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Sample records for park nc usa

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH OUTCOMES WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS -RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC, 7/30-31/2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better define ORD's Environmental Public Health Outcomes (EPHO) research agenda, a workshop was held 7/30-31/2002 at EPA facilities in Research Triangle Park, NC. The intent of this workshop was to engage federal and other organizations in a dialog that will assist ORD in deve...

  2. Design Schematics for a Sustainable Parking Lot: Building 2-2332, ENRD Classroom, Fort Bragg, NC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stumpf, Annette

    2003-01-01

    ...) was tasked with planning a sustainable design "charrette" to explore and develop alternative parking lot designs that would meet Fort Bragg's parking needs, as well as its need to meet sustainable...

  3. South Park : meil on rohkem peeretusi kui USA-s / Märt Milter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Milter, Märt

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker, Matt Stone ja Pam Brady : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  4. Proximity to Parks in the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Community Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    People use parks to socialize, exercise, recreate, and enjoy nature. Having a park within walking distance creates opportunities for individuals to experience the benefits of trees and other green space on health and well-being. These maps are part of the US Environmental Protect...

  5. Investigation of and Response to 2 Plague Cases, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Mary; Novak, Mark; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul; Kingry, Luke; Weinburke, Matthew; Buttke, Danielle; Hacker, Gregory; Tucker, James; Niemela, Michael; Jackson, Bryan; Padgett, Kerry; Liebman, Kelly; Vugia, Duc; Kramer, Vicki

    2016-12-01

    In August 2015, plague was diagnosed for 2 persons who had visited Yosemite National Park in California, USA. One case was septicemic and the other bubonic. Subsequent environmental investigation identified probable locations of exposure for each patient and evidence of epizootic plague in other areas of the park. Transmission of Yersinia pestis was detected by testing rodent serum, fleas, and rodent carcasses. The environmental investigation and whole-genome multilocus sequence typing of Y. pestis isolates from the patients and environmental samples indicated that the patients had been exposed in different locations and that at least 2 distinct strains of Y. pestis were circulating among vector-host populations in the area. Public education efforts and insecticide applications in select areas to control rodent fleas probably reduced the risk for plague transmission to park visitors and staff.

  6. Investigation of and Response to 2 Plague Cases, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Mary; Novak, Mark; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul; Kingry, Luke; Weinburke, Matthew; Buttke, Danielle; Hacker, Gregory; Tucker, James; Niemela, Michael; Jackson, Bryan; Padgett, Kerry; Liebman, Kelly; Vugia, Duc

    2016-01-01

    In August 2015, plague was diagnosed for 2 persons who had visited Yosemite National Park in California, USA. One case was septicemic and the other bubonic. Subsequent environmental investigation identified probable locations of exposure for each patient and evidence of epizootic plague in other areas of the park. Transmission of Yersinia pestis was detected by testing rodent serum, fleas, and rodent carcasses. The environmental investigation and whole-genome multilocus sequence typing of Y. pestis isolates from the patients and environmental samples indicated that the patients had been exposed in different locations and that at least 2 distinct strains of Y. pestis were circulating among vector–host populations in the area. Public education efforts and insecticide applications in select areas to control rodent fleas probably reduced the risk for plague transmission to park visitors and staff. PMID:27870634

  7. Widespread occurrence and potential for biodegradation of bioactive contaminants in Congaree National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Battaglin, William A.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Henning, Frank; Hladik, Michelle L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Journey, Celeste A.; Riley, Jeffrey W.; Romanok, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Organic contaminants with designed molecular bioactivity, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, originate from human and agricultural sources, occur frequently in surface waters, and threaten the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Congaree National Park in South Carolina (USA) is a vulnerable park unit due to its location downstream of multiple urban and agricultural contaminant sources and its hydrologic setting, being composed almost entirely of floodplain and aquatic environments. Seventy-two water and sediment samples were collected from 16 sites in Congaree National Park during 2013 to 2015, and analyzed for 199 and 81 targeted organic contaminants, respectively. More than half of these water and sediment analytes were not detected or potentially had natural sources. Pharmaceutical contaminants were detected (49 total) frequently in water throughout Congaree National Park, with higher detection frequencies and concentrations at Congaree and Wateree River sites, downstream from major urban areas. Forty-seven organic wastewater indicator chemicals were detected in water, and 36 were detected in sediment, of which approximately half are distinctly anthropogenic. Endogenous sterols and hormones, which may originate from humans or wildlife, were detected in water and sediment samples throughout Congaree National Park, but synthetic hormones were detected only once, suggesting a comparatively low risk of adverse impacts. Assessment of the biodegradation potentials of 8 14C-radiolabeled model contaminants indicated poor potentials for some contaminants, particularly under anaerobic sediments conditions.

  8. Widespread occurrence and potential for biodegradation of bioactive contaminants in Congaree National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M; Battaglin, William A; Clark, Jimmy M; Henning, Frank P; Hladik, Michelle L; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Journey, Celeste A; Riley, Jeffrey W; Romanok, Kristin M

    2017-11-01

    Organic contaminants with designed molecular bioactivity, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, originate from human and agricultural sources, occur frequently in surface waters, and threaten the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Congaree National Park in South Carolina (USA) is a vulnerable park unit due to its location downstream of multiple urban and agricultural contaminant sources and its hydrologic setting, being composed almost entirely of floodplain and aquatic environments. Seventy-two water and sediment samples were collected from 16 sites in Congaree National Park during 2013 to 2015, and analyzed for 199 and 81 targeted organic contaminants, respectively. More than half of these water and sediment analytes were not detected or potentially had natural sources. Pharmaceutical contaminants were detected (49 total) frequently in water throughout Congaree National Park, with higher detection frequencies and concentrations at Congaree and Wateree River sites, downstream from major urban areas. Forty-seven organic wastewater indicator chemicals were detected in water, and 36 were detected in sediment, of which approximately half are distinctly anthropogenic. Endogenous sterols and hormones, which may originate from humans or wildlife, were detected in water and sediment samples throughout Congaree National Park, but synthetic hormones were detected only once, suggesting a comparatively low risk of adverse impacts. Assessment of the biodegradation potentials of 8 14 C-radiolabeled model contaminants indicated poor potentials for some contaminants, particularly under anaerobic sediments conditions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3045-3056. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. © 2017 SETAC.

  9. Snowmelt timing, phenology, and growing season length in conifer forests of Crater Lake National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Donal S.; Kellermann, Jherime L.; Wayne, Chris

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is having significant impacts on montane and high-elevation areas globally. Warmer winter temperatures are driving reduced snowpack in the western USA with broad potential impacts on ecosystem dynamics of particular concern for protected areas. Vegetation phenology is a sensitive indicator of ecological response to climate change and is associated with snowmelt timing. Human monitoring of climate impacts can be resource prohibitive for land management agencies, whereas remotely sensed phenology observations are freely available at a range of spatiotemporal scales. Little work has been done in regions dominated by evergreen conifer cover, which represents many mountain regions at temperate latitudes. We used moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to assess the influence of snowmelt timing and elevation on five phenology metrics (green up, maximum greenness, senescence, dormancy, and growing season length) within Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA from 2001 to 2012. Earlier annual mean snowmelt timing was significantly correlated with earlier onset of green up at the landscape scale. Snowmelt timing and elevation have significant explanatory power for phenology, though with high variability. Elevation has a moderate control on early season indicators such as snowmelt timing and green up and less on late-season variables such as senescence and growing season length. PCA results show that early season indicators and late season indicators vary independently. These results have important implications for ecosystem dynamics, management, and conservation, particularly of species such as whitebark pine ( Pinus albicaulis) in alpine and subalpine areas.

  10. Urban growth and landscape connectivity threats assessment at Saguaro National Park, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkl, Ryan; Norman, Laura M.; Mitchell, David; Feller, Mark R.; Smith, Garrett; Wilson, Natalie R.

    2018-01-01

    Urban and exurban expansion results in habitat and biodiversity loss globally. We hypothesize that a coupled-model approach could connect urban planning for future cities with landscape ecology to consider wildland habitat connectivity. Our work combines urban growth simulations with models of wildlife corridors to examine how species will be impacted by development to test this hypothesis. We leverage a land use change model (SLEUTH) with structural and functional landscape-connectivity modeling techniques to ascertain the spatial extent and locations of connectivity related threats to a national park in southern Arizona, USA, and describe how protected areas might be impacted by urban expansion. Results of projected growth significantly altered structural connectivity (80%) when compared to current (baseline) corridor conditions. Moreover, projected growth impacted functional connectivity differently amongst species, indicating resilience of some species and near-complete displacement of others. We propose that implementing a geospatial-design-based model will allow for a better understanding of the impacts management decisions have on wildlife populations. The application provides the potential to understand both human and environmental impacts of land-system dynamics, critical for long-term sustainability.

  11. Decadal-scale climate drivers for glacial dynamics in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Gregory T.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Gray, Stephen T.; Graumlich, Lisa J.

    2004-06-01

    Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries A.D.) glacial maxima and 20th century retreat have been well documented in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. However, the influence of regional and Pacific Basin driven climate variability on these events is poorly understood. We use tree-ring reconstructions of North Pacific surface temperature anomalies and summer drought as proxies for winter glacial accumulation and summer ablation, respectively, over the past three centuries. These records show that the 1850's glacial maximum was likely produced by ~70 yrs of cool/wet summers coupled with high snowpack. Post 1850, glacial retreat coincides with an extended period (>50 yr) of summer drought and low snowpack culminating in the exceptional events of 1917 to 1941 when retreat rates for some glaciers exceeded 100 m/yr. This research highlights potential local and ocean-based drivers of glacial dynamics, and difficulties in separating the effects of global climate change from regional expressions of decadal-scale climate variability.

  12. Quantifying the fire regime distributions for severity in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, Andrea E.; van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Miller, Jay D.; Quinn, James F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper quantifies current fire severity distributions for 19 different fire-regime types in Yosemite National Park, California, USA. Landsat Thematic Mapper remote sensing data are used to map burn severity for 99 fires (cumulatively over 97 000 ha) that burned in Yosemite over a 20-year period. These maps are used to quantify the frequency distributions of fire severity by fire-regime type. A classification is created for the resultant distributions and they are discussed within the context of four vegetation zones: the foothill shrub and woodland zone; the lower montane forest zone; the upper montane forest zone and the subalpine forest zone. The severity distributions can form a building block from which to discuss current fire regimes across the Sierra Nevada in California. This work establishes a framework for comparing the effects of current fires on our landscapes with our notions of how fires historically burned, and how current fire severity distributions differ from our desired future conditions. As this process is refined, a new set of information will be available to researchers and land managers to help understand how fire regimes have changed from the past and how we might attempt to manage them in the future.

  13. Eruptions at Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA, part 1: energetics and eruption dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Murphy, Fred; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Johnston, Malcolm J.S.; Manga, Michael; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Geysers provide a natural laboratory to study multiphase eruptive processes. We present results from a four–day experiment at Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We simultaneously measured water discharge, acoustic emissions, infraredintensity, and visible and infrared video to quantify the energetics and dynamics of eruptions, occurring approximately every three hours. We define four phases in the eruption cycle: 1) a 28 ± 3 minute phase with liquid and steam fountaining, with maximum jet velocities of 16–28 m s− 1, steam mass fraction of less than ∼ 0.01. Intermittently choked flow and flow oscillations with periods increasing from 20 to 40 s are coincident with a decrease in jet velocity and an increase of steam fraction; 2) a 26 ± 8 minute post–eruption relaxation phase with no discharge from the vent, infrared (IR) and acoustic power oscillations gliding between 30 and 40 s; 3) a 59 ± 13 minute recharge period during which the geyser is quiescent and progressively refills, and 4) a 69 ± 14 minute pre–play period characterized by a series of 5–10 minute–long pulses of steam, small volumes of liquid water discharge and 50–70 s flow oscillations. The erupted waters ascend froma 160 − 170° C reservoir and the volume discharged during the entire eruptive cycle is 20.8 ± 4.1 m3. Assuming isentropic expansion, we calculate a heat output from the geyser of 1.4–1.5 MW, which is < 0.1% of the total heat output from Yellowstone Caldera.

  14. BASEMAP, MECKLENBURG, NC, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  15. An evaluation of species richness estimators for tardigrades of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee and North Carolina, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane R. NELSON

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available For the past 5 years we have been conducting a large-scale, multi-habitat inventory of the tardigrades in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (U.S.A. as part of the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI (see www.dlia.org. In terrestrial habitats, we collected moss, lichen, and soil samples from 19 permanent ATBI plots, representing all major land cover types within the park. Each ATBI plot is 100 × 100 m. In each plot, when available, 16 moss samples, 16 lichen samples, and 4 soil samples were collected in paper bags and air dried in the laboratory. Specimens were isolated with LudoxAM centrifugation, and for each sample up to 50 adults plus eggs were individually mounted on microscope slides in Hoyer's medium and identified using phase contrast and DIC microscopy. Additional collections were made in the limestone caves of the Cades Cove region of the park, bird nests, and 13 different streams. To date (1-Jun-06, 589 samples have been collected, and of these 401 have been analyzed, yielding a total of 8133 identifiable tardigrades or, in some cases, species groups. A total of 73 species have been found in the park, 14 of which we believe are new to science. Seven species richness estimators have been developed to predict total species richness (see EstimateS 7.5 software, viceroy.eeb.uconn.edu/estimates, and these were evaluated by comparing predictions from half of our data to the actual numbers from the total database. The results of this comparison indicate that different estimators work best in different habitats. Using the best estimators in each habitat, EstimateS 7.5 indicates that a total of 96 species are likely to occur throughout the park. Thus, Great Smoky Mountains National Park tardigrade diversity represents 10% of the world's known tardigrade fauna.

  16. Trees in urban parks and forests reduce O3, but not NO2 concentrations in Baltimore, MD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa; Scott, Anna A.; Viippola, Viljami; Setälä, Heikki

    2017-10-01

    Trees and other vegetation absorb and capture air pollutants, leading to the common perception that they, and trees in particular, can improve air quality in cities and provide an important ecosystem service for urban inhabitants. Yet, there has been a lack of empirical evidence showing this at the local scale with different plant configurations and climatic regions. We studied the impact of urban park and forest vegetation on the levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) while controlling for temperature during early summer (May) using passive samplers in Baltimore, USA. Concentrations of O3 were significantly lower in tree-covered habitats than in adjacent open habitats, but concentrations of NO2 did not differ significantly between tree-covered and open habitats. Higher temperatures resulted in higher pollutant concentrations and NO2 and O3 concentration were negatively correlated with each other. Our results suggest that the role of trees in reducing NO2 concentrations in urban parks and forests in the Mid-Atlantic USA is minor, but that the presence of tree-cover can result in lower O3 levels compared to similar open areas. Our results further suggest that actions aiming at local air pollution mitigation should consider local variability in vegetation, climate, micro-climate, and traffic conditions.

  17. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in Yellowstone National Park, USA; Beikoku Yellowstone kokuritsu koen ni okeru genchi jikaritsu sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuma, S [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    For the purpose of interpreting data of the aeromagnetic anomalies in Yellowstone National Park in the U.S.A., in-situ magnetization intensity measurements have been carried out in 1994 and 1995 on geological outcrops of rocks in that area. Comparisons and discussions were given on the measurement results, and existing rock magnetic data and aeromagnetic anomaly data available for the area. Outside the Yellowstone caldera, part of granitic gneisses among the Precambrian granitic gneisses and crystalline schists distributed to the north has an abnormally high magnetization intensity of 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI. This could be a powerful anomaly source for the high magnetic anomaly in this area. Paleogene volcanic rocks distributed widely in the eastern part of the park also have magnetization intensity as high as 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher, which are also thought a powerful anomaly source in this area. Part of Pleistocene basalts which are exposed partially in the western part of the park has also very high magnetization intensity at 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher. This suggests correlation with the magnetic anomaly in the east-west direction distributed in this area. Quaternary rhyolites are more magnetic than Quaternary welded tuffs, which should give greater effects to the magnetic anomaly. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A history of trade routes and water-level regulation on waterways in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; LaBounty, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    Unlike most national parks, main access to Voyageurs National Park is by boat. This remote system of interconnected waterways along the USA-Canada border was an important transportation route for thousands of years of American Indian occupation, leading up to and including the trade route of the voyageurs, or French-Canadian fur traders from around 1680 to 1870. The Ojibwe people collaborated with the voyageurs and the two cultures developed a trade network that continued to rely on these waterways. By the mid-1800s, European fashion changed, and the fur trade dwindled while the Ojibwe remained tied to the land and waters. The complexity of the waterways increased with the installation of dams on two of the natural lakes in the early 1900s. Modern water levels have affected—and in some cases destabilized—vulnerable landforms within the past century. The knowledge of these effects can be used by resource managers to weigh the consequences of hydrologic manipulation in Voyageurs National Park.

  19. Assessing trail conditions in protected areas: Application of a problem-assessment method in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of trail resources associated with expanding recreation and tourism visitation is a growing management problem in protected areas worldwide. In order to make judicious trail and visitor management decisions, protected area managers need objective and timely information on trail resource conditions. This paper introduces a trail survey method that efficiently characterizes the lineal extent of common trail problems. The method was applied to a large sample of trails within Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a highuse protected area in the USA. The Trail ProblemAssessment Method (TPAM) employs a continuous search for multiple indicators of predefined tread problems, yielding census data documenting the location, occurrence and extent of each problem. The present application employed 23 different indicators in three categories to gather inventory, resource condition, and design and maintenance data of each surveyed trail. Seventy-two backcountry hiking trails (528 km), or 35% of the Park's total trail length, were surveyed. Soil erosion and wet soil were found to be the two most common impacts on a lineal extent basis. Trails with serious tread problems were well distributed throughout the Park, although wet muddy treads tended to be concentrated in areas where horse use was high. The effectiveness of maintenance features installed to divert water from trail treads was also evaluated. Water bars were found to be more effective than drainage dips. The TPAM was able to provide Park managers with objective and quantitative information for use in trail planning, management and maintenance decisions, and is applicable to other protected areas elsewhere with different environmental and impact characteristics.

  20. A new species of in the Rhyacophila vagrita group (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae) from Olympic National Park, Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan J; Giersch, J. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Rhyacophila vagrita Milne, 1936 was described from specimens collected in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. Ross (1950), while examining R. vagrita paratypes from Alberta, discovered four males that did not fi t the R. vagrita description. These he described and named R. milnei Ross, 1950. Ross (1956) established the R. vagrita group for R. vagrita and R. milnei based primarily on the synapomorphies of the “curious dorsal projections of both ninth and tenth tergites”, a very small simple aedeagus, and “a curious development of the apical band and anal sclerite”. Schmid (1970) indicated that males of the vagrita group have genitalia that are among the most unique in all of the species of Rhyacophila. While collecting in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, we discovered an undescribed Rhyacophila species, most similar to R. milnei, with structures as remarkable as those described for R. vagrita and R. milnei

  1. Inhibition of Caused by Bacteria Isolated from the Skin of Boreal Toads, , from Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna T. Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a significant cause of the worldwide decline in amphibian populations; however, various amphibian species are capable of coexisting with B. dendrobatidis. Among them are boreal toads ( Anaxyrus ( Bufo boreas boreas located in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP in Wyoming, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify cultivable bacterial isolates from the skin microbiota of boreal toads from GTNP and determine if they were capable of inhibiting B. dendrobatidis in vitro, and therefore might be a factor in the toad's coexistence with this pathogen. Isolates from 6 of 21 genera tested were found to inhibit the growth of B. dendrobatidis. These bacteria represent diverse lineages such as the Gammaproteobacteria, the Betaproteobacteria, and the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobium groups. We propose that these bacteria compete via microbial antagonism with B. dendrobatidis.

  2. Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in surface-water sediment at Rocky Mountain National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M; Battaglin, William A; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Clark, Jimmy M; Journey, Celeste A

    2016-05-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDCs, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, USA). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 (14) C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. Bed sediment microbial communities in Rocky Mountain National Park also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The present study's results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  3. USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html......http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html...

  4. Twentieth-century decline of large-diameter trees in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, J.A.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Franklin, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of forest change in western North America often focus on increased densities of small-diameter trees rather than on changes in the large tree component. Large trees generally have lower rates of mortality than small trees and are more resilient to climate change, but these assumptions have rarely been examined in long-term studies. We combined data from 655 historical (1932-1936) and 210 modern (1988-1999) vegetation plots to examine changes in density of large-diameter trees in Yosemite National Park (3027 km2). We tested the assumption of stability for large-diameter trees, as both individual species and communities of large-diameter trees. Between the 1930s and 1990s, large-diameter tree density in Yosemite declined 24%. Although the decrease was apparent in all forest types, declines were greatest in subalpine and upper montane forests (57.0% of park area), and least in lower montane forests (15.3% of park area). Large-diameter tree densities of 11 species declined while only 3 species increased. Four general patterns emerged: (1) Pinus albicaulis, Quercus chrysolepis, and Quercus kelloggii had increases in density of large-diameter trees occur throughout their ranges; (2) Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus lambertiana, and Pinus ponderosa, had disproportionately larger decreases in large-diameter tree densities in lower-elevation portions of their ranges; (3) Abies concolor and Pinus contorta, had approximately uniform decreases in large-diameter trees throughout their elevational ranges; and (4) Abies magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, Juniperus occidentalis, Pinus monticola, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Tsuga mertensiana displayed little or no change in large-diameter tree densities. In Pinus ponderosa-Calocedrus decurrens forests, modern large-diameter tree densities were equivalent whether or not plots had burned since 1936. However, in unburned plots, the large-diameter trees were predominantly A. concolor, C. decurrens, and Q. chrysolepis, whereas P. ponderosa

  5. Adapting to the reality of climate change at Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    The glaciers of Glacier National Park (GNP) are disappearing rapidly and likely will be gone by 2030. These alpine glaciers have been continuously present for approximately 7,000 years so their loss from GNP in another 25 years underscores the significance of current climate change. There are presently only 27 glaciers remaining of the 150 estimated to have existed when GNP was created in 1910. Mean annual temperature in GNP has increased 1.6 0 C during the past cen- tury, three times the global mean increase. The temperature increase has affected other parts of the mountain ecosystem, too. Snowpacks hold less water equivalent and melt 2+ weeks earlier in the spring. Forest growth rates have increased, alpine treelines have expanded upward and be- come denser, and subalpine meadows have been invaded by high elevation tree species. These latter responses can be mostly attributed to longer growing seasons and warmer temperatures.

  6. Wetland occupancy of pond-breeding amphibians in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Miller, David A.W.

    2015-01-01

    We estimated wetland occupancy and population trends for three species of pond-breeding anurans in Yosemite National Park from 2007-2011. We used a double survey technique in which two observers independently surveyed each site on the same day. Double surveys allowed us to calculate detectability for the three most common anurans within the park: Rana sierrae, Anaxyrus canorus, and Pseudacris regilla. Annual estimates of detectability were generally high; mean detectability ranged from 73.7% + 0.6 (SE) for any life history stage of A. canorus to 86.7% + 0.7 for sites with P. regilla reproduction (eggs or larvae present). Detectability was most variable for Anaxyrus canorus, which ranged from 45.9% to 99.7%. The probability of occupancy for R. sierrae was highest in larger, low-elevation wetlands that lacked fish. Anaxyrus canorus were more common in shallow high-elevation ponds; their occurrence was minimally impacted by the presence of fish. Finally, occurrence of P. regilla was largely unrelated to wetland size and elevation, but like R. sierrae, they were less likely to occupy sites with fi sh. Occupancy showed no trend over the five years of our study for R. sierrae or A. canorus when considering either sites with any life stage or only sites with reproduction. However, P. regilla showed a modest downward trend for sites with any life stage and sites with reproduction. Our results for R. sierrae run counter to expectations given recent concern about the decline of this species, while our findings for P. regilla raise concerns for this widespread and generally common species.

  7. Bioactive contaminants of emerging concern in National Park waters of the northern Colorado Plateau, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissinger, Rebecca H; Blackwell, Brett R; Keteles, Kristen; Battaglin, William A; Bradley, Paul M

    2018-05-02

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), wastewater indicators (WWIs), and pesticides (herein, Contaminants of Emerging Concern [CECs]) have been documented in surface waters throughout the world and have associated risks to aquatic life. While much research has focused on temperate and urbanized watersheds, less is known about CEC presence in semi-arid landscapes, where water availability is limited and populations are low. CEC presence in water and sediment is reported for 21 sites in eight U.S. national parks in the northern Colorado Plateau region. From 2012 to 2016, at least one PPCP and/or WWI was detected at most sites on over half of sampling visits, indicating that CECs are not uncommon even in isolated areas. CEC detections were generally fewer and at lower concentrations than in urbanized or agricultural watersheds. Consistent with studies from other U.S. regions, the most frequently detected CECs in this study include DEET, caffeine, organophosphorus flame retardants, and bisphenol A in water and fecal indicators and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment. Maximum concentrations in this study were generally below available water quality benchmarks, sediment quality guidelines, and risk assessment thresholds associated with vertebrates. Additional work is needed to assess the potential activity of hormones, which had high reporting limits in our study, and potential bioactivity of environmental concentrations for invertebrates, microbial communities, and algae. Potential sources of CEC contamination include upstream wastewater effluent discharges and National Park Service invasive-plant-control herbicide applications. CEC occurrence patterns and similarities between continuous and isolated flow locations suggest that direct contamination from individual visitors may also occur. While our data indicate there is little aquatic health risk associated with CECs at our sites, our results demonstrate the ubiquity of CECs on the landscape and a

  8. Bioactive contaminants of emerging concern in National Park waters of the northern Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissinger, Rebecca H; Blackwell, Brett R.; Keteles, Kristen; Battaglin, William A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), wastewater indicators (WWIs), and pesticides (herein, Contaminants of Emerging Concern [CECs]) have been documented in surface waters throughout the world and have associated risks to aquatic life. While much research has focused on temperate and urbanized watersheds, less is known about CEC presence in semi-arid landscapes, where water availability is limited and populations are low. CEC presence in water and sediment is reported for 21 sites in eight U.S. national parks in the northern Colorado Plateau region. From 2012 to 2016, at least one PPCP and/or WWI was detected at most sites on over half of sampling visits, indicating that CECs are not uncommon even in isolated areas. CEC detections were generally fewer and at lower concentrations than in urbanized or agricultural watersheds. Consistent with studies from other U.S. regions, the most frequently detected CECs in this study include DEET, caffeine, organophosphorus flame retardants, and bisphenol A in water and fecal indicators and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment. Maximum concentrations in this study were generally below available water quality benchmarks, sediment quality guidelines, and risk assessment thresholds associated with vertebrates. Additional work is needed to assess the potential activity of hormones, which had high reporting limits in our study, and potential bioactivity of environmental concentrations for invertebrates, microbial communities, and algae. Potential sources of CEC contamination include upstream wastewater effluent discharges and National Park Service invasive-plant-control herbicide applications. CEC occurrence patterns and similarities between continuous and isolated flow locations suggest that direct contamination from individual visitors may also occur. While our data indicate there is little aquatic health risk associated with CECs at our sites, our results demonstrate the ubiquity of CECs on the landscape and a

  9. Plant dieback under exceptional drought driven by elevation, not by plant traits, in Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth F. Waring

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA, experienced the most severe single year drought in its recorded history, resulting in significant plant mortality. We used this event to test how perennial plant response to drought varied across elevation, plant growth form and leaf traits. In October 2010 and October 2011, we measured plant cover by species at six evenly-spaced elevations ranging from Chihuahuan desert (666 m to oak forest in the Chisos mountains (1,920 m. We asked the following questions: what was the relationship between elevation and stem dieback and did susceptibility to drought differ among functional groups or by leaf traits? In 2010, pre-drought, we measured leaf mass per area (LMA on each species. In 2011, the percent of canopy dieback for each individual was visually estimated. Living canopy cover decreased significantly after the drought of 2011 and dieback decreased with elevation. There was no relationship between LMA and dieback within elevations. The negative relationship between proportional dieback and elevation was consistent in shrub and succulent species, which were the most common growth forms across elevations, indicating that dieback was largely driven by elevation and not by species traits. Growth form turnover did not influence canopy dieback; differences in canopy cover and proportional dieback among elevations were driven primarily by differences in drought severity. These results indicate that the 2011 drought in Big Bend National Park had a large effect on communities at all elevations with average dieback for all woody plants ranging from 8% dieback at the highest elevation to 83% dieback at lowest elevations.

