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Sample records for parenteral antibiotic therapy

  1. [Domiciliary parenteral antibiotic therapy: a prospective analysis of the last 12 years].

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    Peláez Cantero, M J; Madrid Rodríguez, A; Urda Cardona, A L; Jurado Ortiz, A

    2014-08-01

    Parenteral antibiotic treatment has been classically developed in hospitals and is considered as a hospital procedure. The development of Hospital at Home Units (HHU) has led to an increase in outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in paediatrics patients. The objective of this study is to describe our experience, as an HHU integrated within a Paediatric Department, in home antimicrobial therapy over a period of 12 years. This prospective and descriptive study included every patient with a disease requiring parenteral antimicrobial therapy who was admitted to our HHU from January 2000 to December 2012. During the study there were 163 cases on OPAT. The mean age of the patients was 11.1 years, and the sample group was comprised of 33 males and 22 feamales. The main sources of the treated infections were respiratory tract (76%), catheter-related bloodstream (9.2%), and urinary tract infections (5.5%). Amikacin was the most widely used antibiotic. Almost all treatments (96.6%) were via an intravenous route. Catheter-associated complications were more common than drug-associated complications. Successful at-home treatment was observed in 90.2% of cases. OPAT is a good and safe alternative in many paediatric diseases. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Parenteral and oral antibiotic duration for treatment of pediatric osteomyelitis: a systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric osteomyelitis is a bacterial infection of bones requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment using parenteral followed by enteral agents. Major complications of pediatric osteomyelitis include transition to chronic osteomyelitis, formation of subperiosteal abscesses, extension of infection into the joint, and permanent bony deformity or limb shortening. Historically, osteomyelitis has been treated with long durations of antibiotics to avoid these complications. However, with improvements in management and antibiotic treatment, standard of care is moving towards short durations of intravenous antibiotics prior to enteral antibiotics. Methods/Design The authors will perform a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines in order to evaluate the literature, looking for evidence to support the optimal duration of parenteral and enteral therapy. The main goals are to see if literature supports shorter durations of either parenteral antibiotics and/or enteral antibiotics. Multiple databases will be investigated using a thorough search strategy. Databases include Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Dissertation Abstracts, CINAHL, Web of Science, African Index Medicus and LILACS. Search stream will include medical subject heading for pediatric patients with osteomyelitis and antibiotic therapy. We will search for published or unpublished randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Two authors will independently select articles, extract data and assess risk of bias by standard Cochrane methodologies. We will analyze comparisons between dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios and continuous outcomes using mean differences. 95% confidence intervals will be computed. Discussion One of the major dilemmas of management of this disease is the duration of parenteral therapy. Long parenteral therapy has increased risk of serious complications and the necessity for long therapy has been called into question. Our study aims to review the currently available

  3. Comparative outcomes of β-lactam antibiotics in outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy: treatment success, readmissions and antibiotic switches.

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    Lee, Boeun; Tam, Idy; Weigel, Bernard; Breeze, Janis L; Paulus, Jessica K; Nelson, Jason; Allison, Genève M

    2015-08-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics are commonly used in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), but data regarding outcomes of long-term therapy are limited. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment success, readmission and antibiotic switch rates in patients treated with β-lactam antibiotics as OPAT. We carried out a retrospective review of all patients, discharged from Tufts Medical Center with cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem or oxacillin, between January 2009 and June 2013. A competing risks analysis was used to compare the cumulative incidence of first occurrence of treatment success, antibiotic switch and 30 day readmission for each drug. Four hundred patients were identified (cefazolin n = 38, ceftriaxone n = 104, ertapenem n = 128 and oxacillin n = 130). Baseline demographics were similar. Treatment success rates were higher for ceftriaxone and ertapenem (cefazolin 61%, ceftriaxone 81%, ertapenem 73% and oxacillin 58%; P antibiotic switches were accomplished without readmission. Adverse drug events (ADEs) were the most common reason for outpatient antibiotic switches (31/37, 84%). The ADE rate was higher for the oxacillin group (cefazolin 2.0 versus ceftriaxone 1.5 versus ertapenem 2.9 versus oxacillin 8.4 per 1000 OPAT days; P antibiotics is effective, but antibiotic switches for adverse events were more frequent with oxacillin use. Clinicians should be cognizant of the risk of readmissions and ADEs in OPAT patients, as the value of OPAT lies in reducing patient morbidity and readmissions by managing ADEs and preventing clinical failures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Tratamento da endometrite puerperal com antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva Treatment of puerperal endometritis using a regimen with exclusive parenteral antibiotics

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    Geraldo Duarte

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a efetividade e segurança da antibioticoterapia parenteral hospitalar exclusiva para tratamento da endometrite puerperal, em população de baixo nível socioeconômico. MÉTODOS: estudo clínico prospectivo, que avaliou 21 puérperas com diagnóstico de endometrite puerperal, cujas gestações foram resolvidas em hospital universitário por cesárea (52,4% ou parto normal (47,6. A amostra caracterizou-se por baixo nível socioeconômico e de escolaridade. Foram submetidas ao regime de antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva, apenas durante o período de internação (grupo ATP-EX. Os resultados foram comparados com aqueles obtidos de série histórica do mesmo serviço (20 casos submetidas a antibioticoterapia parenteral hospitalar, complementada por terapia via oral ambulatorial (grupo ATP+VO. As pacientes foram avaliadas clinicamente em retornos periódicos visando identificar casos de recidivas e complicações infecciosas. RESULTADOS: uma paciente do grupo ATP+VO necessitou de reinternação no 6º dia após a alta por recrudescência da endometrite. Não foi observada nenhuma complicação entre as pacientes do grupo ATP-EX. CONCLUSÃO: para o tratamento de endometrite puerperal, não foi observado benefício adicional com a adição da antibioticoterapia oral complementar após a alta. Os resultados com o uso da antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva durante a internação indicam que esse esquema pode ser utilizado com segurança em população de baixo nível socioeconômico.PURPOSE: to analyze the effectiveness and safety of exclusive hospital parenteral antibiotic therapy to treat puerperal endometritis in a population of low socioeconomic level. METHODS: a prospective clinical trial evaluated 21 puerperae with a diagnosis of postpartum endometritis, whose deliveries occurred at a university hospital by cesarean section (52.4% or normal delivery (47.6%. The sample was characterized by low socioeconomic and

  5. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Gourdeau, Marie; Deschênes, Louise; Caron, Martine; Desmarais, Marc

    1993-01-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-pa...

  6. Parenteral Antibiotics Reduce Bifidobacteria Colonization and Diversity in Neonates

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    Séamus Hussey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of parenteral antibiotic treatment in the early neonatal period on the evolution of bifidobacteria in the newborn. Nine babies treated with intravenous ampicillin/gentamicin in the first week of life and nine controls (no antibiotic treatment were studied. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the composition of Bifidobacterium in stool samples taken at four and eight weeks. Bifidobacteria were detected in all control infants at both four and eight weeks, while only six of nine antibiotic-treated infants had detectable bifidobacteria at four weeks and eight of nine at eight weeks. Moreover, stool samples of controls showed greater diversity of Bifidobacterium spp. compared with antibiotic-treated infants. In conclusion, short-term parenteral antibiotic treatment of neonates causes a disturbance in the expected colonization pattern of bifidobacteria in the first months of life. Further studies are required to probiotic determine if supplementation is necessary in this patient group.

  7. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions.

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    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues.

  8. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hien; Halilovic,Jenana; Christensen,Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Jenana Halilovic,1 Cinda L Christensen,2 Hien H Nguyen31University of the Pacific Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy, Stockton, CA, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Services, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USA; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Section of Hospital Medicine, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and hig...

  9. Home iv Antibiotic Therapy through a Medical Day Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Gourdeau

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%. The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days. Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days. Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  10. Parenteral nutrition in childhood and consequences for dentition and gingivae.

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    Olczak-Kowalczyk, D; Danko, M; Banaś, E; Gozdowski, D; Popińska, K; Krasuska-Sławińska, E; Książyk, J

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of dentition in children under parenteral nutrition, risk factors for caries, and dental developmental abnormalities. The study involved 63 patients (aged 2.25-16.6 years), i.e. 32 subjects receiving parenteral nutrition for a mean period of 5.6±2.94 years, and 31 healthy control subjects. Oral hygiene (OHI-S, PL-I), gingival (GI), and dentition status (caries, DMFT/dmft, enamel defects, shape alterations), frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption were evaluated. Medical records provided information on parenteral meals per week, age parenteral nutrition started, birth body mass, Apgar score, weight deficiency, and antibiotic therapy until aged 1 year. The Mann-Whitney test, chi-squared test, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient were used (p≤0.05). Dental developmental abnormalities occurred more often in PN subjects (71.87% vs. 25.80%). The prevalence of caries in PN (56.25% vs. 90.32%) and dmft (2.00±3.30 vs. 4.21±3.33) and DMFT (2.47±4.08 vs. 3.33±3.50) were lower. Positive caries Spearman's rank correlation coefficients: frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption, and GI. Negative correlation coefficients: low birth body mass, antibiotic therapy, and low body mass in the first year of life. Positive dental developmental abnormality Spearman's coefficients: low birth body mass, Apgar score parenteral nutrition duration, low body mass and antibiotic therapy in the first year of life. Beta- lactam, aminoglycoside, glycopeptide and nitroimidazole treatments were related to enamel hypoplasia. Parenteral nutrition in childhood is related to the risk of dental developmental abnormalities, promoted by malnutrition and antibiotic therapy in infancy. Limiting the number of meals and cariogenic snacks, and most probably administration of antibiotics, decreases the risk of caries.

  11. Acute dental infections managed in an outpatient parenteral antibiotic program setting: prospective analysis and public health implications.

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    Connors, William J; Rabie, Heidi H; Figueiredo, Rafael L; Holton, Donna L; Parkins, Michael D

    2017-03-09

    The number of Acute Dental Infections (ADI) presenting for emergency department (ED) care are steadily increasing. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT) programs are increasingly utilized as an alternative cost-effective approach to the management of serious infectious diseases but their role in the management of severe ADI is not established. This study aims to address this knowledge gap through evaluation of ADI referrals to a regional OPAT program in a large Canadian center. All adult ED and OPAT program ADI referrals from four acute care adult hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, were quantified using ICD diagnosis codes in a regional reporting system. Citywide OPAT program referrals were prospectively enrolled over a five-month period from February to June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire and OPAT medical records were reviewed upon completion of care. Of 704 adults presenting to acute care facilities with dental infections during the study period 343 (49%) were referred to OPAT for ADI treatment and 110 were included in the study. Participant mean age was 44 years, 55% were women, and a majority of participants had dental insurance (65%), had seen a dentist in the past six months (65%) and reported prior dental infections (77%), 36% reporting the current ADI as a recurrence. Median length of parenteral antibiotic therapy was 3 days, average total course of antibiotics was 15-days, with a cumulative 1326 antibiotic days over the study period. There was no difference in total duration of antibiotics between broad and narrow spectrum regimes. Conservative cost estimate of OPAT care was $120,096, a cost savings of $597,434 (83%) compared with hospitalization. ADI represent a common preventable cause of recurrent morbidity. Although OPAT programs may offer short-term cost savings compared with hospitalization, risks associated with extended antibiotic exposures and delayed definitive dental management must also be gauged.

  12. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halilovic J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jenana Halilovic,1 Cinda L Christensen,2 Hien H Nguyen31University of the Pacific Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy, Stockton, CA, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Services, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USA; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Section of Hospital Medicine, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues.Keywords: OPAT, quality, safety, program management

  13. Good practice recommendations for paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) in the UK: a consensus statement.

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    Patel, Sanjay; Abrahamson, Ed; Goldring, Stephen; Green, Helen; Wickens, Hayley; Laundy, Matt

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the rationale for managing children on intravenous antimicrobial therapy at home whenever possible, including parent and patient satisfaction, psychological well-being, return to school/employment, reductions in healthcare-associated infection and cost savings. As a joint collaboration between the BSAC and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunity and Infection Group, we have developed good practice recommendations to highlight good clinical practice and governance within paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) services across the UK. These guidelines provide a practical approach for safely delivering a p-OPAT service in both secondary care and tertiary care settings, in terms of the roles and responsibilities of members of the p-OPAT team, the structure required to deliver the service, identifying patients and pathologies that are suitable for p-OPAT, ensuring appropriate vascular access, antimicrobial choice and delivery and the clinical governance aspects of delivering a p-OPAT service. The process of writing a business case to support the introduction of a p-OPAT service is also addressed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Role of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in the treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Singapore.

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    Chan, Monica; Ooi, Chee Kheong; Wong, Joshua; Zhong, Lihua; Lye, David

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) is a common indication for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in USA, UK and Australasia, however data from Asia are lacking. OPAT is well established within the Singapore healthcare since 2002, however, systematic use of OPAT for the treatment of SSTIs remains infrequent. In this report, we describe the treatment and outcome of patients with SSTIs referred directly from Emergency Department (ED) to OPAT for continuation of intravenous (IV) antibiotics in Singapore, thus avoiding potential hospital admission. This is a single center university hospital retrospective study of patients with SSTIs presenting to ED who were assessed to require IV antibiotics and accepted to the OPAT clinic for continuation of IV treatment. Exclusion criteria were: haemodynamic instability, uncontrolled or serious underlying co-morbidities, necessity for inpatient surgical drainage, facial cellulitis and cephalosporin allergy. Patients returned daily to the hospital’s OPAT clinic for administration of IV antibiotics and review, then switched to oral antibiotics on improvement. From 7 February 2012 to 31 July 2015, 120 patients with SSTIs were treated in OPAT. Median age was 56 years and 63% were male. Lower limbs were affected in 91%. Diabetes was present in 20%. Sixty-seven (56%) had been treated with oral antibiotics for a median duration of 3 days prior to OPAT treatment. Common symptoms were erythema (100%), swelling (96%), pain (88%) and fever (55%). Antibiotics administered were IV cefazolin with oral probenecid (71%) or IV ceftriaxone (29%) for median 3 days then oral cloxacillin (85%) for median 7 days. Clinical improvement occurred in 90%. Twelve patients (10%) were hospitalized for worsening cellulitis, with 4 patients requiring surgical drainage of abscess. Microbiological cultures from 2 patients with drained abscess grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Klebsiella

  15. [Role of parenteral cephalosporins for outpatients treatment of infections].

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    Esposito, S; Mazzei, T; Novelli, A

    2001-12-01

    OPAT (Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy) arose in the early 1980s in the USA and later in many other countries from the primary consideration that outpatient treatment is more cost-effective than hospitalisation. Currently, several thousand patients undergo OPAT programmes all over the world and several different bacterial infections are included in the list of treatable diseases, especially those requiring long-term parenteral treatment such as osteomyelitis and soft tissue infections. All injectable antibiotics are suitable for OPAT according to their microbiological spectrum, although clearly some pharmacological properties make one antibiotic more preferable than another. Beta-lactams represent more than half of the antibiotic world market and two-thirds of them are cephalosporins. Such a widespread use of cephalosporins is certainly due to their wide antibacterial spectrum and good tolerability. Among third-generation cephalosporins, covering the majority of micro-organisms responsible for community-acquired infections, ceftriaxone is the only one with an 8-hour half-life, thereby permitting a single daily dose, which represents a great advantage when undertaking an OPAT programme. Analysis of antibiotic consumption used for OPAT therapies, based on data collected from the International OPAT Registry project, with the participation of many countries (USA, Canada, Britain, Argentina, etc.) including Italy, shows that ceftriaxone is the most widely used antibiotic for home therapy, clearly due to the above-mentioned properties.

  16. Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, J

    2012-02-01

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) was first reported in 1972. OPAT programmes are not well established in Ireland, with no reported outcomes in the literature. An OPAT programme was established at St. James Hospital in 2006. Demographics, diagnoses and outcomes of the first 60 courses are reported. A retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data was performed on patients treated from March 2006 to February 2009. The data was analysed using SPSS v.17. Sixty OPAT courses were administered to 56 patients, 57 percent of which were male. The median age was 50 years, the median inpatient stay was 19 days, the median duration of OPAT was 16 days and 1,289 inpatient bed days were saved. The additional cost per day of OPAT was 167.60 euros. Vancomycin was the most prescribed antimicrobial, administered to 35%. Musculoskeletal infection was the indication for treatment in 50%. Confirmatory microbiological diagnosis was identified in 72%, most frequently due to Staphylococcus aureus (68%). Only minor adverse events were recorded. Clinical cure was achieved in 92.8%. A patient satisfaction survey showed high satisfaction. OPAT is a safe and effective way of providing parenteral antibiotic therapy in the Irish healthcare system. Better integration of funding and the appointment of Infectious Diseases specialists will facilitate its expansion.

  17. Antibioticoterapia parenteral en la infección urinaria neonatal Parenteral antibiotic therapy in neonatal urinary infection

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    Manuel Díaz Álvarez

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico, retrospectivo, en el que se conformaron dos grupos según el régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral (TAP: corto y largo. Éste fue seguido de antibioticoterapia oral, lo cual generó un ciclo de tratamiento parenteral-oral secuencial al menos de 10 días de duración. Se determinó la tasa de curación de la infección del tracto urinario, las reinfecciones en los primeros 3 meses de edad y la presencia de cicatrices renales. El objetivo fue evaluar la efectividad de un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días en recién nacidos con infección del tracto urinario alta, de evolución inicial favorable. La tasa de curación de la infección con el TAP corto fue de 93,9 % y con el largo de 97,0 % (p = 0,32. En 5 pacientes del grupo de TAP corto ocurrió reinfección dentro de los 3 meses de edad, mientras que sólo ocurrió en 3 de los que llevaron TAP largo (p = 0,49. En los casos estudiados con gammagrafía con DMSA renal, se constató la presencia de cicatrices renales en 3 de 32 (9,4 % del grupo de TAP corto y en 7 de 33 (21,2 % en los pacientes de TAP largo (p = 0,30. Ambos regímenes de TAP tuvieron similar efectividad.

  18. Clinical and economic consequences of failure of initial antibiotic therapy for patients with community-onset complicated intra-abdominal infections.

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    Yong Pil Chong

    Full Text Available Complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI is infection that extends beyond the hollow viscus of origin into the peritoneal space, and is associated with either abscess formation or peritonitis. There are few studies that have assessed the actual costs and outcomes associated with failure of initial antibiotic therapy for cIAI. The aims of this study were to evaluate risk factors and impact on costs and outcomes of failure of initial antibiotic therapy for community-onset cIAI.A retrospective study was performed at eleven tertiary-care hospitals. Hospitalized adults with community-onset cIAI who underwent an appropriate source control procedure between August 2008 and September 2011 were included. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was defined as a change of antibiotics due to a lack of improvement of the clinical symptoms and signs associated with cIAI in the first week.A total of 514 patients hospitalized for community-onset cIAI were included in the analysis. The mean age of the patients was 53.3 ± 17.6 years, 72 patients (14% had health care-associated infection, and 48 (9% experienced failure of initial antibiotic therapy. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was associated with increased costs and morbidity. After adjustment for covariates, patients with unsuccessful initial therapy received an additional 2.9 days of parenteral antibiotic therapy, were hospitalized for an additional 5.3 days, and incurred $3,287 in additional inpatient charges. Independent risk factors for failure of initial antibiotic therapy were health care-associated infection, solid cancer, and APACHE II ≥13.To improve outcomes and costs in patients with community-onset cIAI, rapid assessment of health care-associated risk factors and severity of disease, selection of an appropriate antibiotic regimen accordingly, and early infection source control should be performed.

  19. Management of Hyperglycemia During Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Therapy

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    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent complication of enteral and parenteral nutrition in hospitalized patients. Extensive evidence from observational studies indicates that the development of hyperglycemia during parenteral and enteral nutrition is associated with an increased risk of death and infectious complications. There are no specific guidelines recommending glycemic targets and effective strategies for the management of hyperglycemia during specialized nutritional support. Managing hyperglycemia in these patients should include optimization of carbohydrate content and administration of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy. The administration of continuous insulin infusion and insulin addition to nutrition bag are efficient approaches to control hyperglycemia during parenteral nutrition. Subcutaneous administration of long-acting insulin with scheduled or corrective doses of short-acting insulin is superior to the sliding scale insulin strategy in patients receiving enteral feedings. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate safe and effective therapeutic strategies for the management of hyperglycemia in patients receiving nutritional support. PMID:23065369

  20. Enteral but not parenteral antibiotics enhance gut function and prevent necrotizing enterocollitis in forumula-fed newborn preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birck, Malene M; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted

    2016-01-01

    , relative to CON pigs (P pigs were intermediate with few affected parameters (reduced lactic acid levels and density and adherence of Gram-positive bacteria, relative to CON pigs, P antimicrobial resistance following the treatments. We......Preterm infants are susceptible to infection and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and are often treated with antibiotics. Simultaneous administration of enteral and parenteral antibiotics during the first days after preterm birth prevents formula-induced NEC lesions in pigs, but it is unknown which...... administration route is most effective. We hypothesized that only enteral antibiotics suppress gut bacterial colonization and NEC progression in formula-fed preterm pigs. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs (90–92% of gestation) were fed increasing amounts of infant formula from birth to day 5 and given saline (CON...

  1. Successful recovery of infective endocarditis-induced rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis by steroid therapy combined with antibiotics: a case report

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    Kikkawa Ryuichi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mortality rate among patients with infective endocarditis, especially associated with the presence of complications or coexisting conditions such as renal failure and the use of combined medical and surgical therapy remains still high. Prolonged parenteral administration of a bactericidal antimicrobial agent or combination of agents is usually recommended, however, the optimal therapy for infective endocarditis associated with renal injury is not adequately defined. Case presentation Patient was a 24-years old man who presented to our hospital with fever, fatigue, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. He had a history of ventricular septum defect (VSD. A renal biopsy specimen revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis and echocardiogram revealed VSD with vegetation on the tricuspid valve. Specimens of blood demonstrated Propionibacterium Acnes. The intensive antibiotic therapy with penicillin G was started without clinical improvement of renal function or resolution of fever over the next 7 days. After the short-term treatment of low dose of corticosteroid combined with continuous antibiotics, high fever and renal insufficiency were dramatically improved. Conclusion Although renal function in our case worsened despite therapy with antibiotics, a short-term and low dose of corticosteroid therapy with antibiotics was able to recover renal function and the patient finally underwent tricuspid valve-plasty and VSD closure. We suggest that the patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis associated with infective endocarditis might be treated with a short-term and low dose of corticosteroid successfully.

  2. Iron Deficiency in Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

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    Hwa, Yi L; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Kelly, Darlene G; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    Iron is not routinely added to parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations in the United States because of the risk of anaphylaxis and concerns about incompatibilities. Studies have shown that iron dextran in non-lipid-containing PN solutions is safe. Data are limited on iron status, prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and efficacy of intravenous iron infusion in long-term home PN (HPN). We aimed to determine the incidence of IDA and to examine the effectiveness of parenteral iron replacement in patients receiving HPN. Medical records of patients receiving HPN at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2010 were reviewed. Diagnoses, time to IDA development, and hemoglobin, ferritin, and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values were extracted. Response of iron indices to intravenous iron replacement was investigated. Of 185 patients (122 women), 60 (32.4%) were iron deficient. Five patients were iron deficient, and 18 had unknown iron status before HPN. Of 93 patients who had sufficient iron storage, 37 had IDA development after a mean of 27.2 months (range, 2-149 months) of therapy. Iron was replaced by adding maintenance iron dextran to PN or by therapeutic iron infusion. Patients with both replacement methods had significant improvement in iron status. With intravenous iron replacement, mean ferritin increased from 10.9 to 107.6 mcg/L (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

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    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parenteral nutrition following intensive cytotoxic therapy: an exploratory study on the need for parenteral nutrition after various treatment approaches for haematological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iestra, J. A.; Fibbe, W. E.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Romijn, J. A.; Kromhout, D.

    1999-01-01

    Patients receiving intensive cytotoxic therapy are traditionally supported with parenteral nutrition (PN), although it is unclear whether all patients benefit from PN. This study aimed to identify regimen-associated differences in PN requirements, to reveal discrepancies between the number of PN

  5. Antibiotic Dosing in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alexander R; Mueller, Bruce A

    2017-07-01

    Appropriate antibiotic dosing is critical to improve outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. The addition of continuous renal replacement therapy makes achieving appropriate antibiotic dosing more difficult. The lack of continuous renal replacement therapy standardization results in treatment variability between patients and may influence whether appropriate antibiotic exposure is achieved. The aim of this study was to determine if continuous renal replacement therapy effluent flow rate impacts attaining appropriate antibiotic concentrations when conventional continuous renal replacement therapy antibiotic doses were used. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the effect of effluent flow rate variance on pharmacodynamic target attainment for cefepime, ceftazidime, levofloxacin, meropenem, piperacillin, and tazobactam. Published demographic and pharmacokinetic parameters for each antibiotic were used to develop a pharmacokinetic model. Monte Carlo simulations of 5000 patients were evaluated for each antibiotic dosing regimen at the extremes of Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommended effluent flow rates (20 and 35 mL/kg/h). The probability of target attainment was calculated using antibiotic-specific pharmacodynamic targets assessed over the first 72 hours of therapy. Most conventional published antibiotic dosing recommendations, except for levofloxacin, reach acceptable probability of target attainment rates when effluent rates of 20 or 35 mL/kg/h are used. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Timeliness and use of antibiotic prophylaxis in selected inpatient surgical procedures. The Antibiotic Prophylaxis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, A; Eichorn, A; Kral, J; Pickett, G; Barie, P; Pryor, V; Dearie, M B

    1996-06-01

    Twenty-five percent of all nosocomial infections are wound infections. Professional guidelines support the timely use of preoperative prophylaxis for prevention of postoperative wound infections. Barriers exist in implementing this practice. IPRO, the New York State peer review organization, as part of the Health Care Financing Administration's Health Care Quality Improvement Program, sought to determine the proportion of patients receiving timely antibiotic prophylaxis for aortic grafts, hip replacements and colon resections in 44 hospitals in New York State. IPRO conducted a retrospective medical record review of 44 hospitals through out New York State stratified for teaching, nonteaching status. A sample was drawn of 2651 patients, 2256 from Medicare and 395 from Medicaid, undergoing either abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, partial or total hip replacement or large bowel resection. The study determined the proportion of patients who had documentation of receiving antibiotics and those who received antibiotics timely, that is less than or equal to 2 hours preoperatively. Eighty-six percent of patients had documentation of receiving an antibiotic. Forty-six percent of aneurysm repairs and 60% of hip replacements had evidence of receiving timely antibiotic prophylaxis, that is within 2 hours prior to surgery. For colon resections, 73% of cases had either oral prophylaxis or timely parenteral therapy. An increased proportion of patients had received parenteral antibiotics prematurely as the surgical start time occurred later in the day. A total of 44 different antibiotics were recorded for prophylaxis. Antibiotic prophylaxis was performed in 81% to 94% of cases, however, anywhere from 27% to 54% of all cases did not receive antibiotics in a timely fashion. By delegating implementation of ordered antibiotic prophylaxis to the anesthesia team, timing may be improved and the incidence of postoperative wound infections may decrease.

  7. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  8. Utilizing a Modified Care Coordination Measurement Tool to Capture Value for a Pediatric Outpatient Parenteral and Prolonged Oral Antibiotic Therapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Louise E; Farnstrom, Cindi L; Felder, Kimberly K; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith; Rosenberg, Hannah; Antonelli, Richard C

    2017-04-17

    Outpatient parenteral or prolonged oral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) programs reduce inpatient healthcare costs by shifting care to outpatient settings. Care coordination (CC) is a necessary component to successfully transition patients. Our objective was to assess outcomes of provider time spent on nonreimbursable CC activities in a pediatric OPAT program. We used a qualitative feasibility pilot design and modified the Care Coordination Measurement Tool. We captured nonreimbursable CC activity and associated outcome(s) among pediatric patients enrolled in OPAT from March 1 to April 30, 2015 (44 work days) at Doernbecher Children's Hospital. We generated summary statistics for this institutional review board-waived QI project. There were 154 nonreimbursable CC encounters conducted by 2 infectious diseases (ID) providers for 29 patients, ages 17 months-15 years, with complex infections. Total estimated time spent on CC was 54 hours, equivalent to at least 6 workdays. Five patients with complex social issues used 37% of total CC time. Of 129 phone events, 38% involved direct contact with families, pharmacies (13%), primary care providers (13%), and home health nursing (11%). Care coordination prevented 10 emergency room (ER) visits and 2 readmissions. Care coordination led to 16 additional, not previously scheduled subspecialist and 13 primary care visits. The OPAT providers billed for 32 clinic visits during the study period. Nonreimbursable CC work by OPAT providers prevented readmissions and ER visits and helped facilitate appropriate healthcare use. The value of pediatric OPAT involvement in patient care would have been underestimated based on reimbursable ID consultations and clinic visits alone. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Antibiotic therapy in preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, Mark H; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Eyk, Nancy Van

    2009-09-01

    . Antibiotic regimens may consist of an initial parenteral phase followed by an oral phase, or may consist of only an oral phase. (I-A) 5. Antibiotics of choice are penicillins or macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin) in parenteral and/or oral forms. (I-A) In patients allergic to penicillin, macrolide antibiotics should be used alone. (III-B) 6. The following two regimens may be used (the two regimens were used in the largest PPROM randomized controlled trials that showed a decrease in both maternal and neonatal morbidity): (1) ampicillin 2 g IV every 6 hours and erythromycin 250 mg IV every 6 hours for 48 hours followed by amoxicillin 250 mg orally every 8 hours and erythromycin 333 mg orally every 8 hours for 5 days (I-A); (2) erythromycin 250 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 days (I-A) 7. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid should not be used because of an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates exposed to this antibiotic. Amoxicillin without clavulanic acid is safe. (I-A) 8. Women presenting with PPROM should be screened for urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted infections, and group B streptococcus carriage, and treated with appropriate antibiotics if positive. (II-2B).

  10. [Antibiotic therapy of hospital-acquired pneumonia and its pharmacoeconomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolář, Milan; Htoutou Sedláková, Miroslava; Urbánek, Karel; Uvízl, Radomír; Adamus, Milan; Imwensi, O P

    2016-03-01

    Important hospital-acquired infections include pneumonia, mainly because of the increasing resistance of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobials and the associated potential failure of antibiotic therapy. The present study aimed at determining the most frequent etiological agents of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and assessing the relationship between 30-day mortality and adequacy of antibiotic therapy. Based on the obtained information, optimal patterns of antibiotic therapy were to be defined, including a pharmacoeconomic perspective. In patients with clinically confirmed HAP, bacterial etiological agents were identified, their susceptibility to antimicrobials was determined and statistical methods were used to assess the relationship between adequacy of antibiotic therapy and 30-day mortality. The study comprised 68 patients with clinically confirmed HAP. The most common etiological agents were strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.8 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (23.1 %) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (15.4 %). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 86.5 % of all bacterial pathogens. The overall mortality reached 42.5 %. In the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy, 30-day mortality was significantly higher (83.3 %) than in the subgroup with adequate therapy (30.0 %; p = 0.002). The risk for 30-day mortality was 2.78 times higher in case of inadequate antibiotic therapy (95%CI: 1.52-5.07). The proportion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with inadequate antibiotic therapy than in those with adequate therapy (67 % vs. 27 %; p = 0.032). Results of the present study suggest a significant relationship between mortality of patients with HAP and ineffective antibiotic therapy due to resistance of the bacterial pathogen. Thus, it is clear that initial antibiotic therapy must be based on qualified assumption of sufficient activity against the most common bacterial pathogens and results of surveillance

  11. Pros and cons of antibiotic therapy for pouchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Shen, Bo

    2009-10-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical treatment of choice for patients with medically refractory ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis with dysplasia and for the majority of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. However, pouchitis and other pouch-associated complications frequently occur following surgery. Pouchitis is the most common long-term complication of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in patients with ulcerative colitis, with a cumulative prevalence of up to 50%. The pathogenesis of pouchitis is probably associated with alterations in commensal bacterial flora, and most patients with pouchitis respond favorably to antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment for active pouchitis, with ciprofloxacin or metronidazole traditionally being first-line agents. Some patients may develop dependency on antibiotics, thus requiring long-term maintenance therapy. In a subset of patients, the disease course may be refractory to antibiotic therapy, which is one of the common causes of pouch failure, requiring permanent ileostomy or pouch excision. On the other hand, long-term antibiotic use is expensive and can be associated with adverse effects and bacterial resistance. There may also be the risk of secondary infections, such as Clostridium difficile and fungal infections. The risks and benefits should be carefully balanced in patients who require long-term antibiotic therapy, and safe, efficacious, non-antibiotic-based agents are needed.

  12. Nutrition quality control in the prescription and administration of parenteral nutrition therapy for hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Glaucia Midori; Horie, Lilian Mika; Castro, Melina Gouveia; Martins, Juliana R; Bittencourt, Amanda F; Logullo, Luciana; Teixeira da Silva, Maria de Lourdes; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-06-01

    Nutrition quality control in parenteral nutrition therapy (PNT) allows the identification of inadequate processes in parenteral nutrition (PN). The objective of this study was to assess the quality of PNT at a hospital with an established nutrition support team (NST). This observational, longitudinal, analytical, and prospective study examined 100 hospitalized PNT adult patients under the care of an NST for 21 days or until death/hospital discharge. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) 2007 guidelines for PNT prescription were followed. PNT indications were not in accordance with the A.S.P.E.N. 2007 guidelines in 15 patients. Among the remaining 85 patients, 48 (56.5%) did not receive adequate PNT (≥80% of the total volume prescribed). Non-NST medical orders, progression to and from enteral nutrition, changes in the central venous catheter, unknown causes, and operational errors (eg, medical prescription loss, PN nondelivery, pharmacy delays, inadequate PN bag temperature) were associated with PNT inadequacy (P nutrition therapy related to estimated energy expenditure and protein requirements and glycemia levels reached the expected targets; however, the central venous catheter infection rate was higher than 6 per 1000 catheters/d and did not meet the expected targets. Despite an established NST, there was a moderate level of PNT inadequacy in indications, administration, and monitoring. It is important to establish periodic meetings among different health professionals who prescribe and deliver PNT to define responsibilities and protocols. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Parenteral nutrition in radiation therapy and combined treatment of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudzhyan, A.V.; Buzovkina, L.P.; Biletov, B.V.; Breusenko, E.Ya.; Krasnova, A.I.; Tsaryuk, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained while studying 165 patients with esophageal cancer are presented. It is shown that radiation therapy and combined treatment result in the body mass loss, in the increase of katabolic processes in organism, in the negative nitrogen balance. Weaken patients, being under starvation conditions, are subjected more often to reaction changes and complications developing during the treatment. A comparison characteristics of two methods providing the organism with nutrition is given, i.e. gastrostomy and parenteral nutrition. Shown is the advantage of the adequate parenteral nutrition preventing the appearence of reaction changes and complications, improving the subjective state of patients, homeostasis indices, promoting the elimination of esophagitis phenomena, general radiation response and reaction to chemical preparations; resulting in the increase of quantity of leucocytes at leukopenia

  14. Optimising the duration of antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chastre

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP has traditionally been treated with a 14–21-day course of antibiotics. However, prolonged antibiotic therapy is associated with the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, as well as higher toxicity and costs. In a large, randomised, controlled trial in patients with microbiologically confirmed VAP who received appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, an 8-day antibiotic regimen was not associated with excess mortality or more episodes of recurrent pulmonary infection compared with a 15-day regimen. Amongst patients who developed recurrent infection, multidrug-resistant pathogens emerged less frequently in the group receiving 8 days of antibiotic therapy. The 8-day regimen was also not associated with excess mortality in the subgroup with VAP caused by nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, mostly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although recurrent infections occurred more often. Pending confirmatory studies, an 8-day course of antibiotic therapy may be appropriate for many patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, providing that initial antibiotic therapy is appropriate, the clinical course is favourable and extreme vigilance is maintained after stopping antibiotics. Patients whose initial treatment regimen was inappropriate, those infected with difficult-to-treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and immunocompromised patients and others at high risk for relapse are likely to require a longer duration of antibiotic therapy.

