A.

    1986-10-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched control group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate.

  10. Dyssynchronous ventricular contraction in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a risk factor for the development of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chen-Cheng; Guo, Bao-Jing; Li, Wen-Xiu; Xiao, Yan-Yan; Jin, Mei; Han, Lin; Sun, Jing-Ping; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Dong, Jian-Zeng

    2013-11-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that significant left ventricular dysfunction may arise in right-sided septal or paraseptal accessory pathways (APs) with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, even in the absence of recurrent or incessant tachycardia. During 1 year and 9 months, we identified four consecutive female children with median age of 8 years diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) combined with overt right-sided APs several years ago. Incessant or recurrent tachycardia as the cause of DCM could be excluded. Anti-heart failure chemotherapy did not produce satisfactory effects. The patients underwent radiofrequency ablations (RFCAs). This report describes the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of the cases before and after the ablation. Dyssynchronous ventricular contraction was observed in all patients. The locations of the APs were the right-sided anteroseptum and the free wall (n = 2 each). All patients received successful RFCAs. Their physical activities and growth improved greatly, and the echocardiographic data demonstrated that their left ventricular (LV) contraction recovered to synchrony shortly after the ablation and that their LV function recovered to normal gradually during the follow-up. A causal relationship between overt ventricular preexcitation and the development of DCM is supported by the complete recovery of LV function and reversed LV remodeling after the loss of ventricular preexcitation. Preexcitation-related dyssynchrony was probably the crucial mechanism. Not only right-sided septal or paraseptal but also free wall overt APs may induce LV dysfunction and even DCM. AP-induced DCM is an indication for ablation with a good prognosis.

  11. Is Exercise Stress Testing a Cost-Saving Strategy For Risk Assessment of Pediatric Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltedo, Jose M.; Iyer, Ramesh V.; Forman, Howard; Fahey, John; Rosenthal, Geoffrey; Snyder, Christopher S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) patients the loss of pre-excitation in a single heartbeat during exercise stress testing (EST) is a predictor of low risk of sudden death. The purpose of this study was to: 1) assess the frequency of loss of pre-excitation in a single heartbeat during exercise testing, and 2) compare the cost of EST versus trans-catheter electrophysiology study (EPS) in the risk assessment of WPW patients. Methods: A retrospective review of 50 cases of patients with WPW who underwent EST was conducted including demographics, history of supraventricular tachycardia, associated congenital heart disease, maximum heart rate achieved, and loss of pre-excitation in a single heartbeat. Hospital costs of EST and EPS were compared. Results: Of the 50 patients who underwent EST, 4 (8%), lost pre-excitation in a single heartbeat during EST. No differences were found regarding gender, age at diagnosis or EST, history of supraventricular tachycardia, presence of congenital heart disease or maximal heart rate. A cost comparison, utilizing the cost data: EST ($62.75) and EPS ($5,597) found EST to be a cost-saving approach in WPW patients. With 4 patients losing pre-excitation during EST, the cost saving of EST was $22,388 for this population of WPW patients. Conclusions: A frequency of 8% loss of pre-excitation was found in a pediatric sample that underwent EST. Additionally, EST was shown to be a cost-saving strategy in risk assessment of pediatric WPW patients. PMID:21845141

  12. Long-Term Natural History of Adult Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Patients Treated With and Without Catheter Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; May, Heidi T; Bair, Tami L; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Crandall, Brian G; Cutler, Michael J; Jacobs, Victoria; Mallender, Charles; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Osborn, Jeffrey S; Weiss, J Peter; Day, John D

    2015-12-01

    There are a paucity of data about the long-term natural history of adult Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) patients in regard to risk of mortality and atrial fibrillation. We sought to describe the long-term outcomes of WPW patients and ascertain the impact of ablation on the natural history. Three groups of patients were studied: 2 WPW populations (ablation: 872, no ablation: 1461) and a 1:5 control population (n=11 175). Long-term mortality and atrial fibrillation rates were determined. The average follow-up for the WPW group was 7.9±5.9 (median: 6.9) years and was similar between the ablation and nonablation groups. Death rates were similar between the WPW group versus the control group (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.11; P=0.56). Nonablated WPW patients had a higher long-term death risk compared with ablated WPW patients (hazard ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.50-20.93; P<0.0001). Incident atrial fibrillation risk was higher in the WPW group compared with the control population (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.87; P<0.0001). Nonablated WPW patients had lower risk than ablated patients (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.53; P<0.0001). Long-term mortality rates in WPW patients are low and similar to an age-matched and gender-matched control population. WPW patients that underwent the multifactorial process of ablation had a lower mortality compared to nonablated WPW patients. Atrial fibrillation rates are high long-term, and ablation does not reduce this risk. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Phase mapping of radionuclide gated biventriculograms in patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guludec, D.; Bourguignon, M.; Sebag, C.; Valette, H.; Sirinelli, A.; Davy, J.M.; Syrota, A.; Motte, G.

    1987-01-01

    Accuracy of Fourier phase mapping of radionuclide gated biventriculograms in detecting the origin of abnormal ventricular activation was studied during ventricular tachycardia or preexcitation. Group I included six patients suffering from clinical recurrent VT; 3 gated blood pool studies were acquired for each patient: during sinus rhythm, right ventricular pacing, and induced sustained VT-Group II included seven patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and recurrent paroxysmal tachycardia; 3 gated blood pool studies were acquired for each patient: during sinus rhythm, right atrial pacing and orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia. Each acquisition lasted 5 min, in 30 degrees-40 degrees left anterior oblique projection. In Group I, the Fourier phase mapping was consistent with QRS morphology and axis during VT (5/6), except in one patient with LV aneurysm and LBBB electrical pattern during VT. Origin of VT on phase mapping was located in the right ventricle (n = 2) or in left ventricle (n = 4), at the border of wall motion abnormalities each time they existed (5/6). In Group II, the phase advance correlated with the location of the accessory pathway determined by ECG and endocardial mapping (n = 6) and per-operative epicardial mapping (n = 1). Discrimination between anterior and posterior localization of paraseptal pathways and location of intermittent preexcitation was not possible. We conclude that Fourier phase mapping is an accurate method for locating the origin of VT and determining its etiology. It can help locate the site of ventricular preexcitation in patients with only one accessory pathway; its accuracy in locating multiple accessory pathways remains unknown

  14. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.; Guibourg, H.; Camps, J.; Perosio, A.

    1986-01-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched control group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate

  15. Tomographic phase analysis to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Tonami, N.; Taki, J.; Nanbu, I.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis has been applied to Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP); however, there was a limitation to estimate the precise location of ACP by planar phase analysis. In this study, the authors applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography. Twelve patients with WPW who underwent epicardial mapping and surgical division of ACP were studied by both of gated emission computed tomography (GECT) and routine gated blood pool study (GBPS). The GBPS was performed with Tc-99m red blood cells in multiple projections; modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique and/or left lateral views. In GECT, short axial, horizontal and vertical long axial blood pool images were reconstructed. Phase analysis was performed using fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform in both GECT and GBPS images, and abnormal initial contractions on both the planar and tomographic phase analysis were compared with the location of surgically confirmed ACPs. In planar phase analysis, abnormal initial phase was identified in 7 out of 12 (58%) patients, while in tomographic phase analysis, the localization of ACP was predicted in 11 out of 12 (92%) patients. Tomographic phase analysis is superior to planar phase images in 8 out of 12 patients to estimate the location of ACP. Phase analysis by GECT can avoid overlap of blood pool in cardiac chambers and has advantage to identify the propagation of phase three-dimensionally. Tomographic phase analysis is a good adjunctive method for patients with WPW to estimate the site of ACP.

  16. Noninvasive Localization of Accessory Pathways in Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A Strain Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Omran, Mohammad Taghi Salehi; Maleki, Majid; Haghjoo, Majid; Noohi, Feridoun; Haghighi, Zahra Ojaghi; Sadeghpour, Anita; Davari, Paridokht Nakhostin; Abkenar, Hooman Bakhshandeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Noninvasive techniques for the localization of the accessory pathways (APs) might help guide mapping procedures and ablation techniques. We sought to examine the diagnostic accuracy of strain imaging for the localization of the APs in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Methods: We prospectively studied 25 patients (mean age = 32 ± 17 years, 58.3% men) with evidence of pre-excitation on electrocardiography (ECG). Electromechanical interval was defined as the time difference between the onset of delta wave and the onset of regional myocardial contraction. Time differences between the onset of delta wave (δ) and the onset of regional myocardial contraction (δ-So), peak systolic motion (δ-Sm), regional strain (δ-ε), peak strain (δ-εp), and peak strain rate (δ-SRp) were measured. Results: There was a significant difference between time to onset of delta wave to onset of peak systolic motion (mean ± SD) in the AP location (A) and normal segments (B) versus that in the normal volunteers (C) [A: (57.08 ± 23.88 msec) vs. B: (75.20 ± 14.75) vs. C: (72.9 0 ± 11.16); p value (A vs. B) = 0.004 and p value (A vs. C) = 0.18] and [A: (49.17 ± 35.79) vs. B: (67.60 ± 14.51) vs. C: (67.40 ± 6.06 msec); p value (A vs. B) < 0.001 and p value (A vs. C) = 0.12, respectively]. Conclusion: Our study showed that strain imaging parameters [(δ-So) and (δ-Strain)] are superior to the ECG in the localization of the APs (84% vs. 76%). PMID:23967027

  17. Gated blood-pool SPECT assessment of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndromes before and after radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontemps, L.; Ben Brahim, H.; Kraiem, T.; Chevalier, P.; Kirkorian, G.; Touboul, P.; Itti, R.

    1997-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of accessory pathways in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is supposed to be less aggressive than fulguration while providing excellent results. The aims of our study were therefore the evaluation of the functional results of this therapy in terms of left or right ejection fractions and its effects on the contraction synchronism between both ventricular chambers, derived from bi-ventricular Fourier phase histograms. A consecutive series of 44 patients has been investigated within 48 hours before and after RF therapy: 14 patients had right sided WPW and 30 patients left sided WPW. Only patients for whom RF treatment was considered as a success have been included in the study. Gated blood pool tomography has been performed in order to localize the site of pre-excitation and to build-up the phase histograms for both ventricles, and planar gated imaging has been used for right and left ejection fraction determination. Functional results demonstrate the absence of deleterious effect of RF on ventricular contraction and rather a slight increase of ejection fractions, with a more statistically significant difference for left WPW (LVEF = 62.2 % before RF vs 64.4 % after RF; p = 0.02) than for right WPW (RVEF = 36.3 % before RF vs 39.7 after RF; p = 0.16). Phase analysis, on the contrary, show only significant differences for right WPW, with a noticeable decrease of the pre-excitation (left-to-right phase difference 14.4 deg before RF vs 7.5 deg after RF; p = 0.03) and a significant reduction of the right ventricular phase dispersion (right phase standard deviation 26.5 deg before RF vs 19.0 deg after RF; p = 0.03). For left WPW no measurable differences can be demonstrated in the basal state and it is suggested to use stimulation techniques in order to enhance the competition between the normal and accessory conduction pathways. (authors)