  10. Habitat models to assist plant protection efforts in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Manen, F.T.; Young, J.A.; Thatcher, C.A.; Cass, W.B.; Ulrey, C.

    2005-01-01

    During 2002, the National Park Service initiated a demonstration project to develop science-based law enforcement strategies for the protection of at-risk natural resources, including American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.), bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis L.), and black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa (L.) Nutt. [syn. Actaea racemosa L.]). Harvest pressure on these species is increasing because of the growing herbal remedy market. We developed habitat models for Shenandoah National Park and the northern portion of the Blue Ridge Parkway to determine the distribution of favorable habitats of these three plant species and to demonstrate the use of that information to support plant protection activities. We compiled locations for the three plant species to delineate favorable habitats with a geographic information system (GIS). We mapped potential habitat quality for each species by calculating a multivariate statistic, Mahalanobis distance, based on GIS layers that characterized the topography, land cover, and geology of the plant locations (10-m resolution). We tested model performance with an independent dataset of plant locations, which indicated a significant relationship between Mahalanobis distance values and species occurrence. We also generated null models by examining the distribution of the Mahalanobis distance values had plants been distributed randomly. For all species, the habitat models performed markedly better than their respective null models. We used our models to direct field searches to the most favorable habitats, resulting in a sizeable number of new plant locations (82 ginseng, 73 bloodroot, and 139 black cohosh locations). The odds of finding new plant locations based on the habitat models were 4.5 (black cohosh) to 12.3 (American ginseng) times greater than random searches; thus, the habitat models can be used to improve the efficiency of plant protection efforts, (e.g., marking of plants, law enforcement activities). The field searches also

  11. Unweaving the joints in Entrada Sandstone, Arches National Park, Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Kenneth M.; Aydin, Atilla

    1995-03-01

    On the southwest limb of Salt Valley Anticline, Arches National Park, Utah three sets of joints are developed in the Entrada Sandstone covering an area of about 6 km 2. Within the 20 m thick Moab Member, a single joint set is is found in three distinct areas, separated by a second set of joints at a 35° angle to the first set. Joint interaction features show that the second set is younger than the first. This illustrates that joints of a single set do not have to fill the entire area across which the stresses that formed the joints were acting. The underlying Slickrock Member contains a third set of joints, which is at an angle of 5°-35° to joints in the Moab Member. The Slickrock set nucleated from the lower edges of joints of all orientations in the overlying Moab Member. Thus, the fracture pattern evolved both horizontally, within the same unit, and vertically between units. The sequence of jointing is determined by establishing the relative ages of each joint set. Each joint orientation is best interpreted as representing a direction of maximum compression, ruling out the possibility that the joints are a conjugate set. The joints, and an earlier set of deformation bands, record a 95° counterclockwise rotation of the direction of maximum compression.

  12. Rare earth element composition of Paleogene vertebrate fossils from Toadstool Geologic Park, Nebraska, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandstaff, D.E., E-mail: grand@temple.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Terry, D.O. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Fossil bones and teeth from terrestrial environments encode unique rare earth and trace element (REE and TE) signatures as a function of redox conditions, pH, concentrations of complexing ligands, and water-colloid interactions. This signature is set early in the fossilization process and serves as a paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic proxy. These signatures can also be used to interpret temporal and spatial averaging within vertebrate accumulations, and can help relocate displaced fossil bones back into stratigraphic context. Rare earth elements in vertebrate fossils from upper Eocene and Oligocene strata of Toadstool Geologic Park, northwestern Nebraska, record mixing and evolution of Paleogene vadose or groundwaters and variations in paleoenvironments. REE signatures indicate that HREE-enriched alkaline groundwater reacted with LREE- and MREE-enriched sediments to produce 3-component mixtures. REE signatures become increasingly LREE- and MREE-enriched toward the top of the studied section as the paleoenvironment became cooler and drier, suggesting that REE signatures may be climate proxies. Time series analysis suggests that REE ratios are influenced by cycles of ca. 1050, 800, 570, 440, and 225 ka, similar to some previously determined Milankovitch astronomical and climate periodicities.

  13. Eruptions at Lone Star geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA: 2. Constraints on subsurface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Sohn, Robert A.; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Manga, Michael; Johnston, Malcolm J.S.; Soule, S. Adam; McPhee, Darcy K.; Glen, Jonathan M.G.; Karlstrom, Leif; Murphy, Fred

    2014-01-01

    We use seismic, tilt, lidar, thermal, and gravity data from 32 consecutive eruption cycles of Lone Star geyser in Yellowstone National Park to identify key subsurface processes throughout the geyser's eruption cycle. Previously, we described measurements and analyses associated with the geyser's erupting jet dynamics. Here we show that seismicity is dominated by hydrothermal tremor (~5–40 Hz) attributed to the nucleation and/or collapse of vapor bubbles. Water discharge during eruption preplay triggers high-amplitude tremor pulses from a back azimuth aligned with the geyser cone, but during the rest of the eruption cycle it is shifted to the east-northeast. Moreover, ~4 min period ground surface displacements recur every 26 ± 8 min and are uncorrelated with the eruption cycle. Based on these observations, we conclude that (1) the dynamical behavior of the geyser is controlled by the thermo-mechanical coupling between the geyser conduit and a laterally offset reservoir periodically filled with a highly compressible two-phase mixture, (2) liquid and steam slugs periodically ascend into the shallow crust near the geyser system inducing detectable deformation, (3) eruptions occur when the pressure decrease associated with overflow from geyser conduit during preplay triggers an unstable feedback between vapor generation (cavitation) and mass discharge, and (4) flow choking at a constriction in the conduit arrests the runaway process and increases the saturated vapor pressure in the reservoir by a factor of ~10 during eruptions.

  14. Climate, lightning ignitions, and fire severity in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, J.A.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Thode, A.E.; Miller, J.D.; Franklin, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Continental-scale studies of western North America have attributed recent increases in annual area burned and fire size to a warming climate, but these studies have focussed on large fires and have left the issues of fire severity and ignition frequency unaddressed. Lightning ignitions, any of which could burn a large area given appropriate conditions for fire spread, could be the first indication of more frequent fire. We examined the relationship between snowpack and the ignition and size of fires that occurred in Yosemite National Park, California (area 3027 km2), between 1984 and 2005. During this period, 1870 fires burned 77 718 ha. Decreased spring snowpack exponentially increased the number of lightning-ignited fires. Snowpack mediated lightning-ignited fires by decreasing the proportion of lightning strikes that caused lightning-ignited fires and through fewer lightning strikes in years with deep snowpack. We also quantified fire severity for the 103 fires >40 ha with satellite fire-severity indices using 23 years of Landsat Thematic Mapper data. The proportion of the landscape that burned at higher severities and the complexity of higher-severity burn patches increased with the log10 of annual area burned. Using one snowpack forecast, we project that the number of lightning-ignited fires will increase 19.1% by 2020 to 2049 and the annual area burned at high severity will increase 21.9%. Climate-induced decreases in snowpack and the concomitant increase in fire severity suggest that existing assumptions may be understated-fires may become more frequent and more severe. ?? IAWF 2009.

  15. Holocene seasonal variability inferred from multiple proxy records from Crevice Lake, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Cathy; Dean, Walter E.; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Stevens, Lora R.; Stone, Jeffery R.; Power, Mitchell J.; Rosenbaum, Joseph R.; Pierce, Kenneth L.; Bracht-Flyr, Brandi B.

    2012-01-01

    A 9400-yr-old record from Crevice Lake, a semi-closed alkaline lake in northern Yellowstone National Park, was analyzed for pollen, charcoal, geochemistry, mineralogy, diatoms, and stable isotopes to develop a nuanced understanding of Holocene environmental history in a region of northern Rocky Mountains that receives both summer and winter precipitation. The limited surface area, conical bathymetry, and deep water (> 31 m) of Crevice Lake create oxygen-deficient conditions in the hypolimnion and preserve annually laminated sediment (varves) for much of the record. Pollen data indicate that the watershed supported a closed Pinus-dominated forest and low fire frequency prior to 8200 cal yr BP, followed by open parkland until 2600 cal yr BP, and open mixed-conifer forest thereafter. Fire activity shifted from infrequent stand-replacing fires initially to frequent surface fires in the middle Holocene and stand-replacing events in recent centuries. Low values of δ18O suggest high winter precipitation in the early Holocene, followed by steadily drier conditions after 8500 cal yr BP. Carbonate-rich sediments before 5000 cal yr BP imply warmer summer conditions than after 5000 cal yr BP. High values of molybdenum (Mo), uranium (U), and sulfur (S) indicate anoxic bottom-waters before 8000 cal yr BP, between 4400 and 3900 cal yr BP, and after 2400 cal yr BP. The diatom record indicates extensive water-column mixing in spring and early summer through much of the Holocene, but a period between 2200 and 800 cal yr BP had strong summer stratification, phosphate limitation, and oxygen-deficient bottom waters. Together, the proxy data suggest wet winters, protracted springs, and warm effectively wet summers in the early Holocene and less snowpack, cool springs, warm dry summers in the middle Holocene. In the late Holocene, the region and lake experienced extreme changes in winter, spring, and summer conditions, with particularly short springs and dry summers and winters during

  16. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, Hans W.; Wetz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  17. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Emily K; Paerl, Hans W; Wetz, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  18. The effects of raking on sugar pine mortality following prescribed fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, Jonathan C. B.; O'Hara, Kevin L.; van Mantgem, Phillip J.; de Valpine, Perry

    2010-01-01

    Prescribed fire is an important tool for fuel reduction, the control of competing vegetation, and forest restoration. The accumulated fuels associated with historical fire exclusion can cause undesirably high tree mortality rates following prescribed fires and wildfires. This is especially true for sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas), which is already negatively affected by the introduced pathogen white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch. ex Rabenh). We tested the efficacy of raking away fuels around the base of sugar pine to reduce mortality following prescribed fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks, California, USA. This study was conducted in three prescribed fires and included 457 trees, half of which had the fuels around their bases raked away to mineral soil to 0.5 m away from the stem. Fire effects were assessed and tree mortality was recorded for three years after prescribed fires. Overall, raking had no detectable effect on mortality: raked trees averaged 30% mortality compared to 36% for unraked trees. There was a significant effect, however, between the interaction of raking and average pre-treatment forest floor fuel depth: the predicted probability of survival of a 50 cm dbh tree was 0.94 vs. 0.96 when average pre-treatment fuel depth was 0 cm for a raked and unraked tree, respectively. When average pre-treatment forest floor fuel depth was 30 cm, the predicted probability of survival for a raked 50 cm dbh tree was 0.60 compared to only 0.07 for an unraked tree. Raking did not affect mortality when fire intensity, measured as percent crown volume scorched, was very low (0% scorch) or very high (>80% scorch), but the raking treatment significantly increased the proportion of trees that survived by 9.6% for trees that burned under moderate fire intensity (1% to 80% scorch). Raking significantly reduced the likelihood of bole charring and bark beetle activity three years post fire. Fuel depth and anticipated fire intensity need

  19. Groundwater residence times in Shenandoah National Park, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia, USA: A multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Busenberg, E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Nelms, D.L.; Michel, R.L.; Schlosser, P.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic properties of water discharging from springs and wells in Shenandoah National Park (SNP), near the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, VA, USA were monitored to obtain information on groundwater residence times. Investigated time scales included seasonal (wet season, April, 1996; dry season, August–September, 1997), monthly (March through September, 1999) and hourly (30-min interval recording of specific conductance and temperature, March, 1999 through February, 2000). Multiple environmental tracers, including tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), sulfur-35 (35S), and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) of water, were used to estimate the residence times of shallow groundwater discharging from 34 springs and 15 wells. The most reliable ages of water from springs appear to be based on SF6 and 3H/3He, with most ages in the range of 0–3 years. This range is consistent with apparent ages estimated from concentrations of CFCs; however, CFC-based ages have large uncertainties owing to the post-1995 leveling-off of the CFC atmospheric growth curves. Somewhat higher apparent ages are indicated by 35S (>1.5 years) and seasonal variation of δ18O (mean residence time of 5 years) for spring discharge. The higher ages indicated by the 35S and δ18O data reflect travel times through the unsaturated zone and, in the case of 35S, possible sorption and exchange of S with soils or biomass. In springs sampled in April, 1996, apparent ages derived from the 3H/3He data (median age of 0.2 years) are lower than those obtained from SF6 (median age of 4.3 years), and in contrast to median ages from 3H/3He (0.3 years) and SF6 (0.7 years) obtained during the late summer dry season of 1997. Monthly samples from 1999 at four springs in SNP had SF6apparent ages of only 1.2 to 2.5±0.8 years, and were consistent with the 1997 SF6 data. Water from springs has low excess air (0–1 cm3 kg−1) and N2–Ar temperatures that vary

  20. Using nestling feathers to assess spatial and temporal concentrations of mercury in bald eagles at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Pittman; W. W. Bowerman; L. H. Grim; Teryl Grubb; W. C. Bridges

    2011-01-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have been utilized as a biosentinel of aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes Region since the early 1960s. Bald eagle populations have been monitored at Voyageurs National Park (VNP), Minnesota, since 1973. For the past 20 years, researchers have collected feathers from nestling bald eagles to assess their dietary exposure...

  1. Philometrid nematodes infecting fishes from the Everglades National Park, Florida, USA, with description of two new species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František; Bakenhaster, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2010), s. 213-222 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Philometridae * Marine fish * USA Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2010

  2. Channel-planform evolution in four rivers of Olympic National Park, Washington, U.S.A.: The roles of physical drivers and trophic cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Amy E.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Sankey, Joel B.; Randle, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying the relative contributions of physical and ecological processes to channel evolution remains a substantial challenge in fluvial geomorphology. We use a 74-year aerial photographic record of the Hoh, Queets, Quinault, and Elwha Rivers, Olympic National Park, Washington, U.S.A., to investigate whether physical or trophic-cascade-driven ecological factors—excessive elk impacts after wolves were extirpated a century ago—are the dominant controls on channel planform of these gravel-bed rivers. We find that channel width and braiding show strong relationships with recent flood history. All four rivers have widened significantly in recent decades, consistent with increased flood activity since the 1970s. Channel planform also reflects sediment-supply changes, evident from landslide response on the Elwha River. We surmise that the Hoh River, which shows a multi-decadal trend toward greater braiding, is adjusting to increased sediment supply associated with rapid glacial retreat. In this sediment-routing system with high connectivity, such climate-driven signals appear to propagate downstream without being buffered substantially by sediment storage. Legacy effects of anthropogenic modification likely also affect the Quinault River planform. We infer no correspondence between channel geomorphic evolution and elk abundance, suggesting that trophic-cascade effects in this setting are subsidiary to physical controls on channel morphology. Our findings differ from previous interpretations of Olympic National Park fluvial dynamics and contrast with the classic example of Yellowstone National Park, where legacy effects of elk overuse are apparent in channel morphology; we attribute these differences to hydrologic regime and large-wood availability.

  3. Fire-climate-human interactions during the postglacial period at Sunrise Ridge, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Megan K.; Lukens, Michael L.; McCutcheon, Patrick T.; Burtchard, Greg C.

    2017-12-01

    With the creation of Mount Rainier National Park (MORA) in 1899 came the active management of the park's landscapes and a heavy emphasis on fire suppression. Today, managers at MORA seek to better manage current fire activity; however, this requires an improved understanding of past fire activity on the mountain. In this study high-resolution macroscopic charcoal analysis and pollen analysis of lake sediment records was used to reconstruct the postglacial fire and vegetation history for the Sunrise Ridge area of MORA. Fire activity was lowest during the Late Glacial when vegetation was sparse and climate was cool and dry. Fire activity increased during the early Holocene as the regional climate warmed and dried, and burnable biomass became more abundant. Fire activity continued to increase into the middle Holocene (until ca. 6600 cal yr BP) even as the regional climate became wetter and eventually cooler; the modern-day mesic forest and subalpine meadow landscapes of the park established at this time. Fire activity was generally highest and mean fire return intervals were lowest on Sunrise Ridge during the late Holocene, and are consistent with tree-ring based estimates of fire frequency. The similarity between the Sunrise Ridge and other paleofire records in the Pacific Northwest suggests that broad-scale climatic shifts, such as the retreat of the Cordilleran ice sheet and changes in annual insolation, as well as increased interannual climate variability (i.e., drought) particularly in the middle to late Holocene, were responsible for changes in fire activity during the postglacial period. However, abundant and increasing archaeological evidence from Sunrise Ridge during the middle to late Holocene suggests that humans may have also influenced the landscape at this time. It is likely that fires will continue to increase at MORA as drought becomes a more frequent occurrence in the Pacific Northwest.

  4. Modeled subalpine plant community response to climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, T.C.; Belyazid, S.; Sullivan, T.J.; Sverdrup, H.; Bowman, W.D.; Porter, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate potential long-term effects of climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on subalpine ecosystems, the coupled biogeochemical and vegetation community competition model ForSAFE-Veg was applied to a site at the Loch Vale watershed of Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Changes in climate and N deposition since 1900 resulted in pronounced changes in simulated plant species cover as compared with ambient and estimated future community composition. The estimated critical load (CL) of N deposition to protect against an average future (2010–2100) change in biodiversity of 10% was between 1.9 and 3.5 kg N ha −1  yr −1 . Results suggest that the CL has been exceeded and vegetation at the study site has already undergone a change of more than 10% as a result of N deposition. Future increases in air temperature are forecast to cause further changes in plant community composition, exacerbating changes in response to N deposition alone. - Highlights: • A novel calibration step was introduced for modeling biodiversity with ForSAFE-Veg. • Modeled increases in tree cover are consistent with empirical studies. • Reductions in N deposition decreased future graminoid percent cover. • Critical loads of N to protect biodiversity should consider climate change effects. - Subalpine plant biodiversity in Rocky Mountain National Park has already been impacted by N deposition and climate change and is expected to experience significant future effects

  5. Environmental epigenomics and disease susceptibility. Keystone symposia on molecular and cellular biology. The Grove Park Hotel & Spa, Ashville, NC, USA, 27 March–1 April 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanenkov, Victor; Loukinov, Dmitry; Pugacheva, Elena

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this conference was to provide solid evidence that environmental exposures during early development can affect faithful reproduction of individual parental epigenomes without changing DNA sequence in the offspring. No doubt, this important goal has been successfully achieved owing to the high quality of presented epidemiological and experimental studies and engaging discussions of many yet to be published results. Compelling data suggested a strong causal link between prenatal vulnerability of future parental epigenomes to damaging environmental factors aggravated by abnormal socio-cultural conditions (including, for instance, malnutrition and chronic stress) and the alarming risk of developing heritable complex medical conditions later in life, such as asthma, autism, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, schizophrenia and a whole range of rare neuromuscular pathologies. It was concluded that modern epigenetic research promises to markedly improve our ability to diagnose, prevent and treat these and other pathological conditions of humans. However, the complex heritability pattern of 'epigenetic syndromes' also introduces unique legal and ethical issues that were discussed at the end of this outstanding meeting.

  6. Effects of stock use and backpackers on water quality in wilderness in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Forrester, Harrison; Miller, Benjamin; Roop, Heidi; Sickman, James O.; Ryu, Hodon; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    During 2010-2011, a study was conducted in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI) to evaluate the influence of pack animals (stock) and backpackers on water quality in wilderness lakes and streams. The study had three main components: (1) a synoptic survey of water quality in wilderness areas of the parks, (2) paired water-quality sampling above and below several areas with differing types and amounts of visitor use, and (3) intensive monitoring at six sites to document temporal variations in water quality. Data from the synoptic water-quality survey indicated that wilderness lakes and streams are dilute and have low nutrient and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. The synoptic survey sites were categorized as minimal use, backpacker use, or mixed use (stock and backpackers), depending on the most prevalent type of use upstream from the sampling locations. Sites with mixed use tended to have higher concentrations of most constituents (including E.coli) than those categorized as minimal-use (p≤0.05); concentrations at backpacker-use sites were intermediate. Data from paired-site sampling indicated that E.coli, total coliform, and particulate phosphorus concentrations were greater in streams downstream from mixed-use areas than upstream from those areas (p≤0.05). Paired-site data also indicated few statistically significant differences in nutrient, E. coli, or total coliform concentrations in streams upstream and downstream from backpacker-use areas. The intensive-monitoring data indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations normally were low, except during storms, when notable increases in concentrations of E.coli, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and turbidity occurred. In summary, results from this study indicate that water quality in SEKI wilderness generally is good, except during storms; and visitor use appears to have a small, but statistically significant influence on stream water quality.

  7. Short-term response of Holcus lanatus L. (Common Velvetgrass) to chemical and manual control at Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laura J.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Hutten, Martin

    2015-01-01

    One of the highest priority invasive species at both Yosemite and Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks is Holcus lanatus L. (common velvetgrass), a perennial bunchgrass that invades mid-elevation montane meadows. Despite velvetgrass being a high priority species, there is little information available on control techniques. The goal of this project was to evaluate the short-term response of a single application of common chemical and manual velvetgrass control techniques. The study was conducted at three montane sites in Yosemite National Park. Glyphosate spot-spray treatments were applied at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% concentrations, and compared with hand pulling to evaluate effects on cover of common velvetgrass, cover of other plant species, and community species richness. Posttreatment year 1 cover of common velvetgrass was 12.1% ± 1.6 in control plots, 6.3% ± 1.5 averaged over the four chemical treatments (all chemical treatments performed similarly), and 13.6% ± 1.7 for handpulled plots. This represents an approximately 50% reduction in common velvetgrass cover in chemically- treated plots recoded posttreatment year 1 and no statistically significant reduction in hand pulled plots compared with controls. However, there was no treatment effect in posttreatment year 2, and all herbicide application rates performed similarly. In addition, there were no significant treatment effects on nontarget species or species richness. These results suggest that for this level of infestation and habitat type, (1) one year of hand pulling is not an effective control method and (2) glyphosate provides some level of control in the short-term without impact to nontarget plant species, but the effect is temporary as a single year of glyphosate treatment is ineffective over a two-year period.

  8. Use of regression‐based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Huggett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall‐season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall‐season surface‐water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface‐water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Data Set for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface‐water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface‐water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high‐elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high‐elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 μeq L−1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide

  9. Use of regression-based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D. W.; Nanus, L.; Huggett, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple-linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall-season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall-season surface-water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface-water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Dataset for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface-water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface-water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high-elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high-elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 µeq L-1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide development of

  10. Application of a MODIS Soil Moisture-Evapotranspiration (MOD-SMET) Model to Evaluate Landscape and Hydrologic Recovery after the High Park Fire in Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, W. K.; Hogue, T. S.; Franz, K.; Knipper, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is critical for the management of water resources, especially in water-stressed regions. ET accounts for approximately 60% of terrestrial precipitation globally and approaches 100% of annual rainfall in arid ecosystems, where transpiration becomes the dominant term. ET is difficult to measure due to its spatiotemporal variation, which requires adequate data coverage. While new remote sensing-based ET products are available at a 1 km spatial resolution, including the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance model (SSEBop) and the MODIS Global Evapotranspiration Project (MOD16), these products are available at monthly and 8-day temporal resolutions, respectively. To better understand the changing dynamics of hydrologic fluxes and the partitioning of water after land cover disturbances and to identify statically significant trends, more frequent observations are necessary. Utilizing the recently developed MODIS Soil Moisture-Evapotranspiration (MOD-SMET) model, daily temporal resolution is achieved. This presentation outlines the methodology of the MOD-SMET model and compares SSEBop, MOD16, and MOD-SMET ET estimates over the High Park Fire burn scar in Colorado, USA. MOD-SMET estimates are used to identify changes in fluxes and partitioning of the water cycle after a wildfire and during recovery in the High Park Fire near Fort Collins, Colorado. Initial results indicate greenness and ET from all three models decrease post-fire, with higher statistical confidence in high burn areas and spatial patterns that closely align with burn severity. MOD-SMET improves the ability to resolve statistically significant changes in ET following wildfires and better understand changes in the post-fire water budget. Utilizing this knowledge, water resource managers can better plan for, and mitigate, the short- and long-term impacts of wildfire on regional water supplies.

  11. Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface-water sediment at Rocky Mountains National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Battaglin, William A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDC, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountains National Park (ROMO). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 14C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. ROMO bed sediment microbial communities also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens, bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The current results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged.

  12. Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera on Isle Royale National Park, USA, compared to mainland species pool and size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, R Edward; South, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Extensive sampling for aquatic insects was conducted in the orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies), Plecoptera (stoneflies), and Trichoptera (caddisflies) (EPT) of Isle Royale National Park (ISRO), Michigan, United States of America, during summer 2013. The island was ice covered until 8,000 to 10,000 years ago and is isolated by 22-70 km distance from the mainland. Two hypotheses were examined: that ISRO EPT richness would be much reduced from the mainland, and that the species colonizing ISRO would be of smaller size than mainland, adults presumably using updrafts to bridge the distance from mainland sources. Data sets were developed for known mainland EPT species and size for those species. The first hypothesis was confirmed with the mainland species pool consisting of 417 EPT, while ISRO is known to support 73 species. Richness of EPT is directly related to the number of specimens examined. Small streams supported five EPT species, while 15-25 species were found in larger streams. Lakeshores had intermediate diversity. The second hypothesis was substantiated for stoneflies, but not for mayflies or caddisflies. Stoneflies apparently are poorer fliers than either of the other two orders.

  13. A half century of change in alpine treeline patterns at Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasner, F.L.; Fagre, D.B.

    2002-01-01

    Using sequential aerial photography, we identified changes in the spatial distribution of subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) habitat at the alpine treeline ecotone. Six 40-ha study sites in the McDonald Creek drainage of Glacier National Park contained subalpine fir forests that graded into alpine tundra. Over a 46-yr period, altitudinal changes in the location of alpine treeline ecotone were not observed. However, over this 46-yr period the area of krummholz, patch-forest, and continuous canopy forest increased by 3.4%, and tree density increased within existing patches of krummholz and patch-forest. Change in subalpine fir vegetation patterns within 100 m of trails was also compared to areas without trails. Within 100 m of trails, the number of small, discrete krummholz stands increased compared to areas without trails, but there was no significant change in total krummholz area. We used historical terrestrial photography to expand the period (to 70 yr) considered. This photography supported the conclusions that a more abrupt ecotone transition developed from forest to tundra at alpine treeline, that tree density within forested areas increased, and that krummholz became fragmented along trails. This local assessment of fine-grained change in the alpine treeline ecotone provides a comparative base for looking at ecotone change in other mountain regions throughout the world.

  14. Multireaction equilibrium geothermometry: A sensitivity analysis using data from the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2016-01-01

    A multireaction chemical equilibria geothermometry (MEG) model applicable to high-temperature geothermal systems has been developed over the past three decades. Given sufficient data, this model provides more constraint on calculated reservoir temperatures than classical chemical geothermometers that are based on either the concentration of silica (SiO2), or the ratios of cation concentrations. A set of 23 chemical analyses from Ojo Caliente Spring and 22 analyses from other thermal features in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park are used to examine the sensitivity of calculated reservoir temperatures using the GeoT MEG code (Spycher et al. 2013, 2014) to quantify the effects of solute concentrations, degassing, and mineral assemblages on calculated reservoir temperatures. Results of our analysis demonstrate that the MEG model can resolve reservoir temperatures within approximately ±15°C, and that natural variation in fluid compositions represents a greater source of variance in calculated reservoir temperatures than variations caused by analytical uncertainty (assuming ~5% for major elements). The analysis also suggests that MEG calculations are particularly sensitive to variations in silica concentration, the concentrations of the redox species Fe(II) and H2S, and that the parameters defining steam separation and CO2 degassing from the liquid may be adequately determined by numerical optimization. Results from this study can provide guidance for future applications of MEG models, and thus provide more reliable information on geothermal energy resources during exploration.