  15. [Antibiotic therapy in patients with renal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhaupt, H; Rose, K G

    1985-06-01

    For the otolaryngologist (ENT specialist), too, antibiotics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. This article gives the essential fundamentals for the antibiotic treatment of patients with restricted kidney functions, as well as advice for antibiotic therapy in clinics and in medical practice.

  16. Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Li, David X; Dzintars, Kathryn; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2017-09-01

    Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable. To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center. At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy. Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians. In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non-clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics. Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

  17. Executive summary of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Domiciliary Hospitalisation Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Mujal Martínez, Abel; Fernández Martínez de Mandojana, Magdalena; Martín, Natalia; Gil Bermejo, Mercè; Solà Aznar, Joan; Villegas Bruguera, Eulalia; Peláez Cantero, Maria José; Retamar Gentil, Pilar; Delgado Vicente, Miriam; González-Ramallo, Víctor José; Ponce González, Miguel Ángel; Mirón Rubio, Manuel; Gómez Rodríguez de Mendarozqueta, M Montserrat; Goenaga Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Sanroma Mendizábal, Pedro; Delgado Mejía, Elena; Pajarón Guerrero, Marcos

    2018-05-18

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programmes make it possible to start or complete intravenous antimicrobial therapy for practically any type of infection at home, provided that patient selection is appropriate for the type of OPAT programme available. Although the clinical management of infections in the home setting is comparable in many respects to that offered in conventional hospitalization (selection of antibiotics, duration of treatment, etc.), there are many aspects that are specific to this care modality. It is essential to be aware of them so that OPAT continues to be as safe and effective as inpatient care. The objective of this clinical guideline is therefore to provide evidence- and expert-based recommendations with a view to standardizing clinical practice in this care modality and contribute to a progressive increase in the number of patients who can be cared for and receive intravenous therapy in their own homes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stawny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient’s energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them.

  19. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawny, M.; Olijarczyk, R.; Jaroszkiewicz, E.; Jelińska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient's energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them. PMID:24453847

  20. Toyota production system quality improvement initiative improves perioperative antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Kelly H; Mor, Maria K; Jain, Rajiv; Kruszewski, Matthew S; McCray, Ellesha E; Moreland, Michael E; Muder, Robert R; Obrosky, David Scott; Sevick, Mary Ann; Wilson, Mark A; Fine, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To assess the role of a Toyota production system (TPS) quality improvement (QI) intervention on appropriateness of perioperative antibiotic therapy and in length of hospital stay (LOS) among surgical patients. Pre-post quasi-experimental study using local and national retrospective cohorts. We used TPS methods to implement a multifaceted intervention to reduce nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on a Veterans Affairs surgical unit, which led to a QI intervention targeting appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy was defined as selection of the recommended antibiotic agents for a duration not exceeding 24 hours from the time of the operation. The local computerized medical record system was used to identify patients undergoing the 25 most common surgical procedures and to examine changes in appropriate antibiotic therapy and LOS over time. Overall, 2550 surgical admissions were identified from the local computerized medical records. The proportion of surgical admissions receiving appropriate perioperative antibiotics was significantly higher (P <.01) in 2004 after initiation of the TPS intervention (44.0%) compared with the previous 4 years (range, 23.4%-29.8%) primarily because of improvements in compliance with antibiotic therapy duration rather than appropriate antibiotic selection. There was no statistically significant decrease in LOS over time. The use of TPS methods resulted in a QI intervention that was associated with an increase in appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy among surgical patients, without affecting LOS.

  1. A Comparison of Hospital Versus Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy at Home for Pyelonephritis and Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensey, Conor C; Sett, Arun; Connell, Tom G; Bryant, Penelope A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the benefits of home treatment with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), children with pyelonephritis and meningitis are rarely included. We aimed to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes between hospital and home treatment for these conditions and to identify factors influencing home treatment. Children admitted to the hospital with pyelonephritis or proven and presumed bacterial meningitis from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013 were identified retrospectively. Patients who received any OPAT (home group) received daily visits via our Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program; inpatients (hospital group) received standard care. Clinical and demographic features, length of stay, readmission rate and cost were compared between hospital and home groups. One hundred thirty-nine children with pyelonephritis and 70 with meningitis were identified, of which 127 and 44 were potentially suitable for OPAT, respectively. Of these, 12 (9%) with pyelonephritis received OPAT, contrasting with 29 (66%) with meningitis. Clinical features did not differ between hospital- and home-treated patients for either condition. Patients with meningitis in the hospital group were younger than those transferred to HITH (1 vs. 2 months; P = 0.01). All patients were afebrile before transfer to HITH. Admissions for pyelonephritis were brief with inpatients having a shorter length of stay than home patients (median: 3 vs. 4.5 days; P = 0.002). Unplanned readmission rates were comparable across all groups. Transfer to HITH resulted in a saving of AU$178,180. Children with pyelonephritis and meningitis can feasibly receive OPAT. Age, treatment duration and fever influence this decision. None of these should be barriers to OPAT, and the cost savings support change in practice.

  2. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Parenteral nutrition versus enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis Nutrição parenteral versus enteral em pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiel Paiva Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effect of parenteral versus enteral nutritional support in severe acute pancreatitis, with respect to efficacy, safety, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. METHODS: The study was comprised of 31 patients, divided into a parenteral group (n=16 and an enteral group (n=15, who met severity criteria for abdominal tomography (Balthazar classes C, D, and E. The patients were compared by demographics, disease etiology, antibiotic prophylaxis, use or not of somatostatin, nutritional support, complications and disease progression. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the average duration of nutritional support, somatostatin, or antibiotics in the two groups. Imipenem was the drug of choice for prophylaxis of pancreatic infections in both groups. More complications occurred in the parenteral group, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.10. Infectious complications, such as catheter sepsis and infections of the pancreatic tissue, were significantly more frequent in the parenteral group (p=0.006. There was no difference in average length of hospitalization in the two groups. There were three deaths in the parenteral group and none in the enteral group. CONCLUSION: Enteral nutritional support is associated with fewer septic complications compared to parenteral nutritional support.OBJETIVO: Comparar o efeito do suporte nutricional parenteral versus enteral, em pancreatite aguda grave, com relação à eficácia, à segurança, à morbi-mortalidade e ao tempo de internação. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 31 pacientes distribuídos em grupo parenteral (n=16, no período de 1995 a 1998 e grupo enteral (n=15, no período de 1999 a 2002, que preencheram os critérios de gravidade pela tomografia de abdome (Balthazar C,D,E. Os pacientes foram comparados quanto aos dados demográficos, etiologia, antibioticoprofilaxia, somatostatina, suporte nutricional, complicações e evolução. RESULTADOS

  4. Antibiotic Therapy for Very Low Birth Weigh Newborns in NICU

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed-Abolfazl Afjeh; Mohammad-Kazem Sabzehei; Seyyed-Ali-Reza Fahimzad; Farideh Shiva; Ahmad-Reza Shamshiri; Fatemeh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged empiric antibiotics therapy in neonates results in several adverse consequences including widespread antibiotic resistance, late onset sepsis (LOS), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prolonged hospital course (HC) and increase in mortality rates. Objectives To assess the risk factors and the outcome of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns. ...

  5. Antibiotic Therapy for Very Low Birth Weigh Newborns in NICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Fahimzad, Seyyed-Ali-Reza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged empiric antibiotics therapy in neonates results in several adverse consequences including widespread antibiotic resistance, late onset sepsis (LOS), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prolonged hospital course (HC) and increase in mortality rates. Objectives To assess the risk factors and the outcome of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns. Materials and Methods Prospective study in VLBW neonates admitted to NICU and survived > 2 W, from July 2011 - June 2012. All relevant perinatal and postnatal data including duration of antibiotics therapy (Group I 2W) and outcome up to the time of discharge or death were documented and compared. Results Out of 145 newborns included in the study, 62 were in group I, and 83 in Group II. Average duration of antibiotic therapy was 14 days (range 3 - 62 days); duration in Group I and Group II was 10 ± 2.3 vs 25.5 ± 10.5 days. Hospital stay was 22.3 ± 11.5 vs 44.3 ± 14.7 days, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed following risk factors as significant for prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy: VLBW especially stage II, 12 (8.3%) newborns died. Infant mortality alone and with LOS/NEC was higher in group II as compared to group I (P < 0.002 and < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy caused increasing rates of LOS, NEC, HC and infant mortality. PMID:27307961

  6. Problems concerning the parenteral nutrition within the complex therapy of radiation injuries of the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloventantor, V.Yu.; Kurpesheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.; Bardychev, M.S.; Khmelevskij, Ya.M.

    1982-01-01

    The treatment results of 52 patients with radiation enterocolitis and rectosygmoiditis are reported. The complex therapy included a partial or a complete parenteral nutrition according to the indication. The treatment caused an improvement in 86.7% of the cases, no changes in 5.7% and a deterioration of the condition in 7.6%. The additional nutritive therapy rendered it possible to hold the cell mass of the body constant and to decrease the protein losses of the gastrointestinal tract significantly. (author)

  7. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichvarova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  8. Antibiotic Therapy in Pyogenic Meningitis in Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajdin, F.; Rasheed, M.A.; Ashraf, M.; Khan, G.J.; Rasheed, H.; Ejaz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and identify the causative pathogen, antibiotic sensitivity testing and success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy in pyogenic meningitis. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan, from March to July 2012. Methodology: The study was performed on 72 culture positive meningitis cases in children less than 15 years of age. This therapy was evaluated by monitoring the patient's clinical picture for 14 - 21 days. The collected data was analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Seventeen different bacteria were isolated. The most commonly occurring bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococci (25%), E. coli (12.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (8.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.3%). All the bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin (96.7%), meropenem (76.7%), amikacin (75%), ciprofloxacin (65.3%), chloramphenicol (46.5%), ceftazidime (44.2%), cefepime (41.9%), co-amoxiclav (38.0%), oxacillin (34.8%), cefotaxime (21.4%), penicillin (20.7%), ceftriaxone (18.6%), cefuroxime (14%) and ampicillin (6.9%). The combination of sulbactam and cefoperazone showed antimicrobial sensitivity of 81.4%. The success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy was 91.7%. Conclusion: It was found that Gram negative bacteria were the major cause of pyogenic meningitis. Mostly there were resistant strains against all commonly used antibiotics except vancomycin. All empirical antibiotic therapies were found to be most successful. (author)

  9. Concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic nutrients metabolism presents a severe problem in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, especially those with canceromatosis. A hypermetabolism-catabolism syndrome frequently develops in in patients with progressing canceromatosis. This leads to cachexia anorexia syndrome, which significantly impedes available treatment options. Artificial nutrition allows to improve available treatment in such patients. We present a successful case of concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patient with peritoneal canceromatosis.

  10. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Prescribing: The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Peggi; Boullata, Joseph I; Ayers, Phil; Gervasio, Jane; Malone, Ainsley; Raymond, Erica; Holcombe, Beverly; Kraft, Michael; Sacks, Gordon; Seres, David

    2015-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provision is complex, as it is a high-alert medication and prone to a variety of potential errors. With changes in clinical practice models and recent federal rulings, the number of PN prescribers may be increasing. Safe prescribing of this therapy requires that competency for prescribers from all disciplines be demonstrated using a standardized process. A standardized model for PN prescribing competency is proposed based on a competency framework, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines. This framework will guide institutions and agencies in developing and maintaining competency for safe PN prescription by their staff. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. [Proper antibiotic therapy. From penicillin to pharmacogenomic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, G; Ruffini, E

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. The use of penicillin by Flaming, opened up the golden era of antibiotics and now is hard to imagine the practice of medicine without antibiotics. Life-threatening infections, such as meningitis, endocarditis, bacteremic pneumonia sepsis, would again prove fatal. Also aggressive chemotherapy and transplant procedures would prove impossible. Another real wonder has been the rise of antibiotic resistance soon after the clinical use of penicillin in hospitals and communities. Several study demonstrated an excessive amount of antibiotic prescribing for communities patients and inpatients and in some hospital up to 50% of antibiotic usage is inappropriate: the benefits of antibiotic treatment come with the risk of antibiotic resistance development. In hospitals, infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are associated with higher mortality, morbidity and prolonged hospital stay compared with infections caused by antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. A variety of strategies has been proposed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of medication use. Education, guidelines and evidence based recommendations are considered to be essential elements of any program designed to influence prescribing behavior and can provide a foundation of knowledge that will enhance and increase the acceptance of stewardship strategies. Evidence-based recommendations, an approach to clinical practice helping to make decisions based on clinical expertise and on intimate knowledge of the individual patient's situations, beliefs, and priorities, enhance antimicrobial stewardship, that include appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy can maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection while limiting the unintended consequences, such as the emergence of resistance, adverse drug events, and cost. These evidence-based guidelines are not a substitute for clinical

  12. Duration of antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Wendy L; Taddonio, Michael A; Arbabi, Saman; Hemmila, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Shorter compared with longer courses of antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in mixed medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) have been reported to produce equivalent outcomes. There have been few studies on the duration of antibiotic therapy for VAP in the burn population. We hypothesized that a shorter duration of antibiotic therapy for VAP would produce similar outcomes in our burn ICU. All burn patients from July 2001 to December 2006 admitted to the burn ICU requiring mechanical ventilation were studied. VAP was diagnosed prospectively by our Infection Control Liaison using bronchoalveolar lavage for cultures. Patients were cohorted into two groups: before July 1, 2004, antibiotic therapy duration was directed by the discretion of the attending physician (preprotocol), and after, the goal was 8 days of appropriate therapy or longer based on physician discretion (postprotocol). There were 98 patients treated for VAP with similar rates of inhalation injury, %TBSA burn size, age, and need for mechanical ventilation between the groups. The incidence of recurrent VAP was the same: 17% for the preprotocol and 15% for the postprotocol periods. The overall duration of antibiotic therapy did not change from 11 +/- 4 to 12 +/- 6 days. For patients treated longer than the target of 8 days, 66% had positive respiratory cultures at 4 days after initiation of antibiotic therapy. For the majority of patients with aspiration-type organisms or nonvirulent strains, there were fewer antibiotic days overall at 10 +/- 5 days (P VAP with the same bacteria. Despite a focused effort to decrease antibiotic usage for VAP in burn patients, the overall duration of therapy did not change. The majority of patients with virulent organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or nonfermenting Gram-negative rods still had clinical signs of pneumonia and positive cultures, leading clinicians to continue antibiotics. In patients without virulent

  13. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from 38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  14. Impact of Early Parenteral Nutrition on Metabolism and Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gunst, Jan; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Casaer, Michaël P.; Hermans, Greet; Wouters, Pieter J.; Dubois, Jasperina; Claes, Kathleen; Schetz, Miet; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2013-01-01

    A poor nutritional state and a caloric deficit associate with increased morbidity and mortality, but a recent multicenter, randomized controlled trial found that early parenteral nutrition to supplement insufficient enteral nutrition increases morbidity in the intensive care unit, including prolonging the duration of renal replacement therapy, compared with withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week. Whether early versus late parenteral nutrition impacts the incidence and recovery of AKI is ...

  15. Antibiotic Desensitization Therapy in Secondary Syphilis and Listeria Infection: Case Reports and Review of Desensitization Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magpantay, Gil; Madar, Cristian S; Hsue, Gunther; Belnap, Conrad

    2011-01-01

    Two adult cases, one of secondary syphilis and one of Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia, in which antibiotic desensitization therapy was utilized to assist treatment of active infection in the face of severe penicillin allergy. Clinical considerations are discussed that led to the decision to employ a formal desensitization procedure. Antibiotic desensitization protocols can facilitate optimal and safe antibiotic therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:22187514

  16. A Multicenter Evaluation of Prolonged Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Adult ICUs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zachariah; Bandali, Farooq; Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Reardon, Tom; Olsen, Keith M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in adult ICUs in the United States. Our secondary objective is to examine the relationship between the prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate and certain ICU characteristics. Multicenter, prospective, observational, 72-hour snapshot study. Sixty-seven ICUs from 32 hospitals in the United States. Nine hundred ninety-eight patients admitted to the ICU between midnight on June 20, 2011, and June 21, 2011, were included in the study. None. Antibiotic orders were categorized as prophylactic, definitive, empiric, or prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy was defined as empiric antibiotics that continued for at least 72 hours in the absence of adjudicated infection. Standard definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to determine infection. Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was determined as the ratio of the total number of empiric antibiotics continued for at least 72 hours divided by the total number of empiric antibiotics. Univariate analysis of factors associated with the ICU prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate was conducted using Student t test. A total of 660 unique antibiotics were prescribed as empiric therapy to 364 patients. Of the empiric antibiotics, 333 of 660 (50%) were continued for at least 72 hours in instances where Centers for Disease Control and Prevention infection criteria were not met. Suspected pneumonia accounted for approximately 60% of empiric antibiotic use. The most frequently prescribed empiric antibiotics were vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam. ICUs that utilized invasive techniques for the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia had lower rates of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy than those that did not, 45.1% versus 59.5% (p = 0.03). No other institutional factor was significantly associated with prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy rate. Half of all

  17. Home parenteral nutrition in treatment of severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.G.; Ivey, M.; Young, J.

    1979-01-01

    Ten patients with radiation enteritis unresponsive to conventional medical and surgical therapy were put on long-term parenteral nutrition at home. Six of the patients are alive at home; four patients died, two from recurrent cancer. Some of the patients have been able to resume oral intake, but none have been able to discontinue parenteral nutrition. Fistulas healed or had a marked decrease in output. Two patients in our series were given prednisone and sulfasalazine without significant benefit, in contrast to previously reported clinical improvement of radiation enteritis with this therapy

  18. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  19. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for orthopedic infections – a successful public healthcare experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rosalba Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of orthopedic infections usually requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy, ranging from 14 days up to 6 months. Nowadays, rising levels of antimicrobial resistance demands parenteral therapy for many patients. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is a modality that allows treatment out of hospital in these situations. In Brazil, where a public universal healthcare system allows full coverage for all citizens, implantation and dissemination of OPAT programs would be beneficial for patients and for the system, because it would allow a better allocation of health resources. The Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (IOT started, in July 2013, a partnership with municipal health authorities in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to initiate an OPAT program in which patients discharged from that hospital would be able to continue antimicrobial therapy at primary care facilities. When necessary, patients could also receive their therapy at the day-hospital located at IOT. Primary care nursing and physician staff were trained about antimicrobial infusion and peripherally inserted central catheter manipulation. An OPAT specific antimicrobial protocol was designed and a special reference and counter-reference organized. As a result, 450 primary healthcare professionals were trained. In the first year of this program, 116 patients were discharged for OPAT. Chronic and acute osteomyelitis were most frequent diagnosis. Teicoplanin, ertapenem and tigecycline were the most used drugs. Duration of treatment varied from 10 to 180 days (average 101, median 42. Total sum of days in OPAT regimen was 11,698. Only 3 patients presented adverse effects. Partnership between services of different levels of complexity allowed implantation of a safe and effective public healthcare OPAT program for treatment of orthopedic infections. This program can serve as a model for developing similar strategies

  20. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  1. Patient Characteristics and Outcomes of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is a safe and effective alternative to hospitalization for many patients with infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to describe the OPAT experience at a Canadian tertiary academic centre in the absence of a formal OPAT program. This was achieved through a retrospective chart review of OPAT patients discharged from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre within a one-year period. Between June 2012 and May 2013, 104 patients (median age 63 years were discharged home with parenteral antimicrobials. The most commonly treated syndromes included surgical site infections (33%, osteoarticular infections (28%, and bacteremia (21%. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials were ceftriaxone (21% and cefazolin (20%. Only 56% of the patients received follow-up care from an infectious diseases specialist. In the 60 days following discharge, 43% of the patients returned to the emergency department, while 26% required readmission. Forty-eight percent of the return visits were due to infection relapse or treatment failure, and 23% could be attributed to OPAT-related complications. These results suggest that many OPAT patients have unplanned health care encounters because of issues related to their infection or treatment, and the creation of a formal OPAT clinic may help improve outcomes.

  2. [Health economics and antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, P; Bigdéli, M

    1995-01-01

    In the field of antibiotic therapy, particularly the methods of economic evaluation hold one's attention within the wide range of health economics' applications. Several tools allow a comparison of the outcomes of alternative strategies and thereby guide choices to the most appropriate solutions. After a brief recall of the methods classically used to evaluate health care strategy, the authors stress the importance and difficulty of fixing and applying a correct and satisfactory procedure for evaluation. An evaluation example of antibiotic therapy allows to illustrate the application of the principles confronting a field in which competition is intense and economic stakes stay large--a fact which naturally yields to seek after objective decision making criteria. The health care policies drawn by public authorities as well as the marketing strategies of the health sector trade are partly based on such evaluations. If these techniques are not intended for the practitioner in the first place, they should not be indifferent to him since they influence health authorities and thereby indirectly affect the therapeutic freedom of the physician.

  3. Diabetic foot infections: Current treatment and delaying the 'post-antibiotic era'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for diabetic foot infections requires properly diagnosing infection, obtaining an appropriate specimen for culture, assessing for any needed surgical procedures and selecting an empiric antibiotic regimen. Therapy will often need to be modified based on results of culture and sensitivity testing. Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics for treating diabetic foot infections, resistance to the usually employed bacteria has been increasing to alarming levels. This article reviews recommendations from evidence-based guidelines, informed by results of systematic reviews, on treating diabetic foot infections. Data from the pre-antibiotic era reported rates of mortality of about 9% and of high-level leg amputations of about 70%. Outcomes have greatly improved with appropriate antibiotic therapy. While there are now many oral and parenteral antibiotic agents that have demonstrated efficacy in treating diabetic foot infections, the rate of infection with multidrug-resistant pathogens is growing. This problem requires a multi-focal approach, including providing education to both clinicians and patients, developing robust antimicrobial stewardship programmes and using new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies. Recently, new methods have been developed to find novel antibiotic agents and to resurrect old treatments, like bacteriophages, for treating these difficult infections. Medical and political leaders have recognized the serious global threat posed by the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. By a multipronged approach that includes exerting administrative pressure on clinicians to do the right thing, investing in new technologies and encouraging the profitable development of new antimicrobials, we may be able to stave off the coming 'post-antibiotic era'. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Home parenteral nutrition in children: the Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazyk, J; Lyszkowska, M; Kierkus, J; Bogucki, K; Ratyńska, A; Tondys, B; Socha, J

    1999-02-01

    Home parenteral nutrition has become routine for management of intestinal failure in patients. In Poland the main obstacle to widespread use of home parenteral nutrition is the lack of interest of commercial companies in delivering feedings and ancillaries to patients. Twenty-five home parenteral nutrition patients aged from 4 months to more than 13 years were reviewed. The mother or both parents were trained in home parenteral nutrition techniques for 4 to 6 weeks and compounded the nutrients themselves at home. The mean duration of home parenteral nutrition was 10,117 patient days. Hospital stays of patients receiving parenteral feedings were significantly shorter than the duration of administration of home parenteral nutrition (p rate of catheter occlusion decreased within the observation period, and in 1997 not one case of occlusion was observed. In 1997 only three catheters were removed during 7.8 patient years, and the overall incidence of catheter-related complications was 0.38 per patient year. The overall occurrence of septicemia was one case in 516 days and of catheter infection was one in 459 days. In 1997 a catheter was infected on average of once every 1419 days. There was significant improvement in the z score for weight during therapy. The average monthly cost of nutrients and ancillary items was approximately $1200 (4200 Polish zlotys [PLN]). These costs are 1.6 to 3 times lower than those recorded in other studies. Home parenteral nutrition in children with nutrients mixed by caregivers in the home setting is a safe and appropriate method of treatment that can be used in countries where home parenteral nutrition solutions are not manufactured or where commercial home parenteral nutrition is not economically feasible.

  5. Effect of antibiotic therapy on the sensitivity of indium-111-labeled leukocyte scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Thorne, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Although 111 In-labeled leukocytes have been shown to be a useful technique for detecting infection, it has been postulated that antibiotic therapy may reduce the sensitivity of the leukocyte scan. Many patients with suspected bacterial infections are placed on antibiotics before a definite site of infection has been identified. Three hundred twelve leukocyte scans on 271 patients were retrospectively reviewed and classified as positive or negative, and as to whether or not they were being treated with antibiotics at the time the leukocyte scan was performed. The overall sensitivity, considering all 312 studies, was 90%. One hundred sixty-nine patient studies were on patients receiving antibiotics; 143 studies were on patients not on antibiotics. The sensitivity of the leukocyte scan was 88.7% in patients on antibiotic therapy; it was 92.1% in those who were not receiving antibiotics. The differences in sensitivity between the two groups were not significantly different (p less than 0.05). We conclude that antibiotic therapy does not affect the sensitivity of the 111 In-labeled leukocyte scan

  6. Amino acid composition in parenteral nutrition: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarandi, Shadi S.; Zhao, Vivian M.; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Complete parenteral nutrition solutions contain mixed amino acid products providing all nine essential amino acids and a varying composition of nonessential amino acids. Relatively little rigorous comparative efficacy research on altered parenteral nutrition amino acid composition has been published in recent years. Recent findings Limited data from randomized, double-blind, adequately powered clinical trials to define optimal doses of total or individual amino acids in parenteral nutrition are available. An exception is the growing number of studies on the efficacy of glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition or given as a single parenteral agent. Parenteral glutamine appears to confer benefit in selected patients; however, additional data to define optimal glutamine dosing and the patient subgroups who may most benefit from this amino acid are needed. Although some promising studies have been published, little data are available in the current era of nutrition support on the clinical efficacy of altered doses of arginine, branched chain amino acids, cysteine, or taurine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Summary Despite routine use of parenteral nutrition, surprisingly little clinical efficacy data are available to guide total or specific amino acid dosing in adult and pediatric patients requiring this therapy. This warrants increased attention by the research community and funding agencies to better define optimal amino acid administration strategies in patient subgroups requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:21076291

  7. Successful treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis with antibiotic monotherapy of limited duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghmouche, Nadir; Compain, Fabrice; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Guigui, Pierre; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Lonjon, Guillaume; Bouyer, Benjamin; Fernandez-Gerlinger, Marie-Paule

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to present a 15-year experience and provide a comprehensive analysis of a large cohort of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis. We reviewed the medical records of patients admitted to a large French university hospital for P. aeruginosa osteomyelitis over a 15-year period. Patient outcome was assessed at follow-up after at least six months. Sixty-seven patients were included, comprising 57% with chronic osteomyelitis. Polymicrobial infection was predominant (63%), and an infected device was involved in 39% patients. The overall treatment success rate was 79.1%. All but one patient were treated with a combination of surgery and antibiotic therapy. The antibiotic treatment had a mean duration of 45 days (range, 21-90 days). Single-antibiotic therapy was preferred in nearly all cases. Treatment failure was reported for 14 (21%) patients and was due to the persistence of P. aeruginosa in four cases. No significant risk factor for treatment failure was identified, especially when treatment strategies were compared. We advocate optimal surgical debridement combined with initial parenteral antibiotics for a maximum of 15 days, followed by an oral fluoroquinolone. Total treatment duration should not exceed six weeks, and antibiotic treatment with two-drug combinations does not seem necessary. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic stability related to temperature variations in elastomeric pumps used for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Rachel; Van Neyghem, Niklas; Cochet, Camille; Gardiol, Céline; Decosterd, Laurent; Buclin, Thierry; de Valliere, Serge

    2017-05-01

    Elastomeric pumps can be used for the continuous administration of antimicrobials in the outpatient setting. A potentially limiting factor in their use is the stability of antimicrobials. To investigate under real-life conditions the temperature variations of antibiotic solutions contained in elastomeric pumps, and to examine under such conditions the stability of five antibiotics. Healthy volunteers carried the elastomeric pumps in carry pouches during their daily activities. A thermologger measured the temperatures every 15 min over 24 h. Antibiotic concentrations were measured by HPLC coupled to tandem MS. During daytime, the temperature of solutions in the pumps increased steadily, warming to >30°C. During the night, when the pumps were kept attached to the waist, the temperatures reached up to 33°C. The use of white carry pouches avoided excessive temperature increases. Over seven experiments, cefazolin, cefepime, piperacillin and tazobactam were found to be stable over 24 h. Flucloxacillin showed a mean decrease in concentration of 11% ( P  = 0.001). Real-life situations can cause significant temperature rises in elastomeric pumps, thereby potentially increasing the risk of antibiotic degradation. Patients should be instructed to avoid situations causing excessive temperature increases. Despite these temperature variations, cefazolin, cefepime, piperacillin and tazobactam were found to be stable over 24 h. A moderate degradation was noticed for flucloxacillin, albeit most probably not to an extent that might impair anti-infective efficacy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Wouters, Pieter J; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Debaveye, Yves; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Desmet, Lars; Casaer, Michael P; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Hanot, Jan; Joffe, Ari; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2016-03-24

    receiving renal-replacement therapy (P=0.04) and a shorter duration of hospital stay (P=0.001). Late parenteral nutrition was also associated with lower plasma levels of γ-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase than was early parenteral nutrition (P=0.001 and P=0.04, respectively), as well as higher levels of bilirubin (P=0.004) and C-reactive protein (P=0.006). In critically ill children, withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week in the ICU was clinically superior to providing early parenteral nutrition. (Funded by the Flemish Agency for Innovation through Science and Technology and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01536275.).

  10. Parenteral Nutrition Basics for the Clinician Caring for the Adult Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenski, Karrie; Catlin, Jennifer; Allen, Livia

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy providing nutrients to individuals with impaired intestinal tract function and enteral access challenges. It is one of the most complex prescriptions written routinely in the hospital and home care settings. This article is to aid the nutrition support clinician in the safe provision of PN, including selecting appropriate patients for PN, vascular access, development of a PN admixture, appropriate therapy monitoring, recognition of preparation options, and awareness of preparation and stability concerns. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Early transition to oral antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia: duration of therapy, clinical outcomes, and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, K; de Boisblanc, B P; Karam, G; Nelson, S; Haponik, E; Summer, W

    1998-08-01

    Our objective was to compare therapeutic outcome and analyse cost-benefit of a 'conventional' (7-day course of i.v. antibiotic therapy) vs. an abbreviated (2-day i.v. antibiotic course followed by 'switch' to oral antibiotics) therapy for in-patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We used a multicenter prospective, randomized, parallel group with a 28 day follow-up, at the University-based teaching hospitals: The Medical Center of Louisiana in New Orleans, LA and hospitals listed in the acknowledgement. Ninety-five patients were randomized to receive either a 'conventional' course of intravenous antibiotic therapy with cefamandole 1 g i.v. every 6 h for 7 days (n = 37), or an abbreviated course of intravenous therapy with cefamandole (1 g i.v. every 6 h for 2 days) followed by oral therapy with cefaclor (500 mg every 8 h for 5 days). No difference was found in the clinical courses, cure rates, survival or the resolution of the chest radiograph abnormalities among the two groups. The mean duration of therapy (6.88 days for the conventional group compared to 7-30 days for the early oral therapy group) and the frequencies of overall symptomatic improvement (97% vs. 95%, respectively) were similar in both groups. Patients who received early oral therapy had shorter hospital stays (7.3 vs. 9.71 days, P = 0.01), and a lower total cost of care ($2953 vs. $5002, P < 0.05). It was concluded that early transition to an oral antibiotic after an abbreviated course of intravenous therapy in CAP is substantially less expensive and has comparable efficacy to conventional intravenous therapy. Altering physicians' customary management of hospitalized patients with CAP can reduce costs with no appreciable additional risk of adverse patient outcome.

  12. Antibiotic therapy versus appendicectomy in uncomplicated acute appendicitis in terms of efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, M.A.; Nazeer, T.B.; Aziz, O.B.A.; Asad, T.; Dar, Z.S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare antibiotic therapy and appendectomy in uncomplicated acute appendicitis in terms of efficacy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Ward Forward Treatment Centre (FTC), 5 Mountain Medical Battalion Forward Kahuta Azad Jammu Kashmir (AJK), from Oct 2011 to Mar 2013. Material and Methods: A total of 103 patients with clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA) were admitted during the duration of study and divided into two groups by consecutive sampling. The antibiotic group consisted of 51 patients who received intravenous antibiotics for 48 hours and oral antibiotics for another 8 days. The appendectomy group comprised of 52 patients who all underwent standard appendectomy. All the patients were followed up at 1 month and 1 year for assessing efficacy and post treatment complications. Results: The efficacy of antibiotic treatment is 90.625 percent as compared to appendectomy which was 88.46 percent (p=0.759) at 1 month follow up after treatment. At one year post treatment, the comparison between the efficacy of antibiotic therapy (71.87 percent) and appendectomy (87.14 percent) remains statistically insignificant (p=0.055). Conclusion: Antibiotic therapy is comparable to appendectomy in AA in terms of efficacy at 1 month and 1 year post treatment. (author)

  13. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J

    2018-01-22

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve outcome. In the previous version of this Cochrane Review, published in 2012, we found that antibiotics did reduce the risk of infection but did not reduce the number of dependent or deceased patients. However, included studies were small and heterogeneous. In 2015, two large clinical trials were published, warranting an update of this Review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of preventive antibiotic therapy in people with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We wished to determine whether preventive antibiotic therapy in people with acute stroke:• reduces the risk of a poor functional outcome (dependency and/or death) at follow-up;• reduces the occurrence of infections in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces the occurrence of elevated body temperature (temperature ≥ 38° C) in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces length of hospital stay; or• leads to an increased rate of serious adverse events, such as anaphylactic shock, skin rash, or colonisation with antibiotic-resistant micro-organisms. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (25 June 2017); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 5; 25 June 2017) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE Ovid (1950 to 11 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 11 May 2017). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials, we searched trials and research registers, scanned reference lists, and contacted trial authors, colleagues, and researchers in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of preventive antibiotic therapy versus control (placebo or open control) in people with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Two review authors independently selected

  14. Oral Antibiotics for Community acquired Pneumonia with Chest indrawing in Children Aged Below Five Years: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, Rakesh; Randev, Shivani; Kabra, Sushil K

    2016-06-08

    To determine the efficacy of oral antibiotics in under-five children with pneumonia and chest indrawing. We included controlled clinical trials (randomized or quasi randomized) that compared the efficacy of oral antibiotics versus parenteral antibiotics for treatment of community acquired pneumonia with chest indrawing (severe pneumonia as defined by the World Health Organizations guidelines) in children below 60 months of age. Data were extracted and managed using RevMan software. Main outcome variables were: treatment failure rate, relapse rate, death rate, need for hospitalization, and severe adverse effects. We identified four randomized controlled trials involving 4400 children who were diagnosed to have severe pneumonia but were feeding well and not hypoxic. Baseline characteristics of children in the two treatment arms (oral and parenteral antibiotics) were similar. In two studies, oral antibiotics were administered on an ambulatory basis, while in two, oral antibiotics were used in hospitalized children. Failure rate in children receiving oral antibiotics was 13% (288/2208) while that in children receiving parenteral antibiotics was 13.8% (302/2183) (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.78, 1.11). Failure rates were not affected by the type of oral antibiotic, or presence of wheeze. Relapse rates, hospitalization or serious adverse events were similar in the two groups. Children with tachypnea with chest indrawing without signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia may be treated with oral antibiotics.

