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Sample records for paresis

  1. Possibilities of pfysiotherapy in facial nerve paresis

    OpenAIRE

    ZIFČÁKOVÁ, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis addresses paresis of the facial nerve. The facial nerve paresis is a rather common illness, which cannot be often cured without consequences despite all the modern treatments. The paresis of the facial nerve occurs in two forms, central and peripheral. A central paresis is a result of a lesion located above the motor nucleus of the facial nerve. A peripheral paresis is caused by a lesion located either in the location of the motor nucleus or in the course of the facial ner...

  2. MRI in patients with general paresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zifko, U.; Wimberger, D.; Lindner, K.; Zier, G.; Grisold, W.; Schindler, E.

    1996-01-01

    Few cases of MRI in neurosyphilis have been reported. We examined the value of MRI in patients with general paresis; MRI was performed on four HIV-negative patients with parenchymatous neurosyphilis. It demonstrated frontal and temporal atrophy, subcortical gliosis and, in one patient, increased ferritin in the basal ganglia. The progression of the lesions on MRI correlated well with the neuropsychiatric disturbances. The MRI findings correlated with the wellknown neuropathological findings. This combination of pathological findings in neurosyphilis has not been described before and we suggest that MRI is of prognostic value in patients with general paresis. (orig.)

  3. Abnormal parietal function in conversion paresis.

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    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms.

  4. Abnormal Parietal Function in Conversion Paresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Marije; de Jong, Bauke M.; Gieteling, Esther W.; Renken, Remco; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study

  5. Vocal fold paresis - a debilitating and underdiagnosed condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G; O'Meara, C; Pemberton, C; Rough, J; Darveniza, P; Tisch, S; Cole, I

    2017-07-01

    To review the clinical signs of vocal fold paresis on laryngeal videostroboscopy, to quantify its impact on patients' quality of life and to confirm the benefit of laryngeal electromyography in its diagnosis. Twenty-nine vocal fold paresis patients were referred for laryngeal electromyography. Voice Handicap Index 10 results were compared to 43 patients diagnosed with vocal fold paralysis. Laryngeal videostroboscopy analysis was conducted to determine side of paresis. Blinded laryngeal electromyography confirmed vocal fold paresis in 92.6 per cent of cases, with vocal fold lag being the most common diagnostic sign. The laryngology team accurately predicted side of paresis in 76 per cent of cases. Total Voice Handicap Index 10 responses were not significantly different between vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis groups (26.08 ± 0.21 and 22.93 ± 0.17, respectively). Vocal fold paresis has a significant impact on quality of life. This study shows that laryngeal electromyography is an important diagnostic tool. Patients with persisting dysphonia and apparently normal vocal fold movement, who fail to respond to appropriate speech therapy, should be investigated for a diagnosis of vocal fold paresis.

  6. Neuromuscular compensation mechanisms in vocal fold paralysis and paresis.

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    Dewan, Karuna; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew; Soofer, Donna; Chhetri, Dinesh K

    2017-07-01

    Vocal fold paresis and paralysis are common conditions. Treatment options include augmentation laryngoplasty and voice therapy. The optimal management for this condition is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess possible neuromuscular compensation mechanisms that could potentially be used in the treatment of vocal fold paresis and paralysis. In vivo canine model. In an in vivo canine model, we examined three conditions: 1) unilateral right recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paresis and paralysis, 2) unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) paralysis, and 3) unilateral vagal nerve paresis and paralysis. Phonatory acoustics and aerodynamics were measured in each of these conditions. Effective compensation was defined as improved acoustic and aerodynamic profile. The most effective compensation for all conditions was increasing RLN activation and decreasing glottal gap. Increasing RLN activation increased the percentage of possible phonatory conditions that achieved phonation onset. SLN activation generally led to decreased number of total phonation onset conditions within each category. Differential effects of SLN (cricothyroid [CT] muscle) activation were seen. Ipsilateral SLN activation could compensate for RLN paralysis; normal CT compensated well in unilateral SLN paralysis; and in vagal paresis/paralysis, contralateral SLN and RLN displayed antagonistic relationships. Methods to improve glottal closure should be the primary treatment for large glottal gaps. Neuromuscular compensation is possible for paresis. This study provides insights into possible compensatory mechanisms in vocal fold paresis and paralysis. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1633-1638, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Delayed-onset bilateral abducens paresis after head trauma

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    Pravin Salunke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral sixth nerve paresis following closed head injury, though rare, is a known entity. However, delayed-onset post-traumatic bilateral abducens paresis is extremely rare. We present two cases. The first patient had onset of bilateral abducens paresis 2 weeks after closed head injury and the second patient after 3 days. The cause in the former was detected to be chronic subdural hematoma and in the latter is speculated to be edema/ischemia due to injury to soft tissue structures housing these nerves. The delayed onset of bilateral abducens paresis following head injury may vary according to the cause. There may be another mechanism of injury apart from direct trauma. Though rare, it needs to be evaluated and may have a treatable cause like elevated intracranial pressure.

  8. Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report.

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    Reychler, H; Mahy, P

    2011-01-01

    Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report. This is the first report of a transient, isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after temporomandibular joint arthrotomy. The paresis seems to have resulted from a crush lesion by Backhaus forceps, placed transcutaneously during the operation to distract the intra-articular space.

  9. Stretch-sensitive paresis and effort perception in hemiparesis.

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    Vinti, Maria; Bayle, Nicolas; Hutin, Emilie; Burke, David; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2015-08-01

    In spastic paresis, stretch applied to the antagonist increases its inappropriate recruitment during agonist command (spastic co-contraction). It is unknown whether antagonist stretch: (1) also affects agonist recruitment; (2) alters effort perception. We quantified voluntary activation of ankle dorsiflexors, effort perception, and plantar flexor co-contraction during graded dorsiflexion efforts at two gastrocnemius lengths. Eighteen healthy (age 41 ± 13) and 18 hemiparetic (age 54 ± 12) subjects performed light, medium and maximal isometric dorsiflexion efforts with the knee flexed or extended. We determined dorsiflexor torque, Root Mean Square EMG and Agonist Recruitment/Co-contraction Indices (ARI/CCI) from the 500 ms peak voluntary agonist recruitment in a 5-s maximal isometric effort in tibialis anterior, soleus and medial gastrocnemius. Subjects retrospectively reported effort perception on a 10-point visual analog scale. During gastrocnemius stretch in hemiparetic subjects, we observed: (1) a 25 ± 7 % reduction of tibialis anterior voluntary activation (maximum reduction 98 %; knee extended vs knee flexed; p = 0.007, ANOVA); (2) an increase in dorsiflexion effort perception (p = 0.03, ANCOVA). Such changes did not occur in healthy subjects. Effort perception depended on tibialis anterior recruitment only (βARI(TA) = 0.61, p hemiparesis, voluntary ability to recruit agonist motoneurones is impaired--sometimes abolished--by antagonist stretch, a phenomenon defined here as stretch-sensitive paresis. In addition, spastic co-contraction increases effort perception, an additional incentive to evaluate and treat this phenomenon.

  10. A Case of 72 Diabetic Woman with Zoster Paresis

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    E. Sajadi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: VZV is an exclusively human pathogen. The primary infection typically occurs during childhood and causes varicella. As with other members of the herpes viruses’ family, VZV is noninfectious in its latent form but can reactivate at a later time to form intact virions in the involved sensory neurons. These virions then migrate to the skin through axons, spread from cell to cell, and penetrate the epidermis.Case Report: In this case a 72 years old woman with history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension is reported hospitalized because of urinary retention, weakness and parestesia in the right leg, complicated with vesiculoulcerative lesions in sacral area with distribution to the right buttock and vagina. L.P was done to confirm inflammatory radicopathy that showed aseptic meningitis and therapy started with acyclovir and prednisolone. Patient got well and discharged from the hospital.Conclusion: Motor weakness in noncranial nerve is one of the zoster complications known as zoster paresis. Weakness begins suddenly 2-3 weeks after rash and progresses to extremities. In this case 3 weeks after rash, nerve complications were observed. We recommend to do paresthesia examination of skin for eruption in all patients presented with paresis.

  11. Motor mechanisms of vertical fusion in individuals with superior oblique paresis.

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    Mudgil, Ananth V; Walker, Mark; Steffen, Heimo; Guyton, David L; Zee, David S

    2002-06-01

    We wanted to determine the mechanisms of motor vertical fusion in patients with superior oblique paresis and to correlate these mechanisms with surgical outcomes. Ten patients with superior oblique paresis underwent 3-axis, bilateral, scleral search coil eye movement recordings. Eye movements associated with fusion were analyzed. Six patients had decompensated congenital superior oblique paresis and 4 had acquired superior oblique paresis. All patients with acquired superior oblique paresis relied predominantly on the vertical rectus muscles for motor fusion. Patients with congenital superior oblique paresis were less uniform in their mechanisms for motor fusion: 2 patients used predominantly the oblique muscles, 2 patients used predominantly the vertical recti, and 2 patients used predominantly the superior oblique in the hyperdeviated eye and the superior rectus in the hypodeviated eye. The last 2 patients developed the largest changes in torsional eye alignment relative to changes in vertical eye alignment and were the only patients to develop symptomatic surgical overcorrections. There are 3 different mechanisms for vertical fusion in individuals with superior oblique paresis, with the predominant mechanism being the vertical recti. A subset of patients with superior oblique paresis uses predominantly the superior oblique muscle in the hyperdeviated paretic eye and the superior rectus muscle in the fellow eye for fusion. This results in intorsion of both eyes, causing a large change in torsional alignment. The consequent cyclodisparity, in addition to the existing vertical deviation, may make fusion difficult. The differing patterns of vertical fusional vergence may have implications for surgical treatment.

  12. Analysis of laryngoscopic features in patients with unilateral vocal fold paresis.

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    Woo, Peak; Parasher, Arjun K; Isseroff, Tova; Richards, Amanda; Sivak, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of paresis in patients with vocal fold motion impairment remains a challenge. More than 27 clinical parameters have been cited that may signify paresis. We hypothesize that some features are more significant than others. Prospective case series. Two laryngologists rated laryngoscopy findings in 19 patients suspected of paresis. The diagnosis was confirmed with laryngeal electromyography. A standard set of 27 ratings was used for each examination that included movement, laryngeal configuration, and stroboscopy signs. A Fisher exact test was completed for each measure. A kappa coefficient was calculated for effectiveness in predicting the laterality of paresis. Left-sided vocal fold paresis (n = 13) was significantly associated with ipsilateral axis deviation, thinner vocal fold, bowing, reduced movement, reduced kinesis, and phase lag (P vocal fold paresis (n = 6) was significantly associated with ipsilateral shorter vocal fold, axis deviation, reduced movement, and reduced kinesis (P vocal fold, vocal fold bowing, reduced movement, reduced kinesis, and phase lag were more likely to be associated with vocal fold paresis. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:1831-1836, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

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    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (pmyasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Utricular paresis and semicircular canal hyperactivity: a distinct otolith syndrome.

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    Angeli, Simon I; Snapp, Hillary; Velandia, Sandra; Morgenstein, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Although combined utricular and canal paresis has been described previously, this is the first report of canal hyperactivity associated with utricular hypofunction. Unsteadiness and swaying were the most common symptoms, and patients with shorter duration of symptoms also had positional vertigo. We propose that this syndrome is a variant of utricular dysfunction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorders. To describe a syndrome of instability associated with utricular dysfunction and hyperactive caloric responses. The study comprised 11 consecutive patients exhibiting abnormalities of the eccentric subjective visual vertical test (e-SVV) and high responses during the caloric test of the videonystagmography (VNG). We carried out a review of symptoms, physical examination, and vestibular tests. There was no gender predilection or obvious etiology. The patients' main complaint included instability with linear symptoms (i.e., tilting, rocking, and swaying), with positional vertigo as a secondary symptom. Oculomotor testing, visual fixation index, and brain MRI were normal, excluding a central nervous system disorder. VNG was essentially normal except for hyperactive responses during the caloric testing in all patients. Abnormal e-SVV was found in 10 patients unilaterally and bilaterally in 1 patient. Abnormal oVEMP was found in seven of seven patients, further supporting a utricular site of lesion.

  15. Interrater Reliability in Analysis of Laryngoscopic Features for Unilateral Vocal Fold Paresis.

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    Isseroff, Tova F; Parasher, Arjun K; Richards, Amanda; Sivak, Mark; Woo, Peak

    2016-11-01

    The diagnosis of paresis in patients with vocal fold motion impairment remains a challenge. In particular, laryngoscopy examination may result in significant disagreement in diagnosis among providers. We hypothesize that systematically evaluating for a standard set of clinical parameters will increase the diagnostic concordance among providers. Prospective case series conducted at a Tertiary referral Laryngology office. Two laryngologists (rater 1) and two trainees (rater 2) rated laryngoscopy findings in 19 patients suspected of paresis. The diagnosis was confirmed with laryngeal electromyogram. A standard set of 27 ratings was used for each examination that included movement, laryngeal configuration, and stroboscopy signs. A kappa coefficient was calculated for agreement in laryngoscopy findings and effectiveness in predicting the laterality of paresis. A substantial agreement (kappa coefficient > 0.61) existed between the raters for vocal fold length, vocal fold thickness, bowing, and reduction in movement. A moderate agreement (kappa coefficient > 0.41) existed between raters for piriform opening and reduced kinesis. The senior author was accurately able to diagnose the side of paresis in 89.5% of cases for a kappa coefficient of 0.78, whereas the trainees correctly predicted the side of paresis in 63.1% for a kappa coefficient of 0.35. The raters agreed on the diagnosis in 73.7% of cases for a kappa coefficient of 0.50. Using a standard set of laryngoscopy findings may improve the provider's ability to identify the laterality of vocal fold paresis and increase interrater reliability compared with other series. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult.

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    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Mani, Revathy; Rakshit, Archayeeta; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Vittal Praveen, Smitha

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis and the role of conservative management such as vision training during the recovery process is not well documented in the literature to the best of our knowledge. This case report presents the natural recovery process of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult and the role of vision therapy in the recovery process. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporary hindlimb paresis following dystocia due to foetal macrosomia in a Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra).

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    Debenham, John James; Bettembourg, Vanessa; Østevik, Liv; Modig, Michaela; Jâderlund, Karin Hultin; Lervik, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    A multiparous Celebes crested macaque presented with dystocia due to foetal macrosomia, causing foetal mortality and hindlimb paresis. After emergency caesarean section, recovery of motor function took 1 month before hindlimbs were weight bearing and 2 months before re-integration with the troop. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. An Unusual Case of Neuralgic Amyotrophy Presenting with Bilateral Phrenic Nerve and Vocal Cord Paresis

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    F. Holtbernd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial plexus neuropathy, brachial plexus neuritis, or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is an uncommon inflammatory condition typically characterized by acute and severe shoulder pain followed by paresis with muscle weakness and atrophy of the upper limb or shoulder girdle. We report an unusual clinical manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy, namely bilateral phrenic nerve palsy with concomitant laryngeal paresis. Case Report: A 55-year-old male presented with orthopnea and aphonia after an episode of bilateral shoulder pain preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Spirometry, chest X-ray and videolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral and simultaneous paresis of the diaphragm and the vocal cords. Clinical examination at admission and at the 2-month follow-up did not show upper limb weakness or atrophy, except for a mild atrophy of the right supraspinatus muscle. An electromyography of the upper limb muscles and nerve conduction studies did not reveal signs of denervation. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and an MRI of the neuraxis were unremarkable. After treatment with prednisolone, vocal cord function markedly improved within 8 weeks, whereas paresis of the diaphragm persisted. Conclusion: Shoulder pain followed by diaphragmatic paralysis with dyspnea and hoarseness may be a manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy even if upper limb or shoulder girdle palsies are absent.

  19. Bell’s Palsy: Symptoms Preceding and Accompanying the Facial Paresis

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    Daniele De Seta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This individual prospective cohort study aims to report and analyze the symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis in Bell’s palsy (BP. Two hundred sixty-nine patients affected by BP with a maximum delay of 48 hours from the onset were enrolled in the study. The evolution of the facial paresis expressed as House-Brackmann grade in the first 10 days and its correlation with symptoms were analyzed. At the onset, 136 patients presented postauricular pain, 114 were affected by dry eye, and 94 reported dysgeusia. Dry mouth was present in 54 patients (19.7%, facial pain, hyperlacrimation, aural fullness, and hyperacusis represented a smaller percentage of the reported symptoms. After 10 days, 39.9% of the group had a severe paresis while 10.2% reached a complete recovery. Dry mouth at the onset was correlated with severe grade of palsy and was prognostic for poor recovery in the early period. These outcomes lead to the deduction that the nervus intermedius plays an important role in the presentation of the BP and it might be responsible for most of the accompanying symptomatology of the paresis. Our findings could be of important interest to early address a BP patient to further examinations and subsequent therapy.

  20. [Left lateral gaze paresis due to subcortical hematoma in the right precentral gyrus].

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    Sato, K; Takamori, M

    1998-03-01

    We report a case of transient left lateral gaze paresis due to a hemorrhagic lesion restricted in the right precentral gyrus. A 74-year-old female experienced a sudden clumsiness of the left upper extremity. A neurological examination revealed a left central facial paresis, distal dominant muscle weakness in the left upper limb and left lateral gaze paresis. There were no other focal neurological signs. Laboratory data were all normal. Brain CTs and MRIs demonstrated a subcortical hematoma in the right precentral gyrus. The neurological symptoms and signs disappeared over seven days. A recent physiological study suggested that the human frontal eye field (FEF) is located in the posterior part of the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 8) and the precentral gyrus around the precentral sulcus. More recent studies stressed the role of the precentral sulcus and the precentral gyrus. Our case supports those physiological findings. The hematoma affected both the FEF and its underlying white matter in our case. We assume the lateral gaze paresis is attributable to the disruption of the fibers from the FEF. It is likely that fibers for motor control of the face, upper extremity, and lateral gaze lie adjacently in the subcortical area.

  1. Risks of postoperative paresis in motor eloquently and non-eloquently located brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermueller, Thomas; Schaeffner, Michael; Gerhardt, Julia; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2014-01-01

    When treating cerebral metastases all involved multidisciplinary oncological specialists have to cooperate closely to provide the best care for these patients. For the resection of brain metastasis several studies reported a considerable risk of new postoperative paresis. Pre- and perioperative chemotherapy (Ctx) or radiotherapy (Rtx) alter vasculature and adjacent fiber tracts on the one hand, and many patients already present with paresis prior to surgery on the other hand. As such factors were repeatedly considered risk factors for perioperative complications, we designed this study to also identify risk factors for brain metastases resection. Between 2006 and 2011, we resected 206 brain metastases consecutively, 56 in eloquent motor areas and 150 in non-eloquent ones. We evaluated the influences of preoperative paresis, previous Rtx or Ctx as well as recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class on postoperative outcome. In general, 8.7% of all patients postoperatively developed a new permanent paresis. In contrast to preoperative Ctx, previous Rtx as a single or combined treatment strategy was a significant risk factor for postoperative motor weakness. This risk was even increased in perirolandic and rolandic lesions. Our data show significantly increased risk of new deficits for patients assigned to RPA class 3. Even in non-eloquently located brain metastases the risk of new postoperative paresis has not to be underestimated. Despite the microsurgical approach, our cohort shows a high rate of unexpected residual tumors in postoperative MRI, which supports recent data on brain metastases’ infiltrative nature but might also be the result of our strict study protocol. Surgical resection is a safe treatment of brain metastases. However, preoperative Rtx and RPA score 3 have to be taken into account when surgical resection is considered

  2. Partial Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis or Paresis? In Search for the Accurate Diagnosis

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    Alexander Delides

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “Partial paralysis” of the larynx is a term often used to describe a hypomobile vocal fold as is the term “paresis.” We present a case of a dysphonic patient with a mobility disorder of the vocal fold, for whom idiopathic “partial paralysis” was the diagnosis made after laryngeal electromyography, and discuss a proposition for a different implementation of the term.

  3. Effects of roads on the vertebrates diversity of the Indigenous Territory Paresi and its surrounding.

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    Brum, T R; Santos-Filho, M; Canale, G R; Ignácio, A R A

    2018-02-01

    Roadkill impact is still underestimated due to the lack of knowledge of its intensity and effect on animal populations. To assess differences between animal roadkills on roads in distinct landscapes, this study recorded meso- and megavertebrate roadkills along 50 km during a year in two highways in the transitional area of Amazonia/Cerrado in Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso: MT-358 and MT-235, the latter crossing the Paresi Indigenous Land. We assessed roadkill rates and points with higher rates of roadkills, recording the most impacted species, seasonal effects, biomass loss, activity period of species, and traffic volume. We recorded 178 roadkills in 4,950 km travelled, a rate of 0.035 animal/km-travelled. Mammals were the most impacted with 135 roadkills (75.8%), followed by reptiles (6.2%), amphibians (5.6%) and birds (5.1%). Among mammals 51.1% were Carnivora, and the most impacted species was Cerdocyon thous (n = 42). On highway MT-358 (human-modified landscape), we recorded 155 roadkilled mammals, and the most impacted were C. thous (23.9%) and Euphractus sexcinctus (13.5%). Whilst on highway MT-235 (Paresi Indigenous Land), we recorded 23 roadkilled mammals, and the most impacted were Myrmecophaga tridactyla (26.1%) and C. thous (21.7%). The low roadkill rate in the Paresi Indigenous Land might be related to the presence of fauna pathways along the highway and the availability of a forested landscape.

  4. Effects of roads on the vertebrates diversity of the Indigenous Territory Paresi and its surrounding

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    T. R. Brum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Roadkill impact is still underestimated due to the lack of knowledge of its intensity and effect on animal populations. To assess differences between animal roadkills on roads in distinct landscapes, this study recorded meso- and megavertebrate roadkills along 50 km during a year in two highways in the transitional area of Amazonia/Cerrado in Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso: MT-358 and MT-235, the latter crossing the Paresi Indigenous Land. We assessed roadkill rates and points with higher rates of roadkills, recording the most impacted species, seasonal effects, biomass loss, activity period of species, and traffic volume. We recorded 178 roadkills in 4,950 km travelled, a rate of 0.035 animal/km-travelled. Mammals were the most impacted with 135 roadkills (75.8%, followed by reptiles (6.2%, amphibians (5.6% and birds (5.1%. Among mammals 51.1% were Carnivora, and the most impacted species was Cerdocyon thous (n = 42. On highway MT-358 (human-modified landscape, we recorded 155 roadkilled mammals, and the most impacted were C. thous (23.9% and Euphractus sexcinctus (13.5%. Whilst on highway MT-235 (Paresi Indigenous Land, we recorded 23 roadkilled mammals, and the most impacted were Myrmecophaga tridactyla (26.1% and C. thous (21.7%. The low roadkill rate in the Paresi Indigenous Land might be related to the presence of fauna pathways along the highway and the availability of a forested landscape.

  5. Awake craniotomy for brain lesions within and near the primary motor area: A retrospective analysis of factors associated with worsened paresis in 102 consecutive patients

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    Shinoura, Nobusada; Midorikawa, Akira; Yamada, Ryoji; Hana, Taijun; Saito, Akira; Hiromitsu, Kentaro; Itoi, Chisato; Saito, Syoko; Yagi, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background: We analyzed factors associated with worsened paresis in a large series of patients with brain lesions located within or near the primary motor area (M1) to establish protocols for safe, awake craniotomy of eloquent lesions. Methods: We studied patients with brain lesions involving M1, the premotor area (PMA) and the primary sensory area (S1), who underwent awake craniotomy (n = 102). In addition to evaluating paresis before, during, and one month after surgery, the following parameters were analyzed: Intraoperative complications; success or failure of awake surgery; tumor type (A or B), tumor location, tumor histology, tumor size, and completeness of resection. Results: Worsened paresis at one month of follow-up was significantly associated with failure of awake surgery, intraoperative complications and worsened paresis immediately after surgery, which in turn was significantly associated with intraoperative worsening of paresis. Intraoperative worsening of paresis was significantly related to preoperative paresis, type A tumor (motor tract running in close proximity to and compressed by the tumor), tumor location within or including M1 and partial removal (PR) of the tumor. Conclusions: Successful awake surgery and prevention of deterioration of paresis immediately after surgery without intraoperative complications may help prevent worsening of paresis at one month. Factors associated with intraoperative worsening of paresis were preoperative motor deficit, type A and tumor location in M1, possibly leading to PR of the tumor. PMID:24381792

  6. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis: A biomechanical and morphological observational study.

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    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections have been reported. How these side effects relate to semitendinosus morphology is unknown. This study assessed the effects of bilateral medial hamstring lengthening as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) on (1) knee joint mechanics (2) semitendinosus muscle morphology and (3) gait kinematics. All variables were assessed for the right side only. Six children with spastic paresis selected for surgery to counteract limited knee range of motion were measured before and about a year after surgery. After surgery, in most subjects popliteal angle decreased and knee moment-angle curves were shifted towards a more extended knee joint, semitendinosus muscle belly length was approximately 30% decreased, while at all assessed knee angles tendon length was increased by about 80%. In the majority of children muscle volume of the semitendinosus muscle decreased substantially suggesting a reduction of physiological cross-sectional area. Gait kinematics showed more knee extension during stance (mean change ± standard deviation: 34±13°), but also increased pelvic anterior tilt (mean change ± standard deviation: 23±5°). In most subjects, surgical lengthening of semitendinosus tendon contributed to more extended knee joint angle during static measurements as well as during gait, whereas extensibility of semitendinosus muscle belly was decreased. Post-surgical treatment to maintain muscle belly length and physiological cross-sectional area may improve treatment outcome of medial hamstring lengthening.

  7. As classes verbais da língua Paresi (Aruák

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Barros Brandão

    Full Text Available Resumo O objetivo deste artigo é descrever as classes de verbos em Paresi, uma língua Aruák, falada por aproximadamente 3.000 pessoas no estado do Mato Grosso, Brasil. Em Paresi, os verbos são classificados como intransitivos, transitivos e bitransitivos. Em geral, verbos intransitivos em línguas Aruák são subclassificados em intransitivos ativos e intransitivos estativos. A divisão no grupo de intransitivos é morfologicamente marcada, já que sujeitos de intransitivos estativos e objetos de transitivos são marcados da mesma forma, enquanto os sujeitos de transitivos recebem uma forma diferente. A maioria das línguas Aruák exibem alinhamento semântico, isto é, a seleção da marcação de concordância depende do parâmetro de eventividade. Em Paresi, a divisão nos intransitivos é morfologicamente marcada da seguinte forma: a alguns intransitivos recebem a mesma marca de sujeito do que os transitivos (proclíticos do grupo A; b outros intransitivos recebem uma marcação diferente (proclíticos do grupo B. Semanticamente, os verbos são classificados em agentivos e não agentivos. Os traços semânticos de [agentividade] e de [controle] têm um papel fundamental na assignação dos verbos a subclasses. Os dados foram coletados durante pesquisa de campo e a análise tem por base uma abordagem funcionalista-tipológica.

  8. Ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by anterior cerebral artery territory infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongfeng; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral hemiparesis is rare after a supratentorial stroke, and the role of reorganization in the motor areas of unaffected hemisphere is important for the rehabilitation of the stroke patients. In this study, we present a patient who had a subclinical remote infarct in the right pons developed ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by a new infarct in the left anterior cerebral artery territory. Our case suggests that the motor areas of the unaffected hemisphere might be reorganized after stroke, which is important for the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  9. General paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect syphilis in the body include: CSF-VDRL FTA-ABS Tests of the nervous system may include: ... DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony ...

  10. Perceived vocal fatigue and effort in relation to laryngeal functional measures in paresis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, Sheila V; Bielamowicz, Steven A

    2014-07-01

    To determine if differences in objective measures of laryngeal function can meaningfully explain different levels of self-perceptions of effort or fatigue in patients with vocal fold paresis. A retrospective chart review of 72 patients with vocal fold paresis diagnosed using laryngeal electromyography, who had either been observed (n=21), treated only by injection (n=24), or treated only by surgery (n=27). Before and after treatment/observation, patients' subjective ratings of severity of vocal effort and fatigue were assessed using the Glottal Function Index. Laryngeal function was assessed using maximum phonation time and translaryngeal flow. None of the variables demonstrated a significant linear change across time. Post hoc Tukey analyses following analysis of variance (ANOVA) found significant differences in flow among three groups, those rating symptoms of effort as no problem, moderate problem, or severe problem. Post hoc Tukey analyses following ANOVA found significant differences in the amount that flow changed among three groups, those demonstrating no difference, minor differences, or major differences in ratings of effort before and after treatment. Changes in reported symptom severity of effort were related to changes in translaryngeal midvowel flow that were not explained by passage of time. 4. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. [Electromyographic differential diagnosis in cases of abducens nerve paresis with nuclear or distal neurogenic sive myogenic origine (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, M

    1979-09-01

    Abducens nerve paresis may be of nuclear, of peripheral distal neurogenic origine, or is simulated by a myogenic weakness of abduction. Polygraphic emg analysis of the oculoauricularphenomenon (oap) permits a differentiation. In the emg, the oap proved to be a physiologic and constant automatic and always bilateral interaction between the hemolateral abducens nerve and both Nn. faciales with corresponding and obligatory coinnervation of the Mm. retroauricularis of the external ear. In case of medullary, nuclear or internuclear lesions, the oap is disturbed, instable, diminished or abolished, whereas in distal neurogenic or myogenic paresis, even in complete paralysis the oap is bilaterally well preserved.

  12. Stationary facial nerve paresis after surgery for recurrent parotid pleomorphic adenoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Anders; Andreasen, Simon; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to assess degree of permanent facial nerve dysfunction after surgery for recurrent pleomorphic adenoma (RPA) of the parotid gland, including variables that might influence re-operation outcomes. Nationwide retrospective longitudinal cohort study including a questionnaire survey...... of patients undergoing surgery for RPA. Of 219 living patients, 198 (92 %) responded and 127 (63 %) reported no facial dysfunction. Statistically significant associations were found between number of surgeries and permanent facial nerve dysfunction of all degrees (OR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.16-1.78, p = 0.......001). A not significant tendency for females to be associated with worse outcome was found (p = 0.073). Risks of different degrees of paresis after the second-fourth surgeries were found (OR 1.86-2.19, p RPA of the parotid...

  13. Ophthalmologic outcome after third cranial nerve palsy or paresis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, A V; Repka, M X

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes and ophthalmologic outcome of oculomotor nerve palsy or paresis in children younger than 8 years of age. Patients evaluated between 1985 and 1997 were retrospectively reviewed. Data analyzed included vision, residual strabismus after surgery, aberrant reinnervation, binocular function, and anisometropia. Long-term outcome was assessed in patients followed-up longer than 6 months. Forty-one patients were identified. The most frequent causes were congenital (39%), traumatic (37%), and neoplastic (17%). Visual acuities were reduced in 71% of patients at the time of the initial visit. Long-term outcome could be assessed in 20 of the 41 patients (49%), with a mean follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.5 to 13 years). Visual acuities were reduced because of amblyopia in 35% and nonamblyopic factors in 25% of patients in the long-term outcome group at last follow-up. The best response to amblyopia therapy was in the congenital group, in which all patients improved to normal visual acuity. Strabismus surgery was performed on 8 of 20 children (40%) followed-up, none of whom demonstrated measurable stereopsis after operation despite improved alignment. Aberrant reinnervation was present in 9 of 20 patients (45%). Only 3 patients fully recovered from their oculomotor nerve injuries, and these were the only patients to regain measurable stereopsis. The causes in those 3 patients were congenital, traumatic, and neoplastic. Oculomotor nerve palsy/paresis is associated with poor visual and sensorimotor outcome in children younger than 8 years of age. The best ophthalmologic outcome was in the resolved cases (3 of 20; 15%). Amblyopia therapy was most effective with congenital causes, but treatment results were poor with other causes. Young children with posttraumatic and postneoplastic oculomotor nerve injuries demonstrated the worst ophthalmologic outcomes.

  14. Paresia diafragmática bilateral idiopática Idiopathic bilateral diaphragmatic paresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Corso Pereira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de um paciente com dispnéia intensa ao se deitar, em que foram excluídas doenças pulmonares, neuromusculares ou cardíacas, cuja investigação revelou paresia diafragmática bilateral. Um sinal chave para o diagnóstico foi a evidência de respiração paradoxal com o doente em decúbito supino. Havia piora da oxigenação e da capacidade vital forçada com a mudança da posição ortostática para supina. A fluoroscopia ortostática foi normal. A pressão inspiratória máxima estava muito reduzida. A estimulação elétrica transcutânea do diafragma foi normal, e a eletroestimulação do nervo frênico mostrou ausência de resposta, permitindo o diagnóstico de paresia bilateral do diafragma.We report the case of a patient with severe dyspnea upon reclining. Lung disease, neuromuscular disorders and heart disease were ruled out. However, during the course of the investigation, bilateral diaphragmatic paresis was discovered. A key sign leading to the diagnosis was evidence of paradoxical respiration in the dorsal decubitus position. When the patient was moved from the orthostatic position to the dorsal decubitus position, oxygenation and forced vital capacity worsened. The orthostatic fluoroscopy was normal. Maximal inspiratory pressure was severely reduced. The responses to transcutaneous electric stimulation of the diaphragm were normal. However, electric stimulation of the phrenic nerve produced no response, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paresis.

  15. Early hemi-diaphragmatic plication through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Christofis, Christos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    New symptom onset of respiratory distress without other cause, and new hemi-diaphragmatic elevation on chest radiography postcardiotomy, are usually adequate for the diagnosis of phrenic nerve paresis. The symptom severity varies (asymptomatic state to severe respiratory failure) depending on the degree of the lesion (paresis vs. paralysis), the laterality (unilateral or bilateral), the age, and the co-morbidity (respiratory, cardiac disease, morbid obesity, etc). Surgical treatment (hemi-diaphragmatic plication) is indicated only in the presence of symptoms. The established surgical treatment is plication of the affected hemidiaphragm which is generally considered safe and effective. Several techniques and approaches are employed for diaphragmatic plication (thoracotomy, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, video-assisted mini-thoracotomy, laparoscopic surgery). The timing of surgery depends on the severity and the progression of symptoms. In infants and young children with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis the clinical status is usually severe (failure to wean from mechanical ventilation), and early plication is indicated. Adults with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis usually suffer from chronic dyspnoea, and, in the absence of respiratory distress, conservative treatment is recommended for 6 months -2 years, since improvement is often observed. Nevertheless, earlier surgical treatment may be indicated in non-resolving respiratory failure. We present early (25th day postcardiotomy) right hemi-diaphragm plication, through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in a high risk patient with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis and respiratory distress. Early surgery with minimal surgical trauma, short operative time, minimal blood loss and postoperative pain, led to fast rehabilitation and avoidance of prolonged hospitalization complications. The relevant literature is discussed. PMID:23304442

  16. Exploration of sequence alterations of the vitamin D receptor gene in regard to hypocalcemia and periparturient paresis in dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Reiche, Maria Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Periparturient hypocalcemia belongs to the most important mineral metabolism dysfunctions in dairy cows. The incidence of subclinical hypocalcemia in the USA is given with 25% in heifers and up to 40 to 50 % in older cows (Reinhardt et al. 2010), the incidence of clinical symptoms (downer cow syndrome) is given with 5-10% (DeGaris und Lean 2008; Goff 2008). Hence manifold prophylaxis and therapy concepts to prevent periparturient paresis are established in current practice in dairy cattle hus...

  17. Central facial paresis and its impact on mimicry, psyche and quality of life in patients after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecny, Petr; Elfmark, Milan; Horak, Stanislav; Pastucha, Dalibor; Krobot, Alois; Urbanek, Karel; Kanovsky, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Using functional scales and face video analysis, changes in central facial paresis are monitored in patients with stroke after orofacial therapy and correlations between changes in mimicry, mental function and overall quality of life of patients after stroke are made. A prospective randomized study of patients after stroke with facial paresis. The functional status of the experimental group of 50 cases with orofacial regulation therapy and 49 control cases without mimicry therapy is observed after four weeks of rehabilitation. Changes in mimicry functions evaluated by the House-Brackmann Grading System (HBGS) clinical range and using 2D video analysis of the distance between the paretic corner of the mouth and earlobe at rest and during smiling were statistically better in the experimental group than in controls. Changes in mental function - depression using Beck Depression Inventory and changes in the quality of life using Bartle index and modified Rankin score (scale) were significantly greater in the experimental group. There was a very close relationship between the changes in mimicry, mental state and overall quality of life according to the Spearman correlative coefficient. Orofacial rehabilitation therapy for patients with paresis after stroke has a significant influence on the adjustment of mimicry, mental functions and overall quality of life after 4 weeks of treatment.

  18. [Autopsy case of Lissauer's general paresis with rapidly progressive left hemiparesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroko; Yoshida, Mari; Ando, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Makoto; Hashizume, Yoshio

    2009-06-01

    A 48-years-old man presented with slowly progressive bradykinesia, personality change and rapidly progressive left hemiparesis. On admission, he presented dementia, poor judgment, left hemiparesis. MRI revealed a widespread high intensity area in right hemisphere and MRA was almost normal. Serological tests of serum and CSF demonstrated high titers of antibodies to Treponema pallidum. He was treated for syphilis with daily penicillin injections without improvement. He died of sepsis eight months after admission. At autopsy, the brain weighed 1,100 g and the right cerebral hemisphere was atrophic, especially in frontal base, temporal, parietal, angular, and posterior regions covered by thickened, fibrotic leptomeninges. Microscopically, chronic meningoencephalitis was observed. Severe neuronal loss with gliosis was seen in the right cerebral cortices. Scattered rod-shaped microglia and inflammatory cell infiltration were visible in the cerebral parenchyma. The dorsal column of the spinal cord was not involved and meningovascular syphilis was unclear. The distribution of the encephalitic lesions was well correlated with the clinical and neuroradiological findings. This was a rare autopsy case presenting Lissauer's general paresis, clinically manifesting as rapidly progressive stroke-like episode.

  19. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of cows with parturient paresis using intravenous calcium and oral sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Grob, D; Hässig, M

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether intravenous infusion of 1000 ml 40% calcium borogluconate combined with the oral adminstration of 500 g sodium phosphate leads to a better cure rate and longer-lasting normocalcaemia and normophosphataemia than standard intravenous treatment with 500 ml calcium borogluconate in cows with parturient paresis. Forty recumbent cows with hypocalcaemia and hypophosphataemia were alternately allocated to group A or B. Cows of both groups were treated intravenously with 500 ml 40% calcium borogluconate, and cows of group B additionally received another 500 ml calcium borogluconate via slow intravenous infusion and 500 g sodium phosphate administered via an orogastric tube. Thirty-two cows stood within 8 hours after the start of treatment and 8 did not; of the 32 cows that stood, 18 belonged to group A and 14 to group B (90% of group A vs. 70% of group B; P = 0.23). Seven cows relapsed; of these and the 8 that did not respond to initial treatment, 10 stood after two standard intravenous treatments. Downer cow syndrome occurred in 5 cows, 3 of which recovered after aggressive therapy. The overall cure rate did not differ significantly between groups A and B. Twelve (60%) cows of group A and 14 (70%) cows of group B were cured after a single treatment and of the remaining 14, 11 were cured after two or more treatments. Two downer cows were euthanized and one other died of heart failure during treatment. Serum calcium concentrations during the first eight hours after the start of treatment were significantly higher in group B than in group A, and oral sodium phosphate caused a significant and lasting increase in inorganic phosphate. More cows of group B than group A were cured after a single treatment (P > 0.05). These findings, although not statistically significant, are promising and should be verified using a larger number of cows.

  1. The management of peripheral facial nerve palsy: "paresis" versus "paralysis" and sources of ambiguity in study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Thomas E; Abdelkafy, Wael; Cavero-Vanek, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    Conservative management of idiopathic or herpetic acute peripheral facial palsy (herpes zoster oticus, HZO) often leads to a favorable outcome. However, recent multicenter studies have challenged the necessity of antivirals. Whereas large numbers of patients are required to reveal statistical differences in a disease with an overall positive outcome, surprisingly few studies differentiate between patients with paresis and paralysis. Analyzing our own prospective cohort of patients and reviewing the current literature on conservative treatment of Bell's palsy and HZO, we reveal the importance of initial baseline assessment of the disease course to predict the outcome and to validate the impact of medical treatment options. STUDY DESIGN AND DATA SOURCE: Prospective analysis of consecutive patients referred to 2 tertiary referral centers and research on the Cochrane Library for current updates of their previous reviews and search of MEDLINE (1976-2009) for randomized trials on conservative treatment of acute facial palsy were conducted. One hundred ninety-six patients with Bell's palsy or HZO were followed up prospectively until complete recovery or at least for 12 months. The numeric Fisch score (FS) was used to classify facial function, and patients were separated between incomplete palsy (=paresis) and complete paralysis. Electroneuronography (ENoG) was used to further subdivide patients with paralysis. The treatment protocol was independent of the ongoing investigation including prednisone and valacyclovir in most patients. A total of 250 previous studies on facial palsy outcome were evaluated regarding their distinction between different severity scores at baseline and its impact on treatment outcome. Trials not making the distinction between paresis and paralysis at baseline and with an insufficient follow-up of less than 12 months were excluded. In the Bell's and HZO paresis group, all except 1 patient recovered completely, most of them within 3 months

  2. Can repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increase muscle strength in functional neurological paresis? A proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersma, M; Koops, E A; Vroomen, P C; Van der Hoeven, J H; Aleman, A; Leenders, K L; Maurits, N M; van Beilen, M

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic options are limited in functional neurological paresis disorder. Earlier intervention studies did not control for a placebo effect, hampering assessment of effectivity. A proof-of-principle investigation was conducted into the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), using a single-blind two-period placebo-controlled cross-over design. Eleven patients received active 15 Hz rTMS over the contralateral motor cortex (hand area), in two periods of 5 days, for 30 min once a day at 80% of resting motor threshold, with a train length of 2 s and an intertrain interval of 4 s. Eight of these eleven patients were also included in the placebo treatment condition. Primary outcome measure was change in muscle strength as measured by dynamometry after treatment. Secondary outcome measure was the subjective change in muscle strength after treatment. In patients who received both treatments, active rTMS induced a significantly larger median increase in objectively measured muscle strength (24%) compared to placebo rTMS (6%; P difference due to treatment, i.e. patients did not perceive these objectively measured motor improvements (P = 0.40). Our findings suggest that rTMS by itself can potentially improve muscle weakness in functional neurological paresis disorder. Whereas patients' muscle strength increased as measured with dynamometry, patients did not report increased functioning of the affected hand, subjectively. The results may indicate that decreased muscle strength is not the core symptom and that rTMS should be added to behavioral approaches in functional neurological paresis. © 2015 EAN.

  3. Facial paresis in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis: clinical and quantitative MRI-based evidence of widespread disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Katia; Carrete, Henrique; Lin, Jaime; de Oliveira, Pedro Alessandro Leite; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-08-01

    To assess the frequency and significance of facial paresis (FP) in a well-defined cohort of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients. One hundred consecutive patients with MRI findings consistent with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and concordant electroclinical data underwent facial motor examination at rest, with voluntary expression, and with spontaneous smiling. Hippocampal, amygdaloid, and temporopolar (TP) volumetric measures were acquired. Thirty healthy subjects, matched according to age and sex, were taken as controls. Central-type FP was found in 46 patients. In 41 (89%) of 46, it was visualized at rest, with voluntary and emotional expression characterizing true facial motor paresis. In 33 (72%) of 46 patients, FP was contralateral to the side of MTS. By using a 2-SD cutoff from the mean of normal controls, we found reduction in TP volume ipsilateral to MTS in 61% of patients with FP and in 33% of those without (p = 0.01). Febrile seizures as initial precipitating injury (IPI) were observed in 34% of the patients and were classified as complex in 12 (26%) of 46 of those with FP and in five (9%) of 54 of those without (p = 0.02). The presence of FP was significantly associated with a shorter latent period and younger age at onset of habitual seizures, in particular, with secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Facial paresis is a reliable lateralizing sign in MTLE and was associated with history of complex febrile seizures as IPI, younger age at onset of disease, and atrophy of temporal pole ipsilateral to MTS, indicating more widespread disease.

  4. A hybrid BMI-based exoskeleton for paresis: EMG control for assisting arm movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Toshihiro; Sakurada, Takeshi; Koike, Yasuharu; Kansaku, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) technologies have succeeded in controlling robotic exoskeletons, enabling some paralyzed people to control their own arms and hands. We have developed an exoskeleton asynchronously controlled by EEG signals. In this study, to enable real-time control of the exoskeleton for paresis, we developed a hybrid system with EEG and EMG signals, and the EMG signals were used to estimate its joint angles. Eleven able-bodied subjects and two patients with upper cervical spinal cord injuries (SCIs) performed hand and arm movements, and the angles of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the index finger, wrist, and elbow were estimated from EMG signals using a formula that we derived to calculate joint angles from EMG signals, based on a musculoskeletal model. The formula was exploited to control the elbow of the exoskeleton after automatic adjustments. Four able-bodied subjects and a patient with upper cervical SCI wore an exoskeleton controlled using EMG signals and were required to perform hand and arm movements to carry and release a ball. Estimated angles of the MP joints of index fingers, wrists, and elbows were correlated well with the measured angles in 11 able-bodied subjects (correlation coefficients were 0.81  ±  0.09, 0.85  ±  0.09, and 0.76  ±  0.13, respectively) and the patients (e.g. 0.91  ±  0.01 in the elbow of a patient). Four able-bodied subjects successfully positioned their arms to adequate angles by extending their elbows and a joint of the exoskeleton, with root-mean-square errors  exoskeleton, successfully carried a ball to a goal in all 10 trials. A BMI-based exoskeleton for paralyzed arms and hands using real-time control was realized by designing a new method to estimate joint angles based on EMG signals, and these may be useful for practical rehabilitation and the support of daily actions.

  5. A hybrid BMI-based exoskeleton for paresis: EMG control for assisting arm movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Toshihiro; Sakurada, Takeshi; Koike, Yasuharu; Kansaku, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface (BMI) technologies have succeeded in controlling robotic exoskeletons, enabling some paralyzed people to control their own arms and hands. We have developed an exoskeleton asynchronously controlled by EEG signals. In this study, to enable real-time control of the exoskeleton for paresis, we developed a hybrid system with EEG and EMG signals, and the EMG signals were used to estimate its joint angles. Approach. Eleven able-bodied subjects and two patients with upper cervical spinal cord injuries (SCIs) performed hand and arm movements, and the angles of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the index finger, wrist, and elbow were estimated from EMG signals using a formula that we derived to calculate joint angles from EMG signals, based on a musculoskeletal model. The formula was exploited to control the elbow of the exoskeleton after automatic adjustments. Four able-bodied subjects and a patient with upper cervical SCI wore an exoskeleton controlled using EMG signals and were required to perform hand and arm movements to carry and release a ball. Main results. Estimated angles of the MP joints of index fingers, wrists, and elbows were correlated well with the measured angles in 11 able-bodied subjects (correlation coefficients were 0.81  ±  0.09, 0.85  ±  0.09, and 0.76  ±  0.13, respectively) and the patients (e.g. 0.91  ±  0.01 in the elbow of a patient). Four able-bodied subjects successfully positioned their arms to adequate angles by extending their elbows and a joint of the exoskeleton, with root-mean-square errors  exoskeleton, successfully carried a ball to a goal in all 10 trials. Significance. A BMI-based exoskeleton for paralyzed arms and hands using real-time control was realized by designing a new method to estimate joint angles based on EMG signals, and these may be useful for practical rehabilitation and the support of daily actions.

  6. Femoral nerve compression syndrome with paresis of the quadriceps muscle caused by radiotherapy of malignant tumours. A report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, L E [Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, Helsinki, Finland

    1975-01-01

    Four patients showed signs of femoral nerve compression with subsequent paresis of the quadriceps muscle, after radiation therapy of malignant tumours. The compression was caused by scar tissue due to radiation treatment of the inguinal region. The first symptom was radiating pain in the front of the thigh and lower leg which appeared 12-16 months after X-ray treatment. A decrease in the strength of quadriceps muscle occurred some months later. In one case the femoral nerve was decompressed, another patient was treated by an intradural phenolglycerin injection and one patient was treated with cortisone and oxiphenbutanzone. In these cases the pain decreased considerably, but in one case only the paresis of the quadriceps muscle improved after treatment.

  7. Effects of Voice Therapy on Laryngeal Motor Units During Phonation in Chronic Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paresis Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mami; Hitomi, Takefumi; Takekawa, Takashi; Tsuji, Takuya; Kishimoto, Yo; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-09-26

    Injury to the superior laryngeal nerve can result in dysphonia, and in particular, loss of vocal range. It can be an especially difficult problem to address with either voice therapy or surgical intervention. Some clinicians and scientists suggest that combining vocal exercises with adjunctive neuromuscular electrical stimulation may enhance the positive effects of voice therapy for superior laryngeal nerve paresis (SLNP). However, the effects of voice therapy without neuromuscular electrical stimulation are unknown. The purpose of this retrospective study was to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of voice therapy for rehabilitating chronic SLNP dysphonia in two subjects, using interspike interval (ISI) variability of laryngeal motor units by laryngeal electromyography (LEMG). Both patients underwent LEMG and were diagnosed with having 70% recruitment of the cricothyroid muscle, and 70% recruitment of the cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles, respectively. Both patients received voice therapy for 3 months. Grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, stroboscopic examination, aerodynamic assessment, acoustic analysis, and Voice Handicap Index-10 were performed before and after voice therapy. Mean ISI variability during steady phonation was also assessed. After voice therapy, both patients showed improvement in vocal assessments by acoustic, aerodynamic, GRBAS, and Voice Handicap Index-10 analysis. LEMG indicated shortened ISIs in both cases. This study suggests that voice therapy for chronic SLNP dysphonia can be useful for improving SLNP and voice quality. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laryngeal neuropathy of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: further observations and novel mutations associated with vocal fold paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian; Sulica, Lucian; Guss, Joel; Blitzer, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    To describe and define laryngeal neuropathy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Retrospective record review from a university laryngology practice. Four adult CMT patients presented with laryngeal symptoms. Three patients exhibited bilateral vocal fold palsy, in each case with more severe hypomobility on the left. One case exhibited an isolated left vocal fold palsy. All patients complained of hoarseness and stridor, three had dyspnea, two patients had dysphagia, and one had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). One patient has required airway surgery to date. Genetic testing revealed known sequence alterations in one case and sequence alterations previously not associated with laryngeal dysfunction in two cases. One case was familial and two were sporadic; information is not available in a fourth. The clinical course of the cases suggests slowly progressive neuropathy that appears to be nerve length dependent. The lack of severe respiratory distress despite dense bilateral paresis is consistent with existing reports and with the reported low rate of tracheostomy in adults with laryngeal manifestations of CMT. Genetic testing does not currently inform expectations or management of laryngeal disease. Dyspnea, dysphagia, and OSA symptoms in patients with CMT require careful laryngologic evaluation.

  9. Knee Moment-Angle Characteristics and Semitendinosus Muscle Morphology in Children with Spastic Paresis Selected for Medial Hamstring Lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2016-01-01

    To increase knee range of motion and improve gait in children with spastic paresis (SP), the semitendinosus muscle (ST) amongst other hamstring muscles is frequently lengthened by surgery, but with variable success. Little is known about how the pre-surgical mechanical and morphological characteristics of ST muscle differ between children with SP and typically developing children (TD). The aims of this study were to assess (1) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology in children with SP selected for medial hamstring lengthening differ from TD children, as well as (2) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology are related. In nine SP and nine TD children, passive knee moment-angle characteristics and morphology of ST (i.e. fascicle length, muscle belly length, tendon length, physiological cross-sectional area, and volume) were assessed by hand-held dynamometry and freehand 3D ultrasound, respectively. At net knee flexion moments above 0.5 Nm, more flexed knee angles were found for SP compared to TD children. The measured knee angle range between 0 and 4 Nm was 30% smaller in children with SP. Muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area, and fascicle length normalized to femur length were smaller in SP compared to TD children (62%, 48%, and 18%, respectively). Sixty percent of the variation in knee angles at 4 Nm net knee moment was explained by ST fascicle length. Altered knee moment-angle characteristics indicate an increased ST stiffness in SP children. Morphological observations indicate that in SP children planned for medial hamstring lengthening, the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth of ST muscle fibers is reduced. The reduced fascicle length can partly explain the increased ST stiffness and, hence, a more flexed knee joint in these SP children.

  10. Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T; Eickhof, C; van Kaick, S; Engel, U; Pinkowski, C; Kalok, S; Pause, M

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis. Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial. Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres. Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients. Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training. Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors). An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected. The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

  11. EFFICACY OF COMPLEX NEUROREHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH A POST-STROKE ARM PARESIS WITH THE USE OF A BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE+EXOSKELETON SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Frolov

    2016-01-01

    1.05 points in the comparison group, p<0.001. Conclusion: Rehabilitation of patients with post-stroke paresis with the use of BCI+exoskeleton led not also to a decrease in neurological deficit and an improvement of the paretic arm motor function, but also improved parameters of daily activities. Further studies of the effects of BCI+exoskeleton rehabilitation procedures on the course of motor function restoration are planned.

  12. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI; The relationship between Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle and functional recovery of paresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Iwabuchi, Sadamu (Nanasawa Rehabilitation Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author).

  13. Diagnosis of functional (psychogenic paresis and weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savkov V.S.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional (conversion neurological symptoms represent one of the most common situations faced by neurologists in their everyday practice. Among them, acute or subacute functional weakness may mimic very prevalent conditions such as stroke or traumatic injury. In the diagnosis of functional weakness, although elements of the history are helpful, physical signs are often of crucial importance in the diagnosis and positive signs are as important as absence of signs of disease. Hence, accurate and reliable positive signs of functional weakness are valuable for obtaining timely diagnosis and treatment, making it possible to avoid unnecessary or invasive tests and procedures up to thrombolysis. Functional weakness commonly presents as weakness of an entire limb, paraparesis, or hemiparesis, with observable or demonstrable inconsistencies and non-anatomic accompaniments. Documentation of limb movements during sleep, the arm drop test, the Babinski’s trunk-thigh test, Hoover tests, the Sonoo abductor test, and various dynamometer tests can provide useful bedside diagnostic information on functional weakness. We therefore present here a brief overview of the positive neurological signs of functional weakness available, both in the lower and in the upper limbs; but none should be used in isolation and must be interpreted in the overall context of the presentation. It should be borne in mind that a patient may have both a functional and an organic disorder.

  14. From Paresis to PANDAS and PANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 8 items) Schizophrenia (21 items) Populations Children and Adolescents (12 items) Diversity and Ethnic Groups (5 items) Women’s Mental Health (1 item) Military Service Members (4 items) Global Mental Health (2 items) Prevention Prevention (7 items) Suicide Prevention (16 items) Research ...

  15. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoceli, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  16. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-04-01

     The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation.  Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations.

  17. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    OpenAIRE

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective:?The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case:?Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing ...

  18. 麻痹性痴呆患者认知功能障碍与精神行为症状的随访研究%Cognitive impairment and psychotic symptoms in patients with general paresis of insane: a follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贲; 彭琪; 李丽娟; 宁玉萍; 施海姗; 钟笑梅; 侯乐; 王华丽; 王艳华; 陈辛茹; 罗新妮; 吴章英

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of cognitive impairment and psychotic symptoms in general paresis of insane (GPI) before and after penicillin therapy, and explore factors that may predict the clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty patients with GPI were recruited. All GPI patients underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment before receiving penicillin therapy, and returned for follow-up visits after 7 months. The severity of dementia was determined by Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR), cognitive functions were assessed by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Alzheimer 's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), ability of daily living was assessed by Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IALD) and Physical Self maintenance Scale(PSMS), behavioral and psychological symptoms were assessed by Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Aqueous crystalline penicillin G 24 million units per day was administered as continuous infusion for 14 days, followed by benzathine penicillin 2.4 million units IM once per week for 3 weeks. Patients returned for follow-up visits after 7 months. Clinical outcomes were determined by the improvement of neuropsychological test scores at the end of the treatment. Grouped by CDR scores, changes in neuropsychological tests scores among different GPI groups were used to explore the correlation between severity of dementia and clinical outcomes. Univariate analysis and multivariate linear regression analysis were used to identify factors that may predict the clinical outcomes. Results (1)After penicillin therapy, GPI patients' MMSE scores(14.4± 6.9 vs.17.1 ± 9.1)and IADL scores(4.0(2.0, 5.0)vs.6.0(2.0, 7.3))both improved significantly(t=5.820, Z=3.710, P1,significant change was found only in total scores of NPI (t=-3.772,P1.0分)患者治疗前后各量表评分的变化;采用相关分析、多元线性逐步回归分析GPI患者预后相关的因素.结果 (1)GPI患者MMSE总分[(14.4±6.9)

  19. Local cortical hypoperfusion imaged with CT perfusion during postictal Todd's paresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Binder, Devin K. [University of California, Department of Neurological Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Wade S. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wintermark, Max; Dillon, William P. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Postictal ('Todd's') paralysis, or 'epileptic hemiplegia,' is a well-known complication of focal or generalized epileptic seizures. However, it is unclear whether the pathophysiology of Todd's paralysis is related to alterations in cerebral perfusion. We report CT perfusion findings in a patient presenting with postictal aphasia and right hemiparesis. A 62-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, closed head injury and posttraumatic epilepsy, presented with acute onset aphasia and right hemiparesis. A non-contrast head CT scan demonstrated no acute hemorrhage. Left hemispheric ischemia was suspected, and the patient was considered for acute thrombolytic therapy. MRI revealed a subtle increase in signal intensity involving the left medial temporal, hippocampal and parahippocampal regions on both T2-weighted FLAIR and diffusion-weighted sequences. CT angiography and CT perfusion study were performed. The CT perfusion study and CT angiography demonstrated a dramatic reduction in cerebral blood flow and blood volume involving the entire left hemisphere, but with relative symmetry of mean transit time, ruling out a large vessel occlusion. Clinical resolution of the aphasia and hemiparesis occurred within a few hours, and correlated with normalization of perfusion to the left hemisphere (detected by MR perfusion). This unique case is the first in which clinical evidence of Todd's paralysis has been correlated with reversible postictal hemispheric changes on CT and MR perfusion studies. This is important because CT perfusion study is being used more and more in the diagnosis of acute stroke, and one needs to be careful to not misinterpret the data. (orig.)

  20. Local cortical hypoperfusion imaged with CT perfusion during postictal Todd's paresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Binder, Devin K.; Smith, Wade S.; Wintermark, Max; Dillon, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Postictal (''Todd's'') paralysis, or ''epileptic hemiplegia,'' is a well-known complication of focal or generalized epileptic seizures. However, it is unclear whether the pathophysiology of Todd's paralysis is related to alterations in cerebral perfusion. We report CT perfusion findings in a patient presenting with postictal aphasia and right hemiparesis. A 62-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, closed head injury and posttraumatic epilepsy, presented with acute onset aphasia and right hemiparesis. A non-contrast head CT scan demonstrated no acute hemorrhage. Left hemispheric ischemia was suspected, and the patient was considered for acute thrombolytic therapy. MRI revealed a subtle increase in signal intensity involving the left medial temporal, hippocampal and parahippocampal regions on both T2-weighted FLAIR and diffusion-weighted sequences. CT angiography and CT perfusion study were performed. The CT perfusion study and CT angiography demonstrated a dramatic reduction in cerebral blood flow and blood volume involving the entire left hemisphere, but with relative symmetry of mean transit time, ruling out a large vessel occlusion. Clinical resolution of the aphasia and hemiparesis occurred within a few hours, and correlated with normalization of perfusion to the left hemisphere (detected by MR perfusion). This unique case is the first in which clinical evidence of Todd's paralysis has been correlated with reversible postictal hemispheric changes on CT and MR perfusion studies. This is important because CT perfusion study is being used more and more in the diagnosis of acute stroke, and one needs to be careful to not misinterpret the data. (orig.)