  15. Structure and Composition of Old-Growth and Unmanaged Second-Growth Riparian Forests at Redwood National Park, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Keyes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of second-growth riparian stands has become an important issue for managers of redwood (Sequoia sempervirens [D. Don] Endl. forest reserves. Identifying differences between old-growth and second-growth forest vegetation is a necessary step in evaluating restoration needs and targets. The objective of this study was to characterize and contrast vegetation structure and composition in old-growth and unmanaged second-growth riparian forests in adjacent, geomorphologically similar watersheds at Redwood National Park. In the old-growth, redwood was the dominant overstory species in terms of stem density, basal area, and importance values. Second-growth was dominated by red alder (Alnus rubra Bong., Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirbel] Franco, and redwood. Understory species were similar in both forests, with several key differences: Oxalis oregana Nutt. and Trillium ovatum Pursh had greater importance values in the old-growth, and Vaccinium parvifolium Sm., Dryopteris spp. and sedges Carex spp. had greater importance values in the second-growth. Notable differences in structure and composition suggest that restoration practices such as thinning could expedite the acquisition of old-growth characteristics in second-growth riparian forests.

  16. Foraging and feeding ecology of the gray wolf (Canis lupus): lessons from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Guernsey, Debra S

    2006-07-01

    The foraging and feeding ecology of gray wolves is an essential component to understanding the role that top carnivores play in shaping the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. In Yellowstone National Park (YNP), predation studies on a highly visible, reintroduced population of wolves are increasing our understanding of this aspect of wolf ecology. Wolves in YNP feed primarily on elk, despite the presence of other ungulate species. Patterns of prey selection and kill rates in winter have varied seasonally each year from 1995 to 2004 and changed in recent years as the wolf population has become established. Wolves select elk based on their vulnerability as a result of age, sex, and season and therefore kill primarily calves, old cows, and bulls that have been weakened by winter. Summer scat analysis reveals an increased variety in diet compared with observed winter diets, including other ungulate species, rodents, and vegetation. Wolves in YNP hunt in packs and, upon a successful kill, share in the evisceration and consumption of highly nutritious organs first, followed by major muscle tissue, and eventually bone and hide. Wolves are adapted to a feast-or-famine foraging pattern, and YNP packs typically kill and consume an elk every 2-3 d. However, wolves in YNP have gone without fresh meat for several weeks by scavenging off old carcasses that consist mostly of bone and hide. As patterns of wolf density, prey density, weather, and vulnerability of prey change, in comparison with the conditions of the study period described here, we predict that there will also be significant changes in wolf predation patterns and feeding behavior.

  17. Paleolimnological records of nitrogen deposition in shallow, high-elevation lakes of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Otu, Megan K.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Baron, Jill S.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) from anthropogenic sources has been altering ecosystem function in lakes of the Rocky Mountains, other regions of western North America, and the Arctic over recent decades. The response of biota in shallow lakes to atmospheric deposition of Nr, however, has not been considered. Benthic algae are dominant in shallow, high-elevation lakes and are less sensitive to nutrient inputs than planktonic algae. Because the benthos is typically more nutrient rich than the water column, shallow lakes are not expected to show evidence of anthropogenic Nr. In this study, we assessed sedimentary evidence for regional Nr deposition, sediment chronology, and the nature of algal community response in five shallow, high-elevation lakes in Grand Teton National Park (GRTE). Over 140 diatom taxa were identified from the sediments, with a relatively high species richness of taxa characteristic of oligotrophic conditions. The diatom assemblages were dominated by benthic taxa, especially motile taxa. The GRTE lakes demonstrate assemblage-wide shifts in diatoms, including 1) synchronous and significant assemblage changes centered on ~1960 AD; 2) pre-1960 assemblages differed significantly from post-1960 assemblages; 3) pre-1960 diatom assemblages fluctuated randomly, whereas post- 1960 assemblages showed directional change; 4) changes in δ15N signatures were correlated with diatom community composition. These results demonstrate recent changes in shallow high18 elevation lakes that are most correlated with anthropogenic Nr. It is also possible, however, that the combined effect of Nr deposition and warming is accelerating species shifts in benthic diatoms. While uncertainties remain about the potential synergy of Nr deposition and warming, this study adds shallow lakes to the growing list of impacted high-elevation localities in western North America.

  18. Back-trajectory-based source apportionment of airborne sulfur and nitrogen concentrations at Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Kristi A.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Malm, William C.; Barna, Michael G.; Rodriguez, Marco A.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS), conducted during the spring and summer of 2006, was designed to assess the sources of nitrogen and sulfur species that contribute to wet and dry deposition and visibility impairment at Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado. Several source apportionment methods were utilized for RoMANS, including the Trajectory Mass Balance (TrMB) Model, a receptor-based method in which the hourly measured concentrations are the dependent variables and the residence times of back trajectories in several source regions are the independent variables. The regression coefficients are estimates of the mean emissions, dispersion, chemical transformation, and deposition between the source areas and the receptors. For RoMANS, a new ensemble technique was employed in which input parameters were varied to explore the range, variability, and model sensitivity of source attribution results and statistical measures of model fit over thousands of trials for each set of concentration measurements. Results showed that carefully chosen source regions dramatically improved the ability of TrMB to reproduce temporal patterns in the measured concentrations, and source attribution results were also very sensitive to source region choices. Conversely, attributions were relatively insensitive to trajectory start height, trajectory length, minimum endpoints per source area, and maximum endpoint height, as long as the trajectories were long enough to reach contributing source areas and were not overly restricted in height or horizontal location. Source attribution results estimated that more than half the ammonia and 30-45% of sulfur dioxide and other nitrogen-containing species at the RoMANS core site were from sources within the state of Colorado. Approximately a quarter to a third of the sulfate was from within Colorado.

  19. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Wieczorek

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  20. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G. F.; Stock, G. M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J. B.; Borchers, J. W.; Godt, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  1. Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myesa Legendre-Fixx

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the factors that influence the climate sensitivity of treeline species is critical to understanding carbon sequestration, forest dynamics, and conservation in high elevation forest/meadow ecotones. Using tree cores from four sub-alpine conifer species collected from three sides of Mt. Rainier, WA, USA, we investigated the influences of species identity and sites with different local climates on radial growth–climate relationships. We created chronologies for each species at each site, determined influential plant-relevant annual and seasonal climatic variables influencing growth, and investigated how the strength of climate sensitivity varied across species and location. Overall, similar climate variables constrained growth on all three sides of the mountain for each of the four study species. Summer warmth positively influenced radial growth, whereas snow, spring warmth, previous summer warmth, and spring humidity negatively influenced growth. We discovered only a few subtle differences in the climate sensitivity of co-occurring species at the same site and between the same species at different sites in pairwise comparisons. A model including species by climate interactions provided the best balance between parsimony and fit, but did not lead to substantially greater predictive power relative to a model without site or species interactions. Our results imply that at treeline in moist temperate regions like Mt. Rainier, the same climatic variables drive annual variation in growth across species and locations, despite species differences in physiology and site differences in mean climates.

  2. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract

  3. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract

  4. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  5. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.; Budd, David A.; Clayton, Edward A.; Missimer, Thomas M.; Dickson, John Anthony D

    2011-01-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  6. National Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — National Park Service unit boundaries (NTAD). These park boundaries signify legislative boundary definitions and local park names have been consolidated according to...

  7. ORTHOIMAGERY, PARK COUNTY, COLORADO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). NAIP acquires digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in...

  8. Mercury, trace elements and organic constituents in atmospheric fine particulate matter, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA: A combined approach to sampling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, A.; Engle, M.A.; Orem, W.H.; Bunnell, J.E.; Lerch, H.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Olson, M.L.; McCord, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Compliance with U.S. air quality regulatory standards for atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on meeting average 24 hour (35 ?? m-3) and yearly (15 ??g m-3) mass-per-unit-volume limits, regardless of PM2.5 composition. Whereas this presents a workable regulatory framework, information on particle composition is needed to assess the fate and transport of PM2.5 and determine potential environmental/human health impacts. To address these important non-regulatory issues an integrated approach is generally used that includes (1) field sampling of atmospheric particulate matter on filter media, using a size-limiting cyclone, or with no particle-size limitation; and (2) chemical extraction of exposed filters and analysis of separate particulate-bound fractions for total mercury, trace elements and organic constituents, utilising different USGS laboratories optimised for quantitative analysis of these substances. This combination of sampling and analysis allowed for a more detailed interpretation of PM2.5 sources and potential effects, compared to measurements of PM2.5 abundance alone. Results obtained using this combined approach are presented for a 2006 air sampling campaign in Shenandoah National Park (Virginia, USA) to assess sources of atmospheric contaminants and their potential impact on air quality in the Park. PM2.5 was collected at two sampling sites (Big Meadows and Pinnacles) separated by 13.6 km. At both sites, element concentrations in PM2.5 were low, consistent with remote or rural locations. However, element/Zr crustal abundance enrichment factors greater than 10, indicating anthropogenic input, were found for Hg, Se, S, Sb, Cd, Pb, Mo, Zn and Cu, listed in decreasing order of enrichment. Principal component analysis showed that four element associations accounted for 84% of the PM 2.5 trace element variation; these associations are interpreted to represent: (1) crustal sources (Al, REE); (2) coal combustion (Se, Sb), (3) metal production

  9. Assessing exotic plant species invasions and associated soil characteristics: A case study in eastern Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, using the pixel nested plot design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhan, M.A.; Stafford, E.J.; Woodly, P.J.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado, USA, contains a diversity of plant species. However, many exotic plant species have become established, potentially impacting the structure and function of native plant communities. Our goal was to quantify patterns of exotic plant species in relation to native plant species, soil characteristics, and other abiotic factors that may indicate or predict their establishment and success. Our research approach for field data collection was based on a field plot design called the pixel nested plot. The pixel nested plot provides a link to multi-phase and multi-scale spatial modeling-mapping techniques that can be used to estimate total species richness and patterns of plant diversity at finer landscape scales. Within the eastern region of RMNP, in an area of approximately 35,000 ha, we established a total of 60 pixel nested plots in 9 vegetation types. We used canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and multiple linear regressions to quantify relationships between soil characteristics and native and exotic plant species richness and cover. We also used linear correlation, spatial autocorrelation and cross correlation statistics to test for the spatial patterns of variables of interest. CCA showed that exotic species were significantly (P radiation (r = 0.55), soil nitrogen (r = 0.58) and bare ground (r = -0.66). Pearson's correlation statistic showed significant linear relationships between exotic species, organic carbon, soil nitrogen, and bare ground. While spatial autocorrelations indicated that our 60 pixel nested plots were spatially independent, the cross correlation statistics indicated that exotic plant species were spatially associated with bare ground, in general, exotic plant species were most abundant in areas of high native species richness. This indicates that resource managers should focus on the protection of relatively rare native rich sites with little canopy cover, and fertile soils. Using the pixel nested

  10. Using Ecological Indicators and a Decision Support System for Integrated Ecological Assessment at Two National Park Units in the Mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Carolyn G.; Young, John A.; Miller, Bruce J.; Saunders, Michael C.

    2015-02-01

    We implemented an integrated ecological assessment using a GIS-based decision support system model for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River (UPDE) and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA)—national park units with the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Our assessment examined a variety of aquatic and terrestrial indicators of ecosystem components that reflect the parks' conservation purpose and reference condition. Our assessment compared these indicators to ecological thresholds to determine the condition of park watersheds. Selected indicators included chemical and physical measures of water quality, biologic indicators of water quality, and landscape condition measures. For the chemical and physical measures of water quality, we used a water quality index and each of its nine components to assess the condition of water quality in each watershed. For biologic measures of water quality, we used the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera aquatic macroinvertebrate index and, secondarily, the Hilsenhoff aquatic macroinvertebrate index. Finally, for the landscape condition measures of our model, we used percent forest and percent impervious surface. Based on our overall assessment, UPDE and DEWA watersheds had an ecological assessment score of 0.433 on a -1 to 1 fuzzy logic scale. This score indicates that, in general, the natural resource condition within watersheds at these parks is healthy or ecologically unimpaired; however, we had only partial data for many of our indicators. Our model is iterative and new data may be incorporated as they become available. These natural parks are located within a rapidly urbanizing landscape—we recommend that natural resource managers remain vigilant to surrounding land uses that may adversely affect natural resources within the parks.

  11. Using nestling plasma to assess long-term spatial and temporal concentrations of organochlorine compounds in bald eagles within Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Tyler Pittman; William W. Bowerman; Leland H. Grim; Teryl G. Grubb; William C. Bridges; Michael R. Wierda

    2015-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population at Voyageurs National Park (VNP) provides an opportunity to assess long-term temporal and spatial trends of persistent environmental contaminants. Nestling bald eagle plasma samples collected from 1997 to 2010 were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides. Trends of total PCBs,...

  12. Using ecological indicators and a decision support system for integrated ecological assessment at two national park units in the Mid-Atlantic region, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Carolyn G.; Young, John A.; Miller, Bruce; Saunders, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    We implemented an integrated ecological assessment using a GIS-based decision support system model for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River (UPDE) and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA)—national park units with the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Our assessment examined a variety of aquatic and terrestrial indicators of ecosystem components that reflect the parks’ conservation purpose and reference condition. Our assessment compared these indicators to ecological thresholds to determine the condition of park watersheds. Selected indicators included chemical and physical measures of water quality, biologic indicators of water quality, and landscape condition measures. For the chemical and physical measures of water quality, we used a water quality index and each of its nine components to assess the condition of water quality in each watershed. For biologic measures of water quality, we used the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera aquatic macroinvertebrate index and, secondarily, the Hilsenhoff aquatic macroinvertebrate index. Finally, for the landscape condition measures of our model, we used percent forest and percent impervious surface. Based on our overall assessment, UPDE and DEWA watersheds had an ecological assessment score of 0.433 on a −1 to 1 fuzzy logic scale. This score indicates that, in general, the natural resource condition within watersheds at these parks is healthy or ecologically unimpaired; however, we had only partial data for many of our indicators. Our model is iterative and new data may be incorporated as they become available. These natural parks are located within a rapidly urbanizing landscape—we recommend that natural resource managers remain vigilant to surrounding land uses that may adversely affect natural resources within the parks.

  13. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006–September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25–50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3−) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3− from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p model critical loads by filling gaps in geographic coverage of deposition monitoring/modeling programs and thus may enable policy makers to better protect sensitive natural resources in Class 1 Wilderness areas.

  14. Comparative ozone responses of cutleaf coneflowers (Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata, var. ampla) from Rocky Mountain and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Howard S; Johnson, Jennifer; Kohut, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L. var. digitata) is native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) and an ozone bioindicator species. Variety ampla, whose ozone sensitivity is less well known, is native to Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO). In the early 2000s, researchers found putative ozone symptoms on var. ampla and rhizomes were sent to Appalachian State University to verify that the symptoms were the result of ozone exposure. In 2011, potted plants were exposed to ambient ozone from May to August. These same plants were grown in open-top chambers (OTCs) in 2012 and 2013, and exposed to charcoal-filtered (CF), non-filtered (NF), elevated ozone (EO), NF+50ppb in 2012 for 47days and NF+30/NF+50ppb ozone in 2013 for 36 and 36days, respectively. Ozone symptoms similar to those found in ROMO (blue-black adaxial stippling) were reproduced both in ambient air and in the OTCs. Both varieties exhibited foliar injury in the OTCs in an exposure-dependent manner, verifying that symptoms resulted from ozone exposure. In two of the three study years, var. digitata appeared more sensitive than var. ampla. Exposure to EO caused reductions in ambient photosynthetic rate (A) and stomatal conductance (g s ) for both varieties. Light response curves indicated that ozone reduced A, g s , and the apparent quantum yield while it increased the light compensation point. In CF air, var. ampla had higher light saturated A (18.2±1.04 vs 11.6±0.37μmolm -2 s -1 ), higher light saturation (1833±166.7 vs 1108±141.7μmolm -2 s -1 ), and lower Ci/Ca ratio (0.67±0.01 vs 0.77±0.01) than var. digitata. Coneflowers in both Parks are adversely affected by exposure to ambient ozone and if ozone concentrations increase in the Rocky Mountains, greater amounts of injury on var. ampla can be expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Breeding loggerhead marine turtles Caretta caretta in Dry Tortugas National Park, USA, show high fidelity to diverse habitats near nesting beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Zawada, David G.; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Fujisaki, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to identify in-water habitat used by individuals in the smallest North-west Atlantic subpopulation of adult nesting loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta during the breeding season. During 2010, 2011 and 2012 breeding periods, a total of 20 adult females used habitats proximal to nesting beaches with various levels of protection within Dry Tortugas National Park. We then used a rapid, high-resolution, digital imaging system to map habitat adjacent to nesting beaches, revealing the diversity and distribution of available benthic cover. Turtle behaviour showing measurable site-fidelity to these diverse habitats has implications for managing protected areas and human activities within them. Protecting diverse benthic areas adjacent to loggerhead turtle nesting beaches here and elsewhere could provide benefits for overall biodiversity conservation.

  16. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball James W

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad™ AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan. Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad™ AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns.

  17. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.K.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstorm, D.K.; Ball, J.W.; Xu, Y.; Cohn, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad??? AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab) and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern) and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan). Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad??? AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Division of Geochemistry of the American Chemical Society 2003.

  18. Using GIS and Google Earth for the creation of the Going-to-the-Sun Road Avalanche Atlas, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Dundas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Snow avalanche paths are key geomorphologic features in Glacier National Park, Montana, and an important component of mountain ecosystems: they are isolated within a larger ecosystem, they are continuously disturbed, and they contain unique physical characteristics (Malanson and Butler, 1984). Avalanches impact subalpine forest structure and function, as well as overall biodiversity (Bebi et al., 2009). Because avalanches are dynamic phenomena, avalanche path geometry and spatial extent depend upon climatic regimes. The USGS/GNP Avalanche Program formally began in 2003 as an avalanche forecasting program for the spring opening of the ever-popular Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR), which crosses through 37 identified avalanche paths. Avalanche safety and forecasting is a necessary part of the GTSR spring opening procedures. An avalanche atlas detailing topographic parameters and oblique photographs was completed for the GTSR corridor in response to a request from GNP personnel for planning and resource management. Using ArcMap 9.2 GIS software, polygons were created for every avalanche path affecting the GTSR using aerial imagery, field-based observations, and GPS measurements of sub-meter accuracy. Spatial attributes for each path were derived within the GIS. Resulting products include an avalanche atlas book for operational use, a geoPDF of the atlas, and a Google Earth flyover illustrating each path and associated photographs. The avalanche atlas aids park management in worker safety, infrastructure planning, and natural resource protection by identifying avalanche path patterns and location. The atlas was created for operational and planning purposes and is also used as a foundation for research such as avalanche ecology projects and avalanche path runout modeling.

  19. HEALTH SURVEY OF FREE-RANGING RACCOONS (PROCYON LOTOR) IN CENTRAL PARK, NEW YORK, NEW YORK, USA: IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN AND DOMESTIC ANIMAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, Kimberly L; Marchese, Krysten; Slavinski, Sally; Humberg, Lee A; Dubovi, Edward J; Jarvis, Jodie A; McAloose, Denise; Calle, Paul P

    2017-04-01

    We conducted health assessments on 113 free-ranging raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) in Central Park, New York City, US, in February 2010, September 2010, and November 2011 in conjunction with a trap-vaccinate-release program to control a raccoon rabies epizootic. Five individuals were sampled at two time points for 118 raccoon examinations in total. We tested 13 of 13 and 8 of 13 euthanized raccoons for rabies and canine distemper virus (CDV), respectively, by antigen testing on brain tissue; all were negative for both viruses. Endoparasitism was the most common necropsy finding, with definitive identification of Baylisascaris procyonis in six of eight (75%) necropsied raccoons. Multiple intestinal parasites were detected in feces of living raccoons, including ascarid-type ova in 25 of 80 (31%) raccoons, with B. procyonis confirmed in one sample. Median blood lead level was 7.3 μg/dL (n=104). Rabies virus neutralizing antibody titer was ≥0.5 IU/mL in 9 of 88 (10%) raccoons naive to rabies vaccination and in 13 of 20 (65%) previously vaccinated raccoons. The majority of raccoons we tested were seropositive for canine parvovirus-2 (54/59, 92%) and Toxoplasma gondii (39/60, 65%). Fewer were seropositive for Rickettsia rickettsii (3/30, 10%). None were seropositive for CDV (n=108), canine adenovirus-1 (n=60), or Borrelia burgdorferi (n=30). Ectoparasites found during 16 of 118 (13.6%) physical examinations included Ixodes texanus ticks (15/118, 12.7%) and Trichodectes octomaculatus lice (1/118, 0.8%). We detected Campylobacter jejuni in 5 of 79 (6%) fecal samples. We detected 11 Salmonella enterica serotypes in 70 of 111 (63.1%) enteric cultures, the most common of which were Salmonella Newport (20/70, 29%) and Salmonella Oranienburg (20/70, 29%). These results indicate that raccoons in Central Park likely are involved in the environmental occurrence and potential disease transmission of a variety of infectious and noninfectious diseases of concern for human, wildlife

  20. Episodic Late Holocene dune movements on the sand-sheet area, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, S. L.; Spaeth, M.; Marín, L.; Pierson, J.; Gómez, J.; Bunch, F.; Valdez, A.

    2006-07-01

    The Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, contains a variety of eolian landforms that reflect Holocene drought variability. The most spectacular is a dune mass banked against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, which is fronted by an extensive sand sheet with stabilized parabolic dunes. Stratigraphic exposures of parabolic dunes and associated luminescence dating of quartz grains by single-aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocols indicate eolian deposition of unknown magnitude occurred ca. 1290-940, 715 ± 80, 320 ± 30, and 200-120 yr ago and in the 20th century. There are 11 drought intervals inferred from the tree-ring record in the past 1300 yr at GSDNPP potentially associated with dune movement, though only five eolian depositional events are currently recognized in the stratigraphic record. There is evidence for eolian transport associated with dune movement in the 13th century, which may coincide with the "Great Drought", a 26-yr-long dry interval identified in the tree ring record, and associated with migration of Anasazi people from the Four Corners areas to wetter areas in southern New Mexico. This nascent chronology indicates that the transport of eolian sand across San Luis Valley was episodic in the late Holocene with appreciable dune migration in the 8th, 10-13th, and 19th centuries, which ultimately nourished the dune mass against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

  1. Diversity of Mat-Forming Fungi in Relation to Soil Properties, Disturbance, and Forest Ecotype at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Trappe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In forest ecosystems, fungal mats are functionally important in nutrient and water uptake in litter and wood decomposition processes, in carbon resource allocation, soil weathering and in cycling of soil resources. Fungal mats can occur abundantly in forests and are widely distributed globally. We sampled ponderosa pine/white fir and mountain hemlock/noble fir communities at Crater Lake National Park for mat-forming soil fungi. Fungus collections were identified by DNA sequencing. Thirty-eight mat-forming genotypes were identified; members of the five most common genera (Gautieria, Lepiota, Piloderma, Ramaria, and Rhizopogon comprised 67% of all collections. The mycorrhizal genera Alpova and Lactarius are newly identified as ectomycorrhizal mat-forming taxa, as are the saprotrophic genera Flavoscypha, Gastropila, Lepiota and Xenasmatella. Twelve typical mat forms are illustrated, representing both ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi that were found. Abundance of fungal mats was correlated with higher soil carbon to nitrogen ratios, fine woody debris and needle litter mass in both forest ecotypes. Definitions of fungal mats are discussed, along with some of the challenges in defining what comprises a fungal “mat”.

  2. Topography and vegetation as predictors of snow water equivalent across the alpine treeline ecotone at Lee Ridge, Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, C.A.; Brown, D.G.; Fagre, D.B.

    2005-01-01

    We derived and implemented two spatial models of May snow water equivalent (SWE) at Lee Ridge in Glacier National Park, Montana. We used the models to test the hypothesis that vegetation structure is a control on snow redistribution at the alpine treeline ecotone (ATE). The statistical models were derived using stepwise and "best" subsets regression techniques. The first model was derived from field measurements of SWE, topography, and vegetation taken at 27 sample points. The second model was derived using GIS-based measures of topography and vegetation. Both the field- (R² = 0.93) and GIS-based models (R² = 0.69) of May SWE included the following variables: site type (based on vegetation), elevation, maximum slope, and general slope aspect. Site type was identified as the most important predictor of SWE in both models, accounting for 74.0% and 29.5% of the variation, respectively. The GIS-based model was applied to create a predictive map of SWE across Lee Ridge, predicting little snow accumulation on the top of the ridge where vegetation is scarce. The GIS model failed in large depressions, including ephemeral stream channels. The models supported the hypothesis that upright vegetation has a positive effect on accumulation of SWE above and beyond the effects of topography. Vegetation, therefore, creates a positive feedback in which it modifies its, environment and could affect the ability of additional vegetation to become established.

  3. Development of a spatial analysis method using ground-based repeat photography to detect changes in the alpine treeline ecotone, Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, W.; Munroe, Jeffrey S.; Fagre, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    Repeat photography is a powerful tool for detection of landscape change over decadal timescales. Here a novel method is presented that applies spatial analysis software to digital photo-pairs, allowing vegetation change to be categorized and quantified. This method is applied to 12 sites within the alpine treeline ecotone of Glacier National Park, Montana, and is used to examine vegetation changes over timescales ranging from 71 to 93 years. Tree cover at the treeline ecotone increased in 10 out of the 12 photo-pairs (mean increase of 60%). Establishment occurred at all sites, infilling occurred at 11 sites. To demonstrate the utility of this method, patterns of tree establishment at treeline are described and the possible causes of changes within the treeline ecotone are discussed. Local factors undoubtedly affect the magnitude and type of the observed changes, however the ubiquity of the increase in tree cover implies a common forcing mechanism. Mean minimum summer temperatures have increased by 1.5??C over the past century and, coupled with variations in the amount of early spring snow water equivalent, likely account for much of the increase in tree cover at the treeline ecotone. Lastly, shortcomings of this method are presented along with possible solutions and areas for future research. ?? 2007 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  4. Late Quaternary sea-level history and the antiquity of mammoths (Mammuthus exilis and Mammuthus columbi), Channel Islands NationalPark, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.; Schumann, R. Randall; Agenbroad, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Fossils of Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and pygmy mammoths (Mammuthus exilis) have been reported from Channel Islands National Park, California. Most date to the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 2), but a tusk of M. exilis (or immature M. columbi) was found in the lowest marine terrace of Santa Rosa Island. Uranium-series dating of corals yielded ages from 83.8 ± 0.6 ka to 78.6 ± 0.5 ka, correlating the terrace with MIS 5.1, a time of relatively high sea level. Mammoths likely immigrated to the islands by swimming during the glacial periods MIS 6 (~ 150 ka) or MIS 8 (~ 250 ka), when sea level was low and the island–mainland distance was minimal, as during MIS 2. Earliest mammoth immigration to the islands likely occurred late enough in the Quaternary that uplift of the islands and the mainland decreased the swimming distance to a range that could be accomplished by mammoths. Results challenge the hypothesis that climate change, vegetation change, and decreased land area from sea-level rise were the causes of mammoth extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary on the Channel Islands. Pre-MIS 2 mammoth populations would have experienced similar or even more dramatic changes at the MIS 6/5.5 transition.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of pox-like lesions, avian malaria, and mosquito vectors in Kipahulu valley, Haleakala National Park, Hawai'i, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruch, Samuel; Atkinson, Carter T.; Savage, Amy F.; LaPointe, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence and altitudinal distribution of introduced avian malarial infections (Plasmodium relictum) and pox-like lesions (Avipoxvirus) in forest birds from Kīpahulu Valley, Haleakalā National Park, on the island of Maui, and we identified primary larval habitat for the mosquito vector of this disease. This intensively managed wilderness area and scientific reserve is one of the most pristine areas of native forest remaining in the state of Hawai‘i, and it will become increasingly important as a site for restoration and recovery of endangered forest birds. Overall prevalence of malarial infections in the valley was 8% (11/133) in native species and 4% (4/101) in nonnative passerines; prevalence was lower than reported for comparable elevations and habitats elsewhere in the state. Infections occurred primarily in ‘Apapane (Himatione sanguinea) and Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) at elevations below 1,400 m. Pox-like lesions were detected in only two Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (2%; 2/94) at elevations below 950 m. We did not detect malaria or pox in birds caught at 1,400 m in upper reaches of the valley. Adult mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus) were captured at four sites at elevations of 640, 760, 915, and 975 m, respectively. Culex quinquefasciatus larvae were found only in rock holes along intermittent tributaries of the two largest streams in the valley, but not in standing surface water, pig wallows, ground pools, tree cavities, and tree fern cavities. Mosquito populations in the valley are low, and they are probably influenced by periods of high rainfall that flush stream systems.