  15. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia

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    Prasham Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15th day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability.

  16. Infection After Hysterectomy

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    David L. Hemsell

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis and advances in technology have reduced operative site infections after hysterectomy to a minimum. Pelvic infections are the most common infection type and respond promptly to a variety of parenteral single-agent and combination antibiotic regimens. Oral antibiotic regimens following parenteral therapy are unnecessary. Abdominal incision infections are less common than pelvic infections, less common than seromas or hematomas, and usually do not require antimicrobial therapy. Abscesses or infected hematomas require parenteral antimicrobial therapy, and drainage of those located above the cuff will predictably shorten therapy time. With early discharge from the hospital, many infections will not become evident until after the patient is home. For that reason, it is important that the patient's discharge instructions outline symptoms and signs associated with these infections so she can present for care at the earliest possible time.

  17. Implementation of treatment guidelines to support judicious use of antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuster, S; Roten, I; Muehlebach, S

    2010-02-01

    Judicious use of antibiotics is essential considering the growth of antimicrobial resistance and escalating costs in health care. This intervention study used treatment guidelines to improve antibiotic therapy by changing prescribing practice. A before-after intervention study was performed in a 550-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Switzerland, with an additional follow-up analysis 1 year later. The pre-intervention phase included chart analysis of current antibiotic use in 100 consecutive patients from the representative medical and surgical wards included in the study. Treatment guidelines were defined, taking into account published guidelines, the local antibacterial sensitivity of the pathogens, and the hospital antibiotic formulary defined by the drug and therapeutics committee. The guidelines were presented to the medical residents on a pocket card. They were informed and educated by the pharmacist (intervention). In the post-intervention phase immediately after the instruction, and in the follow-up phase 1 year later, a prospective analysis of antibiotic prescription was performed by chart review of 100 antibacterial treatments in consecutive patients to detect changes in antibiotic prescribing (treatment) and to determine whether these changes were sustained. The pre-intervention review of antibiotic use showed the need for therapy improvements in urinary tract infections (UTI) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). In the post-intervention phase 100% of UTI were treated as recommended, compared to 30% before the intervention (P UTI. Before implementation of the clinical guidelines, HAP was inappropriately treated like community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Immediately after the intervention, 50% of HAP patients were treated as recommended, and 1 year later (follow-up phase) 56% of HAP patients received the recommended antibiotic medication. This change in prescription practice was significant (P < 0.05). Antibiotic treatment guidelines for the

  18. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

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    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  19. Triple combination antibiotic therapy for carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David M; Safir, M Courtney; Huang, Dennis; Minhaj, Faisal; Parker, Adam; Rao, Gauri G

    2017-11-25

    The spread of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (CPKP) has become a significant problem worldwide. Combination therapy for CPKP is encouraging, but polymyxin resistance to many antibiotics is hampering effective treatment. Combination therapy with three or more antibiotics is being increasingly reported, therefore we performed a systematic review of triple combination cases in an effort to evaluate their clinical effectiveness for CPKP infections. The PubMed database was searched to identify all published clinical outcomes of CPKP infections treated with triple combination therapy. Articles were stratified into two tiers depending on the level of clinical detail provided. A tier 1 study included: antibiotic regimen, regimen-specific outcome, patient status at onset of infection, and source of infection. Articles not reaching these criteria were considered tier 2. Thirty-three studies were eligible, 23 tier 1 and ten tier 2. Among tier 1 studies, 53 cases were included in this analysis. The most common infection was pneumonia (31%) followed by primary or catheter-related bacteremia (21%) and urinary tract infection (17%). Different combinations of antibiotic classes were utilized in triple combinations, the most common being a polymyxin (colistin or polymyxin B, 86.8%), tigecycline (73.6%), aminoglycoside (43.4%), or carbapenem (43.4%). Clinical and microbiological failure occurred in 14/39 patients (35.9%) and 22/42 patients (52.4%), respectively. Overall mortality for patients treated with triple combination therapy was 35.8% (19/53 patients). Triple combination therapy is being considered as a treatment option for CPKP. Polymyxin-based therapy is the backbone antibiotic in these regimens, but its effectiveness needs establishing in prospective clinical trials.

  20. Régimen corto de antibioticoterapia parenteral frente a régimen largo: Análisis de minimización de costes A short-term parenteral antibiotic therapy regime versus a long-term regime: Analysis of cost reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Medina García

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de análisis económico, del tipo de minimización de costes, con el objetivo de evaluar los costes de un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días utilizado en recién nacidos con infección del tracto urinario alta, de evolución inicial favorable, en comparación con otro de larga duración (≥ 5 días. Se tuvo como base un estudio analítico, observacional, en el que se conformaron dos grupos según el régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral (corto o largo seguido de antibioticoterapia oral, que generó un ciclo de tratamiento parenteral-oral secuencial de 10 días de duración. Se evaluaron los costes por concepto de tratamiento con antibióticos y de hospitalización. Con el tratamiento corto se habrían ahorrado 29 054,58 CU con respecto a los costes derivados del régimen de tratamiento largo, a lo que se suman otros beneficios en la esfera psico-social familiar. Con los resultados obtenidos concluimos que un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días para el tratamiento de una infección del tracto urinario alta de evolución inicial favorable, tiene mayor eficiencia que un régimen largo (≥ 5 días, pues se logra minimizar los costes relativos al tratamiento antibiótico y a la hospitalización.

  1. Dry powder inhalation of antibiotics : A promising approach for treatment of infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppentocht, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In the thesis of Marcel Hoppentocht the feasibility to treat bacterial infections effectively with inhaled dry powder antibiotics is explored. Most antibiotics are currently administered pulmonary by wet nebulisation or via the parenteral route and both methods have numerous disadvantages. For

  2. Use of parenteral testosterone in hypospadias cases

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    Vikram Satav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the effect of parenteral testosterone on penile length, preputial hood, vascularity of dartos pedicle in patients with hypospadias. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 patients with hypospadias were included in this study. Injection aquaviron (oily solution each ml containing testosterone propionate 25 mg was given deep intramuscularly in three doses with an interval of 3 weeks before reconstructive surgery at the dose of 2 mg/kg body weight. Preoperatively penile length, transverse preputial width and diameter at the base of the penis were measured. Basal testosterone levels were obtained before the institution of therapy and on the day of operation. Results: Following parenteral testosterone administration, the mean increase in penile length, transverse preputial width and diameter at the base of penis was 1.01 ± 0.25 cm (P < 0.001, 1.250 ± 0.52 cm and 0.61 ± 0.35 cm, respectively, (P < 0.001. Serum testosterone level after injection was well within normal range for that age. Conclusion: Parenteral testosterone increased phallus size, diameter and prepuce hypertrophy without any adverse effects. However, due to lack of a control group we cannot make any inferences. Controlled studies are required to establish the benefits of parenteral testosterone.

  3. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Shira R; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances.

  4. Parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkchubasche AG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arlet G Kurkchubasche,1 Thomas J Herron,2 Marion F Winkler31Department of Surgery and Pediatrics, 2Department of Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 3Department of Surgery/Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Intestinal failure is a consequence of extensive surgical resection resulting in anatomic loss and/or functional impairment in motility or absorptive capacity. The condition is clinically characterized by the inability to maintain fluid, energy, protein, electrolyte, or micronutrient balance when on a conventionally accepted, normal diet. Parenteral nutrition (PN is the cornerstone of management until intestinal adaptation returns the patient to a PN-independent state. Intestinal length, residual anatomic segments and motility determine the need for and duration of parenteral support. The goals of therapy are to provide sufficient nutrients to enable normal growth and development in children, and support a healthy functional status in adults. This review addresses indications for PN, the formulation of the PN solution, patient monitoring, and considerations for prevention of PN-associated complications. With the ultimate goal of achieving enteral autonomy, the important role of diet, pharmacologic interventions, and surgery is discussed.Keywords: intestinal failure, short-bowel syndrome, parenteral nutrition, home nutrition support, intestinal rehabilitation

  5. Simplified antibiotic regimens for treatment of clinical severe infection in the outpatient setting when referral is not possible for young infants in Pakistan (Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial [SATT]): a randomised, open-label, equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Fatima; Nisar, Imran; Tikmani, Shiyam S; Baloch, Benazir; Shakoor, Sadia; Jehan, Fyezah; Ahmed, Imran; Cousens, Simon; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2017-02-01

    Parenteral antibiotic therapy for young infants (aged 0-59 days) with suspected sepsis is sometimes not available or feasible in countries with high neonatal mortality. Outpatient treatment could save lives in such settings. We aimed to assess the equivalence of two simplified antibiotic regimens, comprising fewer injections and oral rather than parenteral administration, compared with a reference treatment for young infants with clinical severe infection. We undertook the Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial (SATT), a three-arm, randomised, open-label, equivalence trial in five communities in Karachi, Pakistan. We enrolled young infants (aged 0-59 days) who either presented at a primary health-care clinic or were identified by a community health worker with signs of clinical severe infection. We included infants who were not critically ill and whose family refused admission. We randomly assigned infants to either intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 7 days (reference); oral amoxicillin twice daily and intramuscular gentamicin once a day for 7 days; or intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 2 days followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 7 days of enrolment and the primary analysis was per protocol. We judged experimental treatments as efficacious as the reference if the upper bound of the 95% CI for the difference in treatment failure was less than 5·0. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027429. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 26, 2013, 2780 infants were deemed eligible for the trial, of whom 2453 (88%) were enrolled. Because of inadequate clinical follow-up or treatment adherence, 2251 infants were included in the per-protocol analysis. 820 infants (747 per protocol) were assigned the reference treatment of procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin, 816 (751 per protocol) were allocated amoxicillin and gentamicin, and

  6. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients; Parenteralna vyziva u malnutricnych pacientov

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    Lichvarova, I. [OAIM, Narodny onkologicky ustav, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  7. Supplemental parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a study protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Emma J; Davies, Andrew R; Parke, Rachael; Bailey, Michael; McArthur, Colin; Gillanders, Lyn; Cooper, David J; McGuinness, Shay

    2015-12-24

    Nutrition is one of the fundamentals of care provided to critically ill adults. The volume of enteral nutrition received, however, is often much less than prescribed due to multiple functional and process issues. To deliver the prescribed volume and correct the energy deficit associated with enteral nutrition alone, parenteral nutrition can be used in combination (termed "supplemental parenteral nutrition"), but benefits of this method have not been firmly established. A multi-centre, randomised, clinical trial is currently underway to determine if prescribed energy requirements can be provided to critically ill patients by using a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy in the critically ill. This prospective, multi-centre, randomised, stratified, parallel-group, controlled, phase II trial aims to determine whether a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy will reliably and safely increase energy intake when compared to usual care. The study will be conducted for 100 critically ill adults with at least one organ system failure and evidence of insufficient enteral intake from six intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. Enrolled patients will be allocated to either a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy for 7 days post randomisation or to usual care with enteral nutrition. The primary outcome will be the average energy amount delivered from nutrition therapy over the first 7 days of the study period. Secondary outcomes include protein delivery for 7 days post randomisation; total energy and protein delivery, antibiotic use and organ failure rates (up to 28 days); duration of ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. At both intensive care unit and hospital discharge strength and health-related quality of life assessments will be undertaken. Study participants will be followed up for health-related quality of life, resource utilisation and survival at 90 and 180 days post randomisation (unless death occurs first). This trial

  8. Streamlining antibiotic therapy with procalcitonin protocols: consensus and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubitz, Sebastian; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence supports procalcitonin (PCT) as an accurate surrogate biomarker for likelihood and severity of bacterial infections. In community-acquired pneumonia and other respiratory infections, PCT-guided antibiotic therapy algorithms resulted in reduced antibiotic exposure while maintaining a similar or even better level of safety compared with standard care. Reductions in antibiotic use translate into lower treatment costs, decreased risk of side effects and decreased bacterial multiresistance. This is especially important, as acute respiratory infections represent the most frequent reason for antibiotic prescriptions worldwide. Still, there is some controversy about the benefits of PCT measurement in sepsis patients in the intensive care unit and for nonrespiratory infections. Highly sensitive PCT assays are readily available in many hospitals today, and point-of-care assays with high enough sensitivity for antibiotic guidance are expected to be available soon. Herein, the authors provide an overview of recent studies evaluating PCT in different clinical situations and an outlook of currently enrolling or upcoming interventional trials.

  9. Combined enteral and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerman, Jan

    2012-03-01

    To review and discuss the evidence and arguments to combine enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition in the ICU, in particular with reference to the Early Parenteral Nutrition Completing Enteral Nutrition in Adult Critically Ill Patients (EPaNIC) study. The EPaNIC study shows an advantage in terms of discharges alive from the ICU when parenteral nutrition is delayed to day 8 as compared with combining enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition from day 3 of ICU stay. The difference between the guidelines from the European Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Europe and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition/Society of Critical Care Medicine in North America concerning the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition during the initial week of ICU stay was reviewed. The EPaNIC study clearly demonstrates that early parenteral nutrition in the ICU is not in the best interests of most patients. Exactly at what time point the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition should be considered is still an open question.

  10. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-01-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition

  11. Randomized clinical trial of antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H C; Kim, M J; Lee, B H

    2017-12-01

    Uncomplicated appendicitis may resolve spontaneously or require treatment with antibiotics or appendicectomy. The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the outcome of a non-antibiotic management strategy with that of antibiotic therapy in uncomplicated appendicitis. Patients presenting to a university teaching hospital with CT-verified uncomplicated simple appendicitis (appendiceal diameter no larger than 11 mm and without any signs of perforation) were randomized to management with a no-antibiotic regimen with supportive care (intravenous fluids, analgesia and antipyretics as necessary) or a 4-day course of antibiotics with supportive care. The primary endpoint was rate of total treatment failure, defined as initial treatment failure within 1 month and recurrence of appendicitis during the follow-up period. Some 245 patients were randomized within the trial, and followed up for a median of 19 months. The duration of hospital stay was shorter (mean 3·1 versus 3·7 days; P antibiotics. There was no difference in total treatment failure rate between the groups: 29 of 124 (23·4 per cent) in the no-antibiotic group and 25 of 121 (20·7 per cent) in the antibiotic group (P = 0·609). Eighteen patients (9 in each group) had initial treatment failure, 15 of whom underwent appendicectomy and three received additional antibiotics. Thirty-six patients (20 in the no-antibiotic group, 16 in the antibiotic group) experienced recurrence, of whom 30 underwent appendicectomy and six received further antibiotics. Treatment failure rates in patients presenting with CT-confirmed uncomplicated appendicitis appeared similar among those receiving supportive care with either a no-antibiotic regimen or a 4-day course of antibiotics. Registration number: KCT0000124 ( http://cris.nih.go.kr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Oral versus intravenous antibiotic treatment for bone and joint infections (OVIVA): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ho Kwong; Scarborough, Matthew; Zambellas, Rhea; Cooper, Cushla; Rombach, Ines; Walker, A Sarah; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Briggs, Andrew; Seaton, Andrew; Atkins, Bridget; Woodhouse, Andrew; Berendt, Anthony; Byren, Ivor; Angus, Brian; Pandit, Hemant; Stubbs, David; McNally, Martin; Thwaites, Guy; Bejon, Philip

    2015-12-21

    Bone and joint infection in adults arises most commonly as a complication of joint replacement surgery, fracture fixation and diabetic foot infection. The associated morbidity can be devastating to patients and costs the National Health Service an estimated £20,000 to £40,000 per patient. Current standard of care in most UK centres includes a prolonged course (4-6 weeks) of intravenous antibiotics supported, if available, by an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy service. Intravenous therapy carries with it substantial risks and inconvenience to patients, and the antibiotic-related costs are approximately ten times that of oral therapy. Despite this, there is no evidence to suggest that oral therapy results in inferior outcomes. We hypothesise that, by selecting oral agents with high bioavailability, good tissue penetration and activity against the known or likely pathogens, key outcomes in patients managed primarily with oral therapy are non-inferior to those in patients treated by intravenous therapy. The OVIVA trial is a parallel group, randomised (1:1), un-blinded, non-inferiority trial conducted in thirty hospitals across the UK. Eligible participants are adults (>18 years) with a clinical syndrome consistent with a bone, joint or metalware-associated infection who have received ≤7 days of intravenous antibiotic therapy from the date of definitive surgery (or the start of planned curative therapy in patients treated without surgical intervention). Participants are randomised to receive either oral or intravenous antibiotics, selected by a specialist infection physician, for the first 6 weeks of therapy. The primary outcome measure is definite treatment failure within one year of randomisation, as assessed by a blinded endpoint committee, according to pre-defined microbiological, histological and clinical criteria. Enrolling 1,050 subjects will provide 90 % power to demonstrate non-inferiority, defined as less than 7.5 % absolute increase in treatment

  13. [Rational antibiotic therapy in the dental office: Practical guidelines for decision-making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y

    2016-04-01

    Although most dental and periodontal diseases are caused by bacteria, the usual therapy is mechanical/surgical rather than antimicrobial medications. However, sometimes antibiotic administration may be necessary in addition to or as an alternative to the surgical/mechanical treatment. Many studies have shown that the misuse of antibiotics by dentists may be mostly attributed to unnecessity or inefficient regimen, and could contribute to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The article presents practical guidelines to the administration of antibiotics in the dental office.

  14. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Dry cow therapy with a non-antibiotic intramammary teat seal - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispie Fiona

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Dry cow antibiotic therapy is used to eliminate existing intramammary infections and to prevent new infections in the dry period. It is implemented as part of a total management system known as the 'Five-Point Plan' for mastitis control. Recent public concerns over the widespread prophylactic use of antibiotics, coupled with an increasing interest in organic farming, have lead to a re-evaluation of the treatment of cows at drying-off. As a result, attention has focussed on the use of novel alternatives to antibiotic therapy at the end of lactation. One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation. Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens. To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off. This paper reviews the efficacy of teat seal in preventing dry period mastitis in both conventional and organic dairying systems.

  16. Increase in interleukin-8 production from circulating neutrophils upon antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Pasqualina; Mariggiò, Maria A; Barbuti, Giovanna; Cassano, Amalia; Vincenti, Alessandra; Serio, Gabriella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Diana, Anna; Santostasi, Teresa; Polizzi, Angela; Fumarulo, Ruggiero; Casavola, Valeria; Manca, Antonio; Conese, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    It is not known whether antibiotic therapy for lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) has an influence on circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function and apoptosis. Blood PMNs were obtained from 14 CF patients before and after antibiotic treatment for an acute exacerbation, and from 10 healthy controls. PMNs were evaluated for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by spectrophotometry, of cytokines in the conditioned medium by ELISA, and apoptotic response by cytofluorimetry. ROS and interleukin (IL)-8 were produced at higher levels by CF PMNs pre-therapy than control PMNs under basal conditions. IL-8 levels further increased after therapy. Early apoptotic response was higher in CF PMNs pre-therapy than in control PMNs, and this pattern did not change after antibiotic treatment. Circulating PMNs are primed in CF acute patients. Further studies are needed to consider PMN-produced IL-8 as a biomarker to evaluate response to antibiotic therapy in CF patients. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Systemic therapy with anti-infective agents. Principles of rational use of systemic antibiotics in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderkötter, C; Brehler, R; Becker, K

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotics are frequently prescribed and extremely valuable drugs, because they are curative. However, their often incorrect use is the main reason for the increase of multiresistant pathogens. Inappropriate prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections favors the selection and spread of multiresistant bacteria not only in the skin, but also in remote visceral organs (e.g. in the intestines), due to their systemic distribution and effects in the body (so-called collateral damage). For this reason basic knowledge and special prudence when using antibiotics are just as desirable as an awareness of responsibility for the public welfare. This article intends to convey basic knowledge on the indications and selection of suitable antibiotics as well as on the development of bacterial resistance and it gives recommendations for allergological procedures when patients report alleged drug reactions to antibiotics. Systemic antibiotics for soft tissue infections are indicated when the infection spreads within the tissue so that it is no longer accessible for local antiseptics. In addition to the clinical symptoms, important parameters are high blood sedimentation rates (BSR) and high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis with neutrophilia and fever (not always present in elderly or immunosuppressed patients). Certain constellations, such as the presence of severe underlying diseases, perfusion disorders or a particular localization (e.g. infection of the face) may necessitate early or parenteral administration. There is no need for systemic administration of antibiotics for uncomplicated wounds without soft tissue infections. Due to their curative effects, the decisive criterion for the use of antibiotics is their sufficient antimicrobial efficacy at the site of infection. An inappropriate administration increases both the selection pressure and costs of treatment and can have fatal consequences in serious situations. In

  18. Effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive therapy of Gram-negative bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutob, Leila F; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-11-01

    There is paucity of data evaluating intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch options for Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs). This retrospective cohort study examined the effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive treatment of Gram-negative BSI. Patients with Gram-negative BSI hospitalised for antibiotics were included in this study. The cohort was stratified into three groups based on bioavailability of oral antibiotics prescribed (high, ≥95%; moderate, 75-94%; and low, antibiotics were prescribed to 106, 179 and 77 patients, respectively, for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Mean patient age was 63 years, 217 (59.9%) were women and 254 (70.2%) had a urinary source of infection. Treatment failure rates were 2%, 12% and 14% in patients receiving oral antibiotics with high, moderate and low bioavailability, respectively (P = 0.02). Risk of treatment failure in the multivariate Cox model was higher in patients receiving antibiotics with moderate [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-38.5; P = 0.005] and low bioavailability (aHR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.9-51.5; P = 0.003) compared with those receiving oral antimicrobial agents with high bioavailability. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of oral antibiotics with high bioavailability for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Risk of treatment failure increases as bioavailability of the oral regimen declines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000177.htm Total parenteral nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  20. [Simple parameters of antibiotic utilization and diagnostic background of antimicrobial therapy in Hungarian hospitals in 1995].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almási, I; Ternák, G

    1997-02-23

    This paper is published as second part of a survey on antibiotic utilisation of 8 Hungarian hospitals in January, 1995. The length of hospital stay of the patients receiving systemic antibiotic treatment was significantly higher (P profilaxis 32.7%, pneumonia 13.3% of the 753 diagnoses) and drugs (metronidazol 26.3%, aminoglycosides 20% of the 1455 antibiotics) most frequently found in cases of combined antibiotic therapy it was concluded that parallel treatment with two or more antibiotic was often unjustified. Only 11% of antibiotics was used as directed against known bacteria. It was found that the rate of the achieved microbiological examinations and targeted therapy was low even if microbiological samples were easy to obtain. It was not the main purpose of the survey to get data of the clinical diagnostic background of antibiotic therapy, but indirect signs showed that these drugs were often used without sufficient clinical evidences (anamnesis, physical status, labor, X-ray and other tests) of infection. Authors recommend further survey in order to find out the causes of insufficiency of diagnoses. They also propose elaboration of diagnostic protocols.

  1. Parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility; however, it may also be associated with a number of potentially life-threatening complications. A recent NCEPOD report (2010) identified a number of inadequacies in the overall provision and management of parenteral nutrition and recommendations were made with the aim of improving clinical practice in the future. This paper focuses on the practical aspects relating to parenteral nutrition for adults, including important concepts, such as patient selection, as well as general management. We also explore the various pitfalls and potential complications and how these may be minimised.

  2. An assessment of antibiotic therapy of urinary tract infection in elderly, hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, D J; Stewart, D; Harvey, Y; Downie, G; Scott, C J

    1995-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the antibiotic treatment actually received by elderly, hospitalised patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) with 'optimal' therapy (as gauged by compliance with antibiotic policy, infecting organism, sensitivity data, patient renal function and cost). UTI was more common in females and in catheterised patients and E.Coli was the commonest pathogen. Trimethoprim and co-amoxiclav were the drugs used most frequently for either empirical or sensitivity data-based treatment. In 96% of infections a drug with appropriate action was administered. Often, however, treatment could have been optimised by substituting a cheaper suitable antibiotic, by standardising duration of therapy and ensuring that doses were adjusted for renal impairment. Savings from the use of 'optimal' therapy were estimated at 17%. There is clearly considerable scope for positive input from the clinical pharmacist in this area.

  3. Practical Considerations and the Intestinal Microbiome in Disease: Antibiotics for IBD Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard N; Ismond, Kathleen P

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, have been treated with a range of antibiotics for inducing and maintaining remission, as well as the prevention of post-operative symptoms. To date, many studies have been performed assessing the efficacy of antibiotics when used alone, in combination with other antibiotics, or as an adjunctive therapy to other pharmaceutical treatments. Literature evidence supporting the use of antibiotics in IBD can be ambiguous, especially when considering the potential role of dysbiosis in the gastrointestinal tract. The review considers the systemic effect of antibiotics and the evidence base for their efficacy in the treatment of IBD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Parenteral treatment of episodic tension-type headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, Danielle; Nicastro, Olivia; Akala, Olabiyi; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2014-02-01

    Tension-type headache is highly prevalent in the general population and is a consistent if not frequent cause of visits to acute care settings. Analgesics such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and salicylates are considered first-line therapy for treatment of tension-type headache. For patients who present to an acute care setting with persistent tension-type headache despite analgesic therapy, it is not clear which parenteral agent should be administered. We performed a systematic review of the medical literature to determine whether parenteral therapies other than salicylates or nonsteroidals are efficacious for acute tension-type headache. We performed a systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Google scholar, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials from inception through August, 2012 using the search terms "tension-type headache" and "parenteral or subcutaneous or intramuscular or intravenous." Our goal was to identify randomized trials in which one parenteral treatment was compared to another active comparator or to placebo for the acute relief of tension-type headache. Parenteral was defined as intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous administration. We only included studies that distinguished tension-type headache from other primary headache disorders, such as migraine. The primary outcome for this review was measures of efficacy one hour after medication administration. Data abstraction was performed by two authors. Disagreements were resolved by a third author. We assessed the internal validity of trials using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Because of the small number of trials identified, and the substantial heterogeneity among study design and medications, we decided that combining data and reporting summary statistics would serve no useful function. The results of individual studies are presented using Number Needed to Treat (NNT) with 95%CI when dichotomous outcomes were available and

  5. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  6. Successful treatment of recurrent cholangitis with antibiotic maintenance therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hazel, S. J.; Speelman, P.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Leeuwen, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of antibiotic maintenance therapy on the incidence of biliary tract infection was evaluated in patients with recurrent cholangitis after resection of a malignancy at the hepatic confluence. Thirty-eight of 54 patients (70%) experienced episodes of cholangitis. In 14 of the 38 patients

  7. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals... for Specific Drug Products § 201.323 Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total...

  8. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland-Cunz, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80% for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy.

  9. Home parenteral nutrition in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalousova, J.; Rouskova, B.; Styblova, J.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition delivered at home presents a major improvement in the quality of life of children dependent on long term parenteral nutrition. Indications, technical conditions, logistics, complications, prognosis of home parenteral nutrition as well as some health-care issues to be addressed by pediatric practitioner are summarized. (author)

  10. Frequency of microbiologically correct antibiotic therapy increased by infectious disease consultations and microbiological results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kerremans (Jos); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Vos (Margreet)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective observational study of bacteremic patients we ascertained the influence of different parts of culture results on the correctness of empirical antibiotic therapy. Ninety-three bacteremic patients requiring antibiotic treatment were included. Patients who had consultations

  11. Effect of septoplasty and per-operative antibiotic prophylaxis on nasal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, E; Alimoglu, Y; Aygun, G; Kilic, E; Yagiz, C

    2012-01-01

    Septoplasty is one of the most commonly performed procedures in otolaryngology practice. Prophylactic use of antibiotics is controversial. Disruption of nasal flora may predispose individuals to infection. We investigated the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis and septoplasty on nasal flora. We included 115 consecutive patients who underwent septoplasty because of symptomatic nasal septal deviation. Patients were divided into study and control groups. Study patients received prophylactic parenteral sodium cefazoline twice a day beginning intra-operatively and while the nasal packing remained in the nose for 48 h, and expandable polyvinyl acetate (Merocel) packing covered with antibiotic ointment containing 0.2% nitrofurazone was inserted into each nostril at the end of the operation. Control patients received neither parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis nor antibiotic ointment around the Merocel packs. Both groups received oral prophylactic cefuroxime axetil for 5 d after nasal packing was removed. Nasal flora was determined pre-operatively, post-operatively when nasal packing was removed, and 3 mo after surgery. Study patients were compared to control patients at pack removal and 1 mo after surgery The effect of antibiotic use in septoplasty on nasal flora was as follows: Increased isolation rate of gram-positive rods (p = 0.007), decreased methicillin-sensitive coagulase-negative staphylococci (p = 0.002). Pre-operative and post-operative culture results at 3 mo were compared. The effect of septoplasty on nasal flora was as follows: Decreased coagulase-negative staphylococci (p = 0.05), decreased Klebsiella (p flora. Antibiotics do not protect against S. aureus colonization and contribute to a decrease in normal flora. Antibiotics do not seem to confer benefit in terms of flora changes. Studies investigating flora changes with a longer follow-up should be conducted.

  12. Challenges and Future Prospects of Antibiotic Therapy: From Peptides to Phages Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi M. Mandal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, LPS and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens.

  13. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  14. Is there an improvement of antibiotic use in China? Evidence from the usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Juan; Luo, Zhen-Ni; Tang, Chang-Min; Zou, Xiao-Xu; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Peng-Qian

    2016-10-01

    The improvement of antibiotic rational use in China was studied by usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals. Five kinds of hospitals, including general hospital, maternity hospital, children's hospital, stomatological hospital and cancer hospital, from 30 provinces were surveyed. A systematic random sampling strategy was employed to select outpatient prescriptions and inpatient cases in 2011 and 2012. A total of 29 280 outpatient prescriptions and 73 200 inpatient cases from 244 hospitals in each year were analyzed. Data were collected with regards to the implementation of the national antibiotic stewardship program (NASP), the overall usage and the prophylactic use of antibiotic for type I incisions. Univariate analysis was used for microbiological diagnosis rate before antimicrobial therapy, prophylactic use of antibiotics for type I incision operation, and so on. For multivariate analysis, the use of antibiotics was dichotomized according to the guidelines, and entered as binary values into logistic regression analysis. The results were compared with the corresponding criteria given by the guidelines of this campaign. The antibiotic stewardship in China was effective in that more than 80% of each kind of hospitals achieved the criteria of recommended antibiotics varieties. Hospital type appeared to be a factor statistically associated with stewardship outcome. The prophylactic use of antibiotics on type I incision operations decreased by 16.22% (Pbench marking. More efforts addressing the root cause of antibiotics abuse would continue to improve the rational use of antibiotics in China.

  15. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient.

  16. Developing New Antimicrobial Therapies: Are Synergistic Combinations of Plant Extracts/Compounds with Conventional Antibiotics the Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesman, Matthew J.; Ilanko, Aishwarya; Blonk, Baxter; Cock, Ian E.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin nearly 90 years ago revolutionized the treatment of bacterial disease. Since that time, numerous other antibiotics have been discovered from bacteria and fungi, or developed by chemical synthesis and have become effective chemotherapeutic options. However, the misuse of antibiotics has lessened the efficacy of many commonly used antibiotics. The emergence of resistant strains of bacteria has seriously limited our ability to treat bacterial illness, and new antibiotics are desperately needed. Since the discovery of penicillin, most antibiotic development has focused on the discovery of new antibiotics derived from microbial sources, or on the synthesis of new compounds using existing antibiotic scaffolds to the detriment of other lines of discovery. Both of these methods have been fruitful. However, for a number of reasons discussed in this review, these strategies are unlikely to provide the same wealth of new antibiotics in the future. Indeed, the number of newly developed antibiotics has decreased dramatically in recent years. Instead, a reexamination of traditional medicines has become more common and has already provided several new antibiotics. Traditional medicine plants are likely to provide further new antibiotics in the future. However, the use of plant extracts or pure natural compounds in combination with conventional antibiotics may hold greater promise for rapidly providing affordable treatment options. Indeed, some combinational antibiotic therapies are already clinically available. This study reviews the recent literature on combinational antibiotic therapies to highlight their potential and to guide future research in this field. PMID:28989242

  17. Rapid resolution of cellulitis in patients managed with combination antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Lawrence; Peterson, Sandford; Simmons, Tom; Dall, Amy

    2005-03-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that host inflammatory response has some effect on the clinical manifestations of cellulitis. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate whether the addition of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) therapy to antibiotic treatment hastens resolution of cellulitis-related inflammation. Patients presenting in the emergency department with signs and symptoms of class II cellulitis were assigned to receive treatment with either antibiotic therapy alone (intravenous, supplemented with oral cephalexin or an equivalent) for 10 days (n = 33) or antibiotic therapy for 10 days plus an oral anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen 400 mg every 6 hours) for 5 days (n = 31). Patients were discharged as soon as possible to complete their therapy on an outpatient basis. The addition of an oral anti-inflammatory agent significantly (P < .05) shortened the time to regression of inflammation and complete resolution of cellulitis. Twenty-four of 29 evaluable patients (82.8%) who received supplemental anti-inflammatory treatment showed regression of inflammation within 1 to 2 days compared with only 3 of 33 patients (9.1%) treated without an anti-inflammatory in the same time frame. All patients receiving adjunctive anti-inflammatory treatment experienced complete resolution of cellulitis in 4 to 5 days or less, while 24.2% (8/33) of patients treated with antibiotic alone required 6 to 7 days, and 6.1% (2/33) required 7 days or more (P < .05). This small preliminary study provides some promising data, suggesting that the supplemental use of anti-inflammatory therapy may hasten the time to regression of inflammation and complete resolution of cellulitis.