  1. Dry Needle Acupuncture In Locomotory Paresis Post Column Trauma In Dog – Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin Hulea

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this case study a dog from Timisoara, Romania, 4 years old, female, victim of an accident was taken in therapy. The dog was examined clinically and radiographically. Major clinical sign was that dog unable to lift the hindquarters and in terms of radiographic fracture was identified in the lumbar spine at L1 vertebra, which led to the displacement of spinal canal and compression of the spinal cord. Treatment was established through the dry needle acupuncture technique perpendicular insertion into (Bladder channel, BL acupoints, in our case BL: -18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30; 40; 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54 and respectively 60, for 30 minutes a session / day, consecutively, for 60 days treatment period. Treatment outcomes showed a clear increase in skin and neural sensitivity of the area, finally animal being recovered.

  2. Efficacy of brain-computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation for chronic paresis after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaino, Masahiko; Ono, Takashi; Shindo, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ota, Tetsuo; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-04-01

    Brain computer interface technology is of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic measure for people with severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of brain computer interface, by comparing conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and brain computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation, using an A-B-A-B withdrawal single-subject design. A 38-year-old male with severe hemiplegia due to a putaminal haemorrhage participated in this study. The design involved 2 epochs. In epoch A, the patient attempted to open his fingers during the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, irrespective of his actual brain activity. In epoch B, neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied only when a significant motor-related cortical potential was observed in the electroencephalogram. The subject initially showed diffuse functional magnetic resonance imaging activation and small electro-encephalogram responses while attempting finger movement. Epoch A was associated with few neurological or clinical signs of improvement. Epoch B, with a brain computer interface, was associated with marked lateralization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and blood oxygenation level dependent responses. Voluntary electromyogram (EMG) activity, with significant EEG-EMG coherence, was also prompted. Clinical improvement in upper-extremity function and muscle tone was observed. These results indicate that self-directed training with a brain computer interface may induce activity- dependent cortical plasticity and promote functional recovery. This preliminary clinical investigation encourages further research using a controlled design.

  3. Acoustic neuroma: predominance of Antoni type B cells in tumors of patients with vestibular paresis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stipkovits, E.M.; Graamans, K.; Jansen, G.H.; Velthof, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate whether in patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms is related to the histologic characteristics of the tumor. STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a retrospective clinical study. SETTING: The study was conducted at

  4. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  5. Hot topic: prevention of parturient paresis and subclinical hypocalcemia in dairy cows by zeolite A administration in the dry period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Thilsing, Trine

    2001-01-01

    To test the effects of a zeolite feed supplement on parturient calcium status and milk fever, two groups of dry cows were treated with either 1 kg of zeolite/d or none for 4 wk prepartum. At calving and d 1 and 2 after calving all cows were given 250 g of calcium carbonate as a drench, and a blood...... sample was taken. Serum calcium analysis revealed a greater calcium concentration in zeolite-treated cows. While three control cows contracted milk fever, necessitating intravenous calcium therapy, and six out of eight control cows experienced serum calcium levels below 2 mmol/L in one or more samples...... taken, none of the zeolite-treated cows contracted milk fever or experienced subclinical hypocalcemia....

  6. A thalamic-fronto-parietal structural covariance network emerging in the course of recovery from hand paresis after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio eAbela

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe structural covariance networks of grey matter volume (GMV change in 28 patients with first-ever stroke to the primary sensorimotor cortices, and to investigate their relationship to hand function recovery and local GMV change.Methods: Tensor based morphometry maps derived from high resolution structural images were subject to principal component analyses to identify the networks. We calculated correlations between network expression and local GMV change, sensorimotor hand function and lesion volume. To verify which of the structural covariance networks of GMV change have a significant relationship to hand function we performed an additional multivariate regression approach.Results: Expression of the second network, explaining 9.1% of variance, correlated with GMV increase in the medio-dorsal (md thalamus and hand motor skill. Patients with positive expression coefficients were distinguished by significantly higher GMV-increase of this structure during stroke recovery. Significant nodes of this network were located in md thalamus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and higher order sensorimotor cortices. Parameter of hand function had a unique relationship to the network and depended on an interaction between network expression and lesion volume. Inversely network expression is limited in patients with large lesion volumes.Conclusions: Chronic phase of sensorimotor cortical stroke has been characterized by a large scale covarying structural network in the ipsilesional hemisphere associated specifically with sensorimotor hand skill. Its expression is related to GMV-increase of md thalamus, one constituent of the network, and correlated with the cortico-striato-thalamic loop involved in control of motor execution and higher order sensorimotor cortices. A close relation between expression of this network with degree of recovery might indicate reduced compensatory resources in the impaired subgroup.

  7. [Depressor anguli oris sign (DAO) in facial paresis. How to search it and release the smile (technical note)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, D; Bénichou, L; Iodice, A; Giot, J-P

    2012-06-01

    After facial paralysis recovery, it is common to note a co-contraction between depressor anguli oris (DAO) muscle and zygomatic muscles. This DAO co-contraction will "obstruct" the patient's smile. The purpose of this technical note is to show how to find the DAO sign and how to free up the smile. TECHNICAL: This co-contraction between the zygomatic muscles and DAO research is placing a finger on marionette line, asking the patient to smile: we perceive a rope under the skin corresponding to the abnormal contraction and powerful DAO. A diagnostic test with lidocaine injection into the DAO can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. The treatment of pathological DAO's contraction can be by injection of botulinum toxin in the DAO, or by surgical myectomy. In all cases, a speech therapy complete the treatment. The DAO sign is a semiological entity easy to find. His treatment releases smile without negative effect on the facial expression as the DAO is especially useful in the expression of disgust. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical, serological and virological characteristics of an outbreak of paresis and neonatal foal disease due to equine herpesvirus-1 on a stud farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartan, C G; Russell, M M; Wood, J L; Mumford, J A

    1995-01-07

    An outbreak of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) occurred on a large stud farm with 133 mares, 54 foals and four stallions, and at least 85 mares, 22 foals and three stallions were infected. Clinical disease was observed in 16 mares, two stallions and 13 foals and the predominant clinical signs were scrotal oedema, ataxia and loss of libido in the stallions, ataxia and recumbency in the mares and uveitis and nasal discharge in the foals, although pneumonia and colic with intussusception were also recorded at autopsy. Neurological disease was more common in the mares nursing foals (12 of 38 infected) than in barren mares (one of 46 infected). Three mares died during the outbreak and no mares that had been recumbent bred again. Control procedures were based on virological and serological testing and stringent management practices to limit the spread of infection between groups of mares and foals and away from the stud farm. There were marked antibody responses in the adult horses, but they were generally poor in the foals; three of the nine viraemic foals did not develop significant increases in the levels of circulating antibody. Recommendations are made for the management of future outbreaks.

  9. The Efficacy of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Using Transcranial Electrically Stimulated Muscle-evoked Potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for Predicting Postoperative Segmental Upper Extremity Motor Paresis After Cervical Laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Izumi, Bunichiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Kazumi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Prospective study. To investigate the efficacy of transcranial electrically stimulated muscle-evoked potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for predicting postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy following cervical laminoplasty. Postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy, especially in the deltoid and biceps (so-called C5 palsy), is the most common complication following cervical laminoplasty. Some papers have reported that postoperative C5 palsy cannot be predicted by TcE-MsEPs, although others have reported that it can be predicted. This study included 160 consecutive cases that underwent open-door laminoplasty, and TcE-MsEP monitoring was performed in the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, abductor digiti minimi, tibialis anterior, and abductor hallucis. A >50% decrease in the wave amplitude was defined as an alarm point. According to the monitoring alarm, interventions were performed, which include steroid administration, foraminotomies, etc. Postoperative deltoid and biceps palsy occurred in 5 cases. Among the 155 cases without segmental upper extremity palsy, there were no monitoring alarms. Among the 5 deltoid and biceps palsy cases, 3 had significant wave amplitude decreases in the biceps during surgery, and palsy occurred when the patients awoke from anesthesia (acute type). In the other 2 cases in which the palsy occurred 2 days after the operation (delayed type), there were no significant wave decreases. In all of the cases, the palsy was completely resolved within 6 months. The majority of C5 palsies have been reported to occur several days after surgery, but some of them have been reported to occur immediately after surgery. Our results demonstrated that TcE-MsEPs can predict the acute type, whereas the delayed type cannot be predicted. A >50% wave amplitude decrease in the biceps is useful to predict acute-type segmental upper extremity palsy. Further examination about the interventions for monitoring alarm will be essential for preventing palsy.

  10. Laryngeal Electromyographic findings in patients with vocal fold motion asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Peak; Isseroff, Tova F; Parasher, Arjun; Richards, Amanda; Sivak, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Vocal fold motion asymmetry (VFMA) is often attributed to vocal fold paresis or an anatomical variant. Although laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) may be used to evaluate patients with vocal fold paresis, electrodiagnostic findings in VFMA have not been well defined. Review of a case series Twenty-five symptomatic patients with VFMA were examined by LEMG, and the findings were analyzed. Although all were thought to have unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis, LEMG showed only nine to have unilateral recurrent nerve paresis. There were nine with both ipsilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve and superior laryngeal nerve paresis, four with bilateral paresis, and three were normal. Reduced total number of units, reduced recruitment, motor units firing fast, and polyphasic units were more common, whereas fibrillation potentials, fasciculation, positive sharp waves, and complex repetitive discharges were uncommon. The LEMG findings are most consistent with old, healed neuropathy. McNemar's test for the acute versus chronic denervation potentials showed significant differences. VFMA has a high incidence of vocal fold paresis that can be better defined by LEMG. The site and side of paresis is often wrong based on laryngoscopy findings alone. The LEMG findings of VFMA appear to be consistent with old, healed neuropathy 4 Laryngoscope, 126:E273-E277, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Left is right and right is wrong: fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm. (author)

  12. Left is right and right is wrong: Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm.

  13. aa alysis of the retinal, cardiovascular and neurological disorders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DISORDERS IN DIABETICS ATTENDING AN OUT-PATIENT CLINIC. P. MARKMAN ..... of individual abnormalities within this group was as follows: I. Paresis of the ..... found gross involvement of vibration sense to be less common than loss of ...

  14. Gait training assisted by multi-channel functional electrical stimulation early after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemendaal, M. van; Bus, S.A.; Boer, C.E. de; Nollet, F.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Beelen, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many stroke survivors suffer from paresis of lower limb muscles, resulting in compensatory gait patterns characterised by asymmetries in spatial and temporal parameters and reduced walking capacity. Functional electrical stimulation has been used to improve walking capacity, but evidence

  15. MOG-IgG in NMO and related disorders: A multicenter study of 50 patients. Part 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarius, Sven; Kleiter, Ingo; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2016-01-01

    identified. All were negative for AQP4-IgG. Symptoms included respiratory insufficiency, intractable nausea and vomiting (INV), dysarthria, dysphagia, impaired cough reflex, oculomotor nerve palsy and diplopia, nystagmus, internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO), facial nerve paresis, trigeminal hypesthesia...

  16. Documentation of diaphragmal paralysis with digital subtraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggershauser, T.; Muenchen Univ.; Buente, E.; Muenchen Univ.; Kohz, P.; Muenchen Univ.; Fink, U.; Muenchen Univ.

    1992-01-01

    The causative factors for a paresis of the diaphragm are primarily subsequent to operations on lesions of the phrenic nerve or on such mediastinal tumors as lyphomas which result in compression or infiltration of the nerves. (orig.) [de

  17. Documentation of diaphragmal paralysis with digital subtraction techniques. Dokumentation von Zwerchfellparesen mit digitaler Subtraktionstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggershauser, T. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke); Buente, E. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke); Kohz, P. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke); Fink, U. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke)

    1992-01-01

    The causative factors for a paresis of the diaphragm are primarily subsequent to operations on lesions of the phrenic nerve or on such mediastinal tumors as lyphomas which result in compression or infiltration of the nerves. (orig.)

  18. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Minko Minkov; Maria Vankova; Radoslav Minkov; Stefaniya Terzieva; Toni Dimitrov; Iskren Velikov

    2012-01-01

    A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the c...

  19. Pupilparalyse. En sjaelden komplikation ved øjeninfektion med Varicella zoster-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, P

    2001-01-01

    Pupillary paralysis and paresis of the peripheral facial nerve on the left side was found in a 68-year-old man with concussion and herpes zoster ophthalmicus on the left eye. Post mortem examination showed no sign of intracranial hemorrhage. The cause of death was pulmonary oedema and aspiration....... The neurological signs were probably caused by herpes zoster affection of the oculomotor and optic nerves in association with the facial nerve paresis induced by zoster....

  20. Posterior fossa gangliocytoma with facial nerve invasion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koerbel Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5 year-old boy with a cerebellar gangliocytoma with a peripheral right facial paresis and ataxia is presented. His MRI showed a heterogenous, diffuse lesion, isointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2-weigthed sequences, involving the right cerebellar hemisphere with direct extension into the right facial nerve. The present case is the first description of a gangliocytoma with direct facial nerve invasion, as demonstrated for the facial nerve paresis and supported by MRI and surgical inspection.

  1. Predictors of vertigo in patients with untreated vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jan Fredrik; Nilsen, Kathrin Skorpa; Vassbotn, Flemming Slinning; Møller, Per; Myrseth, Erling; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Goplen, Frederik Kragerud

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that vertigo is the most powerful negative predictor of quality of life in patients with vestibular schwannomas, but the variability in vertigo symptom severity is still poorly understood. We wanted to find out whether vertigo could be related to objective parameters such as tumor size, location, vestibular nerve function, hearing, and postural stability in patients with untreated vestibular schwannomas. Baseline data from prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral center. Four hundred thirty-four consecutive patients with unilateral VS diagnosed on MRI. Mean age 56 years (range 16-84 yr). Fifty-three percent women. Diagnostic, with a medical history, otolaryngological examination, pure-tone and speech audiometry, MRI, posturography, and videonystagmography with bithermal caloric tests. Dizziness measured on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcome measures were canal paresis and postural imbalance (static and dynamic posturography). Three hundred three patients (70%) completed the VAS. Severe dizziness, defined as VAS 75 or greater, was reported by 9% of the patients. Larger tumors were associated with higher risk of postural instability and canal paresis. Moderate to severe dizziness was associated with postural imbalance and canal paresis, and possibly with small to medium-sized tumors. Postural instability was related to tumor size and canal paresis when measured by dynamic, but not with static, posturography. A minority of VS patients experience severe vestibular symptoms related to canal paresis and postural instability. A curvilinear relationship is hypothesized between tumor size and dizziness.

  2. IMPAIRED MOBILITY OF VOCAL FOLDS - etiology and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Pintarić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paresis or paralysis of one or both vocal cords affects some significant aspects of a human life: breathing, swallowing and speech. The major causes for reduced mobility or even immobility are innervation damage, less often fixation of vocal cord or impaired mobility of crycoarytenoid joint. An injury of the superior or/and inferior laryngeal nerve can be a consequence of different medical procedures, tumor growth, trauma, infection, neurological disorders, radiation exposure, toxic damage, impaired circulation of the area or it is idiopathic. The symptoms are different in the case of unilateral and bilateral paresis of the vocal folds. They also depend on the cause for the impaired mobility. In the patients with unilateral vocal fold paresis, hoarseness and aspiration during swallowing are the leading symptoms. In the bilateral vocal fold paralysis, dyspnea prevails. 

  3. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  4. Temporary ectropion therapy by adhesive taping: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Anke

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Various surgical procedures are available to correct paralytic ectropion, which are applied in irreversible facial paresis. Problems occur when facial paresis has an unclear prognosis, since surgery of the lower eyelid is usually irreversible. We propose a simple method to correct temporary ectropion in facial palsy by applying an adhesive strip. Patients and methods Ten patients with peripheral facial paresis and paralytic ectropion were treated with an adhesive strip to correct paralytic ectropion. We used "Steri-Strips" (45 × 6.0 mm, which were taped on the carefully cleaned skin of the lower eyelid and of the adjacent zygomatic region until the prognosis of the paresis was clarified. In addition to the examiner's evaluation of the lower lacrimal point in the lacrimal lake, subjective improvement of the symptoms was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS, 1–10. Results 9 patients reported a clear improvement of the symptoms after adhesive taping. There was a clear regression of tearing (VAS (median = 8; 1 = no improvement, 10 = very good improvement, the cosmetic impairment of the adhesive tape was low (VAS (median = 2.5; 1 = no impairment, 10 = severe impairment and most of the patients found the use of the adhesive strip helpful. There was slight reddening of the skin in one case and well tolerated by the facial skin in the other cases. Conclusion The cause and location of facial nerve damage are decisive for the type of surgical therapy. In potentially reversible facial paresis, procedures should be used that are easily performed and above all reversible without complications. Until a reliable prognosis of the paresis can be made, adhesive taping is suited for the temporary treatment of paralytic ectropion. Adhesive taping is simple and can be performed by the patient.

  5. [Hemiparesis and facial palsy caused by methotrexate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda Arenas, E; García Corzo, J; Franco Ospina, L

    2013-12-01

    Methotrexate used in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia, can cause neurotoxicity, including a rare presentation with hemiparesis. We describe two teenagers, who during the implementation of the M phase of the protocol, suffered hemiparesis, facial paresis and dysarthria which quickly reversed. Leukemia involvement of the central nervous system and stroke, were ruled out. We briefly review the pathophysiology of methotrexate neurotoxicity, the characteristics of the focal paresis presentation and magnetic resonance image findings. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Intoxication following minor stabs from the spines of a porcupine fish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorcum, Teetske F van; Janse, Max; Leenders, Marianne E C; Vries, Irma de; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We report an unusual intoxication by tetrodotoxin (TTX). A curator of an aquarium sustained minor punctures in his finger from the spines of a porcupine fish during an autopsy of a dead porcupine fish. He developed paresthesias, numbness, paresis, dizziness and headache. The death of the fish might

  7. Case report: Calcified chronic subdural haematoma in an elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcified chronic subdural haematoma [CCSDH] is a rare complication of the relatively more common condition of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). We present the case of a 68yr old man referred with a 2 week history of sudden onset Right hemi paresis generalized tonic clonic seizures and aphasia. There was a ...

  8. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J. S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J. P. K.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients, fitted

  9. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J.S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    This paper describes a new, automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients,

  10. Characterizing the protocol for early modified constraint-induced movement therapy in the EXPLICIT-stroke trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, R van; Wegen, E. van; Krogt, H. van der; Bakker, C.D.; Buma, F.; Klomp, A.; Kordelaar, J. van; Kwakkel, G.; Geurts, A.C.; Kuijk, A.A. van; Lindeman, E.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Arendzen, H.J.; Meskers, C.G.; Helm, F.C.T. van der; Vlugt, E. de

    2013-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a commonly used rehabilitation intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. CIMT was originally developed for patients with a chronic upper limb paresis. Although there are indications that exercise interventions should start as early as

  11. Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, H.; McCall, B.; Barrett, J.

    1999-01-01

    The newly emerging Australian bat lyssavirus causes rabieslike disease in bats and humans. A captive juvenile black flying fox exhibited progressive neurologic signs, including sudden aggression, vocalization, dysphagia, and paresis over 9 days and then died. At necropsy, lyssavirus infection was diagnosed by fluorescent antibody test, immunoperoxidase staining, polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Eight human contacts received postexposure vaccination.

  12. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Gooijer-van de Groep, K.L.; De Vlugt, E.; De Groot, J.H.; Van der Heijden-Maessen, H.C.M.; Wielheesen, D.H.M.; Van Wijlen-Hempel, R.M.S.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”).

  13. Trunk sway analysis to quantify the warm-up phenomenon in myotonia congenita patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, G.C.; Drost, G.; Bloem, B.R.; Trip, J.; Pieterse, A.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with autosomal recessive myotonia congenita display myotonia and transient paresis that diminish with repetitive muscle contractions (warm-up phenomenon). A new approach is presented to quantify this warm-up phenomenon under clinically relevant gait and balance tasks. METHODS:

  14. Intoxication of sheep exposed to ozark milkweed (Asclepias viridis Walter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A; Scharko, P; Bolin, D; Hong, C B

    2000-12-01

    Some 20 sheep died 1 at a time on a farm in Fleming County, KY, in late July of 1999 after consumption of Asclepias viridis Walter. Major histological lesions were mild multifocal nonsuppurative myocarditis. Gross pathology revealed wet and heavy lungs. Many affected animals had a hunched appearance, and marked posterior paresis was also observed.

  15. Neuroimaging in patients with conversion disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medically unexplained symptoms are not uncommon in the clinical setting. Conversion disorder is a psychological disorder in which there is no neurological explanation for patients’ physical symptoms. These physical symptoms can be both positive or negative, e.g. tremor or paresis. This

  16. INTRACRANIAL PATHOLOGY AND DIPLOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-10

    Apr 10, 1971 ... bance. Muscle paretic diplopia is the clinical entity com- ... occurring with chiasmal involvement by pituitary tumours. In these cases a new central functioning area or pseudo- fovea may ... may be a cerebral dissociation allowing the independent ... Long-standing convergence paresis in ep~demic encepha-.

  17. Celebral computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofteroed, B.; Sortland, O.

    1985-01-01

    Indications for cerebral computerized tomography (CT) and the diagnostic results from this examination are evaluated in 127 children. Pathological changes were found in 31 children, mostly based on such indications as increasing head size, suspicion of brain tumor, cerebral paresis, delayed psychomotor development and epileptic seizures. A list of indications for CT in children is given

  18. Laryngeal dysfunction after thyroid surgery: diagnostic and treatments

    OpenAIRE

    FINCK, Camille

    2006-01-01

    Vocal fold hypomobility after thyroidectomy is a frequent complication of thyroidectomy. Laryngeal nerve paresis or paralysis may present with various symptoms like dysphagia, aspiration, voice alteration or dyspnea. Are described: the normal anatomophysiology of the larynx, the symptoms of nerve trauma following thyroidectomy, techniques of thoroughfull laryngeal and voice examination, some clinical entities( unilateral recurrent nerve paralysis, bilateral recurrent nerve paralysis, superior...

  19. Ophthalmoplegia, Dysphonia and Tetraparesis Due to Guillain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guillain-Barre's syndrome (GBS) or inflammatory/post-infectious acute polyradiculoneuropathy is due to demyelination of nerves, causing a progressive paresis or paralysis. It usually begins in the legs and sometimes goes up to the respiratory muscles and cranial nerves. The exact mechanism of GBS occurrance is still ...

  20. Paraneoplastic ophthalmoplegia and subacute motor axonal neuropathy associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies in a patient with malignant melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kloos; C.W. Ang (Wim); W.H.J. Kruit (Wim); G. Stoter (Gerrit); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA 68 year old woman developed oculomotor paresis shortly after metastatic progression of her melanoma was discovered. She was then immunised with the tumour antigen MAGE-3 in combination with an immunological adjuvant. During immunisation her symptoms worsened and she

  1. CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS IN NIGERIANS: A STUDY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table III shows the sex and age distribution in patients with NEICVD. .... children under 5 years old, haemoglobin sickle cell crisis was associated with .... +ve. Right hemiparesis. Left hemiparesis. Quadri-paresis. 128. 90. 12. 42. 37. 6. 54. 40. 4.

  2. Efficacy of a combined physical and occupational therapy intervention in patients with subacute neuralgic amyotrophy: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijspeert, J.; Janssen, R.M.J.; Murgia, A.; Pisters, M.F.; Cup, E.H.C.; Groothuis, J.T.; Alfen, N. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) is characterized by neuropathic pain, subsequent patchy paresis and possible sensory loss in the upper extremity. Many patients experience difficulties in performing activities of daily life and are unable to resume work. We developed a combined physical- and

  3. Submandibular gland excision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Line Kanstrup; Møller, Martin Nue

    2013-01-01

    long-term clinical follow-up of 113 of these patients after a median of 81 months. In all patients, the operation was effective. We found a 4.3 % risk of reoperation for wound infection or postoperative hematomas and an 18.7 % risk of early paresis of the marginal branch of the facial nerve, which...

  4. Pituitary apoplexy masquerading as meningitis | Merwitz | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon condition and medical emergency that classically presents with abrupt onset of severe headache, nausea, fever, impaired level of consciousness, visual disturbances and a variable degree of ocular paresis. The constellation of signs, symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid findings in keeping ...

  5. Motor and cognitive impairment after stroke : A common bond or a simultaneous deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, S.M.M.; Mark, R.E.; Sitskoorn, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of both motor deficit and cognitive impairment after stroke is high and persistent. Motor impairment, especially paresis, is often ore obvious to both patients and their carers while cognitive problems can also have devastating effects on quality of life. The current

  6. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  7. Disease: H01837 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lbar paresis (Worster- Drought syndrome) is a permanent movement disorder of the bulbar muscles causing persistent...ndrome: poorly recognized despite severe and persistent difficulties with feeding and speech. ... JOURNAL ... Dev Med Child Neurol 52:27-32 (2010) DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8749.2009.03475.x ...

  8. Linear Identification of Nonlinear Wrist Neuromechanics in Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, A.

    2015-01-01

    In many stroke patients, a motor cortex lesion alters motor control. Initially, paresis is most prominent, but then over time, joint stiffening and hyperreflexia may occur. How these different disorders develop over time is still unknown due to high system complexity. Secondary changes in the

  9. Pupilparalyse. En sjaelden komplikation ved øjeninfektion med Varicella zoster-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, P

    2001-01-01

    Pupillary paralysis and paresis of the peripheral facial nerve on the left side was found in a 68-year-old man with concussion and herpes zoster ophthalmicus on the left eye. Post mortem examination showed no sign of intracranial hemorrhage. The cause of death was pulmonary oedema and aspiration...

  10. Gait training assisted by multi-channel functional electrical stimulation early after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, Maijke; Bus, Sicco A.; de Boer, Charlotte E.; Nollet, Frans; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Beelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Many stroke survivors suffer from paresis of lower limb muscles, resulting in compensatory gait patterns characterised by asymmetries in spatial and temporal parameters and reduced walking capacity. Functional electrical stimulation has been used to improve walking capacity, but evidence is mostly

  11. Opaque iris claw lens in a phakic eye to correct acquired diplopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landesz, M; Worst, JGF; Rij, GV; Houtman, WA

    1997-01-01

    A 25-year-old man had diplopia caused by abducens nerve paresis on both sides after cranial injury. Because of the patient's reports of persistent diplopia after surgical correction, a specially manufactured, tinted iris claw lens was implanted in the left eye, with the crystalline lens in situ.

  12. [An unusual cause of acute dyspnoea: neuralgic amyotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.C. van de; Alfen, N. van; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented at the neurology outpatient clinic with sudden severe pain in both shoulders, followed by paresis of the muscles in this region. These complaints, in combination with acute dyspnoea when lying flat, and paradoxal movements of the abdomen during respiration, led to the

  13. Efficacy of a combined physical and occupational therapy intervention in patients with subacute neuralgic amyotrophy : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJspeert, Jos; Janssen, Renske M. J.; Murgia, Alessio; Pisters, Martijn F.; Cup, Edith H. C.; Groothuis, Jan T.; van Alfen, Nens

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) is characterized by neuropathic pain, subsequent patchy paresis and possible sensory loss in the upper extremity. Many patients experience difficulties in performing activities of daily life and are unable to resume work. We developed a combined physical- and

  14. Comparing unilateral and bilateral upper limb training: the ULTRA-stroke program design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, A.E.Q.; Peper, C.E.; Harlaar, J.; Daffertshofer, A.; Zijp, N.I.; Nienhuys, K.; Koppe, P.; Kwakkel, G.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: About 80% of all stroke survivors have an upper limb paresis immediately after stroke, only about a third of whom (30 to 40%) regain some dexterity within six months following conventional treatment programs. Of late, however, two recently developed interventions - constraint-induced

  15. Effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with floppy paretic ankle muscles : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der Dymphy; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Hijmans, Juha Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with floppy ankle muscles paresis use ankle foot orthoses to improve their walking ability. Ankle foot orthoses also limit ankle range of motion thereby introducing additional problems. Insight in effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with

  16. Functional neuroimaging of recovery from motor conversion disorder: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper W; Sellebjerg, Finn; Schreiber, Karen; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2018-03-27

    A patient with motor conversion disorder presented with a functional paresis of the left hand. After exclusion of structural brain damage, she was repeatedly examined with whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging, while she performed visually paced finger-tapping tasks. The dorsal premotor cortex showed a bilateral deactivation in the acute-subacute phase. Recovery from unilateral hand paresis was associated with a gradual increase in task-based activation of the dorsal premotor cortex bilaterally. The right medial prefrontal cortex displayed the opposite pattern, showing initial task-based activation that gradually diminished with recovery. The inverse dynamics of premotor and medial prefrontal activity over time were found during unimanual finger-tapping with the affected and non-affected hand as well as during bimanual finger-tapping. These observations suggest that reduced premotor and increased medial prefrontal activity reflect an effector-independent cortical dysfunction in conversion paresis which gradually disappears in parallel with clinical remission of paresis. The results link the medial prefrontal and dorsal premotor areas to the generation of intentional actions. We hypothesise that an excessive 'veto' signal generated in medial prefrontal cortex along with decreased premotor activity might constitute the functional substrate of conversion disorder. This notion warrants further examination in a larger group of affected patients. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a hybrid strength training technique for paretic lower-limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, T. L.; Glaser, R. M.; Janssen, T. W J; Couch, W. P.; Herr, C. J.; Almeyda, J. W.; Petrofsky, S. H.; Akuthota, P.

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid resistance exercise technique for strength training of patients with lower-limb paresis was developed. It consists of electrical stimulation-induced contractions (ESIC) superimposed on voluntary contractions to increase recruitment of motor units and the functional load capability of

  18. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI in neonatal osteomyelitis of the cervical-spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, A; van der Vliet, AM; van Waarde, WM; van Aalderen, WMC

    Although the radiographic features of neonatal osteomyelitis are well described, spinal localizations are very rare and occur in about 2–4%. Clinical presentation with paresis and paralysis occurs in less than 1% (Resnick & Niwayama, 1988). In the neonate negative bone scintigraphy in the presence

  19. A Case of Classic Raymond Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas George Zaorsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic Raymond syndrome consists of ipsilateral abducens impairment, contralateral central facial paresis, and contralateral hemiparesis. However, subsequent clinical observations argued on the presentation of facial involvement. To validate this entity, we present a case of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. A 50 year-old man experienced acute onset of horizontal diplopia, left mouth drooling and left-sided weakness. Neurological examination showed he had right abducens nerve palsy, left-sided paresis of the lower part of the face and limbs, and left hyperreflexia. A brain MRI showed a subacute infarct in the right mid-pons. The findings were consistent with those of classic Raymond syndrome. To date, only a few cases of Raymond syndrome, commonly without facial involvement, have been reported. Our case is a validation of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. We propose the concept of two types of Raymond syndrome: (1 the classic type, which may be produced by a lesion in the mid-pons involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticofacial and corticospinal fibers; and (2 the common type, which may be produced by a lesion involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticospinal fibers but sparing the corticofacial fibers.

  20. Dysphonia and dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Lauri, Eija-Riitta; Back, Leif; Juvas, Anja; Räsänen, Pirjo; Roine, Risto P; Sintonen, Harri; Salmi, Tapani; Vilkman, S Erkki; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of anterior cervical decompression (ACD) on swallowing and vocal function. The study comprised 114 patients who underwent ACD. The early group (50 patients) was examined immediately pre- and postoperatively, and the late group (64 patients) was examined at only 3 to 9 months postoperatively. Fifty age- and sex-matched patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery who had not been intubated in the previous 5 years were used as a control group. All patients in the early and control groups were examined by a laryngologist; patients in the late group were examined by a laryngologist and a neurosurgeon. Videolaryngostroboscopy was performed in all members of the patient and control groups, and the function of the ninth through 12th cranial nerves were clinically evaluated. Data were collected concerning swallowing, voice quality, surgery results, and health-related quality of life. Patients with persistent dysphonia were referred for phoniatric evaluation and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Those with persistent dysphagia underwent transoral endoscopic evaluation of swallowing function and videofluorography. Sixty percent of patients in the early group reported dysphonia and 69% reported dysphagia at the immediate postoperative visit. Unilateral vocal fold paresis occurred in 12%. The prevalence of both dysphonia and dysphagia decreased in both groups 3 to 9 months postoperatively. All six patients with vocal fold paresis in the early group recovered, and in the late group there were two cases of vocal fold paresis. The results of laryngeal EMG were abnormal in 14 of 16 patients with persistent dysphonia. Neither intraoperative factors nor age or sex had any effect on the occurrence of dysphonia, dysphagia, or vocal fold paresis. Most patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. Dysphonia, dysphagia, and vocal fold paresis are common but usually transient complications of ACD

  1. Diaphragmatic thickness ratio (inspiratory/expiratory) as a diagnostic method of diaphragmatic palsy associated with interescalene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Escárraga, V M; Dubos España, K; Castillo Bustos, R H; Peidró, L; Sastre, S; Sala-Blanch, X

    2018-02-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis is a side-effect associated with interscalene block. Thickness index of the diaphragm muscle (inspiratory thickness/expiratory thickness) obtained by ultrasound has recently been introduced in clinical practice for diagnosis of diaphragm muscle atrophy. Our objective was to evaluate this index for the diagnosis of acute phrenic paresis associated with interscalene block. We designed an observational study in 22 patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. Spirometry was performed (criteria of phrenic paresis was a decrease in FVC and FEV1 ≥20%). Ultrasound apposition zone was assessed in anterior axillary line and diaphragmatic displacement was evaluated on inspiration and expiration (number of intercostal spaces; phrenic paresis considered a reduction ≥25%) and thickness of the diaphragm muscle (a phrenic paresis was considered an index block at C5-C6 with 20ml of 0.5% ropivacaine. Twenty-one patients (95%) presented phrenic nerve block according to one or more of the methods used. One patient did not show any symptoms or signs suggestive of phrenic paralysis and was excluded. All the patients presented phrenic paresis based on the diaphragmatic thickness index, with the pre-block index being 1.8±0.5 and post-block of 1.05±0.06 (Pblock (from 1.9±0.5 intercostal spaces to 0.5±0.3; Pblock. This index does not require a baseline pre-assessment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A pilot study of robotic-assisted exercise for hand weakness after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Joel; Bishop, Joel; Gillen, Glen; Helbok, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    Upper limb paresis is a major source of disability in stroke survivors, and robotic aided exercise therapy is a promising approach to enhance motor abilities. Few devices have been available to provide robotic therapy to the fingers and hand. We report an open-label pilot study of 12 individuals with chronic moderate hemiparesis after stroke who underwent a six-week training program using a hand robotic device. Participants received a total of 18 hours of robotic therapy. Improvements were found in multiple measures of motor performance, including the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer, the Motor Activity Log, the Manual Ability Measure-36, and the Jebsen Hand Function Test. All subjects tolerated the treatment well and no complications were observed. We conclude that robotic therapy for hand paresis after stroke is safe and feasible, and that further studies of efficacy are justified by these preliminary results. © 2011 IEEE

  3. Functional neuroimaging of recovery from motor conversion disorder: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, A M; Andersen, Kasper W.; Sellebjerg, F

    2018-01-01

    A patient with motor conversion disorder presented with a functional paresis of the left hand. After exclusion of structural brain damage, she was repeatedly examined with whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging, while she performed visually paced finger-tapping tasks. The dorsal premotor...... cortex showed a bilateral deactivation in the acute-subacute phase. Recovery from unilateral hand paresis was associated with a gradual increase in task-based activation of the dorsal premotor cortex bilaterally. The right medial prefrontal cortex displayed the opposite pattern, showing initial task...... that an excessive 'veto' signal generated in medial prefrontal cortex along with decreased premotor activity might constitute the functional substrate of conversion disorder. This notion warrants further examination in a larger group of affected patients....

  4. Is upper limb virtual reality training more intensive than conventional training for patients in the subacute phase after stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Iris; Skouen, Jan Sture; Hofstad, Håkon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Virtual reality (VR) training is thought to improve upper limb (UL) motor function after stroke when utilizing intensive training with many repetitions. The purpose of this study was to compare intensity and content of a VR training intervention to a conventional task......-oriented intervention (CT). Methods: A random sample of 50 video recordings was analyzed of patients with a broad range of UL motor impairments (mean age 61y, 22 women). Patients took part in the VIRTUES trial and were randomized to either VR or CT and stratified according to severity of paresis. A standardized scoring...... and graphical methods were used. Results: Patients in the VR group spent significantly more time actively practicing with an activity rate of 77.6 (8.9) % than patients in the CT 67.3 (13.9) %, (p = .003). This difference was attributed to the subgroup of patients with initially severe paresis (n = 22). While...

  5. Surgical correction of strabismus in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: case reports Correção cirúrgica do estrabismo na síndrome de Lambert-Eaton: relato de dois casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Teixeira Krieger

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a rare and acquired autoimmune disorder. We describe two female patients with medial rectus paresis as the only ocular manifestation. After a unilateral medial rectus recession and lateral rectus resection procedure, both patients recovered normal adduction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of surgery for extraocular muscle paresis in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.A síndrome de Lambert-Eaton é um distúrbio autoimune raro e adquirido. Apresentamos duas pacientes com paresia do reto medial como única manifestação ocular. Após retrocesso do reto lateral e ressecção do reto medial, unilateral, ambas as pacientes apresentaram normalização da adução. Até onde sabemos, este é o primeiro relato de cirurgia para paresia do reto medial na síndrome de Lambert-Eaton.

  6. Jugular foramen meningiomas. Review of the major surgical series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Primary jugular foramen meningiomas are uncommon, with 96 previous cases published between 1992 and 2007. Exact location and extent of tumor were determined on the basis of radiologic and operative findings and used to develop a staging system. The mean age of patients was 39.4 years. The lesion was located on the right in 14 patients and on the left in 11 patients. The series identified 23 males and 58 females. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss and tinnitus. Most clinical findings were middle ear mass and neck mass. Most meningiomas were World Health Organization grade I. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve paresis and facial nerve paresis. Surgical planning should consider that meningiomas usually invade the dura mater, cranial nerves, and surrounding bone. The surgeon should carefully collect detailed data about the tumor, and consult an otolaryngologist preoperatively for lower cranial nerve functions and hearing levels.(author)

  7. Jugular foramen meningiomas. Review of the major surgical series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakar, B [Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale Univ., Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Primary jugular foramen meningiomas are uncommon, with 96 previous cases published between 1992 and 2007. Exact location and extent of tumor were determined on the basis of radiologic and operative findings and used to develop a staging system. The mean age of patients was 39.4 years. The lesion was located on the right in 14 patients and on the left in 11 patients. The series identified 23 males and 58 females. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss and tinnitus. Most clinical findings were middle ear mass and neck mass. Most meningiomas were World Health Organization grade I. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve paresis and facial nerve paresis. Surgical planning should consider that meningiomas usually invade the dura mater, cranial nerves, and surrounding bone. The surgeon should carefully collect detailed data about the tumor, and consult an otolaryngologist preoperatively for lower cranial nerve functions and hearing levels.(author)

  8. Jellyfish Envenomation Resulting In Vascular Insufficiency And Neurogenic Injury of Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong CYL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following a week after a jellyfish sting, a young man presented with regional cyanosis and threat of distal gangrene secondary to vascular spasm in the forearm. The patient also suffered from transient paresis and numbness of the affected upper limb. Contrasted imaging revealed unopacified vessels in the distal forearm and worsening swelling warranted emergency surgical fasciotomy for impending compartment syndrome. This case highlights the occurrence of jellyfish envenomation and the need for early treatment.

  9. Effect of Auditory Constraints on Motor Learning Depends on Stage of Recovery Post Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanath eAluru

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop evidence-based rehabilitation protocols post stroke, one must first reconcile the vast heterogeneity in the post-stroke population and develop protocols to facilitate motor learning in the various subgroups. The main purpose of this study is to show that auditory constraints interact with the stage of recovery post stroke to influence motor learning. We characterized the stages of upper limb recovery using task-based kinematic measures in twenty subjects with chronic hemiparesis, and used a bimanual wrist extension task using a custom-made wrist trainer to facilitate learning of wrist extension in the paretic hand under four auditory conditions: 1 without auditory cueing; 2 to non-musical happy sounds; 3 to self-selected music; and 4 to a metronome beat set at a comfortable tempo. Two bimanual trials (15 s each were followed by one unimanual trial with the paretic hand over six cycles under each condition. Clinical metrics, wrist and arm kinematics and electromyographic activity were recorded. Hierarchical cluster analysis with the Mahalanobis metric based on baseline speed and extent of wrist movement stratified subjects into three distinct groups which reflected their stage of recovery: spastic paresis, spastic co-contraction, and minimal paresis. In spastic paresis, the metronome beat increased wrist extension, but also increased muscle co-activation across the wrist. In contrast, in spastic co-contraction, no auditory stimulation increased wrist extension and reduced co-activation. In minimal paresis, wrist extension did not improve under any condition. The results suggest that auditory task constraints interact with stage of recovery during motor learning after stroke, perhaps due to recruitment of distinct neural substrates over the course of recovery. The findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms of progression of motor recovery and lay the foundation for personalized treatment algorithms post stroke.

  10. Effects of Stroke on Ipsilesional End-Effector Kinematics in a Multi-Step Activity of Daily Living

    OpenAIRE

    Gulde, Philipp; Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke frequently impairs activities of daily living (ADL) and deteriorates the function of the contra- as well as the ipsilesional limbs. In order to analyze alterations of higher motor control unaffected by paresis or sensory loss, the kinematics of ipsilesional upper limb movements in patients with stroke has previously been analyzed during prehensile movements and simple tool use actions. By contrast, motion recording of multi-step ADL is rare and patient-control comparisons f...

  11. Imaging of Horner's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, A.; Haydar, A.A. [Derriford Hospital Plymouth, Derriford, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Derriford Hospital Plymouth, Derriford, Plymouth (United Kingdom)], E-mail: william.adams@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2008-05-15

    Horner's syndrome, or oculosympathetic paresis, results from interruption of the sympathetic trunk innervation to the eye and presents typically with meiosis, ptosis and facial anhydrosis on the affected side.{sup 1} The pathological process ranges from benign, such as cluster headache, or life threatening, such as lung malignancy. Appropriate imaging requires an anatomical appreciation of the complex and circuitous route the neuronal pathway takes as it passes from the central nervous system to the eye.

  12. Imaging of Horner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.; Haydar, A.A.; Adams, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Horner's syndrome, or oculosympathetic paresis, results from interruption of the sympathetic trunk innervation to the eye and presents typically with meiosis, ptosis and facial anhydrosis on the affected side. 1 The pathological process ranges from benign, such as cluster headache, or life threatening, such as lung malignancy. Appropriate imaging requires an anatomical appreciation of the complex and circuitous route the neuronal pathway takes as it passes from the central nervous system to the eye

  13. Effects of mirror therapy through functional activites and motor standards in motor function of the upper limb after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Candice Simões Pimenta de; Fernandes, Sabrina Gabrielle Gomes; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy through functional activities and motor standards in upper limb function of chronic stroke subjects. Six patients with paresis of the arm within at least six months after stroke were randomly to a group of functional activities (GAF - n=3) and group of motor standards (GPM - n=3). Both groups performed 15 sessions of mirror therapy for 30 minutes, but the first one (GAF) were instructed to do the bilateral and symmetrical movements bas...

  14. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  15. CLINICAL AND HAEMATO-BIOCHEMICAL ALTERATIONS FOLLOWING TREATMENT WITH INTERFERENTIAL THERAPY IN THE BACK PAIN IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Sharma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of sixteen clinical cases, comprising of 8 animals each in Group I (animals with hindquarter weakness, which could stand, and had staggering gait and intact pain sensation and Group II (animals with hind quarter paresis, which were unable to stand and dragged hind legs while walking with intact pain sensation were treated with Computerized interferential unit and conventional therapy. Different clinical and haematobiochemical study revealed that the post treatment changes were transient and remains within normal physiological limits.

  16. The Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference as Predictors of Body Composition in Post CSCI Wheelchair Rugby Players (Preliminary Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwierzchowska Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The enforced sedentary lifestyle and muscle paresis below the level of injury are associated with adipose tissue accumulation in the trunk. The value of anthropometric indicators of obesity in patients with spinal cord injuries has also been called into question. We hypothesized that the Body Mass Index recommended by the WHO to diagnose obesity in general population has too low sensitivity in case of wheelchair rugby players.

  17. [Atypical Guillain-Barre syndrome clustering: is it necessary to reconsider the diagnostic criteria and microbiological protocol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Mayoral, A; Gutierrez, C; Lopez-Dominguez, J M; Eichau, S; Abril, J; Navarro-Mascarell, G; Quesada-Garcia, M A; Ramos, M; Alvarez-Lopez, M; Menendez-De Leon, C; Izquierdo, G

    2017-05-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is classically defined as a symmetrical ascending acute polyradiculoneuropathy, although there are atypical variants that make diagnosis difficult. The medical data of six patients in our hospital area are collected during the first quarter of 2013. Lumbar punctures, imaging, neurophysiological studies, ganglioside antibodies and serologies have been proposed in all cases. We focus on the atypical features as late hyporeflexia, increased frequency of asymmetry and distal paresis and initial fever. From a neurophysiological point of view, all patients presented sensorimotor axonal forms. The most consistent datas in early studies is the F wave's alteration. A Miller Fisher variant associated with faciocervicobraquial paresis and cerebral reversible vasoconstriction syndrome has been detected. A bilateral brachial paresis and lumbar polyradiculopathy in the context of influenza A infection is other interesting case. The saltatory variant with cranial nerve involvement and lower limbs paresis has been demonstrated in one patient. Bands in cerebrospinal fluid are positive in three cases and anti-ganglioside antibodies in one patient. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone may explain some of the hyponatremias registered. The first line of treatment are inmunoglobulins in all patients. Plasmapheresis exchanges has been used as an additional therapy in four cases. These clusters of six axonal cases with atypical clinical features justifies the need for knowledge of these variants in order to achieve an early treatment. Late hyporeflexia and brachialfaciocervico, saltatory and lumbar forms should be considered in the spectrum of Guillain-Barre syndrome. The etiological study should rule out a lots of pathogens as influenza A.

  18. Using Biophysical Models to Understand the Effect of tDCS on Neurorehabilitation: Searching for Optimal Covariates to Enhance Poststroke Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Malerba, Paola; Straudi, Sofia; Fregni, Felipe; Bazhenov, Maxim; Basaglia, Nino

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of worldwide disability, and up to 75% of survivors suffer from some degree of arm paresis. Recently, rehabilitation of stroke patients has focused on recovering motor skills by taking advantage of use-dependent neuroplasticity, where high-repetition of goal-oriented movement is at times combined with non-invasive brain stimulation, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Merging the two approaches is thought to provide outlasting clinical gains, by e...

  19. Vocal Fold Injection: Review of Indications, Techniques, and Materials for Augmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Mallur, Pavan S.; Rosen, Clark A.

    2010-01-01

    Vocal fold injection is a procedure that has over a 100 year history but was rarely done as short as 20 years ago. A renaissance has occurred with respect to vocal fold injection due to new technologies (visualization and materials) and new injection approaches. Awake, un-sedated vocal fold injection offers many distinct advantages for the treatment of glottal insufficiency (vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold atrophy and vocal fold scar). A review of materials available and ...

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls in benign vocal fold diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlender, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    More than half of patients presenting with hoarseness show benign vocal fold changes. The clinician should be familiar with the anatomy, physiology and functional aspects of voice disorders and also the modern diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities in order to ensure an optimal and patient specific management. This review article focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic limitations and difficulties of treatment of benign vocal fold tumors, the management and prevention of scarred vocal folds and the issue of unilateral vocal fold paresis. PMID:24403969

  1. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron: an unusual cause of bilateral stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Clare; O'Brien, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant whereby a single vessel arising from the proximal segment of one posterior cerebral artery supplies both medial thalami. This is a rare example of a single arterial supply to brain structures on both sides of the midline. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron results in bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which is manifest clinically as gaze paresis, cognitive disturbance and altered consciousness. The presentation can mimic subarachnoid h...

  2. Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders (CCDDs), and Their Associated Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-21

    Congenital Fibrosis of Extraocular Muscles; Duane Retraction Syndrome; Duane Radial Ray Syndrome; Mobius Syndrome; Brown Syndrome; Marcus Gunn Syndrome; Strabismus Congenital; Horizontal Gaze Palsy; Horizontal Gaze Palsy With Progressive Scoliosis; Facial Palsy; Facial Paresis, Hereditary, Congenital; Third Nerve Palsy; Fourth Nerve Palsy; Sixth Nerve Palsy; Synkinesis; Ocular Motility Disorders; Levator-Medial Rectus Synkinesis; Athabaskan Brainstem Dysgenesis; Tongue Paralysis; Ninth Nerve Disorder; Fifth Nerve Palsy; Seventh Nerve Palsy; Eleventh Nerve Disorder; Twelfth Nerve Disorder; Vagus Nerve Paralysis; Moebius Sequence

  3. Pontine infarction caused by medial branch injury of the basilar artery as a rare complication of cisternal drain placement

    OpenAIRE

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Kuroiwa, Masafumi; Rahmah, Nunung Nur; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare complication of cisternal drain placement during aneurysm surgery. A ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm was clipped through a right pterional approach. A cisternal drain was inserted from the retro-carotid to the prepontine cistern. Postoperatively, a left-sided paresis of the upper extremity had developed. A CT brain scan revealed that the drain was located between the pons and the basilar artery, resulting in a pontine infarction. Vascular neurosurgeons should...

  4. Lakridsinduceret hypertension og hypokaliæmi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Andersen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of large amounts of liquorice can cause hypertension and hypokalaemia. Liquorice contains glycyrrhetinic acid, which inhibits the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, and ultimately leads to an apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome. This case report describes a 50...... year-old woman presenting with hypertension and hypokalaemia-induced limb paresis due to chronic liquorice ingestion. The patient was treated with potassium supplementation and spironolactone. Her blood pressure and electrolyte status normalised within a month after cessation of liquorice intake....

  5. Incidence and diagnosis of anosognosia for hemiparesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, B; Karnath, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: In previous studies, the incidence of anosognosia for hemiparesis has varied between 17% and 58% in samples of brain damaged patients with hemiparesis. Objective: To determine whether this wide variation might be explained by the different criteria used for diagnosing anosognosia. Methods: 128 acute stroke patients with hemiparesis or hemiplegia were tested for anosognosia for hemiparesis using the anosognosia scale of Bisiach et al. Results: 94% of the patients who were rated as having "mild anosognosia"—that is, they did not acknowledge their hemiparesis spontaneously following a general question about their complaints—suffered from, and mentioned, other neurological deficits such as dysarthria, ptosis, or headache. However, they immediately acknowledged their paresis when they were asked about the strength of their limbs. Their other deficits clearly had a greater impact. These patients had significantly milder paresis than those who denied their disorder even when asked directly about their limbs. Conclusions: Patients who do not mention their paresis spontaneously but do so when questioned about it directly should not be diagnosed having "anosognosia." If this more conservative cut off criterion is applied to the data of the present as well as previous studies, a frequency of between 10% and 18% for anosognosia for hemiparesis is obtained in unselected samples of acute hemiparetic stroke patients. The incidence thus seems smaller than previously assumed. PMID:15716526

  6. Effect of platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, on resolution of chronic subdural hematoma. A prospective study to investigate use as conservative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Masanori; Nagai, Shoichi; Hori, Emiko; Origasa, Hideki; Endo, Shunro

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory reaction is very important for formation of the neomembrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study evaluated medical treatment with the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, for the resolution of CSDH, and the factors indicating surgery or conservative therapy. Alternate patients were assigned to the etizolam group or control group without medical treatment. Patients in the etizolam group received 3.0 mg etizolam per day for 14 days. A total of 53 patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Univariate analysis of differences in demographic characteristics, clinical findings, and initial computed tomography (CT) findings, and multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between etizolam treatment and requirement for surgery using age, sex, low density of hematoma on CT, and paresis as confounders were performed. Etizolam treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.156, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.024-0.999, p=0.049) was negatively correlated with requirement for surgery. Low density of hematoma (adjusted OR 0.125, 95% CI 0.019-0.846, p=0.033) was found to be an independent negative predictor, and paresis as an initial symptom (adjusted OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.04-38.7, p=0.045) was an independent positive predictor of requirement for surgery. Etizolam administration can promote the resolution of CSDH, especially at the stage of hygroma appearing as low density on CT. Surgery is recommended if the patient presents with paresis. (author)

  7. Medialization thyroplasty in glottis insufficiency due to unilateral vocal fold paralysis and after laser cordectomies - preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepakowska, Anna; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Sielska-Badurek, Ewelina; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2017-02-28

    Medialization thyroplasty (type I) is surgical procedure performed on the thyroid cartilage. The major indication for this surgery is significant glottis insufficiency due to unilateral vocal fold paresis. However the proce¬dure is also performed after vocal fold resections during cordectomy. The evaluation of voice results in patients after medialisation throplasty. In Otolaryngology Department of Medical University of Warsaw there were performed so far 8 thyroplasty procedures under local anaesthesia with implantation of medical silicon protesis. 6 patients had unilat¬eral vocal fold paresis and the rest two underwent in the past laser cordectomy due to T1a vocal carcinoma. There were no complications during and post the surgery. The follow up examination in 1st , 3rd, 6th i 12th months postoperatively revealed for all patients significant improvement of glottal closure in laryngeal videostrobos¬copy. The voice quality improved both in perceptual evaluation (GRBAS scale) and acoustic analysis (F0, jitter, shim¬mer, NHR) in both patients groups. However the rate of improvement was much more significant in group with uni¬lateral vocal fold paresis. In all patients the maximum phonation time (MPT) increased. The self-evaluation of voice quality with Voice Handicap Index questionnaire confirmed also individual improvement. The speech rehabilitations is not successful in each patient with glottis insufficiency. The medialisation thyroplasty remains the standard procedure for permanent improvement of voice quality in those cases.

  8. Injection laryngoplasty as miniinvasive office-based surgery in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis - voice quality outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielska-Badurek, Ewelina M; Sobol, Maria; Jędra, Katarzyna; Rzepakowska, Anna; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2017-09-01

    Injection laryngoplasty (glottis augmentation) is the preferred method in surgical management of unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Traditionally, these procedures are performed in the operating room. Nowadays, however, these procedures have moved into the office. To evaluate the voice quality after transoral injection laryngoplasty under local anaesthesia in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Fourteen subjects (5 women and 9 men) with unilateral vocal fold paresis (9 with right vocal fold paresis and 5 with left vocal fold paresis) were included in the study. The mean age of the group was 57.8 ±19.0 years (32-83 years). All of the injection laryngoplasties were performed transorally, under local anaesthesia. The injection material was calcium hydroxylapatite. Before and 1, 3 and 6 months after the procedure the following variables were evaluated: voice perception, videostroboscopy, acoustic analysis, aerodynamic evaluation, and the subjective rating of the voice quality by the patient. After injection laryngoplasty, complete glottal closure was achieved or there was a significant improvement in the glottal closure of each subject. We noted great improvement in the post-injection objective and subjective voice outcomes and patients reported improvement in the voice-related quality of life. The transoral approach for injection laryngoplasty under local anaesthesia is an effective and safe way to treat incomplete glottal closure in patients with UVFP. The transoral approach is an efficient alternative to other surgical techniques used for vocal fold injection.

  9. Distinct modulation of event-related potentials during motor preparation in patients with motor conversion disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah L Blakemore

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Conversion paresis patients and healthy people feigning weakness both exhibit weak voluntary movement without detectable neuropathology. Uniquely, conversion patients lack a sense of conscious awareness of the origin of their impairment. We investigated whether conversion paresis patients show distinct electroencephalographic (EEG markers associated with their unconscious movement deficits. METHODS: Six unilateral upper limb conversion paresis patients, 12 feigning participants asked to mimic weakness and 12 control participants performed a precued reaction time task, requiring movements of either hand, depending on precue information. Performance measures (force, reaction and movement time, and event-related EEG potentials (ERP were compared, between groups and across hands or hemisphere, using linear mixed models. RESULTS: Feigners generated the same inter-hand difference in reaction and movement time as expressed by patients, even though no specific targets were set nor feedback given on these measures. We found novel ERP signatures specific to patients. When the symptomatic hand was precued, the P3 ERP component accompanying the precue was dramatically larger in patients than in feigning participants. Additionally, in patients the earlier N1 ERP component was diminished when the precue signalled either the symptomatic or asymptomatic hand. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with previous suggestions that lack of awareness of the origin of their symptoms in conversion disorder patients may result from suppression of brain activity normally related to self-agency. In patients the diminished N1 to all precues is consistent with a generalised reduction in cognitive processing of movement-related precues. The P3 enhancement in patients is unlikely to simply reflect changes required for generation of impaired movements, because it was not seen in feigners showing the same behavioural deficits. Rather, this P3 enhancement in

  10. Radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord after irradiation at different ages: Tolerance, latency and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of the age dependent single-dose radiation tolerance, latency to radiation myelopathy, and the histopathological changes after irradiation of the rat cervical spinal cord is presented. Rats were irradiated with graded single doses of 4 MV photons to the cervical spinal cord. When the rats showed definite signs of paresis of the forelegs, they were killed and processed for histological examination. The radiation dose resulting in paresis due to white matter damage in 50% of the animals (ED 50 ) after single dose irradiation was about 21.5 Gy at all ages ≥ 2 weeks. Only the Ed 50 at 1 week was significantly lower. The latency to the development of paresis clearly changed with the age at irradiation, from about 2 weeks after irradiation at 1 week to 6-8 months after irradiation at age ≥ 8 weeks. The white matter damage was similar in all symptomatic animals studied. The most prominent were areas with diffuse demyelination and swollen axons, often with focal necrosis, accompanied by glial reaction. This was observed in all symptomatic animals, irrespective of the age at irradiation. Expression of vascular damage appeared to depend on the age at irradiation. Although the latency to myelopathy is clearly age dependent, single dose tolerance is not age dependent at age ≥ 2 weeks in the rat cervical spinal cord. The white matter damage is similar in all symptomatic animals studied, but the vasculopathies appear to be influenced by the age at irradiation. It is concluded that white matter damage and vascular damage are separate phenomena contributing to the development of radiation myelopathy, expression of which may depend on the radiation dose applied and the age at irradiation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. A case of hemorrhagic pineal cyst: MR/CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A 30-year-old male had headache pain for one month and was evaluated with both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). These scans demonstrated an obstructing pineal cyst containing layered acute and subacute blood products by MR criteria. The concurrent scans allowed correlation between CT and MR findings in this rare complication of an unusual entity, explained his headache (and the development of later upward gaze paresis), provided a precise surgical/anatomic approach, and gave a good final clinical result. The report illustrates appropriate CT and MR images and pathological specimen. (orig.)

  13. Anesthesia for hemicolectomy in a known porphyric with cecal malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B K Naithani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative management of a known acute intermittent porphyria patient is a challenge requiring awareness of factors, which trigger an acute crisis, clinical features of a porphyric attack, knowledge of safe pharmacologic intervention, and preparedness for reintubation and ventilatory support. The classical signs of a porphyric crisis such as pain abdomen, vomiting and neuropsychiatric symptoms are masked under general anesthesia and can be confused with postoperative pain and vomiting and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, especially for intra-abdominal surgeries. Eternal vigilance for onset of an acute crisis is imperative. After a crisis of acute intermittent porphyria, residual paresis may persist for years in the absence of further attacks.