  6. Soil Seed Bank Responses to Postfire Herbicide and Native Seeding Treatments Designed to Control Bromus tectorum in a Pinyon–Juniper Woodland at Zion National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Hondo Brisbin, graduate student; Andrea Thode, Associate Professor; Karen Weber, graduate student

    2013-01-01

    The continued threat of an invasive, annual brome (Bromus) species in the western United States has created the need for integrated approaches to postfire restoration. Additionally, the high germination rate, high seed production, and seed bank carryover of annual bromes points to the need to assay soil seed banks as part of monitoring programs. We sampled the soil seed bank to help assess the effectiveness of treatments utilizing the herbicide Plateau® (imazapic) and a perennial native seed mix to control annual Bromus species and enhance perennial native plant establishment following a wildfire in Zion National Park, Utah. This study is one of few that have monitored the effects of imazapic and native seeding on a soil seed bank community and the only one that we know of that has done so in a pinyon–juniper woodland. The study made use of untreated, replicated controls, which is not common for seed bank studies. One year posttreatment, Bromus was significantly reduced in plots sprayed with herbicide. By the second year posttreatment, the effects of imazapic were less evident and convergence with the controls was evident. Emergence of seeded species was low for the duration of the study. Dry conditions and possible interactions with imazapic probably contributed to the lack of emergence of seeded native species. The perennial grass sand dropseed outperformed the other species included in the seed mix. We also examined how the treatments affected the soil seed bank community as a whole. We found evidence that the herbicide was reducing several native annual forbs and one nonnative annual forb. However, overall effects on the community were not significant. The results of our study were similar to what others have found in that imazapic is effective in providing a short-term reduction in Bromus density, although it can impact emergence of nontarget species.

  7. Ectomycorrhizal Community Structure and Soil Characteristics of Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta) and Adjacent Stands of Old Growth Mixed Conifer in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Robert B.; Parker, V. Thomas; Cullings, Kenneth W.; Sun, Sidney (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Forest development patterns following disturbance are known to influence the physical and chemical attributes of soils at different points in time. Changes in soil resources are thought to have a corresponding effect on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community structure. We used molecular methods to compare below-ground ECM species richness, composition, and abundance between adjacent stands of homogenous lodgepole pine and old growth mixed conifer in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). In each stand-type we collected soil cores to both identify mycorrhizae and assess soil chemistry. Although no statistical difference was observed in the mean number of ECM root tips per core between stand types, the total number of species identified (85 versus 35) and the mean number of species per core (8.8 +/- 0.6 versus 2.5 +/- 0.3) were significantly higher in lodgepole pine. Differences between the actual and estimated species richness levels indicated that these forest types support a high number of ECM species and that undersampling was severe. Species compositions were widely disparate between stands where only four species were shared out of a total of 116. Soil analysis also revealed that mixed conifer was significantly lower in pH, but higher in organic matter, potassium, phosphorus, and ammonium when compared to lodgepole pine stands. Species richness per core was correlated with these chemical data, however, analysis of covariance indicated that stand type was the only statistically significant factor in the observed difference in species richness. Our data suggest that ECM fungal richness increases as homogenous lodgepole pine stands grow and mature, but declines after Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir colonize. Despite difficulties linking species composition with soil chemistry, there are a variety of physical and chemical factors that could be influencing ECM community structure. Future field experiments are necessary to test some of the mechanisms potentially operating

  8. Environmental Conditions Constrain the Distribution and Diversity of Archaeal merA in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Boyd, E.; Crane, S.; Lu-Irving, P.; Krabbenhoft, D.; King, S.; Dighton, J.; Geesey, G.; Barkay, T.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution and phylogeny of extant protein-encoding genes recovered from geochemically diverse environments can provide insight into the physical and chemical parameters that led to the origin and which constrained the evolution of a functional process. Mercuric reductase (MerA) plays an integral role in mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry by catalyzing the transformation of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Putative merA sequences were amplified from DNA extracts of microbial communities associated with mats and sulfur precipitates from physicochemically diverse Hg-containing springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, using four PCR primer sets that were designed to capture the known diversity of merA. The recovery of novel and deeply rooted MerA lineages from these habitats supports previous evidence that indicates merA originated in a thermophilic environment. Generalized linear models indicate that the distribution of putative archaeal merA lineages was constrained by a combination of pH, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved total mercury and sulfide. The models failed to identify statistically well supported trends for the distribution of putative bacterial merA lineages as a function of these or other measured environmental variables, suggesting that these lineages were either influenced by environmental parameters not considered in the present study, or the bacterial primer sets were designed to target too broad of a class of genes which may have responded differently to environmental stimuli. The widespread occurrence of merA in the geothermal environments implies a prominent role for Hg detoxification in these environments. Moreover, the differences in the distribution of the merA genes amplified with the four merA primer sets suggests that the organisms putatively engaged in this activity have evolved to occupy different ecological niches within the geothermal gradient. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Environmental conditions constrain the distribution and diversity of archaeal merA in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Boyd, Eric; Crane, Sharron; Lu-Irving, Patricia; Krabbenhoft, David; King, Susan; Dighton, John; Geesey, Gill; Barkay, Tamar

    2011-11-01

    The distribution and phylogeny of extant protein-encoding genes recovered from geochemically diverse environments can provide insight into the physical and chemical parameters that led to the origin and which constrained the evolution of a functional process. Mercuric reductase (MerA) plays an integral role in mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry by catalyzing the transformation of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Putative merA sequences were amplified from DNA extracts of microbial communities associated with mats and sulfur precipitates from physicochemically diverse Hg-containing springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, using four PCR primer sets that were designed to capture the known diversity of merA. The recovery of novel and deeply rooted MerA lineages from these habitats supports previous evidence that indicates merA originated in a thermophilic environment. Generalized linear models indicate that the distribution of putative archaeal merA lineages was constrained by a combination of pH, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved total mercury and sulfide. The models failed to identify statistically well supported trends for the distribution of putative bacterial merA lineages as a function of these or other measured environmental variables, suggesting that these lineages were either influenced by environmental parameters not considered in the present study, or the bacterial primer sets were designed to target too broad of a class of genes which may have responded differently to environmental stimuli. The widespread occurrence of merA in the geothermal environments implies a prominent role for Hg detoxification in these environments. Moreover, the differences in the distribution of the merA genes amplified with the four merA primer sets suggests that the organisms putatively engaged in this activity have evolved to occupy different ecological niches within the geothermal gradient.

  10. On the importance of stratigraphic control for vertebrate fossil sites in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA: Examples from new Mammuthus finds on San Miguel Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, Jeffery S.; Muhs, Daniel R.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary vertebrate fossils, most notably mammoth remains, are relatively common on the northern Channel Islands of California. Well-preserved cranial, dental, and appendicular elements of Mammuthus exilis (pygmy mammoth) and Mammuthus columbi (Columbian mammoth) have been recovered from hundreds of localities on the islands during the past half-century or more. Despite this paleontological wealth, the geologic context of the fossils is described in the published literature only briefly or not at all, which has hampered the interpretation of associated 14C ages and reconstruction of past environmental conditions. We recently discovered a partial tusk, several large bones, and a tooth enamel plate (all likely mammoth) at two sites on the northwest flank of San Miguel Island, California. At both localities, we documented the stratigraphic context of the fossils, described the host sediments in detail, and collected charcoal and terrestrial gastropod shells for radiocarbon dating. The resulting 14C ages indicate that the mammoths were present on San Miguel Island between ∼20 and 17 ka as well as between ∼14 and 13 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), similar to other mammoth sites on San Miguel, Santa Cruz, and Santa Rosa Islands. In addition to documenting the geologic context and ages of the fossils, we present a series of protocols for documenting and reporting geologic and stratigraphic information at fossil sites on the California Channel Islands in general, and in Channel Islands National Park in particular, so that pertinent information is collected prior to excavation of vertebrate materials, thus maximizing their scientific value.

  11. Influence of Sea-Level Rise and Storms on Soil Accretion Rates in the Mangrove Forests of Everglades National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J.; Smith, T., III; Sanders, C. J.; Peterson, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove forests provide a range of valuable ecosystem services including sequestering large quantities of organic carbon (OC) in their soils at rates higher than other forests. Whether or not mangrove soils continue to be a sink for OC will be determined by the mangrove ecosystems' response to climate change-induced stressors. The threats of rising sea level outpacing mangrove forest soil accretion and increased wave energy associated with this rise may become the primary climate change-induced stressors on mangrove ecosystems. The threat from wave energy is amplified during storm events, which could increasingly damage mangrove forests along the coastline. However, storms may enhance accretion rates at some sites due to delivery of storm surge material, which could increase the system's ability to keep pace with sea-level rise (SLR). To investigate these processes we measure soil accretion rates over the last 100 years (via 210Pb dating) within the mangrove forests of Everglades National Park, which are situated within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. Accretion rates range from 2 to 2.8 mm per year for sites within 10 km of the Gulf of Mexico. These rates match (within error) or exceed SLR over the last 100 years. Sites farther inland than 10 km have slightly lower accretion rates. Throughout the system organic matter accumulation is the most important source material contributing to accretion. The more seaward sites also show an important contribution from carbonate material. Soil cores from the most seaward sites exhibited visual laminations and Ca peaks (determined via x-ray fluorescence). These are indicators of storm surge deposits. While higher sea level might produce more damage and loss of mangrove forest along open water (e.g., Gulf of Mexico), our findings suggest some sites will have enhanced accretion rates due to supplementation with storm surge material.

  12. Park It!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2010-01-01

    Many artists visit national parks to draw, paint and take photographs of some of the most amazing scenery on earth. Raw nature is one of the greatest inspirations to an artist, and artists can be credited for helping inspire the government to create the National Park System. This article features Thomas Moran (1837-1926), one of the artists who…

  13. Parks & benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jesper; Christensen, Andreas Aagaard; Holmes, Esbern

    2011-01-01

    conservation. Increasing visitor flows and cuts in staff resources has put focus on the management of visitor carrying capacities and their relation to landscape structure and zoning. At the same time park authorities face falling public appropriations and receding focus on their conservation functions...... compared to recreation and settlement. The constant priority of the balancing of nature protection and economic utilization gives rise to various experience with land use and visitor management relevant for sustainable development also outside the parks. In European nature parks the handling of visitor...... carrying capacities related to Natura2000-sites and their included habitat type areas is a priority theme for the sustainable management of nature parks. A comparative analysis of conditions and initiatives related to visitor carrying capacities in 8 nature parks in the Baltic region has been carried out...

  14. Depositional facies and aqueous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouke, B.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J.; Pratt, L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Burns, P.C.; Discipulo, M.K.

    2000-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of travertine-depositing hot springs at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, have been used to define five depositional facies along the spring drainage system. Spring waters are expelled in the vent facies at 71 to 73 C and precipitate mounded travertine composed of aragonite needle botryoids. The apron and channel facies (43--72 C) is floored by hollow tubes composed of aragonite needle botryoids that encrust sulfide-oxidizing Aquificales bacteria. The travertine of the pond facies (30--62 C) varies in composition from aragonite needle shrubs formed at higher temperatures to ridged networks of calcite and aragonite at lower temperatures. Calcite ice sheets, calcified bubbles, and aggregates of aragonite needles (fuzzy dumbbells) precipitate at the air-water interface and settle to pond floors. The proximal-slope facies (28--54 C), which forms the margins of terracette pools, is composed of arcuate aragonite needle shrubs that create small microterracettes on the steep slope face. Finally, the distal-slope facies (28--30 C) is composed of calcite spherules and calcite feather crystals. Despite the presence of abundant microbial mat communities and their observed role in providing substrates for mineralization, the compositions of spring-water and travertine predominantly reflect abiotic physical and chemical processes. Vigorous CO{sub 2} degassing causes a +2 unit increase in spring water pH, as well as Rayleigh-type covariations between the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and corresponding {delta}{sup 13}C. Travertine {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O are nearly equivalent to aragonite and calcite equilibrium values calculated from spring water in the higher-temperature ({approximately}50--73 C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine precipitating in the lower-temperature (<{approximately}50 C) depositional facies exhibits {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values that are as

  15. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-01-01

    positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking

  16. Park Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Parks Districts layer is part of a dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature classes for...

  17. Heterogeneous Parking Market Subject to Parking Rationing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asadi Bagloee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of drivers and parking spaces delineate a heterogeneous parking market for which the literature has yet to provide a model applicable to the real world. The main obstacle is computational complexities of considering various parking restrictions along with traffic congestion on the road network. In this study, the heterogeneity aspects are considered within a Logit parking choice model. A mathematical programming problem was introduced to explicitly consider parking capacities and parking rationing constraints. The parking rationing is defined as any arrangement to reserve parking space for some specific demand such as parking permit, private parking, VIP parking, and different parking durations. Introduction of parking rationing in the presence of other constraints is a unique factor in this study which makes the model more realistic. The algorithm was tested on a central business district case study. The results prove that the algorithm is able to converge rapidly. Among the algorithm’s output are shadow prices of the parking capacity and parking rationing constraints. The shadow prices contain important information which is key to addressing a variety of parking issues, such as the location of parking shortages, identification of fair parking charges, viability of parking permits, and the size of reserved parking.

  18. ParkIndex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Schipperijn, Jasper; Hipp, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    using ArcGIS 9.3 and the Community Park Audit Tool. Four park summary variables - distance to nearest park, and the number of parks, amount of park space, and average park quality index within 1 mile were analyzed in relation to park use using logistic regression. Coefficients for significant park......, planners, and citizens to evaluate the potential for park use for a given area. Data used for developing ParkIndex were collected in 2010 in Kansas City, Missouri (KCMO). Adult study participants (n=891) reported whether they used a park within the past month, and all parks in KCMO were mapped and audited...

  19. Maryon Park

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli, Giasco

    2018-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: "Maryon Park is the place Michelangelo Antonioni chose, in 1966, to shoot the scenes that would become cult images from his film "Blow Up", and deservedly so. The park is located in Charlton, southeast of London, a place that's hardly changed since Antonioni shot there. I first went there to shoot a series of photos on March 7 and 8, 2007. I returned again on March 7, 2014. I called the series “Maryon Park”. I used a medium format, six by seven inch col...

  20. Kes kardab Park Chan-Wooki? / Karlo Funk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Funk, Karlo, 1971-

    2007-01-01

    Vägivalla ajendite teemadel. USA meedia süüdistas peale Virginia koolitulistamist filmikunsti. Seoseid ja/või põhjusi otsiti korealase Park Chan-Wooki filmist "Vana poiss" ("Old Boy") ja John Woo filmidest

  1. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, David A; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Feng; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Zhang, Xiaojing; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren J; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Woyke, Tanja; Brumm, Catherine; Hochstein, Rebecca; Schoenfeld, Thomas; Brumm, Phillip

    2012-07-30

    Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 was one of a number of organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The isolate was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. Y412MC10 based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species, and the organism was most closely related to Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC_013406). The genome of Paenibacillus sp. Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other paenibacilli. The Y412MC10 genome shows a high level of synteny and homology to the draft sequence of Paenibacillus sp. HGF5, an organism from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) Reference Genomes. This, combined with genomic CAZyme analysis, suggests an intestinal, rather than environmental origin for Y412MC10.

  3. Parks of Chapel Hill

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Hours, location, and amenity information for Chapel Hill parks as shown on the Town of Chapel Hill's website. Includes a map with points for each park location.

  4. State Park Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set is a collection of ArcView shapefiles (by park) of trails within statutory boundaries of individual MN State Parks, State Recreation Areas and State...

  5. SMART VEHICLE PARKING

    OpenAIRE

    S.Bharath Ram

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to count the number of empty car parking areas and to display them in a Website. This system consists of sensors attached to several parking areas. These sensors located in different parking area’s detects the presence of vehicle and sends information to Microcontroller, which calculates the number of available empty parking areas and uploads them in a website. This basically works on the principle of Internet of Things here the sensors are connected to internet.

  6. Interview with Steve Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Jennifer Hitchcock interviews community activist and director of Syracuse University's Composition and Cultural Rhetoric doctoral program, Steve Parks. They discuss Parks's working-class background, career path, influences, and activism. Parks also considers the direction of the field of composition and rhetoric and expresses optimism for the…

  7. Warm Season Storms, Floods, and Tributary Sand Inputs below Glen Canyon Dam: Investigating Salience to Adaptive Management in the Context of a 10-Year Long Controlled Flooding Experiment in Grand Canyon National Park, AZ, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S.; Melis, T. S.; Topping, D. J.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Eischeid, J.

    2013-12-01

    The planning and decision processes in the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP) strive to balance numerous, often competing, objectives, such as, water supply, hydropower generation, low flow maintenance, maximizing conservation of downstream tributary sand supply, endangered native fish, and other sociocultural resources of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. In this context, use of monitored and predictive information on the warm season floods (at point-to-regional scales) has been identified as lead-information for a new 10-year long controlled flooding experiment (termed the High-Flow Experiment Protocol) intended to determine management options for rebuilding and maintaining sandbars in Grand Canyon; an adaptive strategy that can potentially facilitate improved planning and dam operations. In this work, we focus on a key concern identified by the GCDAMP, related to the timing and volume of tributary sand input from the Paria and Little Colorado Rivers (located 26 and 124 km below the dam, respectively) into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Episodic and intraseasonal variations (with links to equatorial and sub-tropical Pacific sea surface temperature variability) in the southwest hydroclimatology are investigated to understand the magnitude, timing and spatial scales of warm season floods from this relatively small, but prolific sand producing drainage of the semi-arid Colorado Plateau. The coupled variations of the flood-driven sediment input (magnitude and timing) from these two drainages into the Colorado River are also investigated. The physical processes, including diagnosis of storms and moisture sources, are mapped alongside the planning and decision processes for the ongoing experimental flood releases from the Glen Canyon Dam which are aimed at achieving restoration and maintenance of sandbars and instream ecology. The GCDAMP represents one of the most visible and widely recognized

  8. Effects of backpacker use, pack stock trail use, and pack stock grazing on water-quality indicators, including nutrients, E. coli, hormones, and pharmaceuticals, in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Harrison; Clow, David W.; Roche, James W.; Heyvaert, Alan C.; Battaglin, William A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated how visitor-use affects water quality in wilderness in Yosemite National Park. During the summers of 2012–2014, we collected and analyzed surface-water samples for water-quality indicators, including fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon), suspended sediment concentration, pharmaceuticals, and hormones. Samples were collected upstream and downstream from different types of visitor use at weekly to biweekly intervals and during summer storms. We conducted a park-wide synoptic sampling campaign during summer 2014, and sampled upstream and downstream from meadows to evaluate the mitigating effect of meadows on water quality. At pack stock stream crossings, Escherichia coli concentrations were greater downstream from crossings than upstream (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of three colony forming units 100 mL−1), with the greatest increases occurring during storms (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of 32 CFU 100 mL−1). At backpacker use sites, hormones, and pharmaceuticals (e.g., insect repellent) were detected at downstream sites, and Escherichia coli concentrations were greater at downstream sites (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of 1 CFU 100 mL−1). Differences in water quality downstream vs. upstream from meadows grazed by pack stock were not detectable for most water-quality indicators, however, Escherichia coli concentrations decreased downstream, suggesting entrapment and die-off of fecal indicator bacteria in meadows. Our results indicate that under current-use levels pack stock trail use and backpacker use are associated with detectable, but relatively minor, effects on water quality, which are most pronounced during storms.

  9. Effects of Backpacker Use, Pack Stock Trail Use, and Pack Stock Grazing on Water-Quality Indicators, Including Nutrients, E. coli, Hormones, and Pharmaceuticals, in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Harrison; Clow, David; Roche, James; Heyvaert, Alan; Battaglin, William

    2017-09-01

    We investigated how visitor-use affects water quality in wilderness in Yosemite National Park. During the summers of 2012-2014, we collected and analyzed surface-water samples for water-quality indicators, including fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon), suspended sediment concentration, pharmaceuticals, and hormones. Samples were collected upstream and downstream from different types of visitor use at weekly to biweekly intervals and during summer storms. We conducted a park-wide synoptic sampling campaign during summer 2014, and sampled upstream and downstream from meadows to evaluate the mitigating effect of meadows on water quality. At pack stock stream crossings, Escherichia coli concentrations were greater downstream from crossings than upstream (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of three colony forming units 100 mL-1), with the greatest increases occurring during storms (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of 32 CFU 100 mL-1). At backpacker use sites, hormones, and pharmaceuticals (e.g., insect repellent) were detected at downstream sites, and Escherichia coli concentrations were greater at downstream sites (median downstream increase in Escherichia coli of 1 CFU 100 mL-1). Differences in water quality downstream vs. upstream from meadows grazed by pack stock were not detectable for most water-quality indicators, however, Escherichia coli concentrations decreased downstream, suggesting entrapment and die-off of fecal indicator bacteria in meadows. Our results indicate that under current-use levels pack stock trail use and backpacker use are associated with detectable, but relatively minor, effects on water quality, which are most pronounced during storms.

  10. Exploration of Science Parks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Huibing; Sun Nengli

    2005-01-01

    Science parks have developed gready in the world, whereas empirical researches have showed that science parks based on linear model cannot guarantee the creation of innovation. Hi-tech innovation is derived from flow and management of information. The commercial and social interactions between in-parks and off-park firms and research institutions act as the key determinant for innovation.Industrial clustering is the rational choice for further developing Chinese science parks and solving some problems such as the lack of dear major industries and strong innovation sense, etc.

  11. Parking Navigation for Alleviating Congestion in Multilevel Parking Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Kenmotsu, Masahiro; Sun, Weihua; Shibata, Naoki; Yasumoto, Keiichi; Ito, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Finding a vacant parking space in a large crowded parking facility takes long time. In this paper, we propose a navigation method that minimizes the parking time based on collected real-time positional information of cars. In the proposed method, a central server in the parking facility collects the information and estimates the occupancy of each parking zone. Then, the server broadcasts the occupancy data to the cars in the parking facility. Each car then computes a parking route with the sh...

  12. Biscayne National Park study on reef fish community changes over time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reef fish assemblage structure was assessed in 20062007 (recent period) in Biscayne National Park, Florida, USA , and compared with data collected from 1977 to 1981...

  13. 78 FR 30333 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (Usa), Llc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ...; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (Usa), Llc. By Notice dated November 19, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 27, 2012, 77 FR 70825, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road... 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Siegfried (USA), LLC., to manufacture the...

  14. 77 FR 30027 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...; Notice of Registration; Siegfried (USA) By Notice dated January 6, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2012, 77 FR 2323, Siegfried (USA), 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey... U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Siegfried (USA), to manufacture the listed...

  15. 78 FR 64020 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...; Notice of Registration; Siegfried USA, LLC By Notice dated May 22, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on May 30, 2013, 78 FR 32458, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey... determined that the registration of Siegfried USA, LLC., to manufacture the listed basic class of controlled...

  16. 78 FR 64020 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ..., Notice of Registration, Siegfried USA, LLC The Notice dated July 23, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on August 1, 2013, 78 FR 46613, page 18338, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road...), and Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670). On August 6, 2013, Siegfried (USA), LLC., subsequently withdrew...

  17. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape Fear...

  18. Pulsars at Parkes

    OpenAIRE

    Manchester, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    The first pulsar observations were made at Parkes on March 8, 1968, just 13 days after the publication of the discovery paper by Hewish and Bell. Since then, Parkes has become the world's most successful pulsar search machine, discovering nearly two thirds of the known pulsars, among them many highly significant objects. It has also led the world in pulsar polarisation and timing studies. In this talk I will review the highlights of pulsar work at Parkes from those 1968 observations to about ...

  19. The stakes of the park management in the lasting quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caseau, P.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to surround the stakes of the management in the lasting quality and not to give a table of problems. The actual situation shows two characteristics; the profit margins in the nuclear industry are very small, the economic growth is small too. The advantage of the operating park on any other kind electric source is extremely strong. So it is important to keep the actual park even if operating and maintenance costs increase. If a forty years life time allows to go until 2020 and fifty years until 2030 it is possible to consider that the comparison 'installed park cost/any other production mean cost' leads to keep the actual park until 2015-2025. The first reason is an economic reason. The second reason is connected to what will happen after, that is to say the replacement conditions.To be able to define in the best conditions a new park, devoted to last 60 years or more, that is the second reason to manage the actual park in the lasting quality. (N.C)

  20. iPark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Bin; Fantini, Ernesto Nicolas; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    where the geo-spatial aspect is not just a tag on other content, but is the primary content, e.g., a city street map with up-to-date road construction data. Along these lines, the iPark system aims to turn volumes of GPS data obtained from vehicles into information about the locations of parking spaces...

  1. THE SCHOOL PARK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FISCHER, JOHN H.

    TO ASSIST IN DESEGREGATION, VARIOUS MODELS FOR THE SCHOOL PARK ARE PROPOSED--(1) ASSEMBLING ALL STUDENTS AND SCHOOLS OF A SMALL OR MEDIUM-SIZED COMMUNITY ON A SINGLE CAMPUS, (2) SERVING ONE SECTION OF A LARGE CITY, (3) CENTERING ALL SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR A SINGLE LEVEL OF EDUCATION ON A SINGLE SITE, AND (4) ESTABLISHING RINGS OF SCHOOL PARKS ABOUT…

  2. Parking Space Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg Peter Jensen, Troels; Thomsen Schmidt, Helge; Dyremose Bodin, Niels

    2018-01-01

    system, based on a Convolutional Neural Network, that is capable of determining if a parking space is occupied or not. A benchmark database consisting of images captured from different parking areas, under different weather and illumination conditions, has been used to train and test the system...

  3. Bicycle Parking and Locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    . This article contributes with new insights into parking and locking - ‘moorings’ - to cycling literature. It presents an ethnography of ‘design moorings’ and practices associated with parking and locking bikes. The main case study is the very pro-cycling city of Copenhagen. Yet to explore what is unique about...

  4. Department of Energy - Oak Ridge Operations and URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC. Partnering Framework for the Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 12348

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Allen L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The cleanup and re-industrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) hinges on a collaborative working relationship between the cleanup contractor and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)-Oak Ridge Office (ORO). A Partnering Framework document was signed on June 30, 2011, with an ultimate goal of completing the contract scope of work ahead of schedule and under budget. This partnering process was the first time that DOE and its contractor, jointly developed and signed such an agreement before the contractor assumed management responsibilities of the Site. A strong desire of both parties to utilize a partnering approach in the performance of their respective responsibilities is evident. The Partnering Framework was modeled after a partnering process employed by the California Department of Transportation, Division of Construction. This partnering process has been used successfully by the California Department of Transportation and its major contractors for many years with great success. The partnering process used at ETTP was a phased approach. First, a Partnering Framework document was developed and signed June 30, 2011, by the Partnering Sponsors, the two leaders of the ETTP cleanup and re-industrialization project, the DOE-ORO Assistant Manager for Environmental Management and the contractor's President and Program Manager. In this way the partnering process could begin when the contactor assumed ETTP Site management responsibilities on August 1, 2011. The Partnering Framework then set the stage for the second phase of the partnering process which would be development of the Partnering Agreement and the kick-off of the first of a number of facilitated Partnering Workshops. Key elements of the Partnering Framework document include: (1) a statement of commitment which affirms the desire of both parties to work collaboratively toward the cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site; (2) a vision which describes both parties ultimate goal

  5. Department of Energy - Oak Ridge Operations and URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC. Partnering Framework for the Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 12348

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    The cleanup and re-industrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) hinges on a collaborative working relationship between the cleanup contractor and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)-Oak Ridge Office (ORO). A Partnering Framework document was signed on June 30, 2011, with an ultimate goal of completing the contract scope of work ahead of schedule and under budget. This partnering process was the first time that DOE and its contractor, jointly developed and signed such an agreement before the contractor assumed management responsibilities of the Site. A strong desire of both parties to utilize a partnering approach in the performance of their respective responsibilities is evident. The Partnering Framework was modeled after a partnering process employed by the California Department of Transportation, Division of Construction. This partnering process has been used successfully by the California Department of Transportation and its major contractors for many years with great success. The partnering process used at ETTP was a phased approach. First, a Partnering Framework document was developed and signed June 30, 2011, by the Partnering Sponsors, the two leaders of the ETTP cleanup and re-industrialization project, the DOE-ORO Assistant Manager for Environmental Management and the contractor's President and Program Manager. In this way the partnering process could begin when the contactor assumed ETTP Site management responsibilities on August 1, 2011. The Partnering Framework then set the stage for the second phase of the partnering process which would be development of the Partnering Agreement and the kick-off of the first of a number of facilitated Partnering Workshops. Key elements of the Partnering Framework document include: (1) a statement of commitment which affirms the desire of both parties to work collaboratively toward the cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site; (2) a vision which describes both parties ultimate goal of safe

  6. Parks and their users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Goličnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with urban parks and their use(rs. It focuses on usage-spatial relationships from two different angles. Firstly, it discusses the actual uses mapped in places, using repeated observation on different days, times and weather conditions. Secondly, it addresses designers’ views and beliefs about usage and design of urban parks. However, the paper shows that designers’ beliefs and awareness about uses in places, in some aspects, differ from actual use. It stresses the use of empirical knowledge about usage-spatial relationships, which can be gained by using observation and behavioural mapping, in decision-making processes for parks design.