  18. Coexistence of Wolff-Parkinson-white and Brugada syndrome: mere curiosity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Elisabeth; Sacilotto, Luciana; Darrieux, Francisco; Sosa, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    The association between Brugada syndrome (BS) and ventricular preexcitation is a rare condition, with sporadic cases already reported. We report the case of a 29-year-old man, with palpitation unrelated to physical or emotional stress. The electrocardiogram of the first visit revealed a ventricular preexcitation pattern and an end-conduction delay, with negative T wave in V1 and intraventricular conduction disturbance in V2 (atypical for BS). The typical aspect of BS occurred after introduction of propafenone for the prevention of atrioventricular tachycardia. We discuss the recognition of this rare association, the proarrhythmic effects of some drugs, treatment options, and prognosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. JPH3 Repeat Expansions Cause a Progressive Akinetic-Rigid Syndrome with Severe Dementia and Putaminal Rim in a Five-Generation African-American Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Marshall, Kate E.; Xiao, Jianfeng; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    We report the clinical, neuropsychological, genetic and radiological features of a large five-generation African-American kindred from the southern United States presenting with a progressive akinetic-rigid syndrome and severe dementia, but clinically insignificant chorea, due to mutations in JPH3. Overt disease onset was in the mid-twenties to late thirties with cognitive decline, REM sleep disturbance or psychiatric features, followed by development of a levodopa-unresponsive akinetic-rigid motor syndrome. Dystonia and myoclonus were present in some subjects. A bedridden, non-verbal severely akinetic-rigid state developed within 10 to 15 years after onset. CTG repeat expansions ranged from 47 to 53. Imaging revealed generalized cerebral atrophy with severe striatal involvement and putaminal rim hyperintensity. Analysis of our kindred indicates that JPH3 mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of early-onset dementia and hypokinetic-rigid syndromes in individuals of African descent. Moreover, chorea may not be overtly manifest at presentation or during significant parts of the disease course. PMID:22447335

  20. Recurrence of atrial fibrillation after successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathway in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujović Nebojša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF occurs in 11.5-39% of the patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome and frequently, but not always, disappears after successful accessory pathway (AP ablation. Objective. To determine AF recurrence rate, time to AF recurrence and predictors of AF recurrence after radiofrequency (RF catheter-ablation of AP in WPW-patients with AF. Methods. Data from 245 consecutive patients with WPW-syndrome who underwent RF catheter-ablation of AP were analyzed. A total of 52 patients (43 men, mean age: 42.5±14.1 years with preablation history of spontaneous AF were followed up after definitive AP ablation. At baseline, structural heart disease and comorbidities were diagnosed in 19.2% and 21.2% of the patients, respectively. Results. During the follow-up of 5.2±3.7 years, 3 patients (5.7% died; one of these patients, previously known for recurrent AF, died from ischaemic stroke. Symptomatic recurrence of AF was detected in 9 of 52 patients (17.3%. In 66.7% of these patients, AF recurrence was identified in the first year following the procedure. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that freedom from recurrent AF after 3 months was 94.2%, after 1 year 87.5% and after 4 years 84.3%. Univariate analysis showed that older age (p=0.023, presence of structural heart disease (p=0.05 and dilated left atrium (p=0.013 were significantly related to AF recurrence. However, using multivariate Cox regression, older age was the only independent predictor of AF recurrence (HR=2.44 for every life decade; p=0.006. Analysis of ROC curves showed that, after the age of 36, the risk of AF recurrence abruptly increased. Conclusion. Symptomatic recurrence of AF was detected in 17% of WPW-patients after definite RF ablation of AP. The timedependent occurrence of AF recurrences and age-dependent increase in the rate of AF recurrence were identified. Closer follow-up and/or extension of drug therapy in older patients, at least in

  1. Diagnosis and management of dementia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... Dementia is an acquired syndrome of memory decline with at least one other cognitive .... functions and memory retrieval are the .... behavioural problems.5 Cost-effectiveness of ... (For words not recalled, prompt with a cue.).

  2. Dementia of Alzheimer-type in adult patients with Down`s syndrome. Its frequency, neuroradiological findings, and biochemical study of risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekijima, Yoshiki [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    We examined the frequency, neuroradiological features, and risk factors of Alzheimer-type dementia (DAT) in 123 Japanese adult patients with Down`s syndrome. Among these patients 16 were diagnosed as having DAT. The prevalence of DAT was 0% in the 18- to 39-year-old group, 16% in those aged 40 to 49 years old, and 38% in those over 50 years old. On CT examination, the earliest finding of DAT was atrophy of the temporal lobe. Patients at an advanced stage revealed extensive atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, frequently associated with calcification of the basal ganglia. {sup 123}I-IMP-SPECT studies showed abnormally decreased isotope uptake in the posterior parietal regions in Down`s syndrome patients with DAT, and a similar finding was also seen in Down`s syndrome patients who showed severe mental retardation. The frequency of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) E4 in Down`s syndrome patients with DAT was 18.8%, which was higher than that of non-demented Down`s syndrome patients (4.5%) and Japanese non-demented controls (6.7%). In particular, the frequency of the ApoE E4 in patients who developed DAT before 50 years of age was significantly high (28.6%). It is very likely that the ApoE E4 is a risk factor for DAT even in Down`s syndrome patients with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer`s disease. (author)

  3. Dementia of Alzheimer-type in adult patients with Down's syndrome. Its frequency, neuroradiological findings, and biochemical study of risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekijima, Yoshiki

    1997-01-01

    We examined the frequency, neuroradiological features, and risk factors of Alzheimer-type dementia (DAT) in 123 Japanese adult patients with Down's syndrome. Among these patients 16 were diagnosed as having DAT. The prevalence of DAT was 0% in the 18- to 39-year-old group, 16% in those aged 40 to 49 years old, and 38% in those over 50 years old. On CT examination, the earliest finding of DAT was atrophy of the temporal lobe. Patients at an advanced stage revealed extensive atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, frequently associated with calcification of the basal ganglia. 123 I-IMP-SPECT studies showed abnormally decreased isotope uptake in the posterior parietal regions in Down's syndrome patients with DAT, and a similar finding was also seen in Down's syndrome patients who showed severe mental retardation. The frequency of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) E4 in Down's syndrome patients with DAT was 18.8%, which was higher than that of non-demented Down's syndrome patients (4.5%) and Japanese non-demented controls (6.7%). In particular, the frequency of the ApoE E4 in patients who developed DAT before 50 years of age was significantly high (28.6%). It is very likely that the ApoE E4 is a risk factor for DAT even in Down's syndrome patients with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer's disease. (author)

  4. Language and Dementia: Neuropsychological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Daniel; Goral, Mira

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent evidence for the relationship between extralinguistic cognitive and language abilities in dementia. A survey of data from investigations of three dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia) reveals that, more often than not, deterioration of conceptual organization appears associated with lexical impairments, whereas impairments in executive function are associated with sentence- and discourse-level deficits. These connections between extralinguistic functions and language ability also emerge from the literature on cognitive reserve and bilingualism that investigates factors that delay the onset and possibly the progression of neuropsychological manifestation of dementia.

  5. Atrial fibrillation with wide QRS tachycardia and undiagnosed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Farqani, Abdullah; Al-Rawahi, Najib

    2012-11-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented to the emergency department of a regional hospital with 1 episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Postictal monitoring followed by a 12-lead electrocardiogram showed fast atrial fibrillation with intermittent wide QRS regular tachycardia. Immediately following this, her rhythm changed to wide QRS irregular tachycardia without hemodynamic compromise. She was suspected to have ventricular tachycardia and was treated with intravenous amiodarone with cardioversion to sinus rhythm. Subsequent electrocardiogram in sinus rhythm showed typical features of manifest Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) accessory pathway. This case illustrates the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in patients with atrial fibrillation, wide QRS tachycardia, and undiagnosed WPW syndrome with antidromic conduction of atrial arrhythmias through the accessory pathway. Furthermore, this case demonstrates that undiagnosed wide QRS tachycardias need to be treated with drugs acting on the accessory pathway, thus keeping in mind underlying WPW syndrome as a possibility to avoid potentially catastrophic events.

  6. Assessment of atrial fibrillation and vulnerability in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jie; Wei, Fang; Chen, Ju-Gang; Yu, Yan-Wei; Gu, Hong-Yue; Jiang, Rui; Wu, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to assess atrial fibrillation (AF) and vulnerability in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome patients using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE). All patients were examined via transthoracic echocardiography and 2D-STE in order to assess atrial function 7 days before and 10 days after RF catheter ablation. A postoperative 3-month follow-up was performed via outpatient visit or telephone calls. Results showed significant differences in both body mass index (BMI) and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) duration between WPW patients and DAVNP patients (both Psyndrome may result in increased atrial vulnerability and contribute to the development of AF. Further, RF catheter ablation of AAV pathway can potentially improve atrial function in WPW syndrome patients. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography imaging in WPW patients would be necessary in the evaluation and improvement of the overall function of RF catheter ablation in a long-term follow-up period.

  7. Low frequency of bipolar disorder, dopamine dysregulation syndrome, and punding in Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease Baixa frequência de transtorno bipolar, síndrome de desregulação dopaminérgica e punding em pacientes brasileiros com doença de Parkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Kummer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of bipolar disorder, dopamine dysregulation syndrome and punding in Parkinson's disease patients from a Brazilian movement disorders clinic. METHOD: One hundred patients underwent a comprehensive psychiatric examination composed of MINI-plus and specific questionnaires to investigate dopamine dysregulation syndrome and punding. RESULTS: We identified, respectively, one and five Parkinson's disease patients with bipolar disorder type I and type II. All manic/hypomanic episodes occurred before Parkinson's disease onset. No patient was identified with dopamine dysregulation syndrome or punding. CONCLUSION: The frequency of manic/hypomanic episodes seems to decrease with Parkinson's disease onset, and local environmental factors (e.g. drug availability may be responsible for the low frequency of dopamine dysregulation syndrome and punding in Brazilian Parkinson's disease patients.OBJETIVO: Investigar a frequência de transtorno bipolar, síndrome de desregulação dopaminérgica e punding em pacientes com doença de Parkinson de uma clínica de movimentos anormais no Brasil. MÉTODO: Cem pacientes foram submetidos à avaliação psiquiátrica composta pelo MINI-Plus e questionários específicos para investigar síndrome de desregulação dopaminérgica e punding. RESULTADOS: Identificamos, respectivamente, um e cinco pacientes com transtorno bipolar tipo I e tipo II. Todos os episódios maníacos/hipomaníacos ocorreram antes do início da doença de Parkinson. Nenhum paciente foi identificado com síndrome de desregulação dopaminérgica ou punding. CONCLUSÃO: A frequência de episódios maníacos/ hipomaníacos parece declinar com o início da doença de Parkinson. Fatores ambientais locais (p.ex.: disponibilidade de drogas podem ser responsáveis pela baixa frequência de síndrome de desregulação dopaminérgica e punding em pacientes brasileiros com doença de Parkinson.

  8. Selective impairment of verb processing associated with pathological changes in Brodmann areas 44 and 45 in the motor neurone disease-dementia-aphasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, T H; O'Donovan, D G; Xuereb, J H; Boniface, S; Hodges, J R

    2001-01-01

    We report six patients with clinically diagnosed and electrophysiologically confirmed motor neurone disease (MND), in whom communication problems were an early and dominant feature. All patients developed a progressive non-fluent aphasia culminating in some cases in complete mutism. In five cases, formal testing revealed deficits in syntactic comprehension. Comprehension and production of verbs were consistently more affected those that of nouns and this effect remained stable upon subsequent testing, despite overall deterioration. The classical signs of MND, including wasting, fasciculations and severe bulbar symptoms, occurred over the following 6-12 months. The behavioural symptoms ranged from mild anosognosia to personality change implicating frontal-lobe dementia. In three cases, post-mortem examination has confirmed the clinical diagnosis of MND-dementia. In addition to the typical involvement of motor and premotor cortex, particularly pronounced pathological changes were observed in the Brodmann areas 44 (Broca's area) and 45. The finding of a selective impairment of verb/action processing in association with the dementia/aphasia syndrome of MND suggests that the neural substrate underlying verb representation is strongly connected to anterior cortical motor systems.