  18. Central venous catheter infections in home parenteral nutrition patients: Outcomes from Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vicki M; Guenter, Peggi; Corrigan, Mandy L; Kovacevich, Debra; Winkler, Marion F; Resnick, Helaine E; Norris, Tina L; Robinson, Lawrence; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-12-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a high-cost, complex nutrition support therapy that requires the use of central venous catheters. Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious risks of this therapy. Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care (Sustain registry) provides the most current and comprehensive data for studying CLABSI among a national cohort of HPN patients in the United States. This is the first Sustain registry report detailing longitudinal data on CLABSI among HPN patients. To describe CLABSI rates for HPN patients followed in the Sustain registry from 2011-2014. Descriptive, χ 2 , and t tests were used to analyze data from the Sustain registry. Of the 1,046 HPN patients from 29 sites across the United States, 112 (10.7%) experienced 194 CLABSI events during 223,493 days of HPN exposure, for an overall CLABSI rate of 0.87 episodes/1,000 parenteral nutrition-days. Although the majority of patients were female (59%), adult (87%), white (75%), and with private insurance or Medicare (69%), CLABSI episodes per 1,000 parenteral nutrition-days were higher for men (0.69 vs 0.38), children (1.17 vs 0.35), blacks (0.91 vs 0.41), and Medicaid recipients (1.0 vs 0.38 or 0.39). Patients with implanted ports or double-lumen catheters also had more CLABSIs than those with peripherally inserted or central catheters or single-lumen catheters. Staphylococci were the most commonly reported pathogens. These data support findings of smaller studies about CLABSI risk for children and by catheter type and identify new potential risk factors, including gender, race, and insurance type. Additional studies are needed to determine effective interventions that will reduce HPN-associated CLABSI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, Pparenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An electronic trigger tool to optimise intravenous to oral antibiotic switch: a controlled, interrupted time series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin A. H. Berrevoets

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely switch from intravenous (iv antibiotics to oral therapy is a key component of antimicrobial stewardship programs in order to improve patient safety, promote early discharge and reduce costs. We have introduced a time-efficient and easily implementable intervention that relies on a computerized trigger tool, which identifies patients who are candidates for an iv to oral antibiotic switch. Methods The intervention was introduced on all internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital. Patients were automatically identified by an electronic trigger tool when parenteral antibiotics were used for >48 h and clinical or pharmacological data did not preclude switch therapy. A weekly educational session was introduced to alert the physicians on the intervention wards. The intervention wards were compared with control wards, which included all other hospital wards. An interrupted time-series analysis was performed to compare the pre-intervention period with the post-intervention period using ‘% of i.v. prescriptions >72 h’ and ‘median duration of iv therapy per prescription’ as outcomes. We performed a detailed prospective evaluation on a subset of 244 prescriptions to evaluate the efficacy and appropriateness of the intervention. Results The number of intravenous prescriptions longer than 72 h was reduced by 19% in the intervention group (n = 1519 (p < 0.01 and the median duration of iv antibiotics was reduced with 0.8 days (p = <0.05. Compared to the control group (n = 4366 the intervention was responsible for an additional decrease of 13% (p < 0.05 in prolonged prescriptions. The detailed prospective evaluation of a subgroup of patients showed that adherence to the electronic reminder was 72%. Conclusions An electronic trigger tool combined with a weekly educational session was effective in reducing the duration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy.

  1. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F.; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve

  2. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in patients with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Vermeij, Frederique; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the main cause of disability in high income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce infections and improve outcome.

  3. MRI in children receiving total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaghebeur, G.; Taylor, W.J.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Fell, J.M.E.; Reynolds, A.P.; Milla, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cranial MRI was obtained in 13 of a group of 57 children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition, who were being investigated for hypermanganasaemia. Increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images has been reported in adult patients on long-term parenteral nutrition and with encephalopathy following chronic manganese exposure in arc welding. It has been postulated that these changes are due to deposition of the paramagnetic trace element manganese. In excess manganese is hepato- and neurotoxic and we present the correlation of whole blood manganese levels with imaging findings. The age range of our patients was 6 months to 10 years, and the duration of therapy 3 months to 10 years. In 7 children we found characteristic increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, with no abnormality on T2-weighted images. All patients had elevated whole blood manganese levels, suggesting that the basis for this abnormality is indeed deposition of manganese within the tissues. (orig.). With 3 figs

  4. Time to Guideline-Based Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Pneumonia in a Community Hospital: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Beth L; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Allen, Leland N

    2016-08-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) stress the importance of initiating prompt appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. This study's purpose was to determine the percentage of patients with HAP, VAP, and HCAP who received guideline-based empiric antibiotic therapy and to determine the average time to receipt of an appropriate empiric regimen. A retrospective chart review of adults with HAP, VAP, or HCAP was conducted at a community hospital in suburban Birmingham, Alabama. The hospital's electronic medical record system utilized International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes to identify patients diagnosed with pneumonia. The percentage of patients who received guideline-based empiric antibiotic therapy was calculated. The mean time from suspected diagnosis of pneumonia to initial administration of the final antibiotic within the empiric regimen was calculated for patients who received guideline-based therapy. Ninety-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The overall guideline adherence rate for empiric antibiotic therapy was 31.2%. The mean time to guideline-based therapy in hours:minutes was 7:47 for HAP and 28:16 for HCAP. For HAP and HCAP combined, the mean time to appropriate therapy was 21:55. Guideline adherence rates were lower and time to appropriate empiric therapy was greater for patients with HCAP compared to patients with HAP. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  6. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  7. How to measure the impacts of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic development on empiric therapy: new composite indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Josie S; Hurford, Amy; Finley, Rita L; Patrick, David M; Wu, Jianhong; Morris, Andrew M

    2016-12-16

    We aimed to construct widely useable summary measures of the net impact of antibiotic resistance on empiric therapy. Summary measures are needed to communicate the importance of resistance, plan and evaluate interventions, and direct policy and investment. As an example, we retrospectively summarised the 2011 cumulative antibiogram from a Toronto academic intensive care unit. We developed two complementary indices to summarise the clinical impact of antibiotic resistance and drug availability on empiric therapy. The Empiric Coverage Index (ECI) measures susceptibility of common bacterial infections to available empiric antibiotics as a percentage. The Empiric Options Index (EOI) varies from 0 to 'the number of treatment options available', and measures the empiric value of the current stock of antibiotics as a depletable resource. The indices account for drug availability and the relative clinical importance of pathogens. We demonstrate meaning and use by examining the potential impact of new drugs and threatening bacterial strains. In our intensive care unit coverage of device-associated infections measured by the ECI remains high (98%), but 37-44% of treatment potential measured by the EOI has been lost. Without reserved drugs, the ECI is 86-88%. New cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations could increase the EOI, but no single drug can compensate for losses. Increasing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence would have little overall impact (ECI=98%, EOI=4.8-5.2) because many Gram-positives are already resistant to β-lactams. Aminoglycoside resistance, however, could have substantial clinical impact because they are among the few drugs that provide coverage of Gram-negative infections (ECI=97%, EOI=3.8-4.5). Our proposed indices summarise the local impact of antibiotic resistance on empiric coverage (ECI) and available empiric treatment options (EOI) using readily available data. Policymakers and drug developers can use the

  8. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Gamze

    2011-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Adequacy of antibiotic therapy for urinary tract infection in a Medical Department from the university hospital of Lille: A retrospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, L; Maillard, H; Lemaitre, M; Barbottin, E; Bakhache, E; Galperine, T; Puisieux, F; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess the adequacy of antibiotic therapy for urinary tract infections (UTI) in a French hospital medical department. The secondary objective was to identify factors associated with inadequacy of the antibiotic therapy. A retrospective single centre cohort study was performed in the Post-Emergency Medicine Department (PEMD) of the university hospital of Lille. All patients presenting with an UTI from May 2012 to April 2014 were included. Adequacy of antibiotic therapy was assessed with reference to local guidelines. Factors associated with inadequacy of antibiotic prescription were determined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Two hundred and twenty-eight patients were included. The antibiotic prescription was fully adequate in 173 patients (76%) with appropriate use of a single or a combination antibiotic therapy in 96%, appropriate drug in 80%, appropriate dosage in 89% and appropriate route of administration in 95%. The risk for antibiotic inadequacy was significantly higher in patients with cystitis than in those with pyelonephritis (OR 12.01; 95% CI 4.17-34.65), when antibiotics were prescribed in the Emergency Department (OR 6.84; 95% CI 2.29-20.47) or before hospital admission (OR 382.46; 95% CI 19.61≥999.99) compared to when antibiotics were first administered in the PEMD, and in patients with severe UTI (OR 19.55; 95% CI 2.79-137.01). Adequacy of antibiotic therapy for UTI is relatively high in our study, reflecting the effective dissemination of antibiotic guidelines. However, antibiotic therapy is still inappropriate in cystitis, severe UTI and in case of prescription before the admission in the PEMD. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Percutaneous Drainage on Outcome of Intra-abdominal Infection Associated With Pediatric Perforated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, William; Langer, Miriam; Cueva, Julie; Haaland, Astrid

    2017-10-01

    Perforated appendicitis can result in potentially serious complications requiring prolonged medical care. The optimal approach to successfully managing this condition is controversial. Review of 80 consecutive cases of pediatric acute perforated appendicitis with intra-abdominal infection (IAI) medically managed with parenteral antibiotics and percutaneous drainage (PD) during a 7-year period. All patients received broad spectrum parenteral antibiotic therapy. One-third were hospitalized for >2 weeks. IAI was identified on admission in 60% compared with developing during hospitalization in 40% of cases. Before performing PD, the mean duration of antibiotic therapy in those who developed IAI during hospitalization was 6 days. IAI cultures yielded 127 bacterial isolates; polymicrobial infection occurred in 65% of cases. Only 7% of aspirates were sterile. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (82%), of which 5 isolates exhibited extended-spectrum β-lactamase production, and streptococci (40%). At the time of PD, 60% were febrile (mean duration of in-hospital fever, 7.5 days); 67% defervesced within 24 hours after the procedure. Posthospitalization abdominal complications (recurrent IAI or appendicitis) occurred in one-third of patients. Children with perforated appendicitis and IAI often have a complicated and prolonged clinical course. Medical management consisting solely of parenteral antibiotic therapy is frequently ineffective in resolving IAI. Rapid clinical improvement commonly follows PD.

  12. Parenteral nutrition in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Jan; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-04-01

    Feeding guidelines have recommended early, full nutritional support in critically ill patients to prevent hypercatabolism and muscle weakness. Early enteral nutrition was suggested to be superior to early parenteral nutrition. When enteral nutrition fails to meet nutritional target, it was recommended to administer supplemental parenteral nutrition, albeit with a varying starting point. Sufficient amounts of amino acids were recommended, with addition of glutamine in subgroups. Recently, several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded important new insights. This review summarizes recent evidence with regard to the indication, timing, and dosing of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients. One large RCT revealed no difference between early enteral nutrition and early parenteral nutrition. Two large multicenter RCTs showed harm by early supplementation of insufficient enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition, which could be explained by feeding-induced suppression of autophagy. Several RCTs found either no benefit or harm with a higher amino acid or caloric intake, as well as harm by administration of glutamine. Although unanswered questions remain, current evidence supports accepting low macronutrient intake during the acute phase of critical illness and does not support use of early parenteral nutrition. The timing when parenteral nutrition can be initiated safely and effectively is unclear.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner C. Albrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10, France (n = 3 and the United States (n = 1. Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%. 1,520 (86.4% patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%. Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2% was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001, outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001 and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001 and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP

  14. ROLE OF PARENTERAL AMINO ACIDS SUPPLEMENATION IN OLIGOHYDRAMNIOS & IUGR COMPLICATED PREGNANCIES

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha; Malini; Sumit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To see whether parenteral nutritional supplementation of women with oligohydramnios/IUGR can improve the amount of liquor and to evaluate the role of pareneral therapy in improving maternal and perinatal outcome and to correlate between the occurrence of oligohydramnios and IUGR among women of different age, parity, education and socioe...

  15. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A., Van Gossum; Cabre, E.; Hebuterne, X.

    2009-01-01

    . There is a lack of data supporting specific nutrients in these conditions. Parenteral nutrition is mandatory in case of intestinal failure, at least in the acute period. In patients with short bowel, specific attention should be paid to water and electrolyte supplementation. Currently, the use of growth hormone......-based recommendations for the indications, application and type of parenteral formula to be used in acute and chronic phases of illness. Parenteral nutrition is not recommended as a primary treatment in CD and UC. The use of parenteral nutrition is however reliable when oral/enteral feeding is not possible...

  16. The Efficacy of Perioperative Antibiotic Therapy in Tonsillectomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowski, Krzysztof; Lisowska, Grażyna; Misiołek, Hanna; Paluch, Zbigniew; Misiołek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    While the results of early research suggested that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in tonsillectomy patients is associated with many benefits, these data were not confirmed by further studies and meta-analyses. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness and efficacy of antibiotic monotherapy in the healing of surgical wounds of patients undergoing bilateral resection of the palatine tonsils, based on an analysis of selected objective and subjective characteristics of wound healing during the postoperative period. The study included 50 men and women who underwent routine resection of the palatine tonsils. The patients were randomized into two groups: Group I, undergoing tonsillectomy with cefuroxime prophylaxis (n = 25), and Group II, who were not given perioperative antibiotic therapy (n = 25). The severity of signs and complaints recorded on postoperative days 1-10 was scored on 3- and 10-item scales. The only significant intergroup differences pertained to problems with swallowing food and fluids on postoperative days 4-6, 8 and 9 (less prevalent in Group II), postoperative use of analgesics on postoperative day 9 (less frequent in Group II), the degree of mucosal swelling in the operated area on postoperative days 3 and 7 (less severe in Group II), and the amount of fibrin covering the tonsillar niches on the third postoperative day (significantly higher in Group I). The administration of antibiotics for prevention or control of infection should be preceded by a comprehensive analysis of the potential benefits and risks. Perioperative use of antibiotics is justified only in selected cases, i.e. in individuals with comorbidities.

  17. Microbial shifts in the swine nasal microbiota in response to parenteral antimicrobial administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Mohamed; Aldridge, Brian; Blair, Benjamin; Kancer, Katherine; Lowe, James

    2018-05-24

    The continuous administration of antimicrobials in swine production has been widely criticized with the increase of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and dysbiosis of the beneficial microbial communities. While an increasing number of studies investigate the effects of antimicrobial administration on swine gastrointestinal microbiota biodiversity, the impact of their use on the composition and diversity of nasal microbial communities has not been widely explored. The objective of this study was to characterize the short-term impact of different parenteral antibiotics administration on the composition and diversity of nasal microbial communities in growing pigs. Five antimicrobial treatment groups, each consisting of four, eight-week old piglets, were administered one of the antimicrobials; Ceftiofur Crystalline free acid (CCFA), Ceftiofur hydrochloride (CHC), Tulathromycin (TUL), Oxytetracycline (OTC), and Procaine Penicillin G (PPG) at label dose and route. Individual deep nasal swabs were collected immediately before antimicrobial administration (control = day 0), and again on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after dosing. The nasal microbiota across all the samples were dominated by Firmicutes, proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. While, the predominant bacterial genera were Moraxella, Clostridium and Streptococcus. Linear discriminant analysis, showed a pronounced, antimicrobial-dependent microbial shift in the composition of nasal microbiota and over time from day 0. By day 14, the nasal microbial compositions of the groups receiving CCFA and OTC had returned to a distribution that closely resembled that observed on day 0. In contrast, pigs that received CHC, TUL and PPG appeared to deviate away from the day 0 composition by day 14. Based on our results, it appears that the impact of parenteral antibiotics on the swine nasal microbiota is variable and has a considerable impact in modulating the nasal microbiota structure. Our results will aid in developing alternative

  18. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cross-Canada Survey of Resistance of 2747 Aerobic Blood Culture Isolates to Piperacillin/Tazobactam and Other Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Forward

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity of piperacillin/tazobactam with that of other broad parenteral antibiotics against aerobic and facultative anaerobic blood culture isolates in a Canada-wide survey.

  20. On the local applications of antibiotics and antibiotic-based agents in endodontics and dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Z; Abbott, P V

    2009-07-01

    Antibiotics are a valuable adjunctive to the armamentarium available to health professionals for the management of bacterial infections. During endodontic treatment and when managing trauma to the teeth, antibiotics may be applied systemically (orally and/or parenterally) or locally (i.e. intra-dentally via irrigants and medicaments). Due to the potential risk of adverse effects following systemic application, and the ineffectiveness of systemic antibiotics in necrotic pulpless teeth and the periradicular tissues, the local application of antibiotics may be a more effective mode for delivery in endodontics. The aim of this article was to review the history, rationale and applications of antibiotic-containing irrigants and medicaments in endodontics and dental traumatology. The search was performed from 1981 to 2008 and was limited to English-language papers. The keywords searched on Medline were 'Antibiotics AND endodontics', 'Antibiotics AND root canal irrigation', 'Antibiotics AND intra-canal medicament', 'Antibiotics AND Dental trauma' and 'Antibiotics AND root resorption'. The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. It seems that local routes of antibiotic administration are a more effective mode than systemic applications. Various antibiotics have been tested in numerous studies and each has some advantages. Tetracyclines are a group of bacteriostatic antibiotics with antibacterial substantivity for up to 12 weeks. They are typically used in conjunction with corticosteroids and these combinations have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-resorptive properties, all of which help to reduce the periapical inflammatory reaction including clastic-cell mediated resorption. Tetracyclines have also been used as part of irrigating solutions but the substantivity is only for 4 weeks. Clindamycin and a combination of three antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline) have also been

  1. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    AKBULUT, GAMZE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer. PMID:22977559

  2. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druml, W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial EN (enteral nutrition should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD, peritoneal dialysis (PD or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT, or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully. In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  3. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Al-Taweel, Dalal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN) therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs). This study was designed to explore pharmacists' role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital) in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists' demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists' education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists' communication and conducting TPN-research research. TPN

  4. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs. Objective: This study was designed to explore pharmacists’ role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Methods: Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists’ demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists’ education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists

  5. [Non-Antibiotic Strategies to Prevent the Recurrence of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H W; Bessler, W G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of all medical treatment is "primum nihil nocere" ("First, do no harm").Restoring the integrity of intestinal microbiota and optimising the immune response in recurrent infections, especially in the urinary tract, are treatment alternatives which are closer to this target than the usual focus on antibiotic prevention of recurrence.In the future, antibiotics will continue to be recommended for the prevention of urinary tract infections on a case-by-case basis. However, the problems of an excessive use of antibiotics, e. g. resistance and long-term interference with intestinal microbiota, are forcing us to search for alternatives. The use of probiotics alone or in combination with immunotherapeutics, or the sole use of immunotherapeutics, are important treatment options, which are already routinely available in clinical practice. These therapies are focused on the pathomechanism of an infection and tackle the root cause of the problem. Phytotherapeutics or small molecules like mannose, which restricts the adherence of bacteria to the urothelium, are complementary approaches.The EAU guidelines recommend the following treatments for the long-term prevention of urinary tract infections:Oral and parenteral immunostimulants (StroVac(®)), local estrogen replacement and administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus reuteri. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Appropriate antibiotic therapy improves Ureaplasma sepsis outcome in the neonatal mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Leonard E; Leeming, Angela H; Kong, Lingkun

    2012-11-01

    Ureaplasma causes sepsis in human neonates. Although erythromycin has been the standard treatment, it is not always effective. No published reports have evaluated Ureaplasma sepsis in a neonatal model. We hypothesized that appropriate antibiotic treatment improves Ureaplasma sepsis in a neonatal mouse model. Two ATCC strains and two clinical strains of Ureaplasma were evaluated in vitro for antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, FVB albino mice pups infected with Ureaplasma were randomly assigned to saline, erythromycin, or azithromycin therapy and survival, quantitative blood culture, and growth were evaluated. MICs ranged from 0.125 to 62.5 µg/ml and 0.25 to 1.0 µg/ml for erythromycin and azithromycin, respectively. The infecting strain and antibiotic selected for treatment appeared to affect survival and bacteremia, but only the infecting strain affected growth. Azithromycin improved survival and bacteremia against each strain, whereas erythromycin was effective against only one of four strains. We have established a neonatal model of Ureaplasma sepsis and observed that treatment outcome is related to infecting strain and antibiotic treatment. We speculate that appropriate antibiotic selection and dosing are required for effective treatment of Ureaplasma sepsis in neonates, and this model could be used to further evaluate these relationships.

  7. Do antibiotic residues in soils play a role in amplification and transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria in cattle populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ruben Call

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When we consider factors that contribute to the emergence, amplification, and persistence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, the conventional assumption is that antibiotic use is the primary driver in these processes and that selection occurs primarily in the patient or animal. Evidence suggests that this may not always be the case. Experimental trials show that parenteral administration of a third-generation cephalosporin (ceftiofur in cattle has limited or short-term effects on the prevalence of ceftiofur-resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. While this response may be sufficient to explain a pattern of widespread resistance to cephalosporins, approximately two-thirds of ceftiofur metabolites are excreted in the urine raising the possibility that environmental selection plays an important additive role in the amplification and maintenance of antibiotic resistant E. coli on farms. Consequently, we present a rationale for an environmental selection hypothesis whereby excreted antibiotic residues such as ceftiofur are a significant contributor to the proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in food animal systems. We also present a mathematical model of our hypothesized system as a guide for designing experiments to test this hypothesis. If supported for antibiotics such as ceftiofur, then there may be new approaches to combat the proliferation of antibiotic resistance beyond the prudent use mantra.

  8. Does appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy modify intensive care unit-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia mortality and discharge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, K B; Van Kleef, E; Vansteelandt, S; Batra, R; Edgeworth, J D; Smieszek, T; Robotham, J V

    2017-05-01

    Conflicting results have been found regarding outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia and the potentially modifying effect of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. To evaluate these associations while adjusting for potential time-varying confounding using methods from the causal inference literature. Patients who stayed more than two days in two general ICUs in England between 2002 and 2006 were included in this cohort study. Marginal structural models with inverse probability weighting were used to estimate the mortality and discharge associated with Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia and the impact of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy on these outcomes. Among 3411 ICU admissions, 195 (5.7%) ICU-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia cases occurred. Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia was associated with an increased daily risk of ICU death [cause-specific hazard ratio (HR): 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.99] and a reduced daily risk of ICU discharge (HR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.54-0.80). Appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy did not significantly modify ICU mortality (HR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.59-1.97) or discharge (HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.63-1.32). ICU-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia was associated with an increased daily risk of ICU mortality. Furthermore, the daily discharge rate was also lower after acquiring infection, even when adjusting for time-varying confounding using appropriate methodology. No evidence was found for a beneficial modifying effect of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy on ICU mortality and discharge. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety, cost, and clinical considerations for the use of premixed parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacob W

    2015-06-01

    Premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) can be used for PN therapy in place of traditional compounded or customized PN. Premixed PN may have a number of advantages over compounded PN such as decreased costs, decreased compounding time, reduced chance for error, and reduced incidence of bloodstream infections. However, premixed PN may not be appropriate for all patients and may have other additional costs associated with its use. This article discusses the data available with regard to the use of premixed PN, focusing on the potential advantages and disadvantages of using premixed PN, and also discusses the implementation of premixed PN in a large tertiary cancer center. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Systemic corticosteroid therapy for acute sinusitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, R.P.; Thompson, M.J.; Rovers, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    CLINICAL QUESTION: Are oral or parenteral corticosteroids associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute sinusitis compared with placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? BOTTOM LINE: Oral corticosteroids combined with antibiotics may be associated with modest

  11. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Muhannad R M; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Abd, Arwa Y

    2010-12-31

    To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly imperative in certain clinical situations

  13. In-111 labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in patients with suspected inflammation after failed antibiotic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Reiko; Akagi, Kiyoshi; Murata, Takashi; Uokawa, Kyousuke; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Itagaki, Yasushi

    1998-01-01

    In-111 labeled leukocyte scintigrapy (In-111 WBC scan) was performed in 16 patients with inflammation suspected on the basis of laboratory findings, symptoms, and diagnostic imaging, but who had failed antibiotic therapy. In-111 WBC scans revealed an abnormal focus of radiotracer activity (positive scans) in five of 16 patients. No correlation was found between the peripheral WBC count and accumulation of In-111 WBC. Inflammatory disease suspected on the basis of the CRP level should be considered when In-111 WBC scanning results in negative findings. Our results indicated that In-111 WBC scanning has low sensitivity after antibiotic therapy. Selection of patients on the basis of persistent elevation of CRP may be valuable. (author)

  14. Antibiotics for mastitis in breastfeeding women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Jahanfar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mastitis can be caused by ineffective positioning of the baby at the breast or restricted feeding. Infective mastitis is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus . The prevalence of mastitis in breastfeeding women may reach 33%. Effective milk removal, pain medication and antibiotic therapy have been the mainstays of treatment. OBJECTIVES: This review aims to examine the effectiveness of antibiotic therapies in relieving symptoms for breastfeeding women with mastitis with or without laboratory investigation. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2012, contacted investigators and other content experts known to us for unpublished trials and scanned the reference lists of retrieved articles. Selection criteria: We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs comparing the effectiveness of various types of antibiotic therapies or antibiotic therapy versus alternative therapies for the treatment of mastitis. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. When in dispute, we consulted a third author. MAIN RESULTS: Two trials met the inclusion criteria. One small trial (n = 25 compared amoxicillin with cephradine and found no significant difference between the two antibiotics in terms of symptom relief and abscess formation. Another, older study compared breast emptying alone as 'supportive therapy' versus antibiotic therapy plus supportive therapy, and no therapy. The findings of the latter study suggested faster clearance of symptoms for women using antibiotics, although the study design was problematic. AUTHORS CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to confirm or refute the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of lactational mastitis. There is an urgent need to conduct high-quality, double-blinded RCTs to determine whether antibiotics should be used in this

  15. Comparing short to standard duration of antibiotic therapy for patients hospitalized with cellulitis (DANCE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranendonk, Duncan R.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Prins, Jan M.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2014-01-01

    Recommended therapy duration for patients hospitalized with cellulitis is 10-14 days. Unnecessary use of antibiotics is one of the key factors driving resistance. Recent studies have shown that antibiotic therapy for cellulitis in outpatients can safely be shortened, despite residual inflammation.

  16. Steering Evolution with Sequential Therapy to Prevent the Emergence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nichol

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing rate of antibiotic resistance and slowing discovery of novel antibiotic treatments presents a growing threat to public health. Here, we consider a simple model of evolution in asexually reproducing populations which considers adaptation as a biased random walk on a fitness landscape. This model associates the global properties of the fitness landscape with the algebraic properties of a Markov chain transition matrix and allows us to derive general results on the non-commutativity and irreversibility of natural selection as well as antibiotic cycling strategies. Using this formalism, we analyze 15 empirical fitness landscapes of E. coli under selection by different β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrate that the emergence of resistance to a given antibiotic can be either hindered or promoted by different sequences of drug application. Specifically, we demonstrate that the majority, approximately 70%, of sequential drug treatments with 2-4 drugs promote resistance to the final antibiotic. Further, we derive optimal drug application sequences with which we can probabilistically 'steer' the population through genotype space to avoid the emergence of resistance. This suggests a new strategy in the war against antibiotic-resistant organisms: drug sequencing to shepherd evolution through genotype space to states from which resistance cannot emerge and by which to maximize the chance of successful therapy.

  17. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Samantha C; Poole, Phillippa

    2013-11-28

    an exacerbation was reduced (odds ratio (OR) 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.77, 3 studies, 1262 participants, high quality). This represented a reduction from 69% of participants in the control group compared to 54% in the treatment group (95% CI 46% to 63%) and the number needed to treat to prevent one exacerbation (NNTb) was therefore 8 (95% CI 5 to 18). The frequency of exacerbations was also reduced with continuous prophylactic antibiotic treatment (rate ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.91).Use of pulsed antibiotic treatment showed a non-significant reduction in the number of people with exacerbations (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.09, 1 study, 1149 participants, moderate quality) and the test for interaction showed that this result was significantly different from the effect on exacerbations with continuous antibiotics.There was a statistically significant improvement in quality of life with both continuous and pulsed antibiotic treatment but this was smaller than the four unit improvement that is regarded as being clinically significant (MD -1.78; 95% CI -2.95 to -0.61, 2 studies, 1962 participants, moderate quality).Neither pulsed nor continuous antibiotics showed a significant effect on the secondary outcomes of frequency of hospital admissions, change in lung function, serious adverse events or all-cause mortality (moderate quality evidence).The adverse events that were recorded varied among the trials depending on the different antibiotics used. Azithromycin was associated with a significant hearing loss in the treatment group. The moxifloxacin pulsed study reported a significantly higher number of adverse events in the treatment arm due to the marked increase in gastrointestinal adverse events (P antibiotic resistance in the community is of major concern. One study found newly colonised patients to have higher rates of antibiotic resistance. Patients colonised with moxifloxacin-sensitive pseudomonas at initiation of therapy rapidly became resistant

  18. Impact of antibiotics on necrotizing enterocolitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael A.; Konnikova, Liza; Gerber, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Antibiotics induce changes or dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome. These antibiotic-induce changes may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Studies are beginning to unravel the contribution of specific groups of microbes to these diseases—most notably Gammaproteobacteria for NEC and bile acid- and carbohydrate-metabolizing microbes for AAD. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea occurs when antibiotic treatment induces diarrhea by altering the metabolic function of the patient’s intestinal microbiota leading to either an osmotic or infectious diarrhea, most notably Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Antibiotic therapy impairs the host microbiota’s ability to resist colonization or expansion of pathogenic bacteria. In the case of CDI, there is growing evidence that microbiota-mediated bile acid metabolism is critical in the pathogenesis of this infection. Probiotics or other microbiota-targeted therapies may provide effective strategies to prevent and treat NEC and AAD. PMID:28164853

  19. Outcomes and Pharmacoeconomic Analysis of a Home Intravenous Antibiotic Infusion Program in Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, Christine A; Parameswaran, Ganapathi I; Wojciechowski, Amy L; Mergenhagen, Kari A

    2015-11-01

    The use of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) programs has become more frequent because of benefits in costs with equivalent clinical outcomes compared with inpatient care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of our program. A modified pharmacoeconomic analysis was performed to compare costs of our program with hospital or rehabilitation facility care. This was a retrospective chart review of 96 courses of OPAT between April 1, 2011, and July 31, 2013. Clinical failures were defined as readmission or death due to worsening infection or readmission secondary to adverse drug event (ADE) to antibiotic therapy. This does not include those patients readmitted for reasons not associated with OPAT therapy, including comorbidities or elective procedures. Baseline characteristics and program-specific data were analyzed. Statistically significant variables were built into a multivariate logistic regression model to determine predictors of failure. A pharmacoeconomic analysis was performed with the use of billing records. Of the total episodes evaluated, 17 (17.71%) clinically failed therapy, and 79 (82.29%) were considered a success. In the multivariate analysis, number of laboratory draws (P = 0.02) and occurrence of drug reaction were significant in the final model, P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively. The presence an adverse drug reaction increases the odds of failure (OR = 10.10; 95% CI, 2.69-44.90). Compared with inpatient or rehabilitation care, the cost savings was $6,932,552.03 or $2,649,870.68, respectively. In our study, patients tolerated OPAT well, with a low number of failures due to ADE. The clinical outcomes and cost savings of our program indicate that OPAT can be a viable alternative to long-term inpatient antimicrobial therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Synergistic antimicrobial therapy using nanoparticles and antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Saleh, Neveen M.; Das, Riddha; Landis, Ryan F.; Bigdeli, Arafeh; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosa Campos, Alexandre; Pomeroy, Kenneth; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria pose a serious global burden of mortality, causing thousands of deaths each year. Antibiotic treatment of resistant infections further contributes to the rapidly increasing number of antibiotic-resistant species and strains. Synthetic macromolecules such as nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit broad-spectrum activity against MDR species, however lack of specificity towards bacteria relative to their mammalian hosts limits their widespread therapeutic application. Here, we demonstrate synergistic antimicrobial therapy using hydrophobically functionalized NPs and fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treatment of MDR bacterial strains. An 8-16-fold decrease in antibiotic dosage is achieved in presence of engineered NPs to combat MDR strains. This strategy demonstrates the potential of using NPs to ‘revive’ antibiotics that have been rendered ineffective due to the development of resistance by pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  2. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Variability in Antibiotic Use Across PICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Thomas V; Thurm, Cary; Hersh, Adam L; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Smith, Michael J; Shah, Samir S; Courter, Joshua D; Patel, Sameer J; Parker, Sarah K; Kronman, Matthew P; Lee, Brian R; Newland, Jason G

    2018-03-10

    To characterize and compare antibiotic prescribing across PICUs to evaluate the degree of variability. Retrospective analysis from 2010 through 2014 of the Pediatric Health Information System. Forty-one freestanding children's hospital. Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to a PICU in children's hospitals contributing data to Pediatric Health Information System. To normalize for potential differences in disease severity and case mix across centers, a subanalysis was performed of children admitted with one of the 20 All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups and the seven All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups shared by all PICUs with the highest antibiotic use. The study included 3,101,201 hospital discharges from 41 institutions with 386,914 PICU patients. All antibiotic use declined during the study period. The median-adjusted antibiotic use among PICU patients was 1,043 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 977-1,147 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) compared with 893 among non-ICU children (interquartile range, 805-968 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days). For PICU patients, the median adjusted use of broad-spectrum antibiotics was 176 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 152-217 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) and was 302 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 220-351 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) for antimethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus agents, compared with 153 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 130-182 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) and 244 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days (interquartile range, 203-270 days of therapy/1,000 patient-days) for non-ICU children. After adjusting for potential confounders, significant institutional variability existed in antibiotic use in PICU patients, in the 20 All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups with the highest antibiotic usage and in the seven All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups shared

  4. Influence of antibiotic therapy prior to admission on the efficacy of classical methods for the diagnosis of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemescu, Roxana Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda; Dorneanu, Olivia Simona; Ursu, Ramona Gabriela; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of preadmission antibiotic therapy on the results of the classical methods for bacteriological confirmation of meningococcal disease (MD). Retrospective study of the MD cases diagnosed in the "St. Parascheva" Universitary Clinical Infectious Diseases Iaşi between 1994 and 2011. The etiological diagnosis was made by identifying the meningococcus in the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) in 71.9% of the 323 patients and by blood culture in 8%. Preadmission antibiotic therapy received 39% of the patients, thus the sensitivity of test was significantly reduced: direct examination from 64.6% to 43.2% (p antibiotic therapy significantly increased the ratio of cases in which meningococcus was not detected in CSF by any of the classical methods (44% compared to 17.9% in the cases without prior treatment). The proportion of cases in which meningococcal isolation was done by two methods decreased from 38.5% to 19.2%, and of those by all three methods from 16.9% to 5.6% (p antibiotic therapy also decreased the rate of positive blood cultures from 14.7% to 3.5% (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.009). Antibiotic treatment prior to admission significantly decreases the percentage of patients with MD in which meningococcal isolation can be done; this requires the use of a more sensitive diagnosis method (ex. qPCR).