  7. Versailles' park taasavatud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Osa Pariisi lähedase Versailles' lossi pargist avati jaanuari alguses uuesti publikule. 17.-18. sajandi prantsuse stiilis park suleti avalikkusele detsembris 1999 pärast parki laastanud hiigeltormi, mis murdis ligemale 10000 puud.

  8. New Mexico Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of parks in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data from a...

  9. New Mexico State Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the generalized physical boundaries of New Mexico State Parks, in polygonal form with limited attributes, compiled using...

  10. Allegheny County Parks Outlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the size and shape of the nine Allegheny County parks. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  11. State Park Statutory Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Legislative statutory boundaries for sixty six state parks, six state recreation areas, and eight state waysides. These data are derived principally from DNR's...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Demo (Parent)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  13. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Milutinović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of science and technology parks is necessarily accompanied by the establishment of a base of professional staff as the foundation of the park and the base of the potential management that will manage the park and the professional staff. Science and Technology Park is a broader term used to describe a variety of attempts directed at enhancing the entrepreneurship development by means of establishing knowledge – based, small and medium-sized enterprises. The enterprise at the top of the technology pyramid receives support in the form of capital, administration, space and access to new information technologies. The overall objective of the development of industrial enterprises in the technology park is the introduction of economically profitable production with the efficient usage of nonrenewable resources and the application of the highest environmental standards. Achieving the primary developmental objective of the Technology Park includes: creating a favorable business atmosphere in the local community, attractive to both foreign and domestic investors – providing support to the establishment of small and medium-sized enterprises using different models of joint ventures and direct foreign investment.

  14. The ALARA project of the EDF nuclear park exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potoczek, J.

    1998-01-01

    To bring the exploitation of the nuclear park of EDF at the level of the best exploiters in the world in matter of collective and individual dosimetry, the ALARA principle coordinates numerous actions: to associate the temporary societies, to define common language, methods and tools for the whole park to organize a level effect in this area, to optimize the maintenance that is expansive in radiation doses, to make the different levels of management responsible on dosimetric stakes, to reduce the singular sources of exposure, to assure the organisation and exploitation of the experience back in this field and adapt consequently the system of information. The results are cheerful and the objectives for 2000 are: less than 1.2 h.Sv by year and by reactor, no intervener whom annual radiation dose is upper than 20 mSv (out of exceptional case). (N.C.)

  15. Geology of National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This is a set of two sheets of 3D images showing geologic features of many National Parks. Red-and-cyan viewing glasses are need to see the three-dimensional effect. A search on the World Wide Web will yield many sites about anaglyphs and where to get 3D glasses. Red-blue glasses will do but red-cyan glasses are a little better. This publication features a photo quiz game: Name that park! where you can explore, interpret, and identify selected park landscapes. Can you identify landscape features in the images? Can you explain processes that may have helped form the landscape features? You can get the answers online.

  16. 78 FR 46613 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 10, 2013, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road...

  17. 78 FR 5500 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA) Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 19, 2012, Siegfried (USA), 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville...

  18. 77 FR 70825 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on November 5, 2012, Siegfried (USA) LLC, 33 Industrial Park Road...

  19. 78 FR 49546 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC This is notice that on June 10, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration...

  20. 78 FR 32458 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on April 18, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road...

  1. "South Park" vormistab roppused muusikalivormi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker, Matt Stone ja Pam Brady : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  2. Allegheny County Park Rangers Outreach

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Launched in June 2015, the Allegheny County Park Rangers program reached over 48,000 people in its first year. Park Rangers interact with residents of all ages and...

  3. fantsika National Park

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Station, a dry deciduous forest within Ankarafantsika National. Park. We set Sherman ... dry deciduous forests compared to research in the eastern rainforests (Goodman et al. .... the ground, this rat was observed on both the ground and trees. We tentatively .... Conservation International, Washington DC. Carleton, M. D. ...

  4. fantsika National Park

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We often observed domestic mammals such as cattle, cats and dogs in the forest at Ampijoroa. Although the primary forest in Ampijoroa is managed by Madagascar National Parks, local people leave these domestic animals in the forest. Introduced animals may be a threat to endemic animals. Cattle can be transmitters of ...

  5. Lucas Heights technology park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The proposed Lucas Heights Technology Park will pound together the applied research programs of Government, tertiary and industry sectors, aiming to foster technology transfer particularly to the high-technology manufacturing industry. A description of the site is given along with an outline of the envisaged development, existing facilities and expertise. ills

  6. ECO-INDUSTRIAL PARK - A TOOL FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUGNAR NICOLETA GEORGETA

    2013-07-01

    relations between the firms are success factors within Eco-industrial networks. The successful cases – especially those in the USA or the Northern countries – have proved that Eco parks engage a multitude of entities, from regional/local authorities to non-governmental organizations; in these entities’ action the objectives and actions of the firms; management overlap with those of the community management

  7. Access to parks and physical activity: an eight country comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Cerin, Ester; Adams, Marc A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several systematic reviews have reported mixed associations between access to parks and physical activity, and suggest that this is due to inconsistencies in the study methods or differences across countries. An international study using consistent methods is needed to investigate...... the association between access to parks and physical activity. The International Physical Activity and Environment Network (IPEN) Adult Study is a multi-country cross-sectional study using a common design and consistent methods Accelerometer, survey and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data for 6......,181 participants from 12 cities in 8 countries (Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Denmark, Mexico, New Zealand, UK, USA) were used to estimate the strength and shape of associations of 11 measures of park access (1 perceived and 10 GIS-based measures) with accelerometer-based moderate-to-vigorous physical activity...

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15830145 >gi|15830145|ref|NP_308918.1| putative transmembrane subunit...IFVPIGALQAGEALWHWSVIPLGLAVAILSTALPYSLEMIALTRLPTRTFGTLMSMEPALAAVSGMIFLGETLTPIQLLALGAIIAASMGSTLTVRKESKIKELDIN

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23464690 >gi|23464690|ref|NP_695293.1| hypothetical transmembrane pro...LVQLCAMGFIIGYVIRSNNVWMVFSLMAVMLVAAVQIVMSRARGIPKGLAGPIFLSLVITMLLMLALVTELIVRPHPWYAPQLVVPLTGMLLGNTVSALAVGLSRFYESME

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32471017 >gi|32471017|ref|NP_864010.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...HALISRLRIWGRETLTEMPSWLVSMVVHLTLLLVLALIGRSTSKVGQIELLFRQSSESSSMELAEFTIAAAAPLESFERSMEEERIATTQLVSIDVIDAEAEMFSLVP

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_002942 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002942 gi|52840424 >gi|52840424|ref|YP_094223.1| probable transmembrane protein...EYKRAQKQTFVMFFKGSLKGLVTTAPVTYRGVKIGEVKVIEITENKEHSKVLIPVYVQFFVERTYGFSQDPIHLLIDNGYVANITKPNLLTGVAEIELIKPTPAVKYKQTYYHSYPVFPTHNSAEKYTSME

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32476407 >gi|32476407|ref|NP_869401.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...IYPDDRPGWIDQPIVNDGKDYSLVVTAGPSGSMEEADELIGVYARGAVQSYVDELVSEQEWATEPEMIPLDIDWIRDELVVRRYEGVVQVGDEQQFEKAILIRIEPEDKKVFETAIADMKLKERLAATGIVILGGFSLLVGGSIVLGGLASRQKQPTAAA

  13. Are TODs Over-Parked?

    OpenAIRE

    Cervero, Robert; Adkins, Arlie; Sullivan, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the proposition that TOD, and specifically housing near suburban rail stops, is “over-parked†in the U.S. This is done by comparing parking generation rates for 31 housing complexes near rail stops in the San Francisco Bay Area and Portland, Oregon with on-site parking supplies and with ITE parking generation rates. Factors that explain parking demand for transit-oriented housing are also investigated, both statistically and through case analyses. The re...

  14. 78 FR 24071 - Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary... Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC in support of the Fireworks display for the Potato Festival. This... Guard is establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC...

  15. 78 FR 72009 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ...-0440; Airspace Docket No. 13-ASO-10] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC AGENCY: Federal... at Star, NC, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Star, NC (78 FR 54413...

  16. Modelling parking behaviour considering heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Martin, G.A.; Ibeas Portilla, A.; Alonso Oreña, B.; Olio, L. del

    2016-07-01

    Most of motorized trips in cities of middle and small size are made in public transport and mainly in private vehicle, this has caused a saturation in parking systems of the cities, causing important problems to society, one of the most important problems is high occupancy of public space by parking systems. Thus, is required the estimation of models that reproduce users’ behaviour when they are choosing for parking in cities, to carry out transport policies to improve transport efficiency and parking systems in the cities. The aim of this paper is the specification and estimation of models that simulate users’ behaviour when they are choosing among alternatives of parking that there are in the city: free on street parking, paid on street parking, paid on underground parking and Park and Ride (now there isn´t). For this purpose, is proposed a multinomial logit model that consider systematic and random variations in tastes. Data of users’ behaviour from the different alternatives of parking have been obtained with a stated preference surveys campaign which have been done in May 2015 in the principal parking zones of the city of Santander. In this paper, we provide a number of improvements to previously developed methodologies because of we consider much more realism to create the scenarios stated preference survey, obtaining better adjustments. (Author)

  17. Mount Rainier National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert; Woodward, Andrea; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Griffin, Paul C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hagar, Joan; Cummings, Tonnie; Duriscoe, Dan; Kopper, Karen; Riedel, Jon; Samora, Barbara; Marin, Lelaina; Mauger, Guillaume S.; Bumbaco, Karen; Littell, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural Resource Condition Assessments (NRCAs) evaluate current conditions for a subset of natural resources and resource indicators in national parks. NRCAs also report on trends in resource condition (when possible), identify critical data gaps, and characterize a general level of confidence for study findings. The resources and indicators emphasized in a given project depend on the park’s resource setting, status of resource stewardship planning and science in identifying high-priority indicators, and availability of data and expertise to assess current conditions for a variety of potential study resources and indicators. Although the primary objective of NRCAs is to report on current conditions relative to logical forms of reference conditions and values, NRCAs also report on trends, when appropriate (i.e., when the underlying data and methods support such reporting), as well as influences on resource conditions. These influences may include past activities or conditions that provide a helpful context for understanding current conditions and present-day threats and stressors that are best interpreted at park, watershed, or landscape scales (though NRCAs do not report on condition status for land areas and natural resources beyond park boundaries). Intensive cause-andeffect analyses of threats and stressors, and development of detailed treatment options, are outside the scope of NRCAs. It is also important to note that NRCAs do not address resources that lack sufficient data for assessment. For Mount Rainier National Park, this includes most invertebrate species and many other animal species that are subject to significant stressors from climate change and other anthropogenic sources such as air pollutants and recreational use. In addition, we did not include an analysis of the physical hydrology associated with streams (such as riverine landforms, erosion and aggradation which is significant in MORA streams), due to a loss of staff expertise from the USGS

  18. Serological survey for diseases in free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gese, E M; Schultz, R D; Johnson, M R; Williams, E S; Crabtree, R L; Ruff, R L

    1997-01-01

    From October 1989 to June 1993, we captured and sampled 110 coyotes (Canis latrans) for various diseases in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). Prevalence of antibodies against canine parvovirus (CPV) was 100% for adults (> 24 months old), 100% for yearlings (12 to 24 months old), and 100% for old pups (4 to 12 months old); 0% of the young pups (Yellowstone National Park, with CPV influencing coyote pup survival during the first 3 months of life; eight of 21 transmitted pups died of CPV infection in 1992. The potential impact of these canine pathogens on wolves (C. lupus) reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park remains to be documented.

  19. Are bison exotic in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, James M.; Miquelle, Dale G.; Wright, R. Gerald

    1987-03-01

    The effect of past distributions of animal populations now extinct in an area from unknown causes is considered relative to their status as exotic or native in national parks. The example is the bison (Bison bison) on the Copper and Chitina river drainages in Alaska in the USA which was introduced prior to establishment of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The fossil record suggests that bison were present as recently as 500 years ago in Alaska. The policy of the US National Park Service to maintain natural ecosystems and restrict or eliminate exotic species raises the issue of whether this species should be treated as exotic or native.

  20. Virtual NC machine model with integrated knowledge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, Sofija; Dukovski, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The concept of virtual NC machining was established for providing a virtual product that could be compared with an appropriate designed product, in order to make NC program correctness evaluation, without real experiments. This concept is applied in the intelligent CAD/CAM system named VIRTUAL MANUFACTURE. This paper presents the first intelligent module that enables creation of the virtual models of existed NC machines and virtual creation of new ones, applying modular composition. Creation of a virtual NC machine is carried out via automatic knowledge data saving (features of the created NC machine). (Author)

  1. NC10 bacteria in marine oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padilla, Cory C; Bristow, Laura A; Sarode, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the NC10 phylum link anaerobic methane oxidation to nitrite denitrification through a unique O2-producing intra-aerobic methanotrophy pathway. A niche for NC10 in the pelagic ocean has not been confirmed. We show that NC10 bacteria are present and transcriptionally active in oceanic....... rRNA and mRNA transcripts assignable to NC10 peaked within the OMZ and included genes of the putative nitrite-dependent intra-aerobic pathway, with high representation of transcripts containing the unique motif structure of the nitric oxide (NO) reductase of NC10 bacteria, hypothesized...

  2. Le Corbusier 24NC Un fragmento habitado de la Ville Radieuse = Le Corbusier 24NC An inhabited fragment of the Ville Radieuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Alonso Pereira

    2014-11-01

    the word used to define the ideal city: a modern urbs imagined within a large park. This paper tries to analyse this maison radieuse: the place and the space where Le Corbusier lived in and his ways of living in along the time, from 1934 to his death in 1965. To study the double aspect of habitat and living. To analyse the place and the space where Le Corbusier lived, at his projects and his metaphors: the maison radieuse, the urbs in ortu, the crystal house, the labour archipielago, with its different islands of paints and books, of papers and memories...  Because 24NC suppose the transit from project to life: from planning Ville Radieuse, to living in.

  3. Mathematical model of parking space unit for triangular parking area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahrini, Intan; Sundari, Teti; Iskandar, Taufiq; Halfiani, Vera; Munzir, Said; Ramli, Marwan

    2018-01-01

    Parking space unit (PSU) is an effective measure for the area size of a vehicle, including the free space and the width of the door opening of the vehicle (car). This article discusses a mathematical model for parking space of vehicles in triangular shape area. An optimization model for triangular parking lot is developed. Integer Linear Programming (ILP) method is used to determine the maximum number of the PSU. The triangular parking lot is in isosceles and equilateral triangles shape and implements four possible rows and five possible angles for each field. The vehicles which are considered are cars and motorcycles. The results show that the isosceles triangular parking area has 218 units of optimal PSU, which are 84 units of PSU for cars and 134 units of PSU for motorcycles. Equilateral triangular parking area has 688 units of optimal PSU, which are 175 units of PSU for cars and 513 units of PSU for motorcycles.

  4. Dose in a recreational water park with thermal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses the annual effective dose received by the public due to baths in thermal water of a recreational water park in Royat (France) with significant levels of natural radionuclides. After the context be specified and the measurements of radioactivity presented, an assessment of radiological consequences is performed, based on an hypothetical scenario for persons of the public. Context The french commune of Royat in the Massif Central (centre of France) intends to build a recreational water park, using thermal water from a local source, out of the public water supply network. With this aim in view, the operator builds up a technical file to get a prefectorial authorization. Considering that many waters and thermal waters in this area have significant levels of natural radionuclides (granitic subsoil) on the one hand, and that the operator of establishments receiving public is requested by L 1333-10 article of the Public Health Code to supervise the exposure if an impact on health is possible on the other hand, the operator asked I.R.S.N. to measure the level of radioactivity in the water. Considering the level of radioactivity measured, the competent authority then asks I.R.S.N. if this level is compatible with its use in a recreational water park. After calculations it appears that in the particular case of the commune of Royat, the level of activity of natural radionuclides of the thermal water (22 Bq.L -1 for 222 Rn) is compatible with its use in a recreational water park, the annual effective dose being about 40 μSv with a conservative approach. For other thermal waters in France winch could have much higher levels of natural radioactivity, it is recommended to pay attention to their use in recreational water park. (N.C.)

  5. A Survey of Intelligent Car Parking System

    OpenAIRE

    Faheem; S.A. Mahmud; G.M. Khan; M. Rahman; H. Zafar

    2013-01-01

    The industrialization of the world, increase in population, slow paced city development and mismanagement of the available parking space has resulted in parking related problems. There is a dire need for a secure, intelligent, efficient and reliable system which can be used for searching the unoccupied parking facility, guidance towards the parking facility, negotiation of the parking fee, along with the proper management of the parking facility. Intelligent Parking Service is a part of Intel...

  6. parkITsmart: minimization of cruising for parking

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiaras, Christos; Hobi, Livio; Hofstetter, Fabian; Liniger, Samuel; Stiller, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Finding a parking space in urban areas is a daily challenge for drivers across the world, due to the increasing amount of vehicles and the limited amount of parking spaces. Drivers who are looking for a parking space in peak hours are often forced to drive around city blocks until they spot a free parking space. This process is termed in literature “cruising for parking” and is proven to (a) cost a lot of time and gas for drivers, (b) generate unnecessary traffic load, and (c) affect the envi...

  7. The today nuclear park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Ph.; Marignac, Y.; Tassart, J.

    2000-03-01

    This economic analysis of the nuclear industry, takes stock on the french nuclear park, the nuclear materials flux, the operating and in construction from 1970 to 1998 reactors, the storage and the wastes reprocessing. The second part proposes many scenario in function of the reactors lifetime and the industrial policy of fuel reprocessing. This analysis shows the interest of extending the power plants lifetime and evaluates the consequences of a reprocessing-recycling policy facing the stop of such a policy in 2010. (A.L.B.)

  8. Automated Car Park Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  9. Orlice Nature Park - environmental themes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, L.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this abstract is to outline the main characteristics of Orlice Nature Park and of the procedure of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and to evaluate public interest in the nature park and in nature protection in general. Orlice Nature Park was instituted in 1996. The function of the park is to protect the character of the area of landscape around the River Orlice. Orlice Natural Park covers an area of 115 sq. km. The main environmental risks to the park are: intensive agriculture, forest mono-culture, industry, transport, channel improvement, the building of holiday cottages, sport, and recreation. Among the conflicts of interest in the park are: nature protection, water management, building constrictions, business, fishery, water sports and recreation. During the process of Environmental Impact Assessment in Hradec Kralove, the public voiced its opinion against the building of a supermarket within the grounds of of the nature park. In this case the public showed its interest in the value of nature and landscape, the value of human health and the value of plant species. In general, the public and the local media show an interest in the park only in exceptional circumstances. (author)

  10. Parking Spoorzone Delft : Addressing expected parking challenges 2015-2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccot, C.; Groenendijk, L.; Rot, M.; Van der Meijs, P.; Rakers, T.; Negenborn, R.R.; Annema, J.A.; Pel, A.; Vleugel, J.

    2014-01-01

    This project is carried out on request of the BVOW, the interest group of the neighbourhoods Olofsbuurt and Westerkwartier in Delft, in order to propose solutions for the parking issue of Spoorzone Delft expected between 2015 and 2017. They are worried that parking disturbances will emerge in their

  11. Aulacoseira coroniformis sp. nov., a new diatom (Bacillariophyta) species from Highland Hammock State Park, Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, H.; Pearce, C.; Wagner-Cremer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aulacoseira coroniformis sp. nov. is described from a short peat core recovered in Highlands Hammock State Park, Florida, U.S.A. The morphology of the new diatom species is documented by light and scanning electron micrographs and discussed in detail, including a comparison with related species in

  12. Parking taxes : evaluating options and impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litman, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to encouraging the use of alternative modes of transport, parking taxes can help to reduce congestion, air pollution, and urban sprawl. Various types of parking taxes were evaluated in this paper, as well as their impacts on parking supply, prices and travel patterns. Examples of various parking tax programs in major cities in Canada, Europe, the United States and Australia were presented. Parking tax programs were divided into 2 main categories: (1) per-space parking levies which distribute cost burdens and encourage property owners to manage parking supply more efficiently and (2) commercial parking taxes on parking rental transactions which discourage the pricing of parking and concentrate impacts in limited areas. Worksite parking levies were discussed, as well stormwater fees and employee parking as a taxable benefit. Typical parking facility financial costs were reviewed and best practices for structuring and implementing parking taxes to increase public acceptability were outlined. It was suggested that the tax base should be broad and well-defined. Local governments should increase parking prices to market rates before imposing special parking taxes, and taxes and fees should be structured to avoid undesirable land use. Parking tax reforms should be part of an overall parking and mobility management program. Stakeholders should be consulted to insure that regulations, administrative procedures and enforcement policies are efficient and fair. The establishment of an evaluation program to determine tax impacts on parking supply and pricing, economic activity, traffic and spillover problems was also recommended. 42 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Evaluation of Radon Pollution in Underground Parking Lots by Discomfort Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Bu-Olayan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Recent studies of public underground parking lots showed the influence of radon concentration and the probable discomfort caused by parking cars. Materials and Methods Radon concentration was measured in semi-closed public parking lots in the six governorates of Kuwait, using Durridge RAD7radon detector (USA. Results The peak radon concentration in the parking lots of Kuwait governorates was relatively higher during winter (63.15Bq/m3 compared to summer (41.73 Bq/m3. Radon in the evaluated parking lots revealed a mean annual absorbed dose (DRn: 0.02mSv/y and annual effective dose (HE: 0.06mSv/y.  Conclusion This study validated the influence of relative humidity and temperature as the major components of discomfort index (DI. The mean annual absorbed and effective dose  of radon in the evaluated parking lots were found below the permissible limits. However, high radon DRn and HE were reported when the assessment included the parking lots, the surrounding residential apartments, and office premises. Furthermore, the time-series analysis indicated significant variations of the seasonal and site-wise distribution of radon concentrations in the indoor evaluated parking lots of the six Kuwait governorates

  14. California Community Colleges Parking Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Chuck

    In 1990, a representative sample of 25 California community colleges was contacted by telephone to determine their parking policies and practices. The colleges were sampled on the basis of location and size. Study findings included the following: (1) 17 of the colleges reported that they had insufficient numbers of on-campus parking spaces; (2)…

  15. Smart parking management and navigation system

    KAUST Repository

    Saadeldin, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided for smart parking management, which can include navigation. In one example, a system includes a base station controller configured to: receive a wireless signal from a parking controller located at a parking space

  16. Non-leptonic kaon decays at large Nc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Andrea; Hernández, Pilar; Pena, Carlos; Romero-López, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    We study the scaling with the number of colors Nc of the weak amplitudes mediating kaon mixing and decay, in the limit of light charm masses (mu = md = ms = mc). The amplitudes are extracted directly on the lattice for Nc = 3 - 7 (with preliminar results for Nc = 8 and 17) using twisted mass QCD. It is shown that the (sub-leading) 1 /Nc corrections to B\\hatk are small and that the naive Nc → ∞ limit, B\\hatk = 3/4, seems to be recovered. On the other hand, the O (1/Nc) corrections in K → ππ amplitudes (derived from K → π matrix elements) are large and fully anti-correlated in the I = 0 and I = 2 channels. This may have some implications for the understanding of the ΔI = 1/2 rule.

  17. CERN in the park

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN will be the centre of debate at a 'Café scientifique' on Monday 29 April. The aim of the Cafés scientifiques, which are organised by the association of Bancs Publics, is to kindle discussion between ordinary people and specialists in a scientific field. This Monday, Maurice Bourquin, President of the CERN Council, Hans Hoffmann, Director of Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing at CERN, Gilbert Guignard, a physicist at CERN, and Ruhal Floris, who teaches mathematical didactics at the University of Geneva, will explain the usefulness and contributions to science of the world's biggest laboratory for particle physics. What is CERN for? Monday 29 April at 18.30 Musée d'histoire des sciences, Geneva (in the park Perle du Lac) Entry free Wine and buffet after the discussion

  18. Yellowcake National Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagget, D.

    1985-01-01

    Exploration for and mining of uranium ore is going on within 10 miles of the Grand Canyon National Park. The current rush started in 1980, when a Denver-based company, Energy Fuels Nuclear, took over a claim in Hack Canyon and uncovered a very rich deposit of uranium ore. Recent explorations have resulted in some 1300 claims in the area around the Grand Canyon, many of them in the Arizona Strip, the land between the Canyon and Utah. The center of current controversy is the 1872 Mining Law. Replacement of the law with a leasing system similar to that used for leasable minerals such as coal, oil shale, oil and gas, potash, and phosphate is advocated. 1 figure

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_003909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003909 gi|42782207 >gi|42782207|ref|NP_979454.1| BclA protein [Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987] MANRLNFTGP...LGCCGISGKTGPTGPTGPTGVTGSTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGP...TGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGSTGP

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523756 >gi|42523756|ref|NP_969136.1| membrane protein necessary for nodulation/competitivene...ss [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] MKSLMLILFVSLLSVVAKADCTTAITINEAISASTSDYLERAEKR

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_003078 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etitiveness [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MQLSACARRREAVRYRRRMARILILLFSLLSAFAFPVTPVP... NC_003078 gi|16264863 >gi|16264863|ref|NP_437655.1| probable membrane protein necessary for nodulation comp

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13471138 >gi|13471138|ref|NP_102707.1| transcriptional regulatory protein, nodulation competit...iveness determinant [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] MTNESDTRSAELAELTADIVSAYVSNNPLPV

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39933242 >gi|39933242|ref|NP_945518.1| possible nicotinate-nucleotide adn...WWLVSPGNPLKDISSLREIDARVAAAQAIADDPRIQVSRLEAVIGTRYTADTLRYLRRHCPGARFVWIMGADNLAQFHRWQQWQQIAAEIPIAVIDRPPTSFRALAAPAAQRLMRMRIPNNKAATLADREPPAWVYLTGLKSLVSSTALRNPDGSWKT

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15964332 >gi|15964332|ref|NP_384685.1| PROBABLE PYRAZINAMIDASE/NICOTINAMIDAS...E (INCLUDES: PYRAZINAMIDASE, NICOTINAMIDASE) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MADAARPDLREAMADEAL

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental [Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP 32953] MTKTDYLMRLRKCTTIDTLERVIEKNKYELSDDELELFYSAADHRLAELTMNKLYDKIPPTVWQHVK ... NC_006155 gi|51595328 >gi|51595328|ref|YP_069519.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_003279 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003279 gi|17507795 >gi|17507795|ref|NP_493043.1| putative protein, with at least 2 transme...YLNIQIADETTDLPVSIDRANVDMRIYRAFEMSMEKDIISLSTSNTSHAEISTPKSRKKKSRKLGLKNLEEVINSKYNSCQKQDNSMSIQ

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32475512 >gi|32475512|ref|NP_868506.1| hypothetical protein-signal peptide and transme...VLVGLLLPAVQAAREAARRMSCSNNIAQLTLATHNYEFSMEHLPPGTTNPTGPIVNTPNGEHISFLVRLLPYIEQQGTADDFDLTASVYAPANAKVRAYQISAFLCPS

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18407972 >gi|18407972|ref|NP_564823.1| no apical meristem (NAM) famil...y protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] MQAEEIICRVSDEEIIENYLRPKINGETSSIPRYVVELAEELYTVEPWLLPRQTAPILNPGEWFYFGKRNRKYSN

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17533935 >gi|17533935|ref|NP_496777.1| ZYXin (zyx-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MNQIFHVDC...FAPRCALCSKPIVPQDGEKESVRVVAMDKSFHVDCYKCEDCGMQLSSKLEGQGCYPIDNHLLCKTCNGNRLRVVSST

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358092 >gi|13358092|ref|NP_078366.1| cytosine-specific methyltransferase [Ureap...RILFDLQKLNQLPQFLLLENVNNMLSKQHKLDYDMWTKSLKQLGYSTCTFQLNALDYGSAQRRKRVYAISILNYDGLIDSNGNILDLEAPIFDGKQKQLKDVLKTNYK

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358063 >gi|13358063|ref|NP_078337.1| hypothetical protein UU500 [Ureap...MGNHTWDHPDIFEILTTKTNIIRPYNIINTHQYHLVGSGSRVFYCNKKMIRVTNLLGNSIDMKGLQTNPFESLDKIIAFNEAPIHIVDFHAETTSEKNALFLDFKSKL

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358146 >gi|13358146|ref|NP_078420.1| transcription antitermination factor [Ureap...lasma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MAYKIKDLDSKLLSDLKIDFNHRHQWYIVTVVSGNEQKVIENIKDKLNGYGYGDKLSDLKIIKEKIKEVKIYEPSEAP

  13. Echinococcus granulosus in gray wolves and ungulates in Idaho and Montana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreyt, William J; Drew, Mark L; Atkinson, Mark; McCauley, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the small intestines of 123 gray wolves (Canis lupus) that were collected from Idaho, USA (n=63), and Montana, USA (n=60), between 2006 and 2008 for the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The tapeworm was detected in 39 of 63 wolves (62%) in Idaho, USA, and 38 of 60 wolves (63%) in Montana, USA. The detection of thousands of tapeworms per wolf was a common finding. In Idaho, USA, hydatid cysts, the intermediate form of E. granulosus, were detected in elk (Cervus elaphus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and a mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). In Montana, USA, hydatid cysts were detected in elk. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult E. granulosus in Idaho, USA, or Montana, USA. It is unknown whether the parasite was introduced into Idaho, USA, and southwestern Montana, USA, with the importation of wolves from Alberta, Canada, or British Columbia, Canada, into Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA, and central Idaho, USA, in 1995 and 1996, or whether the parasite has always been present in other carnivore hosts, and wolves became a new definitive host. Based on our results, the parasite is now well established in wolves in these states and is documented in elk, mule deer, and a mountain goat as intermediate hosts.