  14. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, T.L.; Bresnan, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced internal carotid artery occlusion has not been well recognized previously as a cause of childhood cerebrovascular disease. A child who had received radiation as a neonate for a hemangioma involving the left orbit at the age of 6 years experienced a recurrent right-sided paresis, vascular headaches, and speech difficulties. Angiography showed a hypoplastic left carotid artery with occlusion of both the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Collateral vessels bypassed the occluded-stenotic segments. Review of the literature showed two additional cases of large vessel occlusion in childhood associated with anastomatic telangiectatic vessel development following early radiation therapy of facial hemangioma

  15. Chondrosarcoma of T2 Vertebrae Treated by Combined Anterior and Posterior Approach: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Norazian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma of the spine is rare; it presents predominantly in very young males and presentation with neurological deficit is uncommon. Treatment of this type of tumour is mainly through surgery as adjuvant therapy is ineffective. En bloc resection of tumours in the spine are difficult although it remains the recommended treatment for chondrosarcoma. We report here presentation of a female with paresis (Frankel C whom was diagnosed with a large chondrosarcoma of the T2 vertebra extending to the right upper thoracic cavity. The patient underwent radical excision through an anterior and posterior approach to the spine.

  16. Severe ischemic colitis following olanzapine use: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Raimundo Fernandes

    Full Text Available Ischemic colitis is the most common subtype of intestinal ischemia usually resulting from vasospasm, vessel occlusion or mesenteric hypoperfusion. Neuroleptics have seldom been linked to ischemic colitis by blocking peripheral anticholinergic and antiserotonergic receptors inducing severe gastrointestinal paresis. We report a young patient with severe ischemic colitis requiring surgery due to necrosis of the bowel. After exclusion of other potential causes, olanzapine was admitted as the cause of ischemia. Clinicians should be aware of how to recognize and treat the potentially life-threatening effects of neuroleptics.

  17. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide Cypermethrin on the locomotor activity of the wolf spider Pardosa amentata: quantitative analysis employing computer-automated video tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Bayley, M

    1993-01-01

    Pardosa amentata was quantified in an open field setup, using computer-automated video tracking. Each spider was recorded for 24 hr prior to pesticide exposure. After topical application of 4.6 ng of Cypermethrin, the animal was recorded for a further 48 hr. Finally, after 9 days of recovery, the spider...... paresis, the effects of Cypermethrin were evident in reduced path length, average velocity, and maximum velocity and an increase in the time spent in quiescence. Also, the pyrethroid disrupted the consistent distributions of walking velocity and periods of quiescence seen prior to pesticide application...

  18. Stenosis of the thoracolumbar vertebral canal in a Basset Hound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigen, Ø.; Hagen, G.; Kolbjørnsen, Ø.

    1990-01-01

    A three-month-old female basset hound was referred to the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine with a history of progressive paresis of the pelvic limbs. Following neurological examination and the study of myelograms, extradural masses causing spinal cord compressions at the T 12.13 and T 13 -L 1 junctions were diagnosed. At necropsy bone-tissue of the vertebral laminae was found to have formed stenoses of the vertebral canal producing compressions of the spinal cord. Irreversible tissue-damage was observed in histological sections prepared from the compressed areas of the spinal cord

  19. Dysphagia caused by a lateral medullary infarction syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mekkaoui, Amine; Irhoudane, Hanane; Ibrahimi, Adil; El Yousfi, Mounia

    2012-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to our hospital for a dysphagia evolving for 10 days. Clinical examination had found neurological signs as contralateral Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral palatal paresis, gait ataxia and hoarseness. Video-fluoroscopy showed a lack of passage of contrast medium to the distal esophagus. Esogastroduodenoscopy was normal. The cranial MRI had shown an acute ischemic stroke in the left lateral medullar region and the diagnosis of Wallenberg syndrome (WS) was established. WS remains an unknown cause of dysphagia in the clinical practice of the gastroenterologist. PMID:23077713

  20. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  1. [Incidence and follow-up characteristics of neurologically relevant psychogenic symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Schellberg, D; Reister, G; Schepank, H

    1993-06-01

    The author reports on the prevalence and stability of the course of neurologically relevant psychogenic symptoms as well as their dependence on age and sex. Altogether 240 probands from the Mannheim Cohort Study on the epidemiology of psychogenic disorders were examined for psychogenic impairment over a 10-year period during three investigation periods. On the whole, seven neurologically relevant groups of symptoms (headache, lumbar and cervical vertebral complaints, non-systematic vertigo, functional hyperkinesia, functional paresis, sleep disturbances, concentration disturbances) differ clearly in frequency, characteristics of the course and clinical relevance.

  2. Verletzung der A. subscapularis durch Reposition einer vorderen Schulterluxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Strohm, P C; Rosahl, S K

    2006-01-01

    report a case with rupture of the arteria subscapularis following reduction of an anterior shoulder dislocation with formation of an axillary hematoma and consecutive paresis of the plexus brachialis. Interdisciplinary operative revision was necessary to remove the hematoma, stop the hemorrhage...... and for neurolysis of the plexus brachialis. Treatment resulted in a speedy recovery of the patient. Gentle reduction of a dislocated shoulder is a prerequisite for a low complication rate. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography facilitated diagnosis of the hematoma and identification of the bleeding vessel....

  3. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy: also a simple technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; Foster, J; Rosemurgy, A S; Carey, L C

    1992-01-01

    Placement of feeding tubes is a common procedure for general surgeons. While the advent of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy has changed and improved surgical practice, this technique is contraindicated in many circumstances. In some patients placement of feeding tubes in the stomach may be contraindicated due to the risks of aspiration, gastric paresis, or gastric dysmotility. We describe a technique of laparoscopic jejunostomy tube placement which is easy and effective. It is noteworthy that this method may be used in patients who have had previous abdominal operations, and it has the added advantage of a direct peritoneal view of the viscera. We suggest that qualified laparoscopic surgeons learn the technique of laparoscopic jejunostomy.

  4. Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture as a presenting feature of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Breza, Marianthi; Evangelopoulos, Maria-Eleftheria; Anagnostouli, Maria; Andreadou, Elisavet; Karagiorgis, Georgios; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Kilidireas, Costas; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture (SPHC) is characterized by sustained unilateral contraction of the facial muscles associated with mild ipsilateral facial paresis. Rarely described in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has never been reported as presenting symptom of MS. Two patients developed SPHC within the context of a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS. EMG revealed continuous resting activity of irregularly firing motor unit potentials, associated with impaired recruitment upon voluntary contraction. SPHC remitted fully in both patients. SPHC, a rare but distinct clinical and EMG entity, can occasionally be the presenting feature of MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Central nervous system dysfunction associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever infection in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikszewski, Jessica S; Vite, Charles H

    2005-01-01

    Five dogs from the northeastern United States were presented with clinical signs of neurological disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) infection. Four of the five dogs had vestibular system dysfunction. Other neurological signs included paresis, tremors, and changes in mentation. All of the dogs had an elevated indirect fluorescent antibody titer or a positive semiquantitative enzyme screening immunoassay titer for Rickettsia rickettsii at the time of presentation. Although a higher mortality rate has been reported for dogs with neurological symptoms and RMSF infection, all of the dogs in this study improved with appropriate medical therapy and supportive care.

  6. Hypersomnia as presenting symptom of anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Marcos, Iñigo; Graus, Francesc; Sanz, Gema; Robledo, Arturo; Diaz-Espejo, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and was eventually diagnosed with anti-Ma2 encephalitis. Neurological examination disclosed somnolence, left palpebral ptosis, and vertical gaze paresis. A brain MRI showed high signal intensity in the hypothalamus and each hippocampus. Ma2 antibodies were found in the patient's serum, and fiberbronchoscopy disclosed a lung carcinoma. After three months of steroid treatment, the results of the patient's neurological exam became normal. We conclude that anti-Ma2 encephalitis may present with mostly isolated EDS and that it may respond to steroids despite old age and the presence of an untreated lung cancer.

  7. Quadriplegia due to celiac crisis with hypokalemia as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Malobika; Kapoor, Seema

    2012-02-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare, life-threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by worsening of clinical symptoms, multiple metabolic derangements and shock. We report an 8-year-old girl with previously undiagnosed celiac disease who presented with flaccid quadriparesis secondary to severe hypokalemia associated with celiac crisis. Diagnosis was expedited by an elevated anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody titer. The patient improved with correction of hypokalemia, corticosteroids and gluten-free diet. In tropical countries such as India, where both acute flaccid paresis and diarrhea are usually of infective etiologies, this rare clinical condition should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of both.

  8. Moya - Moya syndrome: Diagnose by means of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero Borrero, Leonidas; Henao Gomez, Liliana; Hernandez Castro, John Jairo

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of moya-moya syndrome diagnosed by means of study of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in an eight-year old patient with Seckel syndrome and progressive neurological deficit of several years, characterized by left hemi paresis and gait limitation as well as microcephalus. Previous imaging studies included cerebral CT (CCT) that showed several infarctions, without affecting a particular vascular territory. The MRA study was carried out in a 1.5 t system. Besides confirming the CCT findings, it demonstrated characteristic images of the moya - moya syndrome. This is the first case published in Colombia

  9. The outcome after head injury in patients with radiologically demonstrated brain contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, P.K.; Tysnes, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    The early and late outcome was evaluated in head injury patients who presented brain contusion(s) on the cranial CT scan and in patients hospitalized for concussion. There was a high degree of concurrence between mortality and CT findings. Late complaints were common among cases of concussion of the brain. However, the frequency of impaired memory and concentration, speech problems, paresis and epileptic seizures was increased in cases where the CT scan showed brain contusion. Adaptive and social functioning was most impaired in cases with multifocal contusions in both hemispheres. 16 refs., 5 tabs

  10. Sporadic Endolymphatic Sac Tumor-A Very Rare Cause of Hearing Loss, Tinnitus, and Dizziness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnack, Didde Trærup; Kiss, Katalin; Hansen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic endolymphatic sac tumor is a very rare neoplasm. It is low malignant, locally destructive and expansive, but non-metastasizing. The tumor is very rare in the sporadic form, but more often associated with Von Hippel-Lindau disease. A 65-year old man with left sided tinnitus and hearing loss......-operative freeze-microscopy showed inflammation tissue, whereas subsequent microscopy showed papillary-cystic endolymphatic sac tumor. Endolymphatic sac tumor is a rare neoplasm. The tumor may present with asymmetrically sensory neural hearing loss with or without tinnitus, dizziness and facial nerve paresis...

  11. Experimental arsanilic acid poisoning in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, J D.J.; Lewis, G; Done, J T

    1968-11-30

    Twenty-one pigs were poisoned with rations containing 611, 1000 or 2000 g. arsanilic acid per ton. The chief symptoms were tremor of the head and incoordination followed by progressive blindness, ataxia and paresis. The only post-mortem abnormality was distension of the urinary bladder. The principal histological lesions were degeneration of the optic nerves, optic tracts and peripheral nerves, but such lesions could not be detected until about four, 10 and 14 days respectively after the onset of symptoms. The arsenic levels in various tissues were estimated. Concentrations in liver and kidney cortex were highest in the early stages of illness, two to 14 days after the onset of symptoms.

  12. Botulinum toxin in myotonia congenita: it does not help against rigidity and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Adib Saberi, Fereshte

    2014-05-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) is a potent local muscle relaxant with analgetic properties. Myotonia congenita (MC) is a genetic disorder producing muscle rigidity and pain. BT injected into the trapezius produced mild paresis, but no effect on rigidity and pain. There were no signs of systemic effects. Lack of BT efficacy on MC rigidity confirms its origin from muscle membrane dysfunction rather than from inappropriate neuromuscular activation. Lack of BT efficacy on pain could be caused by lack of anti-rigidity effect. It could also be due to separate non-muscular pain mechanisms unresponsive to BT.

  13. Brainstem Tuberculoma in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Muin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a Somali refugee who presented in the second trimester of her first pregnancy with a four-week history of gradual right-sided sensomotoric hemisyndrome including facial palsy and left-sided paresis of the oculomotorius nerve causing drooping of the left eyelid and double vision. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary brainstem lesion. Upon detection of hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray (CXR, the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis with involvement of the central nervous system was confirmed by PCR and treatment induced with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The patient had a steady neurological improvement and a favorable pregnancy outcome.

  14. Neurothekeoma of petrous apex: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarina Abdul Assis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous nerve sheath tumors are very rare tumors accounting for lesser than 0.2% of primary bone tumors. We present an 18-year-old female who presented with left facial paresis for the last 1 year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated expansile, multiseptated, enhancing bony lesion in the left petrous apex. There was also abnormal enhancement of the 7-8 th nerve complex within the internal auditory canal. Tumor was excised by subtemporal extradural approach. The lesion was diagnosed as intraosseous neurothekeoma on histopathology. This is an extremely rare tumor and its MRI appearance in this location is being described for the first time in literature.

  15. The influence of body position on Bielschowsky's test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Souza-Dias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the veracity of Jampolsky's statement that Bielschowsky's head tilt test is inverted if performed with the patient in the upside-down position and to interpret its neuromuscular mechanism. Methods: We present a series of 10 patients selected from a referred sample who were diagnosed with superior oblique paresis. Hypertropia was measured in the primary position, with the head erect and tilted toward both shoulders with the patient in the erect, supine, and upside-down positions. The last position was achieved by hanging the patient upside-down. Results: As expected, our results showed the veracity of Jampolsky's statement. The forced head tilt difference was inverted or significantly decreased when the test was performed in the upside-down position. Moreover, in all patients, Bielschowsky's phenomenon was neutralized in the supine body position, in which hypertropia with the head erect tended to vanish. In 3 patients, it disappeared completely. Conclusions: This study showed that, in patients with superior oblique paresis, differences in the extent of hypertropia in Bielschowsky's test tended to vanish when the test was performed with the patient in the supine position and invert when it was performed with the patient in the upside-down position.

  16. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eMiklossy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented.

  17. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  18. Metastatic tumours to hypophysis: a report of three cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Šmigoc

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metastatic tumours to pituitary are rare. The most frequent are metastases from breast and lung.Methods. In this paper, three cases of metastatic tumours to the pituitary are presented with panhypopituitarism as a common symptom: I a 60-year-old gentleman with metastasis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, who presented with diabetes insipidus, II a 54-year-old lady with metastatic renal clear cell carcinoma and consequent disturbances in visual acuity, brain nerve paresis and III a 57-year-old lady with breast cancer metastasis, visual impairment and brain nerve paresis.Results. A transnasal endoscopic resection of the tumours was performed in all cases, followed by oncological treatment. All patients improved after the treatment.Conclusions. Despite the rarity of the disease, a metastatic tumour to the pituitary gland must be included in the differential diagnosis when symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, ophthalmoplegy due to brain nerve palsies, rapid course of the disease and headache are observed. In 20% to 30%, pituitary metastases are the first manifestation of a tumour of unknown origin. Surgical and adjuvant therapy may improve the quality of life. The survival and prognosis are generally poor.

  19. Motor cortex stimulation therapy for post-stroke weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Koichiro; Aoshima, Chihiro; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Tachibana, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) delivered concurrently with rehabilitation therapy may enhance motor recovery following stroke. We investigated the effects of MCS on the recovery from upper extremity paresis in patients with chronic stroke. In 12 patients who had moderate arm and finger paresis at more than 4 months after stroke, an electrode was placed through a small craniotomy on the epidural space of the motor cortex that was identified using functional MRI. MCS during occupational therapy for one hour was performed 3 times a day for at least 4 weeks. The mean scores for Fugl-Meyer assessments of the arm improved, from 37 preoperatively to 46 postoperatively. The mean grip strength improved from 3.25 to 9.0 kg. All patients appeared satisfactory in their results because they recognized an improvement of arm function. Although the mechanism of the beneficial effects of MCS on recovery after stroke has not been well known, the neuroplasticity might play a important role. In a few cases of the present series, it was observed that the hand motor cortex area detected on functional MRI had been enlarged after MCS therapy. MCS could become a novel neurosurgical treatment modality for the chronic post-stroke weakness. (author)

  20. The impact of cognitive impairment on upper body dressing difficulties after stroke: a video analysis of patterns of recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C M; Sunderland, A; Sharma, J; Walker, M F

    2004-01-01

    to study the underlying cognitive deficits influencing a stroke patient's ability to relearn to dress. The aim was to investigate how recovery had occurred and whether the nature of cognitive impairment was the reason for persistent dressing problems. the dressing performance of 30 stroke patients was compared at the sub-acute stage and three months later. Standardised cognitive and physical tests were carried out, together with a video analysis of patients putting on a polo shirt. thirteen patients with preserved power in the upper limb used both arms to put on the shirt. Despite visuospatial impairment or apraxia in some cases, all were successful given sufficient time. Out of 17 patients with arm paresis, 12 were dependent putting on the shirt. Amongst the five who were independent, significantly fewer cases of cognitive impairment were seen on tests for apraxia (papraxia. Three patients who failed shirt dressing showed neglect or apraxia at follow up and had persistent arm paresis. Test failures also occurred amongst those who were independent. cognitive impairment affected patients attempting to relearn to dress with one hand, but did not affect patients who used both hands. The three patients who remained impaired on cognitive tests at follow up were unable to adapt or learn any compensatory strategies. The influence of cognition on a person's ability to learn compensatory strategies has implications for the design of rehabilitation therapies.

  1. Ultrasonography of the larynx for diagnosis of the vocal folds mobility impairment

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    Petr S. Vetshev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study a possibility of performance and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography (US of a larynx in identification of motility disorders of VF (vocal folds in comparison with the laryngoscope which is traditionally applied for this purpose. Materials and methods. According to the objectives of the study, two patient groups were formed. In first group of patients (n = 466 we studied acceptability of ultrasonografy to discriminate various laryngeal structures. In second group of patient (n = 432 we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in point of detection of vocal muscles paresis. Results. Laryngeal structures were available to examination by ultrasound (without taking in account age and sex in 92.7% of patients. Two patterns have been identified in the course of this part of the study: deterioration of visibility of the vocal folds with increasing patient age and better visibility of the vocal folds in women than in men. According to the comparative analysis, ultrasonography accuracy rate (in those patients who had had clearly visible vocal folds during ultrasonography did not differ from that during videolaryngoscopy. Conclusion. During the conducted research it was found that the US of the larynx is an effective and perspective method for detection of a paresis of VF with sensitivity and specificity 93,55% and 100% respectively. Among those patients who' VF are available to ultrasound evaluation the accuracy of method is comparable with a videolaryngoscopy and can be used with success in daily work of units of endocrine surgery.

  2. Motor Imagery Impairment in Postacute Stroke Patients

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    Niclas Braun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Not much is known about how well stroke patients are able to perform motor imagery (MI and which MI abilities are preserved after stroke. We therefore applied three different MI tasks (one mental chronometry task, one mental rotation task, and one EEG-based neurofeedback task to a sample of postacute stroke patients (n=20 and age-matched healthy controls (n=20 for addressing the following questions: First, which of the MI tasks indicate impairment in stroke patients and are impairments restricted to the paretic side? Second, is there a relationship between MI impairment and sensory loss or paresis severity? And third, do the results of the different MI tasks converge? Significant differences between the stroke and control groups were found in all three MI tasks. However, only the mental chronometry task and EEG analysis revealed paresis side-specific effects. Moreover, sensitivity loss contributed to a performance drop in the mental rotation task. The findings indicate that although MI abilities may be impaired after stroke, most patients retain their ability for MI EEG-based neurofeedback. Interestingly, performance in the different MI measures did not strongly correlate, neither in stroke patients nor in healthy controls. We conclude that one MI measure is not sufficient to fully assess an individual’s MI abilities.

  3. Recurrent Laryngeal Edema Imitating Angioedema Caused by Dislocated Screw after Anterior Spine Surgery

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    Piotr Wójtowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis.

  4. Neurovascular complications due to the Hippocrates method for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Markus; Polzer, Hans; Mutschler, Wolf

    2014-01-18

    In spite of the fact that the Hippocrates method hardly has been evaluated in a scientific manner and numerous associated iatrogenic complications have been reported, this method remains to be one of the most common techniques for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations. We report the case of a 69-year-old farmer under coumarin anticoagulant therapy who sustained acute first time anterior dislocation of his dominant right shoulder. By using the Hippocrates method with the patient under general anaesthesia, the brachial vein was injured and an increasing hematoma subsequently caused brachial plexus paresis by pressure. After surgery for decompression and vascular suturing, symptoms declined rapidly, but brachial plexus paresis still was not fully reversible after 3 mo of follow-up. The hazardousness of using the Hippocrates method can be explained by traction on the outstretched arm with force of the operator's body weight, direct trauma to the axillary region by the physician's heel, and the topographic relations of neurovascular structures and the dislocated humeral head. As there is a variety of alternative reduction techniques which have been evaluated scientifically and proofed to be safe, we strongly caution against the use of the Hippocrates method as a first line technique for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, especially in elder patients with fragile vessels or under anticoagulant therapy, and recommend the scapular manipulation technique or the Milch technique, for example, as a first choice.

  5. Comparison of Self-Report Versus Sensor-Based Methods for Measuring the Amount of Upper Limb Activity Outside the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kimberly J; Lang, Catherine E

    2018-03-10

    To compare self-reported with sensor-measured upper limb (UL) performance in daily life for individuals with chronic (≥6mo) UL paresis poststroke. Secondary analysis of participants enrolled in a phase II randomized, parallel, dose-response UL movement trial. This analysis compared the accuracy and consistency between self-reported UL performance and sensor-measured UL performance at baseline and immediately post an 8-week intensive UL task-specific intervention. Outpatient rehabilitation. Community-dwelling individuals with chronic (≥6mo) UL paresis poststroke (N=64). Not applicable. Motor Activity Log amount of use scale and the sensor-derived use ratio from wrist-worn accelerometers. There was a high degree of variability between self-reported UL performance and the sensor-derived use ratio. Using sensor-based values as a reference, 3 distinct categories were identified: accurate reporters (reporting difference ±0.1), overreporters (difference >0.1), and underreporters (difference sensor-based assessment. Participants did not consistently or accurately self-report UL performance when compared with the sensor-derived use ratio. Although self-report and sensor-based assessments are moderately associated and appear similar conceptually, these results suggest self-reported UL performance is often not consistent with sensor-measured performance and the measures cannot be used interchangeably. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Neuromotor Device for Reducing Phantom Limb Pain in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

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    Cui Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom Limb Pain is a disorder that can be experienced by individuals after amputation or spinal cord injury. In spinal cord injury the paralysis or paresis is often bilateral, thus limiting the application of apparent movement as a therapeutic model for phantom limb pain. This project aimed to develop a robotic rehabilitation device that replicated apparent movement to apply the same therapeutic principles with individuals with lower limb phantom pain that have bilateral paralysis of paresis. The proposed device achieved lower limb planar motion of the knee by a six-bar linkage of a single degree of freedom (DOF. It is driven by a linear actuator while the ankle motion is achieved by a gear motor, reaching an effective 70° range of motion for both joints. The system features closed loop control using feedback from surface electromyography sensors, limit switches and position sensors with an Arduino microcontroller as the control unit. This device will be used to further our understanding of the disorder and create opportunities for robot aided treatment for individuals with phantom limb pain as a result of spinal cord injury.

  7. Low cortisol levels in blood from dairy cows with ketosis: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kristina B; Ljungvall, Orjan A; Jones, Bernt V

    2010-05-20

    An elevated plasma glucose concentration has been considered to be a potential risk factor in the pathogenesis of left-displaced abomasums (DA). Therefore the present study was performed to investigate if spontaneous disease (parturient paresis, metritis, ketosis etc) in dairy cows results in elevated concentrations of glucose and cortisol in blood as cortisol is the major regulator of glucose in ruminants. Cortisol, insulin, beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA), non esterified fatty acids (NEFA), and serum calcium were analyzed in blood serum and glucose, in whole blood, from 57 spontaneously diseased cows collected at different farms. The cows were grouped according to the disease; parturient paresis, recumbent for other reasons, mastitis, metritis, ketosis, inappetance and others. No elevated concentrations of cortisol or glucose were found in cows with metritis and mastitis but both cortisol and glucose were elevated in cows stressed by recumbency. Cows with ketonemia (BHBA > 1.5 mmol/l) did not have low concentration of glucose in blood but significantly low levels of cortisol. Some of these cows even had cortisol concentrations below the detection limit of the analysing method (ketosis, recommending glucocorticoids, insulin etc. However further studies of this problem are needed to understand why cows with ketosis have low levels of cortisol and normal levels of glucose. To what extent elevated cortisol and glucose levels in hypocalcemic and recumbent cows are involved in the ethiology and /or the pathogenesis of DA also will need further research.

  8. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

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    Preisinger Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV. Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift.

  9. Conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis: personal experience and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwicki, Tomasz; Jozwiak, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The principles of conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis in childhood and adolescence are presented. Analysis of personal experience and literature review. The topic is discussed separately for patients with flaccid or spastic paresis. These demonstrate that conservative management might be proposed for patients with neuromuscular scoliosis in many clinical situations. In spastic disorders, it maintains the symmetry around the hip joints. Bracing is technically difficult and often is not tolerated well by cerebral palsy children. In patients with flaccid paresis, the fitting and the use of brace is easier than in spastic patients. The flexibility of the spinal curvature is more important. Functional benefits of conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis comprise stable sitting, easier use of upper limbs, discharge of the abdomen from the collapsing trunk, increased diaphragm excursion, and, not always, prevention of curve progression. Specific natural history and multiple medical problems associated with the disease make the treatment of children with neuromuscular scoliosis an extremely complex issue, best addressed when a team approach is applied. Continuously improving techniques of conservative management, comprising bracing and physiotherapy, together with correctly timed surgery incorporated in the process of rehabilitation, provide the optimal care for patients.

  10. [Impairment and disability in patients with a severe ischemic cerebral infarction at admission to the rehabilitation center and six months after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevo, A J; Dijkman, M M; Le Fèvre, F A

    1998-03-21

    Evaluation of impairment and disability in stroke patients with a severe cortical infarction at admission as well as six months after the stroke. Prospective and descriptive study. Rehabilitation Centre Heliomare, Wijk aan Zee, the Netherlands. Between 1 January 1987 en 31 May 1992 stroke patients were admitted to the rehabilitation centre with a severe, first ever, cortical infarction without any comorbidity. The patients were dependent in activities of daily living and wheel-chair-bound. Motor and neuropsychological impairment and disability were evaluated at admission to the rehabilitation centre as well as six months after the stroke. Return to home and length of stay were evaluated. 43 patients were included. Recovery of arm and hand function was very poor (there was complete paresis at admission in 33 patients (77%) and six months after the CVA in 25 patients (58%)); recovery of the affected leg was reasonable (complete paresis in 10 (23%) and 0 patients, respectively). Cognitive deficits diminished in severity, but remained noticeable in three-quarters of the patients. Independent walking was achieved by 30 patients (70%), independence in personal activities of daily living by 32 patients (74%) and returning home by 36 patients (84%). The mean hospital stay was 26 weeks (SD: 9.26; range: 11-30). Prognosis of personal independence and returning home after a severe cortical infarction was rather good despite poor recovery of motor and cognitive impairment.

  11. CT and MR findings in HIV-negative neurosyphilis

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    Peng Fuhua [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: pfh93@21cn.com; Hu Xueqiang [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: huxueqiangqm@yahoo.com.cn; Zhong Xiufeng [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-Sen University, 54 Xianlie Road, Guangzhou, 510060 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: xiufengzhong@yahoo.com.cn; Wei Qiu [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: qw9406@tom.com; Jiang Ying [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: jiangying722@163.com; Bao Jian [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: baoj92@tom.com; Wu Aimin [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: wuaim@126.com; Pei Zhong [Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 89 Zhongshaner Road, Guangzhou, 510080 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: peizhong@yahoo.com

    2008-04-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate neuroimaging findings of patients with neurosyphilis. Methods: The neuroimaging studies of 14 patients with documented neurosyphilis were reviewed. Diagnosis was established in 14 patients with cerebrospinal fluid for a Treponema Pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) test. All patients had reactive TPPA and Unheated Serum Regain test (USR) in their sera. Imaging studies included plain, contrast-enhanced CT of the brain, plain and gadolinium-enhanced MR, and MR angiography. Results: In the 14 HIV-negative patients with neurosyphilis, CT and MR showed the presence of cerebral infarction in six cases, arteritis in four cases, nonspecific white matter lesion in three cases, acute syphilitic meningitis in one case and normal neuroimaging finding in one case. In addition, 4 in 14 patients had general paresis, and MRI showed high signal intensity on T2 -weighted images involving frontotemporal lobes, hippocampus and periventricular area. Treatment with penicillin significantly diminished the size of these high signal intensity on T2-weighted images with general paresis. Conclusion: These results suggest that MR and CT images have some characteristic manifestations in patients of neurosyphilis. Because early diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis are crucial to avoid persistent brain damage, the neuroimaging findings are valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide useful information to follow-up after therapy.

  12. The importance of neurophysiological-Bobath method in multiple sclerosis

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    Adrian Miler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation treatment in multiple sclerosis should be carried out continuously, can take place in the hospital, ambulatory as well as environmental conditions. In the traditional approach, it focuses on reducing the symptoms of the disease, such as paresis, spasticity, ataxia, pain, sensory disturbances, speech disorders, blurred vision, fatigue, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. In kinesiotherapy in people with paresis, the most common methods are the (Bobathian method.Improvement can be achieved by developing the ability to maintain a correct posture in various positions (so-called postural alignment, patterns based on corrective and equivalent responses. During the therapy, various techniques are used to inhibit pathological motor patterns and stimulate the reaction. The creators of the method believe that each movement pattern has its own postural system, from which it can be initiated, carried out and effectively controlled. Correct movement can not take place in the wrong position of the body. The physiotherapist discusses with the patient how to perform individual movement patterns, which protects him against spontaneous pathological compensation.The aim of the work is to determine the meaning and application of the  Bobath method in the therapy of people with MS

  13. Could visual neglect induce amblyopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, J C; Vokaer, M; Fery, P; Garbusinski, J; Van Campenhoudt, G; Blecic, S A; Bartholomé, E J

    2004-12-01

    Oculomotor nerve disease is a common cause of diplopia. When strabismus is present, absence of diplopia has to induce the research of either uncovering of visual fields or monocular suppression, amblyopia or blindness. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman presenting with right oculomotor paresis and left object-centred visual neglect due to a right fronto-parietal haemorrhage expanding to the right peri-mesencephalic cisterna caused by the rupture of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm. She never complained of diplopia despite binocular vision and progressive recovery of strabismus, excluding uncovering of visual fields. Since all other causes were excluded in this case, we hypothesise that the absence of diplopia was due to the object-centred visual neglect. Partial internal right oculomotor paresis causes an ocular deviation in abduction; the image being perceived deviated contralaterally to the left. Thus, in our case, the neglect of the left image is equivalent to a right monocular functional blindness. However, bell cancellation test clearly worsened when assessed in left monocular vision confirming that eye patching can worsen attentional visual neglect. In conclusion, our case argues for the possibility of a functional monocular blindness induced by visual neglect. We think that in presence of strabismus, absence of diplopia should induce the search for hemispatial visual neglect when supratentorial lesions are suspected.

  14. [Successive subcortical hemorrhages in the superior parietal lobule and postcentral gyrus in a 23-year-old female].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Yoshikawa, H; Komai, K; Takamori, M

    1998-04-01

    We report a non-hypertensive 23-year-old female with successive hemorrhages in parietal subcortical regions. She had first experienced a transient pain in the left upper extremity one month before admission. She noticed dysesthesia in the same limb and weakness on her left hand, and, five days after, visited our hospital because of suddenly developed convulsion in the limb and loss of consciousness for a few minutes. Neurological examination revealed distal dominant flaccid paresis, positive pathological reflex and touch and position sense disturbances in the affected limb. Brain CT detected two high-density areas in the parietal lobe. Brain MRI demonstrated an acute phase subcortical hematoma in the left postcentral gyrus and a subacute phase one in the left superior parietal lobule. SPECT indicated hypoperfusion in the left frontal and parietal cortex. Cerebral angiography showed no abnormal findings. Her symptoms gradually improved, but left ulnar-type pseudoradicular sensory impairment remained on discharge. We considered the hemorrhage in this patient have arisen from rupture of cavernous hemangioma, because she was relatively young, the hematomas were oval in shape and successively developed in the left parietal lobe. Our patient suggests that a subcortical hemorrhage in the post-central gyrus causes flaccid paresis and pyramidal tract involvement.

  15. Specific features of vocal fold paralysis in functional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowska, K.; Mackiewicz-Nartowicz, H.; Serafin, Z.; Nawrocka, E.

    2008-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis is usually recognized in laryngological examination, and detailed vocal fold function may be established based on laryngovideostroboscopy. Additional imaging should exclude any morphological causes of the paresis, which should be treated pharmacologically or surgically. The aim of this paper was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) images of the larynx in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. CT examinations of the larynx were performed in 10 patients with clinically defined unilateral vocal fold paralysis. The examinations consisted of unenhanced acquisition and enhanced 3-phased acquisition: during free breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and phonation. The analysis included the following morphologic features of the paresis.the deepened epiglottic vallecula, the deepened piriform recess, the thickened and medially positioned aryepiglottic fold, the widened laryngeal pouch, the anteriorly positioned arytenoid cartilage, the thickened vocal fold, and the filled infraglottic space in frontal CT reconstruction. CT images were compared to laryngovideostroboscopy. The most common symptoms of vocal cord paralysis in CT were the deepened epiglottic vallecula and piriform recess, the widened laryngeal pouch with the filled infraglottic space, and the thickened aryepiglottic fold. Regarding the efficiency of the paralysis determination, the three functional techniques of CT larynx imaging used did not differ significantly, and laryngovideostroboscopy demonstrated its advantage over CT. CT of the larynx is a supplementary examination in the diagnosis of vocal fold paralysis, which may enable topographic analysis of the fold dysfunction. The knowledge of morphological CT features of the paralysis may help to prevent false-positive diagnosis of laryngeal cancer. (author)

  16. Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a child – case report

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    Joanna Grabowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare disease characterized by complications of herpes zoster oticus. This syndrome is defined by characteristic skin lesions with paresis of the facial and/or vestibulocochlear nerve. Objective. To present a case of a 14-year-old child with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Case report . A 14-year-old patient was admitted to the Department of Dermatology due to vesicular lesions in the left auricular region. On medical examination, insufficiency of the left eyelid, asymmetry of the facial lines, drooping of the left corner of the mouth, and smoothing of the forehead were observed. According to the House-Brackmann scale, the patient had paresis (grade IV of the facial nerve. The patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Supplementation with vitamin B and rehabilitation procedures were also introduced. Conclusions . Ramsay Hunt syndrome is very rare in the pediatric population. It requires interdisciplinary cooperation between doctors. The presented case confirms the validity of therapy with acyclovir and prednisone and rehabilitation.

  17. Bald Eagle nestling mortality associated with Argas radiatus and Argas ricei tick infestation and successful management with nest removal in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice-Allen, Anne; Orr, Kathy; Schuler, Krysten L.; McCarty, Kyle; Jacobson, Kenneth; Meteyer, Carol U.

    2016-01-01

    Eight Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings heavily infested with larval ticks were found in or under a nest near the confluence of the Verde and Salt rivers in Arizona in 2009-11. The 8-12-wk-old nestlings were slow to respond to stimuli and exhibited generalized muscle weakness or paresis of the pelvic limbs. Numerous cutaneous and subcutaneous hemorrhages were associated with sites of tick attachment. Ticks were identified as Argas radiatus and Argas ricei. Treatment with acaricides and infection with West Nile virus (WNV) may have confounded the clinical presentation in 2009 and 2010. However, WNV-negative birds exhibited similar signs in 2011. One nestling recovered from paresis within 36 h after the removal of all adult and larval ticks (>350) and was released within 3 wk. The signs present in the heavily infested Bald Eagle nestlings resembled signs associated with tick paralysis, a neurotoxin-mediated paralytic syndrome described in mammals, reptiles, and wild birds (though not eagles). Removal of the infested nest and construction of a nest platform in a different tree was necessary to break the cycle of infection. The original nesting pair constructed a new nest on the man-made platform and successfully fledged two Bald Eagles in 2012.

  18. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  19. Anatomical study of the facial nerve canal in comparison to the site of the lesion in Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowsky, Krsto; Branica, Srećko; Batelja, Lovorka; Dawidowsky, Barbara; Kovać-Bilić, Lana; Simunić-Veselić, Anamarija

    2011-03-01

    The term Bell's palsy is used for the peripheral paresis of the facial nerve and is of unknown origin. Many studies have been performed to find the cause of the disease, but none has given certain evidence of the etiology. However, the majority of investigators agree that the pathophysiology of the palsy starts with the edema of the facial nerve and consequent entrapment of the nerve in the narrow facial canal in the temporal bone. In this study the authors wanted to find why the majority of the paresis are suprastapedial, i.e. why the entrapment of the nerve mainly occurs in the proximal part of the canal. For this reason they carried out anatomical measurements of the facial canal diameter in 12 temporal bones. By use of a computer program which measures the cross-sectional area from the diameter, they proved that the width of the canal is smaller at its proximal part. Since the nerve is thicker at that point because it contains more nerve fibers, the authors conclude that the discrepancy between the nerve diameter and the surrounding bony walls in the suprastapedial part of the of the canal would, in cases of a swollen nerve after inflammation, cause the facial palsy.

  20. Risk of marginal mandibular nerve injury in neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and permanent frequency of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) after neck dissection has only scarcely been addressed in the medical literature. We investigated the risk of injury in 159 consecutive patients after neck dissection for various reasons...... in level I B and level II A, respectively. In 95 patients with oral cancer 13 (14%) of the cases had malfunction of the lower lip domain 2 weeks after neck dissection in level I B indicating paresis to the MMN. Follow-up analyses 1-2 years after the operation showed permanent paralysis in 4 to 7......% of the cases in whom two of them had the nerve sacrificed for oncologic reasons during the operation. In 18 patients with parotic cancer the corresponding permanent frequency of MMN paralysis was 11.1%. In 46 patients with neck dissection in level II A but not in level I B, no paresis of the MMN was registered...

  1. Outcomes of surgical treatment of thyroid disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S. Rogova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In recent years there has been a tendency of increase in the proportion of nodular goiter and Graves’ disease in thyroid pathology in children, which necessitates a choice of rational tactics for treatment of these diseases. At present there is no optimal method of treatment for thyroid gland pathology, but one of the methods is surgery. Thyroid surgery due to the determination of the indications and choice of the optimal volume of the surgical intervention continues to be under debate as postoperative complications of surgical treatment of thyroid diseases in children are possible.Aim: to study the outcomes of surgical treatment for thyroid pathology in children, depending on the volume of operation.Materials and methods. This article presents the results of a survey of 77 children operated on in the period of 2002–2016 for Graves’ disease, single-node goiter, and multinodular goiter. The examination included the determination of the levels of ionized calcium and TSH, FT4, FT3 in the blood serum, the evaluation of the functional state of the pituitary-thyroid system, thyroid ultrasound examination, and examination by an otolaryngologist.Results. The incidence of adverse outcomes of surgical treatment in children with nodular goiter was 27%. Adverse outcomes were observed equally often after organ-preserving operations and after thyroidectomy, but they were of different structure. The frequency of postoperative complications after thyroidectomy performed on the nodular goiter was 27%. Complications presented as postsurgical hypoparathyroidism and vocal cord paresis. In children with nodular goiter, after thyroidectomy hypoparathyroidism occurred more frequently than paresis of the vocal folds. Symptomatic hypocalcemia was observed more frequently than the asymptomatic variant, and in most cases hypoparathyrodism was transient. Among children with a single-node goiter who underwent organ-preserving surgery on the thyroid gland

  2. Incidence estimate and guideline-oriented treatment for post-stroke spasticity: an analysis based on German statutory health insurance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egen-Lappe V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Veronika Egen-Lappe, Ingrid Köster, Ingrid SchubertPMV Research Group, Department of Child and Adolescence Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyBackground: Spasticity after stroke has been internationally recognized as an important health problem causing impairment of mobility, deformity, and pain. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of first-ever and recurrent stroke and of subsequent spastic and flaccid paresis. Factors influencing the development of spasticity were analyzed. A further major aim was to provide a "real-life" assessment of the treatment of spasticity in Germany and to discuss this in view of the treatment recommended by German and international clinical guidelines.Methods: The database used in this study comprised a cohort of 242,090 insurants from a large statutory health insurance fund in the federal state of Hesse, Germany. A first hospital discharge diagnosis in 2009 with any of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 codes I60–I64 was used to identify patients with acute stroke (hemorrhage and ischemic. These patients were followed up six months after stroke to monitor whether they developed spastic or flaccid paresis (hospital or ambulatory care diagnoses ICD-10 code G81–G83 [excluding G82.6/G83.4/G83.8]. For patients with spastic paresis after stroke the spasticity treatment was analyzed for a six-month period (physiotherapy, oral muscle relaxants, intrathecal baclofen, and botulinum toxin.Results: Standardized to the population of Germany, 3.7 per 1000 persons suffered a stroke in 2009 (raw 5.2/1000. Of all surviving patients, 10.2% developed spasticity within 6 months. Cox regression revealed no significant influence of patient age, gender, morbidity (diabetes, hypertensive diseases, ischemic heart diseases or type of stroke on development of spasticity. 97% of surviving patients with spasticity received physiotherapy (inpatient care 89

  3. Associations between clinical outcome and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation characteristics in patients with motor-eloquent brain lesions: a combined navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation-diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Wildschuetz, Noémie; Kelm, Anna; Conway, Neal; Moser, Tobias; Bulubas, Lucia; Kirschke, Jan S; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI FT) based on nTMS data are increasingly used for preoperative planning and resection guidance in patients suffering from motor-eloquent brain tumors. The present study explores whether nTMS-based DTI FT can also be used for individual preoperative risk assessment regarding surgery-related motor impairment. METHODS Data derived from preoperative nTMS motor mapping and subsequent nTMS-based tractography in 86 patients were analyzed. All patients suffered from high-grade glioma (HGG), low-grade glioma (LGG), or intracranial metastasis (MET). In this context, nTMS-based DTI FT of the corticospinal tract (CST) was performed at a range of fractional anisotropy (FA) levels based on an individualized FA threshold ([FAT]; tracking with 50%, 75%, and 100% FAT), which was defined as the highest FA value allowing for visualization of fibers (100% FAT). Minimum lesion-to-CST distances were measured, and fiber numbers of the reconstructed CST were assessed. These data were then correlated with the preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up status of motor function and the resting motor threshold (rMT). RESULTS At certain FA levels, a statistically significant difference in lesion-to-CST distances was observed between patients with HGG who had no impairment and those who developed surgery-related transient or permanent motor deficits (75% FAT: p = 0.0149; 100% FAT: p = 0.0233). In this context, no patient with a lesion-to-CST distance ≥ 12 mm suffered from any new surgery-related permanent paresis (50% FAT and 75% FAT). Furthermore, comparatively strong negative correlations were observed between the rMT and lesion-to-CST distances of patients with surgery-related transient paresis (Spearman correlation coefficient [r s ]; 50% FAT: r s = -0.8660; 75% FAT: r s = -0.8660) or surgery-related permanent paresis (50% FAT: r s = -0.7656; 75% FAT: r s = -0.6763). CONCLUSIONS

  4. Suspected natural lysosomal storage disease from ingestion of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) in goats in northern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Elvio E; Cholich, Luciana A; Chileski, Gabriela; García, Enrique N; Lértora, Javier; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Guidi, María G; Mussart, Norma; Teibler, Gladys P

    2015-07-01

    This study describes an occurrence of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) intoxication in goats in northern Argentina. The clinical signs displayed by the affected animals were ataxia, lethargy, emaciation, hypertonia of the neck muscles, spastic paresis in the hind legs, abnormal postural reactions and death. The clinico-pathologic examination revealed that the affected animals were anemic and their serum level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells and pancreatic acinar cells was observed by histological examination. The neuronal lectin binding pattern showed a strong positive reaction to WGA (Triticum vulgaris), sWGA (succinylated T. vulgaris) and LCA (Lens culinaris). Although I. carnea is common in tropical regions, this is the first report of spontaneous poisoning in goats in Argentina.

  5. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Sandip K. Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  6. Post-operative complications after removal of sporadic vestibular schwannoma via retrosigmoid-suboccipital approach: current diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampakis, Stylianos; Koutsimpelas, Dimitrios; Gouveris, Haralampos; Mann, Wolf

    2011-05-01

    The retrosigmoid (suboccipital) approach is one of four surgical approaches for the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas). It is increasingly used by otologic surgeons, and in experienced hands is associated with improved results and more limited complications. Mortality rates are minimal and often zero, while postoperative sequelae, on the other hand, are not rare. In order to not only save the patient's life, but also to assure good quality of life after the surgery, one must consider many different aspects of management of the respective complications. In this review the issues of current management of CSF leak and meningitis, facial paresis, headache, hearing loss, unsteadiness, disequilibrium, vertigo, tinnitus, cerebellar and brain stem injuries or abscess, vascular complications and venous air embolism after retrosigmoid approach for removal of vestibular schwannomas are presented. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  7. Isolated thalamic tuberculoma presenting as ataxic hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ritesh; Patil, Tushar B; Kori, Prakash; Shukla, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Lacunar syndrome is a neurodeficit secondary to a deep cerebral lesion, usually because of microatheroma of small arteries. Ataxic hemiparesis (AH) is a lacunar syndrome with unilateral pyramidal weakness and ipsilateral ataxia. Thalamic tuberculoma, as a cause of AH, has not been previously described in the literature. We describe an elderly man who presented with left hemiparesis and ipsilateral ataxia. Clinical examination revealed upper motor neuron left facial paresis and left-sided hemiparesis. The patient had incoordination in left upper and lower limbs. Mantoux test was positive and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated. MRI of brain showed a conglomerated hypointense lesion in the right thalamus with a peripheral hyperintensity on T1-weighted imaging and a hyperintense lesion in T2-weighted imaging with significant perilesional oedema, suggesting a tuberculoma. The patient was treated with antitubercular therapy and was symptomatically better at the 9 months follow-up. PMID:23580686

  8. Reversible brain damage following acute organic solvents' poisoning determined by magnetic resonance

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    Dujmović Irena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute exposure to the effects of volatile solvents is characterized by the abrupt onset of symptoms and signs of poisoning, and relatively fast recovery in the majority of cases. Case report. We report a 24-year-old patient with an acute, accidental poisoning with a mixture of volatile organic solvents (most probably toluene, styrene and xylene, which led to the development of upward gaze paresis, diplopia, hemiparesis, ataxic gate, and the late onset truncal ataxia episodes. After 6 weeks, he recovered completely, while his extensive brain MRI lesions in the caudate nuclei, laterobasal putaminal regions, bilateral anterior insular cortex, central midbrain tegmental area withdrew completely after 4 months. Conclusion. Acute toxic encephalopathy should be a part of the differential diagnosis in any patient with acute neurobehavioral and neurological deficit.

  9. Total body irradiation for installment of arylsulfatase B activity in a cat by bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macy, D.W.; Gillette, E.L.; Gasper, P.W.; Thrall, M.A.; Wenger, D.A.; Kessell, M.L.; Hoover, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI is an inherited, metabolic defect in which a deficiency of arylsulfatase B, results in accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in lysosomes. Arylsulfatase B activity was installed in an affected 2 year old siamese cat with no arylsulfatase B activity, excess urinary GAG, Alder-Reilly bodies in neutrophils, facial dysmorphia, corneal clouding, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and hind limb paresis. Following grafting of bone marrow from an immunologically nonreactive, female sibling with normal arylsulfatase B activity, increased arylsulfatase B activity and urinary excretion of hexuronic acid decreased by 19 days post transplantation. There were no metachromatic inclusions in circulating neutrophils, which were phenotypically female. The cat now has competent trilineage hematopoiesis, resolution of the facial dysmorphia, no corneal clouding, and improved movement of the head, neck, and mandible. The technique, sequence of hematologic recovery, and evidence of engraftment, are discussed. This may be a model for correction of mucopolysaccharidosis VI in man

  10. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Wszolek, Z.K.; Pfeiffer, R.F.; Calne, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [ 18 F[-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K i (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [de

  11. [Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system: 20 years' experience in a referral hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Pacheco-Calleros, J; Castelán-Maldonado, E; Nocedal-Rustrián, F C

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) are rare neoplasms. AIM. To study the clinical aspects and the immuno-phenotype of all cases of PCNSL in a 20 years lapse in a referral hospital in Northeastern Mexico. From January 1986 to December 2005 all PCNSL histologically confirmed were studied. The primary lymphomas were 1% of malignant central nervous system neoplasms. 21 cases were studied (ages from 9-70 years) with male predominance (2:1). 24% patients had immuno-suppression. The more frequent clinical data were: papilledema (71%), headache (62%), paresis (48%) and seizures (33%). 33% of patients died during the first six months after diagnosis. The T lymphomas were 19% of cases and corresponded to small cell type. PCNSL are still a diagnostic challenge. Multicenter studies are required in order to determine the best treatment protocol.

  12. Evaluation of a physiotherapeutic treatment intervention in "Bell's" facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederwall, Elisabet; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Hanner, Per; Fogdestam, Ingemar

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a physiotherapeutic treatment intervention in Bell's palsy. A consecutive series of nine patients with Bell's palsy participated in the study. The subjects were enrolled 4-21 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis. The study had a single subject experimental design with a baseline period of 2-6 weeks and a treatment period of 26-42 weeks. The patients were evaluated using a facial grading score, a paresis index and a written questionnaire created for this study. Every patient was taught to perform an exercise program twice daily, including movements of the muscles surrounding the mouth, nose, eyes and forehead. All the patients improved in terms of symmetry at rest, movement and function. In conclusion, patients with remaining symptoms of Bell's palsy appear to experience positive effects from a specific training program. A larger study, however, is needed to fully evaluate the treatment.

  13. EARLY TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WHIT INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES IN THE ADVISORY INSTITUTION FOR DEVELOPMENT IN BITOLA

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    Liljana NAUMOVSKA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1985-1995, 38 children with intracranal hemorrhages were treated in the Advisory Institution for Development in Bitola.Out of them:· or 44.7% were no consequences;· or 18.4% were with mute paresis;· or 36.8% were with cerebral paralysesTreatment in the Advisory Institution commences on the 15 day or within the first month of the child at the most. By using the Gunzberg defektology method the organization of the psycho-motor coordination, speech and knowledge functions are assessed. This diagnosis is necessary in order to begin with an early neuropsyhiatric habilitation treatment.Our Advisory Institution uses the method of conscious development synthesis which requires maximum involvement of the parent in the habilitation, rehabilitation and reeducation treatment.Parents are motivated and educated to participate through frequent visits to Advisory Institution by a defectologist-somatopead.

  14. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in children: a neurologic sequela of extreme prematurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, N.K.; Wen, T.S.; Dominguez, R.

    1995-01-01

    We retrospectively identified eight children, aged 8 months to 13 years, in whom cerebellar atrophy associated with cerebral injury was diagnosed on MR or CT, and reviewed their past medical history, neurologic findings, and neuroimaging studies. Seven patients were born extremely premature, EGA 25-28 weeks, and had severe perinatal intracranial hemorrhage. Neurologic problems include severe developmental delay in seven, spastic paresis in six, and seizures in five. Neuroimaging showed severe unilaterial holohemispheric atrophy in four, bilateral asymmetric holohemispheric atrophy in two, and left temporoparietal atrophy in one. Cerebellar atrophy was unilateral in five and bilateral but asymmetric in two. Gliosis of the atrophic cerebellum occurred in one patient. Sequential neuroimaging in one patient showed evolution of crossed cerebellar atrophy at 8 months of age. The final patient, a term infant, had an idiopathic perinatal left cerebral infarct. (orig./MG)

  15. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

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    Rita Galeiras Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries (SCIs often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with severely impaired VC may require assisted ventilation. It is best to proceed with intubation under controlled circumstances rather than waiting until the condition becomes an emergency. Mechanical ventilation can adversely affect the structure and function of the diaphragm. Early tracheostomy following short orotracheal intubation is probably beneficial in selected patients. Weaning should start as soon as possible, and the best modality is progressive ventilator-free breathing (PVFB. Appropriate candidates can sometimes be freed from mechanical ventilation by electrical stimulation. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve patients’ inspiratory function following a SCI.

  16. Stridor in an Elderly Woman: An Unusual Presentation of a Giant Thyroglossal Cyst

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    Sithananda Kumar Venkatesan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglossal cysts are one of the most common midline neck masses. They usually present as midline painless cystic neck mass in the first three decades of life. These anomalies are very rare in elderly patients and may pose difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Here, we report a case of giant thyroglossal cyst in a 72-year-female patient who presented with stridor, hoarseness of voice, and vocal cord paresis with gross distortion of normal airway anatomy secondary to pressure effect of the mass. The gross distortion and displacement of airway along with respiratory distress in this patient posed a difficult situation in securing the airway. The airway was secured by a unique way of orotracheal intubation with the help of a ventilating airway exchange catheter. The cyst was excised in toto under general anaesthesia. The stridor completely resolved after surgery and tracheostomy was avoided.

  17. Cytokine production by cells in cerebrospinal fluid during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Lin, J Y; Piccirillo, C

    1994-01-01

    Cytokine production by T cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and central nervous system (CNS) of SJL/J mice during myelin basic protein (MBP)-induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was examined. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) was used to measure...... interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA levels from perfused CNS tissue (brain and spinal cord) and from cells isolated from CSF. Animals were grouped according to EAE severity, ranging from asymptomatic (adjuvant only) to severe disease (paralysis or severe paresis). Cytokine signals......, normalized to actin, were almost undetectable in control tissues, and only slightly elevated in whole CNS tissue from animals with mild EAE. Both cytokine messages were strongly upregulated in CNS tissues derived from severely affected animals, consistent with previous observations correlating disease...

  18. Increased Expression of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 by T Cells, Induced by B7 in Sera, Reduces Adaptive Immunity in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khamri, Wafa; Abeles, Robin D; Hou, Tie Zheng

    2017-01-01

    , hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, and biliary epithelial cells from healthy or diseased liver tissues. We also measured levels of soluble B7 serum samples from patients and controls, and mice with acetaminophen-induced liver injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Peripheral blood...... mice with acetaminophen-induced liver injury contained high levels of soluble B7 compared to sera from mice without liver injury. Plasma exchange reduced circulating levels of soluble B7 in patients with ALF and expression of CTLA4 on T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral CD4+ T cells from patients with ALF......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have defects in innate immune responses to microbes (immune paresis) and are susceptible to sepsis. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4), which interacts with the membrane receptor B7 (also called CD80 and CD86...

  19. A Young Male with Spontaneous Ruptured Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation (Case Report

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    Vitorino Modesto Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM is considered a congenital condition characterized by arterial-venous connections in the absence of intermediate capillaries with circulatory and functional changes, inclusive on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. Case: A previously healthy young man with abrupt onset of intense headache followed by incoercible vomiting and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. On admission, he was in Glasgow scale IV with respiratory gasping, signs of decerebration and anisocoric mydriasis, and right paresis. Computed tomography showed left intraparenchymal hematoma and intraventricular blood. The abnormal vessels and blood clots were removed by neurosurgery. In early postoperative phase a large cerebrospinal fluid leak developed, and was aspirated and further controlled. The patient had respiratory complications, including pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas. Conclusions: After longstanding hospitalization, he was referred to other medical institution and home care. 

  20. Friedrich Nietzsche: the wandering and learned neuropath under Dionisius

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    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900 was a remarkable philologist-philosopher while remaining in a condition of ill-health. Issues about his wandering/disruptive behavior that might be a consequence and/or protection against his cognitive decline and multifaceted disease are presented. The life complex that raises speculations about its etiology is constituted by: insight, creativity and wandering behavior besides several symptoms and signs of disease(s, mainly neurological one. The most important issue to be considered at the moment is not the disease diagnosis (Lissauer’s general paresis or CADASIL, e.g., but the probable Nietzsche’s great cognitive reserve linked to the multifactorial etiology (genetic and environmental, and shared characteristics both to creativity and psychopathology. This makes any disease seems especial regarding Nietzsche, and whichever the diagnostic hypothesis has to consider the Nietzsche’s unique background to express any disease(s.

  1. OUTCOMES OF TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS IN THE TOMSK REGION

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    T. S. Pinegina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study outcomes of tick-borne encephalitis in adults in the Tomsk Region. Patients conducted a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination. Revealed the prevalence of autonomic disorders in individuals who have had at different periods of tick-borne encephalitis, which is regarded as the effects of tick-borne infection. Residual effects of tick-borne encephalitis occurs mainly in the form of light paresis after suffering a focal forms. Among the chronic (progredient forms of tick-borne encephalitis often formed hyperkinetic options. Most of the study revealed the presence of precipitating factors that could have an influence on the outcome. Fundamental diffe rences in all-clinical and immunological analyses at patients with various outcomes of tick-borne encephalitis it wasn't noted. KEY WORDS: tick-borne encephalitis, Tomsk Region, the outcomes.

  2. [A case of pulmonary malignant melanoma mimicking lung abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideaki; Chikui, Emiko; Tokumaru, Aya; Kato, Takayuki; Arai, Tomio; Takahashi, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    An 84-year-old man was admitted with paresis of the right lower limb. Hemorrhagic lesions were demonstrated in the left frontoparietal lobe and cerebellum by cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chest CT revealed an ill-defined mass measuring 4 x 6 cm in the left lower lobe of the lung, although bronchoscopic examination failed to obtain pathological diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis of primary lung cancer with multiple brain metastases was made, and he underwent whole brain radiotherapy. The pulmonary and cerebral lesions mimicked abscesses during his clinical course, and he died of respiratory failure due to bilateral pneumonia three months after admission. Autopsy revealed that both the pulmonary and brain lesions were malignant melanomas, but no other melanoma lesions could be identified despite meticulous investigation. Although malignant melanoma with an unknown primary site is rare in Japan, careful evaluation of the CT and MRI findings might be the key to correct diagnosis in this case.

  3. An unusual case of orbito-frontal rod fence stab injury with a good outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miscusi, Massimo; Arangio, Paolo; De Martino, Luca; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Cascone, Piero; Raco, Antonino

    2013-08-13

    High-energy non-missile penetrating injuries (stab injuries) account for a small percentage of penetrating head injuries and they present a series of special features. A 35-year-old man suffered orbito-frontal? and trans-cranial injuries after falling five meters from a terrace onto a rod iron fence. The removal of the metal rod was performed outside the operating room. The orbital roof was exposed and repaired through a bifrontal craniotomy and the frontal sinuses were cranialised. The orbital floor and zygoma were plated with micro-screws. The patient recovered without significant complications, apart from a slight paresis of the right superior rectus; the ocular globe remained intact.The positive outcome obtained in this very challenging case is attributable to the competency of the Neurotrauma Unit and to the use of a synergistic approach which involved the contribution of neurosurgeons, maxillo-facial surgeons, radiologists and anaesthesiologists.

  4. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in HIV-infected patients during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Frederik Neess; Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection predisposes to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Here, we describe the incidence, presentation, and prognosis of PML in HIV-1-infected patients during the period before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (1995...... at presentation and follow-up. RESULTS: Among 4,649 patients, we identified 47 patients with PML. The incidence rates were 3.3, 1.8, and 1.3 cases per 1000 person-years at risk in 1995-1996, 1997-1999, and 2000-2006, respectively. The risk of PML was significantly associated with low CD4(+) cell count, and 47......% of cases were diagnosed by means of brain biopsy or polymerase chain reaction analysis for JC virus. The predominant neurological symptoms at presentation were coordination disturbance, cognitive defects, and limb paresis. Thirty-five patients died; the median survival time was 0.4 years (95% confidence...

  5. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  6. A catheter malpositioned patient with pain and paresthesia

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    Akbar Fadaei Haghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 54-year-old woman with the history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD who was admitted to our hospital because of volume overload. Due to long-term use of peripheral veins and arteriovenous fistula (AVF failure, central venous catheterization was the only choice for hemodialysis. She developed right upper extremiti’s pain and paresis during hemodialysis. A posteroanterior chest x-ray showed the catheter tip was accidently pushed from right internal jugular vein into right subclavian vein during hemodialysis by the dialysis center nurse. Therefore, we believe that the physician should be aware of any changes in the catheter size after insertion. And a chest x-ray should ensure the catheter’s correct position in any patient who develops complications.