  5. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R. [Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Rostock Univ. (Germany)]|[Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen Univ. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Der Ernaehrungsstatus von Tumorpatienten ist haeufig bereits vor jeder antitumoroesen Therapie reduziert und kann sich durch die notwendige Radio(chemo)therapie weiter verschlechtern. Methode: Im Rahmen dieses Uebersichtsartikels werden die Moeglichkeiten und Risiken der enteralen und parenteralen Ernaehrung waehrend einer Radiotherapie besprochen. Die Indikationen der enteralen Ernaehrung werden anhand von eigenen Ergebnissen begruendet. Ergebnisse: Die Langzeiternaehrung wird am besten ueber einen enteralen Zugang durchgefuehrt. In einer prospektiven, nichtrandomisierten Studie konnten wir zeigen, dass eine enterale Ernaehrung mittels perkutaner endoskopisch kontrollierter Gastrostomie (PEG) nicht nur die anthropometrischen und biochemischen Parameter waehrend einer Radio(chemo)therapie verbessert, sondern auch die Lebensqualitaet. Eine weitere Moeglichkeit besteht in der

  6. Nutrición parenteral precoz en el neonato grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina González Mustelier

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo en el Servicio de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal del Hospital Ginecoobstétrico "Ramón González Coro" de Ciudad de La Habana, desde enero del 2000 hasta enero del 2002, con el objetivo de valorar las ventajas del uso de nutrición parenteral (NP precoz en los neonatos críticamente enfermos, durante la primera semana de vida. Se compararon 2 grupos de 23 recién nacidos críticos, uno de ellos recibió alimentación parenteral (grupo I y el otro no (grupo II. Se encontró homogeneidad en ambos grupos en cuanto a peso, edad gestacional, valoración nutricional al nacer, sexo y morbilidad inicial. La nutrición parenteral se caracterizó por su uso precoz (menos de 72 horas, conjuntamente con alimentación enteral mínima. La media del aporte máximo de macronutrientes fue de 16 g/kg/d de dextrosa, 1,2 g/kg/d de lípidos y 2 g/kg/d de proteínas. El desarrollo nutricional fue más favorable en el grupo con NP, porque le disminuyó a la mitad el tanto por ciento de peso perdido en la primera semana de vida, le sostuvo mayor aporte energético durante ese período y recupó 7 días antes su peso del nacimiento en relación con el grupo II. Las complicaciones fueron similares en ambos grupos, para concluir en que estas no estuvieron relacionadas con el uso de NP.A descriptive study was conducted at the Neonatal Intensive Therapy Service of "Ramón Gonzalez Coro" Gynecoobstetric Hospital, in Havana City, from January 2000, to January 2002, aimed at assessing the advantages of the use of early parenteral nutrition in the critically ill neonates during the first week of life. 2 groups of 23 critical newborn infants each were compared. One of them recieved parenteral nutrition (group 1 and the other one did not (group II. Homogeneity was found in both groups as regards weight, gestational age, nutritional assessment at birth and initial morbidity. The parenteral nutrition was characterized by its early use (less than 72

  7. Peripheral parenteral nutrition: an option for patients with an indication for short-term parenteral nutrition La nutrición parenteral periférica, alternativa para los pacientes con indicación de nutrición parenteral durante poco tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. T. D. Correia; J. Guimarâes; L. Cirino de Mattos; K. C. Araújo Gurgel; E. B. Cabral

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine and describe our experience with the use of peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN). Methods: Patients with an indication for parenteral nutrition for less than 15 days received it via a peripheral vein via a short, 20 or 22 gauge French polyurethane catheter. Parenteral nutrition had a final osmolality of 993 mOsm/l and was administered by infusion pump. The nutritional status of patients was assessed by the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) tec...

  8. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Arwa Y

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010 for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This

  9. Antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Frieri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens is a challenge that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Multidrug resistance patterns in Gram-positive and -negative bacteria are difficult to treat and may even be untreatable with conventional antibiotics. There is currently a shortage of effective therapies, lack of successful prevention measures, and only a few new antibiotics, which require development of novel treatment options and alternative antimicrobial therapies. Biofilms are involved in multidrug resistance and can present challenges for infection control. Virulence, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile infection, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and control in the Emergency Department are also discussed. Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, Biofilms, Infections, Public health, Emergency Department

  10. Protocol for extended antibiotic therapy after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute calculous cholecystitis (Cholecystectomy Antibiotic Randomised Trial, CHART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Pablo; Campana, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, Agustín; Goransky, Jeremías; Glinka, Juan; Giunta, Diego; Barcan, Laura; Alvarez, Fernando; Mazza, Oscar; Sánchez Claria, Rodrigo; Palavecino, Martin; Arbues, Guillermo; Ardiles, Victoria; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Pekolj, Juan; de Santibañes, Martin

    2015-11-18

    Acute calculous cholecystitis represents one of the most common complications of cholelithiasis. While laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the standard treatment in mild and moderate forms, the need for antibiotic therapy after surgery remains undefined. The aim of the randomised controlled Cholecystectomy Antibiotic Randomised Trial (CHART) is therefore to assess if there are benefits in the use of postoperative antibiotics in patients with mild or moderate acute cholecystitis in whom a laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed. A single-centre, double-blind, randomised trial. After screening for eligibility and informed consent, 300 patients admitted for acute calculus cholecystitis will be randomised into two groups of treatment, either receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or placebo for 5 consecutive days. Postoperative evaluation will take place during the first 30 days. Postoperative infectious complications are the primary end point. Secondary end points are length of hospital stay, readmissions, need of reintervention (percutaneous or surgical reinterventions) and overall mortality. The results of this trial will provide strong evidence to either support or abandon the use of antibiotics after surgery, impacting directly in the incidence of adverse events associated with the use of antibiotics, the emergence of bacterial resistance and treatment costs. This study and informed consent sheets have been approved by the Research Projects Evaluating Committee (CEPI) of Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (protocol N° 2111). The results of the trial will be reported in a peer-reviewed publication. NCT02057679. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Increasing antibiotic resistance among uropathogens isolated during years 2006-2009: impact on the empirical management

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    Hamid Mohammad-Jafari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infections with an increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents. PURPOSE: Empirical initial antibiotic treatment of UTI must rely on susceptible data from local studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of isolated bacteria from children with UTIs was performed at the university hospital during years 2006-2009. The findings were compared with data collected in a similar study carried out in 2002- 2003. RESULTS: A total of 1439 uropathogens were isolated. Escherichia coli (E.coli was the leading cause, followed by Enterobacter, and other gram negative bacilli. It was observed resistance of E.coli to ceftriaxone, cefexime, amikacin, gentamycin, and nalidixic acid; Enterobacter to cefexime; and the resistance of gram negative bacilli to gentamicin and cefexime increased significantly. The highest effective antibiotic was Imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin with 96.7%, 95% and 91% sensitivity rates , respectively, followed by ceftriaxone 77.2%, gentamicin 77%, nitrofurantoin 76.4%, nalidixic acid 74.3% and cefexime with 70%. CONCLUSION: The use of nitrofurantoin or nalidixic acid as initial empirical antibacterial therapy for cystitis seems appropriate. For cases of simple febrile UTI, the use of initial parenteral therapies with amikacin or ceftriaxone followed by an oral third generation cephalosporin also seemed appropriated, and in cases of severely ill patients or complicated UTI, imipenem as monotherapy or, a combination of Ceftriaxone with an aminoglycoside, are recommended.

  12. [Antibiotics in the critically ill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolak, Radmila R

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are one the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. This review outlines the strategy for optimal use of antimicrobial agents in the critically ill. In severely ill patients, empirical antimicrobial therapy should be used when a suspected infection may impair the outcome. It is necessary to collect microbiological documentation before initiating empirical antimicrobial therapy. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, it is recommended to control a focus of infection and to modify factors that promote microbial growth or impair the host's antimicrobial defence. A judicious choice of antimicrobial therapy should be based on the host characteristics, the site of injection, the local ecology, and the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of antibiotics. This means treating empirically with broad-spectrum antimicrobials as soon as possible and narrowing the spectrum once the organism is identified (de-escalation), and limiting duration of therapy to the minimum effective period. Despite theoretical advantages, a combined antibiotic therapy is nor more effective than a mono-therapy in curing infections in most clinical trials involving intensive care patients. Nevertheless, textbooks and guidelines recommend a combination for specific pathogens and for infections commonly caused by these pathogens. Avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will improve patient outcomes while minimizing risks for the development of bacterial resistance. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilisation and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use be evaluated at the local level.

  13. Changes of Proteases, Antiproteases, and Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis Patients’ Upper and Lower Airways after IV-Antibiotic Therapy

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    Ulrike Müller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In cystic fibrosis (CF the upper (UAW and lower airways (LAW are reservoirs for pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The consecutive hosts’ release of proteolytic enzymes contributes to inflammation and progressive pulmonary destruction. Objectives were to assess dynamics of protease : antiprotease ratios and pathogens in CF-UAW and LAW sampled by nasal lavage (NL and sputum before and after intravenous- (IV- antibiotic therapy. Methods. From 19 IV-antibiotic courses of 17 CF patients NL (10 mL/nostril and sputum were collected before and after treatment. Microbiological colonization and concentrations of NE/SLPI/CTSS (ELISA and MMP-9/TIMP-1 (multiplex bead array were determined. Additionally, changes of sinonasal symptoms were assessed (SNOT-20. Results. IV-antibiotic treatment had more pronounced effects on inflammatory markers in LAW, whereas trends to decrease were also found in UAW. Ratios of MMP-9/TIMP-1 were higher in sputum, and ratios of NE/SLPI were higher in NL. Remarkably, NE/SLPI ratio was 10-fold higher in NL compared to healthy controls. SNOT-20 scores decreased significantly during therapy (P=0.001. Conclusion. For the first time, changes in microbiological patterns in UAW and LAW after IV-antibiotic treatments were assessed, together with changes of protease/antiprotease imbalances. Delayed responses of proteases and antiproteases to IV-antibiotic therapy were found in UAW compared to LAW.

  14. REAL TIME PCR IDENTIFICATION FOR TARGET ADJUNCTIVE ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS. PART II - MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS.

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    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic use in chronic periodontitis may result in improvement in periodontal status, although many questions regarding the indications for this therapy remain unanswered. The polymicrobial etiology of the periodontal infection hinders the choice of the proper antibiotic agent. Furthermore the indiscriminate use of antibiotics could lead to high levels of resistance and to various adverse reactions. In the recent years a various molecular diagnostics protocols were proposed in order to facilitate the decision for adjunctive antibiotic administration. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the microbiological effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic administration with the mechanical periodontal therapy. METHODS: 30 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study and were divided in 3 groups: Control group – with mechanical debridement only. Test group 1 – with combined adjunctive antibiotic administration using Amoxicillin+ Metronidazole. Test group 2 – with target antibiotic administration according to the resuts from the Real Time PCR identification. RESULTS: The prevalence of all the isolated microorganisms (exept. E.nodatum and C.gingivalis in Test Group 2 demonstrates statistically significant reduction compared with the other treatment approaches. Almost complete elimination was registered for the consensus pathogens from the red and orange complexes (above 99% and 100% for P.intemedia. CONCLUSION: The adjunct antibiotic treatment targeted with Real-Time PCR identification demonstrates almost complete elimination of the putative periodontal pathogens in the deep periodontal pockets in patients with severe chronic periodontitis. This result suggests slower recolonisation of these habitats thus limiting the risk for progression of the periodontal destruction.

  15. Newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality indicators for enteral and parenteral nutrition therapy: application in critically ill patients "at nutritional risk".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Filho, Ronaldo Sousa; Ribeiro, Lia Mara Kauchi; Caruso, Lucia; Lima, Patricia Azevedo; Damasceno, Náglia Raquel Teixeira; García Soriano, Francisco

    2016-09-20

    Quality Indicators for Nutritional Therapy (QINT) allow a practical assessment of nutritional therapy (NT) quality. To apply and monitor QINT for critically ill patients at nutritional risk. Cross sectional study including critically ill patients > 18 years old, at nutritional risk, on exclusive enteral (ENT) or parenteral nutritional therapy (PNT) for > 72 hours. After three consecutive years, 9 QINT were applied and monitored. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 17.0. A total of 145 patients were included, 93 patients were receiving ENT, among then 65% were male and the mean age was 55.7 years (± 17.4); 52 patients were receiving PNT, 67% were male and the mean age was 58.1 years (± 17.4). All patients (ENT and PNT) were nutritionally screened at admission and their energy and protein needs were individually estimated. Only ENT was early initiated, more than 70% of the prescribed ENT volume was infused and there was a reduced withdrawal of enteral feeding tube. The frequency of diarrhea episodes and digestive fasting were not adequate in ENT patients. The proper supply of energy was contemplated only for PNT patients and there was an expressive rate of oral intake recovery in ENT patients. After three years of research, the percentage of QINT adequacy varied between 55%-77% for ENT and 60%-80% for PNT. The results were only made possible by the efforts of a multidisciplinary team and the continuous re-evaluation of the procedures in order to maintain the nutritional assistance for patients at nutritional risk.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of OPC-20011, a Novel Parenteral Broad-Spectrum 2-Oxaisocephem Antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Makoto; Tamaoka, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Mikio

    1998-01-01

    OPC-20011, a new parenteral 2-oxaisocephem antibiotic, has an oxygen atom at the 2- position of the cephalosporin frame. OPC-20011 had the best antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecalis, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited were 6.25, 6.25, and 0.05 μg/ml, respectively. Its activity is due to a high affinity of the penicillin-binding protein 2′ in MRSA, an affinity which was approximately 1,050 times as high as that for flomoxef. Against gram-negative bacteria, OPC-20011 also showed antibacterial activities similar to those of ceftazidime. The in vivo activities of OPC-20011 were comparable to or greater than those of reference compounds in murine models of systemic infection caused by gram-positive and -negative pathogens. OPC-20011 was up to 10 times as effective as vancomycin against MRSA infections in mice. This better in vivo efficacy is probably due to the bactericidal activity of OPC-20011, while vancomycin showed bacteriostatic activity against MRSA. OPC-20011 produced a significant decrease of viable counts in lung tissue at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg of body weight, an efficacy similar to that of ampicillin at a dose of 10 to 20 mg/kg on an experimental murine model of respiratory tract infection caused by non-ampicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae T-0005. The better therapeutic efficacy of OPC-20011 was considered to be due to its potent antibacterial activity and low affinity for serum proteins of experimental animals (29% in mice and 6.4% in rats). PMID:9797230

  18. Biological and physicochemical stability of ceftazidime and aminophylline on glucose parenteral solution

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    Carolina Alves dos Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceftazidime is a broad spectrum antibiotic administered mainly by the parenteral route, and it is especially effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The period of time in which serum levels exceed the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC is an important pharmacodynamic parameter for its efficacy. One of the forms to extend this period is to administer the antibiotic by continuous infusion, after prior dilution in a Parenteral Solution (PS. The present work assessed the stability of ceftazidime in 5% glucose PS for 24 hours, combined or not with aminophylline, through High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. The physicochemical evaluation was accompanied by in vitro antimicrobial activity compared MIC test in the 24-hour period. Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the microorganisms chosen for the MIC comparison. The HPLC analysis confirmed ceftazidime and aminophylline individual stability on PS, while the MIC values were slightly higher than the mean described in the literature. When both drugs were associated in the same PS, the ceftazidime concentration by HPLC decreased 25% after 24 hours. Not only did the MIC values show high loss of antibiotic activity within the same period, but also altered MIC values immediately after the preparation, which was not detected by HPLC. Our results indicate that this drug combination is not compatible, even if used right away, and that PS might not be the best vehicle for ceftazidime, emphasizing the importance of the MIC evaluation for drug interactions.Ceftazidima é um antimicrobiano administrado por via parenteral, que apresenta amplo espectro de ação, principalmente contra Pseudomonas aeruginosa. O tempo em que a concentração sérica de ceftazidima permanece acima da concentração mínima inibitória (MIC é um importante parâmetro farmacodinâmico para a determinação da eficácia antimicrobiana e pode ser potencializado através da utilização de infusão contínua em

  19. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

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    Al Alawi S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Samah Al Alawi,1 Somaya Abdulkarim,1 Hazem Elhennawy,1 Anwar Al-Mansoor,2 Ahmed Al Ansari3,4,5 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, 3Training and Education Department, Bahrain Defence Force Hospital, Riffa, 4Arabian Gulf University, Manama, 5Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain Background: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective: We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS, with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods: A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results: In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31 out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute

  20. Clinical efficacy of cycling empirical antibiotic therapy for febrile neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Hideto; Koga, Yuhki; Nishio, Hisanori; Kato, Wakako; Ono, Hiroaki; Kanno, Shunsuke; Nakashima, Kentaro; Takada, Hidetoshi

    2017-07-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is the main treatment-related cause of mortality among children with cancer, as the prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance in these patients. Antibiotic cycling has been reported to limit the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among adult patients. However, no studies have evaluated pediatric patients with FN. Between September 2011 and February 2014, 126 pediatric cancer patients were admitted to our center for chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and were included in this study. Retrospective and prospective data collection were performed before and after antibiotic cycling, respectively. Between September 2011 and November 2012 (before antibiotic cycling was implemented), intravenous cefpirome was used as the empirical therapy for FN. Between December 2012 and February 2014 (after antibiotic cycling was implemented), the monthly antibiotic cycling involved intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam (PIPC/TAZ), intravenous meropenem or ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and intravenous cefepime in that order. For children aged ≥13 years, the monthly cycling involved intravenous PIPC/TAZ, and CPFX was administered. The detection rates for extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers in blood and stool culture samples decreased significantly after the implementation of antibiotic cycling (0.33/1000 patient-days vs 0/1000 patient-days, p = 0.03; 1.00/1000 patient-days vs 0/1000 patient-days, p Antibiotic cycling was associated with a decreased emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  2. Síndrome do intestino curto na criança: tratamento com nutrição parenteral domiciliar Short bowel syndrome in children: treatment with home parenteral nutrition

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    Uenis Tannuri

    2004-09-01

    estado nutricional com a via oral exclusiva.BACKGROUND: In 1979 the author first utilized the method of home parenteral nutrition in a child in Brazil. The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, during the last 23 years, of treatment of children with short bowel utilizing home parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Nineteen children with short bowel syndrome (resection of more than 75% of total intestinal length were initially treated in the hospital and then nutrition therapy was continued at home. Total duration of nutrition therapy ranged from 4 months to 4 years and a half, while periods of home nutrition therapy ranged from 1 week to 4 years (median 8 months. Complete nutrition mixtures containing amino acids, glucose, lipid emulsion, electrolytes, vitamins and micro-elements were administered through Broviac or Hickman central venous catheters. Solutions were infused during the day or the night according to preference of the parents. RESULTS: In all cases weight gain, growth and development similar to normal children under oral nutrition were verified. Catheter occlusion, liver dysfunction and sepsis related to the catheter were the most frequent complications. Seven children (37% are alive and treatment free. Twelve children died (ten of them with resection of the entire small bowel and cecum, 11 due to parenteral nutrition complications (nine due to catheter sepsis and two due to massive pulmonary embolization and one child died with neurological complications after a combined liver and small bowel transplantation. CONCLUSION: Home parenteral nutrition is sometimes the only therapeutic choice for children with short bowel syndrome and promotes a maximal level of comfort to the patient and to the parents. Furthermore it reduces the period of hospitalization, while adaptation of the remaining small bowel occurs with maintenance of the nutritional status by oral route.

  3. Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

    OpenAIRE

    J Salas Salvado; A Recaséns Garica

    1993-01-01

    Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

  4. Is intensive multimodality therapy the best treatment for fournier gangrene? Evaluation of clinical outcome and survival rate of 41 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sigrid; Greco, Francesco; Hoda, M Raschid; Kawan, Felix; Heynemann, Hans; Fornara, Paolo

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of surgical wound debridement, antibiotics, and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in the treatment of Fournier gangrene (FG). Forty-one patients with a mean age of 54.3±14.6 years were referred to our department with a diagnosis of FG. To calculate a Fourier Gangrene Severity Index (FGSI), nine factors were assessed (temperature; heart rate; ventilatory rate; serum sodium, potassium, creatinine, and bicarbonate concentrations; hematocrit; and leukocyte count). After clinical stabilization, extensive debridement of the necrotic tissue was performed, and a surgical vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) device was applied. Hyperbaric oxygen was administered; medical therapy consisted of intravenous antibiotics, electrolyte replacement, and parenteral nutrition. Intraoperative cultures revealed Escherichia coli in 27 patients (66%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 28 (68%), gram-positive cocci in 24 (59%), and mixed flora (aerobic and anaerobic bacteria) in 39 (95%). One month after primary debridement, wound granulation was sufficient for plastic surgical reconstruction in all patients. Because of the rapid worsening of FG, early diagnosis and immediate, aggressive multi-modality therapy with surgical debridement and broad-spectrum empiric antibiotics is crucial. The utility of HBO remains unproved.

  5. PIRATE project: point-of-care, informatics-based randomised controlled trial for decreasing overuse of antibiotic therapy in Gram-negative bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, Angela; Albrich, Werner C; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Rossel, Anne; Dach, Elodie von; Harbarth, Stephan; Kaiser, Laurent

    2017-07-13

    Antibiotic overuse drives antibiotic resistance. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative bacteraemia (GNB), a common community and hospital-associated infection, remains unknown and unstudied via randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This investigator-initiated, multicentre, non-inferiority, informatics-based point-of-care RCT will randomly assign adult hospitalised patients receiving microbiologically efficacious antibiotic(s) for GNB to (1) 14 days of antibiotic therapy, (2) 7 days of therapy or (3) an individualised duration determined by clinical response and 75% reduction in peak C reactive protein (CRP) values. The randomisation will occur in equal proportions (1:1:1) on day 5 (±1) of efficacious antibiotic therapy as determined by antibiogram; patients, their physicians and study investigators will be blind to treatment duration allocation until the day of antibiotic discontinuation. Immunosuppressed patients and those with GNB due to complicated infections (endocarditis, osteomyelitis, etc) and/or non-fermenting bacilli ( Acinetobacter spp, Burkholderia spp, Pseudomonas spp) Brucella spp, Fusobacterium spp or polymicrobial growth with Gram-positive organisms will be ineligible. The primary outcome is incidence of clinical failure at day 30; secondary outcomes include clinical failure, all-cause mortality and incidence of Clostridiumdifficile infection in the 90-day study period. An interim safety analysis will be performed after the first 150 patients have been followed for ≤30 days. Given a chosen margin of 10%, the required sample size to determine non-inferiority is roughly 500 patients. Analyses will be performed on both intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. Ethics approval was obtained from the cantonal ethics committees of all three participating sites. Results of the main trial and each of the secondary endpoints will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. This trial is registered at www

  6. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AMONG CHILDREN AND THERAPY SELECTION

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    Ye.A. Kornienko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The reason for the low therapy efficiency of many gastrobduodenal diseases is the increasing resistance to the antibiotics helicobacter pylori (Н. pylori, which is conditioned by the mutations of its various genes. The most practical importance is attributed to the 23s RRNA mutations, underlying resistance to claritromicin. According to the international consensus maastrichtb3, the scheme of treatment with the inhibitor of the proton pump, claritromicin and metronidasol is recommended as the 1st line therapy. The present work assesses the resistance of Н. pylori to claritromicin aided by pcrbdiagnostics of the 23s RRNA mutation of rna in the biopsy material of the mucous coat of stomach and standard treatment scheme efficiency if compared with the onebantibiotic scheme – amoxicillin, bismuth and inhibitor of the proton pump. 68 children with Н. pylori bassociated diseases have been examined. The frequency of resistance of Н. pylori to claritromicin made up 28%. The standard 10bday long scheme of treatment was efficient among 14% of the patients, the 7bday long schemes with amoxicillin, bismuth and omeprazole were efficient among 40% of the patients, the 10bday long schemes with amoxicillin, bismuth and omeprazole were efficient among 75% of the patients; with omeprazole replaced by esomeprazole the efficiency was observed among 83% of the patients along with the good treatment tolerance.Key words: helicobacter pylori, antibiotic resistance, eradication.

  7. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Jon B; Myhr, Randi; Reikvam, Asmund

    2011-12-13

    Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics--that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones--in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval. There is a need for caution in

  8. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

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    Silvia Maria Rodrigues Querido

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37ºC. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp.

  9. International experts' practice in the antibiotic therapy of infective endocarditis is not following the guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot-Dupont, H; Casalta, J P; Gouriet, F; Hubert, S; Salaun, E; Habib, G; Fernandez-Gerlinger, M P; Mainardi, J L; Tattevin, P; Revest, M; Lucht, F; Botelho-Nevers, E; Gagneux-Brunon, A; Snygg-Martin, U; Chan, K L; Bishara, J; Vilacosta, I; Olmos, C; San Román, J A; López, J; Tornos, P; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Durante-Mangoni, E; Utili, R; Paul, M; Baddour, L M; DeSimone, D C; Sohail, M R; Steckelberg, J M; Wilson, W R; Raoult, D

    2017-10-01

    The management of infective endocarditis (IE) may differ from international guidelines, even in reference centres. This is probably because most recommendations are not based on hard evidence, so the consensus obtained for the guidelines does not represent actual practices. For this reason, we aimed to evaluate this question in the particular field of antibiotic therapy. Thirteen international centres specialized in the management of IE were selected, according to their reputation, clinical results, original research publications and quotations. They were asked to detail their actual practice in terms of IE antibiotic treatment in various bacteriological and clinical situations. They were also asked to declare their IE-related in-hospital mortality for the year 2015. The global compliance with guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy was 58%, revealing the differences between theoretical 'consensus', local recommendations and actual practice. Some conflicts of interest were also probably expressed. The adherence to guidelines was 100% when the protocol was simple, and decreased with the seriousness of the situation (Staphylococus spp. 54%-62%) or in blood-culture-negative endocarditis (0%-15%) that requires adaptation to clinical and epidemiological data. Worldwide experts in IE management, although the majority of them were involved and co-signed the guidelines, do not follow international consensus guidelines on the particular point of the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Duration of oral tetracycline-class antibiotic therapy and use of topical retinoids for the treatment of acne among general practitioners (GP): A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, John S; Hoffstad, Ole; Margolis, David J

    2016-12-01

    Guidelines recommend limiting the duration of oral antibiotic therapy in acne to 3 to 6 months and prescribing concomitant topical retinoids for all patients. We sought to evaluate the duration of therapy with oral tetracyclines and the use of topical retinoids among patients with acne treated primarily by general practitioners in the United Kingdom. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Health Improvement Network database. The mean duration of therapy was 175.1 days. Of antibiotic courses, 62% were not associated with a topical retinoid; 29% exceeded 6 months in duration. If all regions were to achieve uses similar to the region with the shortest mean duration of therapy, approximately 3.3 million antibiotic days per year could be avoided in the United Kingdom. The Health Improvement Network does not include information on acne severity and clinical outcomes. Prescribing behavior for oral antibiotics in the treatment of acne among general practitioners is not aligned with current guideline recommendations. Increasing the use of topical retinoids and considering alternative agents to oral antibiotics when appropriate represent opportunities to reduce antibiotic exposure and associated complications such as antibiotic resistance and to improve outcomes in patients treated for acne. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic Therapy vs Appendectomy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis: The APPAC Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Paulina; Paajanen, Hannu; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Tuominen, Risto; Hurme, Saija; Virtanen, Johanna; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Jartti, Airi; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Grönroos, Juha M

    2015-06-16

    An increasing amount of evidence supports the use of antibiotics instead of surgery for treating patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis. To compare antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by computed tomography (CT). The Appendicitis Acuta (APPAC) multicenter, open-label, noninferiority randomized clinical trial was conducted from November 2009 until June 2012 in Finland. The trial enrolled 530 patients aged 18 to 60 years with uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by a CT scan. Patients were randomly assigned to early appendectomy or antibiotic treatment with a 1-year follow-up period. Patients randomized to antibiotic therapy received intravenous ertapenem (1 g/d) for 3 days followed by 7 days of oral levofloxacin (500 mg once daily) and metronidazole (500 mg 3 times per day). Patients randomized to the surgical treatment group were assigned to undergo standard open appendectomy. The primary end point for the surgical intervention was the successful completion of an appendectomy. The primary end point for antibiotic-treated patients was discharge from the hospital without the need for surgery and no recurrent appendicitis during a 1-year follow-up period. There were 273 patients in the surgical group and 257 in the antibiotic group. Of 273 patients in the surgical group, all but 1 underwent successful appendectomy, resulting in a success rate of 99.6% (95% CI, 98.0% to 100.0%). In the antibiotic group, 70 patients (27.3%; 95% CI, 22.0% to 33.2%) underwent appendectomy within 1 year of initial presentation for appendicitis. Of the 256 patients available for follow-up in the antibiotic group, 186 (72.7%; 95% CI, 66.8% to 78.0%) did not require surgery. The intention-to-treat analysis yielded a difference in treatment efficacy between groups of -27.0% (95% CI, -31.6% to ∞) (P = .89). Given the prespecified noninferiority margin of 24%, we were unable to demonstrate noninferiority of

  12. Combination antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis due to enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Sebastiano; Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Silvano

    2016-06-01

    Enterococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) in both health care and community-based setting. Enterococcal IE requires bactericidal therapy for an optimal outcome. For decades, cell-wall-active antimicrobial agents (penicillins or vancomycin) in combination with aminoglycosides were the cornerstone of the treatment; however, the emergence of antibiotic resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of these regimens. Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE and references from relevant articles on antibiotic combination regimens for the treatment of enterococcal IE. Abstracts presented in scientific conferences were not searched for. New effective and safe combination treatments, including double-β-lactam and daptomycin/β-lactam combination, are proving useful for the management of IE due to enterococci.

  13. Inhaled antibiotics for lower airway infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Goss, Christopher H; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2014-03-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been used to treat chronic airway infections since the 1940s. The earliest experience with inhaled antibiotics involved aerosolizing antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. These formulations caused significant bronchial irritation due to added preservatives and nonphysiologic chemical composition. A major therapeutic advance took place in 1997, when tobramycin designed for inhalation was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Attracted by the clinical benefits observed in CF and the availability of dry powder antibiotic formulations, there has been a growing interest in the use of inhaled antibiotics in other lower respiratory tract infections, such as non-CF bronchiectasis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mycobacterial disease, and in the post-lung transplant setting over the past decade. Antibiotics currently marketed for inhalation include nebulized and dry powder forms of tobramycin and colistin and nebulized aztreonam. Although both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have approved their use in CF, they have not been approved in other disease areas due to lack of supportive clinical trial evidence. Injectable formulations of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ceftazidime, and amphotericin are currently nebulized "off-label" to manage non-CF bronchiectasis, drug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and post-transplant airway infections. Future inhaled antibiotic trials must focus on disease areas outside of CF with sample sizes large enough to evaluate clinically important endpoints such as exacerbations. Extrapolating from CF, the impact of eradicating organisms such as P. aeruginosa in non-CF bronchiectasis should also be evaluated.

  14. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  15. Evaluation of genome-wide expression profiles of blood and sputum neutrophils in cystic fibrosis patients before and after antibiotic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Conese

    Full Text Available In seeking more specific biomarkers of the cystic fibrosis (CF lung inflammatory disease that would be sensitive to antibiotic therapy, we sought to evaluate the gene expression profiles of neutrophils in CF patients before treatment in comparison with non-CF healthy individuals and after antibiotic treatment. Genes involved in neutrophil-mediated inflammation, i.e. chemotaxis, respiratory burst, apoptosis, and granule exocytosis, were the targets of this study. Microarray analysis was carried out in blood and airway neutrophils from CF patients and in control subjects. A fold change (log threshold of 1.4 and a cut-off of p<0.05 were utilized to identify significant genes. Community networks and principal component analysis were used to distinguish the groups of controls, pre- and post-therapy patients. Control subjects and CF patients before therapy were readily separated, whereas a clear distinction between patients before and after antibiotic therapy was not possible. Blood neutrophils before therapy presented 269 genes down-regulated and 56 up-regulated as compared with control subjects. Comparison between the same patients before and after therapy showed instead 44 genes down-regulated and 72 up-regulated. Three genes appeared to be sensitive to therapy and returned to "healthy" condition: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1, and β-arrestin 1 (ARRB1. The up-regulation of these genes after therapy were confirmed by real time PCR. In airway neutrophils, 1029 genes were differentially expressed post- vs pre-therapy. Of these, 30 genes were up-regulated and 75 down-regulated following antibiotic treatment. However, biological plausibility determined that only down-regulated genes belonged to the gene classes studied for blood neutrophils. Finally, it was observed that commonly expressed genes showed a greater variability in airway neutrophils than that found in blood neutrophils

  16. Evaluation of genome-wide expression profiles of blood and sputum neutrophils in cystic fibrosis patients before and after antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conese, Massimo; Castellani, Stefano; Lepore, Silvia; Palumbo, Orazio; Manca, Antonio; Santostasi, Teresa; Polizzi, Angela Maria; Copetti, Massimiliano; Di Gioia, Sante; Casavola, Valeria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Diana, Anna; Montemurro, Pasqualina; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Gallo, Crescenzio; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Carella, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In seeking more specific biomarkers of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung inflammatory disease that would be sensitive to antibiotic therapy, we sought to evaluate the gene expression profiles of neutrophils in CF patients before treatment in comparison with non-CF healthy individuals and after antibiotic treatment. Genes involved in neutrophil-mediated inflammation, i.e. chemotaxis, respiratory burst, apoptosis, and granule exocytosis, were the targets of this study. Microarray analysis was carried out in blood and airway neutrophils from CF patients and in control subjects. A fold change (log) threshold of 1.4 and a cut-off of p<0.05 were utilized to identify significant genes. Community networks and principal component analysis were used to distinguish the groups of controls, pre- and post-therapy patients. Control subjects and CF patients before therapy were readily separated, whereas a clear distinction between patients before and after antibiotic therapy was not possible. Blood neutrophils before therapy presented 269 genes down-regulated and 56 up-regulated as compared with control subjects. Comparison between the same patients before and after therapy showed instead 44 genes down-regulated and 72 up-regulated. Three genes appeared to be sensitive to therapy and returned to "healthy" condition: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1), and β-arrestin 1 (ARRB1). The up-regulation of these genes after therapy were confirmed by real time PCR. In airway neutrophils, 1029 genes were differentially expressed post- vs pre-therapy. Of these, 30 genes were up-regulated and 75 down-regulated following antibiotic treatment. However, biological plausibility determined that only down-regulated genes belonged to the gene classes studied for blood neutrophils. Finally, it was observed that commonly expressed genes showed a greater variability in airway neutrophils than that found in blood neutrophils, both before and

  17. Contemporary Parenteral Antiplatelet Bridging Strategies: A Single-Center Real-World Experience at a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Gretchen; Rimsans, Jessica; Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-03-13

    Oral antiplatelet therapy may require interruption soon after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or acute coronary syndrome. The optimal parenteral antiplatelet bridge strategy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors or cangrelor, a P2Y12 inhibitor, is unclear. We explore real-world use of cangrelor or eptifibatide for antiplatelet bridging at a large tertiary-care center. Thirty-one patients (9 eptifibatide, 20 cangrelor, and 2 both) received bridge therapy from October 2015 to June 2017. Primary bridge therapy indications included surgery (68%), limited enteral access/absorption (16%), and high-perceived bleed risk (16%). Median duration of bridge therapy was 61 (20-100) hours for cangrelor and 83 (19-98) hours for eptifibatide. Severe/life-threatening bleeding or stent thrombosis was not observed. GUSTO-defined bleeding occurred in 30% (cangrelor) and 27% (eptifibatide). Initial dosing errors occurred in 23% of patients. Death during hospitalization occurred in 16% of patients. Parenteral antiplatelet bridging was used for ~3 days in this single-center, tertiary care experience, commonly for unplanned surgery following PCI. Despite high-risk presentations with >15% in-hospital mortality, efficacy profiles were reassuring with no identified stent thrombosis, but bleeding and dosing errors were common. Antiplatelet bridging should only be used in well-selected patients at the appropriate dose for the minimal necessary duration.