  9. Reversion of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and abnormal stress test: by catheter ablation, in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome from Para-Hisian Kent bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chung-Ming; Chu, Kai-Ming; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Mung; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is typically reserved for patients who experience ventricular pre-excitation and symptoms that are related to paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, such as chest pain, dyspnea, dizziness, palpitations, or syncope. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old woman who presented at our outpatient department because of exercise intolerance. Cardiac auscultation revealed a grade 2/6 pansystolic murmur over the left lower sternal border. Twelve-lead electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm at a rate of 76 beats/min, with a significant delta wave. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormal left ventricular systolic function. The results of a thallium stress test were also abnormal. Coronary artery disease was suspected; however, coronary angiography yielded normal results. Electrophysiologic study revealed a para-Hisian Kent bundle and a dual atrioventricular nodal pathway. After radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed, the patient's left ventricular function improved and her symptoms disappeared. In Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, left ventricular systolic dyssynchrony can yield abnormal findings on echocardiography and thallium scanning--even in persons who have no cardiovascular risk factors. Physicians who are armed with this knowledge can avoid performing coronary angiography unnecessarily. Catheter ablation can reverse the dyssynchrony of the ventricle and improve the patient's symptoms.

  10. The prevalence of early repolarization in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with a special reference to J waves and the effects of catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagihara, Nobue; Sato, Akinori; Iijima, Kenichi; Izumi, Daisuke; Furushima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Irie, Tadanobu; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Chinushi, Masaomi; Satou, Masahito; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2012-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of J waves in the electrocardiograms (ECG) of 120 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in comparison with J-wave prevalence in a control group of 1936 men and women with comparable demographic and ECG characteristics and with normal atrioventricular conduction. J waves were present only during manifest preexcitation in 22 of 120 patients (18.3%), disappearing after catheter ablation and suggesting that J waves were associated with the presence of preexcitation. J waves were present in 19 (15.8%) of 120 patients only after ablation, apparently having been masked by early depolarization of the preexcited myocardial region, and in 22 patients (18.3%), J waves were not altered significantly by preexcitation. Thus, the overall J-wave prevalence was 52.5% (63/120) and, excluding those apparently due to preexcitation, 34.8% (41/120), both substantially higher than the prevalence (11.5%) in the control group (P Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and is influenced by manifest preexcitation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Wszolek, Z.K.; Pfeiffer, R.F.; Calne, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [ 18 F[-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K i (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [de

  12. Music perception in dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD, n=16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n=5) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. No specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation. PMID:27802226

  13. Music Perception in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n = 5), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. Taking working memory performance into account, no specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis, or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation.

  14. Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome Presented with Sensory Ataxia Associated with Bilateral Hearing Loss and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madjdinasab Nastaran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary Sjorgen syndrome is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases with characteristic of involvement of lachrymal and salivary glands, but other organ involvements as peripheral and central nervous system are also possible. The reported case is a 23 year old lady presented with progressive sensory ataxia and weakness of four limbs, bilateral sensory hearing loss and cognitive impairment with minimental score equal to 15/30 since one year prior to admission with associated bilateral central corneal opacity, dry mouth and dry eyes. Electro physiologic studies showed sensory motor axonal polyneuropathy . A biopsy of sural nerve and salivary glands of lower lip showed lymphocytic infiltration. Serologic evidence showed positive Anti Ro (SS-B, negative HCV and HIV antibody, thereafter the diagnosis was confirmed and according to this diagnosis she received high dose of intravenous methyl prednisolon then both hearing loss and cognitive impairment improved partially (minimental score 21/30 . At last, she underwent plasmapheresis and her sensory ataxia improved greatly.

  15. The correlation of characters of cognitive impairment preceding Alzheimer s dementia in individuals with questionable dementia to Chinese medical syndrome%可疑痴呆人群中阿尔茨海默氏病临床前的认识损害特征及其与中医证候的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田金洲; 杨承芝; 盛彤; 刘桓; JudyHawortb; RomolaBucks; GordonWilcock

    1999-01-01

    To look for predictive markers preceding Alzheimer s dementia. Methods: This study involved multitudinal assessment of individuals in whom there was cognitive impairment that was insufficient to warrant a diagnosis of dementia, which were followed up for mean 11 months. Results: A diagnosis of probable AD was made in 58% of cases, VD in 21%, FLD in 5% and dementia of uncertain aetiology in the remainder. 42% subjects with memory loss are as result of ageassociated cognitive decline, 25% subjects are due to cerebralvascular accident, 1.8% subjects due to menopausal symptoms. 30.4% are of memory loss of unknown aetiology. Cognitive markers preceding dementia found within this study actually have discriminant function of the earliest changes of AD from age-associated cognitive decline. The group that developed dementia on follow-up does not differ significantly from the memory loss group on the WAIS-R total scores or on the digit forward, digit backward and picture completion. However, the subtest score for similarities on the WAIS-R is significantly lower in patients who became demented comparing with the rest of sample. Verbal memory such as story recall immediate and story recall delayed, verbal learning discriminant index, verbal fluency raw score showed significant lower in patients who became dementia. Moreover digit copy transformedscore on the SSRS also is very significantly lower in patients who became demented than those who were stable memory loss. The kidney deficiency syndrome of Chinese medicine was most common in QD, and the phlegm syndrome and the blood stasis syndrome were more common. The scores of the picture completion subtest and the story recall immediate subtest were significantly correlated to the score of the phlegm syndrome respectively. The scores of the picture completion subtest and the similarities subtest were significantly correlated with the score of the kidney deficiency syndrome respectively. Suggestion: Often a significantly long

  16. Detecting Regional Myocardial Abnormalities in Patients With Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome With the Use of ECG-Gated Cardiac MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Hong, Yoo Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-04-01

    Myocardial dyskinesia caused by the accessory pathway and related reversible heart failure have been well documented in echocardiographic studies of pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. However, the long-term effects of dyskinesia on the myocardium of adult patients have not been studied in depth. The goal of the present study was to evaluate regional myocardial abnormalities on cardiac CT examinations of adult patients with WPW syndrome. Of 74 patients with WPW syndrome who underwent cardiac CT from January 2006 through December 2013, 58 patients (mean [± SD] age, 52.2 ± 12.7 years), 36 (62.1%) of whom were men, were included in the study after the presence of combined cardiac disease was excluded. Two observers blindly evaluated myocardial thickness and attenuation on cardiac CT scans. On the basis of CT findings, patients were classified as having either normal or abnormal findings. We compared the two groups for other clinical findings, including observations from ECG, echocardiography, and electrophysiologic study. Of the 58 patients studied, 16 patients (27.6%) were found to have myocardial abnormalities (i.e., abnormal wall thinning with or without low attenuation). All abnormal findings corresponded with the location of the accessory pathway. Patients with abnormal findings had statistically significantly decreased left ventricular function, compared with patients with normal findings (p syndrome. These abnormal findings might reflect the long-term effects of dyskinesia, suggesting irreversible myocardial injury that ultimately causes left ventricular dysfunction.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: the long-term mortality and risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borregaard, Rune; Lukac, Peter; Gerdes, Christian; Møller, Dorthe; Mortensen, Peter Thomas; Pedersen, Lars; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf

    2015-01-01

    To assess the long-term mortality and occurrence of post-ablation atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing a radiofrequency ablation for the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. A retrospective cohort study of patients (N = 362) subjected to radiofrequency ablation of the WPW syndrome at Aarhus University Hospital from 1990 to 2011. A comparison cohort (N = 3619) was generated from the Danish National Board of Health Central Population Registry. We found no significant difference in all-cause mortality when comparing the WPW group with the control group [hazard ratio (HR): 0.77 and confidence interval (CI): 0.47-1.25]. After radiofrequency ablation, the WPW group had a significantly higher risk of atrial fibrillation than the control group (HR: 4.77 and CI: 3.05-7.43). Atrial fibrillation prior to ablation (HR: 4.66 and CI: 2.09-10.41) and age over 50 years (HR: 9.79 and CI: 4.29-22.36) at the time of ablation were independent risk factors for post-ablation atrial fibrillation in the WPW group. Patients with radiofrequency ablation-treated WPW syndrome have a post-ablation mortality that is similar to the background population. The risk of atrial fibrillation remains high after radiofrequency ablation of the WPW syndrome. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in young people, from childhood to young adulthood: relationships between age and clinical and electrophysiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Jung Jung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of the present study was to evaluate the characteristics of electrophysiologic studies (EPS and radiofrequency ablation (RFA performed in subjects aged less than 30 years with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome, particularly pediatric patients under 18 years of age, based on our experience. Methods : Two hundred and one consecutive patients with WPW syndrome were recruited and divided to 3 groups according to age: group 1, 6 to 17 years; group 2, 18 to 29 years; and group 3, 30 to 60 years. The clinical, electrophysiological, and therapeutic data for these patients were evaluated by a retrospective medical record review. Results : A total of 73 (36% of these patients were &lt;30 years of age. Although there were more males than females in group 2 (male:female, 31:11, there was no sex difference in group 1 (male:female, 16:15. Left accessory pathway was detected less frequently in group 1 (32%, 10/31 than in group 2 (57%, 24/42 and group 3 (63%, 81/128 (P=0.023 and P=0.002, respectively. Conclusion : The present study describes several different electrophysiological characteristics in children and adolescents with WPW syndrome. Therefore, when EPS and RFA are performed in children and adolescence with WPW syndrome, we recommend that these characteristics be considered.

  19. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography of the brain in early Parkinson's disease: correlation with dementia and lateralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuujiun; Lin Kerneng; Shan Dinge; Liao Kwankum; Fuh Jongling; Lee Liangshong; Liu Renshyan; Liu Hsiuchih

    1993-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was assessed in 19 patients with early idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 12 control subjects of similar age by single-photon emission tomography using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). Of the patients with PD, seven were mildly demented and 15 presented with hemiparkinsonism. Mean HMPAO cortical or basal ganglia/cerebellum activity ratios were calculated. Mean cortical and regional uptake ratios in non-demented PD patients were not significantly different from values in the controls. In contrast, besides generalized cortical hypoperfusion, demented PD patients had significantly lower HMPAO uptake in the frontal and basal ganglia regions than non-demented patients. These observations support the hypothesis of impaired neuronal activity in both cortical and subcortical regions of the brain in demented PD patients. In hemiparkinsonian patients, the only asymmetrical finding was a relative hypoperfusion in the contralateral parietal region. This may be due to deafferentation of the thalamoparietal pathways. The lack of asymmetrical uptake in basal ganglia in our PD patients may be explained by their staging at the time of the investigation (stage I and II, Hoehn and Yahr scale). (orig.)

  20. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography of the brain in early Parkinson's disease: correlation with dementia and lateralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shuujiun; Lin Kerneng; Shan Dinge; Liao Kwankum; Fuh Jongling; Lee Liangshong (National Yang-Ming Medical Coll., Taipei (Taiwan)); Liu Renshyan (Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Liu Hsiuchih (Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan). Neurological Inst.)