  7. Sarcocystis neurona encephalitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, A J; Barr, B; Rejmanek, D

    2007-11-01

    A 1.5-year-old male Feist dog was presented to a veterinarian for reluctance to stand on the hind legs. Treatment included dexamethasone and resulted in a favorable initial response, but posterior paresis returned and progressed to recumbency, hyperesthesia, and attempts to bite the owner. The dog was euthanized. The brain was negative for rabies by fluorescent antibody analysis. Multiple foci of encephalitis were found in the cerebrum and particularly in the cerebellum. Protozoa morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis sp. were identified at sites of intense inflammation and malacia. Additionally, multiple schizonts were identified in areas without inflammation. Immunohistochemistry using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for Sarcocystis neurona was strongly positive. No reaction to polyclonal antisera for Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum was found. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the protozoa were S. neurona. Additional aberrant hosts for S. neurona other than horses have been identified, but S. neurona encephalitis has not been documented previously in the dog.

  8. Electrical stimulation in treatment of pharyngolaryngeal dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Simone; Jungheim, Michael; Kühn, Daniela; Ptok, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been proposed in the treatment of laryngopharyngeal dysfunctions (dysphonia, dyspnoea, dysphagia) for more than 40 years. Several studies have investigated possible therapeutic effects. Some researchers described favourable results, whereas others did not find relevant benefits. This article aims to review available studies to give an overview regarding the current state of knowledge. We conducted a selective literature search using PubMed. In total, 356 papers were identified: 6 case reports, 11 reviews, 43 prospective clinical trials and 3 retrospective trials were found. Due to different stimulation protocols, electrode positioning and various underlying pathological conditions, summarizing the present studies appears to be difficult. However, there is evidence that NMES is a valuable adjunct in patients with dysphagia and in patients with vocal fold paresis. Nevertheless, more empirical data is needed to fully understand the benefits provided by NMES. Further research suggestions are put forward. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Lesions in nerves and plexus after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, W.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the typical, radiation-induced changes in the skin, common secondary findings were oedemas, radiation-induced ulceration, fibroses of the mediastinum and lungs, pleura adhesions, and osteoradionecroses. In one patient with radiogenic paresis of the plexus brachialis, irradiation of the spinal cord because of epidural metastases of a mammary carcinoma resulted in radiation myelopathy which was verified by laminectomy. Observations of radiogenic lesions of the plexus brachialis show that the usual site of the lesion in the vasomotoric nerve bundle is the axilla. The lesion is assumed to be caused mainly by an overlapping of the axillary, infraclavicular and supraclavicular fields of irradiation which results in a dose peak in the axilla. (orig./AJ) 891 AJ/orig.- 892 MKO [de

  10. Churg-Strauss Syndrome following PTU Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. M. Quax

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil (PTU is a frequently prescribed drug in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The use of PTU is, however, accompanied by numerous potentially serious side effects including vasculitis. PTU-related vasculitides can present as haematuria, pulmonary haemorrhage, or cutaneous lesion together with aspecific symptoms such as fever, myalgia, arthralgia, and fatigue. Cerebral involvement is seldom observed. We present a 49-year-old female with Graves' disease and asthma, who developed paresis of the proximal extremities, eosinophilia, pulmonary, and cutaneous lesions following treatment with PTU. A cerebral vasculitis consistent with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS was suspected. Although cerebral involvement is seldom observed with PTU treatment, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in patients developing CNS symptoms.

  11. Endovascular treatment of basilar tip aneurysms associated with moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Ohba, S.; Shibukawa, M.; Kiura, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Uozumi, T.; Nakahara, T.

    2003-01-01

    We report the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of basilar tip aneurysms (BTA) in five patients with moyamoya disease. The patients underwent intra-aneurysmal embolisation with detachable platinum coils. Three BTA presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH); the other two were asymptomatic. In four cases, one embolisation procedure produced >95% angiographic obliteration of the aneurysm. In the other patient, 80-90% obliteration was achieved initially, but due to growth of the residual aneurysm, the procedure was repeated 7 months later. Two patients experienced transient oculomotor paresis as a procedure-related complication. Mean follow-up was 43.6±34.0 months (range 8-92 months). One patient died of putaminal haemorrhage unrelated to the aneurysm 15 months after embolisation. The other four had no subsequent SAH and survived without sequelae. Endovascular embolisation using detachable platinum coils proved to be a safe and efficient treatment modality for BTA associated with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  12. Virtual Reality Training for Upper Extremity in Subacute Stroke (VIRTUES)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Iris; Skouen, Jan Sture; Hofstad, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of upper extremity virtual reality rehabilitation training (VR) to time-matched conventional training (CT) in the subacute phase after stroke. Methods: In this randomized, controlled, single-blind phase III multicenter trial, 120 participants with upper...... extremity motor impairment within 12 weeks after stroke were consecutively included at 5 rehabilitation institutions. Participants were randomized to either VR or CT as an adjunct to standard rehabilitation and stratified according to mild to moderate or severe hand paresis, defined as $20 degrees wrist...... were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at the 3-month follow-up. Results: Mean time from stroke onset for the VR group was 35 (SD 21) days and for the CT group was 34 (SD 19) days. There were no between-group differences for any of the outcome measures. Improvement of upper extremity motor...

  13. Asymptomatic brain tumor detected at brain check-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizuka, Masanari; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Shibayama, Akira; Hiura, Tsuyoshi; Horie, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Hisaya

    2001-01-01

    Brain check-up was performed in 4000 healthy subjects who underwent medical and radiological examinations for possible brain diseases in our hospital from April 1996 to March 2000. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 11 brain tumors which consisted of six meningiomas, three pituitary adenomas, one astrocytoma, and one epidermoid cyst. The detection rate of incidental brain tumor in our hospital was 0.3%. Nine patients underwent surgery, with one case of morbidity due to postoperative transient oculomotor nerve paresis. The widespread use of brain check-up may increasingly detect asymptomatic brain tumors. Surgical indications for such lesions remain unclear, and the strategy for treatment should be determined with consideration of the patient's wishes. (author)

  14. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  15. Feline infectious peritonitis with neurologic involvement: clinical and pathological findings in 24 cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, K.L.; Joseph, R.J.; Averill, D.R. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The medical records of 24 cats with histopathologically diagnosed feline infectious peritonitis involving the nervous system were reviewed. Seventeen cats had historical, clinical, and pathological findings of systemic disease. Twelve cats had focal signs of central nervous system dysfunction. Twelve cats had multifocal signs including seizures, nystagmus, head tilt, vestibular or cerebellar ataxia, paresis, and proprioceptive loss with a preponderance of caudal fossa signs. Computed tomography of the brain revealed hydrocephalus in two cats. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid revealed pyogranulomatous pleocytosis in fivecats; the tap was nonproductive in five cats. Findings on histopathological examination of appropriate tissues included nephritis, hepatitis, and pleuritis. Neuropathological findings included ependymitis, choroid plexitis, meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis. Hydrocephalus was seen in 18 cats on necropsy

  16. Coccidioidomycosis in the llama: case report and epidemiologic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, S; Pappagianis, D

    1982-12-01

    An 8-year-old nongravid female llama with a 1-month history of progressive posterior paresis was referred because of suspected degenerative myelopathy secondary to copper deficiency or plant poisoning. Neurologic examination revealed loss of conscious proprioception and slightly depressed bilateral patellar reflexes. Electromyographic examination of hindlimb flexors and extensors did not elicit evidence of lower motor neuron disease. Possible fragmentation and mottling of the 10th thoracic vertebral body were noted radiographically. Results of a lumbar CSF tap, complete blood count, and fecal flotation were not diagnostic. In the face of poor prognosis, the llama was euthanatized. Postmortem and histologic evaluation revealed, in addition to disseminated visceral granulomas, an extradural pyogranulomatous mass compressing the cord laterally at the level of T-10. Large numbers of Coccidioides immitis were dispersed throughout the granulomas. Complement fixing antibody tests in 11 other herd members showed evidence of C immitis infection in three.

  17. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a rare phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewicz, Joanna; Szczepańska-Szerej, Anna; Ogórek, Magdalena; Dropko, Piotr; Wojtal, Katarzyna; Rejdak, Konrad

    2018-03-04

    We reported the case of a patient with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKs) as an early clinical manifestation of sporadic Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (sCJD). The 66-year-old female complained of dizziness and imbalance which mostly occurred while walking. A neurological examination revealed a triad of symptoms characteristic for WKs such as gaze paresis, ataxia of limbs and trunk as well as memory disturbances with confabulations. The disturbances increased during the course of the disease, which led to the death of the patient four months after the appearance of the signs. The patient was finally diagnosed with sCJD disease. The most useful ancillary examination results supporting sCJD diagnosis were brain diffusion DWI MRI (diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging) and the presence of 14-3-3 protein in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid). Since that manifestation of sCJD is very unique other causes should be taken into consideration while making a final diagnosis.

  18. Social ecological analysis of an outbreak of pufferfish egg poisoning in a coastal area of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Saiful; Luby, Stephen P; Rahman, Mahmudur; Parveen, Shahana; Homaira, Nusrat; Begum, Nur Har; Dawlat Khan, A K M; Sultana, Rebeca; Akhter, Shammi; Gurley, Emily S

    2011-09-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of marine pufferfish poisoning in Bangladesh highlight the need to understand the context in which the outbreaks occurred. In a recent outbreak investigation, a multidisciplinary team conducted a mixed-method study to identify the demography and clinical manifestation of the victims and to explore different uses of pufferfish, and local buying, selling, and processing practices. The outbreak primarily affected a low income household where an elderly woman collected and cooked pufferfish egg curry. Nine persons consumed the curry, and symptoms developed in 6 (67%) of these persons. Symptoms included vomiting, diarrhea, paresis, and tingling sensation; 2 (22%) persons died. The unstable income of the affected family, food crisis, and the public disposal of unsafe pufferfish byproducts all contributed to the outbreak. A multi-level intervention should be developed and disseminated with the participation of target communities to discourage unsafe discarding of pufferfish scraps and to improve the community knowledge about the risk of consuming pufferfish.

  19. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron: an unusual cause of bilateral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Clare; O'Brien, Richard

    2012-11-19

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant whereby a single vessel arising from the proximal segment of one posterior cerebral artery supplies both medial thalami. This is a rare example of a single arterial supply to brain structures on both sides of the midline. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron results in bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which is manifest clinically as gaze paresis, cognitive disturbance and altered consciousness. The presentation can mimic subarachnoid haemorrhage, drug intoxication, encephalitis and other inflammatory or infective conditions. The presentation is similar to the 'top of the basilar syndrome' and early recognition should prompt further investigation for underlying stroke aetiologies and consideration can be given to thrombolysis if vascular occlusion can be confirmed.

  20. Outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas, with special focus on the facial nerve function. The study design is a case series from a national centralized database and it is set in two University Hospitals in Denmark....... Participants were 1244 patients who underwent translabyrinthine surgery during a period of 33 years from 1976 to 2009. Main outcome measures were tumor removal, intraoperative facial nerve preservation, complications, and postoperative facial nerve function. In 84% patients, the tumor was totally resected...... and in ~85% the nerve was intact during surgery. During 33 years, 12 patients died from complications to surgery and ~14% had cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Before surgery, 74 patients had facial paresis and 46% of these improved after surgery. In patients with normal facial function, overall ~70% had a good...

  1. Nonlinear dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor from voice analysis and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-09-01

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis and model simulations are used to study the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of vocal folds with vocal tremor, which can typically be characterized by low-frequency modulation and aperiodicity. Tremor voices from patients with disorders such as paresis, Parkinson's disease, hyperfunction, and adductor spasmodic dysphonia show low-dimensional characteristics, differing from random noise. Correlation dimension analysis statistically distinguishes tremor voices from normal voices. Furthermore, a nonlinear tremor model is proposed to study the vibrations of the vocal folds with vocal tremor. Fractal dimensions and positive Lyapunov exponents demonstrate the evidence of chaos in the tremor model, where amplitude and frequency play important roles in governing vocal fold dynamics. Nonlinear dynamic voice analysis and vocal fold modeling may provide a useful set of tools for understanding the dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor in patients with laryngeal diseases.

  2. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  3. Aldosterone and cortisol co-secreting bifunctional adrenal cortical carcinoma: A rare event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puskar Shyam Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC co-secreting aldosterone and cortisol is extremely rare. We report the case of a 37-yearold female who presented with paresis and facial puffiness. Evaluation revealed hypertension, hyperglycemia, severe hypokalemia and hyperaldosteronemia with elevated plasma aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR. Urinary free cortisol estimation showed elevated levels. Computed tomography scan revealed a right adrenal mass. Radical adrenalectomy specimen revealed ACC (T3N1. Post-operatively, the patient became normotensive and euglycemic with normalization of urinary cortisol and ARR. This case highlights the need for a complete evaluation in patients of hyperaldosteronism if overlapping symptoms of hypercortisolism are encountered, to avoid post-operative adrenal crisis.

  4. Interstitial pituitary irradiation with 90Y for the treatment of acromomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Banks, L.M.; Jadresic, A.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    The management of 54 acromegalics referred to us between 1974 and 1978 has been analysed. Twenty-two patients were treated with pituitary implants of yttrium-90 ( 90 Y). Eleven are in complete remission (mean growth hormone (GH) < 11 mlU/l), 8 had improved (mean GH 11-20 mlU/l or 50% less than preoperatively) and 3 were poor responders. Two patients had temporary 6th nerve paresis. Seven patients are on replacement therapy. Thirty- one patients were not implanted for the following reasons with a number of patients having more than one: extension of the tumour into the spehnoid sinus 10, or above the sella 3, partially empty sella 9, internal carotids too close to midline 2, invisible landmarks 1, mild acromegaly 6, poor general health 3, declined investigations or operation 6. It is concluded that pituitary implant of yttrium is an effective and safe form of treatment on carefully selected patients. (author)

  5. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis

  6. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis.

  7. Idiopathic acute onset myelopathy in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Christian; Url, Angelika; Robert, Nadia; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Nowotny, Norbert; Schmidt, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Numerous cases of ataxia, hind limb paresis, and paralysis have occurred in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cubs over the past 10 yr within the European Endangered Species Program population, including 12 in mainland Europe, two in the British Isles, one in Namibia, and one in Dubai. The condition is the most important medical factor limiting European cheetah population growth. Eight cubs at the Salzburg Zoo, Austria, were affected. They demonstrated upper motor neuron lesions when alive and bilateral, symmetrical myelin degeneration of the spinal cord on necropsy. Ballooning of myelin sheaths surrounded mostly preserved axons, and no spheroids, characteristic of acute axonal degeneration, were found. Myelin loss markedly exceeded axonal degeneration. The syndrome's etiology is unclear, although viral, bacterial, parasitic, genetic, nutritional-metabolic, toxic, and physical causes have been considered.

  8. Iliopsoas haematoma: a rare complication of warfarin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkan, O.F.; Guner, A.; Cekic, A.B.; Reis, E.; Turan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Iliopsoas haematoma is a rare complication that occurs in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. The clinical manifestation of iliopsoas haematoma is non-specific. It can mimic orthopaedic or neurological disorders, including paraesthesia or paresis of the thigh and leg due to compression of the nerve plexus. Among the many available diagnostic modalities, computed tomography is the most useful radiological method for diagnosis. Treatment approaches for iliopsoas haematoma include conservative therapy, surgical intervention, or transcatheter arterial embolisation. Conservative therapy consists of bed rest, restoration of circulating volume, and drug discontinuation for correcting underlying coagulopathy. Although a conservative approach is the first choice, transcatheter arterial embolisation and surgical intervention may be required in patients with hemodynamically unstable and active bleeding. The report described a case of iliopsoas haematoma due to anticoagulant therapy with paraesthesia in the left leg who was successfully treated by conservative approach. (author)

  9. Recovery from an acute relapse is associated with changes in motor resting-state connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Blinkenberg, Morten; Paulson, Olaf B.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) of the brain has been successfully used to identify altered functional connectivity in the motor network in multiple sclerosis (MS).1 In clinically stable patients with MS, we recently demonstrated increased coupling between the basal ganglia and the motor...... network.1 Accordingly, rs-fMRI in MS is particularly suited to investigate functional reorganisation of the motor network in the remission phase after a relapse because the resting-state connectivity pattern is not influenced by interindividual differences in motor ability and task performance....... In this prospective rs-fMRI study, we mapped acute changes in resting-state motor connectivity in 12 patients with relapsing forms of MS presenting with an acute relapse involving an upper limb paresis. Previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies have shown that the activation of sensorimotor areas was stronger and more...

  10. Familial hemiplegic migraine: a clinical comparison of families linked and unlinked to chromosome 19.DMG RG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwindt, G M; Ophoff, R A; Haan, J; Frants, R R; Ferrari, M D

    1996-05-01

    We compared the clinical characteristics of 46 patients from three unrelated families with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) linked to chromosome 19, with those of 20 patients from two families with FHM not linked to chromosome 19. We found no significant differences for age at onset, frequency and duration of attacks, duration of the paresis, and occurrence of basilar migraine symptoms. In the linked families, significantly more patients reported unconsciousness during attacks (39% vs 15%; p < 0.05) and provocation of attacks by mild head trauma (70% vs 40%; p < 0.05). In one linked family patients also displayed chronic progressive cerebellar ataxia, whereas in one unlinked family benign infantile convulsions occurred in addition to FHM. Interestingly, so far an association with cerebellar ataxia was only described in chromosome 19-linked families. FHM linked to chromosome 19 and FHM unlinked to chromosome 19 do not differ with respect to clinical features.

  11. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  12. Occlusion of Heubner's artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Manabu; Kidooka, Minoru

    1982-01-01

    A case of occlusion of the left Heubner's artery in a right-handed, 51-year-old man is reported. Cardinal clinical features were transient right hemiparesis and mental disturbance, especially intellectual defect. Low density areas were found at CT in the globus pallidus, putamen, anterior limb of the internal capsule and a part of the caudate nucleus. It is well known that the occlusion of the Heubner's artery causes transient motor paresis of upper extremity on the contralaterl side. However, in the case where the Heubner's artery is remarkably well developed when compared with the medial striate arteries as was the case in this patient, it should be noted that the occlusion of the Heubner's artery may well causes grave mental disturbance, in addition. (author)

  13. Ethical issues in states of impaired communication with intact consciousness and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic peripheral and/or central disorders of the voluntary motor system can produce profound paresis or paralysis, at times with ophthalmoplegia, while preserving consciousness and language function. Although at times appearing to be unconscious, these patients are awake and alert but unable to communicate, manipulate their environment, or participate in medical decision-making. Clinicians caring for these patients are ethically tasked with recognizing this clinical reality, enacting measures to facilitate communication, and abiding by ethical and legal principles that support autonomous patient-centered decision-making. This chapter reviews the various disorders that may cause this state while using three exemplary disorders - locked-in syndrome, caused by an anterior pontine lesion; high cervical spinal cord lesion; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - to discuss the management of these patients. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Aftercare of malignant thyroid growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, W.; Reiners, C.

    1982-01-01

    The 'standard programme of aftercare for patients with malignant thyroid growths' practised in our department comprises the following measures: - Searching for residual tissues and recurrences in the neck/throat region and for metastases by means of physical examination, scintigraphy, x-ray diagnosis and laboratory tests (including determination of tumour markers); - monitoring and treatment of side effects by thyroidectomy (recurrent paresis, parathyroprival tetany); - prevention, detection and treatment of side effects of high-dosed radio-iodine therapy (on salivary glands and bone marrow) or those of cytostatic treatment (on heart muscle and bone marrow); - monitoring substitutive and suppressive treatment with thyroxines; - psychological guidance and genetic counselling. Corresponding to therapeutic approach, the overall aftercare programme is aimed primarily at papillary and follicular carcinoma and C-cell carcinoma. However, aftercare is hardly effective with anaplastic carcinoma owing to its persistently bad prognosis and its 50% survival time of some three months. (orig./MG) [de

  15. [Nutritional or secondary hyperparathyroidism in a German shepherd litter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, D C

    1980-06-01

    Nutritional or secondary hyperparathyroidism in a litter of German shepherd dogs is reported. The bitch lost interest in the litter 2 weeks post partum, the owner proceeded to feed the pups on a mainly meat diet (low in calcium) together with whole wheat bread (high in phosphate) until they were presented at Onderstepoort at the age of 6 weeks. Clinically the pups showed poor growth, posterior paresis and pain on palpation of the long bones. Radiological examination revealed decreased bone density and thickness of bone cortices. A diagnosis of nutritional or secondary hyperparathyroidism was made. The diet was corrected and in addition the pups were treated with a balanced supplement of calcium and phosphate with very good clinical response. The pathophysiology of nutritional or secondary hyperparathyroidism as well as ricketts and hypertrophic osteodystrophy as differential diagnoses are discussed.

  16. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  17. Facial nerve hemangioma: a rare case involving the vertical segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Neda; Newkirk, Kenneth; Kim, H Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    This case report and literature review reports on a rare case of facial nerve hemangioma (FNH) involving the vertical facial nerve (FN) segment, and discusses the clinical presentation, imaging, pathogenesis, and management of these rare lesions. A 53-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of right hemifacial twitching and progressive facial paresis (House-Brackmann grading score V/VI). The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies confirmed an expansile lesion along the vertical FN segment. Excision and histopathologic examination demonstrated FNH. FNHs involving the vertical FN segment are extremely rare. Despite being rare lesions, we believe that familiarity with the presentation and management of FNHs are imperative. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Physical fitness in persons with hemiparetic stroke: its structure and longitudinal changes during an inpatient rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Tetsuya; Liu, Meigen; Hase, Kimitaka; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Hara, Yukihiro; Chino, Naoichi

    2004-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that the structure of fitness in patients with hemiparetic stroke can be categorized into impairment/disability, cardiopulmonary, muscular and metabolic domains, and to study longitudinal changes in their fitness during an inpatient rehabilitation programme. Structure analysis of multiple fitness parameters with principal component analysis (PCA), and a before and after trial. Tertiary rehabilitation centre in Japan. One hundred and seven consecutive inpatients with hemiparetic stroke. A conventional stroke rehabilitation programme consisting of 80 minutes of physical therapy and occupational therapy sessions five days a week, and daily rehabilitation nursing for a median duration of 105.5 days. Principal component scores extracted from measurement of paresis/daily living (the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)); muscular (grip strength (GS), knee extensor torque, and cross-sectional areas of thigh muscles); metabolic (body mass index (BMI) and fat accumulation on CT); cardiopulmonary (heart rate oxygen coefficient (HR-O2-Coeff) obtained with a graded bridging activity and a 12-minute propulsion distance). PCA categorized the original 15 variables into four factors corresponding to paresis/activities of daily living, muscular, metabolic and cardiopulmonary domains, and explained 78.1% of the total variance at admission and 69.6% at discharge. Except the metabolic domain, PCA scores for the other three domains improved significantly at discharge (paired t-test, p < 0.05). The hypothetical structure of fitness was confirmed, and the PCA scores were useful in following longitudinal changes of fitness during inpatient rehabilitation.

  19. Survey of young patients with polio and a foreign background at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, polio survivors aged under 60 years are non-native Swedes which pose new aspects and challenges to a post-polio outpatient clinic. To analyze the medical data, walking aids, occupational, and family situation in non-native polio survivors aged less than 60 years at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic. Retrospective data analysis. Data were retrieved from medical records at the post-polio outpatient clinic. Actual age, age at acute polio infection, walking capacity, pain, concomitant diseases, working and family situation, and ethnical origin were analyzed. Data are presented in numbers and percentage. 153 patients were included. Mean age was 45 (17-60) years, and mean age at acute polio infection was 2 (0-12) years. Paresis of the lower extremities was the most common disability. 10 % were wheelchair dependent. Pain occurred in 70 % with a mean intensity of 55 measured with the visual analog scale. Hypertension was the most common concomitant disease. Half of the polio survivors were working at least part time, and roughly half were singles. Data were comparable with data earlier published in Swedish native polio survivors. Non-native polio survivors aged under 60 years showed similarities in age at acute polio infection, paresis, prevalence, and intensity of pain when compared with native Swedish polio survivors. They were, however, younger, and were less often working and married/cohabitants than native Swedish polio survivors. The results of this study underline the importance of social and vocational rehabilitation tailoring rehabilitation suitable for polio survivors with a foreign background.

  20. Facial Nerve Morbidity Following Surgery for Benign Parotid Tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musani, M. A.; Suhail, Z.; Zafar, A.; Malik, S.; Mirza, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of facial nerve dysfunction following surgery for benign parotid gland tumours. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: ENT Department, Karachi Medical and Dental College and Abbasi Shaheed Hospital and Ziauddin University Hospital, from 1990 to 2010. Methodology: Data was collected of all patients who were surgically managed for benign parotid tumours from 1990 to 2010. Data was reviewed for presentation of tumour, age and gender of the patient, site of tumour, nature and morphology of the tumour, primary or recurrent, surgical procedure adopted and the complications of the surgery especially the facial nerve dysfunction, its severity, complete or partial paresis and transient or permanent and time of recovery. Results were described as frequency percentages. Results: Out of 235 patients, 159 (67.65%) were female and 76 (32.35%) were male. Age ranged from 18 to 70 years. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common tumour (n=194, 82.6%), followed by Warthin's tumour. Superficial parotidectomy was done in 188 cases and extended parotidectomy in 47 cases. In the immediate postoperative period facial nerve function was normal in 169 (72%) patients and nerve dysfunction was observed in 66 (28%) patients. Complete paresis involving all the branches of facial nerve was seen in 25 (10.6%) patients and 41 (17.4%) patients were having incomplete dysfunction. Of these, 62 (26.3%) recovered and 04 (1.7%) had permanent facial nerve dysfunction. Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve was involved in 57 (86.3%) cases. Conclusion: The frequency of temporary and permanent facial nerve dysfunction was 26.3% and 1.7% respectively in 235 consecutive parotidectomies for benign parotid gland tumours. Higher frequency of facial nerve dysfunction was found in recurrent and deep lobe tumours. (author)

  1. Population Characteristics and Progressive Disability in Neurofibromatosis Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatate, Kensho; Yokoo, Takeshi; Iwatate, Eriko; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Taku; Fujii, Masazumi; Sakuma, Jun; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    To characterize the clinical features of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and determine prognostic risk factors for progressive disabilities. In this retrospective cohort study of the Japanese national NF2 registry between 2009 and 2013, clinical data (demographic, history, oncologic, and neurologic) of 807 patients with a diagnosis of NF2 were analyzed. The overall severity of neurologic disability was assessed using a comprehensive 25-point scoring system encompassing a wide variety of neurologic deficits. In 587 patients in whom longitudinal disability data were available, multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for significant progression of disability. The clinical characteristics of the Japanese NF2 population were heterogeneous. The median age of onset was 24 years (range, 1-80 years), the male:female ratio was 1:1.29, and the initial severity score was 4 (range, 0-22) out of 25 points. A family history of NF2 was present in 33% of the patients. Most frequent clinical features were bilateral cranial nerve VIII nerve sheath tumor (NST) in 87%, spinal NST in 80%, hearing loss in 65%, spinal dysfunction in 50%, intracranial meningioma in 49%, and facial paresis in 36%. The disability score progressed by ≥5 points in 6.1% of patients over the study period. Based on multivariate logistic regression analyses, the significant independent risk factors of progression (P value) included age of onset history (P = 0.007), positive treatment history (P = 0.026), hearing loss (P = 0.014), facial paresis (P = 0.015), blindness (P = 0.011), and hemiparesis (P = 0.025). The Japanese NF2 population has heterogeneous clinical features. Risk factors for progressive disability include younger age of onset, positive family history, positive treatment history, and specific neurologic deficits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Laterality on Surgical Outcome of Glioblastoma Patients: A Retrospective Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, Daniel; Roth, Tabitha; Marbacher, Serge; Fandino, Javier

    2018-06-01

    Resection of left hemisphere (LH) tumors is often complicated by the risks of causing language dysfunction. Although neurosurgeons' concerns when operating on the presumed dominant hemisphere are well known, literature evaluating laterality as a predictive surgical parameter in glioblastoma (GB) patients is sparse. We evaluated whether tumor laterality correlated with surgical performance, functional outcome, and survival. All patients with GB treated at our institution between 2006 and 2016 were reviewed. Analysis comprised clinical characteristics, extent of resection (EOR), neurologic outcome, and survival in relation to tumor lateralization. Two hundred thirty-five patients were included. Right hemisphere (RH) tumors were larger and more frequently extended into the frontal lobe. Preoperatively, limb paresis was more frequent in RH, whereas language deficits were more frequent in LH tumors (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001, respectively). At 6 months after resection, LH patients presented lower Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score (P = 0.036). More patients with LH tumors experienced dysphasia (P < 0.0001), and no difference was seen for paresis. Average EOR was comparable, but complete resection was achieved less often in LH tumors (37.7 vs. 64.8%; P = 0.0028). Although overall survival did not differ between groups, progression-free survival was shorter in LH tumors (7.4 vs. 10.1 months; P = 0.0225). Patients with LH tumors had a pronounced KPS score decline and shorter progression-free survival without effects on overall survival. This observation might partially be attributed to a more conservative surgical resection. Further investigation is needed to assess whether systematic use of awake surgery and intraoperative mapping results in increased EOR and improved quality survival of patients with GB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low cortisol levels in blood from dairy cows with ketosis: a field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Bernt V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An elevated plasma glucose concentration has been considered to be a potential risk factor in the pathogenesis of left-displaced abomasums (DA. Therefore the present study was performed to investigate if spontaneous disease (parturient paresis, metritis, ketosis etc in dairy cows results in elevated concentrations of glucose and cortisol in blood as cortisol is the major regulator of glucose in ruminants. Methods Cortisol, insulin, β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA, non esterified fatty acids (NEFA, and serum calcium were analyzed in blood serum and glucose, in whole blood, from 57 spontaneously diseased cows collected at different farms. The cows were grouped according to the disease; parturient paresis, recumbent for other reasons, mastitis, metritis, ketosis, inappetance and others. Results No elevated concentrations of cortisol or glucose were found in cows with metritis and mastitis but both cortisol and glucose were elevated in cows stressed by recumbency. Cows with ketonemia (BHBA > 1.5 mmol/l did not have low concentration of glucose in blood but significantly low levels of cortisol. Some of these cows even had cortisol concentrations below the detection limit of the analysing method ( Conclusions The study gives patho-physiological support to the treatment strategies of ketosis, recommending glucocorticoids, insulin etc. However further studies of this problem are needed to understand why cows with ketosis have low levels of cortisol and normal levels of glucose. To what extent elevated cortisol and glucose levels in hypocalcemic and recumbent cows are involved in the ethiology and /or the pathogenesis of DA also will need further research.

  4. Prevalence and Prognosis of Cerebrovascular Accidents and its Subtypes Among Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Isfahan, Iran: A Hospital Clinic-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Sayed-Bonakdar, Zahra; Mohammad-Sharifi, Ghasem; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and prognosis of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and its subtypes among Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In a cross-sectional study, medical records of 575 SLE patients were reviewed. The patients developing CVA in their course of disease were extracted. In these patients, data about demographic features, lupus anti bodies, duration of the disease until CVA, CVA manifestation(s) and follow-up duration were gathered. In the next step, patients with any kinds of CVA were summoned to Neurology clinic to identify the grade of disability in each patient with CVA. We identified 38 patients with CVA of which 6 (15.8%) were men and 32 (84.2%) were women. The most common subtype of CVA was small vessels thrombosis (21.05%) among the study patients and hemi paresis was the most prevalent initial presentation (39.47%). In 11 (28.9%) patients, SLE was initiated with CVA and in 3 (7.9%) patients CVA had happened in the 1(st) year of SLE. Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLA) were positive in 29 (76.3%) patients. Mean modified Rankin Scale in patient with positive and negative serology for APLA was 0.93 ± 1.11 and 0.22 ± 0.66 respectively (P = 0.006). Our study shows that 6.6% of Iranian SLE patients have CVA during their course of the disease. Small vessels thrombosis is the most common CVA subtype and hemi paresis is the most prevalent initial presentation. Moreover, we showed that the prognosis of CVA in Iranian SLE patients is not unfavorable.

  5. Vertical diplopia and oscillopsia due to midbrain keyhole aqueduct syndrome associated with severe cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jinsook Oh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Midline structural defects in the neural axis can give rise to neuro-ophthalmic symptoms. We report a rare case of keyhole aqueduct syndrome presenting after two years of severe cough due to gastroesophageal reflux disease. Observations: A 58-year-old woman with a 2-year history of daily, severe cough presented to the neuro-ophthalmology clinic with progressive diplopia and oscillopsia. Examination revealed a 1–2 Hz down-beating nystagmus in primary gaze that worsened with left, right, and down gazes. Gaze evoked nystagmus and mild paresis were also seen with up gaze. There was an incomitant left hypertropia due to skew deviation that worsened with right and up gazes and improved with down gaze. She also had a right-sided ptosis and a 3 mm anisocoria not due to cranial nerve 3 paresis or Horner's syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.5 mm × 11.7 mm × 6 mm midline cleft in the ventral midbrain communicating with the cerebral aqueduct, consistent with keyhole aqueduct syndrome. Her nystagmus and diplopia improved with oral acetazolamide treatment, at high doses of 2500–3000 mg per day. Conclusions and importance: We report the first case of midbrain keyhole aqueduct syndrome with ocular motor and other neuro-ophthalmic manifestations associated with severe cough. Although her cough was effectively treated and intracranial pressure measurement was normal, her ophthalmic symptoms continued to progress, which is common in previous cases reported. Treatment with acetazolamide led to significant improvement, supporting the use of acetazolamide in this rare condition. Keywords: Keyhole aqueduct syndrome, Midbrain cleft, Mesencephalic cleft, Syrinx, Syringobulbia, Down-beating nystagmus, Cerebrospinal fluid

  6. VORICONAZOLE TOXICITY IN MULTIPLE PENGUIN SPECIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Michael W; Georoff, Timothy A; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wells, Rebecca L; Clauss, Tonya M; Ialeggio, Donna M; Harms, Craig A; Wack, Allison N

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in penguins managed under human care. Triazole antifungal drugs, including itraconazole, are most commonly used for treatment; however, itraconazole treatment failures from drug resistance are becoming more common, requiring newer treatment options. Voriconazole, a newer triazole, is being used more often. Until recently, no voriconazole pharmacokinetic studies had been performed in penguins, leading to empiric dosing based on other avian studies. This has led to increased anecdotal reporting of apparent voriconazole toxicity in penguins. This report describes 18 probable and 6 suspected cases of voriconazole toxicity in six penguin species from nine institutions: 12 African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), 5 Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), 3 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), 2 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua papua), 1 macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and 1 emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). Observed clinical signs of toxicity included anorexia, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, paresis, apparent vision changes, seizure-like activity, and generalized seizures. Similar signs of toxicity have also been reported in humans, in whom voriconazole therapeutic plasma concentration for Aspergillus spp. infections is 2-6 μg/ml. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured in 18 samples from penguins showing clinical signs suggestive of voriconazole toxicity. The concentrations ranged from 8.12 to 64.17 μg/ml, with penguins having plasma concentrations above 30 μg/ml exhibiting moderate to severe neurologic signs, including ataxia, paresis, and seizures. These concentrations were well above those known to result in central nervous system toxicity, including encephalopathy, in humans. This case series highlights the importance of species-specific dosing of voriconazole in penguins and plasma therapeutic drug monitoring. Further investigation, including pharmacokinetic studies, is

  7. The influence of NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Bugajski, Marcin; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Czernicki, Jan

    In stroke patients, the NDT - (Bobath - Neurodevelopmental Treatment) and PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation) methods are used to achieve the main objective of rehabilitation, which aims at the restoration of maximum patient independence in the shortest possible period of time (especially the balance of the body). The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of the NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke. The study included 72 patients aged from 20 to 69 years after ischemic stroke with Hemiparesis. The patients were divided into 4 groups by a simple randomization. The criteria for this division were: the body side (right or left) affected by paresis and the applied rehabilitation methods. All the patients were applied the recommended kinesitherapeutic method (randomized), 35 therapy sessions, every day for a period of six weeks. Before initiation of therapy and after 6 weeks was measured the total area of the support and path length (COP (Center Of Pressure) measure foot pressure) using stabilometer platform - alpha. The results were statistically analyzed. After treatment studied traits decreased in all groups. The greatest improvement was obtained in groups with NDT-Bobath therapy. NDT-Bobath method for improving the balance of the body is a more effective method of treatment in comparison with of the PNF method. In stroke patients, the effectiveness of NDT-Bobath method does not depend on hand paresis. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Intrathoracic versus cervical anastomosis after resection of esophageal cancer: a matched pair analysis of 72 patients in a single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, Christian D; Binnebösel, Marcel; Otto, Jens; Boehm, Gabriele; von Trotha, Klaus T; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Conze, Joachim; Neumann, Ulf P; Jansen, Marc

    2012-08-06

    The aim of this study was to analyze the early postoperative outcome of esophageal cancer treated by subtotal esophageal resection, gastric interposition and either intrathoracic or cervical anastomosis in a single center study. 72 patients who received either a cervical or intrathoracic anastomosis after esophageal resection for esophageal cancer were matched by age and tumor stage. Collected data from these patients were analyzed retrospectively regarding morbidity and mortality rates. Anastomotic leakage rate was significantly lower in the intrathoracic anastomosis group than in the cervical anastomosis group (4 of 36 patients (11%) vs. 11 of 36 patients (31%); p = 0.040). The hospital stay was significantly shorter in the intrathoracic anastomosis group compared to the cervical anastomosis group (14 (range 10-110) vs. 26 days (range 12 - 105); p = 0.012). Wound infection and temporary paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve occurred significantly more often in the cervical anastomosis group compared to the intrathoracic anastomosis group (28% vs. 0%; p = 0.002 and 11% vs. 0%; p = 0.046). The overall In-hospital mortality rate was 6% (4 of 72 patients) without any differences between the study groups. The present data support the assumption that the transthoracic approach with an intrathoracic anastomosis compared to a cervical esophagogastrostomy is the safer and more beneficial procedure in patients with carcinoma of the lower and middle third of the esophagus due to a significant reduction of anastomotic leakage, wound infection, paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and shorter hospital stay.

  9. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy

  10. Vertical diplopia and oscillopsia due to midbrain keyhole aqueduct syndrome associated with severe cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Angela Jinsook; Lanzman, Bryan Alexander; Liao, Yaping Joyce

    2018-06-01

    Midline structural defects in the neural axis can give rise to neuro-ophthalmic symptoms. We report a rare case of keyhole aqueduct syndrome presenting after two years of severe cough due to gastroesophageal reflux disease. A 58-year-old woman with a 2-year history of daily, severe cough presented to the neuro-ophthalmology clinic with progressive diplopia and oscillopsia. Examination revealed a 1-2 Hz down-beating nystagmus in primary gaze that worsened with left, right, and down gazes. Gaze evoked nystagmus and mild paresis were also seen with up gaze. There was an incomitant left hypertropia due to skew deviation that worsened with right and up gazes and improved with down gaze. She also had a right-sided ptosis and a 3 mm anisocoria not due to cranial nerve 3 paresis or Horner's syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.5 mm × 11.7 mm × 6 mm midline cleft in the ventral midbrain communicating with the cerebral aqueduct, consistent with keyhole aqueduct syndrome. Her nystagmus and diplopia improved with oral acetazolamide treatment, at high doses of 2500-3000 mg per day. We report the first case of midbrain keyhole aqueduct syndrome with ocular motor and other neuro-ophthalmic manifestations associated with severe cough. Although her cough was effectively treated and intracranial pressure measurement was normal, her ophthalmic symptoms continued to progress, which is common in previous cases reported. Treatment with acetazolamide led to significant improvement, supporting the use of acetazolamide in this rare condition.

  11. Chronic Granulomatous Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Purwa Samatra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a rare case, characterized by tenderness, persistent around the affected eye and ophthalmoplegia /paresis caused by granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus region, supra orbital or orbital fissure. Although spontaneous remission may occur, even corticosteroid therapy has a very satisfactory effect. However, relapse can occur after remission. We report a case of granulomatous Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in women aged 47 years who suffer from recurrent Tolosa-Hunt syndrome attacks for 4 years on his left eye, there was a significant recovery after receiving steroid therapy. Case:  We report A 47 years old with recurrent pain in the left eye since 4 years, pain episode duration of 1-2 weeks, accompanied by double vision when having long or short distance viewing, and when climbing stairs. The patient left eye was protruded with blurred vision and difficulty in distinguishing green color. Left eye examination vision 1/300, green color discromatopsia, normal funduscopic, ptosis, with paresis eye movement toward the superior, inferior, nasal and temporal. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were slightly elevated. ANA test was positive. In visual evoked potential, it showed latency elongation of the left face. Head MRI with contrast showed a isointense protrusion on the left cavernous sinus in axial cuts in T1 and T2. Head MRI T1 with contrast on coronal, axial cuts showed the appearance of convex lesions around the left cavernous sinus that enhanced with contrast. Conclusions: The result was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS. Therefore, 10 mg dexamethasone therapy, 4 times a day for 3 days was lowered to three times on day 4, 2 times on the fifth day and one time at day 6. The patient showed clinical improvement. The patient continued 48 mg oral methylprednisolone therapy up to 3 weeks which then gradually decreased and planned head MRI 3 months later.

  12. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Iwabuchi, Sadamu

    1993-01-01

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author)

  13. A comparison of ultrasound-guided interscalene and supraclavicular blocks for post-operative analgesia after shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B G; Han, J U; Song, J H; Yang, C; Lee, B W; Baek, J S

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to interscalene block, there was little information regarding the analgesic efficacy of supraclavicular block for shoulder surgery. This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy and side effects of interscalene and supraclavicular blocks for shoulder surgery. Patients scheduled for shoulder surgery were assigned to receive either ultrasound-guided interscalene (n = 25) or supraclavicular block (n = 24) with 20 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine. We assessed the duration of post-operative analgesia as a primary outcome and pain scores, supplemental analgesia, diaphragmatic excursion, motor block, fingertip numbness, side effects, and patient satisfaction as secondary outcomes. The duration of post-operative analgesia was not statistically different between groups: 868 (800-1440) min for supraclavicular block vs. 800 (731-922) min for interscalene block (median difference -85 min, 95% CI, -283 to 3 min, P = 0.095). The incidence of diaphragmatic paresis was significantly lower in the supraclavicular block group compared with that in the interscalene block group, both at 30 min after the block (66.7% vs. 92%, P = 0.021) and in the post-anaesthesia care unit (62.5% vs. 92%, P = 0.024). Motor block was higher in the supraclavicular block group in the post-anaesthesia care unit, however, not at 24 h. Other secondary outcomes were similar for both groups. This study showed no statistically significant difference in the duration of post-operative analgesia between the supraclavicular and interscalene blocks. However, the supraclavicular block was associated with a lower incidence of diaphragmatic paresis compared with that of the interscalene block after shoulder surgery. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Methotrexate-induced acute toxic leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag R Salkade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is one of the most common malignancies of childhood, which is treated with high doses of methotrexate (MTX, as it crosses the blood-brain barrier and can be administered intravenously and via intrathecal route to eradicate leukemic cells from central nervous system (CNS. Additionally, high doses of MTX not only prevent CNS recurrence but also hematologic relapses. Although, standard treatment protocol for ALL includes multimodality therapy, MTX is usually associated with neurotoxicity and affects periventricular deep white matter region. Methotrexate-induced ′acute toxic leukoencephalopathy′ has varying clinical manifestations ranging from acute neurological deficit to seizures or encephalopathy. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is widely available and routinely used in clinical practice to identify acute stroke and also to distinguish acute stroke from non-stroke like conditions. We report a local teenage Chinese girl who developed 2 discrete episodes of left upper and lower limb weakness with left facial nerve paresis after receiving the 2 nd and 3 rd cycle of high dose of intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate, without having cranial irradiation. After each episode of her neurological deficit, the DW-MRI scan showed focal restricted diffusion in right centrum semiovale. Her left sided focal neurological deficit and facial nerve paresis almost completely subsided on both these occasions within 3 days of symptom onset. Follow-up DW-MRI, after her neurological recovery, revealed almost complete resolution of previously noted restricted diffusion in right centrum semiovale, while the lesion was not evident on concurrent T2W (T2-weighted and FLAIR (Fluid-Attenuated Inversion recovery sequences, nor showed any post contrast enhancement on post gadolinium enhanced T1W (T1-weighted sequences. No residual neurological deficit or intellectual impairment was identified on clinical follow up

  15. An imaging informatics-based ePR (electronic patient record) system for providing decision support in evaluating dose optimization in stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J.; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Ximing; Konersman, Matt; Martinez, Clarisa; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability in America. After stroke, about 65% of survivors still suffer from severe paresis, while rehabilitation treatment strategy after stroke plays an essential role in recovery. Currently, there is a clinical trial (NIH award #HD065438) to determine the optimal dose of rehabilitation for persistent recovery of arm and hand paresis. For DOSE (Dose Optimization Stroke Evaluation), laboratory-based measurements, such as the Wolf Motor Function test, behavioral questionnaires (e.g. Motor Activity Log-MAL), and MR, DTI, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) imaging studies are planned. Current data collection processes are tedious and reside in various standalone systems including hardcopy forms. In order to improve the efficiency of this clinical trial and facilitate decision support, a web-based imaging informatics system has been implemented together with utilizing mobile devices (eg, iPAD, tablet PC's, laptops) for collecting input data and integrating all multi-media data into a single system. The system aims to provide clinical imaging informatics management and a platform to develop tools to predict the treatment effect based on the imaging studies and the treatment dosage with mathematical models. Since there is a large amount of information to be recorded within the DOSE project, the system provides clinical data entry through mobile device applications thus allowing users to collect data at the point of patient interaction without typing into a desktop computer, which is inconvenient. Imaging analysis tools will also be developed for structural MRI, DTI, and TMS imaging studies that will be integrated within the system and correlated with the clinical and behavioral data. This system provides a research platform for future development of mathematical models to evaluate the differences between prediction and reality and thus improve and refine the models rapidly and efficiently.

  16. Vocal fold varices and risk of hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christopher Guan-Zhong; Askin, Gülce; Christos, Paul J; Sulica, Lucian

    2016-05-01

    To establish risk of hemorrhage in patients with varices compared to those without, determine additional risk factors, and make evidence-based treatment recommendations. Retrospective cohort study. Patients who were vocal performers presenting for care during a 24-month period were analyzed to determine incidence of hemorrhage. Patients with varices were compared to those without. Demographic information and examination findings (presence, location, character, and size of varices; presence of mucosal lesions or paresis) were analyzed to determine predictors of hemorrhage. A total of 513 patients (60.4% female, mean age 36.6 years ± 13.95 years) were evaluated; 14 patients presenting with hemorrhage were excluded. One hundred and twelve (22.4%) patients had varices; 387 (77.6%) did not. The rate of hemorrhage in patients with varices was 2.68% at 12 months compared to 0.8% in patients without. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed a hazard ratio of 10.1 for patients with varix developing hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients (P hemorrhage was 3.3 cases per 1,000 person-months for varix patients compared to 0.5 cases per 1,000 person-months in the nonvarix group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of paresis, mucosal lesions, location of varix (left or right side; medial or lateral), or varix morphology (pinpoint, linear, lake) between patients who hemorrhaged and those that did not. The presence of varices increases the risk of hemorrhage. Varix patients had 10 times the rate of hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients, although the overall incidence is low. This data may be used to inform treatment of patients with varices. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1163-1168, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Vocal fold pseudocyst: results of 46 cases undergoing a uniform treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Christine; Sulica, Lucian

    2014-05-01

    To describe treatment results and identify predictors of the need for surgical intervention in patients with vocal fold pseudocyst. Retrospective cohort study with longitudinal followup via survey. Clinical records were reviewed for demographic information, VHI-10 score, and degree of severity of dysphonia. Videostroboscopic examinations were evaluated for presence of vocal fold pseudocyst, along with additional clinical variables, including laterality, reactive lesion, paresis, varix, and hemorrhage. Follow-up surveys were sent to all participants to evaluate current VHI-10 score and degree of vocal limitation. Results were analyzed to determine predictors of surgery and recurrence of pathology. Forty-six patients (41F:5M) with pseudocyst (40 unilateral: 6 bilateral) were reviewed. Twenty-three (50%) had reactive lesions, nineteen (41%) had paresis by clinical criteria, 10 (22%) had varices, and 6 (13%) had hemorrhage on examination. All underwent initial behavioral management (2-12 sessions of voice therapy; mean of 8 sessions). Seventeen (37%) eventually required surgical intervention. No demographic or clinical variables proved predictive of surgical intervention. Follow-up surveys were completed by 63% of patients, and 79% agreed with the statement that they were not professionally limited by their voices. This experience supports behavioral management as an initial intervention in patients with pseudocyst, sufficient by itself to restore vocal function in approximately two out of three patients. Neither initial severity nor any of the studied clinical findings predicted the need for surgery. The large majority of patients with pseudocyst are able to be treated effectively without impact in their professional function. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. [Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve with a prognostic function in parotid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Losarcos, N; González-Hidalgo, M; Franco-Carcedo, C; Poch-Broto, J

    Continuous electromyography during parotidectomies and direct stimulation of the facial nerve as an intraoperative identification technique significantly lower the rate of post-operative morbidity. To determine the usefulness of intra-operative neurophysiological parameters registered by means of electrical stimulation of the facial nerve as values capable of predicting the type of lesion and the functional prognosis. Our sample consisted of a correlative series of 20 cases of monitored parotidectomies. Post-operative facial functioning, type of lesion and its prognosis were compared with the variations in latency/amplitude of the muscle response between two stimulations of the facial nerve before and after resection, as well as in the absence or presence of muscle response to stimulation after resection. All the patients except one presented motor evoked potentials (MEP) to stimulation after resection. There was no facial damage following the operation in 55% of patients and 45% presented some kind of paresis. The 21% drop in the amplitude of the intra-operative MEP and the mean increase in latency of 13.5% correspond to axonal and demyelinating insult, respectively, with a mean recovery time of three and six months. The only case of absence of response to the post-resection stimulation presented permanent paresis. The presence of MEP following resection does not ensure that functioning of the nerve remains undamaged. Nevertheless, it can be considered a piece of data that suggests a lower degree of compromise, if it is present, and a better prognosis. The variations in latency and amplitude of the MEP tend to be intra-operative parameters that indicate the degree of compromise and functional prognosis.

  19. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell's palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face. Although typically self-limited, the facial paresis/paralysis that occurs in Bell's palsy may cause significant temporary oral incompetence and an inability to close the eyelid, leading to potential eye injury. Additional long-term poor outcomes do occur and can be devastating to the patient. Treatments are generally designed to improve facial function and facilitate recovery. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy, and some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, numerous diagnostic tests available are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for Bell's palsy, to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with Bell's palsy, and to decrease harmful variations in the evaluation and management of Bell's palsy. This guideline addresses these needs by encouraging

  20. Dose volume relationships for intraoperatively irradiated saphenous nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Gillette, S.M.; Thames, H.D.; Childs, G.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    . Fifteen of 47 dogs treated using the 8 cm field were euthanatized for severe paresis prior to three years. There was a decreasing conduction velocity which correlated with increasing dose for dogs treated using an 8 cm field at 1, 2, and 3 years following treatment. There was no decrease in the mean conduction velocity for dogs treated with 2 cm fields; however, 5 of 38 dogs were euthanatized for severe paresis. No decrease in mean conduction velocity was observed in dogs treated to 4 cm and only 2 of 45 dogs were euthanatized due to paresis. At three years after IORT, the ED50 for greater than 50% nerve fiber loss and fibrosis was about 15 Gy for the 8 cm field, 25 Gy for the 4 cm field, and 33 Gy for the 2 cm field. Conclusions: There was both a strong dose response and volume effect for functional peripheral nerve injury. The latency of injury was inversely proportional to dose and was also inversely proportional to the volume treated

  1. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Araceli; Linehan, Marsha M; Todd, S Rob; Hoffman, Hunter G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Paralysis from a spinal cord injury (SCI) increases risk of psychological problems including suicide attempts, substance use disorder, negative emotions (e.g., anger), depression, anxiety, ASD/PTSD. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT®) has been shown to be effective for treating similar psychological symptoms in non-SCI patient populations. The current study explored for the first time, the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) enhanced DBT® Mindfulness skills training to help reduce psychological symptoms (negative emotions and anxiety, ASD/PTSD) of two patients with SCI. Patient 1 was a 39-year-old male patient suffering multiple spinal cord injuries, resulting in quadriplegia, after falling out of a four story building. Patient 1 had severe depression, and anxiety symptoms. Patient 2, was a 31 year old male with a C7 vertebral body fracture, leading to paresis, after suffering a blunt force trauma injury during an attempted suicide, jumping from a moving vehicle. Patient 2 had mild depression, and anxiety symptoms. Methods: Each patient looked into VR goggles, and had the illusion of slowly "floating down" a river in virtual reality while listening to DBT® Mindfulness Skills training instructions. Each patient filled out brief psychological ratings before and after each VR session, four VR DBT® sessions for patient 1, and two VR DBT® sessions for patient 2. Results: As predicted, patient 1 reported reductions in negative emotions after each VR DBT® Mindfulness session. Patient 2 had mixed results on some of the measures of negative emotions. And both patients reported feeling less depressed, less anxious, and less emotionally upset, after VR DBT® Mindfulness Skills learning. Patient 2 reported large reductions in short term ASD/PTSD symptoms after his first VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session. Conclusion: This study explored the feasibility of using VR DBT® with quadriplegic or paresis SCI

  2. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Flores

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paralysis from a spinal cord injury (SCI increases risk of psychological problems including suicide attempts, substance use disorder, negative emotions (e.g., anger, depression, anxiety, ASD/PTSD. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT® has been shown to be effective for treating similar psychological symptoms in non-SCI patient populations. The current study explored for the first time, the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR enhanced DBT® Mindfulness skills training to help reduce psychological symptoms (negative emotions and anxiety, ASD/PTSD of two patients with SCI. Patient 1 was a 39-year-old male patient suffering multiple spinal cord injuries, resulting in quadriplegia, after falling out of a four story building. Patient 1 had severe depression, and anxiety symptoms. Patient 2, was a 31 year old male with a C7 vertebral body fracture, leading to paresis, after suffering a blunt force trauma injury during an attempted suicide, jumping from a moving vehicle. Patient 2 had mild depression, and anxiety symptoms.Methods: Each patient looked into VR goggles, and had the illusion of slowly “floating down” a river in virtual reality while listening to DBT® Mindfulness Skills training instructions. Each patient filled out brief psychological ratings before and after each VR session, four VR DBT® sessions for patient 1, and two VR DBT® sessions for patient 2.Results: As predicted, patient 1 reported reductions in negative emotions after each VR DBT® Mindfulness session. Patient 2 had mixed results on some of the measures of negative emotions. And both patients reported feeling less depressed, less anxious, and less emotionally upset, after VR DBT® Mindfulness Skills learning. Patient 2 reported large reductions in short term ASD/PTSD symptoms after his first VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session.Conclusion: This study explored the feasibility of using VR DBT® with quadriplegic

  3. Gamma loop contributing to maximal voluntary contractions in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbarth, K E; Kunesch, E J; Nordin, M; Schmidt, R; Wallin, E U

    1986-01-01

    A local anaesthetic drug was injected around the peroneal nerve in healthy subjects in order to investigate whether the resulting loss in foot dorsiflexion power in part depended on a gamma-fibre block preventing 'internal' activation of spindle end-organs and thereby depriving the alpha-motoneurones of an excitatory spindle inflow during contraction. The motor outcome of maximal dorsiflexion efforts was assessed by measuring firing rates of individual motor units in the anterior tibial (t.a.) muscle, mean voltage e.m.g. from the pretibial muscles, dorsiflexion force and range of voluntary foot dorsiflexion movements. The tests were performed with and without peripheral conditioning stimuli, such as agonist or antagonist muscle vibration or imposed stretch of the contracting muscles. As compared to control values of t.a. motor unit firing rates in maximal isometric voluntary contractions, the firing rates were lower and more irregular during maximal dorsiflexion efforts performed during subtotal peroneal nerve blocks. During the development of paresis a gradual reduction of motor unit firing rates was observed before the units ceased responding to the voluntary commands. This change in motor unit behaviour was accompanied by a reduction of the mean voltage e.m.g. activity in the pretibial muscles. At a given stage of anaesthesia the e.m.g. responses to maximal voluntary efforts were more affected than the responses evoked by electric nerve stimuli delivered proximal to the block, indicating that impaired impulse transmission in alpha motor fibres was not the sole cause of the paresis. The inability to generate high and regular motor unit firing rates during peroneal nerve blocks was accentuated by vibration applied over the antagonistic calf muscles. By contrast, in eight out of ten experiments agonist stretch or vibration caused an enhancement of motor unit firing during the maximal force tasks. The reverse effects of agonist and antagonist vibration on the

  4. Radiation-related vocal fold palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruchinda, Pariyanan; Jindavijak, Somjin; Singhavarach, Natchavadee

    2012-05-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve damage is a rare complication after receiving conventional radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck cancers and will always be underestimated. The purpose of the present study was to focus on the prevalence of vocal cord paralysis after irradiation and the natural history in those patients. All patients who received more than 60 Gy radiation dose of convention radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck carcinoma from Phramongkutklao Hospital and Nation Cancer Institute of Thailand were recruited in the present study duringfollow-up period between May 2006-December 2007. The subjects had to have good mobility of bilateral vocal cords with no recurrence or persistent tumor before the enrollment. Baseline characteristic and the associated symptoms of the recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis were recorded. Laryngeal examinations were done byfiberoptic laryngoscope and in suspicious cases; stroboscope and/or laryngeal electromyography were also performed. The vocal fold paralysis was diagnosed by reviewing recorded VDO by 2 laryngologist who were not involved in the present study. 70 patients; 51 male and 19female were recruited. 5 patients (7.14%) were diagnosed to have vocal cord paralysis and 2 patients (2.86%) were found to have vocal cord paresis confirmed by electromyography. Most of them were the patients with nasopharyngeal cancers (6/7) with the only one had oropharyngeal cancer (1/7). All of the paralysis/paresis was unilateral lesion; 4 on the left and 3 on the right side. The duration from the patients completed radiotherapy to the time of the diagnosis of vocal cord palsy was 14-35 months. The measure of agreement or Kappa value with 95% CI was 0.818 +/- 0.245. Associated symptoms of vocal cord palsy are hoarseness (100%), dysphagia (28.6%) and aspiration (28.6%). A significant number of vocal fold palsy may occur in patients with head and neck carcinoma after receiving conventional radiotherapy. Subcutaneous fibrosis or

  5. Effects of intraoperative irradiation and intraoperative hyperthermia on canine sciatic nerve: neurologic and electrophysiologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gillette, Sharon M.; Powers, Barbara E.; Stukel, Therese A.; LaRue, Susan M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Borak, Thomas B.; Scott, Robert J.; Weiss, Julia; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late radiation injury to peripheral nerve may be the limiting factor in the clinical application of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) raises specific concerns regarding the effects on certain normal tissues such as peripheral nerve, which might be included in the treatment field. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of IORT alone to the effect of IORT combined with IOHT on peripheral nerve in normal beagle dogs. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of three to five dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy to 5 cm of surgically exposed right sciatic nerve using 6 MeV electrons and six groups of four to five dogs each received IORT doses of 0, 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of IOHT for 60 min. IOHT was performed using a water circulating hyperthermia device with a multichannel thermometry system on the surgically exposed sciatic nerve. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examinations were done before and monthly after treatment for 24 months. Electrophysiologic studies included electromyographic (EMG) examinations of motor function, as well as motor nerve conduction velocities studies. Results: Two years after treatment, the effective dose for 50% complication (ED 50 ) for limb paresis in dogs exposed to IORT only was 22 Gy. The ED 50 for paresis in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 15 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.5. Electrophysiologic studies showed more prominent changes such as EMG abnormalities, decrease in conduction velocity and amplitude of the action potential, and complete conduction block in dogs that received the combination of IORT and IOHT. The latency to development of peripheral neuropathies was shorter for dogs exposed to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model was higher

  6. Frontal lobe atrophy in motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, J A; Hudson, A J

    1994-08-01

    Neuronal degeneration in the precentral gyrus alone cannot account for the occurrence of spastic paresis in motor neuron diseases. To look for more extensive cortical atrophy we measured MRIs of the upper parts of the frontal and parietal lobes in 11 sporadic cases of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), eight patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) and an age- and sex-matched group of 49 neurologically normal people. None of the patients had overt dementia or other mental diseases. In PLS there is progressive spastic paresis but in contrast to ALS there is no lower motor neuron degeneration. The surface area of the precentral gyri and the amount of underlying white matter in PLS were consistently approximately 75% of the normal size. By contrast, there was some shrinkage of the precentral gyri in some of the ALS patients but the mean measurements for the group did not differ significantly from the controls. Anterior to the precentral sulci, the cortical surface area in PLS was approximately 85% of that of the controls, with correspondingly reduced white matter. In ALS the cortical surface areas of the anterior frontal lobes did not differ from those of the controls, but the amount of underlying white matter was reduced almost as much in ALS as it was in PLS. The measured changes in the frontal lobes suggest that in PLS there is simultaneous atrophy of the primary, premotor and supplementary motor areas of the cortex, with consequent degeneration of corticospinal and corticoreticular axons descending through the underlying white matter. These changes could account for the progressive upper motor neuron syndrome. In ALS, with no significant frontal cortical atrophy, the shrinkage of the white matter may be due to degeneration of axons projecting to the frontal cortex from elsewhere. Deprivation of afferents could explain the diminution of motor functions of the frontal lobes in ALS and also the changes in word fluency, judgement and attention that

  7. Comparing unilateral and bilateral upper limb training: The ULTRA-stroke program design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppe Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 80% of all stroke survivors have an upper limb paresis immediately after stroke, only about a third of whom (30 to 40% regain some dexterity within six months following conventional treatment programs. Of late, however, two recently developed interventions - constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT and bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC - have shown promising results in the treatment of upper limb paresis in chronic stroke patients. The ULTRA-stroke (acronym for Upper Limb TRaining After stroke program was conceived to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in subacute stroke patients and to examine how the observed changes in sensori-motor functioning relate to changes in stroke recovery mechanisms associated with peripheral stiffness, interlimb interactions, and cortical inter- and intrahemispheric networks. The present paper describes the design of this single-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT, which has recently started and will take several years to complete. Methods/Design Sixty patients with a first ever stroke will be recruited. Patients will be stratified in terms of their remaining motor ability at the distal part of the arm (i.e., wrist and finger movements and randomized over three intervention groups receiving modified CIMT, modified BATRAC, or an equally intensive (i.e., dose-matched conventional treatment program for 6 weeks. Primary outcome variable is the score on the Action Research Arm test (ARAT, which will be assessed before, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. During those test sessions all patients will also undergo measurements aimed at investigating the associated recovery mechanisms using haptic robots and magneto-encephalography (MEG. Discussion ULTRA-stroke is a 3-year translational research program which aims (1 to assess the relative effectiveness of the three interventions, on a group level but also as a function of patient

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Functional Motor Outcomes of Enterovirus 71 Neurological Disease in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Hooi-Ling; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Britton, Philip N; Kandula, Tejaswi; Lorentzos, Michelle S; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl A; Rawlinson, William; Ramachandran, Vidiya; Rodriguez, Michael L; Andrews, P Ian; Dale, Russell C; Farrar, Michelle A; Sampaio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    . Focal paresis was evident in 23 of 57 (40%) at presentation and was the most common persisting clinical and functional problem at 12 months (observed in 5 of 6 patients), with 1 patient also requiring invasive ventilation. Patients initially seen with acute flaccid paralysis or pulmonary edema had significantly greater frequencies of motor dysfunction at follow-up compared with patients initially seen with other syndromes (odds ratio, 15; 95% CI, 3-79; P Enterovirus 71 may cause serious neurological disease in young patients. The distinct clinicoradiological syndromes, predominantly within the spinal cord and brainstem, enable rapid recognition within evolving outbreaks. Long-term functional neurological morbidity is associated with paresis linked to involvement of gray matter in the brainstem or spinal cord.