  18. Does appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy modify intensive care unit-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia mortality and discharge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K B; Van Kleef, E; Vansteelandt, S; Batra, R; Edgeworth, J D; Smieszek, T; Robotham, J V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting results have been found regarding outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia and the potentially modifying effect of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. AIM: To evaluate these associations while adjusting for potential time-varying

  19. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. ESTHETIC OUTCOME OF SURGICAL EXCISION VERSUS ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL CERVICOFACIAL LYMPHADENITIS IN CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Lindeboom, Robert; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Elisabeth S.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Tuk, Jacco; Prins, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred children with microbiologically proven nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomly assigned to excision of the involved lymph nodes, or antibiotic therapy consisting of clarithromycin and rifabutin. The esthetic outcome was rated using a revised and weighted

  1. Esthetic outcome of surgical excision versus antibiotic therapy for nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.A.; Lindeboom, R.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, E.S.; Kuijper, E.J.; Tuk, J.; Prins, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred children with microbiologically proven nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomly assigned to excision of the involved lymph nodes, or antibiotic therapy consisting of clarithromycin and rifabutin. The esthetic outcome was rated using a revised and weighted

  2. Some problems of antibiotic therapy in radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalnova, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Data on the application of antibiotics and the mechanism of their action in radiation sickness are reviewed. Questions are discussed, such as the effect of antibiotics on the course and outcome of radiation sickness, the development of dysbacteriosis following irradiation, the effect of antibiotics on endogenic infection, the development of resistance of autoflora microbes to antibiotics in an irradiated organism and various aspects of the mechanism of action of antibiotics in radiation sickness. (author)

  3. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescription for targeted therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria: assessment of the most common improper uses in a tertiary hospital in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconte, Giulio; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Iula, Vita Dora; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    A huge proportion of antibiotic therapies for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) are inappropriate. In this study, we described the most common causes of inappropriateness of definitive antibiotic regimes in a large university hospital in southern Italy and we evaluated the impact on microbial eradication, length of stay, 30-day readmission and mortality. We retrospectively assessed 45 patients who received a definitive antibiotic therapy after isolation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. strains between 2014 and 2015. From the literature, we set a series of criteria to retrospectively determine the appropriateness of the therapy. In all, 61% of the prescribed antibiotic regimes were found to be inappropriate, especially due to incorrect drug dosage. It emerged that meropenem was the antibiotic most frequently inappropriately used. In 46% of infections caused by MDR but not extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenems were inappropriately administered. Microbial eradication was achieved in 87% of the appropriate therapy group compared to 31% of the inappropriate therapy group (chi-square=6.750, p<0.027). No statistically significant association was found between inappropriate therapy and the length of stay (chi-square=3.084, p=0.101) and 30-day readmission (p=0.103). Definitive antibiotic therapy in infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a large university hospital is often inappropriate, especially due to the drug dosing regimen, particularly in the case of meropenem and colistin. This inappropriateness has a significant impact on post-treatment microbial eradication in specimens collected after antibiotic therapy.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia among Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients: Relation to Initial Antibiotic Therapy and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migiyama, Yohei; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kaku, Norihito; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. However, P. aeruginosa bacteremia in immunocompetent patients has also been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of P. aeruginosa bacteremia in relation to the immune status of the patients. The medical records of 126 adult patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia in Nagasaki University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed between January 2003 and December 2012. Of 126 patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia, 60 patients (47.6%) were classified as immunocompetent. Mortality in immunocompetent patients tended to be lower than in immunocompromised patients (7-day mortality, 8% vs. 30%, P antibiotic therapy (HR: 0.21, P immunocompromised, but not immunocompetent patients, initial appropriate antibiotic therapy was associated with lower mortality (30-day mortality 20.5% vs. 66.7%, P < 0.01 by log-rank test).

  5. Adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jamal Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is associated with high morbidity as well as significant mortality rate. Today the risk of death in pemphigus from the side effect of oral prednisolone is greater than risk of death from the disease itself. Objec­tive: To observe the adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone compared with oral prednisolone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Methods: An interventional study was carried out in the department of Dermatology and Venereol­ogy, Bangabandu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total number of patients was thirty and among them fifteen patients were treated with parenteral dexamethasone (Group-A and other fifteen were treated with oral prednisolone (Group-B. Results: The study showed statistically significant differences of skin lesion as well as mucosal lesion of pemphigus after 6 weeks of therapy between of two groups (P<0.05. The most common adverse effects were increased body weight(40%, increased appetite(40%, and puffy face(40% in dexamethasone group. In prednisolone group, these side effects were 60% of the subjects. Other side effects in dexamethasone group were hyperglycemia (33.33%, hypertension (26.66%, and sleep disturbance (13.33%. In prednisolone group, other side effects were hyperglycemia(33.33%, hypertension(40%, gastritis (33.33%, nausea, vomiting (13.33% in each , reactivation of tuberculosis, herpes zoster infection, sleep disturbance, and mood change were 6.66% in each group. Conclusion: In the light of the findings of the study, we conclude that each of the treatment of dexamethasone group and prednisolone group is individually effective and safe in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris but adverse effects are less in parenteral dexamethasone group than oral prednisolone group. So parenteral dexamethasone can be used as an alternative drug in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris.

  6. Conservative Wait-and-See Therapy Versus Antibiotic Treatment for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Cervicofacial Lymphadenitis in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. In this explorative study, 50 children with microbiologically confirmed nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomized to either receive antibiotic therapy or follow a conservative wait-and-see approach. Our primary objective was to assess the time for all

  7. INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANTIBIOTIC PERFUSION THERAPY AS AN ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENT FOR DIGITAL LESIONS IN SEABIRDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorello, Christine V

    2017-03-01

    Foot infections are a common problem among seabirds in wildlife rehabilitation. Pododermatitis and digital infections are often challenging to treat because of the presence of suboptimal substrates, abnormal weight-bearing due to injuries, and suboptimal nutritional or health status. Seabirds represent the majority of animals requiring rehabilitation after oil spills, and foot problems are a common reason for euthanasia among these birds. Antibiotic intravenous regional perfusion therapy is frequently used in humans and other species to treat infections of the distal extremities, but it has not been evaluated in seabirds. During the 2015 Refugio oil spill response, four birds with foot lesions (pododermatitis, osteomyelitis, or both) were treated with ampicillin/sulbactam administered intravenously to the affected limb(s) in addition to systemic antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Three of the birds, all brown pelicans ( Pelecanus occidentalis ) recovered rapidly and were released. Two of these birds had acute pododermatitis and were treated once with intravenous regional perfusion. They were released approximately 3 wk after the perfusion therapy. The third pelican had osteomyelitis of a digit. It was treated twice with intravenous regional perfusion and was released about 1 mo after the initial perfusion therapy. The fourth bird, a Pacific loon ( Gavia pacifica ), was treated once with perfusion therapy but did not respond to treatment and was euthanatized. No serious adverse effects were observed. This technique should be explored further in avian species.

  8. Timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Lissette; Mehta, Nilesh M; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    To review the current literature evaluating clinical outcomes of early and delayed parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children. Nutritional management remains an important aspect of care among the critically ill, with enteral nutrition generally preferred. However, inability to advance enteral feeds to caloric goals and contraindications to enteral nutrition often leads to reliance on parenteral nutrition. The timing of parenteral nutrition initiation is varied among critically ill children, and derives from an assessment of nutritional status, energy requirements, and physiologic differences between adults and children, including higher nutrient needs and lower body reserves. A recent randomized control study among critically ill children suggests improved clinical outcomes with avoiding initiation of parenteral nutrition on day 1 of admission to the pediatric ICU. Although there is no consensus on the optimal timing of parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children, recent literature does not support the immediate initiation of parenteral nutrition on pediatric ICU admission. A common theme in the reviewed literature highlights the importance of accurate assessment of nutritional status and energy expenditure in deciding when to initiate parenteral nutrition. As with all medical interventions, the initiation of parenteral nutrition should be considered in light of the known benefits of judiciously provided nutritional support with the known risks of artificial, parenteral feeding.

  9. Parenteral nutrition dysregulates bile salt homeostasis in a rat model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Schaap, Frank G; Hodin, Caroline M J M; Visschers, Ruben G J; Svavarsson, Björn I; Lenicek, Martin; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN), a lifesaving therapy in patients with intestinal failure, has been associated with hepatobiliary complications including steatosis, cholestasis and fibrosis, collectively known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). To date, the pathogenesis of PNALD is poorly understood and therapeutic options are limited. Impaired bile salt homeostasis has been proposed to contribute PNALD. The objective of this study was to establish a PNALD model in rats and to evaluate the effects of continuous parenteral nutrition (PN) on bile salt homeostasis. Rats received either PN via the jugular vein or received normal diet for 3, 7 or 14 days. Serum biochemistry, hepatic triglycerides, circulating bile salts and C4, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lipogenic and bile salt homeostatic gene expression in liver and ileum were assessed. PN increased hepatic triglycerides already after 3 days of administration, and resulted in conjugated bilirubin elevation after 7 or more days. This indicates PN-induced steatosis and impaired canalicular secretion of bilirubin, the latter which is in line with reduced hepatic expression of Mrp2 mRNA. There was no histological evidence for liver inflammation after PN administration, and circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, were comparable in all groups. Hepatic expression of Fxr mRNA was decreased after 7 days of PN, without apparent effect on expression of Fxr targets Bsep and Shp. Nonetheless, Cyp7a1 expression was reduced after 7 days of PN, indicative for lowered bile salt synthesis. Circulating levels of C4 (marker of bile salt synthesis) were also decreased after 3, 7 and 14 days of PN. Levels of circulating bile salts were not affected by PN. This study showed that PN in rats caused early mild steatosis and cholestasis, while hepatic and systemic inflammation were not present. The onset of these abnormalities was associated with alterations in bile salt synthesis and transport. This

  10. Temporal Trends in the Use of Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Wunsch, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice guidelines recommend enteral over parenteral nutrition in critical illness and do not recommend early initiation. Few data are available on parenteral nutrition use or timing of initiation in the ICU or how this use may have changed over time. Methods: We used the Project IMPACT database to evaluate temporal trends in parenteral nutrition use (total and partial parenteral nutrition and lipid supplementation) and timing of initiation in adult ICU admissions from 2001 to 2008. We used χ2 tests and analysis of variance to examine characteristics of patients receiving parenteral nutrition and multilevel multivariate logistic regression models to assess parenteral nutrition use over time, in all patients and in specific subgroups. Results: Of 337,442 patients, 20,913 (6.2%) received parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for patient characteristics, the use of parenteral nutrition decreased modestly over time (adjusted probability, 7.2% in 2001-2002 vs 5.5% in 2007-2008, P nutrition use increased simultaneously (adjusted probability, 11.5% in 2001-2002 vs 15.3% in 2007-2008, P parenteral nutrition declined most rapidly in emergent surgical patients, patients with moderate illness severity, patients in the surgical ICU, and patients admitted to an academic facility (P ≤ .01 for all interactions with year). When used, parenteral nutrition was initiated a median of 2 days (interquartile range, 1-3), after ICU admission and > 90% of patients had parenteral nutrition initiated within 7 days; timing of initiation of parenteral nutrition did not change from 2001 to 2008. Conclusions: Use of parenteral nutrition in US ICUs declined from 2001 through 2008 in all patients and in all examined subgroups, with the majority of parenteral nutrition initiated within the first 7 days in ICU; enteral nutrition use coincidently increased over the same time period. PMID:24233390

  11. A PCT algorithm for discontinuation of antibiotic therapy is a cost-effective way to reduce antibiotic exposure in adult intensive care patients with sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Michelle Maria Aleida; Kusters, Ron; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Procalcitonin (PCT) is a specific marker for differentiating bacterial from non-infective causes of inflammation. It can be used to guide initiation and duration of antibiotic therapy in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with suspected sepsis, and might reduce the duration of hospital

  12. Inhaled Antibiotics in the Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units. Rational antibiotic therapy is the basis for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. There is currently a challenge of the pathogens of nosocomial pneumonia being resistant to most of the antibiotics recommended for its treatment. Inhaled antibiotics used in combination with systemic drugs are an effective and safe treatment for nosocomial pneumonia. This review of literature characterizes the current possibilities of inhaled antibiotic therapy for nosocomial pneumonia in detail and describes medicaments and the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment option. Despite insufficient evidence in circumstances where the microorganisms are polyresistant and where the design of novel antibiotics shows no promise, the use of inhaled antibiotics is an important alternative in the treatment of severe nosocomial pneumonia caused by polyresistant gram-negative bacteria. Key words: nosocomial pneumonia, antibiotic therapy, inhaled antibiotics, resistance.

  13. Duration of oral antibiotic therapy for the treatment of adult acne: a retrospective analysis investigating adherence to guideline recommendations and opportunities for cost-savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Chelsey E; Lee, Young H; Liu, Guodong; Kirby, Joslyn S

    2015-05-01

    The duration of oral antibiotic acne therapy for adolescents compared with guidelines was recently investigated; however it was uncertain if duration of antibiotics for adult acne therapy differed. This study aimed to evaluate duration of oral antibiotics for adult acne compared with guidelines and determine possible cost-savings. This was a retrospective cohort study of MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database that incorporated claims data to determine duration and costs of antibiotic treatment among adults ages 21 years and older. Of 17,448 courses, 84.5% (14,737) aligned with duration guidelines, although 12,040 (69.0%) courses did not include concomitant topical retinoid therapy. Mean savings of $592.26 per person could result if prolonged courses met guidelines. Mean (median) costs of generic and branded formulations for the most frequent course duration (90-179 days) were $103.77 ($54.27) and $1421.61 ($1462.25), respectively. Actual patient prescription adherence is uncertain and database lacks information regarding acne severity, patient physical characteristics, and clinical outcomes. The majority of oral antibiotic course durations follow guidelines, although topical retinoids are underused. Costs of antibiotic therapy were lower for shorter courses and those using generic medications; the cost-effectiveness of these modifications has not been investigated. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What Is Nutrition Support Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored CE Programs Calendar of Events What Is Nutrition Support Therapy All people need food to live. ... patient populations from pediatrics to geriatrics. Key Terms: Nutrition Support Therapy The provision of enteral or parenteral ...

  15. Total parenteral nutrition - Problems in compatibility and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroder, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Adding calcium, trace elements and vitamins could turn parenteral nutrition into a dangerous product, which could harm the patient. This article focuses on the major pharmaceutical problems of parenteral. nutrition when adding nutritional compounds Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  16. Effects of combination of antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria and corresponding antibiotics on survival of irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, V.M.; Pinegin, B.V.; Ivanova, N.P.; Mal' tsev, V.N.

    1982-05-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are used to treat intestinal dysbacteriosis of diverse etiology, including postradiation dysbacteriosis. Antibiotic therapy is instrumental in decontaminating the intestine. In addition to pathogenic microorganisms, there is disappearance of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria which perform several important and useful functions. For this reason, in addition to antibiotics, bifidobacterial preparations are used to restore the microbial cenosis and administration thereof is started after antibiotics are discontinued. There are some flaws to deferred administration of bifidobacteria, since the process of colonization of the intestine with commercial bifidobacterial preparations is rather lengthy, and there is slow elevation of bididobacterium level in the intestinal tract, whereas exogenous recontamination of the intestine by conditionally pathogenic bacteria is possible after antibiotic therapy is discontinued. On the other hand, use of antibiotics alone could, in turn, be the cause of intestinal dysbacteriosis. Our objective was to eliminate intestinal dysbacteriosis in irradiated animals by means of combining antibiotics and preparations of bifidobacteria resistant to these antibiotics, and thus prolong the life of these animals.

  17. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. AREAS COVERED: Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half......-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review...... discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. EXPERT COMMENTARY: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed...

  18. Improvements in Behavioral Symptoms following Antibiotic Therapy in a 14-Year-Old Male with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, P. Lucas; Barnhill, Kelly; Gutierrez, Alan; Schutte, Claire; Hewitson, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the benefits of antibiotic and antifungal therapy on behavior in a child with autism undergoing treatment for encopresis. Over the course of treatment, the child exhibited a reduction in aberrant behaviors, increased gastrointestinal function, and improved quality of life.

  19. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval

  20. TACTICS OF BIOCENOSIS-SAVING THERAPY BY USE ANTIBIOTICS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Mazankova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 50 children aged from 3 to 67 months with acute intestinal infections receiving antibiotic therapy, were clinically and microbiologically examined using gas-liquid chromatographic test with the measurement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs in coprofiltrates. The influence on the biocenosis is assessed upon treatment with an-tidiarrhoeal medication Gelatin tannat (Adiarin, which acts by forming a protective film on the surface of intestinal mucosa preventing loss of body fluids and microbial toxins. 20 children in the control group received antibiotics, sorbents, probiotics. The study has proved the clinical effect of Gelatin tannat, resulting in reduction of time to normalization of diarrhea and intoxication for 2 days, and data on the probiotic effect of the drug, similar to that of probiotics in the control group which expands the indications for the use of Gelatin tannat for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea.  

  1. Usefulness of gram staining of blood collected from total parenteral nutrition catheter for rapid diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, F; el Alami, S; Van Gossum, A; Struelens, M J; Serruys, E

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of Gram staining of blood drawn from catheters used to administer total parenteral nutrition was compared with paired quantitative blood cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis. Gram staining was positive in 11 of 18 episodes of catheter-related sepsis documented by quantitative culture (sensitivity, 61%) but in none of the 5 episodes of fever unrelated to catheter infection. Thus, this procedure enabled the rapid presumptive diagnosis and guidance of antimicrobial therapy for total parenteral nutrition catheter sepsis, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 42%. PMID:7521359

  2. Costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home units in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramallo, V J; Mirón-Rubio, M; Mujal, A; Estrada, O; Forné, C; Aragón, B; Rivera, A J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the direct healthcare costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home (HaH) units in Spain. An observational, multicentre, economic evaluation of retrospective cohorts was conducted. Patients were treated at home by the HaH units of three Spanish hospitals between January 2012 and December 2013. From the cost accounting of HaH OPAT (staff, pharmacy, transportation, diagnostic tests and structural), the cost of each outpatient course was obtained following a top-down strategy based on the use of resources. Costs associated with inpatient stay, if any, were estimated based on length of stay and ICD-9-CM diagnosis. There were 1324 HaH episodes in 1190 patients (median age 70 years). The median (interquartile range) stay at home was 10 days (7-15 days). Of the OPAT episodes, 91.5% resulted in cure or improvement on completion of intravenous therapy. The mean total cost of each infectious episode was €6707 [95% confidence interval (CI) €6189-7406]. The mean cost per OPAT episode was €1356 (95% CI €1247-1560), mainly distributed between healthcare staff costs (46%) and pharmacy costs (39%). The mean cost of inpatient hospitalisation of an infectious episode was €4357 (95% CI €3947-4977). The cost per day of inpatient hospitalisation was €519, whilst the cost per day of OPAT was €98, meaning a saving of 81%. This study shows that OPAT administered by HaH units resulted in lower costs compared with inpatient care in Spain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis: short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy is not a risk factor for recurrence in adult hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cédric; Huttner, Angela; Assal, Mathieu; Bernard, Louis; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2010-05-01

    No evidence-based recommendations exist for the management of infectious bursitis. We examined epidemiology and risk factors for recurrence of septic bursitis. Specifically, we compared outcome in patients receiving bursectomy plus short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy (7 days). Retrospective study of adult patients with infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis requiring hospitalization at Geneva University Hospital from January 1996 to March 2009. We identified 343 episodes of infectious bursitis (237 olecranon and 106 patellar). Staphylococcus aureus predominated among the 256 cases with an identifiable pathogen (85%). Three hundred and twelve cases (91%) were treated surgically; 142 (41%) with one-stage bursectomy and closure and 146 with two-stage bursectomy. All received antibiotics for a median duration of 13 days with a median intravenous component of 3 days. Cure was achieved in 293 (85%) episodes. Total duration of antibiotic therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.9; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.8-1.1] showed no association with cure. In multivariate analysis, only immunosuppression was linked to recurrence (OR 5.6; 95% CI 1.9-18.4). Compared with 14 days of antibiotic treatment (OR 0.9; 95% CI 0.1-10.7) was equivalent, as was the intravenous component (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.3). In severe infectious bursitis requiring hospitalization, adjuvant antibiotic therapy might be limited to 7 days in non-immunosuppressed patients.

  4. [Clinical effect of different sequences of debridement-antibiotic therapy in treatment of severe chronic periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Li; Lu, Rui-fang; An, Yue-bang; Wang, Xian-e; Song, Wen-li; Meng, Huan-xi

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate the feasibility of full-mouth debridement (subgingival scaling and root planning, SRP) by 2 times within 1 week and compare the clinical effects of different sequences of debridement-antibiotic usage in patients with severe chronic periodontitis (CP). A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted in 30 severe CP patients (14 males and 16 females, 40.5 ± 8.4 years old on average from 35 to 60) receiving 3 different sequences of debridement-antibiotictherapy: Group A, antibiotic usage (metronidazole, MTZ, 0.2 g, tid, 7 d; amoxicillin, AMX 0.5 g, tid, 7 d) was started together with SRP (completed by 2 times in 7 d); Group B, antibiotic usage (MTZ 0.2 g, tid, 7 d; AMX 0.5 g, tid, 7 d) was started 1 d after SRP(completed by 2 times in 7 d); Group C, SRP alone[probing depth (PD), bleeding index (BI) and tooth mobility] was examined. The average full-mouth probing depth, the average full-mouth proximal probing depth (pPD), the percentage of sites with PD>5 mm (PD>5 mm%), the percentage of sites with proximal PD>5 mm (pPD>5 mm%), the average bleeding index (BI) and the percentage of sites with bleeding on probing (BOP%) were calculated. Clinical examinations were performed at baseline and 2 months post therapy. (1) Compared with baseline conditions, all the subjects showed clinical improvements in all the parameters evaluated 2 months post therapy, Pantibiotic usage at the same time comparing with patients using antibiotics after SRP or SRP alone.

  5. Utilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.

  6. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C W; Saad, T F

    1999-01-01

    In the United States, there is a large and growing population of patients undergoing dialysis because of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). These patients present special management considerations for dentists, including antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis (BE). ESRD patients, particularly those with an arteriovenous shunt for hemodialysis access, are predisposed to valvular endocarditis. Thus, BE prevention is the primary goal of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental or other invasive procedures in these patients. Bacteremia may predispose to infection of synthetic vascular access grafts, although this form of endovascular infection in ESRD patients has not been as well-characterized as BE. Antibiotic prophylaxis may be of some benefit for prevention of synthetic graft infections as well as BE. Poor dentist and physician compliance with BE prophylaxis regimens, as well as errors in dosing, timing, or duration of prophylaxis, have been reported. These problems are of particular concern in the treatment of chronically ill patients. In this article, we review the rationale for prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental procedures in ESRD patients with vascular access. We also elaborate on the current American Heart Association guidelines for BE prophylaxis, and address special considerations for ESRD patients.

  7. Immunostimulation asa method limiting unnecessary antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Szczukocka-Zych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurring respiratory tract infections are typical of childhood. This results from the fact that children are exposed to pathogens, usually in groups of people, and from the immaturity of the immune system. Most upper and lower respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses. Nevertheless, antibiotics, which target bacteria, are often prescribed. Antibiotic overuse leads to increased microbial resistance to these drugs, resulting in their inefficacy. Improper treatment of respiratory infections with antibiotics ultimately leads to treatment failure. An increase in antibiotic resistance of many bacterial strains is becoming a serious global problem and makes treatment much more difficult. It is a responsibility of each physician to use antibiotics properly and implement adequate prevention of recurring respiratory tract infections. For many years, it has been attempted to find effective agents that improve immunity in children. The pharmaceutical market offers various preparations advertised as immunostimulants, such as bacterial lysates, vitamins, dietary supplements, probiotics or herbal, animal and homeopathic products. The role of immunomodulatory substances is to promote the immune system to fight pathogens, reduce the frequency of infections and decrease the demand for antibiotics. Unfortunately, most immunomodulators do not have sufficiently reliable clinical trials that would confirm their efficacy.

  8. Impact of prospective verification of intravenous antibiotics in an ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allyson; Nakajima, Steven; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Patel, Manav

    2016-12-01

    Delay in appropriate antibiotic therapy is associated with an increase in mortality and prolonged length of stay. Automatic dispensing machines decrease the delivery time of intravenous (IV) antibiotics to patients in the emergency department (ED). However, when IV antibiotics are not reviewed by pharmacists before being administered, patients are at risk for receiving inappropriate antibiotic therapy. The objective of this study was to determine if a difference exists in the time to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy before and after implementation of prospective verification of antibiotics in the ED. This retrospective, institutional review board-approved preimplementation vs postimplementation study evaluated patients 18years or older who were started on IV antibiotics in the ED. Patients were excluded if pregnant, if the patient is a prisoner, if no cultures were drawn, or if the patient was transferred from an outside facility. Appropriate antibiotic therapy was based on empiric source-specific evidence-based guidelines, appropriate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and microbiologic data. The primary end point was the time from ED arrival to administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Of the 1628 evaluated, 128 patients met the inclusion criteria (64 pre vs 64 post). Patients were aged 65.2±17.0years, with most of infections being pneumonia (44%) and urinary tract infections (18%) and most patients being noncritically ill. Time to appropriate antibiotic therapy was reduced in the postgroup vs pregroup (8.1±8.6 vs 15.2±22.8hours, respectively, P=.03). In addition, appropriate empiric antibiotics were initiated more frequently after the implementation (92% post vs 66% pre; P=.0001). There was no difference in mortality or length of stay between the 2 groups. Prompt administration of the appropriate antibiotics is imperative in patients with infections presenting to the ED. The impact of prospective verification of

  9. Decision and cost analysis of empirical antibiotic therapy of acute sinusitis in the era of increasing antimicrobial resistance: do we have an additional tool for antibiotic policy decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babela, Robert; Jarcuska, Pavol; Uraz, Vladimir; Krčméry, Vladimír; Jadud, Branislav; Stevlik, Jan; Gould, Ian M

    2017-11-01

    No previous analyses have attempted to determine optimal therapy for upper respiratory tract infections on the basis of cost-minimization models and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens in Slovakia. This investigation compares macrolides and cephalosporines for empirical therapy and look at this new tool from the aspect of potential antibiotic policy decision-making process. We employed a decision tree model to determine the threshold level of macrolides and cephalosporines resistance among community respiratory pathogens that would make cephalosporines or macrolides cost-minimising. To obtain information on clinical outcomes and cost of URTIs, a systematic review of the literature was performed. The cost-minimization model of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) treatment was derived from the review of literature and published models. We found that the mean cost of empirical treatment with macrolides for an URTIs was €93.27 when the percentage of resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in the community was 0%; at 5%, the mean cost was €96.45; at 10%, €99.63; at 20%, €105.99, and at 30%, €112.36. Our model demonstrated that when the percentage of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae exceeds 13.8%, use of empirical cephalosporines rather than macrolides minimizes the treatment cost of URTIs. Empirical macrolide therapy is less expensive than cephalosporines therapy for URTIs unless macrolide resistance exceeds 13.8% in the community. Results have important antibiotic policy implications, since presented model can be use as an additional decision-making tool for new guidelines and reimbursement processes by local authorities in the era of continual increase in antibiotic resistance.

  10. Improvements in Behavioral Symptoms following Antibiotic Therapy in a 14-Year-Old Male with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lucas Ramirez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the benefits of antibiotic and antifungal therapy on behavior in a child with autism undergoing treatment for encopresis. Over the course of treatment, the child exhibited a reduction in aberrant behaviors, increased gastrointestinal function, and improved quality of life.

  11. Novel carbapenem antibiotics for parenteral and oral applications: in vitro and in vivo activities of 2-aryl carbapenems and their pharmacokinetics in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Takemoto, Koji; Hatano, Kazuo; Nakai, Toru; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Eriguchi, Yoshiro; Eguchi, Ken; Shimizudani, Takeshi; Sato, Kimihiko; Kanazawa, Katsunori; Sunagawa, Makoto; Ueda, Yutaka

    2013-02-01

    carbapenem-resistant nosocomial pathogens, and allow parenteral, oral, and switch therapies.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negatives isolated from bacteremia in children with cancer. Implications for empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, Elio; Caviglia, Ilaria; Pescetto, Luisa; Bagnasco, Francesca; Haupt, Riccardo; Bandettini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Monotherapy is recommended as the first choice for initial empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia, but local epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility data are now considered pivotal to design a correct management strategy. To evaluate the proportion of Gram-negative rods isolated in bloodstream infections in children with cancer resistant to antibiotics recommended for this indication. The in vitro susceptibility to ceftazidime, piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem and amikacin of Gram-negatives isolated in bacteremic episodes in children with cancer followed at the Istituto "Giannina Gaslini", Genoa, Italy in the period of 2001-2013 was retrospectively analyzed using the definitions recommended by EUCAST in 2014. Data were analyzed for any single drug and to the combination of amikacin with each β-lactam. The combination was considered effective in absence of concomitant resistance to both drugs, and not evaluated by means of in vitro analysis of antibiotic combinations (e.g., checkerboard). A total of 263 strains were evaluated: 27% were resistant to piperacillin-tazobactam, 23% to ceftazidime, 12% to meropenem and 13% to amikacin. Concomitant resistance to β-lactam and amikacin was detected in 6% of strains for piperacillin-tazobactam, 5% for ceftazidime and 5% for meropenem. During the study period there was a nonsignificant increase in the proportions of strains resistant to β-lactams indicated for monotherapy, and also increase in the resistance to combined therapies. in an era of increasing resistance to antibiotics guideline-recommended monotherapy could be not appropriate for initial empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia. Strict local survey on etiology and antibiotic susceptibility is mandatory for a correct management of this complication in cancer patients.

  13. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Antibiotic Therapy for Premature Rupture of Membranes and Preterm Labor and Effect on Fetal Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelbach-Goebel, B.

    2013-01-01

    In Germany almost 10 % of children are born before the end of 37th week of gestation. In at least one quarter of these cases, ascending infection of the vagina plays a causative role, particularly during the early weeks of gestation. If, in addition to the decidua, the amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid and the umbilical cord are also affected, infection not only triggers uterine contractions and premature rupture of membranes but also initiates a systemic inflammatory reaction on the part of the fetus, which can increase neonatal morbidity. Numerous studies and meta-analyses have found that antibiotic therapy prolongs pregnancy and reduces neonatal morbidity. No general benefit of antibiotic treatment was found for premature uterine contractions. But it is conceivable that a subgroup of pregnant women would benefit from antibiotic treatment. It is important to identify this subgroup of women and offer them targeted treatment. This overview summarizes the current body of evidence on antibiotic treatment for impending preterm birth and the effect on neonatal outcomes. PMID:24771902

  15. The use of inhaled antibiotic therapy in the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheobronchitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher J; Shiroishi, Mark S; Siantz, Elizabeth; Wu, Brian W; Patino, Cecilia M

    2016-03-08

    Ventilator-associated respiratory infections (tracheobronchitis, pneumonia) contribute significant morbidity and mortality to adults receiving care in intensive care units (ICU). Administration of broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, the current standard of care, may have systemic adverse effects. The efficacy of aerosolized antibiotics for treatment of ventilator-associated respiratory infections remains unclear. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of aerosolized antibiotics in the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and tracheobronchitis (VAT), using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. We conducted a search of three databases (PubMed, Web of Knowledge and the Cochrane Collaboration) for randomized, controlled trials studying the use of nebulized antibiotics in VAP and VAT that measured clinical cure (e.g., change in Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score) as an outcome measurement. We augmented the electronic searches with hand searches of the references for any narrative review articles as well as any article included in the systematic review. Included studies were examined for risk of bias using the Cochrane Handbook's "Risk of Bias" assessment tool. Six studies met full inclusion criteria. For the systemic review's primary outcome (clinical cure), two studies found clinically and statistically significant improvements in measures of VAP cure while four found no statistically significant difference in measurements of cure. No studies found inferiority of aerosolized antibiotics. The included studies had various degrees of biases, particularly in the performance and detection bias domains. Given that outcome measures of clinical cure were not uniform, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. There is insufficient evidence for the use of inhaled antibiotic therapy as primary or adjuvant treatment of VAP or VAT. Additional, better-powered randomized-controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy of inhaled

  16. Pressing Issues of Rational Antibiotic Therapy for Inflammatory Diseases of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.N. Okhotnikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, high incidence of acute lower respiratory tract infections of bacterial origin, primarily pneumonia and bronchitis, treatment of which under the spread of antibiotic resistance is often a difficult task, cause alarm. Bronchitis — one of the most common respiratory diseases in childhood after acute respiratory viral infections. Application of antibiotics for acute bronchitis in children is not recommended, but they are prescribed for severe intoxication and prolonged hyperthermia (over 3 days, especially in infants, children with poor premorbid background and high risk of pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy is considered as the only science-based treatment of pneumonia. Taking into account the broad spectrum of modern antibiotics, monotherapy is most suitable. If it is necessary to extend their effect, combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate with macrolides, to which all the major respiratory pathogens are sensitive, is preferred.