    1993-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was assessed in 19 patients with early idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 12 control subjects of similar age by single-photon emission tomography using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). Of the patients with PD, seven were mildly demented and 15 presented with hemiparkinsonism. Mean HMPAO cortical or basal ganglia/cerebellum activity ratios were calculated. Mean cortical and regional uptake ratios in non-demented PD patients were not significantly different from values in the controls. In contrast, besides generalized cortical hypoperfusion, demented PD patients had significantly lower HMPAO uptake in the frontal and basal ganglia regions than non-demented patients. These observations support the hypothesis of impaired neuronal activity in both cortical and subcortical regions of the brain in demented PD patients. In hemiparkinsonian patients, the only asymmetrical finding was a relative hypoperfusion in the contralateral parietal region. This may be due to deafferentation of the thalamoparietal pathways. The lack of asymmetrical uptake in basal ganglia in our PD patients may be explained by their staging at the time of the investigation (stage I and II, Hoehn and Yahr scale). (orig.).

  1. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography of the brain in early Parkinson's disease: correlation with dementia and lateralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuujiun, Wang; Kerneng, Lin; Dinge, Shan; Kwankum, Liao; Jongling, Fuh; Liangshong, Lee [National Yang-Ming Medical Coll., Taipei (Taiwan); Renshyan, Liu [Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Hsiuchih, Liu [Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan). Neurological Inst.

    1993-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was assessed in 19 patients with early idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 12 control subjects of similar age by single-photon emission tomography using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). Of the patients with PD, seven were mildly demented and 15 presented with hemiparkinsonism. Mean HMPAO cortical or basal ganglia/cerebellum activity ratios were calculated. Mean cortical and regional uptake ratios in non-demented PD patients were not significantly different from values in the controls. In contrast, besides generalized cortical hypoperfusion, demented PD patients had significantly lower HMPAO uptake in the frontal and basal ganglia regions than non-demented patients. These observations support the hypothesis of impaired neuronal activity in both cortical and subcortical regions of the brain in demented PD patients. In hemiparkinsonian patients, the only asymmetrical finding was a relative hypoperfusion in the contralateral parietal region. This may be due to deafferentation of the thalamoparietal pathways. The lack of asymmetrical uptake in basal ganglia in our PD patients may be explained by their staging at the time of the investigation (stage I and II, Hoehn and Yahr scale). (orig.).

  2. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  3. [Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: insomnia and sleep fragmentation, daytime hypersomnia, alterations to the circadian rhythm and sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rezola, E; Arratíbel-Echarren, I; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Martí-Massó, J F

    2010-02-08

    Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease are present in 60-98% of patients and reduce their quality of life. To review the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach and management of the different sleep disorders. We describe the pathophysiology associated with neurodegeneration, due to symptoms (motor and nonmotor) and drug therapies. This article reviews insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, circadian sleep disorders and sleep apnea. Subjective or objective sleepiness assessment should routinely be performed by physicians looking after Parkinson's disease patients. Management is difficult and should be targeted to the specific sleep disorder and its likely cause.

  4. Computertomographic studies of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlmeyer, K.

    1983-01-01

    It seems to be very complicated even for the experienced neurologist and psychiatrist to correlate the clinical syndrome of dementia to different causing cerebral processes such as a primarily degenerative brain atrophy, a chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency, or other rarer occurring brain diseases unless neurological signs and symptoms do indicate a focal brain lesion. Since computed tomography is able to show both focal and general changes of the brain tissue each patient presenting with a dementia clinically should be undergone such a neuroradiological investigation at least once, and if being negative even repeatedly. Computed tomography is able not only to detect unexpected treatable brain lesions as a cause of dementia for instance tumors, subdural hematomas, and communicating hydrocephalus to expect in about 6% of cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia, but also it is able to help to make the differentialdiagnosis of the dementia of Alzheimer's and the multi-infarct-type in a high percentage. Nevertheless despite the use of computed tomography the pathogenesis of dementia even though being undoubtful clinically remains obscure in 15% of our material of 367 demented patients studied by computed tomography but presenting with a normal finding. (orig.) [de

  5. A prospective study of the cumulative incidence and course of restless legs syndrome in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease during chronic dopaminergic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Elena; Negrotti, Anna; Angelini, Monica; Goldoni, Matteo; Abrignani, Giorgia; Calzetti, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the cumulative incidence of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) over a 3 years follow-up period in 92 de novo Parkinson's disease patients under chronic dopaminergic therapy and the clinical course of the sensory-motor disorder over 12 months as from its onset. The overall cumulative incidence of RLS was found by 15.3%, i.e. 14 incident cases, and by 11.9%, i.e. 11 incident cases, after the exclusion of possible "secondary" forms of the disorder. These figures are higher than those reported in general population in Germany (Study of Health in Pomerania), confirming our previous findings of incidence rate of the disorder. At the end of the 3 years follow-up period the prevalence of "current" RLS was significantly higher than that previously found in drug naïve Parkinson's disease patients and in controls, supporting the view that RLS emerging in the course of chronic dopaminergic therapy is the main determinant of the co-morbid association with Parkinson's disease. During the 12 months period of observation the RLS showed a frequency of occurrence of 6.08 episodes per month on average and a remittent clinical course was prevailing in the 11 incident cases, with a significant frequency decrease in the second as compared to the first 6 months, i.e. 3.26 versus 8.9 episodes per month, and none of the patients developed augmentation in the same period. It is hypothesized that the remittent course could be due to long-term adaptation (downregulation) of the hypersensitive post-synaptic dopamine receptors in the spinal cord to a continuous dopaminergic stimulation, possibly coupled with compensatory up-regulation of pre-synaptic dopamine re-uptake mechanism, in the patients in which the hypothalamic A11 area, site of origin of the dopamine-mediated diencephalo-spinal pathway, is involved in the neurodegenerative process.

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ... Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  7. Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease using a brief cognitive screening tool: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Chade

    Full Text Available Abstract Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is crucial for good clinical practice given the new therapeutic possibilities available. When full neuropsychological evaluations are not available, screening tools capable of detecting cognitive difficulties become crucial. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate whether the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE is capable of detecting cognitive difficulties in patients with Parkinson's disease and discriminating their cognitive profile from patients with dementia. Methods: 77 early dementia patients (53 with Alzheimer's Disease and 24 with Frontotemporal Dementia, 22 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 53 healthy controls were evaluated with the ACE. Results: Parkinson's disease patients significantly differed from both healthy controls and dementia patients on ACE total score. Conclusions: This study shows that the Spanish version of the ACE is capable of detecting patients with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and is able to differentiate them from patients with dementia based on their general cognitive status.

  8. Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease with a brief cognitive screening tool: the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Anabel; Roca, María; Torralva, Teresa; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Fabbro, Nicolás; Arévalo, Gonzalo Gómez; Gershanik, Oscar; Manes, Facundo

    2008-01-01

    Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is crucial for good clinical practice given the new therapeutic possibilities available. When full neuropsychological evaluations are not available, screening tools capable of detecting cognitive difficulties become crucial. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) is capable of detecting cognitive difficulties in patients with Parkinson's disease and discriminating their cognitive profile from patients with dementia. 77 early dementia patients (53 with Alzheimer's Disease and 24 with Frontotemporal Dementia), 22 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 53 healthy controls were evaluated with the ACE. Parkinson's disease patients significantly differed from both healthy controls and dementia patients on ACE total score. This study shows that the Spanish version of the ACE is capable of detecting patients with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and is able to differentiate them from patients with dementia based on their general cognitive status.

  9. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, M. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wszolek, Z.K. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Pfeiffer, R.F. [Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Calne, D.B. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [{sup 18}F]-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K{sub i} (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wir berichten ueber Untersuchungen der praesynaptischen dopaminergen Funktion mit der Positronenemissionstomographie bei einer grossen Familie mit autosomal-dominant vererbtem Parkinsonismus und Demenz. Die Erkrankung ist pathologisch-anatomisch gekennzeichnet durch eine pallido-ponto-nigrale Degeneration. Klinisch bestehen ein Parkinsonismus, Dystonien, eine Apraxie der Augenoeffnung und -schliessung, pyramidale Dysfunktionen und eine Harninkontinenz. Die praesynaptische dopaminerge Funktion wurde untersucht und quantifiziert mittels [{sup 18}F]-L-6-Fluorodopa (6FD) PET bei fuenf erkrankten Patienten, 13 Risikopatienten und 15 Kontrollpersonen vergleichbaren Alters. Die Transportkonstante K{sub i} (ml/Striatum/min) fuer die striatale Aufnahme des Radiotracers war bei allen erkrankten Patienten erniedrigt. Von den 13 Risikopatienten hatte keiner eine reduzierte Aufnahme von 6FD. Drei Risikopatienten zeigten sogar Werte fuer K{sub i}, die oberhalb des Referenzbereiches der Kontrollpersonen lagen

  10. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  11. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and noncompaction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to the variant m.3460G>A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stollberger, Claudia; Gatterer, Edmund

    2018-05-01

    This report describes a 66-year-old Caucasian male who acutely developed severe, bilateral impairment of visual acuity at 24 years of age. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was suspected but the diagnosis was not genetically confirmed until the age of 49 years when the primary LHON mutation m.3460G>A was detected. Since onset, visual acuity had slightly improved. The family history was positive for LHON (brother, two sisters of mother, female cousin) and genetically confirmed in his brother and one aunt. Since the age of 65 years, he had experienced recurrent vertigo. His cardiological history was positive for arterial hypertension, noncompaction, myocardial thickening, intermittent right bundle-branch-block (RBBB) and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In addition to LHON, he presented with polyneuropathy, hyperCKaemia, carotid artery occlusion, and a history of stroke. Cardiological investigations at 66 years of age revealed mildly reduced systolic function, enlarged atria, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardias. He underwent an electrophysiological investigation, but radiofrequency ablation was ruled out due to a 'bizarre' cardiac conduction system. Instead, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was proposed but refused by the patient. Since the vertigo did not resolve it was attributed to polyneuropathy. This case demonstrates that LHON may be associated with noncompaction, myocardial thickening, reduced systolic function, enlarged atria, RBBB, WPW syndrome and nonsustained ventricular tachycardias. WPW syndrome in LHON may require invasive antiarrhythmic treatment.

  12. Cognitive decline in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsland, Dag; Creese, Byron; Politis, Marios; Chaudhuri, K. Ray; ffytche, Dominic H.; Weintraub, Daniel; Ballard, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a frequent problem encountered in advanced stages of Parkinson disease (PD). In recent years, research has focused on the pre-dementia stages of cognitive impairment in PD, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Several longitudinal studies have shown that MCI is a harbinger of dementia in PD, although the course is variable, and stabilization of cognition — or even reversal to normal cognition — is not uncommon. In addition to limbic and cortical spread of Lewy pathology, several other mechanisms are likely to contribute to cognitive decline in PD, and a variety of biomarker studies, some using novel structural and functional imaging techniques, have documented in vivo brain changes associated with cognitive impairment. The evidence consistently suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β42, a marker of comorbid Alzheimer disease (AD), predict future cognitive decline and dementia in PD. Emerging genetic evidence indicates that in addition to the APOE*ε4 allele (an established risk factor for AD), GBA mutations and SCNA mutations and triplications are associated with cognitive decline in PD, whereas the findings are mixed for MAPT polymorphisms. Cognitive enhancing medications have some effect in PD dementia, but no convincing evidence that progression from MCI to dementia can be delayed or prevented is available, although cognitive training has shown promising results. PMID:28257128

  13. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ( 18 F-F-DOPA) and for ( 11 C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  14. PET studies in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik and Max-Planck-Inst. fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ({sup 18}F-F-DOPA) and for ({sup 11}C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs.