  9. Remifentanil: A help in topical strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guillén, I; López, R; Calle, M A; Diez-Lobo, A B

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the analgesic effect of remifentanil, side effects and complications in topical strabismus surgery. To study the results of strabismus surgery with this type of anesthesia. Retrospective descriptive study. We included 39 patients undergoing strabismus surgery with topical anesthesia and analgesia-based sedation with remifentanil. The data of the anesthetic and surgical technique, surgical results and stability of the deviation angle were analyzed. Thirty nine patients (54% women) were included, the average age was 37,4years old. The mean follow-up was 24,5months. The preoperative diagnoses were exotropia (21 patients), esotropia (12), paresis strabismus (4) and Duane's Syndrome (2). 15% patients had preoperative diplopia and 13 had received previous treatments. The dose range of remifentanil used was 0.05 to 0.2μg/kg/min. The side effects presented were 2 cases of vomit and one of bad collaboration during the intraoperative adjustment, one of the patient reported pain and one case of thoracic rigidity was reported. 79% of the patients obtained a good surgical result and 82% reported being satisfied with the results. The reintervention rate was 5%. Analgesia-based sedation with remifentanil is an useful complement to topical strabismus surgery because it reduces pain during surgery and allows the patient to collaborate during intraoperative adjustment due to its pharmacokinetic characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Severe metabolic acidosis in adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Christian M; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Kohler, Malcolm; Fehr, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive paresis, respiratory failure and premature death. Long-term positive pressure ventilation can improve quality of life and survival, but previously unrecognized complications may arise. We analyzed the characteristics of severe metabolic acidosis occurring in 8 of 55 DMD patients, of 20-36 years of age, observed over a 5-year period. All patients were on positive pressure ventilation and were being treated for chronic constipation. Before admission, they had had a reduced intake of fluids and food. Upon examination, they were severely ill, dyspneic and suffering from abdominal discomfort. Metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap was noted in 5 of the 8 patients and with a normal anion gap in the other 3. They all recovered after the administration of fluids and nutrition, the regulation of bowel movements and treatment with antibiotics, as appropriate. Metabolic acidosis is a life-threatening, potentially preventable complication in older DMD patients. Early recognition, subsequent administration of fluids, nutrition and antibiotics and regulation of bowel movements seem to be essential. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Meningoradiculitis due to Cryptococcus neofermans in an immunocompetent patient Meningorradiculite lombossacra causada por Cryptococcus neoformans em paciente imunocompetente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Deus-Silva

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Meningoradiculitis refers to combined involvement of meninges and nerve roots. The most frequent location is the lumbosacral region. Etiology is diverse, including inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic disorders. Meningoradiculitis is a rare form of involvement in cryptococcal infection. We describe a case of subacute lower limbs flaccid paresis diagnosed as lumbosacral meningoradiculitis in view of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF inflammatory changes and typical enhancement on MRI of lumbar spine. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from CSF. Extensive screening yielded no immunodeficiencies.Meningorradiculite refere-se ao envolvimento simultâneo das meninges e das raízes dos nervos. O local mais freqüentemente acometido é a região lombossacra. Patologias inflamatórias, infecciosas e neoplásicas são as causas mais freqüentes. Meningorradiculite é manifestação rara de infecção por Cryptococcus neoformans. Descrevemos um caso de paresia flácida dos membros inferiores, com diagnóstico de meningorradiculite lombossacra baseado nos achados clínicos, de ressonância magnética da coluna lombar e em alterações inflamatórias do líquido cefalorraqueano (LCR. Avaliação microbiológica do LCR revelou a presença de Cryptococcus neoformans e extensa investigação clínica e laboratorial excluiu imunodeficiências primárias e adquiridas.

  12. Strength deficit of knee flexors is dependent on hip position in adults with chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Stella M; Ovando, Angélica C; Bortolotti, Adriano; Bandini, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which muscle length affects force production in paretic lower limb muscles after stroke in comparison to controls has not been established. To investigate knee flexor strength deficits dependent on hip joint position in adults with hemiparesis and compare with healthy controls. a cross-sectional study with ten subjects with chronic (63±40 months) hemiparesis with mild to moderate lower limb paresis (Fugl-Meyer score 26±3) and 10 neurologically healthy controls. Isometric knee flexion strength with the hip positioned at 90° and 0° of flexion was assessed randomly on the paretic and non-paretic side of hemiparetic subjects and healthy controls. Subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric contraction sustained for four seconds and measured by a dynamometer. The ratio of knee flexor strength between these two hip positions was calculated: Hip 0°/Hip 90°. Also, locomotor capacity was evaluated by the timed up and go test and by walking velocity over 10 meters. In subjects with hemiparesis, absolute knee flexion torque decreased (phemiparesis when compared to controls. More attention should be given to lower limb muscle strengthening exercises in individuals with stroke, with emphasis on the strengthening exercises in positions in which the muscle is shortened.

  13. Reconstruction of Injured Carotid Artery in a Comatose Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arben Zenelaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A man 30 years old,was brought to the emergency department after being injured on the left side of the neck area.Massive bleeding from the wound caused by glass was observed.The patient was in cerebral coma and hemorrahagic shock.The eye pupils remained isochoric during and after the operation.He was taken immediately at the surgery room.The bleeding was stopped by using external compression.Exposure of the left neck blood vessels was carried out.The left common carotid artery and internal jugular vein was revealed.A provisory Pruitt-Inahara shunt was put in the common carotid artery,while teh injured vein was ligated.The suture of the left common carotid artery using Prolen 6-0 completed the procedure.After the surgery the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit.About two hours later he woke up,conscious.The left thoracic drainage because of the hemothorax was applied in the second postoperative day.The patient was lively and discharged from the hospitall in the 14-th postoperative day.The right facial paresis and mild left side hemiparesis persisted.Two months after the event no residual neurologic deficits were observed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 598-601

  14. Corticospinal tract integrity and lesion volume play different roles in chronic hemiparesis and its improvement through motor practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterr, Annette; Dean, Phil J A; Szameitat, Andre J; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Shen, Shan

    2014-05-01

    Initial evidence suggests that the integrity of the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) after stroke is strongly related to motor function in the chronic state but not the treatment gain induced by motor rehabilitation. We examined the association of motor status and treatment benefit by testing patients with a wide range of severity of hemiparesis of the left and right upper extremity. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 22 patients beyond 12 months after onset of stroke with severe to moderate hemiparesis. Motor function was tested before and after 2 weeks of modified constraint-induced movement therapy. CST integrity, but not lesion volume, correlated with the motor ability measures of the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Motor Activity Log. No differences were found between left and right hemiparesis. Motor performance improved significantly with the treatment regime, and did so equally for patients with left and right arm paresis. However, treatment benefit was not associated with either CST integrity or lesion volume. CST integrity correlated best in this small trial with chronic long-term status but not treatment-induced improvements. The CST may play a different role in the mechanisms mediating long-term outcome compared to those underlying practice-induced gains after a chronic plateau in motor function.

  15. Measuring upper limb function in children with hemiparesis with 3D inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Christopher J; Bruchez, Roselyn; Roches, Sylvie; Jequier Gygax, Marine; Duc, Cyntia; Dadashi, Farzin; Massé, Fabien; Aminian, Kamiar

    2017-12-01

    Upper limb assessments in children with hemiparesis rely on clinical measurements, which despite standardization are prone to error. Recently, 3D movement analysis using optoelectronic setups has been used to measure upper limb movement, but generalization is hindered by time and cost. Body worn inertial sensors may provide a simple, cost-effective alternative. We instrumented a subset of 30 participants in a mirror therapy clinical trial at baseline, post-treatment, and follow-up clinical assessments, with wireless inertial sensors positioned on the arms and trunk to monitor motion during reaching tasks. Inertial sensor measurements distinguished paretic and non-paretic limbs with significant differences (P < 0.01) in movement duration, power, range of angular velocity, elevation, and smoothness (normalized jerk index and spectral arc length). Inertial sensor measurements correlated with functional clinical tests (Melbourne Assessment 2); movement duration and complexity (Higuchi fractal dimension) showed moderate to strong negative correlations with clinical measures of amplitude, accuracy, and fluency. Inertial sensor measurements reliably identify paresis and correlate with clinical measurements; they can therefore provide a complementary dimension of assessment in clinical practice and during clinical trials aimed at improving upper limb function.

  16. A RARE CASE OF QUADRIPLEGIA DUE TO SPINAL EPIDURAL HAEMATOMA FOLLOWING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quadriplegia following spinal anaesthesia due to spinal epidural haematoma is a rare but critical complication that usually occurs within 24 hours to a few days of the procedure. I report a case of a 32 year old male who underwent Uretero - Renal Scopy (URS and double ‘J’ (DJ stenting for right ureteric calculus under spinal anaesthesia. The patient was on nonsteroidal anti - inflammatory agents (NSAIDS and oral Prednisolone for sero - negative rheumatoid arthritis. The preoperative investigations were normal. About four hours after surgery, the patient developed paraesthesia of lower limbs, a little later paraplegia and gradually quadriplegia within 12 to 15 hours of surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed an extensive spinal epidural haematoma and cord oedema extending from C2 to L5 vertebrae. In consultation with neuro - surgeon, the patient was treated conservatively, while awaiting for the results of coagulation profile, which proved to be Haemophilia. By the end of 2nd and 3rd postoperative day, the upper limbs showed signs of recovery and within a week’s time, both the upper limbs regained normal power and tone. The lower limbs showed sensory as well as motor recovery by 3 rd week and about total recovery to normalcy by 6 weeks. Residual paresis remained in left lower limb. The patient was sent for physiotherapy and he recovered completely by 9 months

  17. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients’ self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  19. Lesion localization in aphasia without hemiparesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Midori; Senoh, Yoko; Okamoto, Koichi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of the lesions responsible for aphasia unassociated with right-sided hemiparesis was evaluated by cranial computed tomography (CT) among stroke patients. In the Broca aphasia group were observed atypical aphasic symptoms, and the lesions were far more localized than in ordinary Broca one. In the Wernicke aphasia group showed relatively large lesions in the left superior temporal gyrus, sometimes extending to supramarginal and angular gyri, which caused such additional symptoms as apraxia without motor paresis in some cases. In the Transcortical motor aphasia group showed the occlusion of the left internal carotid artery, though without obvious abnormality at CT. In another patient a circumscribed low density lesion was disclosed in the area anterior and superior to so-called Broca's area. In the Transcortical sensory aphasia group, the lesion involved the borderzone supplied by the left middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In the Amnestic aphasia group showed a lesion in the left parietal lobe, while in another no remarkable change was demonstrated. In the Global aphasia group, one had multiple isolated lesions in both anterior and posterior speech areas. Another showed a large lesion involving the whole territory of the left middle cerebral artery. In the remaining one a high density area was observed in the left superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri, not extending to the frontal lobe beyond with sylvian fissure. Therefore, in interpreting CTs of such aphasic patients we must take account of not only the extent of the lesion but also the severity of destruction. (J.P.N.)

  20. Lesion localization in aphasia without hemiparesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Midori; Senoh, Yoko; Okamoto, Koichi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of the lesions responsible for aphasia unassociated with right-sided hemiparesis was evaluated by cranial computed tomography (CT) among stroke patients. In the Broca aphasia group were observed atypical aphasic symptoms, and the lesions were far more localized than in ordinary Broca one. In the Wernicke aphasia group showed relatively large lesions in the left superior temporal gyrus, sometimes extending to supramarginal and angular gyri, which caused such additional symptoms as apraxia without motor paresis in some cases. In the Transcortical motor aphasia group showed the occlusion of the left internal carotid artery, though without obvious abnormality at CT. In another patient a circumscribed low density lesion was disclosed in the area anterior and superior to so-called Broca's area. In the Transcortical sensory aphasia group, the lesion involved the borderzone supplied by the left middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In the Amnestic aphasia group showed a lesion in the left parietal lobe, while in another no remarkable change was demonstrated. In the Global aphasia group, one had multiple isolated lesions in both anterior and posterior speech areas. Another showed a large lesion involving the whole territory of the left middle cerebral artery. In the remaining one a high density area was observed in the left superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri, not extending to the frontal lobe beyond with sylvian fissure. Therefore, in interpreting CTs of such aphasic patients we must take account of not only the extent of the lesion but also the severity of destruction.

  1. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [de

  2. The effect of differential training-based occupational therapy on hand and arm function in patients after stroke: Results of the pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repšaitė, Viktorija; Vainoras, Alfonsas; Berškienė, Kristina; Baltaduonienė, Daiva; Daunoravičienė, Algė; Sendžikaitė, Ernesta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of differential training-based occupational therapy on the recovery of arm function and to compare these data with the results obtained after conventional occupational therapy. A total of 27 patients who had suffered a cerebral infarction in the left brain hemisphere were recruited for the study. There were 9 men (33.33%) and 18 women (66.67%). All the patients had paresis of the right arm. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the control group comprised 15 patients who were given conventional occupational therapy (5 times per week) and the study group consisted of 12 patients who underwent conventional occupational therapy (3 times per week) along with occupational therapy based on differential training (2 times per week). In the control group, the mean performance time of only 2 tasks, i.e., flip cards and fold towel, improved significantly (Poccupational therapy sessions, but the patients who underwent conventional occupational therapy along with differential training-based occupational therapy recovered their arm function more effectively than their counterparts after conventional occupational therapy. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Obstructive sialoadenitis role of interventional sialography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The Salivary stones and strictures are the most common cause of unilateral parotid or submandibular gland swelling. Traditionally, these patients treated by open surgery submandibular stones are still the most common cause of submandibular gland resection parotid gland resection is less frequent as it is major surgical procedure with postoperative complication like facial nerve paresis. The common cause of stone formation is obstruction, stricture formation leading to stasis of saliva, dehydration, change in salivary pH associated with oropharngeal sepsis. Over the last two decades, increasing awareness for minimally invasive treatment and with development of interventional radiological procedures for the management of obstructive sialadenitis has led to avoid surgical removal of gland and complications associated with surgery The interventional sialographic procedures can be used to remove salivary duct stones and is treatment of first choice in salivary duct strictures. For stone removal and stricture dilatation local anesthesia, I/V cannulas of different sizes, balloon dilators and wire baskets are used under fluoroscopy. The wire guided sialographic technique (1) is used for sialography and the I/V cannula used for sialography is used as access for interventional sialography. The stones in the intraglandular ducts, large stones and distal stones near the hilum of the gland are difficult to remove and the small size mobile stones can be easily removed. (author)

  4. MRI findings in the patients with the presumptive clinical diagnosis of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome

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    Cakirer, Sinan [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Istanbul Sisli Etfal Hospital, 81120 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present our experience in MRI diagnosis of 23 patients with the clinical findings suggesting Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS). Cranial MRI studies of the patients with a clinical history of at least one episode of unilateral or bilateral orbital and periorbital pain, and associated paresis of one or more of third to sixth cranial nerves, were performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Whereas 5 patients had the diagnosis of THS, paracavernous meningiomas in 4 patients, pituitary macroadenomas with cavernous sinus infiltration in 3 patients, Meckel's cave neurinoma in 1 patient, and suprasellar epidermoid in 1 patient were surgically proven MRI findings. Other pathological MRI findings were leptomeningeal metastases in 3 patients, granulomatous pachymeningitis sequelae in 2 patients, and aneurysm with compression on cavernous sinus in 1 patient. Three patients had normal MRI findings. The incidence of radiologically proven diagnosis of THS among the patients with the clinical findings suggesting THS seemed to be low in our study. In conclusion, MRI is the most valuable imaging technique to distinguish THS from other THS-like entities, and permits a precise assessment, management, and therapeutic planning of the underlying pathological conditions. (orig.)

  5. Surgery of petroclival meningiomas. Recent surgical results and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoi Mugurel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroclival meningiomas represent only 10% of all meningiomas located in the posterior fossa, but are some of the most formidable challenges in skull base surgery. We described our recent experience (2005-September2014 regarding the surgery of these tumors. We retrospectively analyzed surgical results and outcome in 11 cases of petroclival meningiomas. Most common symptoms in our series were headache and gait disturbance, while cranial nerves palsies represented the most common presenting signs. There were 8 females and 3 males, and the mean age was 52 years. Surgical approaches chosen for petroclival meningiomas in our series were retrosigmoid (9 patients and subtemporal transtentorial (2 patients. We achieved total tumor resection in 5 cases (45% and subtotal resection in 6 cases (55%. Overall outcome (total/subtotal resection was good in 6 cases, fair in 3 cases and poor in one case. One postoperative death occurred due to hemorrhagic midbrain infarction (9%. Complications were usually related to cranial nerve deficits: loss of hearing (2 patients, paresis of trochlear nerve (1 patient, trigeminal nerve (3 patients and facial nerve (1 patient. In 4 patients these cranial nerves deficits were transient. In one case, a patient developed postoperative hydrocephalus and needed shunt placement. Despite the fact that complications can be disastrous, we considered that an appropriate approach, combined with microsurgical techniques and a better understanding of the anatomy, greatly decrease the incidence and severity of complications and make feasible a total tumor resection.

  6. Tolosa-Hunt syndrome: is it really necessary to show granuloma? - The report of eight cases

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    Podgorac Ana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tolosa–Hunt syndrome (THS is a rare entity, characterized by unilateral orbital pain associated with paresis of one or more of the oculomotor cranial nerves and caused by a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure or orbit. The low prevalence of THS with a broad spectrum of other disorders that could cause painful ophtalmoplegia resulted in a stricter diagnostic criteria of THS in the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Current criteria require demonstration of granuloma by magnetic resonance imaging or biopsy. The diagnosis could be difficult and the initiation of treatment delayed due to a high variablity of clinical presentation of TSH. Reducing the number of patients that, based on clinical presentation, could be classified as having THS, but do not fullfil all diagnostic criteria further complicates establishing of correct diagnosis. Case report. Hereby we presented eight patients diagnosed with and treated for THS. Inspite the exclusion of other causes of painful ophtalmoplegia, granuloma could not be demonstrated in a half of patients. Clinical presentation of THS in patients with and without shown granuloma, did not significantly differ concerning headache characteristics (localization, intensity, quality, duration preceding cranial nerve palsy, response to steroids, the affected cranial nerve, disease course and response to the treatment, as well as types of diagnostic procedures that were performed in ruling out other diseases from the extensive differential diagnosis of painful ophthalmoplegia. Conclusion. There is no significant difference between the THS patients with and without demonstrated granuloma.

  7. MRI findings in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, Sinan E-mail: scakirer@yahoo.com

    2003-02-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is characterized by painful ophthalmoplegia due to a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus. Corticosteroid therapy dramatically resolves both the clinical and radiological findings of THS. We present MRI findings of six patients with a clinical history of at least one episode of unilateral or bilateral orbital-periorbital pain, clinical findings of associated paresis of one or more of 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th cranial nerves. All of the patients revealed an enlargement of the symptomatic cavernous sinus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Five patients revealed total resolution of the clinical findings within 1-8 weeks, following systemic corticosteroid treatment. One patient revealed only minor regression of clinical findings within 2 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, so the cavernous sinus lesion was reevaluated as meningioma on MRI, and the patient underwent surgical resection of the mass with resultant histopathological finding of cavernous sinus meningioma. A follow-up MRI scan was performed for five patients at the end of 8-weeks of steroid therapy. Three of these five patients showed total resolution of the cavernous sinus lesions whereas two of them revealed a partial regression of the cavernous sinus lesions. MRI findings before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy are important diagnostic criteria to put the definitive diagnosis of THS and to differentiate it from other cavernous sinus lesions that simulate THS both clinically and radiologically.

  8. Exploratory study on the effects of a robotic hand rehabilitation device on changes in grip strength and brain activity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Daniela; Pegritz, Sandra; Pargfrieder, Christa; Reiter, Gudrun; Wurm, Walter; Gattringer, Thomas; Linderl-Madrutter, Regina; Neuper, Claudia; Fazekas, Franz; Grieshofer, Peter; Enzinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The brain mechanisms underlying successful recovery of hand fuenction after stroke are still not fully understood, although functional MRI (fMRI) studies underline the importance of neuronal plasticity. We explored potential changes in brain activity in 7 patients with subacute to chronic stroke (69 ± 8 years) with moderate- to high-grade distal paresis of the upper limb (Motricity Index: 59.4) after standardized robotic finger-hand rehabilitation training, in addition to conventional rehabilitation therapy for 3 weeks. Behavioral and fMRI assessments were carried out before and after training to characterize changes in brain activity and behavior. The Motricity Index (pre: 59.4, post: 67.2, P hand increased significantly after rehabilitation. On fMRI, active movement of the affected (left) hand resulted in contralesional (ie, ipsilateral) activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex prior to rehabilitation. After rehabilitation, activation appeared "normalized," including the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor cortex and supplementary motor area (SMA). No changes and no abnormalities of activation maps were seen during movement of the unaffected hand. Subsequent region-of-interest analyses showed no significant ipsilesional activation increases after rehabilitation. Despite behavioral improvements, we failed to identify consistent patterns of functional reorganization in our sample. This warrants caution in the use of fMRI as a tool to explore neural plasticity in heterogeneous samples lacking sufficient statistical power.

  9. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of the musculoskeletal system: Results of 2027 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, Eugenio; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bartalena, Tommaso; Ciminari, Rosanna; Alberghini, Marco; Ruggieri, Pietro; Errani, Costantino; Angelini, Andrea; Calabro, Teresa; Abati, Caterina Novella; Balladelli, Alba; Tranfaglia, Cristina; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Vanel, Daniel; Mercuri, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Biopsy of the musculoskeletal system is useful in the management of bone lesions particularly in oncology but they are often challenging procedures with a significant risk of complications. Computed tomography (CT)-guided needle biopsies may decrease these risks but doubts still exist about their diagnostic accuracy. This retrospective analysis of the experience of a single institution with percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of musculoskeletal lesions evaluates the results of these biopsies for bone lesions either in the appendicular skeleton or in the spine, and defines indications. Materials and methods: We reviewed the results of 2027 core needle biopsies performed over the past 18 years at the authors' institution. The results obtained are subject of this paper. Results: In 1567 cases the correct diagnosis was made with the first CT-guided needle biopsy (77.3% accuracy rate), in 408 cases the sample was not diagnostic and in 52 inadequate. Within 30 days these 408 patients underwent another biopsy, which was diagnostic in 340 cases with a final diagnostic accuracy of 94%. Highest accuracy rates were obtained in primary and secondary malignant lesions. Most false negative results were found in cervical lesions and in benign, pseudotumoral, flogistic, and systemic pathologies. There were 22 complications (18 transient paresis, 3 haematomas, 1 retroperitoneal haematoma) which had no influence on the treatment strategy, nor on patient outcome. Conclusion: This technique is reliable and safe and should be considered nowadays the gold standard for biopsies of the musculoskeletal system.

  10. POISONING BY THE SWAINSONINE-CONTAINING PLANT SIDA CARPINIFOLIA IN CAPTIVE SAMBAR DEER (CERVUS UNICOLOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Bruno L; Peixoto, Paulo V; Caldas, Saulo A; Bhaltazar, Daniel; França, Ticiana N; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-09-01

    Plant intoxications in wildlife are difficult to diagnose, are overlooked, or are sometimes even neglected. Hence, factors that induce wild animals to ingest poisonous plants have not been sufficiently documented. An outbreak of glycoprotein storage disease in sambar deer ( Cervus unicolor ), induced by ingestion of the swainsonine-containing plant, common wireweed (Sida carpinifolia), is reported. Nine out of 55 deer held by a zoo in Brazil were affected. The poisoning was characterized by emaciation and neurologic signs followed by unexpected death in some of the animals. Animals presented abnormal consciousness, posterior paresis, and musculoskeletal weakness; less evident were vestibulo-cerebellar signs. Histologically, there was vacuolation of neurons and epithelial cells of the pancreatic acines, thyroid follicules, and renal tubules. Furthermore, in the central nervous system were axonal degeneration, necrosis, and loss of neurons. Three factors may lead to the ingestion of S. carpinifolia by sambar deer: 1) A grazing field with only S. carpinifolia as a source of forage; 2) a large number of animals kept in this field; and 3) a hierarchy within a cervid group in which dominant males isolated and displaced juvenile and weaker adult males, leaving them with access to only S. carpinifolia.

  11. Etiología da paralisia facial periférica: relato de um caso inusitado Aetiology of peripheral facial paralysis: report of an unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fortes-Rêgo

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Após conceituar a paralisia de Bell, ressaltar sua alta incidência e expor as teorias que se propõem a explicá-la, é relatado um caso de paralisia facial periférica isolada ocorrido durante o retorno de um mergulho, em paciente de 28 anos. Na revisão bibliográfica realizada são mencionadas e discutidas numerosas entidades que têm sido consideradas como causas de paralisia facial periférica, destacando-se um trabalho americano que relata dois casos ocorridos, de forma transitória, durante aumento de altitude e que foram atribuídos à variação de pressão no ouvido médio. Como conclusão, é admitido um mecanismo similar para o caso em pauta.The case of a 28-year-old patient in which a peripheral facial paralysis occurred during raise of diving is reported. In reviewing the literature several conditions are mentioned and discussed as fortuitous causes of peripheral facial paralysis, being emphazised an North-American report about two patients suffering five episodes of transient seventh nerve paresis during ascent to altitude, where a disequilibrium of pressures between the middle ear and the nasopharynx was assumed to be the efective cause of the Bell's palsy. A similar mechanism was admited for the reported case.

  12. Large motor units are selectively affected following a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, M; Vécsei, L; Beniczky, S

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed a loss of functioning motor units in stroke patients. However, it remained unclear whether the motor units are affected randomly or in some specific pattern. We assessed whether there is a selective loss of the large (high recruitment threshold) or the small (low recruitment threshold) motor units following a stroke. Forty-five stroke patients and 40 healthy controls participated in the study. Macro-EMG was recorded from the abductor digiti minimi muscle at two levels of force output (low and high). The median macro motor unit potential (macro-MUP) amplitude on the paretic side was compared with those on the unaffected side and in the controls. In the control group and on the unaffected side, the macro-MUPs were significantly larger at the high force output than at the low one. However, on the paretic side the macro-MUPs at the high force output had the same amplitude as those recorded at the low force output. These changes correlated with the severity of the paresis. Following a stroke, there is a selective functional loss of the large, high-threshold motor units. These changes are related to the severity of the symptoms. Our findings furnish further insight into the pathophysiology of the motor deficit following a stroke.

  13. Clinical application of the Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for gait training-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Anneli; Borg, Jörgen; Palmcrantz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on clinical applications of the Hybrid Assistive Limb system for gait training. A systematic literature search was conducted using Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL and clinicaltrials.gov and additional search was made using reference lists in identified reports. Abstracts were screened, relevant articles were reviewed and subject to quality assessment. Out of 37 studies, 7 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Six studies were single group studies and 1 was an explorative randomized controlled trial. In total, these studies involved 140 participants of whom 118 completed the interventions and 107 used HAL for gait training. Five studies concerned gait training after stroke, 1 after spinal cord injury (SCI) and 1 study after stroke, SCI or other diseases affecting walking ability. Minor and transient side effects occurred but no serious adverse events were reported in the studies. Beneficial effects on gait function variables and independence in walking were observed. The accumulated findings demonstrate that the HAL system is feasible when used for gait training of patients with lower extremity paresis in a professional setting. Beneficial effects on gait function and independence in walking were observed but data do not allow conclusions. Further controlled studies are recommended.

  14. Early Experience in 100 Consecutive Patients With Injection Adipocytolysis for Neck Contouring With ATX-101 (Deoxycholic Acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M

    2017-07-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is approved for improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe convexity or fullness associated with submental fat. To assess early treatment experience with DCA injection in a clinical practice setting. In this single-center, prospective, single-arm, observational study, 100 consecutive patients seeking to decrease submental fullness received subcutaneous DCA (2 mg/cm) injections in the submental area (maximum of 6 sessions at ≥1 month intervals). Treatment response was assessed 1 and 5 to 7 weeks posttreatment using the clinician-reported submental fat rating scale (CR-SMFRS) and retrospective independent photograph review by 2 physicians. Overall, 100 patients had 152 treatment sessions (58, 33, 8, and 1 patients had 1, 2, 3, and 4 sessions, respectively). CR-SMFRS score improved by ≥1 point from baseline in 88 (88%) patients; of these, 46, 33, 8, and 1 patients had 1, 2, 3, and 4 sessions, respectively. Local edema, numbness, and tenderness were reported for a mean (SD) of 7.7 (5.3), 28.5 (11.4), and 3.5 (3.5) days, respectively. Two patients experienced marginal mandibular nerve paresis. Deoxycholic acid injection, a minimally invasive procedure for neck contouring, was effective and generally well tolerated in the private practice setting.

  15. The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vér, Csilla; Emri, Miklós; Spisák, Tamás; Berényi, Ervin; Kovács, Kázmér; Katona, Péter; Balkay, László; Menyhárt, László; Kardos, László; Csiba, László

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the short-term efficacy of the continuous passive motion (CPM) device developed for the therapy of ankle-foot paresis and to investigate by fMRI the blood oxygen level-dependent responses (BOLD) during ankle passive movement (PM). Sixty-four stroke patients were investigated. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 49 patients received both 15 min manual and 30 min device therapy (M + D), while the other group (n = 15) received only 15 min manual therapy (M). A third group of stroke patients (n = 12) was investigated by fMRI before and immediately after 30 min CPM device therapy. There was no direct relation between the fMRI group and the other 2 groups. All subjects were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a goniometer. Mean MAS decreased, the ankle's mean plantar flexion and dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) increased and the equinovalgus improved significantly in the M + D group. In the fMRI group, the PM of the paretic ankle increased BOLD responses; this was observed in the contralateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, central opercular cortex, and in the ipsilateral postcentral gyrus, frontal operculum cortex and cerebellum. Manual therapy with CPM device therapy improved the ankle PROM, equinovalgus and severity of spasticity. The ankle PM increased ipsi- and contralateral cortical activation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gooijer-van de Groep, Karin L; de Vlugt, Erwin; de Groot, Jurriaan H; van der Heijden-Maessen, Hélène C M; Wielheesen, Dennis H M; van Wijlen-Hempel, Rietje M S; Arendzen, J Hans; Meskers, Carel G M

    2013-07-23

    Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: "spasticity" vs. "contracture"). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p therapy.

  17. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

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    Alex Förster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Anatomical variations of the facial nerve in first branchial cleft anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, C Arturo; Chan, James; Koltai, Peter J

    2003-03-01

    To review our experience with branchial cleft anomalies, with special attention to their subtypes and anatomical relationship to the facial nerve. Case series. Tertiary care center. Ten patients who underwent resection for anomalies of the first branchial cleft, with at least 1 year of follow-up, were included in the study. The data from all cases were collected in a prospective fashion, including immediate postoperative diagrams. Complete resection of the branchial cleft anomaly was performed in all cases. Wide exposure of the facial nerve was achieved using a modified Blair incision and superficial parotidectomy. Facial nerve monitoring was used in every case. The primary outcome measurements were facial nerve function and incidence of recurrence after resection of the branchial cleft anomaly. Ten patients, 6 females and 4 males,with a mean age of 9 years at presentation, were treated by the senior author (P.J.K.) between 1989 and 2001. The lesions were characterized as sinus tracts (n = 5), fistulous tracts (n = 3), and cysts (n = 2). Seven lesions were medial to the facial nerve, 2 were lateral to the facial nerve, and 1 was between branches of the facial nerve. There were no complications related to facial nerve paresis or paralysis, and none of the patients has had a recurrence. The successful treatment of branchial cleft anomalies requires a complete resection. A safe complete resection requires a full exposure of the facial nerve, as the lesions can be variably associated with the nerve.

  19. Recurrent Wernicke s Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

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    S. Lamdhade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy (WE is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae.

  20. Emergency medical service in the stroke chain of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaitia, Hichem; Lefevre, Oriane; Ho, Vanessa; Squarcioni, Christian; Pradel, Vincent; Fournier, Marc; Toesca, Richard; Michelet, Pierre; Auffray, Jean Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) play a primordial role in the early management of adults with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role and effectiveness of the EMS in the stroke chain of survival in Marseille. A retrospective observational study was conducted in patients treated for AIS or transient ischaemic attack in three emergency departments and at the Marseille stroke centre over a period of 12 months. In 2009, of 1034 patients ultimately presenting a diagnosis of AIS or transient ischaemic attack, 74% benefited from EMS activation. Dispatchers correctly diagnosed 57% of stroke patients. The symptoms most frequently reported included limb weakness, speech problems and facial paresis. Elements resulting in misdiagnosis by dispatchers were general discomfort, chest pain, dyspnoea, fall or vertigo. Stroke patients not diagnosed by emergency medical dispatchers but calling within 3 h of symptom onset accounted for 20% of cases. Our study demonstrates that public intervention programmes must stress the urgency of recognizing stroke symptoms and the importance of calling EMS through free telephone numbers. Further efforts are necessary to disseminate guidelines for healthcare providers concerning stroke recognition and the new therapeutic possibilities in order to increase the likelihood of acute stroke patients presenting to a stroke team early enough to be eligible for acute treatment. In addition, EMS dispatchers should receive further training about atypical stroke symptoms, and 'Face Arm Speech Test' tests must be included in the routine questionnaires used in emergency medical calls concerning elderly persons.

  1. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    KAUST Repository

    Heckmann, J M

    2009-08-13

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198CG SNP (odds ratio8.6; P0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5?-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198CG SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Pazopanib

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    Robert Foerster

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old female patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma under third-line treatment with pazopanib for 8 weeks suddenly developed severe headaches, grand mal seizures and paresis of the left arm in combination with gait instability as well as nausea and vomiting during her vacation abroad. The emergency physician measured systolic blood pressure values over 300 mm Hg and suspected a stroke. The CT imaging without contrast agent in a local hospital did not show any pathologic findings despite bone metastases. The colleagues suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa and referred the patient to our department for further diagnostics and treatment planning. An MRI scan ruled out the suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa, but showed signs of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS in the form of band-like hyperintensities as a sign of cytotoxic edema in the gray and white matter of the left parietal lobe. The patient then reported that similar blood pressure values had been measured shortly after the start of a first-line therapy with sunitinib, so that we discontinued the current treatment with pazopanib. Within 6 days the neurologic symptoms vanished and the patient was discharged. An intermittent hypertension persisted. A follow-up MRI 3 weeks later showed an RPLS-typical cortical infarction in the affected area. RPLS should be considered as the actual reason for neurologic findings in hypertensive patients with known metastatic cancers under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

  4. Neurological status and ethanol preference in rats during alcohol addiction formation

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    A S Tarasov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the features of neurological status and drinking behaviour in rats during 20 days of chronic alcohol intake. Methods. The current study was performed on 40 male Wistar rats (170-300 g. The animals from the study group were administered 15% solution of ethanol used as the only fluid source. On day 20 of the experiment the alcohol preference test and evaluation of neurological status were performed: tail-suspension (to determine paresis and paralysis, home cage motion activity (to determine gait disorders and stereotypic movements and features of horizontal beam-walking (evaluation of movement coordination were assessed, presence of the basic reflexes (startle reflex, external auditory canal reflex, corneal reflex was controlled. Results. The main neurological signs were presented as ataxic form, in which unsteady gait in beam-walking test was predominant. In the experimental groups, the signs of ataxic form of neurological deficit were demonstrated, when animals slipped off and fell off the beam within 40 s from the beginning of the test. This was associated with the significant increase of discrimination ratio in alcohol preference test. Conclusion. In rat models of chronic alcohol intake, significant changes in drinking behavior and alcohol preference test were found on day 20 of the experiment, reflecting formation of alcohol addiction; changes in drinking behavior were associated with mild and moderate neurological deficit, primarily including movement coordination disorders that illustrates the malfunction of peripheral nervous system.

  5. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

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    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  6. Mucolipidosis type II in a domestic shorthair cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, M.; Haskins, M.E.; Arnold, S.; Kaser-Hotz, B.; Bosshard, N.U.; Briner, J.; Spycher, M.A.; Gitzelmann, R.; Sommerlade, H.J.; Figura, K. von

    1996-01-01

    A seven-month-old, female domestic shorthair cat was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Zurich, with abnormal facial features, retarded growth and progressive hindlimb paresis. On physical examination the cat had a flat, broad face with hypertelorism, frontal bossing, small ears and thickened upper and lower eyelids. The corneas of both eyes were clear and the pupils were dilated. The skin was generally thickened, most prominently on the dorsal aspect of the neck. Radiography of the entire skeleton revealed a severely deformed spinal column, bilateral hip luxation with hip dysplasia, an abnormally shaped skull and generalised decreased bone opacity. The clinical features and radiographic changes were suggestive of mucopolysaccharidosis. The toluidine blue spot test on a urine sample, however, was negative for glycosaminoglycans. Further biochemical investigations revealed a deficiency of the enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.8.17) in peripheral leukocytes and an elevation of many lysosomal enzymes in the serum of the cat which is diagnostic for mucolipidosis type II. Histology and electron microscopy of different tissues are briefly summarised. The findings of this cat, the first reported case of mucolipidosis type II are compared with other similar storage diseases described in the cat

  7. Effects of intensive arm training with the rehabilitation robot ARMin II in chronic stroke patients: four single-cases

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    Nef Tobias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robot-assisted therapy offers a promising approach to neurorehabilitation, particularly for severely to moderately impaired stroke patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intensive arm training on motor performance in four chronic stroke patients using the robot ARMin II. Methods ARMin II is an exoskeleton robot with six degrees of freedom (DOF moving shoulder, elbow and wrist joints. Four volunteers with chronic (≥ 12 months post-stroke left side hemi-paresis and different levels of motor severity were enrolled in the study. They received robot-assisted therapy over a period of eight weeks, three to four therapy sessions per week, each session of one hour. Patients 1 and 4 had four one-hour training sessions per week and patients 2 and 3 had three one-hour training sessions per week. Primary outcome variable was the Fugl-Meyer Score of the upper extremity Assessment (FMA, secondary outcomes were the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT, the Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS, the Maximal Voluntary Torques (MVTs and a questionnaire about ADL-tasks, progress, changes, motivation etc. Results Three out of four patients showed significant improvements (p Conclusion Data clearly indicate that intensive arm therapy with the robot ARMin II can significantly improve motor function of the paretic arm in some stroke patients, even those in a chronic state. The findings of the study provide a basis for a subsequent controlled randomized clinical trial.

  8. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  9. Intervention to enhance skilled arm and hand movements after stroke: A feasibility study using a new virtual reality system

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    McLaughlin Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation programs designed to develop skill in upper extremity (UE function after stroke require progressive practice that engage and challenge the learner. Virtual realty (VR provides a unique environment where the presentation of stimuli can be controlled systematically for optimal challenge by adapting task difficulty as performance improves. We describe four VR tasks that were developed and tested to improve arm and hand movement skills for individuals with hemiparesis. Methods Two participants with chronic post-stroke paresis and different levels of motor severity attended 12 training sessions lasting 1 to 2 hours each over a 3-week period. Behavior measures and questionnaires were administered pre-, mid-, and post-training. Results Both participants improved VR task performance across sessions. The less impaired participant averaged more time on task, practiced a greater number of blocks per session, and progressed at a faster rate over sessions than the more impaired participant. Impairment level did not change but both participants improved functional ability after training. The less impaired participant increased the number of blocks moved on the Box & Blocks test while the more impaired participant achieved 4 more items on the Functional Test of the Hemiparetic UE. Conclusion Two participants with differing motor severity were able to engage in VR based practice and improve performance over 12 training sessions. We were able to successfully provide individualized, progressive practice based on each participant's level of movement ability and rate of performance improvement.

  10. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of patients with apraxia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Burgard, Emily; Radel, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Stroke-induced paresis commands much attention during rehabilitation; other stroke-related consequences receive less consideration. Apraxia is a stroke disorder that may have important implications for rehabilitation and recovery. To investigate association of apraxia with stroke rehabilitation outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation. This cohort study compared patients with and without apraxia after a first left hemispheric stroke. All study patients received standard of care. Clinical measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) administered upon admission and at discharge. Length of stay was also documented. Florida Apraxia Battery subtests were used to classify patients with apraxia. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 10 of whom had apraxia. Data analysis revealed that patients with apraxia exhibited improvement from admission to discharge in clinical measures; however, admission FIM score was significantly lower compared to patients without apraxia. There was no statistically significant difference between groups on FMA score, length of stay, or amount of change on clinical measures. This study of acute patients found those with apraxia to be significantly less independent upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation compared to patients without apraxia. Although both groups improved a similar amount during rehabilitation, patients with apraxia discharged at a level of independence comparable to patients without apraxia upon admission. Such disparity in independence is of concern, and apraxia as a factor in stroke rehabilitation and recovery deserves further attention.

  11. Motor rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury and stroke - Advances in assessment and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Hesse, S.; Mauritz, K.-H.

    1999-01-01

    A long-term goal in motor rehabilitation is that treatment is not selected on the basis of 'schools of thought', but rather, based on knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of specific interventions for specific situations (e.g. functional syndromes). Motor dysfunction after stroke or TBI can be caused by many different functional syndromes such as paresis, ataxia, deafferentaion, visuo-perceptual deficits, or apraxia. Examples are provided showing that theory-based analysis of motor behavior makes it possible to describe 'syndrome-specific motor deficits'. Its potential implications for motor rehabilitation are that our understanding of altered motor behavior as well as specific therapeutic approaches might be promoted. A methodological prerequisite for clinical trials in rehabilitation is knowledge about test properties of assessment tools in follow-up situations such as test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change. Test-retest reliability assesses whether a test can produce stable measures with test repetition, while sensitivity to change reflects whether a test detects changes that occur over time. Exemplifying these considerations, a reliability and validity study of a kinematic arm movement analysis is summarized. In terms of new therapeutic developments, two examples of clinical therapeutic studies are provided assessing the efficacy of specific inter-ventions for specific situations in arm and gait rehabilitation: the Arm Ability Training for high functioning hemiparetic stroke and TBI patients, and the treadmill training for non-ambulatory hemiparetic patients. In addition, a new technical development, a machine-controlled gait trainer ist introduced.

  12. Oftalmoplegia internuclear em paciente com mielose funicular Internuclear ophtálmoplegia in a patient with subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord

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    J. Lamartine de Assis

    1968-06-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de oftalmoplegia internuclear, tipo posterior, com manifestações oculares bilaterais e assimétricas em paciente com mielose funicular. O diagnóstico da natureza da moléstia foi comprovado pela prova de absorção da vitamina B12 radioativa marcada com 57Co (método de Schilling. Foram realizados três exames electromiográficos do músculo reto mediai mais afetado (esquerdo, com intervalos de 45 a 90 dias, não tendo havido modificação dos traçados. O electromiograma nada mostrou de específico e permitiu excluir lesão neurogênica (paresia ou paralisia do 3.° nervo e muscular propriamente dita (miopatia.Acase of posterior internuclear ophthalmoplegia with bilateral and asymetric manifestations in a patient with subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord is reported. The diagnosis of the spinal cord disease was made in clinical findings and proved by absorption of radioactive cyanocobalamin through the Schilling's urinary excretion test. The electromyogram of the left medial rectus muscle showed no signs of paresis such as are found in lower motor disease or myopathies.

  13. Massive Lumbar Disk Herniation Following "Therapeutic" Water Boiling of the Lower Extremities: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, Aldo; Çelniku, Megi

    2017-01-01

    Legs burning for treating lumbar radicular pain are still in use nowadays in low socioeconomical environments. They are dangerous as the case we report shows clearly. A 49-year-old man came to our attention with severe flaccid paraparesis occurred 10 days before, almost immediately after he had immersed his legs in boiling water to treat his severe left lumbocrural pain. This was known to be due to a right L3/4 herniated disk diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. At the examination he showed severe motor paresis and absent reflexes of his lower limbs, while crural pain was mild and sensation and urinary function were unaffected. The results of his neurologic examination led us to suspect an acute motor axon degeneration related to thermal shock. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging, performed before the planned electromyogram as an exception to the established routine, showed instead a giant 5- × 5.5-cm, herniated disk compressing the dural sac at L3. Prompt surgical decompression led to rapid improvement. We discuss here the pathophysiology of this unusual case and point out how medieval practices for treating sciatica-like pain are not only unjustified from a medical viewpoint but also potentially dangerous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography findings--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Miwa, Shigeru; Noda, Tomoyuki; Sobajima, Atsuhiro; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    A 51-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis rapidly developed anterior neck pain and paresis in the left upper and lower extremities and right lower extremity, sensory disturbance in the left upper and lower extremities, and bladder and rectal disorder. Adduction of the left eye and abduction of the right eye were also disturbed. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe edema in the C1-T5 levels, which then deteriorated rapidly over 3 days, and lesions enhanced with gadolinium in the C1-C3 and C5-T3 levels. 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography study demonstrated the inflammatory sites as segmental enhanced accumulation in the C1-C3, C5-C6, and T1 levels. The serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody level was positive and she was diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Marked improvement in the neurological conditions, concomitant with reduced spinal cord edema, was obtained by steroid pulse therapy.

  15. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis.

  16. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  17. Dysphonia – the single symptom of rifampicin resistant laryngeal tuberculosis

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    Paulauskienė Iveta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still the most frequent granulomatous laryngeal disease. Absence of pathognomonic symptoms and change in clinical pattern frequently leads to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. Hoarseness is the commonest symptom of laryngeal tuberculosis and constitutional symptoms are usually rare. However dysphonia can be caused by many other more common conditions. Hoarseness can be a symptom of organic (nodules and polyps of vocal folds, tumors, vocal fold paresis or functional (functional dysphonia, laryngeal conversion disorder, paradoxical vocal folds motion conditions. Rarely systemic diseases as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, Wegener’s granulomatosis or tuberculosis can cause vocal dysfunction too. That is why laryngeal tuberculosis is often forgotten in case of persistent hoarseness. In this article, we present a case of a young previously healthy woman, complaining of persistent hoarseness with no other leading symptoms. Though endoscopic image suggested a malignancy, histology showed granulomatous lesion. Detailed examination revealed laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis resistant to rifampicin. Conclusion: Dysphonia can be the only one symptom of laryngeal tuberculosis. The disease should be taken into consideration when a patient complains of persistent hoarseness in order to avoid delays in treatment and spread of infection.

  18. Ophthalmoplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Semai; Genc, Gencer; Demirkaya, Seref; Eroglu, Erdal; Odabasi, Zeki

    2009-05-01

    According to the International Headache Society, ophthalmoplegic migraine is recurrent attacks of headache with migrainous characteristics associated with paresis of one or more ocular cranial nerves (commonly the third nerve) in the absence of any demonstrable intracranial lesion. We report a patient with typical clinical features of ophthalmoplegic migraine. A 21-year-old man had right frontal throbbing headaches recurring twice a year. His headache lasted for 1 to 5 days and was followed by slight drooping of his eyelid and double vision that lasted for approximately 3 months. On examination he had ptosis and adduction paralysis of the right eye. Brain MRI revealed a thickened, enhancing right oculomotor nerve. He was treated with methylprednisolone 1000 mg/d IV for 5 days. Only 2 weeks later, clinical improvement was observed and 3 months later the oculomotor nerve enhancement resolved. Ophthalmoplegic migraine has been considered to have a microvascular, ischemic etiology, but more recently it has been reclassified as a demyelinating condition affecting the oculomotor. To our knowledge, this is the first ophthalmoplegic migraine case presented pretreatment and post-treatment with clinical photographic documentation and an MRI showing enduring thickening of the oculomotor nerve although symptoms and contrast enhancement resolved.

  19. Ceftriaxone treatment for two neurosyphilis cases presenting with cognitive and psychiatric symptoms

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    Melek Kandemir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema Pallidum subspecies pallidum. The route of transmission of syphilis is almost always through sexual contact. The incidence of syphilis decreased significantly with the introduction of penicilin in the 1940s but rose sharply again with the advent of HIV infection in the 1980s. Tertiary or late syphilis develops years after the initial infection and can involve any organ system. Neurologic involvement occurs in up to 10 percent of patients with untreated syphilis. General paresis, the clinical form of neurosyphilis most associated with psychiatric symptoms, occurs with parenchymatous disease and involves neuronal loss as opposed to the vascular lesions or inflammatory changes characteristic of most other forms of neurosyphilis. In the classic description, after early psychiatric manifestations such as mood changes, psychosis, or cognitive changes, demantia becomes prominent. Penicillin is the only drug that has proved effective in the treatment of neurosyphilis. Ceftriaxone is used as an alternative treatment in patients with penicilin allergy. This article reports two cases of neurosyphilis one of whom is presented with dementia and the other with psychiatric symptoms. Both of them are treated with ceftriaxone. Our purpose is to reveal the fact that ceftriaxone is a succesful alternative treatment for the cases with penicilin allergy and to emphasize the importance of neurosyphilis in the differential diagnosis for the psychiatric cases that are resistant to treatment

  20. A eletropirexia no tratamento da neurossífilis

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    Iracy Doyle

    1946-12-01

    Full Text Available In the experiments described in this paper, neurosyphilis was treated by artificial fever, the body temperature having been raised my means of short-wave diathermy, and body-heat irradiation prevented by use of an air-conditioned cabinet. The A. considers the optimum rectal temperature to that between 39,5°C (103°F and a little above 41.C (105,8°F; however, temperatures above 38°C (100.5°F were accepted as beneficial. The treatments lasted an average of 8 hours, in a total average number of 10. The process was aplied to 15 patients, 11 suffering from general paresis, 3 from cerebral syphilis and 1 case of tabes. Among the cases ofe general paresis there were 5 of the expansive and 4 of the demented type, one of which in the terminal period; 1 patient had a striatal syndrome of syphilitic origin and the vascular inflammation due to syphilis. The results were as follows: 7 complete clinical cures, 3 partial improvements, one case not influenced by treatment. In percentages this would mean 63.64% clinical-cures, 27.27% partial cures, 9.% unchanged by treatment; no deaths. Of the 3 patients with brain syphilis, 2 were considered clinical cures and 1 was improved. The patient with tabes obtained notable relief from pain. The A. compares these results with those obtained by means of malaria-induced fever in 26 cases of general paresis and 3 cases of brain syphilis. Results obtained in the latter case were the following, for general paresis: clinical cures, 6 (23%; partial cures, 11 (24%; patients not improved, 3 (12%; 1 death; 1 case of post-malarial psychosis. Four of the patients presented no clinical symptoms, but only a positive reaction to the usual tests for syphilis in the spinal fluid. Of the 3 cases of brain syphilis treated with malaria, 1 was a clinical cure and 2 improved. The A. summarizes their findings, from the clinical standpoint, as follows: Electrical fever is not only less harmful, but it offers a greater percentage of cures

  1. Robotic-assisted transoral removal of a bilateral floor of mouth ranulas

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    Stromeyer Frederick W

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe the management of bilateral oral ranulas with the use of the da Vinci Si Surgical System and discuss advantages and disadvantages over traditional transoral resection. Study Design Case Report and Review of Literature. Results A 47 year old woman presented to our service with an obvious right floor of mouth swelling. Clinical evaluation and computerized tomography scan confirmed a large floor of mouth ranula on the right and an incidental asymptomatic early ranula of the left sublingual gland. After obtaining an informed consent, the patient underwent a right transoral robotic-assisted transoral excision of the ranula and sublingual gland with identification and dissection of the submandibular duct and lingual nerve. The patient had an excellent outcome with no evidence of lingual nerve paresis and a return to oral intake on the first postoperative day. Subsequently, the patient underwent an elective transoral robotic-assisted excision of the incidental ranula on the left sublingual gland. Conclusion We describe the first robotic-assisted excision of bilateral oral ranulas in current literature. The use of the da Vinci system provides excellent visualization, magnification, and dexterity for transoral surgical management of ranulas with preservation of the lingual nerve and Wharton's duct with good functional outcomes. However, the use of the robotic system for anterior floor of mouth surgery in terms of improved surgical outcomes as compared to traditional transoral surgery, long-term recurrence rates, and cost effectiveness needs further validation.

  2. Role of the peripheral neuromuscular disturbances in the development of severe movement disorders in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The motor stereotype in patients with cerebral palsy (CP is determined by the magnitude of spasticity and central paresis of muscles, the impaired mechanisms of intermuscular interaction, and the presence of consensual reactions and pathologic synkineses. There are cases of a concomitance of the suprasegmental and segmental structures damages in CP. An attempt has been made to identify and estimate the contribution of the peripheral neuromuscular system lesion in CP patients in its late residual stage. Central nervous system lesion at the central and segmental levels were detected in 12.3% of cases in CP with spastic diplegia with progressive deformities of the lower extremities joints. Needle EMG is the most sensitive technique to detect a lesion at the segmental level: increased duration and higher amplitude motor unit potentials (MUPs and fewer recruited MUPs were registrated. A turn-amplitude analysis has indicated the shift of cloudy diagram to the left and upwards and the decreased ratio of the number of turns to their mean amplitude. The residual pattern of revealed changes is confirmed by the absence of signs of a current denervation process. The contribution of possible myelodysplasia and transneuronal degeneration of spinal motor neurons at the lumbosacral level to the clinical picture of the CP and orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation tactics are discussed.

  3. Diagnostics and therapy of spinal disc herniation; Diagnostik und Therapie des Bandscheibenvorfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Degenerative processes in a movement segment of the vertebral column, which can potentially give rise to herniation of elements of the nucleus pulposus, are complex and of variable clinical and radiological dimensions; however the mere assumption that degenerative changes precede disc herniation remains a matter of debate. By definition, spinal disc herniation (SDH) refers to components of the gelatinous nucleus pulposus protruding beyond the dorsal level of the vertebral body margin through tears in the annulus fibrosus. Clinical presentation may include pain, paresis and sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDH. In the majority of patients a conservative approach with physical therapy exercises and adequate analgesic and antiphlogistic medical treatment results in a substantial improvement of symptoms. (orig.) [German] Degenerative Prozesse eines Bewegungssegments, die in einem Prolaps des Nucleus pulposus resultieren koennen, sind vielschichtig und von unterschiedlicher klinischer und radiologischer Auspraegung. Selbst die Annahme, dass Bandscheibenvorfaellen eine Degeneration vorangeht, ist keineswegs unumstritten. Definitionsgemaess spricht man von einem Bandscheibenvorfall (BSV), wenn das Gewebe des gelatinoesen Nucleus pulposus durch eine Dehiszenz im Anulus fibrosus ueber das Niveau der normalen dorsalen Begrenzung des Bandscheibenfachs hinaus prolabiert. Klinisch kann dies mit Schmerzen, Paresen und Sensibilitaetsstoerungen einhergehen. Die Magnetresonanztomographie gilt als Goldstandard in der Diagnostik eines BSV. In der Mehrzahl der Faelle fuehrt ein konservatives Vorgehen zu einer deutlichen Besserung der Symptomatik im Verlauf. (orig.)

  4. Guillain–Barré syndrome occurring synchronously with systemic lupus erythematosus as initial manifestation treated successfully with low-dose cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE is frequently encountered in clinical practice; a widespread immunological response can involve any organ system, sometimes leading to rare and diagnostically challenging presentations. We describe a 38-year-old female who presented with symmetric numbness and tingling of the hands and feet, and cervical pain. Imaging studies were not diagnostic of any serious underlying pathology. The patient developed ascending paresis involving lower extremities and cranial muscles (dysphagia and facial weakness. Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS was diagnosed on the basis of electromyography and lumbar puncture showing albuminocytologic dissociation. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG were administered for 5 days. Supported by anti-dsDNA antibody, oral ulcers, proteinuria of 0.7 g in 24 h, and neurological manifestation, she was diagnosed with lupus. After completion of IVIG, she received pulse-dose corticosteroids and one dose of low-dose cyclophosphamide. Her neurological symptoms improved and she had complete neurological recovery several months after her initial presentation. Literature search provides evidence of co-occurrence of lupus and GBS occurring mostly later in the course of the disease. However, GBS as initial manifestation of SLE is exceedingly rare and less understood. The association of GBS with lupus is important to recognize for rapid initiation of appropriate therapy and for consideration of immunosuppressive therapy which may affect the outcome.