  17. Hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener Dik, Pablo H; Galletti, María F; Bacigalupo, Leticia T; Fernández Jonusas, Silvia; L Mariani, Gonzalo

    2018-06-01

    Aggressive parenteral nutrition is the standard of care among very-low-birth weight preterm infants. However, in recent studies, its impact on short-term outcomes, has been evaluated. The objective was to compare the prevalence of hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive or standard parenteral nutrition. Observational, retrospective study comparing a group of preterm infants weighing less than 1250 grams who received aggressive parenteral nutrition with a historical control group. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was estimated and its association with aggressive parenteral nutrition was searched adjusting by confounders. The mean phosphate level was estimated for the control group by linear regression and was compared to the value in the other group. Forty patients per group were included. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was higher in the group who received aggressive parenteral nutrition (87.5% versus 35%, p= 0.001). Aggressive parenteral nutrition was associated with hypercalcemia when adjusting by birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction, amino acid, and calorie intake (adjusted odds ratio: 21.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7-128). The mean calcium level was different between both groups (p= 0.002). Infants who received aggressive parenteral nutrition had more sepsis without reaching statistical significance and the mean phosphate level was lower than that estimated for the control group (p= 0.04). The prevalence of hypophosphatemia in this group was 90% (95% CI: 76-97%). Our data show an association between hypercalcemia/hypophosphatemia and aggressive parenteral nutrition. It is recommended to frequently monitor calcium and phosphate levels since they might be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  18. Parenteral nutrition in patients with inborn errors of metabolism - a therapeutic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, L; Szczepanik, M; Siwinska-Mrozek, Z; Borkowska-Klos, M; Cichy, W; Walkowiak, J

    2014-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is now a standard part of supportive treatment in pediatric departments. We describe four cases in which parenteral nutrition was extremely difficult due to coincidence with inborn errors of metabolism. The first two cases was fatty acid beta-oxidation disorders associated with necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital heart disease. Thus, limitations of intravenous lipid intake made it difficult to maintain a good nutritional status. The third case was phenylketonuria associated with a facial region tumour (rhabdomyosarcoma), in which parenteral nutrition was complicated because of a high phenylalanine content in the amino acid formulas for parenteral nutrition. The fourth patient was a child with late-diagnosed tyrosinemia type 1, complicated with encephalopathy - during intensive care treatment the patient needed nutritional support, including parenteral nutrition - we observed amino acid formula problems similar to those in the phenylketonuria patient. Parenteral nutrition in children with inborn errors of metabolism is a rare, but very important therapeutic problem. Total parenteral nutrition formulas are not prepared for this group of diseases.

  19. Antibiotics for acute pyelonephritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, Yvonne; Hodson, Elisabeth M; Willis, Narelle S; Webster, Angela C; Craig, Jonathan C

    2014-07-28

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants. The most severe form of UTI is acute pyelonephritis, which results in significant acute morbidity and may cause permanent kidney damage. There remains uncertainty regarding the optimum antibiotic regimen, route of administration and duration of treatment. This is an update of a review that was first published in 2003 and updated in 2005 and 2007. To evaluate the benefits and harms of antibiotics used to treat children with acute pyelonephritis. The aspects of therapy considered were 1) different antibiotics, 2) different dosing regimens of the same antibiotic, 3) different duration of treatment, and 4) different routes of administration. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings without language restriction to 10 April 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing different antibiotic agents, routes, frequencies or durations of therapy in children aged 0 to 18 years with proven UTI and acute pyelonephritis were selected. Four authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using the random-effects model and the results expressed as risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes or mean difference (MD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). This updated review included 27 studies (4452 children). This update included evidence from three new studies, and following re-evaluation, a previously excluded study was included because it now met our inclusion criteria.Risk of bias was assessed as low for sequence generation (12 studies), allocation concealment (six studies), blinding of outcome assessors (17 studies), incomplete outcome reporting (19 studies) and selective outcome reporting (13 studies). No study was blinded for participants or investigators. The 27 included studies evaluated 12 different

  20. Potential of polymeric particles as future vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants for parenteral and non-parenteral immunization against tuberculosis: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Khademi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Production of effective tuberculosis (TB vaccine is necessity. However, the development of new subunit vaccines is faced with concerns about their weak immunogenicity. To overcome such problems, polymers-based vaccine delivery systems have been proposed to be used via various routes. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of polymeric particles as future vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants for parenteral and non-parenteral immunization against TB. Materials and Methods: PubMed, Scopus, Science-Direct, and the ISI web of knowledge databases were searched for related keywords. A total of 420 articles, written up to June 25, 2016, were collected on the potential of polymeric particles as TB vaccine delivery systems after parenteral and non-parenteral immunization. Thirty-one relevant articles were selected by applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: It was shown that the immunogenicity of TB vaccines had been improved by using biodegradable and non-biodegradable synthetic polymers as well as natural polymers and they are better able to enhance the humoral and cellular immune responses, compared to TB vaccines alone. The present study revealed that various polymeric particles, after M. tuberculosis challenge in animal models, provide long-lasting protection against TB. PLGA (poly (lactide-co-glycolide and chitosan polymers were widely used as TB vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants. Conclusion: It seems that PLGA and chitosan polymers are well-suited particles for the parenteral and non-parenteral administration of TB vaccines, respectively. Non-biodegradable synthetic polymers in comparison with biodegradable synthetic and natural polymers have been used less frequently. Therefore, further study on this category of polymers is required.

  1. Image-guided percutaneous disc sampling: impact of antecedent antibiotics on yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, V.; Wo, S.; Lagemann, G.M.; Tsay, J.; Delfyett, W.T.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of antecedent antimicrobial therapy on diagnostic yield from percutaneous image-guided disc-space sampling. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the electronic health records of all patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous sampling procedures for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis over a 5-year period was performed. One hundred and twenty-four patients were identified. Demographics, medical history, and culture results were recorded as well as duration of presenting symptoms and whether antecedent antibiotic therapy had been administered. Results: Of the 124 patients identified who underwent image-guided percutaneous disc-space sampling, 73 had received antecedent antibiotic treatment compared with 51 who had not. The overall positive culture rate for the present study population was 24% (n=30). The positive culture rate from patients previously on antibiotics was 21% (n=15) compared with 29% (n=15) for patients who had not received prior antibiotic treatment, which is not statistically significant (p=0.26). Eighty-six percent (n=63) of patients who had antecedent antibiotics received treatment for 4 or more days prior to their procedure, whereas 14% (n=10) received treatment for 1–3 days prior to their procedure. The difference in culture positivity rate between these two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.43). Culture results necessitated a change in antibiotic therapy in a third of the patients who had received antecedent antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Antecedent antibiotic therapy, regardless of duration, did not result in significantly diminished diagnostic yield from percutaneous sampling for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis. The present results suggest that percutaneous biopsy may nonetheless yield positive diagnostic information despite prior antimicrobial therapy. If the diagnostic information may impact choice of therapeutic regimen, percutaneous biopsy should still be considered in cases where

  2. A retrospective analysis of the duration of oral antibiotic therapy for the treatment of acne among adolescents: investigating practice gaps and potential cost-savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young H; Liu, Guodong; Thiboutot, Diane M; Leslie, Douglas L; Kirby, Joslyn S

    2014-07-01

    Duration of oral antibiotic therapy in acne has not been widely studied. Recent guidelines suggest it should be limited to 3 to 6 months. We sought to compare the duration of oral antibiotic use with recent guidelines and determine the potential cost-savings related to shortened durations. This is a retrospective cohort study from the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database. Claims data were used to determine duration and costs of antibiotic therapy. The mean course duration was 129 days. The majority (93%) of courses were less than 9 months. Among the 31,634 courses, 18,280 (57.8%) did not include concomitant topical retinoid therapy. The mean (95% confidence interval) duration with and without topical retinoid use was 133 (131.5-134.7) days and 127 (125.4-127.9) days, respectively. The mean excess direct cost of antibiotic treatment for longer than 6 months was $580.99/person. Claims cannot be attributed to a specific diagnosis or provider. The database does not provide information on acne severity. Duration of antibiotic use is decreasing when compared with previous data. However, 5547 (17.53%) courses exceeded 6 months, highlighting an opportunity for reduced antibiotic use. If courses greater than 6 months were shortened to 6 months, savings would be $580.99/person. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hidrotórax secundário à nutrição parenteral: relato de caso Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Silvah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hidrotórax secundário à infusão de nutrição parenteral é uma condição rara, embora se apresente cada vez mais comum. Neste relato de caso, uma paciente com síndrome do intestino curto desenvolveu instabilidade hemodinâmica e insuficiência respiratória algumas horas após o início da infusão de nutrição parenteral. Ressaltamos também as manobras para evitar e tratar tal complicação.Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition infusion is a rare, although increasingly common event. This report shows a short bowel patient who developed hemodynamic instability and respiratory failure few hours after parenteral nutrition infusion's start. We also emphasize the maneuvers to avoid and treat such complication.

  4. Nano-antibiotics in chronic lung infection therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadinoto, Kunn; Cheow, Wean Sin

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic encapsulation into nanoparticle carriers has emerged as a promising inhaled antibiotic formulation for treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Attributed to their prolonged lung retention, sustained antibiotic release, and mucus penetrating ability, antibiotic nanoparticles, or nano-antibiotics in short, can address the principal weakness of inhaled antibiotic solution, i.e. low antibiotic exposure in the vicinity of P. aeruginosa biofilm colonies resulting in diminished anti-pseudomonal efficacy after repeated uses. This review details the current state of development and limitations of the two most widely studied forms of nano-antibiotics, i.e. liposomes and polymer nanoparticles. Factors in their formulation that influence the anti-pseudomonal efficacy in vitro and in vivo, such as liposome's membrane rigidity, surface charge, size, and polymer hydrophobicity, are discussed. This review reveals that the superior anti-pseudomonal efficacy of liposomal antibiotics to free antibiotics has been clearly established when they are correctly formulated, with several liposomal antibiotic formulations are currently undergoing clinical trials. Liposomal antibiotics, nevertheless, are not without limitation due to their weak physicochemical stability. In contrast, only mucus penetrating ability of the more stable polymeric nano-antibiotics has been established, while their anti-pseudomonal efficacy has only been examined in vitro from which their superiority to free antibiotics has not been ascertained. Lastly, future research needs to bring liposome and polymer-based nano-antibiotics closer to their clinical realization are identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of Oritavancin in Moderate-to-Severe ABSSSI Patients Requiring IV Antibiotics: A U.S. Payer Budget Impact Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ivar S; Wu, Elizabeth; Fan, Weihong; Lodise, Thomas P; Nicolau, David P; Dufour, Scott; Cyr, Philip L; Sulham, Katherine A

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) account for nearly 10% of hospital admissions and 3.4-3.8 million emergency department visits per year in the United States. Analyses of hospital discharge records indicate 74% of ABSSSI admissions involve empiric treatment with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) active antibiotics. Analysis has shown that payer costs could be reduced if moderate-to-severe ABSSSI patients were treated to a greater extent in the observational unit followed by discharge to outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT). Oritavancin is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with bactericidal activity against gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA. To estimate the impact on a U.S. payer's budget of using single-dose oritavancin in ABSSSI patients with suspected MRSA involvement who are indicated for intravenous antibiotics. A decision analytic model based on current clinical practice was developed to estimate the economic value of decreased hospital resource consumption by using single-dose oritavancin over a 1-year time horizon. Use of antibiotics was informed by an analysis of the Premier Research Database. Demographic and clinical data were derived from a targeted literature review. Emergency department, observation, laboratory, and administration costs used were Medicare National Limitation amounts. Drug costs were 2014 wholesale acquisition costs. For a hypothetical U.S. payer with 1,000,000 members, it is expected that approximately 14,285 members per year will be diagnosed with ABSSSI severe enough to indicate intravenous antibiotics with MRSA activity. Based on this simulation, use of single-dose oritavancin in 26% of these patients was estimated to reduce the number of inpatient admissions, reduce length of stay for patients requiring admission, and reduce the number of days a patient needs to receive daily infusions in the OPAT clinic. The total patient days decreased from 171,125 to 133

  6. Economic evaluation of antibiotic therapy versus appendicectomy for the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis from the APPAC randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippola, S; Grönroos, J; Tuominen, R; Paajanen, H; Rautio, T; Nordström, P; Aarnio, M; Rantanen, T; Hurme, S; Salminen, P

    2017-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence supports antibiotic therapy for treating uncomplicated acute appendicitis. The objective of this study was to compare the costs of antibiotics alone versus appendicectomy in treating uncomplicated acute appendicitis within the randomized controlled APPAC (APPendicitis ACuta) trial. The APPAC multicentre, non-inferiority RCT was conducted on patients with CT-confirmed uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Patients were assigned randomly to appendicectomy or antibiotic treatment. All costs were recorded, whether generated by the initial visit and subsequent treatment or possible recurrent appendicitis during the 1-year follow-up. The cost estimates were based on cost levels for the year 2012. Some 273 patients were assigned to the appendicectomy group and 257 to antibiotic treatment. Most patients randomized to antibiotic treatment did not require appendicectomy during the 1-year follow-up. In the operative group, overall societal costs (€5989·2, 95 per cent c.i. 5787·3 to 6191·1) were 1·6 times higher (€2244·8, 1940·5 to 2549·1) than those in the antibiotic group (€3744·4, 3514·6 to 3974·2). In both groups, productivity losses represented a slightly higher proportion of overall societal costs than all treatment costs together, with diagnostics and medicines having a minor role. Those in the operative group were prescribed significantly more sick leave than those in the antibiotic group (mean(s.d.) 17·0(8·3) (95 per cent c.i. 16·0 to 18·0) versus 9·2(6·9) (8·3 to 10·0) days respectively; P antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis incurred lower costs than those who had surgery. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paajanen, Hannu; Grönroos, Juha M; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Hurme, Saija; Dean, Kirsti; Jartti, Airi; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-02-08

    Although the standard treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) consists of an early appendectomy, there has recently been both an interest and an increase in the use of antibiotic therapy as the primary treatment for uncomplicated AA. However, the use of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA is still controversial. The APPAC trial is a randomized prospective controlled, open label, non-inferiority multicenter trial designed to compare antibiotic therapy (ertapenem) with emergency appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA. The primary endpoint of the study is the success of the randomized treatment. In the antibiotic treatment arm successful treatment is defined as being discharged from the hospital without the need for surgical intervention and no recurrent appendicitis during a minimum follow-up of one-year (treatment efficacy). Treatment efficacy in the operative treatment arm is defined as successful appendectomy evaluated to be 100%. Secondary endpoints are post-intervention complications, overall morbidity and mortality, the length of hospital stay and sick leave, treatment costs and pain scores (VAS, visual analoque scale). A maximum of 610 adult patients (aged 18-60 years) with a CT scan confirmed uncomplicated AA will be enrolled from six hospitals and randomized by a closed envelope method in a 1:1 ratio either to undergo emergency appendectomy or to receive ertapenem (1 g per day) for three days continued by oral levofloxacin (500 mg per day) plus metronidazole (1.5 g per day) for seven days. Follow-up by a telephone interview will be at 1 week, 2 months and 1, 3, 5 and 10 years; the primary and secondary endpoints of the trial will be evaluated at each time point. The APPAC trial aims to provide level I evidence to support the hypothesis that approximately 75-85% of patients with uncomplicated AA can be treated with effective antibiotic therapy avoiding unnecessary appendectomies and the related operative morbidity, also resulting

  8. Erlotinib plus parenteral nutrition: an opportunity to get through the hardest days of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yuan-Sheng; Fang, Zheng; Li, Bing

    2013-03-01

    This case study details the poor performance status of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer and cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome got through the hardest days of high tumor burden and malnutrition, by using a combined therapy of lung cancer-targeted therapy drug and parenteral nutrition. The related literatures were reviewed.

  9. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using 15 N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats

  10. A clinical examination of antibiotics in continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A prospective randomized controlled trial of BIPM and IPM/CS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shigemichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Kamitani, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy using both protease inhibitors and antibiotics are one of the specific therapeutic methods for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). As for the administered antibiotics, imipenem/cilastatin sodium (IPM/CS) is generally chosen as a first step, but there are only a few reports comparing IPM/CS with other antibiotics. Therefore, we performed a prospective randomized controlled trial between biapenem (BIPM) and IPM/CS as CRAI antibiotics. Twelve patients with SAP were admitted to our institution during April, 2009 since August, 2006, and were randomized into two groups. They were treated with 120 mg/day of nafamostat mesilate and either 1.2 g/day of BIPM (n=6) or 2.0 g/day of IPM/CS (n=6) for CRAI therapy within 48 hours after the administration. The clinical data, inflammatory markers (WBC, CRP), serum pancreatic enzymes (lipase, tripsin, phospholipase A2, elastase 1 and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and contrast-enhanced abdominal Computed Tomography findings were compared between the two groups and the adverse effects were monitored. CRAI therapy was performed for seven days. The curative effect of this therapy was evaluated at the beginning of the treatment, the day 7 and the day 14. Our results suggested that BIPM was a non-recessive antibiotic which had an equal effect in CRAI therapy in comparison with IPM/CS. (author)

  11. Antibiotic prescribing for endodontic therapies: a comparative survey between general dental practitioners and final year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in Cardiff, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masan, A A; Dummer, P M H; Farnell, D J J; Vianna, M E

    2018-07-01

    To evaluate the views of final year dental surgery students (BDS; G1) at Cardiff University and general dental practitioners (GDPs; G2) within the geographic area of Cardiff, Wales, on antibiotic prescribing for endodontic conditions, and investigate the potential differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional online questionnaire-based survey of 12 qualitative and quantitative questions was distributed to 76 final year BDS Cardiff University students and 55 dental practices within Cardiff, UK. Six questions recorded general information, and the remaining questions included a series of hypothetical clinical scenarios, where the participants were asked to state whether they would or would not prescribe antibiotics. The data were analysed using spss version 23 to produce descriptive statistics, contingency tables and to run chi-square (χ²) tests, Fisher's exact tests and relative risk calculations. The response rate was 60% (n = 79). All G1 participants were aware of the consequences of antibiotic overuse. Approximately 60% of responders were aware of guidelines for antibiotic use in endodontic therapies, and 83% would only use antibiotics for a limited selection of patients (e.g. patients with systemic complications). G1 responses to clinical scenarios indicated overall that they were comparable to the ideal answers except for acute apical abscess (64% believed that antibiotics were indicated). The majority of G2 were aware of the consequences of antibiotic overuse. Only 28% of G2 were aware of guidelines for antibiotic use in endodontic therapies. Overall responses revealed that antibiotics would be prescribed for: systemic complications (78%), acute apical abscess (72%) and symptomatic apical periodontitis (28%). The clinical scenarios revealed G1 were more likely to prescribe antibiotics compared to G2 for cases of necrotic pulp with symptomatic apical periodontitis without systemic complications (incorrect answer) and less likely to other clinical

  12. Parenteral nutrition in the ICU setting: need for a shift in utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Hiesmayr, Michael; Pichard, Claude

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties to feed the patients adequately with enteral nutrition alone have drawn the attention of the clinicians toward the use of parenteral nutrition, although recommendations by the recent guidelines are conflicting. This review focuses on the intrinsic role of parenteral nutrition, its new indication, and modalities of use for the critically ill patients. A recent trial demonstrated that selecting either parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition for early nutrition has no impact on clinical outcomes. However, it must be acknowledged that the risk of relative overfeeding is greater when using parenteral nutrition and the risk of underfeeding is greater when using enteral nutrition because of gastrointestinal intolerance. Both overfeeding and underfeeding in the critically ill patients are associated with deleterious outcomes. Thus, early and adequate feeding according to the specific energy needs can be recommended as the optimal feeding strategy. Parenteral nutrition can be used to substitute or supplement enteral nutrition, if adequately prescribed. Testing for enteral nutrition tolerance during 2-3 days after ICU admission provides the perfect timing to start parenteral nutrition, if needed. In case of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, consider starting parenteral nutrition carefully to avoid overfeeding.

  13. Do we treat our patients or rather periodontal microbes with adjunctive antibiotics in periodontal therapy? A 16S rDNA microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenfeld, Daniel; Koch, Raphael; Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Harks, Inga; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kim, Ti-Sun; Kocher, Thomas; Meyle, Jörg; Kaner, Doğan; Schlagenhauf, Ulrich; Ehmke, Benjamin; Harmsen, Dag

    2018-01-01

    Empiric antibiotics are often used in combination with mechanical debridement to treat patients suffering from periodontitis and to eliminate disease-associated pathogens. Until now, only a few next generation sequencing 16S rDNA amplicon based publications with rather small sample sizes studied the effect of those interventions on the subgingival microbiome. Therefore, we studied subgingival samples of 89 patients with chronic periodontitis (solely non-smokers) before and two months after therapy. Forty-seven patients received mechanical periodontal therapy only, whereas 42 patients additionally received oral administered amoxicillin plus metronidazole (500 and 400 mg, respectively; 3x/day for 7 days). Samples were sequenced with Illumina MiSeq 300 base pairs paired end technology (V3 and V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rDNA). Inter-group differences before and after therapy of clinical variables (percentage of sites with pocket depth ≥ 5mm, percentage of sites with bleeding on probing) and microbiome variables (diversity, richness, evenness, and dissimilarity) were calculated, a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) was conducted, and differential abundance of agglomerated ribosomal sequence variants (aRSVs) classified on genus level was calculated using a negative binomial regression model. We found statistically noticeable decreased richness, and increased dissimilarity in the antibiotic, but not in the placebo group after therapy. The PCoA revealed a clear compositional separation of microbiomes after therapy in the antibiotic group, which could not be seen in the group receiving mechanical therapy only. This difference was even more pronounced on aRSV level. Here, adjunctive antibiotics were able to induce a microbiome shift by statistically noticeably reducing aRSVs belonging to genera containing disease-associated species, e.g., Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Aggregatibacter, and by noticeably increasing genera containing health

  14. Effectiveness of Dry Cow Therapy Comprising Antibiotic Treatment, Internal Teat Sealant, and α-Tocopherol Against New Intramammary Infections in Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the preventive effectiveness of dry cow therapy based on antibiotic, internal teat sealant, and α-tocopherol administered separately or in various combinations at drying-off The study was performed on 322 uninfected quarters of 95 cows originating from three dairy herds. The new intramammary infection rates after calving were measured to evaluate the effectiveness. The quarters were divided into six groups differing in treatment, namely: control group (group C, n = 40 and five treatment groups. Treatment groups were arranged as follows: group A (antibiotic alone, n = 81, group AS (antibiotic + sealant, n = 40, group AST (antibiotic + sealant + α-tocopherol, n = 40, group T (α-tocopherol alone, n = 40, group S (sealant alone, n = 81. New infection rate amounted to 47.5% in group C. The treatment in group AST significantly prevented from the occurrence of new intramammary infections (12.5%, P 0.05, although the use of the sealant alone (group S decreased the risk of new infection (24.7%, P 0.05. Increased α-tocopherol level (P < 0.05 was detected after calving in the quarters from cows that received α-tocopherol injections. In conclusion, the combination of antibiotic, internal teat sealant, and α-tocopherol used in dry cow therapy showed a significantly better preventive effect against new intramammary infections, than the therapeutics administered separately.

  15. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  16. Multifaceted antibiotic treatment analysis of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Zhanni; Ariano, Robert; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Zelenitsky, Sheryl

    2016-12-01

    Given the overall prevalence and poor prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSIs), the study of treatment strategies to improve patient outcomes is important. The aim of this study was to conduct a multifaceted antibiotic treatment analysis of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) BSI and to characterise optimal early antibiotic therapy (within the first 7 days of drawing the index blood culture) for this serious infection. Antibiotic selection was categorised as optimal targeted (intravenous cloxacillin or cefazolin), optimal broad (piperacillin/tazobactam or meropenem), adequate (vancomycin) or inadequate (other antibiotics or oral therapy). A TSE (timing, selection, exposure) score was developed to comprehensively characterise early antibiotic therapy, where higher points corresponded to prompt initiation, optimal antibiotic selection and longer exposure (duration). Amongst 71 cases of complicated MSSA-BSI, end-of-treatment (EOT) response (i.e. clinical cure) was improved when at least adequate antibiotic therapy was initiated within 24 h [71.7% (33/46) vs. 48.0% (12/25); P = 0.047]. Clinical cure was also more likely when therapy included ≥4 days of optimal targeted antibiotics within the first 7 days [74.4% (29/39) vs. 50.0% (16/32); P = 0.03]. The TSE score was an informative index of early antibiotic therapy, with EOT cure documented in 72.0% (36/50) compared with 42.9% (9/21) of cases with scores above and below 15.2, respectively (P = 0.02). In multivariable analysis, lower Charlson comorbidity index, presence of BSI on admission, and optimising early antibiotic therapy, as described above, were associated with clinical cure in patients with MSSA-BSI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis after endoscopic therapy prevents rebleeding in acute variceal hemorrhage: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Liu, Tsu-Te; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tieu; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Bacterial infection may adversely affect the hemostasis of patients with gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent bacterial infection in such patients, but its role in preventing rebleeding is unclear. Over a 25-month period, patients with acute GEVB but without evidence of bacterial infection were randomized to receive prophylactic antibiotics (ofloxacin 200 mg i.v. q12h for 2 days followed by oral ofloxacin 200 mg q12h for 5 days) or receive antibiotics only when infection became evident (on-demand group). Endoscopic therapy for the GEVB was performed immediately after infection work-up and randomization. Fifty-nine patients in the prophylactic group and 61 patients in the on-demand group were analyzed. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics of the gastroesophageal varices, time to endoscopic treatment, and period of follow-up were not different between the two groups. Antibiotic prophylaxis decreased infections (2/59 vs. 16/61; P actuarial probability of rebleeding was higher in patients without prophylactic antibiotics (P =.0029). The difference of rebleeding was mostly due to early rebleeding within 7 days (4/12 vs. 21/27, P =.0221). The relative hazard of rebleeding within 7 days was 5.078 (95% CI: 1.854-13.908, P <.0001). The multivariate Cox regression indicated bacterial infection (relative hazard: 3.85, 95% CI: 1.85-13.90) and association with hepatocellular carcinoma (relative hazard: 2.46, 95% CI: 1.30-4.63) as independent factors predictive of rebleeding. Blood transfusion for rebleeding was also reduced in the prophylactic group (1.40 +/- 0.89 vs. 2.81 +/- 2.29 units, P <.05). There was no difference in survival between the two groups. In conclusion, antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent infection and rebleeding as well as decrease the amount of blood transfused for patients with acute GEVB following endoscopic treatment.

  18. Parenteral nutrition in radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glants, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Basing on the results of experiments on mice and rats and their clinical use in oncological patients treatment recommendations are given on use of parenteral nutrition in treatment of radiation disease

  19. Parenteral nutrition in the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2015-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition may be considered when oral intake and/or enteral nutrition are not sufficient to maintain nutritional status and the patient is likely to die sooner from starvation than from the cancer. A detailed assessment should be made prior to the decision about whether parenteral nutrition should be started. A follow up plan should be documented with objective and patient centred treatment goals as well as specific time points for evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindra Irawan Satari

    2011-12-01

    Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward from January 1 – June 30, 2009. Records were screened for patient antibiotic use, followed by qualitative evaluation using Gyssens algorithm on data from patient who received antibiotic treatment. Results We found 49.2% of subject were prescribed antibiotics. The majority of patients given antibiotics were aged 1 month - 1 year (39.3%. Antibiotic use was categorized by therapy type : empirical, prophylactic, or definitive. We found empirical therapy in 73% of cases, prophylactic in 8%, and definitive in 15%. Cefotaxime was the most common antibiotic used (25.1%, followed by ceftazidime (14% and cotrimoxazole (1%. 39.6% of subjects were given antibiotics appropriately, while 48.3% were given inappropriately. In 3.3% of patients, antibiotics were given without indication and in 8.8% there was insufficient data. Conclusions Of hospitalized patients receiving antibiotic treatment at the Departement of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, 39.6% were given antibiotic appropriately, while 48.3% were given antibiotics inappropriately. Cefotaxime was the most commonly used, as well as most inappropriately given antibiotic.

  1. A Spiral in the Heart: Mitral Valve Endocarditis with Unusual Vegetation Shape Potentially Affecting Effectiveness of Antibiotic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Fibbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of infective endocarditis (IE in an 88-year-old woman, occurring on a prolapsing mitral valve and characterized by an atypical vegetation shape resembling a spiral-like appearance. After the patient refused surgical correction, persistent IE despite prolonged antibiotic therapy was observed, resulting in an ischemic stroke probably secondary to septic embolus. The importance of vegetation shape in the management of patients with IE was classically related to the increased risk of embolization associated with pedunculated, irregular, and multilobed masses. We hypothesize that the unusual spiral-like vegetation shape in our patient may have favored IE persistence by two mechanisms, namely, a decrease of the exposed vegetation surface with creation of an internal core where the penetration of antimicrobial agents was obstacled and the creation of blood turbulence within the vegetation preventing a prolonged contact with circulating antibiotics. These considerations suggest that vegetation shape might be considered of importance in patients with IE not only because of its classical association with embolization risk, but also because of its potential effect on the efficacy of antibiotic therapy.

  2. Grievances in cases using antibiotics due to orodental problems and assessment of the need for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, S; Ergül, N

    2000-04-01

    To assess the complaints of patients who were prescribed antibiotics following orodental problems and the need for antibiotics prescribed for this purpose. Examinations were carried out in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Ege University, Turkey. A total of 203 patients (129 females and 74 males) between 8-70 years of age (mean age 37.7 +/- 13.9). Examination and report. Frequency of unnecessary antibiotic use. Antibiotic therapy was not necessary for 151 (74.4 per cent) cases. Antibiotics were unnecessarily prescribed in 45 cases of acute irreversible pulpitis, 10 chronic apical abscess, 6 acute apical paradontitis, 7 gingivitis, 10 periodontitis, 4 epulis, 2 TMJ (temporomandibular junction) dysfunction, 2 sharp ridge of alveolar bone, 1 burning mouth syndrome and 1 recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In 108 (53.2 per cent) of the cases, the prescribed antibiotics were found to be penicillins, 102 of which were broad-spectrum. It was also determined that only 6 (7.7 per cent) of the 78 cases diagnosed as acute apical abscess were given drainage as local therapy. Principles for treating dental infections suggest that an antibiotic should only be used to supplement and not substitute for conventional surgical methods. Therefore, in cases with acute apical abscess, mechanical treatment (drainage) should be the first step. Inappropriate antibiotic use is quite widespread in dentistry. Dentists should avoid inappropriate use of antibiotics. To prevent inappropriate administration, necessary precautions need to be taken against dispensing antibiotics without prescription.

  3. Early antibiotic administration but not antibody therapy directed against IL-6 improves survival in septic mice predicted to die on basis of high IL-6 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Javadi, Pardis; Dipasco, Peter J; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2005-10-01

    Elevated interleukin (IL)-6 levels correlate with increased mortality following sepsis. IL-6 levels >14,000 pg/ml drawn 6 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) are associated with 100% mortality in ND4 mice, even if antibiotic therapy is initiated 12 h after septic insult. Our first aim was to see whether earlier institution of antibiotic therapy could improve overall survival in septic mice and rescue the subset of animals predicted to die on the basis of high IL-6 levels. Mice (n = 184) were subjected to CLP, had IL-6 levels drawn 6 h later, and then were randomized to receive imipenem, a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, beginning 6 or 12 h postoperatively. Overall 1-wk survival improved from 25.5 to 35.9% with earlier administration of antibiotics (P 14,000 pg/ml, 25% survived if imipenem was started at 6 h, whereas none survived if antibiotics were started later (P 14,000 pg/ml. These results demonstrate that earlier systemic therapy can improve outcome in a subset of mice predicted to die in sepsis, but we are unable to demonstrate any benefit in similar animals using targeted therapy directed at IL-6.

  4. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Emma Cb; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine Mb; Bergman, Hanna; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries, and survivors risk deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies may attract extra-vascular fluid and reduce cerebral oedema, and thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2013. Objectives To evaluate the effects of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults on mortality, deafness and neurological disability. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to 17 February 2017), Embase (1974 to 17 February 2017), CINAHL (1981 to 17 February 2017), LILACS (1982 to 17 February 2017) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.com, WHO ICTRP) (21 February 2017). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field (up to 12 December 2015). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the evidence. Main results We included five trials with 1451 participants. Four trials evaluated glycerol against placebo, and one evaluated glycerol against 50% dextrose; in addition three trials evaluated dexamethasone and one trial evaluated acetaminophen (paracetamol) in a factorial design. Stratified analysis shows no effect modification with steroids; we present aggregate effect estimates. Compared to placebo, glycerol probably has little or no effect on death in people with bacterial meningitis (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.30; 5 studies, 1272

  5. Early antibiotic administration but not antibody therapy directed against IL-6 improves survival in septic mice predicted to die based upon high IL-6 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Javadi, Pardis; DiPasco, Peter J; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2005-01-01

    Elevated interleukin (IL)-6 levels correlate with increased mortality following sepsis. IL-6 levels >14,000 pg/ml drawn 6 hours following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) are associated with 100% mortality in ND4 mice, even if antibiotic therapy is initiated 12 hours after the septic insult. The first aim of this study was to see if earlier institution of antibiotic therapy could improve overall survival in septic mice and rescue the subset of animals predicted to die based upon high IL-6 levels. Mice (n=184) were subjected to CLP, had IL-6 levels drawn six hours later and then were randomized to receive imipenem, a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, beginning six or twelve hours post-operatively. Overall one-week survival improved from 25.5% to 35.9% with earlier administration of antibiotics (p14,000 pg/ml, 25% survived if imipenem was started at 6 hours, while none survived if antibiotics were started later (p14,000 pg/ml. These results demonstrate that earlier systemic therapy can improve outcome in a subset of mice predicted to die in sepsis, but we are unable to demonstrate any benefit in similar animals using targeted therapy directed at IL-6. PMID:15947070

  6. Priorities for antibiotic resistance surveillance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluit, A. C.; van der Bruggen, J. T.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem. Surveillance studies are needed to monitor resistance development, to guide local empirical therapy, and to implement timely and adequate countermeasures. To achieve this, surveillance studies must have standardised methodologies, be longitud......Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem. Surveillance studies are needed to monitor resistance development, to guide local empirical therapy, and to implement timely and adequate countermeasures. To achieve this, surveillance studies must have standardised methodologies...... to the various reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as hospitalised patients, nursing homes, the community, animals and food. Two studies that could serve as examples of tailored programmes are the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS), which collects resistance data during...... of antibiotic resistance....