  15. Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease-What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Rimona S; Costantini, Alyssa A; Schrag, Anette E

    2018-03-10

    Mild cognitive impairment is a common feature of Parkinson's disease, even at the earliest disease stages, but there is variation in the nature and severity of cognitive involvement and in the risk of conversion to Parkinson's disease dementia. This review aims to summarise current understanding of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. We consider the presentation, rate of conversion to dementia, underlying pathophysiology and potential biomarkers of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. Finally, we discuss challenges and controversies of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. Large-scale longitudinal studies have shown that cognitive involvement is important and common in Parkinson's disease and can present early in the disease course. Recent criteria for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's provide the basis for further study of cognitive decline and for the progression of different cognitive phenotypes and risk of conversion to dementia. Improved understanding of the underlying pathology and progression of cognitive change are likely to lead to opportunities for early intervention for this important aspect of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Nonmotor Features in Atypical Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kailash P; Stamelou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism (AP) comprises mainly multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD), which are distinct pathological entities, presenting with a wide phenotypic spectrum. The classic syndromes are now called MSA-parkinsonism (MSA-P), MSA-cerebellar type (MSA-C), Richardson's syndrome, and corticobasal syndrome. Nonmotor features in AP have been recognized almost since the initial description of these disorders; however, research has been limited. Autonomic dysfunction is the most prominent nonmotor feature of MSA, but also gastrointestinal symptoms, sleep dysfunction, and pain, can be a feature. In PSP and CBD, the most prominent nonmotor symptoms comprise those deriving from the cognitive/neuropsychiatric domain. Apart from assisting the clinician in the differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease, nonmotor features in AP have a big impact on quality of life and prognosis of AP and their treatment poses a major challenge for clinicians. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Anti- Tremor drugs beta blockers systemic ocular primidone carbonic anhydrase inhibitors gabapentin Drugs causing...parkinsonism or tremor DA receptor blockers metoclopramide other Seroquel DA depletors reserpine tetrabenazine methyldopa beta ...Principal Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems

  18. Frequency of Depressive Syndromes in Elderly Individuals with No Cognitive Impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease Dementia in a Memory Clinic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Byun, Min Soo; Yi, Dahyun; Choe, Young Min; Choi, Hyo Jung; Baek, Hyewon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Younghwa; Woo, Jong Inn; Lee, Dong Young

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of various depressive syndromes in elderly individuals with no cognitive impairment (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD) in a memory clinic setting, and then to test whether severe and milder forms of depressive syndromes are differentially associated with the cognitive groups. For 216 NC, 478 MCI, and 316 AD subjects, we investigated the frequency of depressive syndromes, defined by three different categories: major and minor depressive disorder (MaDD and MiDD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, as well as depression according to the National Institute of Mental Health provisional diagnostic criteria for depression in Alzheimer's disease (NIMH-dAD). The frequency of MaDD did not show any significant difference among NC, MCI, and AD. In contrast, the frequencies of MiDD and NIMH-dAD were higher than those of MaDD and showed significant group differences with a gradual increase from NC to AD. The findings suggest that the degenerative process of Alzheimer's disease contributes to the occurrence of mild depressive conditions, but not to severe depression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Internet-based screening for dementia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jason; Sullivan, Campbell; Burrell, Larry E; Rogerson, Mark; Anderson, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The Dementia Risk Assessment (DRA) is an online tool consisting of questions about known risk factors for dementia, a novel verbal memory test, and an informant report of cognitive decline. Its primary goal is to educate the public about dementia risk factors and encourage clinical evaluation where appropriate. In Study 1, more than 3,000 anonymous persons over age 50 completed the DRA about themselves; 1,000 people also completed proxy reports about another person. Advanced age, lower education, male sex, complaints of severe memory impairment, and histories of cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, and brain tumor all contributed significantly to poor memory performance. A high correlation was obtained between proxy-reported decline and actual memory test performance. In Study 2, 52 persons seeking first-time evaluation at dementia clinics completed the DRA prior to their visits. Their responses (and those of their proxy informants) were compared to the results of independent evaluation by geriatric neuropsychiatrists. The 30 patients found to meet criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or frontotemporal dementia differed on the DRA from the 22 patients without dementia (most other neuropsychiatric conditions). Scoring below criterion on the DRA's memory test had moderately high predictive validity for clinically diagnosed dementia. Although additional studies of larger clinical samples are needed, the DRA holds promise for wide-scale screening for dementia risk.

  20. Lewy Body Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body dementia Overview Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's disease dementia. Protein deposits, ...

  1. Parkinson's Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... one of our signature fundraising programs. Whether you walk with us at Moving Day®, run in a marathon or fundraise your ...

  2. A Dementia Case Presenting with Psychotic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ozdemir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a progressive clinical syndrome in which affected areas of brain function may be affected, such as memory, language, abstract thinking, problem solving and attention. Psychotic symptoms include auditory and visual hallucinations and delusions, which usually occur in the dementia. In this paper, a dementia case presenting with psychotic symptoms is presented. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 482-486

  3. Clinical and neuroimage findings of dementia with lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo

    2002-01-01

    Dementia with lewy bodies (DLB) is the second common degenerative dementia and has several characteristics including fluctuating cognition, visual hallucination and Parkinsonism. We investigated clinical manifestations and neuroimaging findings in DLB patients. Ten probable DLB patients were included in this study. Brain MRI, Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT and I-123 IPT SPECT were performed. All patients were men and mean age of onset was 64.2 years (range from 54 to 80). All had fluctuating cognition and Parkinsonism, and 8 had visual hallucination. Dementia preceded Parkinsonism in 3 patients. Fluctuation of K-MMSE ranges from 3 to 8 points. Rest tremor was seen in 5 patients. Brain MRI showed cortical atrophy in all patients. Tc-99m brain perfusion SPECT showed hypoperfusion in occipital area as well as fronto-temporo-parietal areas. I-123 IPT SPECT revealed reduced uptake comparable to Parkinson's disease in the striatum. DLB should be first considered as one of possible diagnosis in patients showing dementia in the early stage of Parkinsonism. Hypoperfusion in the occipital area was thought to be a characteristic finding in DLB and to be helpful in differentiating DLB from other degenerative dementias

  4. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Feng, Jianlin; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang; Lloyd, Michael S; Chen, Ji

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4%) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI.

  5. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang; Feng, Jianlin; Lloyd, Michael S.; Chen, Ji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  6. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Jianlin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lloyd, Michael S. [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  7. A Case of Multiple Cardiovascular and Tracheal Anomalies Presented with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in a Middle-aged Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hyejin; Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, SungHo; Park, Sungrock; Lee, SangKi; Kim, Song Yi; Jeong, Sun Young; Kim, Changhwan

    2017-12-01

    Congenital cardiovascular anomalies, such as dextrocardia, persistent left superior vena cava (SVC), and pulmonary artery (PA) sling, are rare disorders. These congenital anomalies can occur alone, or coincide with other congenital malformations. In the majority of cases, congenital anomalies are detected early in life by certain signs and symptoms. A 56-year-old man with no previous medical history was admitted due to recurrent wide QRS complex tachycardia with hemodynamic collapse. A chest radiograph showed dextrocardia. After synchronized cardioversion, an electrocardiogram revealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Persistent left SVC, PA sling, and right tracheal bronchus were also detected by a chest computed tomography (CT) scan. He was diagnosed with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) associated with WPW syndrome, and underwent radiofrequency ablation. We reported the first case of situs solitus dextrocardia coexisting with persistent left SVC, PA sling and right tracheal bronchus presented with WPW and PSVT in a middle-aged adult. In patients with a cardiovascular anomaly, clinicians should consider thorough evaluation of possibly combined cardiovascular and airway malformations and cardiac dysrhythmia. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Sleepiness in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Neutel, Dulce; Herlin, Bastien; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Vidailhet, Marie

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether patients with idiopathic and symptomatic RBD were sleepier than controls, and if sleepiness in idiopathic RBD predicted earlier conversion to Parkinson disease. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and its determinants were compared at the time of a video-polysomnography for an RBD diagnosis in patients with idiopathic RBD, in patients with Parkinson disease, and in controls. Whether sleepiness at time of RBD diagnosis predicted an earlier conversion to neurodegenerative diseases was retrospectively analyzed in the followed-up patients. The 75 patients with idiopathic RBD were sleepier (ESS: 7.8 ± 4.6) at the time of RBD diagnosis than 74 age- and sex-matched controls (ESS: 5.0 ± 3.6, P sleep measures. Among the 69 patients with idiopathic RBD who were followed up for a median 3 years (1-15 years), 16 (23.2%) developed parkinsonism (n = 6), dementia (n = 6), dementia plus parkinsonism (n = 2), and multiple system atrophy (n = 2). An ESS greater than 8 at time of RBD diagnosis predicted a shorter time to phenoconversion to parkinsonism and dementia, from RBD onset, and from RBD diagnosis (when adjusted for age and time between RBD onset and diagnosis). Sleepiness is associated with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and predicts more rapid conversion to parkinsonism and dementia, suggesting it is an early marker of neuronal loss in brainstem arousal systems. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Alzheimer disease and dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Adrian W; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-01-01

    To review the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment of dementia. A PubMed literature search was conducted to identify all studies that have investigated the use of DBS for treatment of dementia. Three studies examined the use of DBS for dementia. One study involved fornix DBS for Alzheimer disease (AD), and two studies involved DBS of the nucleus basalis of Meynert, one to treat AD and one to treat Parkinson disease dementia. Evidence for the use of DBS to treat dementia is preliminary and limited. Fornix and nucleus basalis of Meynert DBS can influence activity in the pathologic neural circuits that underlie AD and Parkinson disease dementia. Further investigation into the potential clinical effects of DBS for dementia is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced MR Neuroimaging in Early Stage Presenile Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractDementia is a syndrome affecting cognitive functions and behavior, with an overwhelming impact on both patients and caregivers. An estimated number of 35.6 million patients suffers from dementia, with a subset affected before the age of 65 years, i.e. presenile dementia. Establishing

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... What Is the Helpline? Unconditional Love How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Care Partners CareMAP: Preparing Paid Caregivers How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? What Are Some Tips ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned Giving Shop More Ways to Give Ways to ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... a Fundraiser Understanding Parkinson's What Is Parkinson's? Causes & Statistics Early Signs Movement Symptoms Non-Movement Symptoms Diagnosis ... Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Parkinson's ...

  18. Assessment of atrial fibrillation and vulnerability in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Jie Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim was to assess atrial fibrillation (AF and vulnerability in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome patients using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE. METHODS: All patients were examined via transthoracic echocardiography and 2D-STE in order to assess atrial function 7 days before and 10 days after RF catheter ablation. A postoperative 3-month follow-up was performed via outpatient visit or telephone calls. RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in both body mass index (BMI and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT duration between WPW patients and DAVNP patients (both P<0.05. Echocardiography revealed that the maximum left atrial volume (LAVmax and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI in diastole increased noticeably in patients with WPW compared to patients with DAVNP both before and after ablation (all P<0.05. Before ablation, there were obvious differences in the levels of SRs, SRe, and SRa from the 4-chamber view (LA in the WPW patients group compared with patients in the DAVNP group (all P<0.05. In the AF group, there were significant differences in the levels of systolic strain rate (SRs, early diastolic strain rate (SRe, and late diastolic strain rate (SRa from the 4-chamber view (LA both before and after ablation (all P<0.05. In the non-AF group, there were decreased SRe levels from the 4-chamber view (LA/RA pre-ablation compared to post-ablation (all P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide convincing evidence that WPW syndrome may result in increased atrial vulnerability and contribute to the development of AF. Further, RF catheter ablation of AAV pathway can potentially improve atrial function in WPW syndrome patients. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography imaging in WPW patients would be necessary in the evaluation and improvement of the overall function of RF catheter ablation in a long-term follow-up period.