  14. Two New Species of Bibloplectus Reitter (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae) from the Orlando Park Collection, Field Museum of Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brittany E; Carlton, Christopher E

    2018-04-10

    Two new species of Bibloplectus Reitter, 1881 are described from the Orlando Park Collection of Pselaphinae at the FMNH (Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA): Bibloplectus silvestris Owens and Carlton, new species (type locality, Urbana, IL, USA) and Bibloplectus wingi Owens and Carlton, new species (type locality, Shades State Park, IN, USA). Types of these new species were part of a series of specimens bearing unpublished Park manuscript names in both the pinned and slide collection at the FMNH. They bring the total number of species in the genus in eastern North America to twenty-three. Resolving these manuscript names adds to previous efforts to uncover elements of the hidden diversity of North American Bibloplectus from museum collections (Owens and Carlton 2016, Owens and Carlton 2017) and highlights the importance of close examination of the Orlando Park pselaphine collection as a valuable historic and taxonomic resource.

  15. Understanding parking habits at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2016-01-01

    The SMB department is setting up a monitoring system in certain CERN car parks in order to evaluate their occupancy rates and subsequently make them easier to use.    Vehicle registration plate readers (red triangles) are now installed at the entrances and exits of the Le Cèdres car park (in orange) and of the Building 4 and 5 one (in blue). The 2 other car parks (Building 40 in violet and “high-voltage” in green) will be equipped at a later stage. Vehicle registration plate readers are now installed at the entrances and exits of the Les Cèdres car park and of the Building 4 and 5 car park, both on the Meyrin site. The information collected by these readers will allow the occupancy levels of these car parks to be analysed throughout the day, establishing periods of peak usage and the pattern of vehicle movements. “We have been experiencing parking problems at CERN for several years n...

  16. Aftermath of Griffith Park Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In mid-May 2007, wind-driven flames raced through Griffith Park in Los Angeles, forcing hasty evacuations and threatening numerous famous landmarks and tourist spots, such as the Los Angeles Zoo and the Hollywood Sign. Ultimately, no one was injured in the fire, which may have been started by a cigarette. About 800 acres burned in the urban park, which is itself a Hollywood landmark, having been the location for several movies, including Rebel Without A Cause. This image of the park was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on June 6, 2007, about a month after the fire. ASTER detects both visible and infrared wavelengths of light, and both kinds have been used to make this image. Vegetation appears in various shades of red, while the burned areas appear charcoal. Roads and dense urban areas appear purplish-gray or white. Water is dark blue. Large burned areas are evident in the northwest and southeast parts of the park, with scattered smaller patches along the southern margin. Some botanical gardens and parts of a bird sanctuary, as well as some park structures like restrooms, were destroyed. The park's unburned, natural vegetation appears brick red, while the irrigated golf courses adjacent to the park are bright red. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  17. Analysis of Parking Reliability Guidance of Urban Parking Variable Message Sign System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenyu Mei; Ye Tian; Dongping Li

    2012-01-01

    Operators of parking guidance and information systems (PGIS) often encounter difficulty in determining when and how to provide reliable car park availability information to drivers. Reliability has become a key factor to ensure the benefits of urban PGIS. The present paper is the first to define the guiding parking reliability of urban parking variable message signs (VMSs). By analyzing the parking choice under guiding and optional parking lots, a guiding parking reliability model was constru...

  18. FrogwatchUSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    full text: Frogs and toads are perhaps the most approachable and available of all our wildlife. In many, if not most places, they are abundant. In wetter parts of the East, almost anyone outside on a warm rainy night in spring will hear their dream-like calls, bellows, trills and snores. Even in the deserts of the Southwest, a nocturnal trip after a summer monsoon will yield toads moving across the roads toward a cacophonous orgy of mating and calling in the roadside ditches and desert pools. Birds share with frogs and toads this same sense of presence in our daily lives. But the difference is that birds are like the attractive neighbor who just never gives you the time of day, while frogs are more like the troglodyte who appears regularly to chat, philosophize, and have a beer. Uninvited, frogs appear in our water gardens, toads are on our stoops in the morning, we catch them when we are kids, raise their babies in the aquarium, and feel sorry when we find we have run them over with the lawnmower. When concerns about declining populations of amphibians reached the mass media, the Secretaries' office became involved. In addition to using traditional research mechanisms to investigate the problem, the Secretary also wanted to involve the public directly. The combination of high public appeal and the relative ease with which frog calls can be learned made a large-scale monitoring program for frogs and toads possible. What emerged was a program called Frogwatch USA, modeled after a successful Canadian program with a similar name. A web site was created (www.frogwatch.org) that presented potential frogwatchers with directions and a way to register their site online as well as enter their data. Observers chose where to count frogs depending on what they felt was important. For some it was their backyard, others chose vulnerable wetlands in their neighborhoods, or spots on local refuges and parks. Initially funded at $8,000 a year and then after two years increased to

  19. Influence of Parking Price on Parking Garage Users’ Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Simićević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parking charge is a powerful tool for solving parking and traffic congestion problems. In order to achieve the expected effects without any adverse impact it is necessary to understand well the users’ responses to this policy. This paper, based on a sample of interviewed parking garage users, has developed binary logit model for identification and quantification of characteristics of users and trips, on which the acceptance of parking price is dependent. In addition, multinomial logit model has been made in order to predict what the users will opt for when faced with an increase in parking price. For the first time the parameter “shorten duration” has been introduced which has shown to be the most significant in making behaviour-related decisions. The results show that the users with the purpose work are the most sensitive to an increase in parking charge, what can be deemed positive for policy makers. However, great sensitivity of the users with the purpose shopping should cause their concern. The results of the multinomial model show that they would not discontinue coming into the area after all.

  20. 76 FR 29645 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety... Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We received no...

  1. 76 FR 18669 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  2. 76 FR 38018 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City-Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety...) entitled Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We...

  3. 76 FR 23227 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  4. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  5. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those strains in vivo. NC mice again showed comparable airway reactivity to that seen in A/J mice and a significantly greater reactivity than that seen in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the effects of airway inflammation on airway reactivity to acetylcholine in vivo, NC and BALB/c mice were sensitized to and challenged with antigen. Sensitization to and challenge with antigen induced accumulation of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, in lung and increased airway reactivity in NC and BALB/c mice. These results indicate that NC mice exhibit inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Therefore, NC mice are a suitable strain to use in investigating the mechanisms underlying airway hyperreactivity and such studies will provide beneficial information for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma.

  6. On pseudorandom generators in NC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cryan, Mary; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we consider the question of whether NC 0 circuits can generate pseudorandom distributions. While we leave the general question unanswered, we show – • Generators computed by NC 0 circuits where each output bit depends on at most 3 input bits (i.e, DNC 3 0 circuits) and with stretch ...

  7. USA toetus Eestile

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Ameerika Ühendriikide riigisekretär Condoleezza Rice kinnitas 3. mail 2007 telefonikõnes president Toomas Hendrik Ilvesele USA toetust Eestile ning tõsist muret Venemaa käitumise üle oma naaberriigi suhtes. Ilmunud ka: Meie Kodu 9. mai 2007, lk. 2, pealk.: USA riigisekretär Vabariigi Presidendile: Ühendriigid toetavad Eestit

  8. Glemmer USA Afghanistan nu?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2015-01-01

    Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016.......Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016....

  9. Multinational underground nuclear parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, C.W. [Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F650, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Giraud, K.M. [Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, 1550 Oxen Lane NE, P.O. Box 411, Burlington, KS 66839-0411 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

  10. Architectural heritage or theme park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi Solà-Morales

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing parallelism between the perception and the consumer use of theme parks and architectural heritage gives rise to a reflection about the fact that the architectural object has been turned into a museum piece, stripped  of its original value and its initial cultural substance to become images exposed to multiple gazes, thus producing what the author calis the "Theme Park effect", with consequences on protected architecture.

  11. Translating science into policy: Using ecosystem thresholds to protect resources in Rocky Mountain National Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Ellen; Johnson, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Concern over impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, has prompted the National Park Service, the State of Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Environmental Protection Agency, and interested stakeholders to collaborate in the Rocky Mountain National Park Initiative, a process to address these impacts. The development of a nitrogen critical load for park aquatic resources has provided the basis for a deposition goal to achieve resource protection, and parties to the Initiative are now discussing strategies to meet that goal by reducing air pollutant emissions that contribute to nitrogen deposition in the Park. Issues being considered include the types and locations of emissions to be reduced, the timeline for emission reductions, and the impact of emission reductions from programs already in place. These strategies may serve as templates for addressing ecosystem impacts from deposition in other national parks. - A collaborative approach between scientists and policymakers is described for addressing nitrogen deposition effects to Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

  12. Exploring en-route parking type and parking-search route choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Bekhor, Sholomo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of an on-going research investigating the joint choice of parking type, parking facility and cruising-for-parking route. The importance of this issue derives from the significant share of cruising-for-parking traffic in urban areas, the relevance of parking po...

  13. Wireless based Smart Parking System using Zigbee

    OpenAIRE

    Hamzah Asyrani Bin Sulaiman; Mohd Fareez Bin Mohd Afif; Mohd Azlishah Bin Othman; Mohamad Harris Bin Misran; Maizatul Alice Binti Meor Said

    2013-01-01

    One of main issues of developing big parking space for shopping complexes, office complexes and other types of building that requires large parking space is to notify the visitors of occupied and nonoccupied parking space. Most of the visitors might spending up to 30 to 45 minutes just to find an empty parking space. In most recent technology, some parking lot system offered a system that could automatically count when the car entering the empty car space and blocking an infrared signal thus ...

  14. NC CATCH: Advancing Public Health Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W; Eichelberger, Christopher; Bridger, Colleen; Angelon-Gaetz, Kim; Nelson, Debi

    2010-01-01

    The North Carolina Comprehensive Assessment for Tracking Community Health (NC CATCH) is a Web-based analytical system deployed to local public health units and their community partners. The system has the following characteristics: flexible, powerful online analytic processing (OLAP) interface; multiple sources of multidimensional, event-level data fully conformed to common definitions in a data warehouse structure; enabled utilization of available decision support software tools; analytic capabilities distributed and optimized locally with centralized technical infrastructure; two levels of access differentiated by the user (anonymous versus registered) and by the analytical flexibility (Community Profile versus Design Phase); and, an emphasis on user training and feedback. The ability of local public health units to engage in outcomes-based performance measurement will be influenced by continuing access to event-level data, developments in evidence-based practice for improving population health, and the application of information technology-based analytic tools and methods.

  15. Public parks as urban tourism in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiati, M. P.; Lestari, N. S.; Wiastuti, R. D.

    2018-03-01

    Sustainable urban tourism development should provide better places for people to live in and for people to visit. Jakarta as the capital city has a potential for its urban tourism. Thus, urban tourism attribute such as Public Park should be in high- quality to cope with the needs of urban people and outside visitors. The purpose of this study is to investigate Public Park attributes and to analyze its compliance refer to Public Park that eventually supports sustainable urban tourism. This paper used a qualitative approach. Primary data obtain from direct field observation in seven Public Parks in Jakarta; Menteng Park, Suropati Park, Situ Lembang Park, Ayodhya Park, Cattleya Park, Kodok Park, and Langsat Park. Observation checks list use as guidance. The result provides an assessment of Public Park based on four categories; the accessibility, park activities, safety, and user. The implication of this study offers recommendations to enhance Public Park so that it complies with good public park design- attributes and with the obligations of sustainable urban tourism in Jakarta.

  16. Parking management : strategies, evaluation and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litman, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    Parking facilities are a major cost to society. Current planning practices are based on the assumption that parking should be abundant and provided free, with costs borne indirectly. This report examined parking management strategies related to integrated parking plans. Problems with current parking planning practices were reviewed. The costs of parking facilities were examined, as well as the savings that can accrue from improved management techniques. Strategies included shared parking; remote parking and shuttle services; walking and cycling improvements; improved enforcement and control; and increasing the capacity of existing parking facilities. Parking pricing methods, financial incentives and parking tax reforms were reviewed. Issues concerning user information and marketing were examined. Overflow parking plans were evaluated. Three illustrative examples of parking management programs were outlined, along with details of implementation, planning and evaluation procedures. It was concluded that cost-effective parking management programs can often reduce parking requirements by 20 to 40 per cent compared with conventional planning requirements, in addition to providing economic, social and environmental benefits. 32 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Evaluating the Water Quality Benefits of a Bioswale in Brunswick County, North Carolina (NC, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Purvis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard roadside vegetated swales often do not provide consistent pollutant removal. To increase infiltration and pollutant removal, bioswales are designed with an underlying soil media and an underdrain. However, there are little data on the ability of these stormwater control measures (SCMs to reduce pollutant concentrations. A bioswale treating road runoff was monitored, with volume-proportional, composite stormwater runoff samples taken for the inlet, overflow, and underdrain outflow. Samples were tested for total suspended solids (TSS, total volatile suspended solids (VSS, enterococcus, E. coli, and turbidity. Underdrain flow was significantly cleaner than untreated road runoff for all monitored pollutants. As expected, the water quality of overflow was not significantly improved, since little to no interaction with soils occurred for this portion of the water balance. However, overflow bacteria concentrations were similar to those from the underdrain perhaps due to a first flush of bacteria which was treated by the soil media. For all sampling locations, enterococci concentrations were always higher than the USEPA geometric mean recommendation of 35 Most Probable Number (MPN/100 mL, but there were events where the fecal coliform concentrations was below the USEPA’s 200 MPN/100 mL limit. A reduction in TSS concentration was seen for both overflow and underdrain flow, and only the underdrain effluent concentrations were below the North Carolina’s high quality water limit of 20 mg/L. Comparing results herein to standard swales, the bioswale has the potential to provide greater treatment and become a popular tool.

  18. Smart parking management and navigation system

    KAUST Repository

    Saadeldin, Mohamed

    2017-11-09

    Various examples are provided for smart parking management, which can include navigation. In one example, a system includes a base station controller configured to: receive a wireless signal from a parking controller located at a parking space; determine a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) from the wireless signal; and identify a presence of a vehicle located at the parking space based at least in part on the RSSI. In another example, a method includes receiving a wireless signals from a base station controller and a parking controller located at a parking space; determining RSSIs from the wireless signals; and determining a location of the mobile computing device in a parking facility based at least in part on the RSSIs. In another example, a RSSI can be received, a parking occupancy can be determined using the RSSI, and an electronic record can be updated based on the parking occupancy.

  19. Learning from Millennium Park, Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guen, T. [American Society of Landscape Architects, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Terry Guen Design Associates, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper identified the value of creating green space for public use in an urban area in support of a sustainable environment. The inauguration of Chicago's Millennium Park in July 2004 marked a landmark civic achievement in greening an industrial urban centre. The Park was constructed on a 25-acre, previously vacant 100 year old rail property. In 2001, the first phase of the Park opened with the construction of the garages, train bridge, and infrastructure for future sculptural pieces. The green roof landscaping involved soil and drainage pathways, planting 11 acres of lawn and trees, and building a skating rink and restaurants. Phase 2 included new construction of donor enhancements. Among many benefits, this project stimulated investment in adjacent private development. This paper outlined the historic motivation for the park as a cultural and aesthetic benefit for the public. It reviewed the construction costs, the multiple sources of funding, and the multidisciplinary effort involving public agencies and private supporters. The landscape team included experts in soil, irrigation, planting, design and plant selection. Millennium Park has proven that current design and construction industries have the technical and physical ability to create cultural spaces of interest. 6 figs.

  20. USA kunstidessant Venemaale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    USA kunstnike näitus "Kolm sajandit ameerika kunsti" Moskvas Pushkini muuseumis. Eksponeeritakse Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basguiat', Roy Lichtensteini, Robert Rauschenbergi, Georgia O'Keefe'i, Willem de Kooningi töid

  1. USA Hire Testing Platform

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The USA Hire Testing Platform delivers tests used in hiring for positions in the Federal Government. To safeguard the integrity of the hiring processes and ensure...

  2. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuto Kobayashi; Toru Miura; Tomoko Haba; Miyuki Sato; Masao Takei; Isao Serizawa

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those st...

  3. DETECTING FOREST STRESS AND DECLINE IN RESPONSE TO INCREASING RIVER FLOW IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest stress and decline resulting from increased river flows were investigated in Myakka River State Park (MRSP), Florida, USA. Since 1977, land-use changes around the upper Myakka River watershed have resulted in significant increases in water entering the river, which have...

  4. Science parks as knowledge organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    gained agrowing importance in the new economy. If we shift focus to organizationtheory discussions on new knowledge and innovation has specialized in relationto the process of creation, managing, organizing, sharing, transferring etc. ofknowledge. The evaluation of science parks has to relate......Recent studies of the impact of science parks have questioned traditionalassumption about the effect of the parks on innovation and economic growth.Most studies tend to measure the effect by rather traditional measures, revenue,survival of new firms, without taking into account, that knowledge has...... to the changed role ofknowledge in the creation of economic growth. With the help of the concept ofthe ba from Nonanka, the article discuss if or how traditional organized scienceparks can become central actors in the new knowledge production or has to beviewed as an outdated institution from the industrial...

  5. Smart parking management system with decal electronics system

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Wicaksono, Irmandy

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are related to parking management, including identifying and reserving empty parking spaces. In one example, a smart parking space system includes a parking controller located at a parking space. The parking controller can identify a vehicle located at the parking space via an input sensor or a transceiver that initiates wireless communication with an electronic tag associated with the vehicle; and communicate a parking vacancy associated with the parking space to a remote computing device based at least in part on the identification of the vehicle. In another example, a computing device can receive parking vacancy data associated with a parking space from a parking controller; determine a parking vacancy associated with the parking space using the parking vacancy data; and encode for display on a client device a network page that includes an indication of the parking vacancy associated with the parking space.

  6. Smart parking management system with decal electronics system

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-09-21

    Various examples are related to parking management, including identifying and reserving empty parking spaces. In one example, a smart parking space system includes a parking controller located at a parking space. The parking controller can identify a vehicle located at the parking space via an input sensor or a transceiver that initiates wireless communication with an electronic tag associated with the vehicle; and communicate a parking vacancy associated with the parking space to a remote computing device based at least in part on the identification of the vehicle. In another example, a computing device can receive parking vacancy data associated with a parking space from a parking controller; determine a parking vacancy associated with the parking space using the parking vacancy data; and encode for display on a client device a network page that includes an indication of the parking vacancy associated with the parking space.

  7. Using the Theory of Games to Modelling the Equipment and Prices of Car Parking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkitny, Waldemar

    2017-10-01

    center. There were assumed that from the city’s point of view it is one rival, independently on the actual ownership of private car parks on whose strategy of acting the city do not have an influence. It is consistent with the basic foundations of the game theory. Both players compete for consumers - drivers using car parks, with such parameters like: price, distance from the destination, car parks’ equipment. The built model allows to indicate the best strategy. Knowing that strategy, one can form prices and equipment of car parks. That model may be used by municipal governments and companies which administer car parks. However, one should remember about limitations, which occur in reality, e.g. law restrictions referring to maximum prices for parking. The increasing pressure of cities’ authorities in Poland for changing those regulations, and examples of such solutions received, e.g. in USA, which concern varying prices for parking according to the demand on different car parks, and different hours, permit to have hopes, that the proposed model will be possible to use practically, soon.

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003902 gi|21232942 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21242877 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_004663 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004663 gi|29348666 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004578 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004578 gi|28867366 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_005139 gi|37678876 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21241391 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006177 gi|51892124 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006349 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006349 gi|53716793 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006840 gi|59711756 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006370 gi|54310137 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21243399 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003869 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003869 gi|20807352 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006351 gi|53722013 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004459 gi|27363966 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_006834 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006834 gi|58583632 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_001139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001139 gi|6321518 >gi|6321518|ref|NP_011595.1| Protein of unknown function; deletion... mutant has synthetic fitness defect with an sgs1 deletion mutant; Slx9p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MVA

  4. Observations of NC stop nets for bottlenose dolphin takes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To observe the NC stop net fishery to document the entanglement of bottlenose dolphins and movement of dolphins around the nets.

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26988182 >1rwrA 1 265 36 293 1e-50 ... ref|NP_743607.1| surface colonization... ... gb|AAN67071.1| surface colonization protein, putative ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ...

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_003281 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003281 gi|25151987 >gi|25151987|ref|NP_499440.2| TRAnsformer : XX animals trans...formed into males TRA-1, HERmaphrodization of XO animals HER-2, sex determination zinc-finger protein, alter

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inization of XX and XO animals FEM-3 (46.2 kD) (fem-3) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MEVDPGSDDVEADRETRAQKLKLKRNVK... NC_003282 gi|17540880 >gi|17540880|ref|NP_501587.1| sex determination protein, FEM

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >gi|17540144|ref|NP_500824.1| feminization 1 homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO ani...mals FEM-1 (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTPNGHHFRTVIYNAAAVGNLQRIKVFTINSRNDRQWII

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792282 >gi|31792282|ref|NP_854775.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|57116825 >gi|57116825|ref|YP_177638.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16131649 >gi|16131649|ref|NP_418241.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIATLTWFEFRRVR

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MKVLTVFGTRPEAIKMAPLVHALAKD... NC_000913 gi|49176409 >gi|49176409|ref|YP_026253.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSAKALAAYSKRIDV... NC_002655 gi|15804377 >gi|15804377|ref|NP_290417.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MQQFEWI... NC_006905 gi|62180071 >gi|62180071|ref|YP_216488.1| putative membrane transporter

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002977 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002977 gi|53804693 >1fgjA 20 492 48 517 e-179 ... gb|AAU92745.1| hydroxylamine oxy...doreductase [Methylococcus capsulatus str. Bath] ... ref|YP_113436.1| hydroxylamine oxydoreductase ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_006569 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006569 gi|56708985 >1fgjA 5 498 32 521 0.0 ... ref|YP_165030.1| hydroxylamine oxid...oreductase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... gb|AAV97335.1| hydroxylamine oxidoreductase ... [

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MFYWILL... NC_006905 gi|62180070 >gi|62180070|ref|YP_216487.1| putative membrane transporter

  18. Explorations of the extended ncKP hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Mueller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2004-01-01

    A recently obtained extension (xncKP) of the Moyal-deformed KP hierarchy (ncKP hierarchy) by a set of evolution equations in the Moyal-deformation parameters is further explored. Formulae are derived to compute these equations efficiently. Reductions of the xncKP hierarchy are treated, in particular to the extended ncKdV and ncBoussinesq hierarchies. Furthermore, a good part of the Sato formalism for the KP hierarchy is carried over to the generalized framework. In particular, the well-known bilinear identity theorem for the KP hierarchy, expressed in terms of the (formal) Baker-Akhiezer function, extends to the xncKP hierarchy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that N-soliton solutions of the ncKP equation are also solutions of the first few deformation equations. This is shown to be related to the existence of certain families of algebraic identities

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003295 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003295 gi|17546028 >1fjgR 2 71 22 91 5e-16 ... emb|CAD15011.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION... PROTEIN [Ralstonia solanacearum] ... ref|NP_519430.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION ...

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se/invertase); possible inulinase [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] MTDFTPETPVLTPIHDHAAELAKAEAGVAEMAANRNNRWYP... NC_004307 gi|23464731 >gi|23464731|ref|NP_695334.1| beta-fructofuranosidase (sucra

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_006371 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006371 gi|54302237 >1r690 2 63 15 79 7e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39936477 >1kmoA 7 661 92 753 2e-72 ... emb|CAE28855.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris... ... putative hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006155 gi|51597538 >1kmoA 5 661 59 714 9e-71 ... ref|YP_071729.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...ive ... hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor. [Yersinia ... pseudotuberculosis IP 32953

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23465117 >1g5aA 80 628 2 589 5e-59 ... gb|AAL05573.1| alpha-glucosidase [Bifidobacterium adolesce...ntis] ... Length = 588 ... Query: 1 ... MTANNLNDDWWKQAVVYQIYPRSFKDVNGDGLGDIAGVTEK

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62181272 >gi|62181272|ref|YP_217689.1| H inversion: regulation of fla...gellar gene expression by site-specific inversion of DNA [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choler

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128606 >gi|16128606|ref|NP_415156.1| RNA chaperone, transcription antiterm...inator, affects expression of rpoS and uspA [Escherichia coli K12] MSKIKGNVKWFNESKGFGFITPEDGSKDVFVHFSAIQTNGFKTLAEGQRVEFEITNGAKGPSAANVIAL

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_001147 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001147 gi|6324442 >gi|6324442|ref|NP_014511.1| Plasma membrane Mg(2+) transporter, expression and turnov...er are regulated by Mg(2+) concentration; overexpression confers increased toleranc

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein) (involved in swarmer cell regulation) [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD 2210633] MKKAVKKISSKKIITISAIIV... NC_004605 gi|28901366 >gi|28901366|ref|NP_801021.1| ScrC (sensory box/GGDEF family

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental regulation of virulence factors) [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica s... NC_006905 gi|62179085 >gi|62179085|ref|YP_215502.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17563066 >gi|17563066|ref|NP_506462.1| putative protein family member, with a transme...mbrane domain (5O433) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MWNLVSPIHISSKFSMEMAEVNVVAVPEENRQTYLETDNDRLVMAIIWLIMPPMAVFFKCRGCTKHVFINFLLYLLLVLPAYKHATWFCFVKGREFEAEDGFVRAR

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17535455 >gi|17535455|ref|NP_495314.1| putative endoplasmic reticulum protein, with a transme...mbrane domain (2G788) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTDVRFIIWNCIALLVALMMALTSIIILSDAPHNSME

  12. 76 FR 78331 - Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... following purpose description: ``The purpose of this project is to relieve traffic congestion in the Sylva... that improves the NC 107 north/south vehicular mobility by increasing average speeds for through...