  5. Peripheral neuropathy as a complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in a child with newly diagnosed diabetes type 1 - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszyńska-Wilk, Marta; Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Świercz, Anna; Świderska, Jolanta; Marszał, Magdalena; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2017-12-08

    Neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis are considered to be very serious clinical problem. The most common complication is cerebral edema. However this group includes also less common syndromes such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or very rare peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of 9-year old girl with new onset type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, cerebral edema, multifocal vasogenic brain lesions and lower limbs peripheral paresis. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria one week before admission to the hospital. In laboratory tests initial blood glucose level 1136 mg/dl and acidosis (pH 7.1; BE-25.9) were noted. She was admitted to the hospital in a critical condition and required treatment in intensive care unit. Computed tomography scan showed brain edema and hipodense lesion in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed more advanced multifocal brain lesions Nerve conduction studies demonstrated damage of the motor neuron in both lower extremities with dysfunction in both peroneal nerves and the right tibial nerve. As a result of diabetological, neurological treatment and physiotherapy patient's health state gradually improved. Acute neuropathy after ketoacidosis is rare complication and its pathomechanism is not clear. Patients with DKA require careful monitoring of neurological functions even after normalization of glycemic parameters.

  6. [30-year-old Patient with suspected Marfan Syndrome and Progressive Gait disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balke, Maryam; Lehmann, Helmar C; Fink, Gereon R; Wunderlich, Gilbert

    2017-07-01

    History  A 30-year-old man presented with a history of progressive muscle weakness, difficulty in concentrating, and a slender habitus since early childhood. Marfan syndrome was suspected since the age of 14. Examinations  13 years later he was examined by Marfan experts and by genetic testing and Marfan syndrome could not be confirmed. Further neurological examination revealed the suspected diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy type 1, which was confirmed by genetic testing. Treatment and course  Similar to Marfan syndrome, myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disorder with the risk of cardiac arrythmias. It is necessary to provide an interdisciplinary care by neurologists, internists, ophthalmologists, speech therapists, and physiotherapists. Conclusion  It is not enough to take the habitus as the principle sign to diagnose Marfan syndrome. Furthermore, it is essential to consider symptoms that are not typical for Marfan syndrome, such as cognitive deficiencies or progressive paresis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Neurological aspects of lead intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, H

    1980-05-08

    This study gives a survey over the medical and scientific literature on lead intoxications, which were published until 1979. Neurologic aspects are of particular interest. At present dramatic cases of lead intoxications occur only rarely. However, there are numerous studies about cases of chronical, partly subclinical intoxications. This chronical type of lead intoxication can become manifest clinically as relatively vague symptoms, for example vertigos, insomnia, headaches and weakness. Contrary to this, serious encephalopathies, even with fatal outcome, and polyneuropathies with typical paresis of the radial nerve are preferably observed in acute lead intoxications. Besides the numerous sources of intoxication, also the different opinions found in literature are discussed, concerning the effects of lead on the human body. The fact that there are differing opinions about the limiting value of the blood-lead level at which intoxication symptoms have to be expected, becomes apparent when the determined blood-lead level values are compared and evaluated. Besides the description of general intoxication effects, the discussion of the neurologic aspects found in literature - not only those concerning the central, but also the peripheral system - are preferably concerned. Reports about neuropsychical alterations due to lead exposure, which are mainly found in children, supplement the numerous descriptions of the macroscopic and microscopic alterations of the nervous system provoked by lead. Finally the therapeutic and prophylactic measures given in the literature are discussed.

  8. Facet joint syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigrai, M.; Zakovic, J.; Brezinova, M.; Pavlovicova, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of the study to demonstrate the clinical relevance of degenerative changes in the facet joint of patients with low back pain irradiating to the lower extremities, and discuss some problems relating to diagnosis and different diagnosis. 119 patients presenting the listed bellow syndromes are covered by the study: scoliosis, polytopic pain vertebral syndrome, paresis and history of trauma. all patients undergo comprehensive neurological examination with special attention focused on the spine: CT and plain x-rays are taken of the lumbosacral segment to assess the condition of the facet joints. The neurological examination demonstrates in all cases pain syndrome in the lumbar spine referred to one or both lower extremities. In 56% it is a matter of persisting pain, and in 44% - recurrent. More than half of the patients complain of sacroiliac (SI) dislocation and palpatory pain. Unilateral or bilateral degenerative changes are documented by imaging studies in all patients, including: subchondral thickening, osteopathy narrowing the lateral or central part of the spinal canal with ensuing nerve root compression. The lumbosacral zygoapophyseal joints are source of pseudoradicular pain. A correlation between clinical picture and GT changes is noted in all patients with facet joint syndrome. CT is an indispensable method in diagnosing facet joint syndrome. (authors)

  9. Plasma Vitamin E and Blood Selenium Concentrations in Norwegian Dairy Cows: Regional Differences and Relations to Feeding and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås O

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma α-tocopherol (vit E and blood selenium (Se concentrations in February were determined in samples from 314 dairy cows in Norway, selected to provide a representative subset of the Norwegian dairy cow population. Each sample was followed by a questionnaire with information about feeding of the cow at the time of sampling. The results were correlated to herd data and to calving and health data for each cow from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System and the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. The mean concentrations were 6.9 μg vit E per ml plasma and 0.16 μg Se per g blood. Both levels were highest in mid lactation. Plasma vit E varied with the amount of silage fed to the cow, while blood Se varied with the amount of concentrates and mineral supplements, and with geographical region. No differences in vit E or Se levels were found between cows with recorded treatments for mastitis, parturient paresis or reproductive disorders in the lactation during or immediately prior to sampling, and those without such treatments. For ketosis, a small difference in blood Se was found between the groups with or without recorded treatments. It is concluded that winter-fed lactating cows in Norway had an adequate plasma level of vit E and a marginal-to-adequate level of Se.

  10. Growth rate, health and welfare in a dairy herd with natural suckling until 6–8 weeks of age: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejdell Cecilie

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over a period of two years, growth rate and health were measured for dairy calves allowed to suckle their mothers up to 6–8 weeks of age. Thirty-one calves were weighted weekly, and the mean daily growth rate was 1.2 ± 0.03 kg from birth up to 13 weeks of age. Illness in calves and young stock was not observed. In the cows, the mean incidences of ketosis, displaced abomasum, puerperal paresis, mastitis, teat injury and retained placenta were 0, 0, 8, 22, 1 and 1%, respectively, during a 6-year period. The mean daily gain of 56 growing bulls was 1.4 kg when slaughtered at 15 months of age, which is higher than the mean daily gain of 0.95 kg in the population. Probiotics, hormones and vaccines were not used, and antibiotics were only used for treating illness. The present study indicates many advantages and few problems when dairy calves are penned together with the cows and allowed natural feeding up to 6–8 weeks of age. This production system was easy to manage, preferred by the farmer, and may satisfy the public concern regarding the practice of immediate separation of cow and calf in commercial milk production.

  11. Serum calcium and magnesium level in dairy cows at calving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Pulimeno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Milk fever and hypocalcaemia are post-partum metabolic diseases affecting about 6% of dairy cows and are due to a fail of the homeostatic metabolism regulating the calcium blood level around 9 and 10mg/100mL. The calcium drainage to the mammary gland along with the reduced capacity of the animal to mobilize calcium from bone reserve lead to a drop of the calcium blood level under 5-6mg/100mL with paresis like clinical symptoms known as milk fever. The incidence of the clinical milk fever is low, however the occurrence of mild hypocalcaemia (subclinical could be as high as 15- 20% within few days after calving, particularly in multiparous cows. The hypocalcaemia status as for the reduced bone calcium mobilization and intestinal absorption leads to reduced feed intake and make it a good start for ketosis, retained placenta, displaced abomasums and mastitis problems (Beede, 1991. The acid-base balance of the cow in the late pregnancy is determinant for hypocalcaemia............

  12. Plasma Vitamin E and Blood Selenium Concentrations in Norwegian Dairy Cows: Regional Differences and Relations to Feeding and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivertsen T

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma α-tocopherol (vit E and blood selenium (Se concentrations in February were determined in samples from 314 dairy cows in Norway, selected to provide a representative subset of the Norwegian dairy cow population. Each sample was followed by a questionnaire with information about feeding of the cow at the time of sampling. The results were correlated to herd data and to calving and health data for each cow from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System and the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. The mean concentrations were 6.9 μg vit E per ml plasma and 0.16 μg Se per g blood. Both levels were highest in mid lactation. Plasma vit E varied with the amount of silage fed to the cow, while blood Se varied with the amount of concentrates and mineral supplements, and with geographical region. No differences in vit E or Se levels were found between cows with recorded treatments for mastitis, parturient paresis or reproductive disorders in the lactation during or immediately prior to sampling, and those without such treatments. For ketosis, a small difference in blood Se was found between the groups with or without recorded treatments. It is concluded that winter-fed lactating cows in Norway had an adequate plasma level of vit E and a marginal-to-adequate level of Se.

  13. Surgical experience with skull base approaches for foramen magnum meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin Sanabria, Elio Arnaldo; Ehara, Kazumasa; Tamaki, Norihiko

    2002-11-01

    The surgical treatment of patients with foramen magnum meningioma remains challenging. This study evaluated the outcome of this tumor according to the evolution of surgical approaches during the last 29 years. A retrospective analysis of medical records, operative notes, and neuroimages of 492 meningioma cases from 1972 to 2001 identified seven cases of foramen magnum meningioma (1.4%). All patients showed various neurological symptoms corresponding with foramen magnum syndrome. The tumor locations were anterior in five cases and posterior in two. Surgical removal was performed through a transoral approach in one patient, the suboccipital approach in three, and the transcondylar approach in two. Total removal was achieved in all patients, except for one who refused any surgical treatment. The major complications were tetraparesis and lower cranial nerve paresis for tumors in anterior locations, and minor complications for posterior locations. One patient died of atelectasis and pneumonia after a long hospitalization. The transcondylar approach is recommended for anterior locations, and the standard suboccipital approach for posterior locations.

  14. Electromechanical gait training with functional electrical stimulation: case studies in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, S; Werner, C; Bardeleben, A

    2004-06-01

    Single case studies. To describe the technique of intensive locomotor training on an electromechanical gait trainer (GT) combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES). Neurological Rehabilitation Clinic, Berlin, Germany. Four spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients, one tetraparetic, two paraparetic, and one patient with an incomplete cauda syndrome, more than 3 months postinjury, who were unable to walk at all, or with two therapists. They received 25 min of locomotor training on the GT plus FES daily for 5 weeks in addition to the regular therapy. The patients tolerated the programme well, and therapists rated the programme less strenuous compared to manually assisted treadmill training. Gait ability improved in all four patients; three patients could walk independently on the floor with the help of technical aids, and one required the help of one therapist after therapy; gait speed and endurance more than doubled, and the gastrocnemius activity increased in the patients with a central paresis. This combined technique allows intensive locomotor therapy in SCI subjects with reduced effort from the therapists. The patients' improved walking ability confirmed the potential of locomotor therapy in SCI subjects.

  15. Recovery of gait and other motor functions after stroke: novel physical and pharmacological treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, S

    2004-01-01

    The gait-lab at Klinik Berlin developed and evaluated novel physical and pharmacological strategies promoting the repetitive practise of hemiparetic gait in line with the slogan: who wants to relearn walking, has to walk. Areas of research are treadmill training with partial body weight support, enabling wheelchair-bound subjects to repetitively practice gait, the electromechanical gait trainer GT I reducing the effort on the therapists as compared to the manually assisted locomotor therapy, and the future HapticWalker which will allow the additional practise of stair climbing up and down and of perturbations. Further means to promote gait practice after stroke was the application of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of lower limb spasticity and the early use of walking aids. New areas of research are also the study of D-Amphetamine, which failed to promote motor recovery in acute stroke patients as compared to placebo, and the development of a computerized arm trainer, Bi-Manu-T rack, for the bilateral treatment of patients with a severe upper limb paresis.

  16. Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Gilbert, Tracy; Lindo, John F; Henry, Sonia; Brown, Paul; Christie, Celia D C

    2014-05-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an endemic and emerging disease that affects adults and children in Jamaica. Most cases resolve without sequelae, but young children are at high risk of neurological damage and death. Treatment with corticosteroids and albendazole is considered safe for adults and children, but protocols for its use in children have not been established. A 19-month-old infant with permanent neurological sequlae caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis meningitis is reported, and five other Jamaican cases are summarized. A review of the literature of children with permanent neurological sequlae and death is presented. Children <5 years (especially <2) were at increased risk of incomplete recovery and death if they presented with bulbar signs, flaccid paresis and coma. None of the severe or fatal cases received early intervention with anthelminthics, and disease progression was not altered with corticosteroids. In view of the pathophysiology, necropsy reports and animal studies, it seems that the early use of larvicidals may change the course of severe presentations.

  17. Current and emerging concepts in muscle tension dysphonia: a 30-month review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Kenneth W; Atkinson, Cory; Lazarus, Cathy

    2005-06-01

    The modern theory of hoarseness is that there are multifactorial etiologies contributing to the voice problem. The hypothesis of this study is that muscle tension dysphonia is multifactorial with various contributing etiologies. This project is a retrospective chart review of all patients seen in the Voice Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center at our institution with a diagnosis of muscle tension (functional hypertensive) dysphonia over a 30-month period. A literature search and review is also performed regarding current and emerging concepts of muscle tension dysphonia. One hundred fifty subjects were identified (60% female, 40% male, with a mean age of 42.3 years). Significant factors in patient history believed to contribute to abnormal voice production were gastroesophageal reflux in 49%, high stress levels in 18%, excessive amounts of voice use in 63%, and excessive loudness demands on voice use in 23%. Otolaryngologic evaluation was performed in 82% of patients, in whom lesions, significant vocal fold edema, or paralysis/paresis was identified in 52.3%. Speech pathology assessment revealed poor breath support, inappropriately low pitch, and visible cervical neck tension in the majority of patients. Inappropriate intensity was observed in 23.3% of patients. This set of multiple contributing factors is discussed in the context of current and emerging understanding of muscle tension dysphonia. Results confirm multifactorial etiologies contributing to hoarseness in the patients identified with muscle tension dysphonia. An interdisciplinary approach to treating all contributing factors portends the best prognosis.

  18. Investigating structure and function in the healthy human brain: validity of acute versus chronic lesion-symptom mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Hans-Otto; Rennig, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    Modern voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analyses techniques provide powerful tools to examine the relationship between structure and function of the healthy human brain. However, there is still uncertainty on the type of and the appropriate time point of imaging and of behavioral testing for such analyses. Here we tested the validity of the three most common combinations of structural imaging data and behavioral scores used in VLSM analyses. Given the established knowledge about the neural substrate of the primary motor system in humans, we asked the mundane question of where the motor system is represented in the normal human brain, analyzing individual arm motor function of 60 unselected stroke patients. Only the combination of acute behavioral scores and acute structural imaging precisely identified the principal brain area for the emergence of hemiparesis after stroke, i.e., the corticospinal tract (CST). In contrast, VLSM analyses based on chronic behavior-in combination with either chronic or acute imaging-required the exclusion of patients who had recovered from an initial paresis to reveal valid anatomical results. Thus, if the primary research aim of a VLSM lesion analysis is to uncover the neural substrates of a certain function in the healthy human brain and if no longitudinal designs with repeated evaluations are planned, the combination of acute imaging and behavior represents the ideal dataset.

  19. The risk of sequelae due to pneumococcal meningitis in high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark

    2010-07-01

    To determine the risk of various kinds of sequelae in survivors of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as the influence of co-factors such as study design, study population and treatment on this risk. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched from 1 September 1991 to 18 June 2009 for original articles on pneumococcal meningitis sequelae. Prevalence of sequelae was pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Studies were appraised for the influence of referral bias, external validity of study populations, testing procedure and publication bias. Data were extracted from 63 studies involving 3408 pneumococcal meningitis survivors. The pooled prevalence of any reported sequelae from 48 studies was 31.7% (95% confidence interval 27.2-36.3%) using a random effects model (Cochran-Q = 277, p < 0.01). Differences in studies due to design, study population and treatment were not significant. The pooled prevalence of hearing loss, seizures, hydrocephalus, spasticity/paresis, cranial nerve palsies and visual impairment was 20.9% (17.1-24.7%), 6.5% (3.3-9.7%), 6.8% (3.3-10.2%), 8.7% (6.4-11.0%), 12.2% (5.3-19.1%) and 2.4% (0-5.7%) respectively. The burden of sequelae due to pneumococcal meningitis remains high in the reviewed studies.

  20. Dynamic changes in the inner ear function and vestibular neural pathway related to the progression of labyrinthine infarction in patient with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Rim; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Hong, Sung Kwang

    2011-12-01

    To describe changes in the inner ear function and the vestibular neural pathway according to the progression of a labyrinthine infarction in a patient with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction. A 58-year-old woman with hypertension who presented with isolated inner ear symptoms similar to those of endolymphatic hydrops but finally progressed to an AICA infarction. Serial neurotologic testing according to progression to an AICA infarction and antiplatelet therapy. Radiologic findings and neurotologic parameters, including pure tone audiogram thresholds, spontaneous nystagmus, summating potentials/action potentials on electrocochleography, interaural amplitude difference on the vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test, canal paresis and fixation index on the bithermal caloric test, and gain on oculomotor tests. Our patient initially presented with sudden hearing loss and was diagnosed with an acute AICA infarction on a follow up MRI. Dynamic change in neurotologic testing was observed during disease progression. The vertigo and motion intolerance improved gradually after antiplatelet therapy. Changes in the clinical profile, which were documented during a transition from isolated labyrinthine ischemia to an AICA infarction, suggest that sensitivity to an ischemic injury is variable in different components of the labyrinthine organs in addition to providing a new insight into the response of vestibular neural pathway to ischemic injury.

  1. Technetium-99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT in antiphospholipid syndrome - preliminary data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowicz, G.; Lass, P.; Koseda-Dragan, M.; Nowicki, R.; Krajka-Lauer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined as the presence of repeated episodes of arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent spontaneous abortions and throbocytopenia in patients with elevated antiphospholipid antibodies. An important feature of APS are cerebrovascular disorders of thrombotic origin. The aim of the study was to assess cerebral blood flow changes utilising brain SPECT HMPAO scanning. METHODS: Brain SPECT 99mTc-HMPAO scanning was performed in 20 patients with APS: 12 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 4 with Sneddon's syndrome, 2 with Sjoegren's syndrome, 2 with primary APS. 30 healthy volunteers served as a control group. RESULTS: 19 studies were abnormal, 1 normal. Abnormalities consisted of multifocal perfusion deficits and diffuse decrease of regional blood flow. The average number of focal perfusion deficits was 4.8±1.7. In 7 patients diffuse hypoperfusion of frontal lobes was seen, in 1 patient additionally hypoperfusion of temporal and occipital lobes. There was a correlation between the number of focal perfusion deficits and cognitive impairment in this group of patients. Correlation between SPECT images and clinical data was moderate in cerebellar syndrome and paresis, weak in persistent headache and vertigo. CONCLUSIONS: Those results indicate the high utility of CBF brain SPECT scanning in antiphospholipid syndrome. (author)

  2. Selective arterial embolization of 36 aneurysmal bone cysts of the skeleton with N-2-butyl cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Giuseppe [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Department of Interventional Angiographic Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, Eugenio; Vanel, Daniel [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Bartalena, Tommaso [University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Gerardi, Antonio [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Department of Anatomical Human Science and Physiopathology of the Musculoskeletal System, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, Marco [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Department of Pathological Anatomy, Bologna (Italy); Staals, Eric Lodwijk; Errani, Costantino; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Toscano, Angelo; Mercuri, Mario [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, V Division of Musculoskeletal Tumors, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a lytic benign bone lesion representing about 1% of all primary bone tumors. The lesion causes pain and swelling, which are generally present for less than 3 months. From April 2003 to April 2008 36 patients affected by aneurysmal bone cysts were treated by selective arterial embolization with N-2-butyl cyanoacrylate. The study population comprised 20 male and 16 female patients with an age range of 3.3-60.8 years. Nine lesions were localized in the appendicular skeleton (1 in the upper and 8 in the lower limb), 4 in the thoracic cage (1 rib lesion and 3 scapular lesions), 17 in the pelvis and 6 in the spine (1 thoracic and 5 sacral localizations). A total of 55 embolizations were performed: in 22 cases (61%) only one embolization was needed, whilst two embolizations were necessary in 9 cases (25%) and 3 in the remaining 5 patients (14%). The treatment was effective in 32 patients (94%): follow-up was 0.9-5 years. In one patient, previously surgically treated, only the cyanoacrylate embolization turned out to be useful for healing the lesion. Another 7 patients underwent surgery during the study period. In the 55 procedures we performed we had 3 complications (5%): 2 cases of skin necrosis and 1 of transient paresis. Arterial embolization with cyanoacrylate may be the treatment of choice for aneurysmal bone cysts. Embolization is a less invasive, lower cost, simpler procedure than surgery and is easily repeatable. (orig.)

  3. An evidence-based review of botulinum toxin (Botox) applications in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Ricardo; Garas, George; Silva, Sanjeev; Stamatoglou, Constantine; Chatrath, Paul; Patel, Kalpesh

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It works by blocking the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates leading to inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. Botox is best known for its beneficial role in facial aesthetics but recent literature has highlighted its usage in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. This article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the head and neck. A literature review was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline and EMBASE databases limited to English Language articles published from 1980 to 2012. The findings suggest that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, essential voice tremor, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics, trigeminal neuralgia, dysphagia and post-laryngectomy oesophageal speech. For stuttering, ‘first bite syndrome’, facial nerve paresis, Frey's syndrome, oromandibular dystonia and palatal/stapedial myoclonus the evidence is level 4. Thus, the literature highlights a therapeutic role for Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence). With ongoing research, the spectrum of clinical applications and number of people receiving Botox will no doubt increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’. PMID:23476731

  4. VISUAL PERCEPTION OF THE CHILDREN WITH PLEXUS BRACHIALIS DAMAGE – ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT

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    Dragana M. KLJAJIKJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal communication, psychosocial and mental development of personality and its all other functions take place through the motor control. The most common neurological syndrome is a type of peripheral paresis/paralysis of plexus bracialis, which in most cases occurs at birth and significantly compromises the growth and development of the upper extremities and affects the psychomotor performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of visual perception in children with lesion of plexus brachialis and the effect of the somatopedic treatment over the level of increase of the visual perception. The study sample was consisted of 60 preschool children accommodated at the Rehabilitation Centre “Dr. Miroslav Zotović” in Belgrade (experimental group and examiners that followed regular checkups and had discontinuity in their therapy (control group. For the research purposes, we used The Test for Visual Perception Assessment. By analyzing the results, we concluded that in both, in the first and the second measuring there was a statistically significant correlation between the experimental and the control groups (I measuring: p<0.001, r = 0.408; II measuring: p <0.001, r = 0.593.

  5. Primary extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with AL amyloidosis in cerebral parenchyma in an immunocompetent patient

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    Tadashi Terada, M.D., Ph.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein reported is an extremely rare case of primary MALT lymphoma of cerebral parenchyma. A 79-year-old man presented with paresis. Imaging modalities identified a tumor measuring 3 cm in diameter in right cerebral parenchyma. An operation completely resected the tumor. Macroscopically, the tumor was well defined, but showed mild infiltrative features. Histologically, the tumor showed proliferation of small atypical lymphocytes separated by fibrous septae with AL amyloid depositions. No apparent plasma cell differentiation was seen. The tumor cells showed monotonous appearances with hyperchromatic nuclei but without nucleoli and nuclear indentations. Immunoblastic cells were scattered. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for vimentin, CD45, CD20, CD79α, bcl-2, CD3 (focal, CD45RO (focal, CD5 (focal, CD10, CD23, bcl-6, CD138, p53, and Ki-67 (labeling = 27%. The immunoblastic cells were positive for CD30. The lymphoid cells were negative for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-related molecules of EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1 and EBV early RNAs (EBER. They were also negative for cytokeratins AE 1/3 and CAM5.2, cyclin D1, CD34, GFAP, α-smooth muscle actin, and S100 protein. Because of the heterogeneity of tumor cells and positive AL amyloid deposition, the author diagnosed it as primary MALT lymphoma. The patient is now free from tumors. Differential diagnosis was discussed.

  6. The therapeutic usage of botulinum toxin (Botox in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions – An evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Habib Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (Botox is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It blocks the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates resulting in inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. The efficacy of Botox in facial aesthetics is well established; however, recent literature has highlighted its utilization in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. The present article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the non-cosmetic head and neck conditions. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane databases limited to English Language articles published from January 1980 to December 2014. The findings showed that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics and trigeminal. For stuttering, facial nerve paresis, Frey’s syndrome and oromandibular dystonia the evidence is level 4. Thus, there is compelling evidence in the published literature to demonstrate the beneficial role of Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence. With more and more research, the range of clinical applications and number of individuals getting Botox will doubtlessly increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’.

  7. [Pyramidal syndrome in lateral amyotrophic sclerosis: clinico-morphological analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, L S; Zavalishin, I A; Gulevskaia, T S

    2003-01-01

    Retrospective clinical analysis with a special focus on pyramidal syndrome expression in the disease course as well as morphological study of brain and spinal structures in all levels of cortical-spinal projection (from brain motor cortex to spinal lumbar segments) have been conducted for 11 section cases of lateral amyotrophic sclerosis (LAS), sporadic type. Two groups of patients were studied: with pronounced pyramidal syndrome (spasticity, hyperreflexia, etc)--7 cases and with some signs of pyramidal deficiency (anisoreflexia, stability of peritoneal reflexes)--4 cases. Pyramidal syndrome in LAS is considered as an emergence of current neurodegenerative process, embracing a significant part of upper motor neurons of both precentral convolution and its axons along the whole length of cerebrospinal axis in the form of cytoplasmic inclusions and axonal spheroids. A presence of pathomorphological changes in other upper segmental structures of motor control reveals their role in pyramidal deficiency. Comparative analysis showed that expression of pyramidal syndrome signs and its correlation to atrophic paresis appearances is specifically determined by the severity of upper and lower motor neurons lesions. With regard to morphological changes in CNS structures, the peculiarities of some pyramidal syndrome appearances in LAS are analyzed.

  8. A simple behavioral test for locomotor function after brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuse, Masanao; Yaguchi, Masae; Ohta, Shigeki; Kawase, Takeshi; Toda, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    To establish a simple and reliable test for assessing locomotor function in mice with brain injury, we developed a new method, the rotarod slip test, in which the number of slips of the paralytic hind limb from a rotarod is counted. Brain injuries of different severity were created in adult C57BL/6 mice, by inflicting 1-point, 2-point and 4-point cryo-injuries. These mice were subjected to the rotarod slip test, the accelerating rotarod test and the elevated body swing test (EBST). Histological analyses were performed to assess the severity of the brain damage. Significant and consistent correlations between test scores and severity were observed for the rotarod slip test and the EBST. Only the rotarod slip test detected the mild hindlimb paresis in the acute and sub-acute phase after injury. Our results suggest that the rotarod slip test is the most sensitive and reliable method for assessing locomotor function after brain damage in mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trombose séptica de seios cavernosos, transverso e sigmóide e de veia jugular, associada à meningite, secundária a furúnculo nasal: Relato de Caso Septic thrombosis of cavernous, transverse, sigmoid sinuses and jugular vein, associated with meningitis, secondary to nasal furuncle: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Utida

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem um caso de furúnculo nasal que evoluiu com trombose séptica de seio cavernoso, bilateral e assimétrica, e de seios transverso e sigmóide e de veia jugular interna a esquerda, associada à meningite bacteriana, em um paciente previamente hígido. Apesar da trombose séptica extensa de seios venosos, o paciente apresentou boa evolução, após tratamento clínico agressivo com antibióticos, corticosteróides e anticoagulantes. Porém, manteve como seqüela: paresia de VI nervo à esquerda e lesão parcial de nervo óptico homolateral.The authors report a case of nasal furuncle that progressed to septic bilateral and asymmetric thrombosis of cavernous, transverse, sigmoid sinus and internal jugular vein, associated with bacterial meningitis, in a previously healthy patient. In spite of the extensive thrombosis, the patient presented a good evolution, after an aggressive clinical treatment with antibiotics, corticosteroids and anticoagulants. However, there remained paresis of the VI nerve on the left and partial lesion of the homolateral optic nerve.

  10. Blastomycosis in nondomestic felids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Timothy N; Clyde, Victoria L; Munson, Linda; Ramsay, Edward C

    2003-09-01

    Blastomycosis was diagnosed in six nondomestic felids from eastern Tennessee, including two Asian lions (Panthera leo persicus), one African lion (Panthera leo), one Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris), one cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), and one snow leopard (Panthera uncia). Clinical signs included lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, dyspnea, sneezing. ataxia, and paresis. Variable nonspecific changes included leukocytosis, monocytosis, moderate left shift of neutrophils, moderate hypercalcemia, hyperproteinemia, and hyperglobulinemia. Thoracic radiographs revealed interstitial and alveolar changes, consolidation or collapse of a lung lobe, bullae formation, and a pulmonary mass. Agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) serology for Blastomyces dermatitidis was performed in five felids and was positive in three. The tiger had cerebral blastomycosis and was positive for AGID serologic tests of both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. One percutaneous lung aspirate in the snow leopard and one bronchial aspirate in an Asian lion demonstrated B. dermatitidis organisms. whereas tracheal wash samples and a nasal discharge were nondiagnostic in others. Treatment with itraconazole was attempted in four cats. The tiger improved before euthanasia, whereas the others did not survive beyond initial treatments. In four felids, B. dermatitidis was found in the lungs and tracheobronchial lymph nodes associated with a florid pyogranulomatous reaction; the tiger had a pyogranulomatous encephalomyelitis, and the cheetah had a single pulmonary granuloma. Thoracic radiography, cytologic examination of lung lesion aspirates, and B. dermatitidis AGID serology should be performed on clinically ill zoo felids in endemic areas to rule out blastomycosis.

  11. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  12. Description of two new species of Hisonotus Eigenmann & Eigenmann, 1889 (Ostariophysi, Loricariidae from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin, Brazil

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    Fábio Roxo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Hisonotus are described from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin in Brazil. The most remarkable features of the new species are the odontodes forming longitudinally aligned rows (one odontode after the other, but not necessarily forming parallel series on the head and trunk (vs. odontodes not forming longitudinally aligned rows, a pair of rostral plates at the tip of the snout (vs. a single rostral plate, the functional v-shaped spinelet (vs. spinelet non-functional, square-shaped, or absent. These features suggest close phylogenetic relationships with Hisonotus bockmanni, H. insperatus, H. luteofrenatus and H. piracanjuba. Additionally, both new species are distinguished from their congeners by characters related to head length and depth, orbital diameter, suborbital depth, caudal peduncle depth, pectoral-fin spine length, snout length and counts of teeth. Hisonotus paresi sp. n. further differs from its congeners bycontrasting dark geometric spots on the anterodorsal region of the body, a character lacking in H.oliveirai sp. n. The variation in number and shape of the rostral plate, posterior rostrum plates, infraorbitals and the preopercle in both new species and in H. insperatus are discussed.

  13. Treatment-related fluctuations in guillain barre syndrome and the conundrum of additional cycles of plasmapheresis

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    Subasree Ramakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS, worsening of weakness or disability after initial period of recovery or stabilization is described as treatment-related fluctuations (TRF. Aim: This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of six patients with GBS and TRF. Patients and Methods: Six patients with GBS fulfilling NINCDS criteria, evaluated at a tertiary care university hospital during 2008–2017, were diagnosed to have TRF. They form the basis of this report. Results: All patients were men and their mean age was 40 years. At presentation, mean duration of illness was 15 days; the illness had plateaued in three and progressive in other three patients. Two of the four patients had variant GBS. Initially, five patients were treated with large volume plasmapheresis (LVPP and one patient with methyl prednisolone. At 17–28 days after disease onset, three patients developed new neurologic deficits (bilateral facial paresis in two; paralytic ileus in one. Other three patients with worsening of limb weakness (medical research council sum score of >5 and disability (Hughes disability grade by ≥1 fulfilled Kleyweg's criteria for TRF. All the six patients were treated with the completion of five cycles or additional cycles of LVPP. Conclusion: Awareness about TRF is essential for correct diagnosis and management of patients with GBS.

  14. Head and Arm Tremor in X-linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

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    Irene Aicua

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: X‐linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a rare adult‐onset neuronopathy. Although tremor is known to occur in this disease, the number of reported cases of SBMA with tremor is rare, and the number with videotaped documentation is exceedingly rare. Our aim was to describe/document the characteristic signs of tremor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.Case Report: We report a case of a 58‐year‐old male with a positive family history of tremor. On examination, the patient had jaw and hand tremors but he also exhibited gynecomastia, progressive bulbar paresis, and wasting and weakness primarily in the proximal limb muscles. The laboratory tests revealed an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Genetic testing was positive for X‐SBMA, with 42 CAG repeats.Discussion: Essential tremor is one of the most common movement disorders, yet it is important for clinicians to be aware of the presence of other distinguishing features that point to alternative diagnoses. The presence of action tremor associated with muscle atrophy and gynecomastia should lead to a suspicion of SBMA.

  15. Neurologic abnormalities as the predominant signs of neoplasia of the nasal cavity in dogs and cats: seven cases (1973-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.O.; Turrel, J.M.; Bailey, C.S.; Cain, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Neurologic abnormalities were the predominant historic and physical findings in 5 dogs and 2 cats with primary nasal cavity tumors that had invaded the cranial vault. Seizures, behavior changes, and obtundation were the most common signs. Other neurologic signs included paresis, ataxia, circling, visual deficit, and proprioceptive deficit. Although 1 dog and 2 cats had historic findings of mild respiratory disease, no physical abnormalities related to the respiratory tract were found in any of the 7 animals. Nasal cavity neoplasia was suggested by radiographic and computed tomographic studies and was confirmed histopathologically in each case. The nasal tumor types in the 5 dogs were epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), adenocarcinoma (n = 2), solid carcinoma (n = 1), and anaplastic chondrosarcoma (n = 1). An esthesioneuroblastoma was found in each cat. Radiation therapy was effective for 3 months in palliating the clinical signs in the 2 dogs in which it was used. Neoplasia of the nasal cavity should be considered in the differential diagnosis for animals with neurologic signs suggestive of cerebral disorders

  16. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic Schwannoma. Early effects and preservation of hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masaru; Ohye, Chihiro; Hirato, Junko [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Shibazaki, Tohru; Andou, Yoshitaka

    1995-10-01

    The effects of relatively low dose gamma knife irradiation on acoustic Schwannoma were evaluated. The signal intensity change and tumor shrinkage on magnetic resonance (MR) images, change in hearing, and complications in 28 patients (mean age 47.0{+-}13.6 yrs) were studied. Three patients had bilateral tumors. Six were already deaf when treated. The maximum tumor diameter was 35 mm. The mean dose delivered to the tumor was 12.1{+-}1.6 Gy at the periphery, and 25.2{+-}4.3 Gy at the center. The mean follow-up time was 16 months and the longest 24 months. Lowering of the MR signal intensity in the tumor center appeared after 3 months at earliest but generally after 6 months. Signs of tumor shrinkage appeared within 12 months on average. Cyst in the tumor enlarged rapidly after treatment in two patients. The percentage of hearing preservation was 85% (17/20) at 3 months, 80% (16/20) at 6 months, 72% (13/18) at 9 months, 75% (12/16) at 12 months, 67% (8/12) at 15 months, 60% (6/10) at 18 months, and 50% (2/4) at 24 months. Subtle changes in hearing were detected by speech tone audiometry. Temporary facial numbness and weakness was seen in one patient each. No patient had lower cranial nerve paresis. Relatively low dose gamma knife radiosurgery is effective in suppressing growth of acoustic Schwannoma with preservation of hearing. (author).

  17. A Rare Pontine Neuro-ophthalmic Syndrome: Eight-and-a-Half Syndrome

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    Esra Eruyar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One-and-a half syndrome is seen in paramedian pontine lesions, and may also co-exist with cranial nerve paralysis. This clinical situation is called eight-and-a-half syndrome when facial nerve paralysis also accompanies this manifestation. A man aged 38 years was admitted with symptoms of sudden-onset binocular diplopia and dizziness. The patient had no known co-morbidities. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a small-sized infarct in the left paramedian pontine tegmentum posterior area. In his neuro-ophthalmologic examination, total paresis of left eye horizontal movements, mild lateral deviation, and monocular nystagmus during abduction of the right eye were observed. The patient also had peripheral facial paralysis on the left side; therefore, no signs of motor deficit of his extremities were examined. Eight-and-a-half syndrome is a rare disorder that is seen in localized-small pons lesions, mostly accompanied by infarcts. This clinical manifestation is called eight-and-a-half syndrome and arises within lesions in both the parapontine reticular formation and the medial longitudinal fasciculus in the inferior pons tegmentum where horizontal eye movements are controlled, and facial axons adjacent to the nucleus of the sixth nerve. We wanted to present this case to emphasize this rare situation

  18. [Two horses with neurological symptoms: could this be equine botulism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, H I J; de Bruijn, C M; Picavet, M T J E; Prins, B; Parmentier, D; de Zwart, G M A M; Dijkstra, Y E; van Zijderveld, F G

    2009-10-01

    Symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of equine botulism are discussed by the presentation of two detailed reports of horses with neurological symptoms and the results of laboratory investigations over the period 2003-2008 in the Netherlands. In addition a brief summary of the available literature is presented. Prevailing symptoms of botulism in horses include paralysis of the tongue, salvation, dysphagia and paresis and paralysis of the skeletal muscles, as well as signs of colic. Symptoms and prognosis vary with the amount of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) involved. For early clinical diagnosis of botulism thorough investigation of the facial nerves is important, for instance by the use of the 'Tongue Stress Test'. Laboratory results often remain negative, probably due to the sampling time, the high sensitivity of horses for botulinum neurotoxin or treatment with antitoxins. Most clinical cases in horses are caused by botulinum neurotoxin B (BoNT/B). For therapy to be successful antiserum needs to be administered in the earliest possible stage of the disease and this should be supported by symptomatic therapy. Botulism is a feed-related intoxication caused by either carcasses in the roughage or BoNT/B production after poor conservation of grass silage. This is the main source of botulism in horses due to the popularity of individually packed grass silage as feed for horses. As long as no vaccine is available in the Netherlands quality control of silage and haylage is strictly recommended in order to reduce the risk of botulism in horses.

  19. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  20. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic Schwannoma. Early effects and preservation of hearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masaru; Ohye, Chihiro; Hirato, Junko; Shibazaki, Tohru; Andou, Yoshitaka.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of relatively low dose gamma knife irradiation on acoustic Schwannoma were evaluated. The signal intensity change and tumor shrinkage on magnetic resonance (MR) images, change in hearing, and complications in 28 patients (mean age 47.0±13.6 yrs) were studied. Three patients had bilateral tumors. Six were already deaf when treated. The maximum tumor diameter was 35 mm. The mean dose delivered to the tumor was 12.1±1.6 Gy at the periphery, and 25.2±4.3 Gy at the center. The mean follow-up time was 16 months and the longest 24 months. Lowering of the MR signal intensity in the tumor center appeared after 3 months at earliest but generally after 6 months. Signs of tumor shrinkage appeared within 12 months on average. Cyst in the tumor enlarged rapidly after treatment in two patients. The percentage of hearing preservation was 85% (17/20) at 3 months, 80% (16/20) at 6 months, 72% (13/18) at 9 months, 75% (12/16) at 12 months, 67% (8/12) at 15 months, 60% (6/10) at 18 months, and 50% (2/4) at 24 months. Subtle changes in hearing were detected by speech tone audiometry. Temporary facial numbness and weakness was seen in one patient each. No patient had lower cranial nerve paresis. Relatively low dose gamma knife radiosurgery is effective in suppressing growth of acoustic Schwannoma with preservation of hearing. (author)

  1. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy. (orig.)

  2. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-09-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy.

  3. First report of systemic toxoplasmosis in a New Zealand sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, W D; Michael, S; Fyfe, J; Burrows, E; Hunter, S A; Howe, L

    2017-01-01

    A 1-year-old female New Zealand sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri) was intermittently observed in the Otago region of New Zealand over an 11-month period, always dragging her hind flippers. In December 2012 the sea lion was found dead, after a period of several days being observed to be harassed by male sea lions. At gross postmortem examination the sea lion was in moderate body condition with signs of recent bite wounds and bruising. The lungs were dark and poorly inflated. Histological findings included meningoencephalomyelitis, radiculomyelitis of the cauda equina, myocarditis and myositis. Toxoplasmosis gondii organisms were detected histologically and following immunohistochemistry in the brain, spinal cord, spinal nerves and pelvic muscles. Nested PCR analysis and sequencing confirmed the presence of T. gondii DNA in uterine and lung tissue. A variant type II T. gondii genotype was identified using multilocus PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Systemic toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii involving the spinal cord and nerves was the likely cause of the paresis observed in this sea lion before death. Ultimately, death was attributed to crushing and asphyxiation by a male sea lion, presumably predisposed by impaired mobility. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in a New Zealand sea lion highlights the possibility that this disease could play a role in morbidity and mortality in this endangered species, particularly in the recently established mainland populations that are close to feline sources of T. gondii oocysts.

  4. Intrathoracic versus cervical anastomosis and predictors of anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooszen, J A H; Goense, L; Gisbertz, S S; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R; van Berge Henegouwen, M I

    2018-04-01

    Studies comparing the anastomotic leak rate in patients with an intrathoracic versus a cervical anastomosis after oesophagectomy are equivocal. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcome after oesophagectomy in patients with an intrathoracic or cervical anastomosis, and to identify predictors of anastomotic leakage in a nationwide audit. Between January 2011 and December 2015, all consecutive patients who underwent oesophagectomy for cancer were identified from the Dutch Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Audit. For the comparison between an intrathoracic and cervical anastomosis, propensity score matching was used to adjust for potential confounders. Multivariable logistic regression modelling with backward stepwise selection was used to determine independent predictors of anastomotic leakage. Some 3348 patients were included. After propensity score matching, 654 patients were included in both the cervical and intrathoracic anastomosis groups. An intrathoracic anastomosis was associated with a lower leak rate than a cervical anastomosis (17·0 versus 21·9 per cent; P = 0·025). The percentage of patients with recurrent nerve paresis was also lower (0·6 versus 7·0 per cent; P Risk factors for anastomotic leak were co-morbidities and proximal tumours. © 2018 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

  5. Are there any disturbances in vestibular organ of children and young adults with Type I diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, W; Pospiech, L; Orendorz-Fraczkowska, K; Noczynska, A

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the vestibular organ condition in children and young adults suffering from Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The group examined consisted of 95 children and young adults aged from 6 to 28 years with Type I diabetes diagnosed. The diabetic group was divided into subgroups according to duration of the disease, compensation of the disease, and presence and character of hypoglycaemic incidents, and presence of diabetic complications. The control group consisted of 44 healthy children and young adults aged 6 to 28 years. After collecting detailed medical history in each case an electronystagmographic test was performed using the computed two-canal electronystagmographer. Within the diabetic group 6 patients complained about vertigo and balance disorders. Spontaneous nystagmus occurred in 10 cases, positional one in 21 cases. Impaired optokinesis occurred in 36 cases and impaired eye tracking test in 33 cases. In caloric tests there was partial canal paresis in 4 cases and directional preponderance in 7 cases. Metabolic disturbances present in Type I diabetes cause disturbances in different parts of vestibular organ but mostly in its central part. Comparing disturbances in the vestibular organ with clinical and biochemical parameters characterising diabetes, the range of vestibular organ impairment in diabetes mellitus type 1 seems to depend mainly on the presence and character of hypoglycaemic incidents and the duration of the disease and to some extent on the compensation of diabetes.

  6. Arrest—Individual Treatment with Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jensen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75×10e8 mononuclear cells intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy’s motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words. This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage.

  7. Neuropathic pain in experimental autoimmune neuritis is associated with altered electrophysiological properties of nociceptive DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Omneya; Opitz, Thoralf; Mueller, Marcus; Pitsch, Julika; Becker, Albert; Evert, Bernd Oliver; Beck, Heinz; Jeub, Monika

    2017-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy characterized by rapidly progressive paresis and sensory disturbances. Moderate to severe and often intractable neuropathic pain is a common symptom of GBS, but its underlying mechanisms are unknown. Pathology of GBS is classically attributed to demyelination of large, myelinated peripheral fibers. However, there is increasing evidence that neuropathic pain in GBS is associated with impaired function of small, unmyelinated, nociceptive fibers. We therefore examined the functional properties of small DRG neurons, the somata of nociceptive fibers, in a rat model of GBS (experimental autoimmune neuritis=EAN). EAN rats developed behavioral signs of neuropathic pain. This was accompanied by a significant shortening of action potentials due to a more rapid repolarization and an increase in repetitive firing in a subgroup of capsaicin-responsive DRG neurons. Na + current measurements revealed a significant increase of the fast TTX-sensitive current and a reduction of the persistent TTX-sensitive current component. These changes of Na + currents may account for the significant decrease in AP duration leading to an overall increase in excitability and are therefore possibly directly linked to pathological pain behavior. Thus, like in other animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, Na + channels seem to be crucially involved in the pathology of GBS and may constitute promising targets for pain modulating pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bilateral and unilateral arm training improve motor function through differing neuroplastic mechanisms: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitall, Jill; Waller, Sandy McCombe; Sorkin, John D; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F; Hanley, Daniel F; Goldberg, Andrew P; Luft, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial tests the efficacy of bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC) versus dose-matched therapeutic exercises (DMTEs) on upper-extremity (UE) function in stroke survivors and uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine effects on cortical reorganization. A total of 111 adults with chronic UE paresis were randomized to 6 weeks (3×/week) of BATRAC or DMTE. Primary end points of UE assessments of Fugl-Meyer UE Test (FM) and modified Wolf Motor Function Test Time (WT) were performed 6 weeks prior to and at baseline, after training, and 4 months later. Pretraining and posttraining, fMRI for UE movement was evaluated in 17 BATRAC and 21 DMTE participants. The improvements in UE function (BATRAC: FM Δ = 1.1 + 0.5, P = .03; WT Δ = -2.6 + 0.8, P frontal gyrus (P < .05). Activation change in the latter was correlated with improvement in the WMFT (P = .01). BATRAC is not superior to DMTE, but both rehabilitation programs durably improve motor function for individuals with chronic UE hemiparesis and with varied deficit severity. Adaptations in brain activation are greater after BATRAC than DMTE, suggesting that given similar benefits to motor function, these therapies operate through different mechanisms.

  9. [Mirror movement due to the medial frontal lobe lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N; Kawamura, M; Hirayama, K

    1995-01-01

    We reported a case with acquired mirror movement in upper limbs due to the lesion of right medial frontal lobe including supplementary motor area, and also discussed a possible mechanism underlying it. A 59-year-old right-handed woman developed left hemiparesis caused by cerebral hemorrhage in the right frontoparietal lobe, on April 5, 1981. She had right hemiparesis and right hemianopsia due to cerebral hemorrhage in the left parieto-occipital lobe, 13 days later. As the patient was recovering from paresis, mirror movement appeared on upper limbs. The features of the mirror movement of this case are summarized as follows: (1) it appeared when using both proximal and distal region of upper limbs; (2) it appeared on left upper limb when the patient intended to move right upper limb or on right upper limb when intended to move left upper limb, while it appeared predominantly in the former; and (3) it was more remarkably found in habitual movement using gesture and pantomimic movement for the use of objects, and it was found in lower degree when actual object was used or when the patient tried to imitate the gesture of the examiner. The lesions in MRI were found in medial region of right frontal lobe (supplementary motor area, medial region of motor area, and cingulate gyrus), right medial parietal lobe, posterior region of right occipital lobe, and medial regions of left parietal and occipital lobes. There was no apparent abnormality in corpus callosum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Structural plasticity of remote cortical brain regions is determined by connectivity to the primary lesion in subcortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bastian; Schulz, Robert; Bönstrup, Marlene; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2015-09-01

    Cortical atrophy as demonstrated by measurement of cortical thickness (CT) is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative diseases. In the wake of an acute ischemic stroke, brain architecture undergoes dynamic changes that can be tracked by structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies as soon as 3 months after stroke. In this study, we measured changes of CT in cortical areas connected to subcortical stroke lesions in 12 patients with upper extremity paresis combining white-matter tractography and semi-automatic measurement of CT using the Freesurfer software. Three months after stroke, a significant decrease in CT of -2.6% (median, upper/lower boundary of 95% confidence interval -4.1%/-1.1%) was detected in areas connected to ischemic lesions, whereas CT in unconnected cortical areas remained largely unchanged. A cluster of significant cortical thinning was detected in the superior frontal gyrus of the stroke hemisphere using a surface-based general linear model correcting for multiple comparisons. There was no significant correlation of changes in CT with clinical outcome parameters. Our results show a specific impact of subcortical lesions on distant, yet connected cortical areas explainable by secondary neuro-axonal degeneration of distant areas.

  11. Late radiation effects on hearing, vestibular function, and taste in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesen, Tom B.; Rasmussen, Kjell; Winther, Finn Oe.; Halvorsen, Ulf; Lote, Knut

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate late radiation effects on hearing, vestibular function, and taste after conventional radiotherapy in brain tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Hearing, vestibular function, and taste were assessed in 33 brain tumor patients irradiated unilaterally to the tumor-bearing hemisphere and the temporal bone. Median observation time after completion of radiotherapy was 13 years; the fraction dose was 1.8 Gy, and mean radiation dose was 53.1 Gy. Results: Deep ulceration in the external ear canal and osteoradionecrosis on the irradiated side was seen in three patients. Reduced hearing was found for air and bone conduction of the irradiated side compared to the opposite side (0.25-2 kHz: 6.1 dB, 4 kHz: 10.3 dB, 6 kHz: 15.6 dB, and 8 kHz: 16.5 dB). For bone conduction, the corresponding figures were 0.25-2 kHz: 5.5 dB and 4 kHz: 8.2 dB. Three patients had a canal paresis of the irradiated side, and three patients had affection of the chorda tympani. Conclusion: Irradiation of the temporal bone with doses usually given in the treatment of patients with brain tumors may cause osteoradionecrosis, sensorineural hearing loss, dysfunction of the vestibular inner ear, and loss of taste. Head-and-neck examination should be included in the follow-up of long-term survivors

  12. Vocal Fold Vibration Following Surgical Intervention in Three Vocal Pathologies: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenli; Woo, Peak; Murry, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    High-speed videoendoscopy captures the cycle-to-cycle vibratory motion of each individual vocal fold in normal and severely disordered phonation. Therefore, it provides a direct method to examine the specific vibratory changes following vocal fold surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the vocal fold vibratory pattern changes in the surgically treated pathologic vocal fold and the contralateral vocal fold in three vocal pathologies: vocal polyp (n = 3), paresis or paralysis (n = 3), and scar (n = 3). Digital kymography was used to extract high-speed kymographic vocal fold images at the mid-membranous region of the vocal fold. Spectral analysis was subsequently applied to the digital kymography to quantify the cycle-to-cycle movements of each vocal fold, expressed as a spectrum. Surgical modification resulted in significantly improved spectral power of the treated pathologic vocal fold. Furthermore, the contralateral vocal fold also presented with improved spectral power irrespective of vocal pathology. In comparison with normal vocal fold spectrum, postsurgical vocal fold vibrations continued to demonstrate decreased vibratory amplitude in both vocal folds. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. IMPAIRED MOBILITY OF VOCAL FOLDS – DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES AND TREATMENT, part 2

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    Karlo Pintarić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paresis or paralysis of one or both vocal cords affects phonation, swallowing and breathing. The major cause for reduced mobility or even immobility is innervation damage, less often mechanical disorder.The main procedures in the diagnostics of disordered vocal fold mobility are indirect laryngoscopy and videoendostroboscopy. Different imaging techniques (especially computerized tomography are of great value in searching for a cause of the impaired mobility.In unilateral vocal fold immobility, the treatment is focused on the improvement of voice quality and the prevention of aspiration during swallowing. In bilateral paralysis, it is crucial to find a balance between effective breathing and sufficient voice quality. The treatment of unilateral paralysis is started with voice therapy and swallowing rehabilitation. If these procedures are not enough surgical treatment for the medialization of the paralyzed vocal fold is applied. In the case of breathing difficulties in bilateral vocal fold immobility there is a possibility of surgical lateralization of one or both folds or a surgical excision of a part or the entire vocal fold. Surgical reinnervation, functional electrostimulation of certain laryngeal muscles and gene therapy are developing treatment modalities.

  14. PIXE and ICP analysis of chemical elements in the downer cow syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dima, G.; Stihi, C.; Popescu, I. V.; Badica, T.; Olariu, A.; Petre, M.; Jianu, E. D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was the microelemental analysis of blood serum samples collected from healthy and ill cows (downer cow syndrome DCS). The origin of this syndrome is uncertain but the clinical experience denotes that the DCS is advanced by the hypocalcaemic paresis of parturition. The diminution of some nutritive elements from food can be a cause of DCS. The cows are more sensitive to the diminution of P in food in comparison with the diminution of Ca. Another interesting aspect about the origin of DCS is the ratio Ca/P in food. The samples were collected from cows at some animal farms: 20 healthy cows and 12 DCS cows breeds on the same conditions. Concentrations of P, Cl, K, Ca and Fe elements were obtained by using particle induced X - ray emission (PIXE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The mineral concentrations in the serum have values in normal limits for healthy cows even during the winter, when the mineral content of dry food is very poor. On the other hand, we can observe important decreases under the normal limits of the amount of Ca, P and Mg in the blood serum of DCS cows. It is easy to see the tendency of the DCS animals to have hypocalcemia and hypophosphataemia. Those perturbations can be the causes of the installations of the ill cows in the lypostatic and decubital attitudes. (authors)

  15. Isolated laryngeal myasthenia gravis for 26 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Hedayat, Amir; Gagnard, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Laryngeal myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare variant of myasthenia gravis. A vast portion of patients with initial laryngeal myasthenia gravis develop involvement of ocular and/or extra-ocular muscles during the years after symptom onset although a minority of laryngeal myasthenia gravis patients continues to have isolated laryngeal muscle involvement for several years. We present a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodic isolated dysphonia (associated with diffuse bilateral vocal cord paresis on laryngoscopy) since the age of 32. Dysphonia became permanent since 6 months. A diagnosis of laryngeal myasthenia gravis was made based on abnormal single-fiber electromyography and spectacular response to pyridostigmine treatment. Repetitive nerve stimulation was normal and anti-acetylcholine receptor and anti-muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were absent. This case shows that laryngeal myasthenia gravis can be isolated during 26 years of follow-up. We propose that even when myasthenia gravis seems unlikely as underlying mechanism of isolated dysphonia (because of lack of antibodies, normal repetitive nerve stimulation, and absence of extra-laryngeal involvement after years of follow-up), single-fiber electromyography should be performed and myasthenia gravis treatment should be tried. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Juvenile myasthenia gravis in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of two consanguine sisters born from consanguinity in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneh, Nidain; Apetse, Kossivi; Diatewa, Bénédicte Marèbe; Domingo, Sidik Abou-Bakr; Agba, Aidé Isabelle; Ayena, Koffi Didier; Balogou, Koffi Agnon; Balo, Komi Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare acquired autoimmune pathology causing neuromuscular transmission impairment. Juvenile onset of myasthenia gravis is often characterized by ocular involvement. We report two cases of ocular juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG) in two siblings. They were two young girls, XA and XB, aged 11 and 9 years, of Malian origin, residing in Togo, born from first-degree of consanguinity presenting to Ophthalmology due to progressive decrease in visual acuity. XA showed visual acuity 8/10 on both eyes while XB showed improvement in visual acuity from 3/10 to 7/10 using a pinhole occluder, suggesting ametropia. XA had a 2-year history of bilateral ptosis lifting the upper eyelid of 7 mm, while XB had a 3-year history of bilateral ptosis with no lifting of the upper eyelid. Ice pack test was strongly positive in both patients. They had Cogan's lid twitch with paresis of the oculomotor nerve without diplopia. The dosage of acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies was normal. The diagnosis of JMG associated with ametropia was suspected. Ametropia was corrected by glasses and a specific treatment with pyridostigmine was initiated, but both patients were lost to follow-up. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis with inaugural ophthalmologic manifestation is rare but it can occur among children living in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies should be conducted to establish the features of this disease.

  17. Schiff-Sherrington syndrome in a horse - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Lima Lhamas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Lhamas C.L., Anjos B.L., Pfingstag K.G., Quevedo L.S. & Duarte C.A. [Schiff-Sherrington syndrome in a horse - Case report.] Síndrome de Schiff-Sherrington em equino - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:163-166, 2015. Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciência Animal, Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Uruguaiana, BR 472, Km 585, Uruguaiana, RS 97500-970, Brasil. E-mail: claudiaduarte@unipampa.edu.br Schiff-Sherrington syndrome clinically corresponds to a manifestation of rigidity extensor or hypertonia of the forelimb and hypotonic paralysis of the hind limbs. It is a common condition in dogs, however, rarely described in large animals. It can be caused by trauma and spinal cord compression conditions. The aim of this study was to describe the case of a two-year-old male horse with Schiff-Sherrington syndrome. The animal was sent with signs of paresis and ataxia of the hind limbs, and during the necropsy, multiple fractures were observed in the 1st and 2nd lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression.

  18. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  19. Isolated Medial Orbital Wall Fracture Associated with Enophthalmos in a Paediatric Patient: An Unusual Presentation

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    Panagiotis Giannakouras

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of isolated medial orbital wall fracture with enophthalmos in a paediatric patient and describe the clinical presentation and findings by means of computed tomography (CT of the head and eyes. Methods: We looked at the patient’s medical and ophthalmologic history, and an ophthalmologic examination and a CT of the head were performed at baseline. Results: A 14-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department of our institution with ecchymosis of his right eyelids secondary to a sport accident. Physical examination revealed a moderate limitation of upgaze without diplopia. CT showed a medial orbital wall fracture without haemorrhage and a gross accumulation of air in the right eyelid with pressure exertion over the right globe and enophthalmos. The patient was treated conservatively with oral antibiotics and steroids showing dramatic improvement within 1 week. Enophthalmos and periorbital emphysema were completely resolved within 3 months after the accident as indicated by CT. Conclusions: We conclude that surgical intervention and intravenous treatment are not warranted in similar cases of medial orbital wall fracture. Medical history, clinical and paraclinical evaluations, and a regular follow-up, including CT, are needed though to avoid complications such as painful abduction, horizontal diplopia, pseudo sixth nerve paresis, or pseudo Duane.

  20. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory Guidelines for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis in Canada

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    Tom Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosyphilis refers to infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum, which may occur at any stage. Neurosyphilis has been categorized in many ways including early and late, asymptomatic versus symptomatic and infectious versus non-infectious. Late neurosyphilis primarily affects the central nervous system parenchyma, and occurs beyond early latent syphilis, years to decades after the initial infection. Associated clinical syndromes include general paresis, tabes dorsalis, vision loss, hearing loss and psychiatric manifestations. Unique algorithms are recommended for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients, as immunocompromised patients may present with serologic and cerebrospinal fluid findings that are different from immunocompetent hosts. Antibody assays include a VDRL assay and the FTA-Abs, while polymerase chain reaction for T. pallidum can be used as direct detection assays for some specimens. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, and identifies two possible algorithms for use with immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts using currently available tests in Canada, along with a review of treatment response and laboratory testing follow-up.