  19. The impact of B-type natriuretic peptide levels on the suppression of accompanying atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome patients after accessory pathway ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Mihoko; Goya, Masahiko; Takagi, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Shu; Iwai, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahito; Takamiya, Tomomasa; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Yagishita, Atsuhiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Ono, Yuhichi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Otomo, Kenichiro; Nitta, Junichi; Okishige, Kaoru; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Iesaka, Yoshito; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexists with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. We compared the efficacy of Kent bundle ablation alone and additional AF ablation on accompanying AF, and examined which patients would still have a risk of AF after successful Kent bundle ablation. This retrospective multicenter study included 96 patients (56±15 years, 72 male) with WPW syndrome and AF undergoing Kent bundle ablation. Some patients underwent simultaneous pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for AF. The incidence of post-procedural AF was examined. Sixty-four patients underwent only Kent bundle ablation (Kent-only group) and 32 also underwent PVI (+PVI group). There was no significant difference in the basic patient characteristics between the groups. Additional PVI did not improve the freedom from residual AF compared to Kent bundle ablation alone (p=0.53). In the Kent-only group, AF episodes remained in 25.0% during the follow-up (709 days). A univariate analysis showed that age ≥60 years, left atrial dimension ≥38mm, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) ≥40pg/ml, and concomitant hypertension were predictive factors for residual AF. However, in the multivariate analysis, only BNP ≥40pg/ml remained as an independent predictive factor (HR=17.1 and CI: 2.3-128.2; p=0.006). Among patients with WPW syndrome and AF, Kent bundle ablation alone may have a sufficient clinical impact of preventing recurrence of AF in select patients. Screening the BNP level would help decide the strategy to manage those patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Restless legs syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study on prevalence, clinical characteristics, quality of life and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtehnejad, S-M; Shafieesabet, M; Shahidi, G A; Delbari, A; Lökk, J

    2015-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder that can coexist with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the association between these two movement disorders is quite poorly explored and previous findings are controversial in different aspects. To compare prevalence of RLS in Iranian PD population with a matched control group and to investigate the impact of comorbid RLS on quality of life (QoL), nutritional status, and clinical characteristics in PD population. This study was conducted on 108 individuals with idiopathic PD (IPD) and 424 matched controls. RLS was diagnosed using the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) criteria. Further assessments were performed on clinical characteristics, PD severity scales, psychiatric features, nutritional status, fatigue, and QoL in PD patients with and without RLS. Restless legs syndrome was significantly more common among the patients with IPD (14.8%) compared to the controls (7.5%) [OR = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1-4.0)]. IPD subjects with RLS had significantly higher anxiety score [10.1 (SD = 5.1) vs 5.9 (SD = 5.0); P = 0.003], worse nutritional status [23.7 (SD = 2.7) vs 25.4 (SD = 3.7); P = 0.008], and poorer QoL [26.9 (SD = 13.1) vs 17.0 (SD = 13.2); P = 0.006]. The number of positive answers to the IRLSSG diagnostic criteria had significant direct correlation with unpredictability of the off periods and the presence of symptomatic orthostasis. Our study demonstrated a higher prevalence of RLS in patients with PD compared to general population. PD patients with RLS suffer from more anxiety, worse nutritional status, and worse QoL. RLS negatively accompanies with psychiatric problems, emotional behaviors, stigma, and cognitive impairment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Comparison of the Behavioural and Emotional Characteristics of Alzheimer's Dementia in Individuals with and without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Valerie; Konstantareas, M. Mary

    2005-01-01

    The behavioural and emotional changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are compared for individuals with Down syndrome and AD and individuals with AD from the general population (AD-only). The primary caregivers of 30 people with Down syndrome and AD and 30 people with AD-only completed the BEHAVE-AD and the Apathy subscale of the CERAD.…

  2. The development of the dementia concept in 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dementia concept has been reformulated through its history and the 19th century was remarkable in the construction of this concept as we understand it today. Like other syndromes, much of the history of the dementia concept comes from the attempt to separate it from other nosological conditions, giving it a unique identity. The fundamental elements for the arising of the dementia modern concept were: a correlation of the observed syndrome with organic-cerebral lesions; b understanding of the irreversibility of the dementia evolution; c its relation with human ageing; and d the choice of the cognitive dysfunction as a clinical marker of the dementia concept.

  3. Parkinson disease: α-synuclein mutational screening and new clinical insight into the p.E46K mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Márcia M G; Rodrigues, Fabíola C; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Campos Júnior, Mário; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Nicaretta, Denise H; Pereira, João S; Silva, Delson José; Della Coletta, Marcus V; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Abreu, Gabriella M; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B

    2015-06-01

    Amongst Parkinson's disease-causing genetic factors, missense mutations and genomic multiplications in the gene encoding α-synuclein are well established causes of the disease, although genetic data in populations with a high degree of admixture, such as the Brazilian one, are still scarce. In this study, we conducted a molecular screening of α-synuclein point mutations and copy number variation in the largest cohort of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 549) and also in twelve Portuguese and one Bolivian immigrants. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes or saliva, and the mutational screening was performed by quantitative and qualitative real-time PCR. The only alteration identified was the p.E46K mutation in a 60-year-old man, born in Bolivia, with a familial history of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. This is the second family ever reported, in which this rare pathogenic mutation is segregating. The same mutation was firstly described ten years ago in a Spanish family with a neurodegenerative syndrome combining parkinsonism, dementia and visual hallucinations. The clinical condition of our proband reveals a less aggressive phenotype than previously described and reinforces that marked phenotypic heterogeneity is common among patients with Parkinson's disease, even among those carriers sharing the same mutation. Our findings add new insight into the preexisting information about α-synuclein p.E46K, improving our understanding about the endophenotypes associated to this mutation and corroborate that missense alterations and multiplications in α-synuclein are uncommon among Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Opening up the DNA methylome of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Morales, R; Esteller, M

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a complex clinical condition characterized by several cognitive impairments that interfere with patient independence in executing everyday tasks. Various neurodegenerative disorders have dementia in common among their clinical manifestations. In addition, these diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia, share molecular alterations at the neuropathological level. In recent years, the field of neuroepigenetics has expanded massively and it is now clear that epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation, are mechanisms involved in both normal and pathological brain function. Despite the persistent methodological and conceptual caveats, it has been reported that several genes fundamental to the development of neurodegenerative disorders are deregulated by aberrant methylation patterns of their promoters, and even common epigenetic signatures for some dementia-associated pathologies have been identified. Therefore, understanding the epigenetic mechanisms that are altered in dementia, especially those associated with the initial phases, will allow us not only to understand the etiopathology of dementia and its progression but also to design effective therapies to reduce this global public health problem. This review provides an in-depth summary of our current knowledge about DNA methylation in dementia, focusing exclusively on the analyses performed in human brain.

  5. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing YUAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease cognitive impairment (PD-CI is one of the major non-motor symtoms (NMS of PD, including Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (PD - MCI and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD. Executive dysfunction is relatively prominent, but other cognitive domains as visuospatial ability, memory and language can also be affected. Main risk factors for PD-CI include male gender, advanced age, low education, severe motor symptoms, low baseline cognitive function and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS. Lewy bodies are main pathological changes, and Alzheimer's disease (AD related pathological changes can also be seen. The application value of decreased α?synuclein (α-Syn and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ1-42 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF as biomarkers remains controversial. There are few related research and no defined pathogenic genes currently. Both dopaminergic pathway and acetylcholinergic pathway are involved in the occurrence of PD - CI as demonstrated in PET studies. Cortical and subcortical atrophy are associated with PD - CI as observed in MRI studies. Olfactory dysfunction may be one of the predictors of cognitive impairment. PDD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB share common biological characteristics, therefore the differential diagnosis sometimes is difficult. Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs and memantine help to improve clinical symptoms, but treatment decision should be made with individualization. Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT has potential clinical value and should be investigated by more studies. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.004

  6. Etiologies and risk factors for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is understood as a clinical syndrome characterized by impairment in memory impairment along with cognitive deficits in other domains. Over the years, understanding about the causes of dementias has improved. Broadly, dementias can be classified as irreversible degenerative dementias and reversible dementias. Alzheimer′s disease is the prototype of degenerative dementias and is characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (called as amyloid plaques outside the neurons and accumulation of tau protein (called tau tangles inside the neurons. Vascular dementias are characterized by cerebrovascular insults which lead to pathological brain changes that impair cognition. The pathological hallmark of Lewy body dementia is the presence of α-synuclein neuronal inclusions, also known as Lewy bodies, accompanied by neuronal loss. Frontotemporal dementias are characterized by abnormal deposits of the microtubule-associated protein tau, the trans-activation response TAR DNA-binding protein with molecular weight 43 kDa (TDP-43, and the fused in sarcoma protein. Reversible dementias are characterized by the primary illness and may not present with characteristic brain deposits as seen with many degenerative dementias.

  7. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Study of Oral ELND005 (scyllo-Inositol) in Young Adults with Down Syndrome without Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Michael S.; Skotko, Brian G.; McDonough, Mary Ellen; Pulsifer, Margaret; Evans, Casey; Doran, Eric; Muranevici, Gabriela; Kesslak, Patrick; Abushakra, Susan; Lott, Ira T.

    2018-01-01

    Background ELND005 (scyllo-Inositol; cyclohexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexol) has been evaluated as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for developing AD dementia. Objective To evaluate the safety and tolerability of ELND005 and to determine its pharmacokinetics (PK) and relationship between PK parameters, safety outcome measures, and exploratory efficacy outcome measures in young adults with DS without dementia. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, three-arm, multicenter Phase 2 study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of ELND005 administered orally for 4 weeks (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01791725). Participants who met study eligibility criteria were randomly assigned in a 2:1:1 ratio to receive ELND005 at either 250 mg twice daily (BID) or 250 mg once daily (QD) or matching placebo for 4 weeks. Results There were no apparent treatment group-related trends on cognitive or behavioral measures and there were no SAEs and no deaths in the study. Overall, mean changes from baseline in clinical laboratory parameters, vital sign measurements, electrocardiogram (ECG) results, and other physical findings were unremarkable. ELND005 accumulation averaged approximately 2-fold with QD dosing, and 3- to 4-fold with BID dosing. Conclusion Overall, treatment of adults with DS with ELND005 at both doses was well tolerated, achieved measurable blood levels and demonstrated no safety findings. Further studies will be needed to test efficacy. PMID:28453471

  8. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II Study of Oral ELND005 (scyllo-Inositol) in Young Adults with Down Syndrome without Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Michael S; Skotko, Brian G; McDonough, Mary Ellen; Pulsifer, Margaret; Evans, Casey; Doran, Eric; Muranevici, Gabriela; Kesslak, Patrick; Abushakra, Susan; Lott, Ira T

    2017-01-01

    ELND005 (scyllo-Inositol; cyclohexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexol) has been evaluated as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for developing AD dementia. To evaluate the safety and tolerability of ELND005 and to determine its pharmacokinetics (PK) and relationship between PK parameters, safety outcome measures, and exploratory efficacy outcome measures in young adults with DS without dementia. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, three-arm, multicenter Phase II study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of ELND005 administered orally for 4 weeks (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01791725). Participants who met study eligibility criteria were randomly assigned in a 2 : 1:1 ratio to receive ELND005 at either 250 mg twice daily (BID) or 250 mg once daily (QD) or matching placebo for 4 weeks. There were no apparent treatment group-related trends on cognitive or behavioral measures and there were no SAEs and no deaths in the study. Overall, mean changes from baseline in clinical laboratory parameters, vital sign measurements, electrocardiogram results, and other physical findings were unremarkable. ELND005 accumulation averaged approximately 2-fold with QD dosing, and 3- to 4-fold with BID dosing. Overall, treatment of adults with DS with ELND005 at both doses was well tolerated, achieved measurable blood levels and demonstrated no safety findings. Further studies will be needed to test efficacy.