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_001137 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ull mutation has global effects on transcription; Yer064cp [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MIDDTENSKIHLEGSHKTGKYT... NC_001137 gi|6320907 >gi|6320907|ref|NP_010986.1| Non-essential nuclear protein; n

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_001145 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001145 gi|6323710 >gi|6323710|ref|NP_013781.1| Protein required for nuclear mem...brane fusion during karyogamy, localizes to the membrane with a soluble portion in the endoplasmic reticulum

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21219041 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tide synthetase [Actinoplanes teichomyceticus] ... Length = 427 ... Query: 12 ... LSPLQEGMLFHNLFDEEELDAYNVQ... NC_003888 gi|32141196 >1l5aA 1 423 12 438 2e-57 ... emb|CAE53352.1| non-ribosomal pep

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003306 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003306 gi|17938860 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523916 >1a12A 35 375 64 376 3e-39 ... emb|CAE53335.1| putative RCC1 repeats protein [Actinoplan...es teichomyceticus] ... Length = 313 ... Query: 425 GVGFACALYDNNDLKCFGANDYGQLGD

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003064 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003064 gi|16119505 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13357802 >gi|13357802|ref|NP_078076.1| ribosomal protein L24 [Ureapla...sma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MNRIKKGDTVVVISGKNKNKSGVVIQVNPKEQTALVEGVNKIKRHQKKDQTHEQSGIIEKEAPIRLCKLALVDPKGKDKGKATKVKYLLKDNKKVRVARKSGSELDVNKK

  1. 77 FR 46631 - Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel substitutions in May 2011, it... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A. Kreisman, Chief, Video...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34558174 >1wcv1 4 239 4 244 2e-25 ... ref|NP_907989.1| SEPTUM SITE-DETERMINING...| SEPTUM ... SITE-DETERMINING PROTEIN MIND CELL DIVISION INHIBITOR ... MIND [Wolinella succino

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965329 >gi|15965329|ref|NP_385682.1| PROBABLE CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE LARGE CHAIN (AMMO...NIA CHAIN ARGININE BIOSYNTHESIS) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MPKRQDIKSILI

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_001134 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivery of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins to the nucleoplasm, binds rg-nucl... NC_001134 gi|6319491 >gi|6319491|ref|NP_009573.1| Transportin, cytosolic karyopherin beta 2 involved in del

  5. BChPT x 1/Nc: masses and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Fernando, Ishara P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    A summary of the implementation of the combined BChPT X 1/Nc expansion for three flavors is presented, along with its applications to the octet and decuplet baryon masses, SU(3) charges and axial couplings.

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21242752 >1iwlA 2 180 23 207 3e-47 ... gb|AAM36870.1| outer-membrane lipoproteins... ... outer-membrane lipoproteins carrier protein precursor ... [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citr

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54308356 >1iwlA 4 181 22 199 2e-52 ... ref|YP_129376.1| hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins... ... hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins carrier protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... L

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800754 >gi|15800754|ref|NP_286768.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128858 >gi|16128858|ref|NP_415411.1| periplasmic chaperone effects translocation of lipoprot...eins from inner membrane to outer membrane [Escherichia coli K12] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179485 >gi|62179485|ref|YP_215902.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer membrane [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serov

  11. Perceived Health Benefits and Willingness to Pay for Parks by Park Users: Quantitative and Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Henderson-Wilson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Whilst a growing body of evidence demonstrates people derive a range of health and wellbeing benefits from visiting parks, only a limited number of attempts have been made to provide a complementary economic assessment of parks. The aim of this exploratory study was to directly estimate the perceived health and wellbeing benefits attained from parks and the economic value assigned to parks by park users in Victoria, Australia. The research employed a mixed methods approach (survey and interviews to collect primary data from a selection of 140 park users: 100 from two metropolitan parks in Melbourne and 40 from a park on the urban fringe of Melbourne, Victoria. Our findings suggest that park users derive a range of perceived physical, mental/spiritual, and social health benefits, but park use was predominantly associated with physical health benefits. Overall, our exploratory study findings suggest that park users are willing to pay for parks, as they highly value them as places for exercising, socialising, and relaxing. Importantly, most people would miss parks if they did not exist. The findings aim to provide park managers, public health advocates, and urban policy makers with evidence about the perceived health and wellbeing benefits of park usage and the economic value park visitors place on parks.

  12. precision deburring using NC and robot equipment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-05-01

    Deburring precision miniature components is often time consuming and inconsistent. Although robots are available for deburring parts, they are not precise enough for precision miniature parts. Numerical control (NC) machining can provide edge break consistencies to meet requirements such as 76.2-..mu..m maximum edge break (chamfer). Although NC machining has a number of technical limitations which prohibits its use on many geometries, it can be an effective approach to features that are particularly difficult to deburr.

  13. San Francisco SFpark and parking information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    SFpark is a demonstration of a new approach to parking management that : will evaluate the effectiveness of demand-responsive pricing and real-time : information on parking availability for reducing congestion and greenhouse gas : emissions and provi...

  14. Protect Czech park from development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kindlmann, Pavel; Křenová, Zdeňka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 531, č. 7595 (2016), s. 448-448 ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Protect Czech park Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sci ences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016

  15. Renovated Parks Improve Physical Activity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    We know that children who are physically active every day are less likely to develop chronic diseases as adults, including obesity. Dr. Sandy Slater, a researcher with the University of Illinois, Chicago Prevention Research Center, discusses how a park improvement project in Chicago helped engage communities to improve areas for play and activity.

  16. 'Shockley park' stirs racism row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-07-01

    A local authority in Northern California has encountered unexpected resistance to its decision to name a park after the Nobel-prize-winning physicist William Shockley, with a coalition of churches and civic groups preparing to petition against the name at a meeting scheduled for 23 July.

  17. Seremban Urban Park, Malaysia: a Preference Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maulan, Suhardi

    2002-01-01

    Unlike the West, where many studies have explored how peopleâ s needs are fulfilled by urban parks, Malaysia has received very little attention from researchers. One reason for this is the fact that Malaysia has only a short public park tradition. Although folk art and stories have chronicled a long history of gardens and other parks, these spaces were only accessible to royal family members and autocrats. In Malaysia, the concept of free public parks is relatively recent, having been introd...

  18. PLC Based Automatic Multistoried Car Parking System

    OpenAIRE

    Swanand S .Vaze; Rohan S. Mithari

    2014-01-01

    This project work presents the study and design of PLC based Automatic Multistoried Car Parking System. Multistoried car parking is an arrangement which is used to park a large number of vehicles in least possible place. For making this arrangement in a real plan very high technological instruments are required. In this project a prototype of such a model is made. This prototype model is made for accommodating twelve cars at a time. Availability of the space for parking is detecte...

  19. Evaluating urban parking policies with agent-based model of driver parking behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, C.J.C.M.; Benenson, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an explicit agent-based model of parking search in a city. In the model, “drivers” drive toward their destination, search for parking, park, remain at the parking place, and leave. The city’s infrastructure is represented by a high-resolution geographic information system (GIS)

  20. The on-street parking premium and car drivers' choice between street and garage parking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobus, M.B.W.; Gutierrez Puigarnau, E.; Rietveld, P.; van Ommeren, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a methodology to estimate the effect of parking prices on car drivers' choice between street and garage parking. Our key identifying assumption is that the marginal benefit of parking duration does not depend on this choice. The endogeneity of parking duration is acknowledged in the

  1. What's Ahead for our National Parks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jean Craighead

    1972-01-01

    To insure the future of our National Parks, sweeping changes must be made. Encroaching civilization at the expense of nature has forced National Park officials to consider alternatives to future development - limiting number of visitors, facilities outside the parks and curtailing vehicular traffic. (BL)

  2. SmartPark Technology Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of FMCSAs SmartPark initiative is to determine the feasibility of a technology for providing truck parking space availability in real time to truckers on the road. SmartPark consists of two phases. Phase I was a field operational test ...

  3. 32 CFR 634.31 - Parking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Parking. 634.31 Section 634.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Traffic Supervision § 634.31 Parking. (a) The most efficient use of existing on- and off-street parking...

  4. Structural studies of n-type nc-Si-QD thin films for nc-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debajyoti; Kar, Debjit

    2017-12-01

    A wide optical gap nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) dielectric material is a basic requirement at the n-type window layer of nc-Si solar cells in thin film n-i-p structure on glass substrates. Taking advantage of the high atomic-H density inherent to the planar inductively coupled low-pressure (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma, development of an analogous material in P-doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H network has been tried. Incorporation of C in the Si-network extracted from the CH4 widens the optical band gap; however, at enhanced PH3-dilution of the plasma spontaneous miniaturization of the nc-Si-QDs below the dimension of Bohr radius (∼4.5 nm) further enhances the band gap by virtue of the quantum size effect. At increased flow rate of PH3, dopant induced continuous amorphization of the intrinsic crystalline network is counterbalanced by the further crystallization promoted by the supplementary atomic-H extracted from PH3 (1% in H2) in the plasma, eventually holding a moderately high degree of crystallinity. The n-type wide band gap (∼1.93 eV) window layer with nc-Si-QDs in adequate volume fraction (∼52%) could furthermore be instrumental as an effective seed layer for advancing sequential crystallization in the i-layer of nc-Si solar cells with n-i-p structure in superstrate configuration.

  5. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig histori......, er opdelt i 13 kapitler og består af fire dele: Første del: Slaveriet; anden del: Jim Crow; tredje del. King-årene; fjerde del: Frem mod Obama....

  6. Smart Parking Management Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In almost every major city in the U.S. and internationally, parking problems are ubiquitous. It is well known that the limited availability of parking contributes to roadway congestion, air pollution, and driver frustration and that the cost of expanding traditional parking capacity is frequently prohibitive. However, less research has addressed the effect of insufficient parking at transit stations on transit use. In the San Francisco Bay Area, parking has recently been at or near capacity a...

  7. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. 7.25 Section 7.25 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.25 Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. (a...

  8. Improving Earth Science Metadata: Modernizing ncISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.; Neufeld, D.; Burger, E. F.; Signell, R. P.; Arms, S. C.; Wilcox, K.

    2016-12-01

    ncISO is a package of tools developed at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) that facilitates the generation of ISO 19115-2 metadata from NetCDF data sources. The tool currently exists in two iterations: a command line utility and a web-accessible service within the THREDDS Data Server (TDS). Several projects, including NOAA's Unified Access Framework (UAF), depend upon ncISO to generate the ISO-compliant metadata from their data holdings and use the resulting information to populate discovery tools such as NCEI's ESRI Geoportal and NOAA's data.noaa.gov CKAN system. In addition to generating ISO 19115-2 metadata, the tool calculates a rubric score based on how well the dataset follows the Attribute Conventions for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). The result of this rubric calculation, along with information about what has been included and what is missing is displayed in an HTML document generated by the ncISO software package. Recently ncISO has fallen behind in terms of supporting updates to conventions such updates to the ACDD. With the blessing of the original programmer, NOAA's UAF has been working to modernize the ncISO software base. In addition to upgrading ncISO to utilize version1.3 of the ACDD, we have been working with partners at Unidata and IOOS to unify the tool's code base. In essence, we are merging the command line capabilities into the same software that will now be used by the TDS service, allowing easier updates when conventions such as ACDD are updated in the future. In this presentation, we will discuss the work the UAF project has done to support updated conventions within ncISO, as well as describe how the updated tool is helping to improve metadata throughout the earth and ocean sciences.

  9. Implementation of ergonomics in the management of parking increasing the quality of living parking park in mall Robinson Denpasar city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutapa, I. K.; Sudiarsa, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    The problems that often arise in the area of Denpasar City mostly caused by parking problems at the centers of activities such as shopping centers. The problems that occur not only because of the large number of vehicles that parked but also the result of the condition of parking officers who have not received attention, there is no concern about the physical condition of parking attendants because doing night guard duty. To improve the quality of parking officer, ergonomic parking lot is improved through the application of appropriate technology with systemic, holistic, interdisciplinary and participatory approach. The general objective of the research is to know the implementation of ergonomics in parking management on the improvement of the quality of parking officer in Robinson shopping center. The indicator of the quality of the parking officer work is the decrease of musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue, workload, boredom and increasing work motivation. The study was conducted using the same subject design, involving 10 subjects as a simple random sample. Intervention is done by arrangement of ergonomic basement motorcycle parking. Measurements done before and after repair. Washing out (WO) for 14 days. The data obtained were analyzed descriptively, tested normality (shapirowilk) and homogeneity (Levene Test). For normal and homogeneous distribution data, different test with One Way Anova, different test between Period with Post Hoc. Normally distributed and non-homogeneous data, different test with Friedman Test, different test between periods using Wilcoxon test. Data were analyzed with significance level of 5%. The results showed that the implementation of ergonomic in the management of parking area of the court decreased musculoskeletal complaints by 15.10% (p management of the parking lot improves the quality of the parking officer work from: (1) decrease of musculoskeletal complaints, (2) decrease of melting rate, (3) decrease of parking workload

  10. Terror Park: A future theme park in 2100

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the future, tourism and entertainment could be displayed as spectacles of horror, where consumers are offered and opportunity to revisit the tragedies of the past. Current displays of death where the past is exhibited and consumed as fun, scary and as entertainment productions are widespread. The movie industry provides horror to all ages, children can be exposed to the goulash past in various forms, such as the popular book series ‘Horrible Histories’. Theme parks, rides and roller-coaste...

  11. Rural Latino youth park use: characteristics, park amenities, and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cynthia K; Saelens, Brain E; Thompson, Beti

    2011-06-01

    Less than half of youth engage in sufficient physical activity to achieve health benefits. Key environmental factors of park and recreation spaces may influence youth physical activity. We sought to ascertain youth characteristics and behaviors that attract youth to parks with specific amenities and encourage physical activity while at the parks in a rural, predominantly Latino community. We examined the quality of amenities in the 13 parks and recreation spaces that middle school aged youth have access to in their community using the Environmental Assessment of Parks and Recreation Spaces (EAPRS) tool. Middle school students completed surveys in the school classroom (n = 1,102) regarding park use, physical activity, and intrapersonal characteristics (e.g., motivators). We used logistic regression to identify correlates of any park use, use of higher quality field and court parks, and active and sedentary park use. Younger age, participation in an after school activity, and identification of a team as a motivator were positively associated with any park use. Use of higher quality court and field parks was associated with participation in an after school activity and being Latino. The odds of being active in the parks were greater for boys and Latinos. Older age and alcohol use are correlated with being sedentary at the park, while odds of being sedentary at the park were lower for boys and youth who met physical activity guidelines. Organized team activities may encourage active use of higher quality fields and courts parks by Latino youth; thereby, increasing their level of physical activity.

  12. Increase of child car seat temperature in cars parked in the outpatient parking lot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Tetsu; Suzue, Junji; Kamada, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukiko; Tananari, Yoshifumi; Maeno, Yasuki; Ito, Shinichi; Nishino, Hiroshi; Kakimoto, Noriko; Yamakawa, Rumi

    2011-12-01

    A guideline for the safe use of child car seats (CS) was published by the Japan Pediatric Society in 2008. There have been few studies of the increase of temperature of a CS in parked cars. The aim of this study was to determine the change in the temperature of the CS in cars parked in full sun. The temperature of CS was measured during summer (July and August) in 2006, 2007, and 2008. The CS used in this study (n= 50) were for children (≤ 6 years old) who were taken by car to Sugimura Children's Medical Clinic. Temperatures were only measured on sunny days. Measurements were performed from 09.00 to 17.00 hours. Thermochron (Thermochron i-Button: G type, Maxim Integrated Products, CA, USA) was used to measure the temperatures. The maximum temperatures of CS were compared in time at the clinic, taking into consideration seat colors, and car colors. Of the 50 cars, three cars were excluded due to being in the shade while the temperature was measured. A total of 47 cars were used for this study. The temperature of the CS ranged from 38.0 to 65.5°C (47.8 ± 5.8°C). Eighteen CS (38.3%) reached a temperature of 50°C or above. The maximum temperature of the 13.00-15.00-hours group was significantly higher than that of the 09.00-11.00-hours group (P= 0.035). The CS temperatures in the black car group were significantly higher than those of the white car group (P= 0.013). CS may become very hot while a car is parked in sun, especially if the car and the CS are black, so the CS should be cooled before a young child is placed in it. Guardians of small children should be aware of this risk. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Baltimaade kunsti turnee USAs

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    5. nov.-st USA Lõuna-Carolina osariigis Wellington B. Grey galeriis ja Jenkins Fine Art Center's 13 eesti, läti ja leedu kunstniku näitus, mis hakkab kolme aasta jooksul ringlema Ameerikas. Eksponeeritud fotokunst, video, installatsioon, joonistused. Kuraator Peeter Linnap ja Mari Laanemets peavad ettekande näituse avamisega samal ajal toimuval Fotohariduse Ühingu konverentsil

  14. Changing perspectives in urban park management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chung-shing; Marafa, Lawal M.; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    managers in Hong Kong have encountered different challenges over time, and the quest for changing park managerial strategies. In 2004, a set of indicators for urban park management in Hong Kong was produced as part of a Master's research. Local park managers were asked about their views on the respective......Urban parks provide numerous benefits to our society. In densely populated metropolises such as Hong Kong, urban parks are in high demand. A variety of indicators can be used as tools for improving park planning and management. Facing a dynamic society and increasing user expectations, urban park...... importance and performance (I–P) of the indicators. In 2012, a follow-up questionnaire survey was conducted with the managers to study if their views regarding these indicators and their performance had changed. Results from the 2004 and 2012 surveys revealed changing perceptions regarding both I...

  15. An overview on STEP-NC compliant controller development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. A.; Minhat, M.; Jamaludin, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The capabilities of conventional Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools as termination organiser to fabricate high-quality parts promptly, economically and precisely are undeniable. To date, most CNCs follow the programming standard of ISO 6983, also called G & M code. However, in fluctuating shop floor environment, flexibility and interoperability of current CNC system to react dynamically and adaptively are believed still limited. This outdated programming language does not explicitly relate to each other to have control of arbitrary locations other than the motion of the block-by-block. To address this limitation, new standard known as STEP-NC was developed in late 1990s and is formalized as an ISO 14649. It adds intelligence to the CNC in term of interoperability, flexibility, adaptability and openness. This paper presents an overview of the research work that have been done in developing a STEP-NC controller standard and the capabilities of STEP-NC to overcome modern manufacturing demands. Reviews stated that most existing STEP-NC controller prototypes are based on type 1 and type 2 implementation levels. There are still lack of effort being done to develop type 3 and type 4 STEP-NC compliant controller.

  16. Lake Turkana National Parks Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest, most northerly and most saline of Africa's Rift Valley lakes and an outstanding laboratory for the study of plant and animal communities. The three National Parks are a stopover for migrant waterfowl and are major breeding grounds for the Nile crocodile and hippopotamus. The Koobi Fora deposits are rich in pre-human, mammalian, molluscan and other fossil remains and have contributed more to the understanding of Quaternary palaeoenvironments than any other site on ...

  17. Sovremennoje iskusstvo v angliskom parke

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Performance-kunsti rühmituse Virus (Alan Holligan, Stewart Bennett ja Ewan Robertson Edinburghist) projekt "Sekkumine - kaasaegne kunst inglise pargis" toimub Väliskunsti muuseumis, Mikkeli muuseumis ja selle ümbruses. Inspiratsiooniks on Kadrioru park ning parginäitused Mikkeli ja Väliskunsti muuseumis. Radical Loyalty projektist, millele pani aluse Chris Evans (Glasgow) 2002. a. ja mille raames plaanitakse skulptuuripargi rajamist Järvakandisse. Evansi projekt presentatsiooni formaadis toimub Mikkeli muuseumis video ja fotode abil

  18. Feasibility of Wind Energy Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Jose

    2000-01-01

    The paper discuss the feasibility of wind energy parks including aspects of supply and demand of energy, costs of generation and risks of investment associated. The paper introduce to the situation of wind energy in the word and specifically in Spain, describes the legal framework in promotion of renewables in Spain, the analysis of revenues and the risk of this business in the european market

  19. Guantanamo rikub USA seadusi / Krister Paris

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paris, Krister, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Kaks USA tsiviilkohut leiavad oma otsuses, et USA valitsus rikub USA-s ja Guantanamo sõjaväebaasis kinnipeetavate nn. vaenlasvõitlejate õigusi. Inimõigusorganisatsioonid avaldavad heameelt kohtute otsuste üle

  20. Comparison of mechanical behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC, TiN/TiNC films on 9Cr18 steel by PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingguo; Zhang, Yanshuai; Hu, Hanjun; Zheng, Yugang; Zhang, Kaifeng; Zhou, Hui

    2017-11-01

    TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films were deposited on 9Cr18 steel using magnetron sputtering technique. The morphology, composition, chemical state and crystalline structure of the films were observed and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hardness and adhesion force were tested by nanoindentation and scratch tester, respectively. The friction and wear behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films sliding against GCr15 balls were investigated and compared synthetically using ball-on-disk tribometer. It was found that Tisbnd N, Tisbnd C, Tisbnd Nsbnd C and Csbnd C bonds were formed. The TiN/TiNC film was composed of TiN, TiC and TiNC phases. Hardness and adhesion force results indicated that although the TiN film possessed the highest hardness, its adhesion force was lowest among all the films. Tribological test results showed that the friction coefficient of TiN/TiNC was much lower than that of TiN and the wear rate decreases remarkably from 2.3 × 10-15 m3/Nm to 7.1 × 10-16 m3/Nm, which indicated the TiN/TiNC film has better wear resistance.

  1. Configuration study of large wind parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    In this thesis, layouts of various large-scale wind parks, using both AC as well as DC, are investigated. Loss modelling of the wind park components as well as calculations of the energy capture of the turbines using various electrical systems are performed, and the energy production cost of the various park configurations is determined. The most interesting candidate for a DC transmission based wind park was investigated more in detail, the series DC wind park. Finally, the power quality impact in the PCC (point of common coupling) was studied. It was found that from an energy capture point of view, the difference in energy production between various wind turbine systems is very small. Of all the investigated wind park configurations, the wind park with the series connected DC wind turbines seems to have the best potential to give the lowest energy production cost, if the transmission distance is longer then 10-20 km. Regarding the series DC wind park it was found that it is the most difficult one to control. However, a control algorithm for the series park and its turbines was derived and successfully tested. Still, several more details regarding the control of the series wind park has to be dealt with.

  2. USA-USSR protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    On 30 November the USA Atomic Energy Commission and the USSR State Committee for the Utilization of Atomic Energy signed, in Washington, a protocol 'on carrying out of joint projects in the field of high energy physics at the accelerators of the National Accelerator Laboratory (Batavia) and the Institute for High Energy Physics (Serpukhov)'. The protocol will be in force for five years and can be extended by mutual agreement.

  3. Analysis of Parking Reliability Guidance of Urban Parking Variable Message Sign System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Mei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operators of parking guidance and information systems (PGIS often encounter difficulty in determining when and how to provide reliable car park availability information to drivers. Reliability has become a key factor to ensure the benefits of urban PGIS. The present paper is the first to define the guiding parking reliability of urban parking variable message signs (VMSs. By analyzing the parking choice under guiding and optional parking lots, a guiding parking reliability model was constructed. A mathematical program was formulated to determine the guiding parking reliability of VMS. The procedures were applied to a numerical example, and the factors that affect guiding reliability were analyzed. The quantitative changes of the parking berths and the display conditions of VMS were found to be the most important factors influencing guiding reliability. The parking guiding VMS achieved the best benefit when the parking supply was close to or was less than the demand. The combination of a guiding parking reliability model and parking choice behavior offers potential for PGIS operators to reduce traffic congestion in central city areas.

  4. Denali Park wolf studies: Implications for Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Meier, Thomas J.; Burch, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (1987) recommends re-establishment of wolves (Canis lupus) in Yellowstone National Park. Bills proposing wolf re-establishment in the Park have been introduced into the U.S. House and Senate. However, several questions have been raised about the possible effects of wolf re-establishment on other Yellowstone Park fauna, on human use of the Park and on human use of surrounding areas. Thus the proposed wolf re-establishment remains controversial.Information pertinent to some of the above questions is available from a current study of wolf ecology in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, which we began in 1986. Although Denali Park differs from Yellowstone in several ways, it is also similar enough in important respects to provide insight into questions raised about wolf re-establishment in Yellowstone.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrafiltration/Microfiltration Membranes for Removal of Nitrocellulose (NC) Fines from Wastewater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Byung

    1997-01-01

    .... In Phase II, a pilot-scale crossflow membrane filtration system was constructed to: (1) investigate the concentration polarization and fouling mechanism caused by NC fines during crossflow filtration of NC wastewater, (2...

  6. CAR SECURITY ENHANCEMENT IN PARKING AREAS

    OpenAIRE

    NANYONGA BERINDA; AYESIGA LINDSEY PATRA; BYEKWASO FAISAL; NATULINDA LADAN

    2017-01-01

    Over time, car thefts have been reported within Kampala parking areas. This has been majorly due to inefficient security measures of the available parking systems which focus mainly on the car and not the driver, making parking management a challenge. The focus of this survey was to explore the requirements of a new system called Car to Driver Matching Security System to enhance security of cars in Kampala, in particular, from the experience of 15 people. The data collected was then analyzed ...

  7. Open Days: information on CERN parking

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The organising team for the Open Days (28-29 September) would like to inform you that some parking sites in Meyrin and Prévessin will have to be kept free as of 18 September for the installation of tents and marquees.   Next week, CERN Management will address parking concerns and give you more information on other parking possibilities. The Open Day organising team thanks you for your cooperation and apologises for any inconvenience.

  8. Advanced parking management systems : a cross-cutting study : taking the stress out of parking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This study examines advanced parking management systems (APMSs) in three venues: airports, central business districts, and transit park-and-ride locations. Specifically, the systems examined in this study provide directional and space availability in...

  9. Amphibians of Olympic National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Amphibians evolved from fishes about 360 million years ago and were the first vertebrates adapted to life on land. The word amphibian means "double life." It refers to the life history of many amphibians, which spend part of their life in water and part on land. There are three major groups of amphibians: salamanders, frogs, and toads, and caecilians. Salamanders, frogs, and toads can be found in Olympic National Park (ONP), but caecilians live only in tropical regions. Many amphibians are generalist predators, eating almost any prey they can fit into their mouths.

  10. Ecological Resilience of Small Urban Parks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JasmaniI, Zanariah Binti

    consists of several sub-variables or attributes. The attributes of physical characteristics include park size, land use, park shape, proximity to a road and the presence of a water element. Elements relating to vegetation diversity, such as the presence and share of native and exotic species, presence....... Birds and butterflies react differently to various park maintenance practices (e.g. mowing). Based on the overall results, findings and discussion of the key features for bird and butterfly richness and abundance, study IV proposes nine recommendations for small urban parks to improve their ecological...

  11. Mode choice and shopping mall parking

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Fulya Yüksel; Ersoy, Fulya Yuksel

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, I analyze individuals' mode choice decisions and shopping mall's parking space pricing behavior. Individuals have three choices: first they may come to the mall by car in which case they have to park, second they may come by public transportation, or they do not visit the mall and go for their outside option. The mall determines the price of the good and the parking fee after the government sets public transportation fare. I find that the equilibrium parking fees are always le...