  1. Complex neurological symptoms in bilateral thalamic stroke due to Percheron artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Paola; Manganotti, Paolo; Moretti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant where a single thalamic perforating artery arises from the proximal posterior cerebral artery (P1 segment) between the basilar artery and the posterior communicating artery and supplies the rostral mesencephalon and both paramedian territories of the thalami. Almost one-third of human brains present this variant. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron mostly results in a bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which usually manifests with altered consciousness (including coma), vertical gaze paresis, and cognitive disturbance. The presentation is similar to the "top of the basilar syndrome", and early recognition should be prompted. We describe the case of a young female with this vessel variant who experienced a bilateral thalamic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarcts and a truncated artery of Percheron. Occlusion of the vessel was presumably due to embolism from a patent foramen ovale. Thrombolysis was performed, with incomplete symptom remission, cognitive impairment, and persistence of speech disorders. Early recognition and treatment of posterior circulation strokes is mandatory, and further investigation for underlying stroke etiologies is needed.

  2. Assessment of driving after stroke--a pluridisciplinary task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, A-S; Viitanen, M; Lundberg, C; Johansson, K

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the assessment procedure and identify predictors for the team decision when assessing fitness to drive a car after stroke. The material used was a retrospective data set with 200 stroke clients from Queen Elisabeth's Foundation Mobility Centre at Banstead UK. Fifty-four percent of clients were considered fit to continue driving where 9% could resume driving after car adaptation and training. Important factors for the outcome were vision (acuity and field), neuropsychological functions (divided attention), and track and/or on road test (reaction time, anticipation, speed, and positioning). Cognitive impairment was the main problem in those who failed the driving test and judged not fit for continued driving. Car adaptation, mainly comprising infrared transmitted secondary controls together with automatic transmission was recommended in 35% of the cases. The contribution of different specialist groups appears to be necessary for an effective evaluation, but the assessment procedure can be done more cost-effectively by dividing it into two separate parts and removing certain subtests. The in-car track test is an important part of the assessment procedure with a high face validity and could in many cases make it unnecessary to perform in-traffic tests with unsafe drivers. Car adaptation is often necessary for a client with pronounced hemi-paresis and a full road test can for those only be performed after training the use of car controls.

  3. [Identification of the central sulcus using magnetoencephalography and neuronavigator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, E; Mayanagi, Y; Kaneko, Y

    1993-11-01

    The brain-generated currents that produce potentials measured by the electroencephalogram also produce magnetic fields which can be measured by the magnetoencephalogram (MEG), N 20 compatible evoked field after median nerve stimulation is known to be generated in primary sensory cortex. Using MEG with 37 channel SQUIDs, a current dipole is back traced which corresponds to the sensory cortex. When the dipole is projected onto the MRI of the same patient, the primary sensory cortex is precisely identified in the MRI images. These data were used as the key images for navigator enabling a surgeon identify the central cortex in the surgical field. Seven patients with peri-central mass lesion (3 meningiomas, 1 metastatic tumors, 1 angiomas, 2 gliomas) underwent surgery under MEG-navigator method. In every case, the central sulcus and motor cortex were easily identified on the cortex and the tumor was removed as far as possible preserving the motor strip. There were no postoperative worsening of the motor paresis and no other complications were noticed. The method which combines the MEG functional mapping and navigator was considered to be a powerful tool in surgery of the pericentral mass lesions.

  4. Squint surgery in TED -- hints and fints, or why Graves' patients are difficult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, M

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine ophthalmopathy is the most common cause of acute onset diplopia in middle aged or older individuals. Ocular muscle involvement is characterized by myositis followed by fibrosis: this causes a stiffness and a shortening of the muscles involved with restriction of ocular movements: so the impairment of rotation is due to a mechanical obstacle and not to a paresis. Prisms are rarely useful in relieving diplopia and the majority of symptomatic patients need squint surgery. Timing of surgery is very important and two considerations are to be kept in mind: first, the systemic disease must be in remission and the ocular deviation must be stable for at least six months; second, if more than one surgical procedure is needed for the ophthalmopathy, muscle surgery has its right place after orbital surgery and before lid surgery. Obviously dealing with restrictive disorders, surgery is based on weakening procedures of the affected muscles: identifying the affected muscles is of crucial importance and may be sometime difficult for the presence of misleading signs; great advances have been made in surgical technique with the development of adjustable sutures and of topical anesthesia. Prognosis is usually good with more than 80% of patients recovering a useful field of binocular single vision with one procedure and more than 90% with two or more procedures.

  5. Effects of Sport Climbing on Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Steimer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS with different types of disease courses (relapsing-remitting, secondary-progressive, primary progressive that leads to physical as well as mental disability. The symptoms comprise paresis or/and paralysis, ataxia, bladder dysfunction, visual problems as well as effects on cognition. There is limited data regarding the possible effects of sport climbing respectively therapeutic climbing on patients with MS. Sport climbing offers many potentially beneficial effects for patients with MS since there are effects on coordination, muscular strength, and cognition to name the most relevant ones. Also, disease models in rodents point toward such positive outcomes of climbing. Therefore, we assessed the currently available research literature on general effects of physical exercise, impact of climbing on body and mind and therapeutic climbing for prevention or therapy for the treatment of MS. The sparse published controlled trials that investigated this sport activity on different groups of patients with neurological or geriatric diseases grossly differ in study design and outcome parameters. Nevertheless, it appears that climbing offers the opportunity to improve some of the symptoms of patients with MS and can contribute to an enhanced quality of life.

  6. Interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency and stereotaxic brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary study of the interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation (brachytherapy) for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we performed an experiment of interstitial hyperthermia of brain tissue of dogs. Nine afterloading tubes, four for needle electrodes and five for thermisters, were inserted in the brain tissue of dogs. Rise and stability of temperature were ascertained, and clinical safety was confirmed. Thereafter this combined therapy was applied on seven cases, in which three were malignant gliomas and four were metastatic tumors. Through the guide tubes, 192 Ir thin wires were implanted stereotaxically, and interstitial irradiation was carried out. After removal of 192 Ir wires, needle electrodes were inserted through the same tubes, and also a thermister was guided at the center of electrodes. And interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency was carried out. The results of the treatment were evaluated with CT scan based on criteria of the Japan Neurological Society. In cases of malignant gliomas, 2 PRs (partial remission), and 1 NC (no change) were obtained. In cases of metastatic tumors, 1 CR (complete remission), 2 PRs, 1 NC were obtaind. In cases of NCs, progression of tumors have been suppressed for 10 and 17 months, and still alive. As complication, transient worsening of neurological symptoms were observed in four cases (increased paresis: two cases, nausea and vomiting: two cases). The author have had an impression that interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation might become an effective means of treatment of brain tumors. (author)

  7. Rare neonatal diabetes insipidus and associated late risks: Case report

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    Rivas-Crespo Maximiliano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cases of neonatal central diabetes insipidus are caused by an injury, which often results in other handicaps in the patient. The infant’s prognosis will be determined by his or her own early age and disability as well as by the physician’s skill. However, the rarity of this condition prevents the acquisition of personal experience dealing with it. Case Presentation A neonatal hemorrhagic stroke, caused by an aortic coarctation, caused right lower limb paresis, swallowing disability, and central diabetes insipidus in a term infant. The scant oral intake, as a consequence of his disability, caused progressive undernutrition which closed a vicious circle, delaying his development and his ability to overcome the swallowing handicap. On the other hand, nasal desmopressin absorption was blocked by several common colds, resulting in brain bleeding because of severe dehydration. This even greater brain damage hampered the improvement of swallowing, closing a second harmful circle. Moreover, a devastating central myelinolysis with quadriplegia, caused by an uncontrolled intravenous infusion, consummated a pernicious sequence, possibly unreported. Conclusions The child’s overall development advanced rapidly when his nutrition was improved by gastrostomy: This was a key effect of nutrition on his highly sensitive neurodevelopment. Besides, this case shows potential risks related to intranasal desmopressin treatment in young children.

  8. A Quick Phenotypic Neurological Scoring System for Evaluating Disease Progression in the SOD1-G93A Mouse Model of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzipetros, Theo; Kidd, Joshua D; Moreno, Andy J; Thompson, Kenneth; Gill, Alan; Vieira, Fernando G

    2015-10-06

    The SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse is the most widely used animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At ALS TDI we developed a phenotypic screening protocol, demonstrated in video herein, which reliably assesses the neuromuscular function of SOD1-G93A mice in a quick manner. This protocol encompasses a simple neurological scoring system (NeuroScore) designed to assess hindlimb function. NeuroScore is focused on hindlimb function because hindlimb deficits are the earliest reported neurological sign of disease in SOD1-G93A mice. The protocol developed by ALS TDI provides an unbiased assessment of onset of paresis (slight or partial paralysis), progression and severity of paralysis and it is sensitive enough to identify drug-induced changes in disease progression. In this report, the combination of a detailed manuscript with video minimizes scoring ambiguities and inter-experimenter variability thus allowing for the protocol to be adopted by other laboratories and enabling comparisons between studies taking place at different settings. We believe that this video protocol can serve as an excellent training tool for present and future ALS researchers.

  9. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion blocks combined with pharmacological and occupational therapy in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS): a pilot case series ad interim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Karin; Feldmann, Robert E; Brascher, Anne-Kathrin; Benrath, Justus

    2014-12-01

    This preliminary and retrospective pilot case series examines a treatment concept consisting of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs) combined with pharmacological and occupational therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) of the hand. Efficacy of combined treatment concepts and safety of ultrasound-guided SGB have not been sufficiently investigated yet. A total number of 156 blocks were evaluated in 16 patients with CRPS in a retrospective analysis. All patients received pharmacotherapy and a standard regimen of occupational therapy offered simultaneously to the SGBs. Changes in both spontaneous and evoked pain levels were assessed by numerical pain rating score before and after the last blockade of a series. Side effects were documented. The overall mean pain reduction was 63.2% regarding spontaneous and 45.3% regarding evoked pain. Mild complications, such as hoarseness or dysphagia, occurred in 13.5% of the blocks (21 SGBs). Serious complications, such as plexus paresis or accidental puncture of vessels or other structures, did not occur. Time between symptom onset and start of treatment did not affect the extent of pain reduction. The combination of ultrasound-guided SGB and simultaneous pharmacological and occupational therapy showed encouraging treatment results under conditions of this pilot case series. Assessment of efficacy of this combined treatment concept and safety of ultrasound-guided SGB require further prospective clinical studies with larger number of participants. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [High voltage accidents, characteristics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsbergen-Krüger, S; Pitzler, D; Partecke, B D

    1995-04-01

    High-voltage injuries cause localised entrance and exit burns, extensive arc, flame and flash burns and, even more dangerous, necrosis of the underlying muscles on the pathway of the current through the body. Therefore it should be recognized that the ensuing disease is more like a crush injury than a thermal burn. The extent of injury cannot be judged by the percentage and depth of the skin burn. Diagnostic fasciotomies, radical debridement, and in many cases early amputation are necessary to prevent life-threatening complications. Over a period of 10 years, 43 patients with high-voltage injuries have been treated at the Hamburg Burn Center, 36 of them in primary care. Common causes of injury were accidents in railway areas (28%), using portable aluminium ladders near overhead power lines (9.3%), and working on electrical equipment (30.2%). Six of the primary care patients died (16.6%), and 34.9% had an amputation of one or more extremities. Nearly all patients underwent several debridement and split-skin graft procedures. In 30% of cases additional free and pedicled flaps were needed to cover soft tissue defects. Ten patients (23.3%) sustained fractures and other injuries from falls, seven (16.3%) of them severe polytrauma. Initial cardiac arrhythmics were diagnosed in 16.6% of the primarily treated patients. Thirty per cent of our patients had neurological complications such as peripheral paresis, tetraplegia and paraplegia, 20.7% of these caused solely by the electric current.

  11. [Impact of a simultaneous application of anionic salts and rumen buffer on acid-base-balance and mineral metabolism in dairy cows].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfert, Carl-Christian; Hauser, Simone; Löptien, Antje; Montag, Nicole; Passmann, Mareike; Baumgartner, Walter; Staufenbiel, Rudolf

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the influence of simultaneous application of anionic salts (AS) and rumen buffer (RB) on the metabolism of dairy cows was examined. Eleven rumen fistulated, non-pregnant and non-lactating dairy cows received equal amounts of one AS (CaCl2 or CaSO4) and one RB (NaHCO3 or KHCO3) via rumen cannula during feeding time over a period of eight days. Before the first application of AS and RB and on day eight of the treatment period, blood, urine and rumen fluid samples were taken. The following parameters were measured: whole blood: pH, base excess, bicarbonate; serum: sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium; urine: pH, net acid base excretion, sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium; rumen fluid: pH. The changes of each parameter were compared via ANOVA. The changes in acid-base balance on day eight were very small, although significant. But p-values showed that the statistical evidence was low. The most changes occurred when NaHCO3 was fed in combination with one of the AS used. In this case a small acidogenic load was seen in blood (p buffer must not be fed, if anionic salts are given for prevention of parturient paresis.

  12. Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.; Alvarez-Pasquin, Marie-José; Bijl, Marc; Franco, Elisabetta; Gaillat, Jacques; Clara, João G.; Labetoulle, Marc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Naldi, Luigi; Sanmarti, Luis S.; Weinke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is primarily a disease of nerve tissue but the acute and longer-term manifestations require multidisciplinary knowledge and involvement in their management. Complications may be dermatological (e.g. secondary bacterial infection), neurological (e.g. long-term pain, segmental paresis, stroke), ophthalmological (e.g. keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma) or visceral (e.g. pneumonia, hepatitis). The age-related increased incidence of HZ and its complications is thought to be a result of the decline in cell-mediated immunity (immunosenescence), higher incidence of comorbidities with age and social-environmental changes. Individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of disease or therapy are also at increased risk, independent of age. HZ and its complications (particularly postherpetic neuralgia) create a significant burden for the patient, carers, healthcare systems and employers. Prevention and treatment of HZ complications remain a therapeutic challenge despite recent advances. This is an overview of the multidisciplinary implications and management of HZ in which the potential contribution of vaccination to reducing the incidence HZ and its complications are also discussed. PMID:26478818

  13. A pilot randomized controlled trial of D-cycloserine and distributed practice as adjuvants to constraint-induced movement therapy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Stephen E; Davis, Sandra E; Wu, Samuel S; Dai, Yunfeng; Richards, Lorie G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Phase III trials of rehabilitation of paresis after stroke have proven the effectiveness of intensive and extended task practice, but they have also shown that many patients do not qualify, because of severity of impairment, and that many of those who are treated are left with clinically significant deficits. Objective. To test the value of 2 potential adjuvants to normal learning processes engaged in constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT): greater distribution of treatment over time and the coadministration of d-cycloserine, a competitive agonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor. Methods. A prospective randomized single-blind parallel-group trial of more versus less condensed therapy (2 vs 10 weeks) and d-cycloserine (50 mg) each treatment day versus placebo (in a 2 × 2 design), as potential adjuvants to 60 hours of CIMT. Results. Twenty-four participants entered the study, and 22 completed it and were assessed at the completion of treatment and 3 months later. Neither greater distribution of treatment nor treatment with d-cycloserine significantly augmented retention of gains achieved with CIMT. Conclusions. Greater distribution of practice and treatment with d-cycloserine do not appear to augment retention of gains achieved with CIMT. However, concentration of CIMT over 2 weeks ("massed practice") appears to confer no advantage either. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. [Neurophysiological identification of the cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Ogurtsova, A A; Moshchev, D A; Lubnin, A Yu; Andreev, D N; Koval', K V; Chernov, I V

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative identification of the cranial nerves is a useful technique in removal of skull base tumors through the endoscopic endonasal approach. Searching through the scientific literature found one pilot study on the use of triggered electromyography (t-EMG) for identification of the VIth nerve in endonasal endoscopic surgery of skull base tumors (D. San-Juan, et al, 2014). The study objective was to prevent iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves without reducing the completeness of tumor tissue resection. In 2014, 5 patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach. Surgeries were performed for large skull base chordomas (2 cases) and trigeminal nerve neurinomas located in the cavernous sinus (3). Intraoperatively, identification of the cranial nerves was performed by triggered electromyography using a bipolar electrode (except 1 case of chordoma where a monopolar electrode was used). Evaluation of the functional activity of the cranial nerves was carried out both preoperatively and postoperatively. Tumor resection was total in 4 out of 5 cases and subtotal (chordoma) in 1 case. Intraoperatively, the IIIrd (2 patients), Vth (2), and VIth (4) cranial nerves were identified. No deterioration in the function of the intraoperatively identified nerves was observed in the postoperative period. In one case, no responses from the VIth nerve on the right (in the cavernous sinus region) were intraoperatively obtained, and deep paresis (up to plegia) of the nerve-innervated muscles developed in the postoperative period. The nerve function was not impaired before surgery. The t-EMG technique is promising and requires further research.

  15. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  16. Medullary Venous Hypertension Secondary to a Petrous Apex Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Murphy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dural arteriovenous fistulae (dAVF are common intracranial vascular lesions typically becoming symptomatic with cortical venous hypertension and possible hemorrhage. Here, we present a case illustration of a petrous apex dAVF with marked medullary venous hypertension and a unique clinical presentation. Methods: Case report. Results: A 72-year-old female, whose clinical progression was significant for altered mental status and progressive weakness, presented with diplopia, right leg paresis, and ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema involving the medulla. On digital subtraction cerebral angiogram, the patient was found to have a petrous apex dAVF, Cognard type IV. Following treatment with Onyx embolization, her symptoms rapidly improved, with complete resolution of diplopia and drastic improvement of her ataxia. Conclusion: The importance of this case is in the presentation and deterioration of the clinical exam, resembling an acute ischemic event. Further, this case illustrates that dAVF may cause venous hypertension with rapid onset of focal neurologic symptoms not exclusive to cortical locations.

  17. [The mirror neuron system in motor and sensory rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oouchida, Yutaka; Izumi, Shinichi

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of the mirror neuron system has dramatically changed the study of motor control in neuroscience. The mirror neuron system provides a conceptual framework covering the aspects of motor as well as sensory functions in motor control. Previous studies of motor control can be classified as studies of motor or sensory functions, and these two classes of studies appear to have advanced independently. In rehabilitation requiring motor learning, such as relearning movement after limb paresis, however, sensory information of feedback for motor output as well as motor command are essential. During rehabilitation from chronic pain, motor exercise is one of the most effective treatments for pain caused by dysfunction in the sensory system. In rehabilitation where total intervention unifying the motor and sensory aspects of motor control is important, learning through imitation, which is associated with the mirror neuron system can be effective and suitable. In this paper, we introduce the clinical applications of imitated movement in rehabilitation from motor impairment after brain damage and phantom limb pain after limb amputation.

  18. /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath test and pathological digestive transit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, J N; Coutris, G; Charpentier, G; Milhaud, G [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France)

    1982-01-01

    /sup 14/C-glycine glycocholate breath test is elegant, atraumatic and detects bacterial overgrowth in the proximal portion of small intestine. In such cases an early increase of specific radioactivity of CO/sub 2/ occurs in expired air. Ileal bile salts malabsorption can also induce such an increase in principle later. However, a modification of transit (acceleration or paresis) can shift the time of appearance of the physiological /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ peak due to colonic deconjugation of the labelled tracer, leading to a diagnostic error. Microbial overgrowth, gastroparesis, accelerated intestinal transit or malabsorption can complicate diabetes mellitus, especially in the case of diabetic neuropathy. Several of these disorder can coexist. It is possible to detect and quantify all these abnormalities in a single examination by the simultaneous use of labelled glycocholate and sup(99m)Tc DTPA. Oral administration of this mixture allows the measurement of gastric emptying half-time and the scintigraphic visualisation of labelled meal progression. Thus, the association of /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath-test and sup(99m)Tc DTPA digestive transit insures a correct interpretation in case of associated abnormalities.

  19. [Clinical and radiological evolution of a group of untreated acoustic neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts-Alborch, Miguel; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic neuroma is a benign tumour that originates in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve. The main treatment is surgery, but many authors suggest that with elderly patients or in small neuromas we can opt for watchful waiting. This was a retrospective study from 2007 to 2013 that included 27 patients diagnosed of acoustic neuroma that had not been treated due to the size of the tumour, age and comorbidities, or by patient choice. We evaluated overall condition, hearing thresholds, degree of canal paresis and central disorders. After 6 years of follow up, clinical manifestations of 18 patients remained unchanged, 5 patients underwent hearing loss and developed tinnitus, 2 cases had more intense tinnitus and 2 cases had dizziness. The radiological controls by magnetic resonance imaging showed that the initial maximum diameters (5-16mm) increased by 1.7mm on average, with annual growth rates below 0.5mm. In selected cases, such as for small neuromas and in elderly patients, the conservative option of close monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging is an important alternative given that, in our cases, clinical features and radiological image did not suffer major changes. If there were any such changes, therapeutic options could be proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  1. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Akinori [Saitama Medical Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Moroyama, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  2. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  3. Novel mutations in the PRX and the MTMR2 genes are responsible for unusual Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouioua, Sonia; Hamadouche, Tarik; Funalot, Benoit; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Bellatache, Nora; Bouderba, Radia; Grid, Djamel; Assami, Salima; Benhassine, Traki; Levy, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Meriem

    2011-08-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, relatively common in Algeria due to high prevalence of consanguineous marriages, are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. We report on two consanguineous families with demyelinating autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4) associated with novel homozygous mutations in the MTMR2 gene, c.331dupA (p.Arg111LysfsX24) and PRX gene, c.1090C>T (p.Arg364X) respectively, and peculiar clinical phenotypes. The three patients with MTMR2 mutations (CMT4B1 family) had a typical phenotype of severe early onset motor and sensory neuropathy with typical focally folded myelin on nerve biopsy. Associated clinical features included vocal cord paresis, prominent chest deformities and claw hands. Contrasting with the classical presentation of CMT4F (early-onset Dejerine-Sottas phenotype), the four patients with PRX mutations (CMT4F family) had essentially a late age of onset and a protracted and relatively benign evolution, although they presented marked spine deformities. These observations broaden the spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with these two CMT4 forms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution pattern of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamdi, Ibe Michael Onwuzuruike

    2013-09-01

    The pattern of distribution of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs has been published, though scantily, especially in males. We decided to look at our own series, compare and contrast ours with some of those published. We treated 88 locations of this lesion in 68 males. The clinical features were those of lower back pains, with or without radiation into the lower extremities, sensory loss and paresis of the limbs. There was a case of loss of urinary bladder and ano-rectal control. All lesions were confirmed through cauda-equinograms and treated under general anaesthesia in knee-chest position (MECCA position). The patients were followed up for 3-6 months post-operatively. There were 88 locations in 68 males of 21-70 years of age, with 29 prolapses occurring during the age range 31-40 years, while 54 locations were on the left and 48 at L4/5. The procedures were well tolerated by all patients and there were no post-operative complications. This lesion in our series occurred mostly on the left, at the L4/5 level and peaked at 31-40 years age range. The predictability of occurrence of this disease, using side, level and age is still not feasible in males from our series.

  5. Therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildmeister, W.

    1982-01-01

    The etiology of hyperthyroidism is still largely unknown and therefore no causal therapy of this condition is possible. Antithyroid drug treatment is usually carried out with thiocarbamides. When an euthyroid state is achieved synthetic thyroid hormones are added. Pregnancy and iodine contamination (after exposure to contrast medium) require individual treatment. In this paper the advantages, indications and contraindications are discussed as well as supportive drug therapy necessary in specific cases. Radioiodine therapy is reserved for patients over 35 years of age; the individual dose is calculated according to the size of the thyroid gland and the iodine uptake. Disadvantageous is the late onset of therapeutic efficiency, the small effect on the size of goitre and the exposure to radiation. A patient should be operated upon in an euthyroid state, i.e. after preoperative drug therapy. Operations are normally performed on individuals with a coexistent goitre or where antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy are contraindicated. Paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and hypoparathyroidism are rare complications. 3 to 4 g of thyroid tissues should remain. Of great importance in all cases are precise diagnostics both before and after commencing treatment and adequate follow up. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  7. Upper limb robotics applied to neurorehabilitation: An overview of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duret, Christophe; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    During the last two decades, extensive interaction between clinicians and engineers has led to the development of systems that stimulate neural plasticity to optimize motor recovery after neurological lesions. This has resulted in the expansion of the field of robotics for rehabilitation. Studies in patients with stroke-related upper-limb paresis have shown that robotic rehabilitation can improve motor capacity. However, few other applications have been evaluated (e.g. tremor, peripheral nerve injuries or other neurological diseases). This paper presents an overview of the current use of upper limb robotic systems for neurorehabilitation, and highlights the rationale behind their use for the assessment and treatment of common neurological disorders. Rehabilitation robots are little integrated in clinical practice, except after stroke. Although few studies have been carried out to evaluate their effectiveness, evidence from the neurosciences and indications from pilot studies suggests that upper limb robotic rehabilitation can be applied safely in various other neurological conditions. Rehabilitation robots provide an intensity, quality and dose of treatment that exceeds therapist-mediated rehabilitation. Moreover, the use of force fields, multi-sensory environments, feedback etc. renders such rehabilitation engaging and motivating. Future studies should evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation robots in neurological pathologies other than stroke.

  8. Intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation for preservation of facial nerve function in patients with large acoustic neuroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-yun; TIAN Yong-ji; LIU Wen; LIU Shu-ling; QIAO Hui; ZHANG Jun-ting; JIA Gui-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various monitoring techniques have been used routinely in the treatment of the lesions in the skull base, iatrogenic facial paresis or paralysis remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation on preservation of facial nerve function.Method From January to November 2005, 19 patients with large acoustic neuroma were treated using intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation (TCEMEP) for preservation of facial nerve function. The relationship between the decrease of MEP amplitude after tumor removal and the postoperative function of the facial nerve was analyzed.Results MEP amplitude decreased more than 75% in 11 patients, of which 6 presented significant facial paralysis (H-B grade 3), and 5 had mild facial paralysis (H-B grade 2). In the other 8 patients, whose MEP amplitude decreased less than 75%, 1 experienced significant facial paralysis, 5 had mild facial paralysis, and 2 were normal.Conclusions Intraoperative TCEMEP can be used to predict postoperative function of the facial nerve. The decreased MEP amplitude above 75 % is an alarm point for possible severe facial paralysis.

  9. Spinal angiolipomas: A puzzling case and review of a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Shweikeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs may have a variable presentation. Such an infection has a typical appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and enhances with gadolinium. We present a case that was a diagnostic challenge where pre- and intra-operative findings resulted in conflicting impressions. The mimicker was a spinal angiolipoma (SAL. The authors then provide a thorough review of this rare spinal neoplasm. A 55-year-old man presented with back pain, paresis, paresthesia, and urinary retention. MRI was indicative of a longitudinal epidural thoracic mass with a signal homogeneous to nearby fat, curvilinear vessels, and lack of enhancement. Although at emergent surgery, the lesion was found to contain abundant purulent material. Microbiology was positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and consistent with SEA without evidence of neoplasia. While the imaging features were suggestive of an angiolipoma, the findings at surgery made SEA more likely, which were validated histopathologically. The diagnosis of SEA is often clear-cut, and the literature has reported only a few instances in which it masqueraded as another process such as lymphoma or myelitis. The case highlights SEA masquerading as an angiolipoma, and further demonstrates to clinicians that obtaining tissue diagnosis plays a crucial role diagnostically and therapeutically. SALs, on the other hand, are slow-growing tumors that can be infiltrating or noninfiltrating. They typically present with chronic symptoms and T1-MRI shows an inhomogeneous picture. Complete surgical excision is standard of care and patients tend to do well afterward.

  10. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients' self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica.

  11. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. [The importance of Halmagyi-Curthoys test in standard otoneurological diagnosis of patients with vestibular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Maria; Pawlak-Osińska, Katarzyna; Kaźmierczak, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    This given work is dedicated to examine the correlation of results of the ambulant screening vHIT test conducted by applying ICS Impulse device, with results of standard appliance otoneurological videonystagmography (VNG) testing. Comparison of given results will provide assessment of vHIT test effectiveness for otoneurological diagnosis of patients suffering giddiness or any other equilibrium system disorder. Diagnosis was reached with 20 patients suffering vestibular disorders with no specific ailment location. From overall VNG test there was a caloric testing extracted, containing assessment of canal paresis and directional preponderance. Numerical values of these parameters were compared to vHIT test result - the indicator of "gain" eye-ball movement imaging head move, to be specific. Conducted examinations did not reveal any significant correlation between VNG and vHIT parameters however it is need to be emphasized here, that most of the considered cases were not affected but any defect of vestibular canal receptor. Nevertheless, unsettled values of "gain" indicator may signify that vHIT regardless of ailments location is defected. vHIT test with its quantitative analysis may in the future become indicator of auricular disorders. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensitivity evaluation in air and water caloric stimulation of the vestibular organs using videonystagmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałocha-Kaczka, Anna; Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Miłoński, Jarosław; Olszewski, Jurek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare air and water caloric stimulation of the vestibular organs using videonystagmography (VNG). The study covered 18 women aged 21-63 and 11 men aged 21-74 years hospitalized at the ENT, without complaints for vertigo and/or balance disorders. The alternate binaural bithermal caloric test with cool 30°C and warm 44°C air or water irrigations (after 2h interval for the recordings) with the use of VNG was done. All parameters of air and water vestibular caloric stimulations, assessed in the VNG, differed significantly but were within the normal range. The research showed a statistically significant difference between canal paresis but only for the left ear at 30°C and 44°C. Absolute directional preponderance, relative directional preponderance, vestibular excitability, slow component velocity, frequency were different statistically for both ears at both temperatures. Our study showed that both air and water caloric stimulations were able to distinguish physiological and impaired vestibular function. The obtained results showed statistically higher response for water than air stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Electronystagmography versus videonystagmography in diagnosis of vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Pepaś, Renata; Sułkowski, Wiesław J; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Olszewski, Jurek

    2012-03-01

    Vertigo is a very common symptom mainly caused by the lesion of vestibular system (peripheral or central) and often accompanied by some work-related diseases and occupational intoxications. The aim of this study was to assess the value of electronystagmography (ENG) and videonystagmography (VNG) for diagnosing vertigo of various origin. The study included four groups, 25 subjects each, of patients suffering from vestibular disorders of peripheral, central and mixed origin versus healthy controls. All were examined by means of ENG and VNG, using the bithermal caloric test with 30°C and 44°C air irrigations of the ears. The findings (frequency of induced nystagmus FRQ, its slow phase velocity SPV, canal paresis CP, directional preponderance DP, vestibular excitability VE) were analysed and compared. In all patients with vertigo due to vestibular neuritis, barotrauma and kinetosis, significant CP, the important sign of peripheral site of vestibular lesion was identified both in ENG and VNG. None of the patients with central origin disorders showed CP in VNG; in the majority of cases DP was observed. However, in ENG we found CP in 5 patients with central origin disorders. There were no essential differences between ENG and VNG in measurements of FRQ and SPV except for higher values in VNG in controls and patients with mixed vertigo. The results suggest that the VNG should be recommended in preference as the valuable method to assess vertigo and to discriminate between the peripheral and the central vestibular lesions.

  15. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  16. Effects of migraine disease on the vestibulocochlear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Zaim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Migraine patients have tendency to have vestibular and auditory system problems. The aim of this study is to evaluate vestibule cochlear system of patients with migraine with Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE video-nystagmography (VNG and caloric test. Methods:39 patients diagnosed with migraine and control group of 21 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Before they were included in the study, all of them were examined and those who has acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, tympanic membrane perforation, external otitis, ear surgery history and head trauma were excluded from the study. All patients and volunteers were tested by TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests. In evaluating the statistical data, SPSS 15.0 was utilized. Results: When TEOAE values for the migraine group and for the control group are compared, it is found statistically significant that the TEOAE values for the migraine group is lower than those for the control group. This result shows that there can be a pathology that is able to affect cochlear functions in migraine disease. As for VNG test results, a statistically significant difference cannot be determined between migraine and control groups. More over, the identification of canal paresis in caloric test indicates that peripheral vestibular problems accompany migraine disease. Conclusion:Evaluating vestibulocochlear system of migraine patients with TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests has been an important task for identifying vestibular imperfections accompanying these patients and for predicting potential auricular pathologies. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6(1: 1-4

  17. Vocal fold hemorrhage: factors predicting recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Christen J; Murry, Thomas; Sulica, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Vocal fold hemorrhage is an acute phonotraumatic injury treated with voice rest; recurrence is a generally accepted indication for surgical intervention. This study aims to identify factors predictive of recurrence based on outcomes of a large clinical series. Retrospective cohort. Retrospective review of cases of vocal fold hemorrhage presenting to a university laryngology service. Demographic information was compiled. Videostroboscopic exams were evaluated for hemorrhage extent, presence of varix, mucosal lesion, and/or vocal fold paresis. Vocal fold hemorrhage recurrence was the main outcome measure. Follow-up telephone survey was used to complement clinical data. Forty-seven instances of vocal fold hemorrhage were evaluated (25M:22F; 32 professional voice users). Twelve of the 47 (26%) patients experienced recurrence. Only the presence of varix demonstrated significant association with recurrence (P = 0.0089) on multivariate logistic regression. Vocal fold hemorrhage recurred in approximately 26% of patients. Varix was a predictor of recurrence, with 48% of those with varix experiencing recurrence. Monitoring, behavioral management and/or surgical intervention may be indicated to treat patients with such characteristics. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. The effects of high custom made shoes on gait characteristics and patient satisfaction in hemiplegic gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Martine M; Mulder, Mascha C Borgerhoff; Horemans, Herwin L; van der Woude, Luc H; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2011-10-01

    To determine the effects of a temporary high custom made orthopaedic shoe on functional mobility, walking speed, and gait characteristics in hemiplegic stroke patients. In addition, interference of attentional demands and patient satisfaction were studied. Clinical experimental study. University Medical Centre. Nineteen stroke patients (12 males; mean age 55 years (standard deviation (SD) 10 years); mean time post onset 3.6 months (SD 1.4 months)) with a spastic paresis of the lower extremity. Functional mobility was assessed with the timed up and go test, walking speed and gait characteristics were measured with clinical gait analysis and performed with and without a verbal dual task. Patient satisfaction was determined with a questionnaire. Walking with the high orthopaedic shoe resulted in improved functional mobility (22%; pshoes. The dual task interfered with functional mobility during walking. The interference was equally big for normal shoes as for the orthopaedic shoe. Patients evaluated walking with the high orthopaedic shoe as an improvement (psafety, walking distance and walking speed. In the early recovery phase after stroke, when regaining walking ability, a temporary high orthopaedic shoe can improve hemiplegic gait, even with dual task interference. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eating and rumination activities two weeks prepartum to one month postpartum in 100 healthy cows and cows with peripartum diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Buchli, H; Hässig, M

    2017-10-01

    Eating and rumination activities were investigated in 100 cows from 14 days prepartum to 30 days postpartum. All cows were clinically healthy at the start of the study. A pressure sensor incorporated into the noseband of a halter was used to record jaw movements, which allowed the quantification of the daily duration of eating and rumination, number of regurgitated cuds and number of chewing cycles per cud. The cows were retrospectively divided into 2 main groups healthy (n = 24) and ill cows (n = 76), and the latter were further divided into the following subgroups: cows with periparturient paresis (n = 12), retained placenta (n = 13), metritis (n = 17), primary ketosis (n = 19) and lameness (n = 6). Healthy cows had the shortest eating and rumination times on the day of calving; duration of eating decreased continually before and increased steadily after calving. In contrast, duration of rumination varied little except for a significant drop on the days of calving. Compared with healthy cows, eating times of ill cows were significantly shorter before and after calving and rumination time was reduced on days 2 to 4 postpartum. The duration of eating differed between healthy and ill cows before calving, and therefore the usefulness of eating and rumination variables for early recognition of periparturient diseases in cows requires further investigation.

  20. "Cure" for multiple sclerosis (MS)-Evolving views of therapy goals in patients on different stages of the disease: A pilot study in a cohort of Polish MS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacińska, Weronika; Brzostowska, Marta; Nojszewska, Monika; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław W; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-06-01

    New aggressive treatments promise improvement of results in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), however, with high risk of serious complications. In this study, we analyzed patients' acceptance for risks connected with the MS treatment. The study was designed as a prospective nonanonymous online questionnaire. Responders were asked about the definition of the "cure" for MS and crucial goals in the treatment. One hundred and eighty patients filled in the questionnaire (129 women and 51 men), and the mean age was 33 years ( SD  = 10.29). The MS forms were as follows: relapsing-remitting (65%), secondary progressive (14%), primary progressive (10%), and other (11%), with mean EDSS score of 3 points ( SD  = 2.6). For 50% of the patients, relief of symptoms such as fatigue (72%), paresis (66%), and balance disorders (65%) was synonymous with "cure." The patients with faster progression of the disease were likely to accept risky "curative" treatments-with average 68% accepted mortality risk ( p  = .003). Over 81% of patients accepted mortality rates over 1% for the treatment that achieves self-defined cure. The study shows that the MS patients are likely to accept even very risky treatments as long as they promise patient-defined "cure."

  1. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system: an ante-mortem diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS is reported with its clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features. A 20-year-old girl presented with headache, projectile vomiting, unsteadiness of gait and urgency of micturition. She had left seventh nerve upper motor neuron type paresis, increased tone in all four limbs, exaggerated deep tendon reflexes, cerebellar signs, and papilloedema. Cerebrospinal fluid showed lymphocytosis with elevated protein and normal glucose level. Cerebral computerised tomographic scan and MRI showed bilateral diffuse asymmetric supra- and infra-tentorial lesions (predominantly in the supratentorial and left cerebrum. On MRI, the lesions were hyperintense on T2, and proton density-weighted images and hypointense on T1-weighted images. Based on the clinical findings of raised intracranial tension and MRI features, initial diagnoses of gliomatosis cerebrii, tuberculous meningitis, primary central nervous system lymphoma and chronic viral encephalitis were considered. PACNS was not included in the initial differentials and, an open brain biopsy was advised which established the definitive diagnosis.

  2. Preoperative sclerotherapy of facial venous malformations: impact on surgical parameters and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Charles A; Braswell, Leah E; Wright, Lonnie B; Roberson, Paula K; Moore, Mary B; Waner, Milton; Buckmiller, Lisa M

    2011-07-01

    To analyze the operative benefit of preoperative sclerotherapy of facial venous malformations and assess long-term patient outcome. Preoperative sclerotherapy was performed in 24 consecutive patients referred before resection of facial venous malformation. Pretreatment imaging was reviewed for malformation dimensions (length, width, and height), and volumes were estimated. Sclerotherapy was performed with 3% sodium tetradecyl in the first 15 patients and 98% dehydrated alcohol in the remaining 9 patients. Operative blood loss, operative time, transfusion requirement, and hospital stay were recorded. Operative time per lesion volume and operative blood loss per lesion volume were calculated. Results were compared with 15 historical control patients who underwent resection of facial venous malformations without preoperative sclerotherapy. Long-term follow-up of study and control patients was performed. Compared with controls, patients undergoing preoperative venous sclerotherapy were significantly older (P = .0206) and had larger lesions in all three dimensions (height, P = .0002; length, P = .0010; width, P = .0004). Patients receiving sclerotherapy had shorter operative time per lesion volume (P lesion volume (P nerve paresis occurred in 8.3% of cases. Long-term follow-up revealed retreatment was required in 2 of 24 patients (8.3%). Preoperative sclerotherapy of venous malformations was associated with less operative time per lesion volume and less operative blood loss per lesion volume. Long-term follow-up revealed a low need for retreatment. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Parotid Abscess with Involvement of Facial Nerve Branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Adile; Ors, Ceyda Hayretdag; Kosar, Sule; Ozisik Karaman, Handan Isin

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve paresis is only rarely seen with benign diseases of the parotid gland. A 22-year male had muscle loss in the preauricular region of the right side of his face that extended towards the mandibular angle for the last 6 months. The neurological examination did not reveal any pathology other than right preauricular region muscle atrophy that was limited by the mandibular angle. The Electroneuronography (EnoG) provided a ratio of 55.38%, compared the affected side to left side. Ultrasonography of the defined region showed two mass lesions 13.5 x 7 mm and 10 x 5 mm in size in the anteromedial section of the right parotid gland that were close to each other, without internal calcific foci, and heterogenous hyperechogenic structure without internal vascularization. Fine needle aspiration obtained many polymorphonuclear leukocytes, cell debris, a few mononuclear inflammatory cells and many crystalloid structures. The lesion was diagnosed as a parotid abscess. Antibiotic treatment was started for the parotid gland abscess.

  4. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M; Debus, J; Lohr, F; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Wannenmacher, M

    1997-07-01

    patients (18%) in the RS group, none of them requiring therapy, but none in the FT group. Hearing impairment improved in 1 case (RS) and 4 cases (FT). Complete hearing loss was diagnosed in 1 case in the FT group but in 3 cases in the RS group (all these patients were treated with 16 Gy or more). One temporary facial nerve weakness was found after FT. Among the RS group treated with {>=}16 Gy, 4 permanent facial nerve lesions were observed with complete facial nerve paresis in 2 patients. Improvement of vertigo or tinnitus was found in 1 patient after FT and in 3 patients treated with RS. If radiosurgical doses were <15 Gy, no severe side effects were observed. Among this group, 6 patients (54%) showed a significant reduction of preexisting neurological dysfunction. Conclusion: Radiosurgical treatment of small acoustic neuromas with doses <15 Gy prescribed to a volume <10 ccm results in excellent tumor control with no relevant toxicity. For fractionated therapy, results are comparable, even if the tumor volume exceeded 10 ccm. Single dose treatment with doses >15 Gy may cause higher toxicity. Fractionated conformal radiotherapy offers effective tumor control and low morbidity especially after contralateral neurosurgical resection of an acoustic neuroma with consecutive hearing loss and/or facial paresis.

  5. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.; Debus, J.; Lohr, F.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    patients (18%) in the RS group, none of them requiring therapy, but none in the FT group. Hearing impairment improved in 1 case (RS) and 4 cases (FT). Complete hearing loss was diagnosed in 1 case in the FT group but in 3 cases in the RS group (all these patients were treated with 16 Gy or more). One temporary facial nerve weakness was found after FT. Among the RS group treated with ≥16 Gy, 4 permanent facial nerve lesions were observed with complete facial nerve paresis in 2 patients. Improvement of vertigo or tinnitus was found in 1 patient after FT and in 3 patients treated with RS. If radiosurgical doses were 15 Gy may cause higher toxicity. Fractionated conformal radiotherapy offers effective tumor control and low morbidity especially after contralateral neurosurgical resection of an acoustic neuroma with consecutive hearing loss and/or facial paresis

  6. Poliomyelitis in MuLV-infected ICR-SCID mice after injection of basement membrane matrix contaminated with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson Scholz, Jodi A; Garg, Rohit; Compton, Susan R; Allore, Heather G; Zeiss, Caroline J; Uchio, Edward M

    2011-10-01

    The arterivirus lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) causes life-long viremia in mice. Although LDV infection generally does not cause disease, infected mice that are homozygous for the Fv1(n) allele are prone to develop poliomyelitis when immunosuppressed, a condition known as age-dependent poliomyelitis. The development of age-dependent poliomyelitis requires coinfection with endogenous murine leukemia virus. Even though LDV is a common contaminant of transplantable tumors, clinical signs of poliomyelitis after inadvertent exposure to LDV have not been described in recent literature. In addition, LDV-induced poliomyelitis has not been reported in SCID or ICR mice. Here we describe the occurrence of poliomyelitis in ICR-SCID mice resulting from injection of LDV-contaminated basement membrane matrix. After exposure to LDV, a subset of mice presented with clinical signs including paresis, which was associated with atrophy of the hindlimb musculature, and tachypnea; in addition, some mice died suddenly with or without premonitory signs. Mice presenting within the first 6 mo after infection had regions of spongiosis, neuronal necrosis and astrocytosis of the ventral spinal cord, and less commonly, brainstem. Axonal degeneration of ventral roots prevailed in more chronically infected mice. LDV was identified by RT-PCR in 12 of 15 mice with typical neuropathology; positive antiLDV immunolabeling was identified in all PCR-positive animals (n = 7) tested. Three of 8 mice with neuropathology but no clinical signs were LDV negative by RT-PCR. RT-PCR yielded murine leukemia virus in spinal cords of all mice tested, regardless of clinical presentation or neuropathology.

  7. Age-related distance esotropia: Clinical features and therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez de Liaño Sánchez, P; Olavarri González, G; Merino Sanz, P; Escribano Villafruela, J C

    2016-12-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes of a group of patients with age-related distance esotropia (ARDE). A retrospective study was conducted on a consecutive case series of 16 adult patients diagnosed with ARDE between 2008 and 2015. The clinical features evaluated included mean age and gender, primary position deviations at distance and near, measured in prism dioptres (pd), treatment offered in each case, and post-surgical deviations. Ductions and versions were full, with no evidence of lateral rectus paresis. None of these patients had any obvious underlying neurological disorder, such as, high myopia or thyroid disease. A good result is considered to be the disappearance of diplopia in all positions of gaze. A total of 16 patients (11 females [68.8%]) were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 78.19±6.77 years. The mean initial esodeviation was 2.25±3.08 pd at near (-4 to +8 pd) and 9.5±4.18 pd at distance (2 to 18 pd). Treatment was not necessary in 5 cases because the symptoms were intermittent or well-tolerated. Of the 11 patients with symptoms, one was corrected with an external base therapeutic prism. Botulinum toxin was administered in another patient, without satisfactory results. Unilateral medial rectus muscle recession was performed on one patient, and unilateral lateral rectus plication on 7 patients, indicating prisms before surgery. One patient refused surgery despite continuous diplopia in far vision. After a mean follow-up of 16.5 months, all operated patients were asymptomatic. Not all patients with ARDE require treatment, as the tolerance to diplopia varies from one subject to another. Both medial rectus weakening and lateral rectus strengthening provides excellent results. Crown Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Late neurological complications after irradiation of malignant tumors of the testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knap, Marianne M.; Overgaard, Jens; Bentzen, Soeren M.

    2007-01-01

    To identify and describe late neurological complications in a Danish testis cancer cohort treated by radiotherapy. Clinical retrospective material of 94 consecutive patients with malignant testicular tumours treated at Aarhus County Hospital from 1964 to 1973. The irradiated dose in the paraaortic field varied from 27 to 55 Gy given 5 or 6 days a week, from the back and front alternately. The biological equivalent dose of the spinal cord was calculated using the linear-quadratic model. Median follow-up was 25 years, range 7 to 33 years. Seven patients were identified with late neurological complications after irradiation. One developed symptoms 9 months after treatment, but in the six other cases we found a latency period between 10 and 20 years from radiotherapy until the initial neurological symptoms began. The clinical picture in all seven patients was dominated by muscle atrophy, flaccid paresis in the lower limbs and absence of sphincter disturbances or sensory symptoms. High spinal cord dose was related to increased risk of neurological damage. During follow-up 19 patients developed another primary cancer in the radiation field; nine patients were diagnosed with severe arteriosclerosis and 13 patients with long-term gastrointestinal morbidity. Seven patients were identified with late neurological complications, and a clear dose-incidence relationship was shown. The latency period, from irradiation to the initial neurological symptoms began, ranged from 9 months to 20 years with progression of symptoms beyond 25 years. Furthermore many patients in the cohort suffered from solid tumours in the radiation field, severe arteriosclerosis and long-term gastrointestinal morbidity

  9. Effect of Anionic Salt and Highly Fermentable Carbohydrate Supplementations on Urine pH and on Experimentally Induced Hypocalcaemia in Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enemark JMD

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of dietary grain on calcium homeostasis. Six rumen-fistulated dairy cows with 3 or more previous lactations and no history of parturient paresis were randomly assigned to a sequence of diets in a crossover study with 4 periods of 10 days each. Dietary treatments were: A control ration consisting of wrap grass silage alone (1, the control ration supplemented with ammonium chloride and ammonium sulphate salt solution (2, control ration following a period with supplementation (3 and control ration supplemented with increasing amounts of barley from 4 to 10 kg/cow per day, expected to produce subclinical rumen acidosis (4. Daily intake of the diets was adjusted to 14 kg DM/cow per day. On day 11, the calcium-regulating mechanisms in cows were challenged until recumbency by a standardized intravenous EDTA infusion and cows were left to recover spontaneously. Anion supplementation and the feeding of highly fermentable carbohydrate lowered urine pH below 7.0 due to subclinical acidosis. During spontaneous recovery from EDTA induced hypocalcaemia, the cows more quickly regained a whole blood free calcium concentration of 1.00 mmol/L if they had most recently been supplemented with either anionic salts or with increasing amounts of barley, as compared to the basic ration. It is concluded that so-called slug-feeding or 'steaming up' with highly fermentable carbohydrates before parturition in milk fever susceptible cows enhanced calcium homeostasis similar to the effect seen in cows on anionic diets.

  10. Robots integrated with virtual reality simulations for customized motor training in a person with upper extremity hemiparesis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluet, Gerard G.; Merians, Alma S.; Qiu, Qinyin; Lafond, Ian; Saleh, Soha; Ruano, Viviana; Delmonico, Andrea R.; Adamovich, Sergei V.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A majority of studies examining repetitive task practice facilitated by robots for the treatment of upper extremity paresis utilize standardized protocols applied to large groups. Others utilize interventions tailored to patients but don't describe the clinical decision making process utilized to develop and modify interventions. This case report will describe a robot-based intervention customized to match the goals and clinical presentation of a gentleman with upper extremity hemiparesis secondary to stroke. Methods PM is an 85 year-old man with left hemiparesis secondary to an intracerebral hemorrhage five years prior to examination. Outcomes were measured before and after a one month period of home therapy and after a one month robotic intervention. The intervention was designed to address specific impairments identified during his PT examination. When necessary, activities were modified based on the patient's response to his first week of treatment. Outcomes PM trained twelve sessions using six virtually simulated activities. Modifications to original configurations of these activities resulted in performance improvements in five of these activities. PM demonstrated a 35 second improvement in Jebsen Test of Hand Function time and a 44 second improvement in Wolf Motor Function Test time subsequent to the robotic training intervention. Reaching kinematics, 24 hour activity measurement and the Hand and Activities of Daily Living scales of the Stroke Impact Scale all improved as well. Discussion A customized program of robotically facilitated rehabilitation resulted in large short-term improvements in several measurements of upper extremity function in a patient with chronic hemiparesis. PMID:22592063

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in mild to severe hemiparesis early after stroke: a proof of principle and novel approach to improve motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Sarah M.; Saposnik, Gustavo; Mello, Eduardo A.; Nagaya, Erina M.; Santos, Waldyr; Ferreiro, Karina N.; Melo, Eduardo S.; Reis, Felipe I.; Scaff, Milberto; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the unaffected hemisphere can enhance function of the paretic hand in patients with mild motor impairment. Effects of low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex at an early stage of mild to severe hemiparesis after stroke are unknown. In this pilot, randomized, double-blind clinical trial we compared the effects of low-frequency rTMS or sham rTMS as add-on therapies to outpatient customary rehabilitation, in 30 patients within 5–45 days after ischemic stroke, and mild to severe hand paresis. The primary feasibility outcome was compliance with the interventions. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of intervention-related adverse events. Performance of the paretic hand in the Jebsen–Taylor test and pinch strength were secondary outcomes. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, after ten sessions of treatment administered over 2 weeks and at 1 month after end of treatment. Baseline clinical features were comparable across groups. For the primary feasibility outcome, compliance with treatment was 100% in the active group and 94% in the sham group. There were no serious intervention-related adverse events. There were significant improvements in performance in the Jebsen–Taylor test (mean, 12.3% 1 month after treatment) and pinch force (mean, 0.5 Newtons) in the active group, but not in the sham group. Low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex early after stroke is feasible, safe and potentially effective to improve function of the paretic hand, in patients with mild to severe hemiparesis. These promising results will be valuable to design larger randomized clinical trials. PMID:22173953

  12. EFFECTS OF FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IN REHABILITATION WITH HEMIPARESIS PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanović, Edina

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident is a focal neurological deficiency occurring suddenly and lasting for more than 24 hours. The purpose of our work is to determine the role of the functional electrical simulation (FES) in the rehabilitation of patients with hemiparesis, which occurred as a consequence of a cerebrovascular accident. This study includes the analysis of two groups of 40 patients with hemiparesis (20 patients with deep hemiparesis and 20 patients with light hemi- paresis), a control group which was only treated with kinesiotherapy and a tested group which was treated with kinesiotherapy and functional electrical stimulation. Both groups of patients were analyzed in respect to their sex and age. Additional analysis of the walking function was completed in accordance with the BI and RAP index. The analysis of the basic demographical data demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the control and tested group. The patients of both groups are equal in respect of age and sex. After 4 weeks of rehabilitation of patients with deep and light hemiparesis there were no statistically significant differences between the groups after evaluation by the BI index. However, a statistically significant difference was noted between the groups by the RAP index among patients with deep hemiparesis. After 8 weeks of rehabilitation the group of patients who were treated with kinesiotherapy and functional electrical stimulation showed better statistically significant results of rehabilitation in respect to the control group with both the BI index and the RAP index (p<0,001). In conclusion, we can state that the patients in rehabilitation after a cerebrovascular accident require rehabilitation longer than 4 weeks. Walking rehabilitation after stroke is faster and more successful if we used functional electrical stimulation, in combination with kinesiotherapy, in patients with disabled extremities. PMID:19284395

  13. Functional networks of motor inhibition in conversion disorder patients and feigning subjects

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    Thomas Hassa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of motor inhibition leading to paresis in conversion disorder are not well known. The key question is whether they are different of those of normal subjects feigning the symptoms. Thirteen conversion disorder patients with hemiparesis and twelve healthy controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance tomography under conditions of passive motor stimulation of the paretic/feigned paretic and the non-paretic hand. Healthy controls were also investigated in a non-feigning condition. During passive movement of the affected right hand conversion disorder patients exhibited activations in the bilateral triangular part of the inferior frontal gyri (IFG, with a left side dominance compared to controls in non-feigning condition. Feigning controls revealed for the same condition a weak unilateral activation in the right triangular part of IFG and an activity decrease in frontal midline areas, which couldn't be observed in patients. The results suggest that motor inhibition in conversion disorder patients is mediated by the IFG that was also involved in inhibition processes in normal subjects. The activity pattern in feigning controls resembled that of conversion disorder patients but with a clear difference in the medial prefrontal cortex. Healthy controls showed decreased activity in this region during feigning compared to non-feigning conditions suggesting a reduced sense of self-agency during feigning. Remarkably, no activity differences could be observed in medial prefrontal cortex for patients vs healthy controls in feigning or non-feigning conditions suggesting self-agency related activity in patients to be in between those of non-feigning and feigning healthy subjects.

  14. Correlation of Respiratory Activity of Contralateral Diaphragm Muscles for Evaluation of Recovery Following Hemiparesis

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    Dow, Douglas E.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiration is impaired by disruption of the central drive for inspiration to the diaphragm muscle (DIAm). Some function may recover involving nerve regeneration, reinnervation or neuroplasticity. A research animal model involves inducing hemiparesis of the DIAm and monitoring any recovery under different conditions. Methods to accurately track the level of functional recovery are needed. In this study, an algorithm was developed and tested to quantify the relative amount of electromyogram (EMG) activity that temporally correlated for an experimental (EXP) hemi-DIAm with its intact contralateral hemi-DIAm. An average rectified value (ARV) trace was calculated. A template was formed of the ARV trace of the intact hemi-DIAm, with higher positive values corresponding with periods of inspirations and lower negative values corresponding with quiet periods. This template was multiplied by the EXP ARV trace to reward (more positive) periods of correlating activity, and punish (more negative) periods of high activity on the EXP side that corresponded with quiet periods on the intact side. The average integrated value was the index of correlating contralateral activity (ICCA). A negative ICCA value indicated no net correlation of activity, and a positive value indicated a net correlation of activity. The algorithm was tested on rats having the conditions of control or hemi-paresis induced by denervatation (DNV), tetrodotoxin administration (TTX) or cervical spinal hemi-section (SH). Control had high positive ICCA values, and DNV had negative values. TTX maintained negative ICCA values at 3, 7 and 14 days, indicating a lack of functional recovery. SH maintained negative values at 3 and 7 days, but a subset had positive values at 14 days indicating some functional recovery. PMID:19965125

  15. The main clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis at the children in the debut. Own observation

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    Stetsenko T.I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate first clinical signs of MS for early diagnosis and prevention of disability. Patients and methods. There are results of examination of 9 patients (5 boys, 4 girls aged 15 to 17 years, who sought a neurological department NDSL «OKHMATDYT» during 2014 for further diagnosis & treatment. Researches included a general clinical examination, immunological parameters, visual evoked potentials, CT, MRI with contrast of brain and spinal cord. Data analysis was performed according to McDonald criteria. Results. The complaints are presented in all cases of violation of the sensitivity of the limbs (numbness of limbs mainly in the left part of a body as a result of stress, during the studies at school, after physical exercises, against a background of full health. Later, they were accompanied by paresis of facial muscles in the central-type, by the central amaurosis of both eyes, by the periodic urinary incontinence in the last 7 years, lower spastic paraparesis and left-side hemiparesis. Clinically: nistahmoyid in extreme abduction of the eyeballs, asymmetry of reflexes, abnormal volatility of iambic signs, violation of statics and coordination. In the first case there were detected 7 exacerbations. In MRI of the brain was detected multiple hiperintense foci of periventricular and subcortical mostly (8 cases, spread to the spinal cord (2 cases. At the previous stages was diagnosed herpes infection, subacute encephalitis, brain volumetric process, ADEM, acute myelitis, tuberous sclerosis, CVA. After the examination in conditions of highly specialized branch was established in RS for appropriate treatment. Conclusions. 1. The manifestation of MS among children 15–17 year old mostly presented monosymptomatic and sensitivity violation almost in all cases. 2. Characteristic remitting and relapsing-remitting-relapsing course of MS, cerebral form (in 2 cases cerebrovascular spinal. 3. A clearly shown dissemination in space and time

  16. Effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on upper-limb spasticity and impairment in patients with spastic hemiparesis: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewer, Carmen; Hartl, Sandra; Müller, Friedemann; Koenig, Eberhard

    2014-06-01

    To investigate short-term and long-term effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rpMS) on spasticity and motor function. Monocentric, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial. Neurologic rehabilitation hospital. Patients (N=66) with severe hemiparesis and mild to moderate spasticity resulting from a stroke or a traumatic brain injury. The average time ± SD since injury for the intervention groups was 26 ± 71 weeks or 37 ± 82 weeks. rpMS for 20 minutes or sham stimulation with subsequent occupational therapy for 20 minutes, 2 times a day, over a 2-week period. Modified Tardieu Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (arm score), assessed before therapy, at the end of the 2-week treatment period, and 2 weeks after study treatment. Additionally, the Tardieu Scale was assessed after the first and before the third therapy session to determine any short-term effects. Spasticity (Tardieu >0) was present in 83% of wrist flexors, 62% of elbow flexors, 44% of elbow extensors, and 10% of wrist extensors. Compared with the sham stimulation group, the rpMS group showed short-term effects on spasticity for wrist flexors (P=.048), and long-term effects for elbow extensors (P<.045). Arm motor function (rpMS group: median 5 [4-27]; sham group: median 4 [4-9]) did not significantly change over the study period in either group, whereas rpMS had a positive effect on sensory function. Therapy with rpMS increases sensory function in patients with severe limb paresis. The magnetic stimulation, however, has limited effect on spasticity and no effect on motor function. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

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    Cordes, M. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wszolek, Z.K. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Pfeiffer, R.F. [Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Calne, D.B. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [{sup 18}F]-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K{sub i} (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wir berichten ueber Untersuchungen der praesynaptischen dopaminergen Funktion mit der Positronenemissionstomographie bei einer grossen Familie mit autosomal-dominant vererbtem Parkinsonismus und Demenz. Die Erkrankung ist pathologisch-anatomisch gekennzeichnet durch eine pallido-ponto-nigrale Degeneration. Klinisch bestehen ein Parkinsonismus, Dystonien, eine Apraxie der Augenoeffnung und -schliessung, pyramidale Dysfunktionen und eine Harninkontinenz. Die praesynaptische dopaminerge Funktion wurde untersucht und quantifiziert mittels [{sup 18}F]-L-6-Fluorodopa (6FD) PET bei fuenf erkrankten Patienten, 13 Risikopatienten und 15 Kontrollpersonen vergleichbaren Alters. Die Transportkonstante K{sub i} (ml/Striatum/min) fuer die striatale Aufnahme des Radiotracers war bei allen erkrankten Patienten erniedrigt. Von den 13 Risikopatienten hatte keiner eine reduzierte Aufnahme von 6FD. Drei Risikopatienten zeigten sogar Werte fuer K{sub i}, die oberhalb des Referenzbereiches der Kontrollpersonen lagen

  18. Treatment of complex internal carotid artery aneurysms using radial artery grafts. Surgical technique, perioperative complications, and results in 17 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Yasuo; Teramoto, Akira; Mizunari, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2007-01-01

    Complex giant or large internal carotid artery aneurysms present a surgical challenge because limitations and difficulty are encountered with either clipping or endovascular treatment. Our review of previous reports suggests that no current vascular assessment can accurately predict the occurrence of ischemic complications after internal carotid artery ligation. The present study concerns surgical technique, complications, and clinical outcome of radial artery grafting followed by parent artery trapping or proximal occlusion for management of these difficult lesions. Between September 1997 and October 2005, we performed radial artery grafting followed immediately by parent artery occlusion in 17 patients with giant or large complex intracranial carotid aneurysms (3 men, 14 women; mean follow-up duration, 62 months). All patients underwent postoperative digital subtraction angiography to assess graft patency and aneurysm obliteration. All 17 aneurysms were excluded from the cerebral circulation, with all radial artery grafts patent. Among 4 patients with cranial nerve disturbances, dysfunction was temporary in 5; in the others, oculomotor nerve paresis persisted. No perioperative cerebral infarction occurred. Sensory aphasia reflecting cerebral contusions caused by temporal lobe retraction resolved within 2 months, as did hemiparesis from a postoperative epidural hematoma. With appropriate attention to surgical technique, radial artery grafting followed by acute parent artery occlusion is a safe treatment for complex internal carotid artery aneurysms. Graft patency and aneurysm thrombosis were achieved in all patients. Cranial nerve dysfunction (III, VI) caused by altered blood flow from the internal carotid artery after occlusion was the most common complication and typically was temporary. In our experience with these difficult aneurysms, not only clipping but also reconstruction of the internal carotid artery was required, especially for wide-necked symptomatic

  19. Apresentações clínicas não usuais de pacientes portadores de síndrome de Patau e Edwards: um desafio diagnóstico? Unusual clinical presentations of patients with Patau and Edwards syndromes: a diagnostic challenge?