  9. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  10. Differentiating between visual hallucination-free dementia with Lewy bodies and corticobasal syndrome on the basis of neuropsychology and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Michael R; Mitchell, Sara; Francis, Philip L; Sherborn, Kayla; Meradje, Katayoun; McNeely, Alicia A; Honjo, Kie; Zhao, Jiali; Scott, Christopher Jm; Caldwell, Curtis B; Ehrlich, Lisa; Shammi, Prathiba; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Bilbao, Juan M; Lang, Anthony E; Black, Sandra E; Masellis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS) are atypical parkinsonian disorders with fronto-subcortical and posterior cognitive dysfunction as common features. While visual hallucinations are a good predictor of Lewy body pathology and are rare in CBS, they are not exhibited in all cases of DLB. Given the clinical overlap between these disorders, neuropsychological and imaging markers may aid in distinguishing these entities. Prospectively recruited case-control cohorts of CBS (n =31) and visual hallucination-free DLB (n =30), completed neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric measures as well as brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Perfusion data were available for forty-two controls. Behavioural, perfusion, and cortical volume and thickness measures were compared between the groups to identify features that serve to differentiate them. The Lewy body with no hallucinations group performed more poorly on measures of episodic memory compared to the corticobasal group, including the delayed and cued recall portions of the California Verbal Learning Test (F (1, 42) =23.1, P reproduction of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (F (1, 36) =9.7, P =0.004). The Lewy body group also demonstrated reduced perfusion in the left occipital pole compared to the corticobasal group (F (1,57) =7.4, P =0.009). At autopsy, the Lewy body cases all demonstrated mixed dementia with Lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease and small vessel arteriosclerosis, while the corticobasal cases demonstrated classical corticobasal degeneration in five, dementia with agyrophilic grains + corticobasal degeneration + cerebral amyloid angiopathy in one, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy in two, and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration-Ubiquitin/TAR DNA-binding protein 43 proteinopathy in one. MRI measures were not significantly different between the patient groups. Reduced perfusion in the left occipital region and worse

  11. Low LDL cholesterol, PCSK9 and HMGCR genetic variation, and risk of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2017-01-01

     Risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, all dementia, and Parkinson's disease.Results In observational analyses, the multifactorially adjusted hazard ratio for Parkinson's disease in participants with an LDL cholesterol level ....79), whereas the corresponding hazard ratios for Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or any dementia did not differ from 1.0. PCSK9 and HMGCR variants combined were associated with a 9.3% lower LDL cholesterol level. In genetic, causal analyses adjusted for age, sex, and year of birth, the risk ratios...... for a lifelong 1 mmol/L lower LDL cholesterol level were 0.57 (0.27 to 1.17) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.81 (0.34 to 1.89) for vascular dementia, 0.66 (0.34 to 1.26) for any dementia, and 1.02 (0.26 to 4.00) for Parkinson's disease. Summary level data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project using...

  12. Radiologic diagnostics of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.

    2003-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most common diseases in the elderly population and is getting more and more important with the ageing of the population. A radiologic structural examination with CT or MRI is meanwhile a standard procedure in the diagnostic work up of patients with dementia syndrome. Radiology enables an early diagnosis and a differential diagnosis between different causes of dementia. Because structural changes occur only late in the disease process, a more detailed structural analysis using volumetric techniques or the use of functional imaging techniques is mandatory. These days, structural imaging uses MRI which enables to detect early atrophic changes at the medial temporal lobe with focus on the amygdala hippocampal complex. These changes are also present in the normal ageing process. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, however, they are more rapid and more pronounced. The use of functional imaging methods such as perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI or fMRI allow new insights into the pathophysiologic changes of dementia. The article gives an overview of the current status of structural imaging and an outlook into the potential of functional imaging methods. Detailed results of structural and functional imaging are presented in other articles of this issue. (orig.) [de

  13. Capgras delusion for animals and inanimate objects in Parkinson?s Disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Lucrezia; Piacentini, Sylvie; Soliveri, Paola; Scarone, Silvio; Gambini, Orsola

    2015-01-01

    Background Capgras delusion is a delusional misidentification syndrome, in which the patient is convinced that someone that is well known to them, usually a close relative, has been replaced by an impostor or double. Although it has been frequently described in psychotic syndromes, including paranoid schizophrenia, over a third of the documented cases of Capgras delusion are observed in patients with organic brain lesions or neurodegenerative disease, including Parkinson?s Disease. Variants o...

  14. Electroencephalography Is a Good Complement to Currently Established Dementia Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Jelic, Vesna; Cavallin, Lena

    2016-01-01

    , 135 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 15 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease with dementia (DLB/PDD), 32 other dementias]. The EEG data were recorded in a standardized way. Structural imaging data were visually rated using scales of atrophy in the medial temporal, frontal, and posterior cortex......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Dementia biomarkers that are accessible and easily applicable in nonspecialized clinical settings are urgently needed. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) is a good candidate, and the statistical pattern recognition (SPR) method has recently provided promising results. We......EEG to the diagnostic workup substantially increases the detection of AD pathology even in pre-dementia stages and improves differential diagnosis. EEG could serve as a good complement to currently established dementia biomarkers since it is cheap, noninvasive, and extensively applied outside academic centers....

  15. Computed tomography brain changes in Parkinsonian dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inzelberg, R; Teeves, T; Reider, I; Gerlenter, I; Korczyn, A D

    1987-11-01

    In order to evaluate the relationship between brain atrophy and the motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease, we have evaluated CT changes in 132 consecutive patients and compared them to measures of physical and mental decline, using intercorrelations and variance analysis. The result demonstrated age as a most important factor relating to brain atrophy. After correction for this determinant, it became clear that the motor and cognitive parameters were interdependent but they affected similar CT parameters. The effect of motor decline was the stronger of the two and it was the only one which correlated with cortical atrophy. The results support the notion of subcortical changes underlying the dementia of Parkinson's disease.

  16. An evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of phase analysis of data from radionuclide ventriculograms in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Bitter, F.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Weismueller, P.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculograms may be of value for detecting and localising the abnormal sequence of ventricular contraction secondary to Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) symdrome. The present study was undertaken to test this hypothesis. The space - time sequences of right- and left-ventricular action obtained from radionuclide ventriculograms obtained during rest studies were evaluated in 8 patients with WPW syndrome (confirmed by 12-lead surface electrocardiography) and compared to those of 14 normal subjects. All of the latter showed a consistent ventricular activation pattern, i.e. the first site of ventricular activity in the upper septal region followed by a second site either at the base of the left ventricle or located apically. It was possible to diagnose 11 of the 14 normal subjects (specificity, 79%) and 7 of the 8 patients (sensitivity, 88%). The 4 patients who had been classified as having a left-sided accessory bundle by surface electrocardiography were likewise diagnosed by phase analysis, as were the 2 patients with a confirmed right-sided bypass tract. Two patients with septal posterior accessory pathways could not be identified by phase analysis. Furthermore, cases with an activation pattern which closely resembled that of the 2 patients with right-sided accessory bundles were found to be normal from their ECGs. It is now necessary to evaluate phase analysis against invasive electrophysiological methods in such patients. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of phase analysis of data from radionuclide ventriculograms in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Bitter, F.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Weismueller, P.

    1985-10-01

    It has been suggested that phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculograms may be of value for detecting and localising the abnormal sequence of ventricular contraction secondary to Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) symdrome. The present study was undertaken to test this hypothesis. The space-time sequences of right- and left-ventricular action obtained from radionuclide ventriculograms obtained during rest studies were evaluated in 8 patients with WPW syndrome (confirmed by 12-lead surface electrocardiography) and compared to those of 14 normal subjects. All of the latter showed a consistent ventricular activation pattern, i.e. the first site of ventricular activity in the upper septal region followed by a second site either at the base of the left ventricle or located apically. It was possible to diagnose 11 of the 14 normal subjects (specificity, 79%) and 7 of the 8 patients (sensitivity, 88%). The 4 patients who had been classified as having a left-sided accessory bundle by surface electrocardiography were likewise diagnosed by phase analysis, as were the 2 patients with a confirmed right-sided bypass tract. Two patients with septal posterior accessory pathways could not be identified by phase analysis. Furthermore, cases with an activation pattern which closely resembled that of the 2 patients with right-sided accessory bundles were found to be normal from their ECGs. It is now necessary to evaluate phase analysis against invasive electrophysiological methods in such patients.

  18. An Asymptomatic Case of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Right-sided Free-wall Accessory Pathway and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanao Mine, MD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl with a known history of asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome exhibited signs of left ventricular (LV septal akinesia and LV dysfunction during routine follow-up. A 12-lead surface ECG showed pre-excitation, a predominantly negative delta wave in V1 and left axis deviation, which was consistent with the presence of a right free-wall accessory pathway. Radiofrequency ablation of the anterolateral right atrium around the local shortest atrium-to-ventricle interval created the accessory pathway block. An echocardiogram taken one month after the procedure revealed that LV septal wall motion had normalized and that LV ejection fraction had improved from 50% before the ablation to 64% after the ablation. Most previous reports of asymptomatic patients of WPW with LV septal dyskinesia and dysfunction have described right septal or posteroseptal accessory pathways. This patient reported here represents a rare case with right free-wall accessory pathway and LV dysfunction without tachycardia.