  12. Park Accessibility Impacts Housing Prices in Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Han Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing prices are determined by a variety of factors, including the features of the building and the neighborhood environment, and a potential buyer decides to buy a house after reviewing these factors and concluding that it is worth the price. We used Hedonic Price Methods to find the relationship between monetary value of house and access conditions to urban parks. Two meaningful results were discovered in this study: first, as the distance from the park increases, the value of the park inherent in the housing price decreases; second, the greater walking accessibility, to the park, the higher the park value inherent in housing prices. Despite presenting shorter distances to walk and more entrances, poorly accessible zones were deemed as such due to the necessity of crossing an arterial road. This indicates that the results can define accessibility not as the Euclidian distance but as the shortest walking distance while considering crossroads and park entrances. The results of this study have significant implications for urban park economic impact analyses in Seoul. Also, the increase in housing prices closer to parks supports the idea that access is dependent on the residents’ socioeconomic status. Lastly, the results of this study can improve walking accessibility to the park.

  13. iParking: An Intelligent Indoor Location-Based Smartphone Parking Service

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Ruizhi; Chen, Yuwei; Pei, Ling; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Indoor positioning technologies have been widely studied with a number of solutions being proposed, yet substantial applications and services are still fairly primitive. Taking advantage of the emerging concept of the connected car, the popularity of smartphones and mobile Internet, and precise indoor locations, this study presents the development of a novel intelligent parking service called iParking. With the iParking service, multiple parties such as users, parking facilities and service p...

  14. Smart Parking Management Pilot Project: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen, Susan; Rodier, Caroline; Eaken, Amanda M.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents early findings from an application of advanced parking technologies to maximize existing parking capacity at the Rockridge BART station, which was launched in December 2004 in the East San Francisco Bay Area. The smart parking system includes traffic sensors that count the number of vehicles entering and exiting the parking lots at the station. A reservation system allows travelers to reserve spaces by Internet, personal digital assistant (PDA), phone, and cell phone. The...

  15. Alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie: effects of vegetation type, stochiasticity, and anthropogenic disturbance in two park units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Diane L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Newton, Wesley E.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of alien plant species to invade a region depends not only on attributes of the plant, but on characteristics of the habitat being invaded. Here, we examine characteristics that may influence the success of alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, in western North Dakota, USA. The park consists of two geographically separate units with similar vegetation types and management history, which allowed us to examine the effects of native vegetation type, anthropogenic disturbance, and the separate park units on the invasion of native plant communities by alien plant species common to counties surrounding both park units. If matters of chance related to availability of propagules and transient establishment opportunities determine the success of invasion, park unit and anthropogenic disturbance should better explain the variation in alien plant frequency. If invasibility is more strongly related to biotic or physical characteristics of the native plant communities, models of alien plant occurrence should include vegetation type as an explanatory variable. We examined >1300 transects across all vegetation types in both units of the park. Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) indicated that the fully parameterized model, including the interaction among vegetation type, disturbance, and park unit, best described the distribution of both total number of alien plants per transect and frequency of alien plants on transects where they occurred. Although all vegetation types were invaded by alien plants, mesic communities had both greater numbers and higher frequencies of alien plants than did drier communities. A strong element of stochasticity, reflected in differences in frequencies of individual species between the two park units, suggests that prediction of risk of invasion will always involve uncertainty. In addition, despite well-documented associations between anthropogenic disturbance and alien plant invasion, five of

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13474471 >1gkpA 2 454 5 422 3e-10 ... ref|NP_106039.1| creatinine deamin...ase [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB51825.1| creatinine deaminase [Mesorhizobium loti ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002570 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002570 gi|15612789 >1v7zA 3 254 1 238 1e-53 ... dbj|BAB03945.1| creatinine amidohy...drolase [Bacillus halodurans C-125] ... ref|NP_241092.1| creatinine amidohydrolase [Bacillus ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002952 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002952 gi|49483221 >1pwgA 4 329 74 373 1e-38 ... ref|YP_040445.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... aureus subsp. aureus MRSA252] emb|CAG40034.1| autolysis

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_004461 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004461 gi|27467672 >1pwgA 4 344 72 389 1e-36 ... ref|NP_764309.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... epidermidis ATCC 12228] gb|AAO04351.1| autolysis

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003098 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003098 gi|15902282 >1in4A 3 311 20 328 5e-98 ... ref|NP_357832.1| Branch migration of Holliday structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae ... R6] gb|AAK99042.1| Branch migration of Holliday ... structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae R6] pir||F97901 ... branch migration of Holliday structures

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42524871 >1tjlA 27 144 16 133 6e-10 ... ref|NP_970251.1| dnaK deletion s...uppressor protein [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] ... emb|CAE78310.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27380945 >1tjlA 26 141 1 116 7e-32 ... ref|NP_772474.1| dnaK deletion su...ppressor protein [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA ... 110] dbj|BAC51099.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_003317 gi|17988031 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_002696 gi|16127809 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1mgtA 4 167 79 239 2e-25 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletio...n [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1adn0 1 76 1 75 1e-17 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26247437 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 7e-21 ... ref|NP_753477.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging... protein NU1 homolog [Escherichia coli ... CFT073] gb|AAN80037.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging ... ...teriophage ... 21] pir||A49849 DNA-packaging protein Nu1 - phage 21 ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179784 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 5e-21 ... ref|YP_216201.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging... ... gb|AAX65120.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging protein ... [Phage Gifsy-1] ... Length = 68 ... Q

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_001136 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001136 gi|6320573 >gi|6320573|ref|NP_010653.1| Nucleolar protein involved in pre-rRNA processing; deplet...ion causes severely decreased 18S rRNA levels; Esf1p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MAG

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006840 gi|59712585 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900550 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592330 >1uynX 1 299 352 647 5e-40 ... ref|NP_879974.1| tracheal colonization... factor precursor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama ... I] emb|CAA08832.2| tracheal colonization fac...tor ... [Bordetella pertussis] emb|CAE41497.1| tracheal ... colonization factor precursor [Bor

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18397761 >1wocC 2 96 2 97 5e-15 ... ref|YP_063428.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter... ... gb|EAL55921.1| single-strand binding protein, putative ... [Campylobacter coli RM2228] gb|AAR29517.1| ssb1

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003075 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003075 gi|30692533 >3ullA 5 115 1 104 8e-18 ... ref|YP_063478.1| ssb1 [Campylobact...er jejuni] gb|AAR29567.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter ... jejuni] ... Length = 104 ... Query: 31 ... GQDSDVS

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >1n0rA 2 124 89 212 5e-26 ... gb|AAA96093.1| Feminization of xx and xo animals... ... homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO animals FEM-1 ... (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] pir||

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900808 >1l3wA 6 536 1265 1798 3e-11 ... ref|NP_800463.1| putative biofilm...-associated surface protein [Vibrio parahaemolyticus ... RIMD 2210633] dbj|BAC62296.1| putative biofilm

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15804385 >gi|15804385|ref|NP_290425.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIA

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|15221381 >1bq00 2 77 15 90 4e-20 ... ref|NP_177004.1| gravity-responsive... protein / altered response to gravity protein ... (ARG1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAD13758.1| Altere

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377041 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1ii8A 3 194 4 202 2e-10 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1gxlA 2 204 475 685 1e-34 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003237 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003237 gi|19075000 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus jannaschii ... DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome segreta

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1| ... acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biotransformation ... protein, putative [Pseudomo...ransformation protein, ... putative [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68958.... NC_002947 gi|26990069 >1u8vA 9 432 4 458 7e-34 ... ref|NP_745494.1| acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biot

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990072 >1uzbA 37 513 3 472 6e-68 ... ref|NP_745497.1| vanillin dehydro...genase [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68961.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Pseudomonas putida KT24

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27381528 >1uzbA 40 515 6 475 3e-74 ... ref|NP_773057.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC51682.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377799 >1uzbA 40 515 5 474 3e-69 ... ref|NP_769328.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC47953.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16126641 >1uzbA 58 515 12 462 8e-77 ... ref|NP_421205.1| vanillin dehydr...ogenase [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] gb|AAK24373.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] ... pir||A87547 vanillin dehydrogenase [imported] - ... Caulobacter crescentus ...

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34557929 >1kmoA 12 661 39 664 3e-52 ... ref|NP_907744.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most...ly Fe transport [Wolinella succinogenes DSM ... 1740] emb|CAE10644.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_006085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006085 gi|50842772 >1qr0A 1 205 2 202 3e-27 ... ref|YP_055999.1| biosurfactants pr...oduction protein [Propionibacterium acnes ... KPA171202] gb|AAT83041.1| biosurfactants production ...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_000917 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000917 gi|11498546 >1yozA 1 116 1 116 6e-47 ... pdb|1YOZ|B Chain B, Predicted Coding... Region Af0941 From Archaeoglobus Fulgidus ... pdb|1YOZ|A Chain A, Predicted Coding Region Af0941 F

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17561408 >1bor0 2 53 282 342 3e-04 ... ref|NP_757385.1| synoviolin 1 iso...form b [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH30530.1| Synoviolin 1, ... isoform b [Homo sapiens] ... Length = 61

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_006841 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006841 gi|59714046 >1gntA 1 552 1 553 0.0 ... ref|YP_206821.1| hydroxylamine reduc...tase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] gb|AAW87933.1| ... hydroxylamine reductase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003228 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003228 gi|60681683 >1gntA 1 551 3 543 0.0 ... emb|CAH07898.1| hydroxylamine reduct...ase [Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343] ... ref|YP_211827.1| hydroxylamine reductase [Bacteroides ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_000963 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000963 gi|15604438 >1xvqA 17 163 47 203 4e-07 ... ref|NP_220956.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) [Rickettsia prowazekii str. Madrid E] ... emb|CAA15032.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) ... [Rickettsia prowazekii] pir||F71663 sco2 protein ... precursor (sco2) RP587 - Rickettsia

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_006142 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006142 gi|51473766 >1xvqA 17 163 40 196 7e-07 ... ref|YP_067523.1| Sco2-like prote...in [Rickettsia typhi str. Wilmington] gb|AAU04041.1| ... Sco2-like protein [Rickettsia typhi str. Wil

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003911 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003911 gi|56698151 >1wy2A 3 347 27 396 7e-44 ... gb|AAV96554.1| creatinase [Silici...bacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ref|YP_168523.1| ... creatinase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... Length

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003366 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003366 gi|18309739 >1v7zA 1 255 3 250 3e-61 ... dbj|BAB80463.1| creatinase [Clostr...idium perfringens str. 13] ref|NP_561673.1| ... creatinase [Clostridium perfringens str. 13] ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990378 >1wy2A 3 347 23 393 2e-45 ... ref|NP_745803.1| creatinase [Pseu...domonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN69267.1| creatinase ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ... Length = 3

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003030 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003030 gi|15895740 >1w3oA 13 174 5 153 2e-30 ... ref|NP_349089.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics... ... gb|AAK80429.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics ... resistance protein, NimA-family [Clost...ridium ... acetobutylicum ATCC 824] pir||B97205 probable ... 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_000964 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000964 gi|16078891 >1jmkC 6 230 1056 1270 2e-59 ... ref|NP_389712.1| plipastatin s...ynthetase [Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168] ... emb|CAB13713.1| plipastatin synthetase [B

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264213 >1ub4C 1 63 1 63 4e-10 ... gb|AAM39232.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein I [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644714.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002946 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002946 gi|59800954 >1ub4B 4 109 2 113 3e-22 ... ref|YP_207666.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance... ... gb|AAW89254.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance ... protein putative phage associated prote

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical stbA Plasmid stable inheritance protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... Length = ... NC_006370 gi|54307287 >1mwmA 2 317 24 344 3e-96 ... ref|YP_128307.1| Hypothetical stbA Plasmid stable inherita...nce protein ... [Photobacterium profundum SS9] emb|CAG18505.1| ... Hy

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264212 >1m1fA 1 109 2 110 1e-34 ... gb|AAM39231.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein K [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644713.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_005791 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005791 gi|45358156 >1wcv1 4 241 4 235 5e-21 ... ref|NP_987713.1| walker type ATPas...e [Methanococcus maripaludis S2] emb|CAF30149.1| ... walker type ATPase [Methanococcus maripaludis S2

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004547 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004547 gi|50121646 >1kmoA 14 661 37 705 8e-56 ... ref|YP_050813.1| exogenous ferri...c siderophore TonB-dependent receptor [Erwinia ... carotovora subsp. atroseptica SCRI1043] emb|CAG75622.1| ... exogenou

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937619 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15891046 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33603734 >1kmoA 3 661 60 754 2e-50 ... ref|NP_891294.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica ... RB50] gb|AAB51774.1| exogenous ferric siderophor...e ... receptor emb|CAE35124.1| exogenous ferric siderophore ... receptor [Bordetella bronchise

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34497787 >1f39A 3 98 107 198 1e-23 ... gb|AAQ60004.1| SOS mutagenesis [C...hromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_902002.1| SOS mutagenesis [Chromobacterium ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_005861 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005861 gi|46446610 >1f39A 5 95 55 141 1e-16 ... ref|YP_007975.1| probable SOS mutagenesis... and repair protein UmuD [Parachlamydia sp. ... UWE25] emb|CAF23700.1| probable SOS mutagenesis

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_005070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005070 gi|33865578 >1f39A 4 97 54 143 4e-22 ... ref|NP_897137.1| putative SOS mutagenesis... protein UmuD [Synechococcus sp. WH 8102] ... emb|CAE07559.1| putative SOS mutagenesis protein

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003233 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003233 gi|19074284 >1ltlE 10 233 29 251 7e-31 ... emb|CAD25394.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM5 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_585790.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1ewiA 5 113 54 161 1e-18 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION F...ACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PROT

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173253 >1a5t0 17 316 29 298 4e-25 ... emb|CAD27104.1| REPLICATION FACT...OR C (ACTIVATOR 1) 37kDa SUBUNIT [Encephalitozoon ... cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597056.1| REPLICATION FA

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31791180 >1ii8A 1 187 1 168 2e-14 ... ref|NP_853673.1| DNA REPLICATION A...D92865.1| ... DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEIN RECF (SINGLE-STRAND ... DNA BINDING PROTEIN)

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1ltlE 44 240 100 302 2e-23 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION... LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003364 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003364 gi|18312259 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1jmcA 1 238 213 445 1e-62 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_005787 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005787 gi|45198873 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002607 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002607 gi|15791012 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987645 >1j1vA 4 94 20 109 8e-10 ... gb|AAL52543.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION... INITIATOR PROTEIN DNAA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_540279.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION IN

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19074034 >1ltlE 2 242 49 290 7e-40 ... emb|CAD25144.1| DNA REPLICATION L...ICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM4) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584640.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1l1oC 2 175 456 623 1e-43 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19073988 >1a5t0 2 324 6 283 2e-17 ... emb|CAD25098.1| DNA REPLICATION FA...CTOR (ACTIVATOR 1) 36 kDa SUBUNIT ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584594.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003232 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003232 gi|19173617 >1ltlE 7 224 22 242 3e-38 ... ref|NP_597420.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM6) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi] emb|CAD26597.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  9. Stepping Motor - Hydraulic Motor Servo Drives for an NC Milling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the retrofit design of the control system of an NC milling machine with a stepping motor and stepping motor - actuated hydraulic motor servo mechanism on the machines X-axis is described. The servo designed in the course of this study was tested practically and shown to be linear - the velocity following errors ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_000117 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000117 gi|15605324 >1jgmA 39 326 7 260 4e-33 ... ref|NP_220110.1| PHP superfamily hydrolase [Chlamydia trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] ... gb|AAC68196.1| PHP... ... trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] pir||G71494 probable php ... hydrolase - Chlamydia trachomatis (sero

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003902 gi|21229523 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 4e-10 ... ref|NP_635440.1| methicillin resista...nce protein [Xanthomonas campestris pv. ... campestris str. ATCC 33913] gb|AAM39364.1| methicillin ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006582 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006582 gi|56962048 >1sd4A 2 99 6 103 1e-24 ... ref|YP_173770.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein MecI [Bacillus clausii ... KSM-K16] dbj|BAD62809.1| methicillin resistance ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21240843 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 8e-10 ... gb|AAM34961.1| methicillin resistanc...e protein [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ... str. 306] ref|NP_640425.1| methicillin resistance ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13472874 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006177 gi|51893967 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002967 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002967 gi|42528039 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792055 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31793631 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15841974 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15840280 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15609587 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003155 gi|29830077 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15608007 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004331 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004331 gi|23619306 >1wfiA 3 125 209 328 1e-34 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putativ

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003071 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003071 gi|18403860 >1rl1A 4 90 215 300 7e-09 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putative

  6. Large-Nc quantum chromodynamics and harmonic sums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-08

    Jun 8, 2012 ... This has led us to consider a class of analytic number theory .... The self-energy function LR(Q2) in the chiral limit vanishes order by order in QCD ... the 1/Nc expansion, the Goldstone loop corrections are subleading and, ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004310 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004310 gi|23502014 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987131 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002771 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002771 gi|15829246 >1nm8A 15 579 43 592 3e-82 ... ref|NP_326606.1| CARNITINE O-ACE...TYLTRANSFERASE [Mycoplasma pulmonis UAB CTIP] ... emb|CAC13948.1| CARNITINE O-ACETYLTRANSFERASE ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002655 gi|15803232 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310050 >1r0wC 43 281 30 288 6e-50 ... ref|YP_131070.1| putative ABC-type oligopeptide transport...putative ... ABC-type oligopeptide transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profu

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310056 >1r0wC 45 273 39 283 1e-54 ... ref|YP_131076.1| putative ABC-type metal ion transports...ative ... ABC-type metal ion transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profundum

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_000913 gi|49176263 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002695 gi|15832825 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006361 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006361 gi|54022220 >1y7yA 7 68 12 73 3e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002758 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002758 gi|15923033 >1sd4A 3 117 7 121 9e-28 ... dbj|BAB56205.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein [Staphylococcus aureus ... subsp. aureus Mu50] sp|Q932L5|MECI_STAAM Methicill...in ... resistance regulatory protein mecI ref|NP_370567.1| ... methicillin resistance regulato

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002506 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002506 gi|15600953 >1cqxA 1 398 1 388 e-107 ... gb|AAF96096.1| ferrisiderophore re...ductase [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. ... N16961] ref|NP_232583.1| ferrisiderophore reductase... ... [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961] ... pir||F82491 ferrisiderophore reductase

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available outer ... membrane receptor for iron transport; outer membrane ... porin protein, putative ferris...porin protein, putative ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Escherichia coli K12] gb|AAC73892.1| putative ... NC_000913 gi|16128773 >1kmoA 12 661 63 760 6e-50 ... ref|NP_415326.1| outer membrane

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002928 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002928 gi|33596933 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 8e-60 ... ref|NP_884576.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella parapertussis 12822] ... emb|CAE37631.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592999 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 1e-60 ... ref|NP_880643.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama I] ... emb|CAE42244.1| putative ferrisiderophore rece

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003143 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003143 gi|16121259 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039110 >1kmoA 11 661 79 730 2e-52 ... ref|YP_191074.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60418.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15890948 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_005810 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005810 gi|45443224 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33600770 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 2e-60 ... ref|NP_888330.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica RB50] ... emb|CAE32282.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004088 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004088 gi|22127219 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039006 >1kmoA 12 661 92 773 1e-43 ... ref|YP_190970.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60314.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937718 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225320 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225300 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003284 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003284 gi|17551448 >1rw3A 32 443 156 555 3e-25 ... gb|AAF64414.1| Pol [equine foam...y virus] ref|NP_054716.1| Pol [equine foamy virus] ... Length = 400 ... Query: 980 ... KLRIVLD--ASSPPGPEPSL

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800390 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_004741 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004741 gi|30062138 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26246664 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15829972 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56479698 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|24115225 >1e94E 1 443 7 449 e-162 ... pdb|1E94|F Chain F, Hslv-Hslu From E.Coli... pdb|1E94|E Chain E, Hslv-Hslu From ... E.Coli pdb|1HQY|F Chain F, Nucleotide-Dependent ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56480239 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|49176300 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34495619 >1t06A 1 193 1 205 2e-24 ... gb|AAQ57843.1| DNA alkylation repa...ir enzyme [Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_899834.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23466169 >1u94A 19 326 67 387 5e-28 ... ref|NP_696772.1| alkylation dama...ge repair protein [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] ... gb|AAN25408.1| alkylation damage repair protei

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_006087 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006087 gi|50955643 >1u94A 24 325 68 337 3e-32 ... ref|YP_062931.1| alkylation dama...ge DNA repair protein [Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli ... str. CTCB07] gb|AAT89826.1| alkylation damage D

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32477023 >1t06A 1 191 9 220 1e-24 ... ref|NP_870017.1| probable DNA alkylation... repair enzyme [Rhodopirellula baltica SH 1] ... emb|CAD79170.1| probable DNA alkylation repair

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004350 gi|24378587 >1t06A 1 191 11 210 3e-32 ... gb|AAN57848.1| DNA alkylation rep...air enzyme [Streptococcus mutans UA159] ... ref|NP_720542.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_006348 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006348 gi|53726196 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_000907 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000907 gi|16272918 >1etoB 1 97 1 98 9e-28 ... ref|ZP_00320663.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion... ... ref|ZP_00156839.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator [Hae

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002528 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002528 gi|15617004 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 1e-23 ... ref|NP_240217.1| factor-for-inversion... ... DNA-binding protein fis dbj|BAB13103.1| ... factor-for-inversion stimulation protein [Buchnera ... ... aphidicola str. APS (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] pir||G84976 ... factor-for-inversion

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004459 gi|27364633 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_004603 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004603 gi|28899659 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_004061 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004061 gi|21672661 >1etoB 1 98 1 99 3e-23 ... ref|NP_660728.1| factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Buchnera aphidicola ... str. Sg (Schizaphis graminum)] gb|AAM67939.1| ... factor-for-inversion

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006512 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006512 gi|56461389 >1etoB 1 98 1 97 7e-25 ... ref|YP_156670.1| Factor for inversion... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ... [Idiomarina loihiensis L2TR] gb|AAV83121.1| Factor for ... inversion

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006350 gi|53720503 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005139 gi|37681323 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310477 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006511 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006511 gi|56414667 >1hcrA 1 48 25 72 5e-05 ... ref|YP_151742.1| inversion of adjac... ... 9150] gb|AAV78430.1| inversion of adjacent DNA; at ... locus of e14 element [Salmonella ent

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|25149956 >1qauA 5 99 56 151 2e-04 ... gb|AAN38752.1| axon identity speci...rm b ... [Caenorhabditis elegans] ref|NP_495592.2| SYnapse ... Defective SYD-1, axon identity

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|25149956 >1tx4A 1 170 679 853 1e-24 ... gb|AAN38752.1| axon identity spe...form b ... [Caenorhabditis elegans] ref|NP_495592.2| SYnapse ... Defective SYD-1, axon identity

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_004722 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004722 gi|30021592 >1vkpA 12 368 2 333 2e-83 ... ref|NP_833223.1| Agmatine deimina...se [Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579] gb|AAP10424.1| ... Agmatine deiminase [Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579] ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002607 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002607 gi|15790649 >1b22A 10 70 5 63 2e-10 ... pdb|1XU4|A Chain A, Atpase In Compl...ex With Amp-Pnp, Magnesium And Potassium ... Co-F pdb|1T4G|A Chain A, Atpase In Complex With Amp-Pnp ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003551 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003551 gi|20094872 >1b22A 10 70 5 63 2e-10 ... pdb|1XU4|A Chain A, Atpase In Compl...ex With Amp-Pnp, Magnesium And Potassium ... Co-F pdb|1T4G|A Chain A, Atpase In Complex With Amp-Pnp

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669589 >1vhtA 3 200 2 186 2e-14 ... ref|NP_248402.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...408.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R584_orf2.nr ... [Me

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_005791 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005791 gi|45359158 >1q7hA 13 141 446 567 8e-09 ... ref|NP_248016.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...B99026.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R428_orf1.nr ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669211 >1q7hA 13 141 446 567 8e-09 ... ref|NP_248016.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...B99026.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R428_orf1.nr ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_000918 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000918 gi|15606868 >1tg6E 33 200 25 196 8e-08 ... ref|NP_214248.1| nodulation competitiveness... protein NfeD [Aquifex aeolicus VF5] ... gb|AAC07639.1| nodulation competitiveness protein... NfeD ... [Aquifex aeolicus VF5] pir||H70456 nodulation ... competitiveness protein NfeD - Aqu

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39936538 >1u07A 13 88 186 259 1e-09 ... emb|CAE28917.1| possible energy ...transducer TonB [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] ... ref|NP_948814.1| possible energy transducer T

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_002745 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002745 gi|15925955 >1n8kA 34 374 26 339 4e-06 ... dbj|BAB56414.1| similar to xylitol... ... SA0242 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315] ... ref|NP_370776.1| similar to xylitol

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006351 gi|53722258 >1kolA 2 388 1 341 4e-33 ... ref|YP_111243.1| putative zinc-binding xylitol... ... zinc-binding xylitol/sorbitol dehydrogenase ... [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ... .../sorbitol dehydrogenase [Burkholderia ... pseudomallei K96243] emb|CAH38702.1| putative ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_002758 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002758 gi|15923242 >1n8kA 34 374 26 339 4e-06 ... dbj|BAB56414.1| similar to xylitol... ... SA0242 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315] ... ref|NP_370776.1| similar to xylitol

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002745 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002745 gi|15925959 >1kolA 35 389 28 338 2e-04 ... dbj|BAB56418.1| similar to xylitol... ... SA0246 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315] ... ref|NP_370780.1| similar to xylitol

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003155 gi|29828632 >1w1oA 22 489 11 408 6e-19 ... dbj|BAC69801.1| putative xylitol... oxidase [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_823266.1| putative xylitol oxidase [Streptomyc

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004461 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004461 gi|27467238 >1kolA 35 391 30 342 2e-04 ... ref|NP_763875.1| xylitol dehydro...genase [Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228] ... gb|AAO03917.1| xylitol dehydrogenase [Staphylococc

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002758 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002758 gi|15923246 >1kolA 35 389 28 338 2e-04 ... dbj|BAB56418.1| similar to xylitol... ... SA0246 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315] ... ref|NP_370780.1| similar to xylitol

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039331 >1hxhA 1 247 2 262 8e-39 ... pir||JC7939 xylitol dehydrogenase ...(EC 1.1.1.-) - Gluconobacter oxydans (Strain ... ATCC621) dbj|BAC16227.1| xylitol dehydrogenase ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_001137 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ograde regulon which ... consists of genes whose expression is stimulated by... NC_001137 gi|6320764 >1wvfA 13 508 29 496 1e-67 ... ref|NP_010843.1| D-lactate dehydrogenase, part of the retr

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_001136 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001136 gi|6320230 >gi|6320230|ref|NP_010310.1| Component of the GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde... protein) complex, Vps51p-Vps52p-Vps53p-Vps54p, which is required for retrograde transport

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_001141 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001141 gi|6322114 >gi|6322114|ref|NP_012189.1| Part of a heptameric protein complex that regulates retro...grade Golgi-to-ER protein traffic in eukaryotic cells; coatomer forms the COP I ves

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006274 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006274 gi|52142162 >1gpuA 4 663 4 663 0.0 ... ref|YP_084669.1| transketolase (glycoal...dehyde transferase) [Bacillus cereus ZK] ... gb|AAU17181.1| transketolase (glycoaldehyde transfera

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42522087 >3ncmA 2 92 125 205 3e-07 ... gb|AAQ14642.1| HK97 major tail subunit [Bacteriophage Feli...x 01] ref|NP_944848.1| ... HK97 major tail subunit [Bacteriophage Felix 01

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_000917 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000917 gi|11498586 >1b0uA 5 258 11 250 4e-55 ... ref|NP_069814.1| osmoprotection p...rotein (proV) [Archaeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304] ... gb|AAB90260.1| osmoprotection protein (proV) ... ... ... [Archaeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304] pir||E69372 ... osmoprotection protein (proV) homolog - Arch

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_000915 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000915 gi|15645437 >1r9lA 6 291 286 549 7e-39 ... gb|AAD07866.1| osmoprotection pr...otein (proWX) [Helicobacter pylori 26695] ... pir||B64622 osmoprotection protein - Helicobacter pylor...i ... (strain 26695) ref|NP_207611.1| osmoprotection protein ... (proWX) [Helicobacter pylori