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    Paulo Ricardo G. Zen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar dois pacientes, um acometido por trissomia do cromossomo 13 em mosaico e outro por trissomia do cromossomo 18, ambos com apresentações clínicas não usuais. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino de dois meses de idade, que apresentava deficiência de crescimento, dismorfias menores de face e de membros, paresia facial unilateral, cardiopatia congênita, hipotonia e evolução com o surgimento de manchas hipocrômicas e atraso do desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor. O segundo caso é de um paciente do sexo masculino, com 19 dias de vida, que também mostrava deficiência de crescimento, anomalias faciais menores, defeito radial, cardiopatia congênita e hipertonia. Os cariótipos por bandas GTG confirmaram o diagnóstico, respectivamente, de síndromes de Patau e de Edwards. COMENTÁRIOS: Os presentes relatos têm por objetivo alertar os pediatras sobre manifestações não usuais nas trissomias dos cromossomos 13 e 18, as quais podem dificultar a suspeita diagnóstica.OBJECTIVE: Report two patients, one with trisomy 13 mosaicism and the other with trisomy 18, both with unusual clinical presentations. CASE DESCRIPTION: The first case was a female patient with two months of age who presented growth deficiency, minor dysmorphia of face and limbs, unilateral facial paresis, congenital heart defect and hypotonia, who developed hypochromic spots and neuropsychomotor delay. The second case was a male patient with 19 days of age who also had growth deficiency, minor facial anomalies, radial defect, congenital heart defect and hypertonia. GTG-Banding karyotypes confirmed the diagnosis of Patau and Edwards syndromes respectively. COMMENTS: The aim of these reports is to call attention to the fact that Patau and Edwards syndromes may present an unusual pattern of abnormalities, making the diagnostic hypothesis difficult.

  20. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

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    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction.

  1. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction. (author)

  2. Implementation of different histochemical methods in diagnostics of brain Aspergillosis in turkey chicks

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    Kureljušić Branislav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis is a frequent fungal disease in different species of birds and mammals caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. It is characterized by inflammatory changes primarily in the respiratory system, even though it sometimes takes on a generalized form when several organ systems are affected. Mucotic-granulomatous meningoencephalitis with a predominant localization in the cerebellum has been described in turkeys, ducks and geese. Within this paper, examinations have been performed on a flock of broiler turkeys aged 12 days who had sustained evident neurological disorders in the form of ataxy, torticollis, paresis, and paralysis of the hind extremities and wings. In three of the ten autopsied chicks the macroscopic findings indicated granulomatous encephalitis of the cerebellum. A white-coloured granuloma, around 3mm in diameter, was situated cranioventrally and was clearly visible on the sagital section of the cerebellum. Mucological examinations of the cerebellum lesion resulted in the isolation of the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus. Haematoxylin-eosin (HE, Grocott and PAS methods were used for the evaluation of histopathological changes and proving Aspergillus fumigatusa hyphae. The microscopic examination of brain tissue sections stained with the HE method revealed the existence of a granuloma with a centrally placed necrotic area. The necrotic area was infiltrated with heterophilic granulocytes and surrounded by macrophage, giant cells and lymphocytes. A connective tissue capsule was located on the periphery of the granuloma. The fungi hyphae, as integral parts of the granuloma, were difficult to observe, and in some samples stained using the HE method they could not be seen at all. On the other hand, sections stanied using the Grocott and PAS methods showed prominent septed and branched hyphae in different parts of the granuloma. With the objective of making an etiological diagnosis of mucotic diseases, it is necessary to apply several

  3. Electroejaculation functions primarily by direct activation of pelvic musculature: Perspectives from a porcine model

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    Adam M.R. Groh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ejaculatory dysfunction is a significant cause of infertility in men that have incurred spinal cord injury or iatrogenic lesions to the sympathetic nerves in the retroperitoneum. For such patients, electroejaculation – whereby a voltage is applied transrectally under general anesthesia – is a highly-effective procedure to obtain ejaculate. At present, however, there remains uncertainty as to the physiological mechanism by which electroejaculation prompts seminal emission in males with neurogenic anejaculation. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine, for the first time, whether electroejaculation functions by mimicking a neurophysiological response, or by directly activating local pelvic musculature. Using electroejaculation in a novel porcine model, we monitored the strength of contraction of the internal urethral sphincter (a smooth muscle involved in ejaculation before and after lesioning its sympathetic innervation with a combination of progressively-worsening surgical and pharmacological insults in three anesthetized boars (46.1 ± 7.4 kg. Importantly, prior to this investigation, we confirmed the comparative structural anatomy of the porcine model to humans through gross dissection and histological analysis of the infrarenal retroperitoneal sympathetic nerves and ganglia in 18 unembalmed boars. Prior to sacrifice, three of these boars underwent functional testing to confirm control of the internal urethral sphincter by the hypogastric nerves. Our results demonstrate that electroejaculation-induced contraction of the internal urethral sphincter was preserved following each progressive neural insult compared to the control state (p > 0.05. In contrast, these same insults resulted in paralysis/paresis of the internal urethral sphincter when its sympathetic innervation was directly stimulated with bipolar electrodes (p < 0.05. Taken together, our results provide the first empirical evidence to suggest that

  4. First branchial cleft anomalies: presentation, variability and safe surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdy, Emad A; Ashram, Yasmine A

    2013-05-01

    First branchial cleft (FBC) anomalies are uncommon. The aim of this retrospective clinical study is to describe our experience in dealing with these sporadically reported lesions. Eighteen cases presenting with various FBC anomalies managed surgically during an 8-year period at a tertiary referral medical institution were included. Ten were males (56 %) and eight females (44 %) with age range 3-18 years. Anomaly was right-sided in 12 cases (67 %). None were bilateral. Nine patients (50 %) had prior abscess incision and drainage procedures ranging from 1 to 9 times. Two also had previous unsuccessful surgical excisions. Clinical presentations included discharging tract openings in external auditory canal/conchal bowl (n = 9), periauricular (n = 6), or upper neck (n = 4); cystic postauricular, parotid or upper neck swellings (n = 5); and eczematous scars (n = 9). Three distinct anatomical types were encountered: sinuses (n = 7), fistulas (n = 6), and cysts (n = 5). Complete surgical excision required superficial parotidectomy in 11 patients (61 %). Anomaly was deep to facial nerve (FN) in three cases (17 %), in-between its branches in two (11 %) and superficial (but sometimes adherent to the nerve) in remaining cases (72 %). Continuous intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring was used in all cases. Two cases had postoperative temporary lower FN paresis that recovered within 2 months. No further anomaly manifestation was observed after 49.8 months' mean postoperative follow-up (range 10-107 months). This study has shown that awareness of different presentations and readiness to identify and protect FN during surgery is essential for successful management of FBC anomalies. Intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring can help in that respect.

  5. Surgical management of first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as infected retroauricular mass using a microscopic dissection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Chieh; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Che-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This is a detailed description of the clinical and anatomical presentation of the first branchial cleft anomaly presenting as retroauricular infected mass. Our experience with a microscopic dissection with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst is also described. Between 2001 and 2008, patients with the final histologic diagnosis of first branchial cleft anomaly in the retroauricular area were managed with a microscopic dissection technique with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst. Classifications were done in accordance with Work, Olsen, and Chilla. Outcomes measured intervention as a function of disease recurrence and complications including facial nerve function was used. Eight patients with a mean age of 14.2 years were enrolled, and this included 4 females and 4 males. Four type 1 and 4 type 2 lesions as per the Work's and Chilla's classification were found, and there were 5 sinuses, 2 fistulae, and 1 cyst according to Olsen's classification. All patients presented to the department with acute infection at the time of diagnosis. Five of the 8 patients had previous surgical treatment, 2 of those had up to 3 previous operations. None of the patients were complicated by disease recurrence or had surgical related complications (facial nerve paresis or paralysis, infection, canal stenosis) requiring reoperation with more than 1 year of follow-up. First branchial cleft anomaly presenting as retroauricular infected mass can be effectively treated by adopting a microscopic dissection technique with control of the sinus lumen from within the cyst. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carotid angiodysplasia complicated by the use of anti-hypertensive drugs during pregnancy: a case report

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    Tavares Beatriz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hypertensive syndromes in pregnancy are one of the leading causes of obstetric admissions into intensive care units. They are related to changes in the central nervous system caused by a decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure, indicated by an increase in intracranial pressure. These changes in pressure usually result from acute injuries or a decrease in the mean arterial pressure due to iatrogenic action or shock. However, other vascular disorders may contribute to similar occurrences. Case presentation A 15-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital complaining of severe headaches since the eighth month of pregnancy, and presented with an arterial blood pressure of 180/120 mmHg. The diagnostic hypothesis was pre-eclampsia. Our patient's blood pressure levels remained elevated, and she was submitted to a cesarean section. After the procedure, she was referred to our infirmary, presenting with a blank distant look and with no interaction with the environment, dyslalia, and labial and upper and lower right limb paresis. She was confused and unable to speak, but responded to painful stimuli as she conveyed abdominal pain at superficial and deep palpation. The hypothesis of post-partum psychosis was suggested. She was then transferred to our intensive care unit, maintaining an impassive attitude in bed but reacting to external stimuli. Results of a computed tomography scan revealed ischemic infarction of the territory of her left middle cerebral artery. A selective cerebral arteriography showed bilateral occlusion of her internal carotid artery in the intracranial position, prebifurcation and angiodysplasia in the cervical segments of her internal carotid artery. Sixteen days after hospital admission, our patient died. Conclusion This data shows the need for careful monitoring of hypertensive syndromes in pregnancy cases, especially in cases with a history of chronic hypertension or with vascular alterations, It also

  7. Retropharyngeal Contralateral C7 Nerve Transfer to the Lower Trunk for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Technique and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anthony T; Sparkman, Darlene M; van Belle, Christopher J; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Schwentker, Ann R

    2018-05-01

    Brachial plexus birth injuries with multiple nerve root avulsions present a particularly difficult reconstructive challenge because of the limited availability of donor nerves. The contralateral C7 has been described for brachial plexus reconstruction in adults but has not been well-studied in the pediatric population. We present our technique and results for retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer to the lower trunk for brachial plexus birth injury. We performed a retrospective review. Any child aged less than 2 years was included. Charts were analyzed for patient demographic data, operative variables, functional outcomes, complications, and length of follow-up. We had a total of 5 patients. Average nerve graft length was 3 cm. All patients had return of hand sensation to the ulnar nerve distribution as evidenced by a pinch test, unprompted use of the recipient limb without mirror movement, and an Active Movement Scale (AMS) of at least 2/7 for finger and thumb flexion; one patient had an AMS of 7/7 for finger and thumb flexion. Only one patient had return of ulnar intrinsic hand function with an AMS of 3/7. Two patients had temporary triceps weakness in the donor limb and one had clinically insignificant temporary phrenic nerve paresis. No complications were related to the retropharyngeal nerve dissection in any patient. Average follow-up was 3.3 years. The retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer is a safe way to supply extra axons to the severely injured arm in brachial plexus birth injuries with no permanent donor limb deficits. Early functional recovery in these patients, with regard to hand function and sensation, is promising. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wireless distributed functional electrical stimulation system

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    Jovičić Nenad S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of movement in humans is hierarchical and distributed and uses feedback. An assistive system could be best integrated into the therapy of a human with a central nervous system lesion if the system is controlled in a similar manner. Here, we present a novel wireless architecture and routing protocol for a distributed functional electrical stimulation system that enables control of movement. Methods The new system comprises a set of miniature battery-powered devices with stimulating and sensing functionality mounted on the body of the subject. The devices communicate wirelessly with one coordinator device, which is connected to a host computer. The control algorithm runs on the computer in open- or closed-loop form. A prototype of the system was designed using commercial, off-the-shelf components. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves and the distributed nature of the system were considered during the development of a two-hop routing protocol, which was implemented in the prototype’s software. Results The outcomes of this research include a novel system architecture and routing protocol and a functional prototype based on commercial, off-the-shelf components. A proof-of-concept study was performed on a hemiplegic subject with paresis of the right arm. The subject was tasked with generating a fully functional palmar grasp (closing of the fingers. One node was used to provide this movement, while a second node controlled the activation of extensor muscles to eliminate undesired wrist flexion. The system was tested with the open- and closed-loop control algorithms. Conclusions The system fulfilled technical and application requirements. The novel communication protocol enabled reliable real-time use of the system in both closed- and open-loop forms. The testing on a patient showed that the multi-node system could operate effectively to generate functional movement.

  9. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

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    Kerkhofs Lore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session, supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring. Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5 actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT. Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02, while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05. At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively. Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program.

  10. ORBITAL INJURIES

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    Andrej Kansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbit is involved in 40% of all facial fractures. There is considerable variety in severity, ranging from simple nondisplaced to complex comminuted fractures. Complex comminuted fractures (up to 20% are responsible for the majority of complications and unfavorable results. Orbital fractures are classified as internal orbital fractures, zygomatico-orbital fractures, naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures and combined fractures. The ophtalmic sequelae of midfacial fractures are usually edema and ecchymosis of the soft tissues, subconjuctival hemorrhage, diplopia, iritis, retinal edema, ptosis, enophthalmos, ocular muscle paresis, mechanical restriction of ocular movement and nasolacrimal disturbances. More severe injuries such as optic nerve trauma and retinal detachments have also been reported. Within the wide range of orbital fractures small group of complex fractures causes most of the sequelae. Therefore identification of severe injuries and adequate treatment is of major importance. The introduction of craniofacial techniques made possible a wide exposure even of large orbital wall defects and their reconstruction by bone grafts. In spite of significant progress, repair of complex orbital wall defects remains a problem even for the experienced surgeons.Results. In 1999 121 facial injuries were treated at our department (Clinical Centre Ljubljana Dept. Of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Orbit was involved in 65% of cases. Isolated inner orbital fractures presented 4% of all fractures. 17 (14% complex cases were treated, 5 of them being NOE, 5 orbital (frame and inner walls, 3 zygomatico-orbital, 2 FNO and 2 maxillo-orbital fractures.Conclusions. Final result of the surgical treatment depends on severity of maxillofacial trauma. Complex comminuted fractures are responsable for most of the unfavorable results and ocular function is often permanently damaged (up to 75% in these fractures.

  11. Clinical efficacy and prognostic indicators for lower limb pedalling exercise early after stroke: Study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

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    Myint Phyo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that repetitive, skilled, functional movement is beneficial in driving functional reorganisation of the brain early after stroke. This study will investigate a whether pedalling an upright, static exercise cycle, to provide such beneficial activity, will enhance recovery and b which stroke survivors might be able to participate in pedalling. Methods/Design Participants (n = 24 will be up to 30 days since stroke onset, with unilateral weakness and unable to walk without assistance. This study will use a modified exercise bicycle fitted with a UniCam crank. All participants will give informed consent, then undergo baseline measurements, and then attempt to pedal. Those able to pedal will be entered into a single-centre, observer-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT. All participants will receive routine rehabilitation. The experimental group will, in addition, pedal daily for up to ten minutes, for up to ten working days. Prognostic indicators, measured at baseline, will be: site of stroke lesion, trunk control, ability to ambulate, and severity of lower limb paresis. The primary outcome for the RCT is ability to voluntarily contract paretic lower limb muscle, measured by the Motricity Index. Secondary outcomes include ability to ambulate and timing of onset and offset of activity in antagonist muscle groups during pedalling, measured by EMG. Discussion This protocol is for a trial of a novel therapy intervention. Findings will establish whether there is sufficient evidence of benefit to justify proceeding with further research into clinical efficacy of upright pedalling exercise early after stroke. Information on potential prognostic indicators will suggest which stroke survivors could benefit from the intervention. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN45392701

  12. Dexamphetamine improves upper extremity outcome during rehabilitation after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

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    Schuster, Corina; Maunz, Gerd; Lutz, Karin; Kischka, Udo; Sturzenegger, Rolf; Ettlin, Thierry

    2011-10-01

    For early inpatient stroke rehabilitation, the effectiveness of amphetamine combined with physiotherapy varies across studies. To investigate whether the recovery of activities of daily living (ADL, primary outcome) and motor function (secondary outcome) can be improved by dexamphetamine added to physiotherapy. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 16 patients, from 918 who were screened, were randomized to the experimental group (EG, dexamphetamine + physiotherapy) or control group (CG, placebo + physiotherapy). Both groups received multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation. Dexamphetamine (10 mg oral) or placebo was administered 2 days per week before physiotherapy. ADL and motor function were measured using the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA) twice during baseline, every week during the 5-week treatment period, and at follow-up 1 week, 6 months, and 12 months after intervention. The majority of ineligible patients had too little paresis, were on anticoagulants, or had a stroke >60 days prior to entry. Participants (EG, n = 7, age 70.3 ± 10 years, 5 women, 37.9 ± 9 days after stroke; CG, n = 9, age 65.2 ± 17 years, 3 women, 40.3 ± 9 days after stroke) did not differ at baseline except for the leg subscale. Analysis of variance from baseline to 1 week follow-up revealed significant improvements in favor of EG for subscales ADL (P = .023) and arm function (P = .020) at end of treatment. No adverse events were detected. In this small trial that was based on prior positive trials, significant gains in ADL and arm function suggest that the dose and timing of dexamphetamine can augment physiotherapy. Effect size calculation suggests inclusion of at least 25 patients per group in future studies.

  13. Mechanisms of Short-Term Training-Induced Reaching Improvement in Severely Hemiparetic Stroke Patients: A TMS Study

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    Harris-Love, Michelle L.; Morton, Susanne M.; Perez, Monica A.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying improved upper-extremity motor skills have been partially investigated in patients with good motor recovery but are poorly understood in more impaired individuals, the majority of stroke survivors. Objective The authors studied changes in primary motor cortex (M1) excitability (motor evoked potentials [MEPs], contralateral and ipsilateral silent periods [CSPs and ISPs] using transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS]) associated with training-induced reaching improvement in stroke patients with severe arm paresis (n = 11; Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer score (F-M) = 27 ± 6). Methods All patients underwent a single session of reaching training focused on moving the affected hand from a resting site to a target placed at 80% of maximum forward reaching amplitude in response to a visual “GO” cue. Triceps contribute primarily as agonist and biceps primarily as antagonist to the trained forward reaching movement. Response times were recorded for each reaching movement. Results Preceding training (baseline), greater interhemispheric inhibition (measured by ISP) in the affected triceps muscle, reflecting inhibition from the nonlesioned to the lesioned M1, was observed in patients with lower F-M scores (more severe motor impairment). Training-induced improvements in reaching were greater in patients with slower response times at baseline. Increased MEP amplitudes and decreased ISPs and CSPs were observed in the affected triceps but not in the biceps muscle after training. Conclusion These results indicate that along with training-induced motor improvements, training-specific modulation of intrahemispheric and interhemispheric mechanisms occurs after reaching practice in chronic stroke patients with substantial arm impairment. PMID:21343522

  14. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

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    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  15. Coupling brain-machine interfaces with cortical stimulation for brain-state dependent stimulation: enhancing motor cortex excitability for neurorehabilitation

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    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor recovery after stroke is an unsolved challenge despite intensive rehabilitation training programs. Brain stimulation techniques have been explored in addition to traditional rehabilitation training to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex. This modulation of cortical excitability augments the response to afferent input during motor exercises, thereby enhancing skilled motor learning by long-term potentiation-like plasticity. Recent approaches examined brain stimulation applied concurrently with voluntary movements to induce more specific use-dependent neural plasticity during motor training for neurorehabilitation. Unfortunately, such approaches are not applicable for the many severely affected stroke patients lacking residual hand function. These patients require novel activity-dependent stimulation paradigms based on intrinsic brain activity. Here, we report on such brain state-dependent stimulation (BSDS combined with haptic feedback provided by a robotic hand orthosis. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and haptic feedback to the hand were controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization during motor-imagery and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in one healthy subject and one patient with severe hand paresis in the chronic phase after stroke. BSDS significantly increased the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex in both healthy and post-stroke conditions, an effect not observed in non-BSDS protocols. This feasibility study suggests that closing the loop between intrinsic brain state, cortical stimulation and haptic feedback provides a novel neurorehabilitation strategy for stroke patients lacking residual hand function, a proposal that warrants further investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients.

  16. Surgical management of thalamic gliomas: case selection, technical considerations, and review of literature.

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    Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Thakar, Sumit; Dadlani, Ravi; Mohan, Dilip; Furtado, Sunil Valentine; Ghosal, Nandita; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Alangar S

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to identify (1) the thalamic gliomas suitable for surgical resection and (2) the appropriate surgical approach based on their location and the displacement of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC). A retrospective study over a 5-year period (from 2006 to 2010) was performed in 41 patients with thalamic gliomas. The mean age of these patients was 20.4 years (range, 2-65 years). Twenty (49 %) tumors were thalamic, 19 (46 %) were thalamopeduncular, and 2 (5 %) were bilateral. The PLIC, based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance axial sections, was displaced anterolaterally in 23 (56 %) cases and laterally in 6 (14 %) cases. It was involved by lesion in eight (20 %) cases and could not be identified in four (10 %) cases. Resection, favored in patients with well-defined, contrast-enhancing lesions, was performed in 34 (83 %) cases, while a biopsy was resorted to in 7 (17 %) cases. A gross total resection or near total resection (>90 %) could be achieved in 26 (63 %) cases. The middle temporal gyrus approach, used when the PLIC was displaced anterolaterally, was the commonly used approach (63.5 %). Common pathologies were pilocytic astrocytoma (58 %) in children and grade III/IV astrocytomas (86 %) in adults. Preoperative motor deficits improved in 64 % of the patients with pilocytic lesions as compared to 0 % in patients with grade III/IV lesions (P value, 0.001). Postoperatively, two patients (5 %) had marginal worsening of motor power, two patients developed visual field defects, and one patient developed a third nerve paresis. Radical resection of thalamic gliomas is a useful treatment modality in a select subset of patients and is the treatment of choice for pilocytic astrocytomas. Tailoring the surgical approach, depending on the relative position of the PLIC, has an important bearing on outcome.

  17. Carotid endarterectomy in cervical block anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery

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    Ilijevski Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of modern carotid surgery is relief of symptoms, stroke prevention, improvement in quality of life, prevention of vascular dementia, and prolongation of lifetime. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper was to compare the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in cervical block vs. general anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA. METHOD: One hundred patients (76 male, 24 female, mean age 60.81 years with occluded contralateral ICA were operated from 1997-2000. Neurological symptomatology, deficiency and stroke incidence were preoperatively analyzed in two groups. Duplex-scanning, angiograms and CT-scan confirmed the diagnosis. Risk factors analysis included hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, smoking and history of CAD, CABG and PAOD. Morbidity and mortality were used to compare the outcome of surgery in two groups. RESULTS There was no difference of age, gender and symptomatology between the groups. Paresis, TIA and dysphasia were most frequent. 70%-90% of ICA stenosis was seen in the majority of patients. Hypertension and smoking were dominant risk factors in these two groups. Eversion carotid end arterectomy was the most frequent technique used. In three cases out of nine that were operated under cervical block, the neurological symptoms developed just after clamping, so the intra-luminal shunt was placed. Postoperative morbidity was 12% and mortality was 8%. Conclusion: There was no difference of preoperative parameters, surgical technique and outcome in these two groups. Without other intraoperative monitoring, cervical block anesthesia might be an option in patients with the occlusion of the contralateral ICA. However, prospective studies involving more patients are needed.

  18. The neural substrates of impaired finger tapping regularity after stroke.

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    Calautti, Cinzia; Jones, P Simon; Guincestre, Jean-Yves; Naccarato, Marcello; Sharma, Nikhil; Day, Diana J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2010-03-01

    Not only finger tapping speed, but also tapping regularity can be impaired after stroke, contributing to reduced dexterity. The neural substrates of impaired tapping regularity after stroke are unknown. Previous work suggests damage to the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and prefrontal cortex (PFCx) affects externally-cued hand movement. We tested the hypothesis that these two areas are involved in impaired post-stroke tapping regularity. In 19 right-handed patients (15 men/4 women; age 45-80 years; purely subcortical in 16) partially to fully recovered from hemiparetic stroke, tri-axial accelerometric quantitative assessment of tapping regularity and BOLD fMRI were obtained during fixed-rate auditory-cued index-thumb tapping, in a single session 10-230 days after stroke. A strong random-effect correlation between tapping regularity index and fMRI signal was found in contralesional PMd such that the worse the regularity the stronger the activation. A significant correlation in the opposite direction was also present within contralesional PFCx. Both correlations were maintained if maximal index tapping speed, degree of paresis and time since stroke were added as potential confounds. Thus, the contralesional PMd and PFCx appear to be involved in the impaired ability of stroke patients to fingertap in pace with external cues. The findings for PMd are consistent with repetitive TMS investigations in stroke suggesting a role for this area in affected-hand movement timing. The inverse relationship with tapping regularity observed for the PFCx and the PMd suggests these two anatomically-connected areas negatively co-operate. These findings have implications for understanding the disruption and reorganization of the motor systems after stroke. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms in Lyme neuroborreliosis after pharmacological treatment: a systematic review.

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    Dersch, R; Sommer, H; Rauer, S; Meerpohl, J J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists about residual symptoms after pharmacological treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Reports of disabling long-term sequels lead to concerns in patients and health care providers. We systematically reviewed the available evidence from studies reporting treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis to assess the prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms after treatment. A literature search was performed in three databases and three clinical trial registers to find eligible studies reporting on residual symptoms in patients after pharmacological treatment of LNB. Diagnosis must have been performed according to consensus-derived case definitions. No restrictions regarding study design or language were set. Symptom prevalence was pooled using a random-effects model. Forty-four eligible clinical trials and studies were found: 8 RCTs, 17 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 case series. The follow-up period in the eligible studies ranged from 7 days to 20 years. The weighted mean proportion of residual symptoms was 28 % (95 % CI 23-34 %, n = 34 studies) for the latest reported time point. Prevalence of residual symptoms was statistically significantly higher in studies using the "possible" case definition (p = 0.0048). Cranial neuropathy, pain, paresis, cognitive disturbances, headache, and fatigue were statistically significantly lower in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. LNB patients may experience residual symptoms after treatment with a prevalence of approximately 28 %. The prevalence and spectrum of residual symptoms differ according to the applied case definition. Symptoms like fatigue are not reported in studies using the "probable/definite" case definition. As the "possible" case definition is more unspecific, patients with other conditions may be included. Reports of debilitating fatigue and cognitive impairment after LNB, a "post-Lyme syndrome", could therefore be an artifact of unspecific case definitions in single

  20. Venomous snakebites in children in southern Croatia.

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    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Vrkić, Ivana; Brizić, Ivica; Ivić, Ivo; Lukšić, Boris

    2016-03-15

    This retrospective study represents observation of 160 children and adolescents aged up to 18 years that experienced venomous snakebites in southern Croatia and were treated in the Clinical Department of Infectious Diseases in the University Hospital Centre Split from 1979 to 2013. The main purpose of this research was to determine the epidemiological characteristics, clinical presentation, local and general complications, and received treatment. Most bites occurred during warm months, from early May to late August (80%), mostly in May and June. Upper limb bites were more frequent (59%) than lower limb bites (40%). Out of the total number of poisoned children, 24% developed local, and 25% general complications. The most common local complications were haemorrhagic blisters that occurred in 20% children, followed by compartment syndrome presented in 7.5% patients. The most dominated general complication was cranial nerve paresis or paralysis, which was identified in 11.2% patients, whereas shock symptoms were registrated in 7% children. According to severity of poisoning, 9.4% children had minor, 35% mild, 30.6% moderate, and 24.4% had severe clinical manifestation of envenomation. Only one (0.6%) child passed away because of snakebite directly on the neck. All patients received antivenom produced by the Institute of Immunology in Zagreb, tetanus prophylaxis as well, and almost all of them received antibiotics, and a great majority of them also received corticosteroids and antihistamines. Neighter anaphylactic reaction nor serum disease were noticed in our patients after administrating antivenom. A total of 26% children underwent surgical interventions, and incision of haemorrhagic blister was the most common applied surgical treatment, which was preformed in 15.6% patients, while fasciotomy was done in 7.5% subjects. All of our surgically treated patients recovered successfully. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distinct neuromuscular phenotypes in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2 : a whole body highfield MRI study.

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    Kornblum, Cornelia; Lutterbey, Götz; Bogdanow, Manuela; Kesper, Kristina; Schild, Hans; Schröder, Rolf; Wattjes, Mike Peter

    2006-06-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) and 2 (DM2) present with distinct though overlapping clinical phenotypes. Comparative imaging data on skeletal muscle involvement are not at present available. We used the novel technique of whole body 3.0 Tesla (T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to further characterize musculoskeletal features in DM2 and compared the results with DM1.MRI findings of 15 DM1 and 14 DM2 patients were evaluated with respect to patterns of skeletal muscle affection and clinical data using the Muscular Impairment Rating Scale (MIRS) and Medical Research Council scale (MRC). All DM1 patients had pathological MRI compared with only 5 DM2 patients. In contrast to DM2, DM1 patients showed a characteristic distribution of muscle involvement with frequent and early degeneration of the medial heads of gastrocnemius muscles, and a perifemoral semilunar pattern of quadriceps muscle affection sparing the rectus femoris. The most frequently affected muscles in DM1 were the medial heads of gastrocnemius, soleus, and vastus medialis muscles. In DM2, however, the erector spinae and gluteus maximus muscles were most vulnerable to degeneration. MRI data were in line with the clinical grading in 12 DM1 and 3 DM2 patients. In 3 DM1 and 5 DM2 patients, MRI detected subclinical muscle involvement. 9 DM2 patients with mild to moderate proximal muscle weakness and/or myalgias had normal MRI. Pathological MRI changes in DM2 emerged with increasing age and were restricted to women. Whole body 3.0T MRI is a sensitive imaging technique that demonstrated a characteristic skeletal muscle affection in DM1. In contrast, MRI was no reliable indicator for skeletal muscle involvement in mildly affected DM2 patients since myalgia and mild paresis were usually not reflected by MRI signal alterations.

  2. Sclerosteosis involving the temporal bone: histopathologic aspects.

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    Nager, G T; Hamersma, H

    1986-01-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare, potentially lethal, autosomal recessive, progressive craniotubular sclerosing bone dysplasia with characteristic facial and skeletal features. The temporal bone changes include a marked increase in overall size, extensive sclerosis, narrowing of the external auditory canal, and severe constriction of the internal auditory meatus, fallopian canal, eustachian tube, and middle ear cleft. Attenuation of the bony canals of the 9th, 10th, and 11th cranial nerves, reduction in size of the internal carotid artery, and severe obliteration of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb also occur. Loss of hearing, generally bilateral, is a frequent symptom. It often manifests in early childhood and initially is expressed as sound conduction impairment. Later, a sensorineural hearing loss and loss of vestibular nerve function often develop. Impairment of facial nerve function is another feature occasionally present at birth. In the beginning, a unilateral intermittent facial weakness may occur which eventually progresses to a bilateral permanent facial paresis. The histologic examination of the temporal bones from a patient with sclerosteosis explains the mechanisms involved in the progressive impairment of sound conduction and loss of cochlear, vestibular, and facial nerve function. There is a decrease of the arterial blood supply to the brain and an obstruction of the venous drainage from it. The histopathology reveals the obstacles to decompression of the middle ear cleft, ossicular chain, internal auditory and facial canals, and the risks, and in many instances the contraindications, to such procedures. On the other hand, decompression of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb should be considered as an additional life-saving procedure in conjunction with the prophylactic craniotomy recommended in all adult patients.

  3. Experimental and iatrogenic poisoning by sodium selenite in pigs

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    Paulo V. Peixoto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Following a case of iatrogenic selenium poisoning in a young pig, an experimental study was carry out. Sodium selenite was orally and parenterally administered to 13 pigs that were subdivided into three groups (G1, G2 and G3. The animals in groups G1 and G3 received sodium selenite intramuscularly (IM, G1 received a comercial formula, and G3 received sodium selenite mixed with distilled water at different dosages, and those in group G2 were fed commercial sodium selenite. Acute and subacute poisoning was observed in both groups, although the onset of clinical signs was slower in group G2. Only one pig (in group G1 that had received the highest dose showed a peracute course. Apathy, anorexia, dyspnea, vomiting, muscular tremors, proprioceptive deficit, ataxia and paresis of the hind limbs progressing to the front limbs evolving to tetraplegia were observed. Postmortem findings differed whether the animals received the injected (G1 and G3 or oral (G2 sodium selenite. The liver was moderately atrophic in some animals of G2. Some of the animals in groups G1 and G3 presented with lung edema. One pig in G3 had yellowish-brown areas in the ventral horns of the cervical intumescences of the spinal cord. The most important histological changes were present in the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar intumescences of the spinal cord. In one animal, changes were present in the brainstem and mesencephalon. The initial lesion was a perivascular and astrocyte edema that progressing to lysis and death of astrocytes and neurons. In the chronic stage of the lesions, there were extensive areas of liquefaction necrosis with perivascular lymphocytic and histiocytic infiltration and occasional eosinophils. It seems that disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to astrocyte edema is the most likely mechanism of CNS lesion.

  4. Resultados a largo plazo de la parotidectomía subtotal para tumores mixtos

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    Manuel Estrada Sarmiento

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Se realiza una investigación retrospectiva de las historias clínicas de 31 pacientes con tumor mixto de la glándula parótida consecutivamente tratados con una parotidectomía subtotal en nuestro Departamento, desde 1979 hasta 1983, ambos inclusives. De los 31 pacientes 12 eran masculinos (38,7 % y 19 femeninos (61,3 %. La parótida derecha fue la más afectada; la incisión quirúrgica de Blair se empleó en 19 pacientes. La paresia del nervio facial se presentó en el 32,2 % de la serie. La apreciación de la supervivencia y el control local a los 10 y 15 años fueron de 90,3 y 0 % y 80,6 % y 0, respectivamente.A retrospective investigation of the medical histories of 31 patients with mixed tumor of the parotid gland that were consecutively treated with subtotal parotidectomy in our Department from 1979 to 1983, including both, was made. Of the 31 patients 12 were males (38.7 % and 19 females (61.3 %. The right parotid was the most affected. Blair’s surgical incision was used in 19 patients. 32.2 % of the series had paresis of the facial nerve.The estimation of survival and the local control at 10 and 15 years old were 90.3 and 0 %, and 80.6 and 0 %, respectively.

  5. Detection and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease virus in peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Haryana State, India.

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    Kumar, Aman; Maan, Sushila; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Rana, Virender Pratap; Jindal, Naresh; Batra, Kanisht; Ghosh, Arnab; Mishra, Shiv Kumar; Kapoor, Sanjay; Maan, Narender Singh

    2013-12-01

    Present study was undertaken to investigate the cause of deaths of peafowls in Haryana State. In total, 145 birds were sick and 28 birds were reported dead during July to September 2012. Some of the sick birds were showing signs of shaking of heads, torticollis and paresis. Blood and cloacal swab samples from sick birds along with brain and intestinal tissues from dead birds were collected for further investigation. Although post-mortem examination showed no typical lesions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) yet raised HI tires against NDV in some serum samples and clinical signs indicated the presence of NDV. One of the brain tissues (NDV/IND2012/01) from the field case was processed and adapted to Vero cell line for virus isolation. The fusion (F) gene based nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) confirmed the presence of NDV in all field samples and cell culture isolate. Sequencing of the partial F gene amplicons (216 bp) using the PCR primers as sequencing primers confirmed the PCR results. The deduced amino acid sequences of partial F gene were found to have the amino acid motif (111)GRRQKR/F(117) in the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS). This amino acid motif is indicative of the velogenic nature of these NDVs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the virus belonged to class II genotype VII very closely related to virus isolates originated from outbreaks in Western Europe, Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan and India. Phylogenetic grouping of the virus and sequence of FPCS is indicative of pathogenic potential of virus strain circulating in peacocks in Haryana.

  6. Safety and efficacy of a new tourniquet system

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    Sato Junko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In upper limb surgery, the pneumatic tourniquet is an essential tool to provide a clean, bloodless surgical field, improving visualization of anatomical structures and preventing iatrogenic failure. Optimal inflation pressure to accomplish these objects without injuring normal tissue and inducing complications is not yet established. Use of the minimum tourniquet pressure necessary to produce a bloodless surgical field is preferable in order to prevent injury to normal tissue. Various methods have been implemented in an effort to lower effective cuff pressure. The purpose of this study is to report clinical experience with a new tourniquet system in which pressure is synchronized with systolic blood pressure (SBP using a vital information monitor. Methods We routinely used the tourniquet system in 120 consecutive upper limb surgeries performed under general anaesthesia in our operating room instead of our clinic. Cuff pressure was automatically regulated to additional 100 mmHg based on the SBP and was renewed every 2.5 minutes intervals. Results An excellent bloodless field was obtained in 119 cases, with the exception of one case of a 44-year-old woman who underwent internal screw fixation of metacarpal fracture. No complications, such as compartment syndrome, deep vein disorder, skin disorder, paresis, or nerve damage, occurred during or after surgery. Conclusions This new tourniquet system, synchronized with SBP, can be varied to correspond with sharp rises or drops in SBP to supply adequate pressure. The system reduces labor needed to deflate and re-inflate to achieve different pressures. It also seemed to contribute to the safety in upper limb surgery, in spite of rare unexpected oozing mid-surgery, by reducing tissue pressure.

  7. Monensin toxicosis in swine: potentiation by tiamulin administration and ameliorative effect of treatment with selenium and/or vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vleet, J F; Runnels, L J; Cook, J R; Scheidt, A B

    1987-10-01

    Modulation of acute monensin toxicosis in swine was evaluated in 2 studies. In study 1, 56 weanling male pigs were allotted to 14 groups of 4 each. Pigs in 7 groups were given tiamulin in the drinking water (to supply 7.7 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 3 days before and for 2 days after monensin administration. Monensin was given as a single oral dose (at 0, 7.5, 15, 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg/kg) to pigs in groups with or without tiamulin exposure. Prominent acute clinical signs of monensin toxicosis (hypermetria, hind limb ataxia, paresis, knuckling of hind limbs, and recumbency) developed by 2 to 6 hours after dosing in pigs given 15 or 25 mg of monensin/kg with tiamulin exposure, but not in pigs given the 15 or 25 mg of monensin/kg without tiamulin exposure. Also, the extent of monensin-induced skeletal muscle damage at 4 days after monensin dosing was enhanced in pigs given 7.5, 15, or 25 mg of monensin/kg and exposed to tiamulin. In study 2, 48 weanling male pigs were allotted to 8 groups of 6 each. Four groups of pigs were given 20 mg of monensin/kg orally, and 4 groups were given 100 mg of monensin/kg orally. For each monensin dose, a group was treated 24 hours before monensin administration with (i) selenium (Se)-vitamin E preparation, 0.25 mg of Se and 68 IU of d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E)/kg, IM; (ii) vitamin E only, 68 IU of d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg; (iii) Se only, 0.25 mg of Se/kg; or (iv) vehicle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain-computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. N.; Carey, J.; Edelman, B. J.; Doud, A.; Grande, A.; Lakshminarayan, K.; He, B.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain-computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Approach. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Main results. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. Significance. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  9. Wireless distributed functional electrical stimulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovičić, Nenad S; Saranovac, Lazar V; Popović, Dejan B

    2012-08-09

    The control of movement in humans is hierarchical and distributed and uses feedback. An assistive system could be best integrated into the therapy of a human with a central nervous system lesion if the system is controlled in a similar manner. Here, we present a novel wireless architecture and routing protocol for a distributed functional electrical stimulation system that enables control of movement. The new system comprises a set of miniature battery-powered devices with stimulating and sensing functionality mounted on the body of the subject. The devices communicate wirelessly with one coordinator device, which is connected to a host computer. The control algorithm runs on the computer in open- or closed-loop form. A prototype of the system was designed using commercial, off-the-shelf components. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves and the distributed nature of the system were considered during the development of a two-hop routing protocol, which was implemented in the prototype's software. The outcomes of this research include a novel system architecture and routing protocol and a functional prototype based on commercial, off-the-shelf components. A proof-of-concept study was performed on a hemiplegic subject with paresis of the right arm. The subject was tasked with generating a fully functional palmar grasp (closing of the fingers). One node was used to provide this movement, while a second node controlled the activation of extensor muscles to eliminate undesired wrist flexion. The system was tested with the open- and closed-loop control algorithms. The system fulfilled technical and application requirements. The novel communication protocol enabled reliable real-time use of the system in both closed- and open-loop forms. The testing on a patient showed that the multi-node system could operate effectively to generate functional movement.

  10. Vertebral body osteomyelitis in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markel, M.D.; Madigan, J.E.; Lichtensteiger, C.A.; Large, S.M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical signs, laboratory data, results of nuclear scintigraphy and radiographic examination of five horses with vertebral body osteomyelitis are described together with response to treatment. Three horses were less than five months of age. Four horses demonstrated hindlimb paresis and in three a focus of pain in the thoracolumbar region could be identified. An umbilical abscess, a caudal lobe lung abscess and a patent urachus were considered primary niduses of infection in each of three horses. Leucocytosis, neutrophilia, anaemia and elevated fibrinogen were the most consistent laboratory abnormalities. Nuclear scintigraphy was performed in three horses and identified the site of the vertebral lesion which was subsequently evaluated radiographically. In the other two horses radiographic examination in the region of areas of focal pain identified a lesion. Radiographic abnormalities included compression fractures of vertebral bodies (two), proliferative new bone (three) and soft tissue swelling ventral to a vertebral body (one). Two horses, including one with a compression fracture of the second lumbar vertebra, received parenteral antimicrobial therapy for 40 and 74 days, respectively. When re-examined six months later they showed no neurological abnormalities. The other three horses failed to respond to antimicrobial treatment and were humanely destroyed. The horse with a lung abscess also had an abscess cranial to the right tuber coxae which extended into the vertebral bodies of the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae from which Streptococcus zooepidemicus was cultured. A horse with proliferative new bone on the ventral aspect of the fifth and sixth thoracic vertebrae had a mediastinal mass associated with these vertebrae and fungal granulomas, from which Aspergillus species was cultured, in the heart and aorta, trachea, spleen and kidney. The horse with a patent urachus and soft tissue swelling ventral to the vertebral body of the 12th thoracic vertebra

  11. Preoperative irradiation of an extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shobu; Kurihara, Masaki; Mori, Kazuo; Amamoto, Yuhei.

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of case with the extracerebral cavernous hemangioma in the middle fossa in which total removal was carried out after radiotherapy. Follow-up study with computed tomography during and after irradiation are presented. A 44-year-old house-wife complained of a decreased vision of the both eyes and paresis of the left upper and lower limbs. CT scan revealed a slightly high density area in the right middle cranial fossa which was markedly enhanced with contrast media. Right carotid angio-graphy demonstrated a large avascular mass in the right middle fossa and no feeding artery or draining vein was visualized except a faint irregular stain in the venous phase. An attempt to total removal of the tumor had failed to success because of extensive hemorrhage from the tumor. Histological examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma. Irradiation with a total dose of 5000 rads was delivered. After irradiation. CT scan revealed a marked decrease of size and EMI number of the tumor. At this stage, hypervascular mass lesion with feeding arteries was noted in conventional angiography. Tumor stain in prolonged injection angiography was also visualized. In the second operation, removal of the tumor was performed without any difficulty and hemorrhage was controlled easily by electrocoagulation. Histology revealed a marked narrowing of vessels with an increase in the connective tissues. In the central part of specimen, there noted findings of coagulation necrosis, intraluminal thrombus formations and so on, which were attributed to the influence of radiation. It is concluded that in case of a extracerebral cavernous hemangioma with massive hemorrhage, radiation of up to 3000 - 5000 rads was a method of choice. The treatment results in an increase of probability of total removal of the tumor. (author)

  12. Clinical and radiological observations in the spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Byung Soo

    1980-01-01

    The spondylolysis is a defective ossification in the pars interarticularis of the neural arches without displacement of the vertebral body and it sometimes confuses with other spinal lesions complaining of low back pain. The authors analyzed with clinical observations in 88 cases of spondylolysis diagnosed radiologically at B.N.U.H. from January 1977 to August 1978. The results obtained as follows: 1. Among 88 cases of the spondylolysis, the highest incidence of the age was second decade in 55.7%, and the sex ratio was 4.2 to 1 in male to female. 2. The prominent symptoms were a low back pain in 71.6%, the radiating pain with the low backache in 27.3% and the paresis of low extremities in 1.2%. 3. The frequent sites of the involvement were fifth lumbar vertebra in 83.6%, fourth lumbar vertebra in 9.8%, third lumbar vertebra in 5.5%, first lumbar vertebra in 1.1% and second lumbar vertebra in zero. 4. Bilateral lesions were in 68.2% and unilateral lesion was 20.9% in the right side and 10.9% in the left. 5. The combined abnormal findings of the spine were spondylitis in 36.1%, suspicious H.N.P. in 27.8%, spondylolisthesis in 25.0%, spina bifida in 8.3% and lumbarization in 2.8% in that order. 6. The cause of spondylolysis are still uncertain, but we are experienced 9 cases (10.3%) in the definite history of the trauma.

  13. Clinical and radiological profile of Hirayama disease: A flexion myelopathy due to tight cervical dural canal amenable to collar therapy

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    K M Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirayama disease (HD is benign focal amyotrophy of the distal upper limbs, often misdiagnosed as motor neuron disease. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often reported normal. Objective: To study the clinicoradiological profile of hand wasting in young males. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with insidious-onset hand wasting from March 2008 to May 2011 were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cervical MRI in neutral position was done in 11 patients and flexion contrast imaging was done in 10 patients. Results: All patients were males less than 25 years of age, with median age 23 years, except one patient who was 50 years old. Duration of illness was 3 months to 3 years. All (100% had oblique amyotrophy, four (36% cold paresis, 10 (91% minipolymyoclonus and three (27% had fasciculations. Regional reflexes were variably absent. Two patients (18% had brisk reflexes of lower limbs with flexor plantars. Electromyography (EMG showed chronic denervation in the C7-T1 myotomes. Neutral position MRI showed loss of cervical lordosis in 10/11 (91%, localized lower cervical cord atrophy in 9/11 (82%, asymmetric cord flattening in 11/11 (100% and intramedullary hyperintensity in 2/11 (18%; flexion study showed loss of dural attachment, anterior displacement of dorsal dura, epidural flow voids in 9/10 (90% and enhancing epidural crescent in 10/10 (100%. Clinical profile, imaging and electrophysiological findings of the patient aged 50 years will be described in detail as presentation at this age is exceptional. Collar therapy slowed progression in most cases. Conclusion: Clinical features of HD corroborated well with electrophysiological diagnosis of anterior horn cell disease of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast MRI is characteristic, routine studies have a high predictive value for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  14. Radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas: Early experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linskey, M.E.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed our early experience with the first 26 patients with acoustic neurinomas (21 unilateral, 5 bilateral) treated by stereotactic radiosurgery using the first North American 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 19 months (median, 13 months). Serial postoperative imaging showed either a decrease in tumor size (11 patients) or growth arrest (15 patients). Loss of central contrast enhancement was a characteristic change (18 patients). Seven patients had good or serviceable hearing preoperatively. In all 7 the preoperative hearing status was retained immediately after radiosurgery. At follow-up, 3 had preserved hearing, 1 had reduced hearing, and 3 had lost all hearing in the treated ear. Hearing in 1 patient that was nonserviceable preoperatively later improved to a serviceable hearing level. Delayed facial paresis developed in 6 patients, and delayed trigeminal sensory loss developed in 7 patients, none of whom had significant deficits before radiosurgery. Both facial and trigeminal deficits tended to improve within 3 to 6 months of onset with excellent recovery anticipated. Lower cranial nerve dysfunction was not observed. All 26 patients remain at their preoperative employment or functional status. At present, stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas in patients who are elderly, have significant concomitant medical problems, have a tumor in their only hearing ear, have bilateral acoustic neurinomas, refuse microsurgical excision, or have recurrent tumor despite surgical resection. Although longer and more extensive follow-up is required, the control of tumor growth and the acceptable rate of complications in this early experience testifies to the future expanding role of this technique in the management of selected acoustic neurinomas

  15. [A case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K; Arai, E; Kobayashi, T; Takasaka, T

    1992-12-01

    Since the advent of antibiotics, otogenic complications have decreased considerably. However, incomplete antibiotic therapy has altered the clinical course of middle ear disease so as to be more insidious. This paper reports a case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. A 48-year-old man visited our hospital presenting with a 4-day history of right otorrhea and a tender swelling in the right neck. Physical examination showed a febrile patient (38.8 degrees C) with right facial paresis and trismus. A hyperemic, hard and tender swelling was observed in his right neck from the lateral cervical to the mental region. The tympanic membrane was invisible because of granulation and swelling of the posterior wall of the external auditory canal. Intravenous clindamycin and ceftazidime therapy was started immediately. A CT-scan revealed a diffuse shadow with bony destruction in the right mastoid cortex. Extensive abscess formation was also found in the right sternocleidomastoid muscle, in the anterior neck and in the posterior neck. He was diagnosed as having Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. Radical mastoidectomy and drainage of the neck abscess was performed on the third day under general anesthesia. The mastoid cavity was found to be filled with pus and cholesteatoma debris. A small area of defective bone was found at the mastoid tip, through which there were communications between the mastoid cavity and the abscesses in the neck. Bony destruction was also found in the horizontal and vertical portion of the facial canal. Bacteroides and three kinds of gram-negative rods were cultured from the mastoid cavity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Evidence that antibodies against recombinant SnSAG1 of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites are involved in infection and immunity in equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Siobhan; Witonsky, Sharon

    2009-07-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the principal etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). An immunodominant protein of S. neurona, SnSAG-1, is expressed by the majority of S. neurona merozoites isolated from spinal tissues of horses diagnosed with EPM and may be a candidate for diagnostic tests and prophylaxis for EPM. Five horses were vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant SnSAG1 (rSnSAG1) and 5 control (sham vaccinated) horses were vaccinated with adjuvant only. Serum was evaluated pre- and post-vaccination, prior to challenge, for antibodies against rSnSAG1 and inhibitory effects on the infectivity of S. neurona by an in vitro serum neutralization assay. The effect of vaccination with rSnSAG1 on in vivo infection by S. neurona was evaluated by challenging all the horses with S. neurona merozoites. Blinded daily examinations and 4 blinded neurological examinations were used to evaluate the presence of clinical signs of EPM. The 5 vaccinated horses developed serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers of SnSAG1, detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), post-vaccination. Post-vaccination serum from vaccinated horses was found to have an inhibitory effect on merozoites, demonstrated by in vitro bioassay. Following the challenge, the 5 control horses displayed clinical signs of EPM, including ataxia. While 4 of the 5 vaccinated horses did not become ataxic. One rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horse showed paresis in 1 limb with muscle atrophy. All horses showed mild, transient, cranial nerve deficits; however, disease did not progress to ataxia in rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horses. The study showed that vaccination with rSnSAG-1 produced antibodies in horses that neutralized merozoites when tested by in vitro culture and significantly reduced clinical signs demonstrated by in vivo challenge.

  17. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF HEAD INJURIES

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    Kanukollu Venkata Madusudana Rao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to evaluate the incidence of ocular manifestations in head injury and their correlation with the intracranial lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 108 consecutive cases of closed head injury admitted in the neurosurgical ward of a tertiary teaching hospital underwent a thorough ophthalmic assessment. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS were applied to grade the severity of injury. RESULTS Total number of 108 patients of head injury were examined of which 38 patients had ocular manifestations (35.18%. Of these, 85.18% were males, 84% of injuries were due to road traffic accidents and 16% were due to fall from a height. The ocular manifestations were as follows- Orbital complications were seen in 6 patients (15.8%. Anterior segment manifestations included black eyes seen in 10 patients (26.3%, subconjunctival haemorrhage in 10.5% of patients (4 patients, corneal involvement in 21% of patients (8 patients and pupillary involvement in 50% of patients (19 patients. Posterior segment manifestations were seen in 26.3% of patients (10 patients and were as follows- Purtscher’s retinopathy in 2 patients and optic atrophy in 5 patients. Cranial nerve palsies were seen in 15 patients (39.47% and supranuclear movement disorders were seen in 3 patients (8%. CONCLUSION Even though, neurosurgeons perform comprehensive clinical examination including eye examination, the main purpose is limited to aid topical diagnosis of neurological lesions. This study emphasises the importance of a detailed eye examination by an ophthalmologist to prevent irreversible visual loss in addition to aiding in the neurological diagnosis. Pupillary involvement, papilloedema and ocular motor paresis pointed to a more severe head injury. This observational prospective study helped us to correlate the severity of head injuries in association with ocular findings in patients admitted in neurosurgical ward

  18. The minimal ice water caloric test compared with established vestibular caloric test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmäl, Frank; Lübben, Björn; Weiberg, Kerstin; Stoll, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Caloric testing of the vestibular labyrinth is usually performed by classical caloric test procedures (CCTP) using water warmed to 30 degrees C and 44 degrees C. Ice water irrigation (4 degrees C) is usually not performed, although it might be useful as a bedside test. To verify the validity of the Minimal Ice Water Caloric Test (MIWCT), comparative video-oculographic investigations were performed in 22 healthy subjects using ice water (0.5 ml, 1.0 ml, 2 ml), CCTP, and cold air (27 degrees C). Frequency, amplitude, slow phase velocity (SPV), the onset, and the duration of nystagmus were documented. After addition of three ice cubes, the temperature of conventional tap water (16 degrees C) fell within 13 min to 4 degrees C. In pessimum position the subjects demonstrated no nystagmus response. Compared to CCTP, MIWCT was associated with a significantly later onset of nystagmus and a significant prolongation of the nystagmus reaction. In contrast to air stimulation (27 degrees C), a significant Spearman's correlation was noted between MIWCT (1 and 2 ml) and established CCTP in respect of essential nystagmus parameters (frequency, amplitude and SPV). Furthermore, MIWCT (0.5 and 1 ml) showed a higher sensitivity and specificity with regard to the detection of canal paresis based on Jongkees' formula compared to stimulation with air 27 degrees C. Thus, MIWCT appears to be a suitable procedure for bedside investigation of vestibular function outside the vestibular laboratory, e.g. in a hospital ward, where bedridden patients with vertigo occasionally require vestibular testing.

  19. Laryngopharyngeal abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Gregory N; McGuirt, W Frederick; Butler, Susan G; Rees, Catherine J; Crandall, Heather L; Tansavatdi, Kristina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal (LP) abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia referred for flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Retrospective, blinded review by two otolaryngologists of 100 consecutive FEES studies performed and video-recorded by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Two otolaryngologists reviewed videos of 100 consecutive FEES studies on hospitalized patients with dysphagia for the presence of abnormal LP findings. Sixty-one male and 38 female patients comprised the hospital dysphagia cohort. The mean age was 62. One subject could not be evaluated because of the severity of the retained secretions, leaving 99 subjects in the cohort. Seventy-six percent had been previously intubated, with a mean intubation duration of 13 days. The overall prevalence of abnormal LP findings was 79%. Forty-five percent of the patients presented with two or more findings, which included arytenoid edema (33%), granuloma (31%), vocal fold paresis (24%), mucosal lesions (17%), vocal fold bowing (14%), diffuse edema (11%), airway stenosis (3%), and ulcer (6%). There was a significant difference in LP findings between those individuals who had or had not been intubated. Hospitalized patients with dysphagia are at high risk for LP abnormalities, particularly if they have been intubated, and may benefit from either 1) an initial joint examination by the SLP and otolaryngologist or 2) an otolaryngologist's review of the recorded examination conducted by the SLP. Such otolaryngology involvement could identify airway stenosis patients at an earlier stage, initiate granuloma treatment sooner, enable earlier biopsy of unexpected lesions, and allow follow-up of mucosal and neuromuscular findings that do not respond to medical management.

  20. Histoplasmoma como lesão isolada do sistema nervoso central em paciente imunocompetente Histoplasmoma as isolated central nervous system lesion in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson L. Gasparetto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available O acometimento cerebral pela histoplasmose é raro, ocorrendo mais comumente sob a forma de doença disseminada. Raramente, a doença pode ocorrer sob a forma de histoplasmomas, que simulam tumores do sistema nervoso central. Mais raro ainda é a ocorrência de histoplasmomas em pacientes imunocompetentes como única manifestação desta infecção. Neste relato é apresentado um paciente masculino de 13 anos com cefaléia, vômitos, redução da acuidade visual e auditiva à esquerda e hemiparesia à direita. A ressonância magnética mostrou lesão expansiva com impregnação anelar de contraste, localizada na região talâmica, hipotalâmica e quiasmática à esquerda. Foi realizada biópsia estereotáxica e a avaliação histológica do material definiu o diagnóstico de histoplamose. Iniciou-se tratamento com fluconazol, com melhora clínica importante após 6 meses do início do tratamento.The cerebral lesions are uncommon in patients with histoplasmosis, occurring more frequently in the disseminated form of the disease. Rarely, the disease may present as a histoplasmoma, simulating a neoplastic lesion. The histoplasmoma as the only manifestation of this infection in immunocompetent patients is even rarer. This case report describes a 13 year-old male patient with headache, vomit, low visual acuity and auditive deficit on the left, and paresis on the right. The magnetic resonance image showed an expansible lesion in the thalamic, hypothalamic, and chiasmatic regions, which showed ring enhancement. The stereotactic biopsy was performed and the histological diagnosis of histoplasmosis was defined. The treatment was initiated with fluconazole. The patient showed important clinical improvement after 6 months.