  19. Epidemiological profile of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a general population younger than 50 years of age in an era of radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Chen, Hui-Chi; Kao, Feng-Yu; Huang, San-Kuei

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome varies between 0.68 and 1.7/1000. The epidemiological profile may be modified after the introduction of transcatheter interventions. The aim of this study is to investigate the epidemiological trends of the WPW syndrome in a general population during a period with available and reimbursed transcatheter ablation. Data of WPW patients <50 years old were retrieved from our national database (2000-2010). We identified 6086 (61% male) patients, accounting for an overall prevalence of 0.36/1000 with a peak of 0.61/1000 in ages 20-24 years. The risk of death and sudden death was 0.071% and 0.02% per patient-year, respectively. The 42 deaths occurred at a median age of 29 years. Associated congenial heart disease was noted in 158 (2.6%) patients, including 42 with Ebstein's anomaly that increased the mortality risk (P=0.001, OR=8.5). In those without congenital heart disease, myocardial dysfunction occurred in 115 (1.9%) patients and increased the risk of death (P<0.001, OR=10.6) and sudden death. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed in 2527 patients at a median age of 25.7 years (4.54% per patient-year, discharge mortality 0.16%); 11 (0.4%) before the age of 5, and 2231 (88%) after the age of 15. Whereas repeated ablation procedures accounted for 6.0% of the procedures, those in Ebstein's patients were 25%. Radiofrequency catheter ablation is already a common treatment for WPW patients, particularly during young adulthood, which accounts for a lower prevalence. Myocardial dysfunction and associated congenital heart disease remain as risks of mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ffytche, Dominic H; Aarsland, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Although illusions, hallucinations and delusions did not play a prominent role in James Parkinson's original clinical descriptions, the longitudinal view of disease progression he advocated has important lessons for the study of such symptoms today. A focus on longitudinal progression rather than individual symptoms led to the concept of PD psychosis-a spectrum of positive symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The publication of criteria for PD psychosis in 2007 helped unify the disparate set of symptoms, raising their profile and resulting in a rapid expansion of literature focussing on clinical aspects, mechanisms, and treatment. Here we review this literature and the evolving view of PD psychosis. Adding to previous evidence of a prospective risk for dementia and the move to supervised care, key recent developments include: recognition of prevalence increase with disease duration; a broadening of symptoms included in PD psychosis; better characterization of higher visual and cognitive dysfunction risk factors; structural, functional, and neurotransmitter imaging biomarker evidence; and approval of pimavanserin in the United States for the treatment of PD psychosis. The accumulating evidence raises novel questions and directions for future research that promise a better understanding of the clinical management of PD psychosis and its role as a biomarker for PD stage and progression. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Types of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Teens For Parents & Teachers Resolving Family Conflicts The Holidays and Alzheimer's Glossary Virtual Library Online ... Use Map Selector Search Alzheimer’s Association Alzheimer's & Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia ...

  2. Vascular dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poor judgment and loss of ability to recognize danger Using the wrong word, not pronouncing words correctly, ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Neurodegenerative Dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Full text: With increasing life expectancy across the world, the number of elderly people at risk of developing dementia is growing rapidly. Thus, progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia represent a growing public health concern. These diseases are characterized by a progressive loss in most of the cognitive functions. The promise, possibly in a near future, of disease-modifying therapies has made the characterization of the early stages of dementia a topic of major interest. The assessment of these early stages is a challenge for neuroimaging studies. In order to conceive prevention trials; it is of major outcome to fully understand the mechanisms of the cognitive system impairment and its evolution, with a particular reference to the symptomatic pre-dementia stage, when subjects just begin to depart from normality. In this article we review recent progress in neuroimaging, and their potentiality for increasing a diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  4. Reduced sympathetic activity in idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Mehlsen, Jesper; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    More than 50% of patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) will develop Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. In a previous study, we found attenuated heart rate responses in iRBD and Parkinson's disease patients during sleep. The current study aimed to evaluate heart rate...... variability further in order to identify possible changes in these components during wakefulness and sleep in patients with iRBD and Parkinson's disease....

  5. Parkinson's disease mild cognitive impairment: application and validation of the criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Hoogland, Jeroen; Goldman, Jennifer G.; Schmand, Ben A.; Tröster, Alexander I.; Burn, David J.; Litvan, Irene; Filoteo, J. Vincent; Hurtig, Howard; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Adler, Charles H.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Leverenz, Jim; Zabetian, Cyrus; Huang, Xuemei; Eslinger, Paul J.; Marras, Connie; Duff-Canning, Sarah; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.; Anderson, Tim J.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Lewis, Simon J. G.; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Yu, Rwei-Ling; Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Breen, David P.; Barker, Roger A.; Yarnall, Alison J.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Koene, Ted; Klein, Martin; Trautmann, Ellen; Mollenhauer, Brit; Dodel, Richard; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Pagonabaragga, Javier; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C.; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Junque, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Sportiello, Marco Timpano; Cammisuli, Davide M.; Barone, Paolo; Pedersen, Kenn Freddy; Alves, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a serious health issue and a major concern for many patients. In most cases mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between normal cognitive functioning and dementia which is of potential importance in the early identification of

  6. Early AIDS dementia complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountz, J.M.; Speed, N.M.; Adams, K.; Schwartz, J.A.; Gross, M.D.; Ostrow, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    A frequent complication of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is AIDS dementia complex (ADC). The authors evaluated seven patients with AIDS (aged 28-55 years, all male) for ADC by psychiatric evaluation, neuropsychological testing, CT scanning, and IMP-SPECT. Six of seven patients exhibited cognitive or behavioral abnormalities. Neuropsychological testing showed general deficits but no cases of explicit dementia. SPECT showed marked abnormalities in two cases: posterior temporal-parietal diminution of tracer uptake in one case (posterior/anterior=0.81) and marked right/left subcortical asymmetry (1.17) in the other. In three additional cases there was asymmetric tracer uptake in the subcortical and parietal regions. CT findings were normal in all seven cases. The authors conclude that functional imaging with the use of IMP-SPECT may be a useful method to follow ADC progression and response to therapy

  7. Symptoms and quality of life in late stage Parkinson syndromes: a longitudinal community study of predictive factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene J Higginson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palliative care is increasingly offered earlier in the cancer trajectory but rarely in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease(IPD, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy(PSP or Multiple System Atrophy(MSA. There is little longitudinal data of people with late stage disease to understand levels of need. We aimed to determine how symptoms and quality of life of these patients change over time; and what demographic and clinical factors predicted changes. METHODS: We recruited 82 patients into a longitudinal study, consenting patients with a diagnosis of IPD, MSA or PSP, stages 3-5 Hoehn and Yahr(H&Y. At baseline and then on up to 3 occasions over one year, we collected self-reported demographic, clinical, symptom, palliative and quality of life data, using Parkinson's specific and generic validated scales, including the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS. We tested for predictors using multivariable analysis, adjusting for confounders. FINDINGS: Over two thirds of patients had severe disability, over one third being wheelchair-bound/bedridden. Symptoms were highly prevalent in all conditions - mean (SD of 10.6(4.0 symptoms. More than 50% of the MSA and PSP patients died over the year. Over the year, half of the patients showed either an upward (worsening, 24/60 or fluctuant (8/60 trajectory for POS and symptoms. The strongest predictors of higher levels of symptoms at the end of follow-up were initial scores on POS (AOR 1.30; 95%CI:1.05-1.60 and being male (AOR 5.18; 95% CI 1.17 to 22.92, both were more predictive than initial H&Y scores. INTERPRETATION: The findings point to profound and complex mix of non-motor and motor symptoms in patients with late stage IPD, MSA and PSP. Symptoms are not resolved and half of the patients deteriorate. Palliative problems are predictive of future symptoms, suggesting that an early palliative assessment might help screen for those in need of earlier intervention.

  8. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  9. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  10. Visual Hallucinations in PD and Lewy Body Dementias: Old and New Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Onofrj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual Hallucinations (VH are a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s Disease (PD and the Lewy body dementias (LBD of Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB. The origin of VH in PD and LBD is debated: earlier studies considered a number of different possible mechanisms underlying VH including visual disorders, Rapid Eye Movement (REM Sleep Intrusions, dysfunctions of top down or bottom up visual pathways, and neurotransmitter imbalance.

  11. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  12. The Everyday Cognition Scale in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Rachel A.; Benge, Jared; Lantrip, Crystal; Soileau, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    This brief report describes caregiver ratings on the Everyday Cognition (ECog) scale, a psychometrically robust measure of cognitively driven daily activities that was initially designed for other neurodegenerative conditions, in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). In 49 individuals with PD, those with suspected PD dementia had more difficulties across ECog domains than those with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment. Results from multiple regression analyses revealed that act...

  13. Acid rain may cause senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, F

    1985-04-25

    Aluminium, released from the soil by acid rain, may be a cause of several forms of senile dementia including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Many upland reservoirs, fed by acid rain, supply homes with water laced with significant amounts of aluminium. Studies in the Pacific have shown that communities living on soils that are extremely rich in bauxite, the rock containing aluminium, have a very high incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Vascular risk factors, cognitve decline, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Duron

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available E Duron, Olivier HanonBroca Hospital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer’s disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.Keywords: dementia, hypertension, diabetus mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic syndrome

  15. Validity of dementia diagnoses in the danish hospital registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, T.K.T.; Andersen, B.B.; Phung, T.K.T.

    2007-01-01

    .24-0.48). Conclusion: The validity of dementia syndrome in the Danish hospital registers was high and allows for epidemiological studies about dementia. Alzheimer's disease, although underregistered, also had a good validity once the diagnosis was registered. In general, other ICD-10 dementia subtypes in the registers......Background:The validity of dementia diagnoses in the Danish nationwide hospital registers was evaluated to determine the value of these registers in epidemiological research about dementia. Methods: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from 4,682 patients registered for the first time...... with a dementia diagnosis in the last 6 months of 2003. The patients' medical journals were reviewed to evaluate if they fulfilled ICD-10 and/or DSM-IV criteria for dementia and specific dementia subtypes. The patients who were still alive in 2006 were invited to an interview. Results: One hundred and ninety...

  16. Type A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Generating an Antidromic Atrioventricular (AV Reentrant Tachycardia (AVRT and an Orthodromic AVRT with a Long RP Interval Initiated only after Incomplete Impairment of an AV Accessory Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushi Tanaka, MD PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case of a 23-year-old male with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. At baseline, constant right atrial pacing induced antidromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT, whereas constant right ventricular (RV pacing only revealed a normal His-Purkinje system. Mapping below the mitral annulus during sinus rhythm revealed fusion of atrial and ventricular potentials at multiple lateral sites. After unsuccessful ablation at these sites, constant RV pacing induced a long RP interval, orthodromic AVRT with the earliest atrial site being located at an anterior aspect, where successful ablation was later achieved. These phenomena may indicate an unexpected arrhythmogenic effect of initial ablations.

  17. [Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: characteristics, evaluation and therapeutic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faludi, Béla; Janszky, József; Komoly, Sámuel; Kovács, Norbert

    2015-07-05

    Parkinson's disease is a well known representent of the movement disorder group of neurological disorders. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on specific symptoms and signs of movement abnormalities. In addition to classic motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease has characteristic non-motor features, and some of these emerges the classic signs. The authors discuss characteristics and therapeutic interventions in Parkinson's disease related sleep disturbances. The authors reviewed and summarised literature data on sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease published in the PubMed database up to January 2015. Sleep problems are important non-motor complains (insomnia, hypersomnia, REM behaviour disorder, sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome). The neurodegenerative process of the brain-stem, the effect of symptoms of Parkinson's disease on sleep and concomitant sleep disorders constitute the background of the patient's complains. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy of the consequential or concomitant sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease will help to improve the patient's quality of life.

  18. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  19. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  20. White matter alterations in neurodegenerative and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supprian, T.; Kessler, H.; Falkai, P.; Retz, W.; Roesler, M.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W.

    2003-01-01

    Due to a significant overlap of the two syndromes, differentiation of degenerative dementia of the Alzheimer-type from vascular dementia may be difficult even when imaging studies are available. White matter changes occur in many patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Little is known about the impact of white matter changes on the course and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease. High sensitivity of MRI in the detection of white matter alterations may account for over-diagnosing vascular dementia. The clinical significance of white matter alterations in dementia is still a matter of debate. The article reviews current concepts about the role of white matter alterations in dementia. (orig.) [de