  7. [A multicenter randomized controlled study of Saccharomyces boulardii in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in infants and young children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, C M; Yu, H; Liu, G; Xu, H M; Mao, Z Q; Xu, Y; Jin, Y; Luo, R P; Wang, W J; Fang, F

    2017-05-04

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Saccharomyces boulardii in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) in infants and young children. Method: From November 2012 to September 2013, ten research units of large teaching hospitals or children's hospitals participated in this multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial. Hospitalized young children aged between 1 month and 3 years (nongastrointestinal infection and antibiotic therapy required)were involved in our study. The children were randomly divided into control group and prevention group by means of block random allocation method. The control group received antibiotic therapy and other conventional treatment. The prevention group was given additional Saccharomyces boulardii (250 mg/d) orally. Diarrhea rates of two groups were compared both during the usage of antibiotics and within 14 days after the antibiotics withdrawal. The adverse reactions of Saccharomyces boulardii were observed all through this study. The results were analyzed by χ(2) test or Kruskal-Wallis test or t test. Result: Totally 408 cases (213 cases in prevention group and 195 cases in control group) were enrolled. The age ranged from 1 month to 3 years, with an average age of 1.14 years. The basic diseases were parenteral infections: 368 cases with different kinds of respiratory tract infections or pneumonia, 10 cases of bacterial meningitis, 9 cases with septicemia or sepsis, 6 cases with pertussis or pertussis like syndrome, 5 cases with urinary infection, 5 cases with skin or subcutaneous tissue infections, 3 cases of Kawasaki disease, one with scarlet fever and one with congenital syphilis. During the administration of antibiotics, the incidence of AAD in prevention group was 10.3% (22 cases), which was significantly lower than that of control group (57 cases, 29.2%, χ(2)=23.296, P 1 year old); the risk of diarrhea was reduced by 86% (χ(2)=9.57, P 0.05). No adverse effects related with Saccharomyces

  8. Safety, therapeutic effectiveness, and cost of parenteral iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2009-07-01

    Patients have to discontinue the use of oral iron therapy due to the development of side effects and lack of long-term adherence to medication for iron deficiency anemia. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness, safety, and cost of intravenous iron sucrose therapy. The computerized database and medical records of 453 patients diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia who received intravenous iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. The improvement of hematologic parameters and cost of therapy were evaluated 4 weeks after therapy. 453 patients (443 females, 10 males; age: 44.2 +/- 12.3 years) received iron sucrose therapy. Mean hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean corpuscular volume values were 8.2 +/- 1.4 g/dL, 26.9 +/- 3.8%, and 66.1 +/- 7.8 fL, respectively, before therapy and 11.5 +/- 1.0 g/dL, 35.8 +/- 2.5%, 76.5 +/- 6.1 fL, respectively, after therapy (P 50%). The mean cost of therapy was 143.07 +/- 29.13 US dollars. The therapy was well tolerated. Although the cost of intravenous iron sucrose therapy may seem high, a lack of adherence to therapy and side effects including gastrointestinal irritation during oral iron therapy were not experienced during intravenous therapy.

  9. Parenteral Fish-Oil Lipid Emulsions in the Prevention of Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Bashir, Rani A; Rabi, Yacov; Amin, Harish; Spence, Jill-Marie; Robertson, Helen Lee; Lodha, Abhay

    2017-06-01

    Objective  Omega-3 fatty acids are vital for brain and retinal maturation. It is not clear if early use of ω-3 fatty acids in the form of fish-oil lipid emulsions (FLEs) prevents retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm infants. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate whether early administration of parenteral FLEs reduces ROP requiring laser therapy or severe ROP ≥stage 3 in preterm infants. Methods  A literature search was performed to identify studies comparing parenteral FLEs with soybean-based lipid emulsions (SLEs) in preventing ROP. The main outcome was incidence of severe ROP or ROP requiring laser therapy. Results  Studies met the inclusion criteria (four RCTs and two observational studies). The pooled relative risk of ROP requiring laser therapy or severe ROP ≥ stage 3 in FLEs group was 0.47 [95% CI: 0.24-0.90] and 0.40 [95% CI: 0.22-0.76] in RCTs and observational studies, respectively. FLEs also reduced cholestasis; however, other secondary outcomes of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), sepsis, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and mortality were similar. Conclusion  The use of FLEs may reduce the incidence of severe ROP or need for laser therapy in preterm infants. A large multicenter RCT is required to confirm this. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Clinical significance of changes of serum TBA, CG, HA levels in neonate with parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Weiliang; Zhou Jiongying; Zhang Xiaoyi; Lv Weihua; Ma Yunbao; He Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum levels of TBA, CG, HA in neonate with parenteral nutrition. Methods: Serum total bile acid (TBA, with biochemistry) and CG, HA (with RIA) contents were measured in 52 neonates (full-term 32, preterm 20) with parenteral nutrition and 28 neonates (full-term 16, preterm 12) without parenteral nutrition (as controls). Results: Before parenteral nutrition,the serum TBA, CG and HA levels in full-term neonates were not significantly different from those in the controls (P>0.05). After parenteral nutrition,serum levels were significantly higher than those before parenteral nutrition (P<0.01). The levels in pre-term neonates were significantly higher after parenteral nutrition than those in full-term neonates (P<0.05). Conclusion: Long term parenteral nutrition might be harmful to hepatic and gall bladder function in neonates especially in premature ones. (authors)

  11. Transfer of antibiotic resistant bacteria from animals to man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    1999-01-01

    for animals either for therapy or for growth promotion. Antibiotic resistance in zoonotic bacteria constitute a public health hazard, primarily through the increased risk of treatment failures. This paper describes the zoonotic bacteria, salmonella, campylobacter, yersinia and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC......Antibiotic resistance develops in zoonotic bacteria in response to antibiotics used in food animals. A close association exists between the amounts of antibiotics used and the levels of resistance observed. The classes of antibiotics routinely used for treatment of human infections are also used......). Infections with these agents do not generally require antibiotic therapy, but in some cases antibiotics are essential to obtain a successful cure. The levels and types of resistance observed in zoonotic bacteria in some countries, especially the increasing levels of fluoroquinolone resistance in salmonella...

  12. Effects on combination of antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria and corresponding antibiotics of survival of irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, V.M.; Pinegin, B.V.; Ivanova, N.P.; Maltsev, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Elimination of intestinal dysbacteriosis in irradiated animals by combining antibiotics and peparations of bifidobacteria resistant to these antibiotics prolonging the life of these animals was investigated. Broad spectrum antibiotics are used to treat intestinal dysbacteriosis. Bifidobacterial preparations are used to restore the microbial cenosis and their administration is started after antibiotics are discontinued. There are some flaws to deferred administration of bifidobacteria, since the process of colonization of the intestine with commercial bifidobacterial preparations is rather lengthy, and there is slow elevation of bifidobacterium level in the intestinal tract, whereas exogenous recontamination of the intestine by conditionally pathogenic bacteria is possible after antibiotic therapy is discontinued. Use of antibiotics alone could be the cause of intestinal dysbacteriosis

  13. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer -- Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Per Olov; Ala-Opas, Martti; Brekkan, Einar

    2002-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, interest in parenteral estrogen therapy for prostate cancer was renewed when it was found that it influenced liver metabolism only marginally and had very few cardiovascular side-effects. In this study high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) was compared to combined...

  14. Study of the use of probiotic foods as a complement of the conventional antibiotic-therapy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and it's use as a prophylactic therapy in the reinfection by this pathogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubillaga, M.; Goldman, C.; Caro, R.; Boccio, J.; Weill, R.; Postaire, E.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very frequent in children in developing countries. Studies on eradication regimens and its complications are not well documented. The European Helicobacter pylori Study Group strongly recommends that treatment should be with proton pump inhibitor based triple therapy, consisting of a proton pump inhibitor and two of the following: clarithromycin, a nitroimidazole (metronidazole or tinidazole) and amoxycillin in various combinations. Recent advances in probiotic research show much promise in a new product development of functional foods based on milk. Among the reported beneficial effects of consuming certain strains of cultures or their metabolites, or both are control of ulcers related to Helicobacter pylori. Kefir seems to be a potential probiotic to control Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study 2 groups of 10 children each which demonstrate to be Helicobacter pylori positive will be treated as follows: Group 1: antibiotic treatment + placebo (fluid milk) and Group 2: antibiotic treatment + kefir. The Triple Therapy consists in the combination of two antibiotics (amoxycillin and clarithromycin) with a proton pump inhibitor (Lansoprazole). In all the cases, the post-treatment control will be performed by the 13 C UBT 2 months after the end of the treatment. Once the infection is eradicated, the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with milk (placebo) as well as the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with the probiotic under study will continue with the administration of the milk and/or probiotic food during one year. During this period, the children will be submitted to post-treatment controls performed by the 13 C UBT every three months. We expect to find that the group that received the triple therapy in combination with the probiotic food (kefir) would have less recidiva rates for the Helicobacter pylori infection than the group that received the triple therapy with the placebo (fluid milk). (author)

  15. Study of the use of probiotic foods as a complement of the conventional antibiotic-therapy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and it's use as a prophylactic therapy in the reinfection by this pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubillaga, M; Goldman, C; Caro, R; Boccio, J [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Weill, R [Departamento de Industrias Agrarias, Facultad de Agronomia, Universidad de Moron, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Postaire, E [Research International Center Daniel Carasso (France)

    2000-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very frequent in children in developing countries. Studies on eradication regimens and its complications are not well documented. The European Helicobacter pylori Study Group strongly recommends that treatment should be with proton pump inhibitor based triple therapy, consisting of a proton pump inhibitor and two of the following: clarithromycin, a nitroimidazole (metronidazole or tinidazole) and amoxycillin in various combinations. Recent advances in probiotic research show much promise in a new product development of functional foods based on milk. Among the reported beneficial effects of consuming certain strains of cultures or their metabolites, or both are control of ulcers related to Helicobacter pylori. Kefir seems to be a potential probiotic to control Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study 2 groups of 10 children each which demonstrate to be Helicobacter pylori positive will be treated as follows: Group 1: antibiotic treatment + placebo (fluid milk) and Group 2: antibiotic treatment + kefir. The Triple Therapy consists in the combination of two antibiotics (amoxycillin and clarithromycin) with a proton pump inhibitor (Lansoprazole). In all the cases, the post-treatment control will be performed by the {sup 13}C UBT 2 months after the end of the treatment. Once the infection is eradicated, the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with milk (placebo) as well as the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with the probiotic under study will continue with the administration of the milk and/or probiotic food during one year. During this period, the children will be submitted to post-treatment controls performed by the {sup 13}C UBT every three months. We expect to find that the group that received the triple therapy in combination with the probiotic food (kefir) would have less recidiva rates for the Helicobacter pylori infection than the group that received the triple therapy with the placebo (fluid milk). (author)

  16. Cyclic antibiotic therapy for diverticular disease: a critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Maconi, Giovanni; Manes, Gianpiero; Tammaro, Gianfranco; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno; Ficano, Leonardo; Buri, Luigi; Gatto, Giovanni; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore M; Ierardi, Enzo; Pace, Fabio; Morini, Sergio

    2010-09-01

    Different symptoms have been attributed to uncomplicated diverticular disease (DD). Poor absorbable antibiotics are largely used for uncomplicated DD, mainly for symptom treatment and prevention of diverticulitis onset. Controlled trials on cyclic administration of rifaximin in DD patients were evaluated. Four controlled, including 1 double-blind and 3 open-label, randomized studies were available. Following a long-term cyclic therapy, a significant difference emerged in the global symptoms score (range: 0-18) between rifaximin plus fibers (from 6-6.5 to 1-2) and fibers alone (from 6.7 to 2-3.8), although the actual clinically relevance of such a very small difference remains to be ascertained. Moreover, a similar global symptom score reduction (from 6 to 2.4) can be achieved by simply recommending an inexpensive high-fiber diet. Current data suggest that cyclic rifaximin plus fibers significantly reduce the incidence of the first episode of acute diverticulitis as compared to fibers alone (1.03% vs 2.75%), but a cost-efficacy analysis is needed before this treatment can be routinely recommended. The available studies have been hampered by some limitations, and definite conclusions could not be drawn. The cost of a long-life, cyclic rifaximin therapy administered to all symptomatic DD patients would appear prohibitive.

  17. Disseminated candidemia refractory to caspofungin therapy in an infant with extremely low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ju Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic fungal infections have high morbidity and mortality rates in neonates, especially neonates with an extremely low birth weight (ELBW. Here, we describe a 21-day-old ELBW female infant with an amphotericin B-unresponsive congenital Candida albicans infection that was treated with caspofungin. Blood sterilization was performed during the first episode, but a second episode of candidemia occurred after the discontinuation of caspofungin. Blood sterilization was again performed during the second round of caspofungin treatment, but fungal endocarditis and renal fungal balls still developed during the second episode. Caspofungin can be considered for invasive candidiasis in premature infants, especially in life-threatening situations. As for the focal lesions, more aggressive treatments other than just parenteral antibiotics should be considered. The literature regarding caspofungin therapy for neonatal candidiasis is also reviewed.

  18. Antibiotic treatment delay and outcome in acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Korshin, André; Meyer, Christian N

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify to what degree in-hospital delay of antibiotic therapy correlated to outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis. METHODS: All cases of culture-positive cerebrospinal fluids in east Denmark from 2002 to 2004 were included. Medical records were collected retrospectiv......OBJECTIVES: To identify to what degree in-hospital delay of antibiotic therapy correlated to outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis. METHODS: All cases of culture-positive cerebrospinal fluids in east Denmark from 2002 to 2004 were included. Medical records were collected......=1.30/h, CI: 1.08-1.57). The median delay to the first dose of adequate antibiotics was 1h and 39min (1h and 14min in children vs. 2h in adults, pmeningitis. CONCLUSION: The delay in antibiotic therapy correlated...

  19. Features of liver tissue remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanen, Annika; Lohi, Jouko; Sorsa, Timo; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal failure is associated frequently with liver injury, which persists after weaning off parenteral nutrition. We compared features of liver remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Liver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 intestinal failure patients at a median age of 9.7 years (interquartile range: 4.6-18) and from age-matched control patients. Seven patients had been receiving parenteral nutrition for 53 months (22-160), and 18 patients had been weaned off parenteral nutrition 6.3 years (2.4-17) earlier, after having received parenteral nutrition for 10 months (3.3-34). Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was measured. Significant increases in immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1 were observed predominantly in portal areas and were similar to increases seen in patients currently receiving parenteral nutrition and in patients weaned off parenteral nutrition. Gene and protein expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen were interrelated. Gene expression of ACTA2, encoding alpha-smooth muscle actin, was increased only in patients who were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Comparable upregulation of interleukin-1 (α and ß), epidermal growth factor, integrin-ß6, and MMP9 gene expression was observed in both patient groups, irrespective of whether they were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Liver expression and serum levels of TIMP1 and MMP7 were increased only in the patients on parenteral nutrition currently but were not increased after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Intestinal failure is characterized by abnormal activation of hepatic myofibroblast and accumulation of collagen both during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Persistent transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines after weaning off

  20. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  1. Sequential (as Opposed to Simultaneous) Antibiotic Therapy Improves Helicobacter pylori Eradication in the Pediatric Population: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine S M; Ward, Amanda; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common infection associated with many gastrointestinal diseases. Triple or quadruple therapy is the current recommendation for H pylori eradication in children but is associated with success rates as low as 50%. Recent studies have demonstrated that a 10-day sequential therapy regimen, rather than simultaneous antibiotic administration, achieved eradication rates of nearly 95%. This meta-analysis found that sequential therapy increased eradication rates by 14.2% (relative risk [RR] = 1.142; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.082-1.207; P sequential therapy significantly improved H pylori eradication rates compared to the 7-day standard therapy (RR = 1.182; 95% CI = 1.102-1.269; p sequential therapy is associated with increased H pylori eradication rates in children compared to standard therapy of equal or shorter duration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Experimental Simulation of the Effects of an Initial Antibiotic Treatment on a Subsequent Treatment after Initial Therapy Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yanfang; Händel, Nadine; de Groot, Marnix H. P.; Brul, Stanley; Schultsz, Constance; ter Kuile, Benno H.

    2014-01-01

    Therapy failure of empirical antibiotic treatments prescribed by primary care physicians occurs commonly. The effect of such a treatment on the susceptibility to second line antimicrobial drugs is unknown. Resistance to amoxicillin was rapidly induced or selected in E. coli at concentrations

  3. Circulating cytokines and procalcitonin in acute Q fever granulomatous hepatitis with poor response to antibiotic and short-course steroid therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Lin-Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Q fever is a zoonosis distributed worldwide that is caused by Coxiella burnetii infection and the defervescence usually occurs within few days of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Whether the changes of cytokine levels are associated with acute Q fever with persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy had not been investigated before. Case Presentation We report a rare case of acute Q fever granulomatous hepatitis remained pyrexia despite several antibiotic therapy and 6-day course of oral prednisolone. During the 18-month follow-up, the investigation of the serum cytokines profile and procalcitonin (PCT revealed that initially elevated levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, and PCT decreased gradually, but the IL-6 remained in low titer. No evidence of chronic Q fever was identified by examinations of serum antibodies against C. burnetii and echocardiography. Conclusions The changes of cytokine levels may be associated with acute Q fever with poor response to treatment and PCT may be an indicator for monitoring the response to treatment.

  4. Safety of parenteral nutrition in newborns: Results from a nationwide prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Berleur, Marie-Pierre; Brasseur, Yvette; Calvez, Sophie

    2018-04-01

    Limited or delayed availability of parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions, as well as difficulties in ordering are often identified as reasons for non-compliance with international guidelines in newborns. This study aims at assessing the modality of use and safety of premixed standardized PN solutions in a nationwide prospective cohort of newborns treated in clinical practice. Two premixed fixed formulations with respective osmolarity of 715 and 790 mOsm/L specifically designed for neonates were made available throughout the country for clinical use from birth onwards. Descriptive data and modality of use were prospectively collected in a case report form, whereas all related and unrelated adverse events were recorded on a separate adverse event form. A total of 14,167 infants were prospectively included and 16,640 parenteral nutrition periods were analyzed. Mean age was 33 weeks of gestation, and mean weight was 2086 g. The majority of infants (81%) started the parenteral nutrition the first day of life or the day after. The route of parenteral nutrition delivery was peripheral in 47% of the parenteral nutrition periods. During the whole study, a total of 72 adverse events occurring in 68 infants were reported. Of these adverse events, 59 (0.37% of the nutrition periods), among which 19 serious adverse events, were reported as related to the parenteral nutrition solutions. The events related to parenteral nutrition solutions were general disorders and administration site conditions (n = 42 including 9 cases of cutaneous necrosis), and nutrition and metabolism disorders (n = 17). There was no case of thrombophlebitis. Six of the 19 serious events related to the parenteral nutrition solutions (32%) were due to the misuse of the infusion bag. These data support the concept that ready-to-use parenteral nutrition formulations can safely provide parenteral nutrition from birth onwards. They further support that parenteral solutions with an osmolarity up to 800

  5. Pulmonary melioidosis presenting with pleural effusion: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ian Soo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a serious infection, which can involve multiple systems. We report a case of pulmonary melioidosis with the initial presentation mimicking a partially treated pneumonia complicated by right-sided pleural effusion. The patient is a 49-year old man who did not respond to parenteral ceftriaxone and tazobactam/piperacillin therapy. However, upon culture and sensitivity results from blood and pleural samples isolated Burkholderia pseudomallei; antimicrobial therapy was de-escalated to parenteral ceftazidime. Within 72 h duration, his fever subsided and other respiratory symptoms improved tremendously. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of B. pseudomallei in pulmonary infection in order for prompt institution of appropriate antibiotics treatment; thus reducing morbidity and mortality.

  6. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L.

    2016-01-01

    with the resistance evolved after single-drug exposure. Combination therapy selected for mutants that displayed broad-spectrum resistance, and a major resistance mechanism was mutational inactivation of the repressor gene mexR that regulates the multidrug efflux operon mexAB–oprM. Deregulation of this operon led...... to a broad-spectrum resistance phenotype that decreased susceptibility to the combination of drugs applied during selection as well as to unrelated antibiotic classes. Mutants isolated after single-drug exposure displayed narrow-spectrum resistance and carried mutations in the MexCD–OprJ efflux pump...... regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use...

  7. IODINE CONTENT OF ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Devina L; Young, Lorraine S; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2017-07-01

    Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis, and iodine deficiency may result in thyroid disorders including goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long-term enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The recommended daily allowance for iodine intake is 150 μg for nonpregnant adults. However, there is no current consensus among scientific societies regarding the quantity of iodine to be added in adult EN and PN formulations. The objective of this study was to determine the iodine content of U.S. adult enteral and parenteral nutrition solutions. This study also aimed to determine whether adult patients in the United States who are receiving long-term artificial nutrition may be at risk for iodine deficiency. Ten enteral nutrition solutions and 4 parenteral nutrition solutions were evaluated. The iodine contents of these solutions were measured spectrophotometrically and compared to the labeled contents. Measured and labeled EN iodine contents were similar (range 131-176 μg/L and 106-160 μg/L, respectively). In contrast, PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled amounts of iodine, averaging 27 μg/L. Typical fluid requirements are 30 to 40 mL/kg/day for adults receiving either total EN (TEN) or total PN (TPN). Adults on long-term TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. However, patients on long-term TPN would require on average 5.6 L PN/day to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. Thus, U.S. patients requiring long-term TPN may be at risk for iodine deficiency. EN = enteral nutrition; PN = parenteral nutrition; TEN = total enteral nutrition; TPN = total parenteral nutrition; UIC = urinary iodine concentration.

  8. Cycling empirical antibiotic therapy in hospitals: meta-analysis and models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Abel zur Wiesch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The rise of resistance together with the shortage of new broad-spectrum antibiotics underlines the urgency of optimizing the use of available drugs to minimize disease burden. Theoretical studies suggest that coordinating empirical usage of antibiotics in a hospital ward can contain the spread of resistance. However, theoretical and clinical studies came to different conclusions regarding the usefulness of rotating first-line therapy (cycling. Here, we performed a quantitative pathogen-specific meta-analysis of clinical studies comparing cycling to standard practice. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar and identified 46 clinical studies addressing the effect of cycling on nosocomial infections, of which 11 met our selection criteria. We employed a method for multivariate meta-analysis using incidence rates as endpoints and find that cycling reduced the incidence rate/1000 patient days of both total infections by 4.95 [9.43-0.48] and resistant infections by 7.2 [14.00-0.44]. This positive effect was observed in most pathogens despite a large variance between individual species. Our findings remain robust in uni- and multivariate metaregressions. We used theoretical models that reflect various infections and hospital settings to compare cycling to random assignment to different drugs (mixing. We make the realistic assumption that therapy is changed when first line treatment is ineffective, which we call "adjustable cycling/mixing". In concordance with earlier theoretical studies, we find that in strict regimens, cycling is detrimental. However, in adjustable regimens single resistance is suppressed and cycling is successful in most settings. Both a meta-regression and our theoretical model indicate that "adjustable cycling" is especially useful to suppress emergence of multiple resistance. While our model predicts that cycling periods of one month perform well, we expect that too long cycling periods are detrimental. Our results suggest that

  9. Reconciling divergent results of the latest parenteral nutrition studies in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Pierre; Pichard, Claude

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies on the optimal modalities to feed patients during the ICU stay show divergent results. The level and the timing of energy provision is a critical issue, associated with the clinical outcome. These results questioned the clinical relevance of the recent guidelines issued by American, Canadian and European academic societies. Four recent prospective randomized studies enrolled critically ill patients who received various nutritional regimens and tested the effect of nutritional support on outcome. The Tight Calorie balance Control Study (TICACOS) targeted on calorie administration according to measured energy expenditure and found increased ICU morbidity but improved hospital mortality. The large EpaNIC study compared 'early' with 'late' (parenteral nutrition) nutrition, mostly in patients after cardiac surgery, and found an increased morbidity associated with early parenteral nutrition. The supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) study randomized the patients after 3 days and targeted the calories administered by parenteral nutrition as a complement to unsuccessful enteral nutrition using indirect calorimetry. The SPN resulted in less nosocomial infections and shorter duration of mechanical ventilation. Finally, a recent Australian study enrolled patients unable to be early fed enterally to receive, or not, parenteral nutrition targeted at 1500 kcal. No complications were noted in the parenteral nutrition group. Lessons from all these studies are summarized and should help in designing better studies and guidelines. The critical analysis of recent prospective studies comparing various levels of calorie administration, enteral versus parenteral nutrition and enteral versus SPN confirms the recommendations to avoid underfeeding and overfeeding. Parenteral nutrition, required if enteral feeding is failing, and if adjusted up to a measured optimal level, may improve outcome. More studies on the optimal level of energy and protein administration to

  10. In Vitro Susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains to Mupirocin, an Antibiotic Reformulated for Parenteral Administration in Nanoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cern, Ahuva; Connolly, Kristie L; Jerse, Ann E; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2018-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an urgent antibiotic-resistant threat. This study determined the MICs of mupirocin to be 0.0039 to 0.0625 μg/ml for 94 N. gonorrhoeae strains. Cross-resistance with other antibiotics was not detected. Mupirocin, which is currently limited to topical administration, demonstrated activity by injection when delivered in nanoliposomes. The nanoliposomal formulation of mupirocin is a potential treatment for drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae . Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Principles of Antibiotic Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael T; Niederman, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) encompasses a broad spectrum of disease severity and may require outpatient, inpatient, or intensive care management. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely offending pathogens and the severity of disease. This review summarizes key principles in starting treatment and provides recommended empiric therapy regimens for each site of care. In addition, we discuss the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory role macrolides play in CAP, as well as specific information for managing individual CAP pathogens such as community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae . We also examine several novel antibiotics being developed for CAP and review the evidence guiding duration of therapy and current best practices for the transition of hospitalized patients from intravenous antibiotics to oral therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Antibiotic misuse in the community--a contributor to resistance?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, B

    2012-02-03

    The problem of antibiotic resistance is associated with the indiscriminate usage of antibiotics. Efforts have been directed at encouraging the rational use of these drugs to reduce the volume of antibiotic consumption and decrease resistance rates. There is evidence to suggest that the misuse of antibiotics by patients may also contribute to the problem. We describe a survey of a random selection of patients attending a General Practitioners\\' surgery over a six week period in an effort to estimate the level of non-compliance to antibiotic therapy in the community. The results suggest that there may be a significant level of antibiotic misuse prevalent in the local community. We discuss these results and present evidence in the literature suggesting how antibiotic misuse may affect resistance in the community. The factors affecting patient compliance to therapy are outlined along with suggested measures to improve compliance among patients.

  13. Changes in Bacterial Resistance Patterns of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Rationale for Empirical Antibiotic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Gökçe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The causative agent spectrum and resistance patterns of urinary tract infections in children are affected by many factors. Aims: To demonstrate antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections and changing ratio in antibiotic resistance by years. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: We analysed antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated Gram (- bacteria during the years 2011-2014 (study period 2 in children with urinary tract infections. We compared these findings with data collected in the same centre in 2001-2003 (study period 1. Results: Four hundred and sixty-five uncomplicated community-acquired Gram (- urinary tract infections were analysed from 2001-2003 and 400 from 2011-2014. Sixty-one percent of patients were female (1.5 girls : 1 boy. The mean age of children included in the study was 3 years and 9 months. Escherichia coli was the predominant bacteria isolated during both periods of the study (60% in study period 1 and 73% in study period 2. Bacteria other than E. coli demonstrated a higher level of resistance to all of the antimicrobials except trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than E. coli bacteria during the years 2011-2014. In our study, we found increasing resistance trends of urinary pathogens for cefixime (from 1% to 15%, p0.05. Conclusion: In childhood urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance should be evaluated periodically and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be decided according to antibiotic sensitivity results

  14. Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization Pattern in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital, Zabol-IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Vatanpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are the most available medicines to get rid of any general severe pain and avoiding of any deleterious sequential that can worsen patient outcomes. Rational prescription of opioid analgesics with respect to the possibility of abuse is a big concern in the medical care costs. Zabol, where is located in eastern part of Iran and has common border with Afghanistanhas the most opioid traffic in the region. In this study the rational prescription of parenteral opioid in Amir-al-Momenin general hospital was investigated. A retrospective drug utilization review was performed on 509 in-patients who received parenteral opioids including Morphine, Pethidin, Pentazocin, Fentanyl, Alfentanil, Sufentanil and Methadone from March 21sttoSeptember 23rd, 2011. Multivariate conditional regression modeling was used to determine independent predictors for daily parenteral opioid consumption. Total daily parenteral opioid consumption was 38.63 DDDs/100bed-days for Morphine, Pethidine and Pentazocin and 84564.78 PFEQs/100bed-days for Fentanyl, Alfentanil and Sufentanil and 766 mg for Methadone. Pethidine was the most frequently prescribed parenteral opioid. Most patients who were prescribed by the intramuscular routes, ordered PRN. Daily parenteral opioid consumption was the highest in the emergency ward whereas it was considered as the lowest in the intensive care unit[ICU]. According to our findings, total daily parenteral opioid consumption was almost high in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital. Unlike to some relevant factors that can effect on the consumption of analgesic opioids like gender, age, drug-drug interaction and etc, we found no rational prescription and consumption in the mentioned hospital.

  15. Nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus polymerase chain reaction: a potential use in guiding antibiotic therapy for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Wright, Michael E; Sheperd, Lyndsay A; Musher, Daniel M; Dang, Bich N

    2015-01-01

    The role at admission of nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in guiding antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infection is unknown. To determine whether nasal MRSA PCR at admission can predict the absence of MRSA in lower respiratory tract secretions. We performed a retrospective study of adult patients admitted to a large urban hospital. Patients had a nasal MRSA PCR test and a lower respiratory tract culture obtained within 48 hours of admission and the culture yielded S aureus. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Our results showed high sensitivity (93.3%) and negative predictive value (95.2%) of nasal PCR for MRSA in the lower respiratory tract. With its high sensitivity and negative predictive value, a nasal MRSA PCR test performed within 48 hours of hospital admission could help guide the discontinuation of MRSA-directed empiric antibiotic therapy in patients who are unlikely to be infected with this organism. A prospective study is needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Diazepam parenteral no tratamento de epilepsias graves Treatment of severe epilepsies with parenteral diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Speciali

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available As modificações dos quadros clínico e EEG foram estudadas em 9 pacientes com manifestações epilépticas rebeldes às medicações anticonvulsivantes habituais, quando submetidos à administração parenteral diária de diazepam (Valium e após sua interrupção. Houve diminuição do número e da duração das crises, superior a 75%, em três pacientes. Esses resultados são satisfatórios, considerando a gravidade dos quadros epilépticos e foram obtidos em pacientes com predomínio de alterações EEG lentas antes de iniciar o esquema terapêutico. Não se verificaram efeitos colaterais relevantes na época da administração parenteral. Em dois pacientes foi observado o aparecimento de crises tônicas coincidindo com o aumento de elementos EEG paroxísticos rápidos, localizados ou difusos.Changes of the clinical pictures and electroencephalographic patterns were studied in 9 patients suffering from epileptic seizures non responsive to common anticonvulsivants, when submitted to daily parenteral administration of diazepam (Valium and after its interruption. There was decrease of the number and duration of seizures, over to 75%, in 3 patients. These results can be considered as satisfatory, considering the intensity of the seizures. The best results were obtained in those patients which showed predominance of slow waves in the EEGs prior to the begin of the treatment. No side effects were observed during the treatment. Two patients developed tonic seizures coincident with the increasing of fast paroxistic EEG patterns, of localized or diffuse type.

  17. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  18. Antibiotic stewardship and empirical antibiotic treatment: How can they get along?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Valentina; Columpsi, Paola; Sacchi, Paolo; Lucà, Maria Grazia; Fagiuoli, Stefano; Bruno, Raffaele

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the recent knowledge on antibiotic stewardship and empiric antibiotic treatment in cirrhotic patients. The application of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) rules appears to be the most appropriate strategy to globally manage cirrhotic patients with infectious complications: indeed they represent a unique way to provide both early diagnosis and appropriate therapy in order to avoid not only antibiotic over-prescription but, more importantly, selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Moreover, cirrhotic patients must be considered "frail" and susceptible to healthcare associated infections: applying AMS policies would assure a cost reduction and thus contribute to the improvement of public health strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Plasma trace metals during total parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, N W; Layden, T J; Rosenberg, I H; Vo-Khactu, K; Sandstead, H H

    1976-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of the trace metals zinc and copper were studied prospectively in 13 patients with gastrointestinal diseases treated with parenteral alimentation (TPA) for periods of from 8 days to 7 1/2 weeks. Plasma copper levels fell rapidly and consistently in all patients, with an overall rate of - 11 mug per 100 ml per week. Zinc concentrations declined in 10 of 13 patients at a more gradual rate. Analysis of the standard parenteral alimentation fluids revealed zinc content equivalent to 50% of the daily requirement and a negligible content of copper. From combined analysis of plasma zinc, hair zinc, and taste acuity, there is evidence that increased utilization or redistribution within the body may effect plasma concentrations in some patients. Neither an increase in urinary excretion nor a primary decrease in plasma binding proteins appeared to be a major factor in lowering plasma trace metal concentrations. These findings indicate that a marked decrease in plasma copper is regular and a decline in plasma zinc is common during TPA using fluids unsupplemented with trace metals. Supplementation of parenteral alimentation fluids with the trace metals zinc and copper is recommended.

  20. ROLE OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL OCCLUSION AND PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aría Guerra, Eva; Cortés-Salgado, Alfonso; Mateo-Lobo, Raquel; Nattero, Lía; Riveiro, Javier; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Valbuena, Beatriz; Carabaña, Fátima; Carrero, Carmen; Grande, Enrique; Carrato, Alfredo; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    the precise role of parenteral nutrition in the management of oncologic patients with intestinal occlusion is not well defined yet. We aimed to identify the effects of parenteral nutrition in these patients regarding prognosis. 55 patients with intestinal occlusion and peritoneal carcinomatosis were included. Parenteral nutrition aimed at 20-35 kcal/Kg/day, and 1.0 g/kg/day of amino-acids. Weight, body mass index, type of tumor, type of chemotherapy, and ECOG among others were recorded and analyzed. 69.1% of the patients had gastrointestinal tumors, 18.2% gynecologic and 12.7% others. Age was 60 ± 13y, baseline ECOG 1.5 ± 0.5 and body mass index 21.6 ± 4.3. Malnutrition was present in 85%. Survival from the start of parenteral nutrition was not significant when considering baseline ECOG (log rank = 0.593, p = 0.743), previous lines of chemotherapy (log rank = 2.117, p = 0.548), baseline BMI (log rank = 2.686, p = 0.261), or type of tumor (log rank = 2.066, p = 0.356). Survival in patients who received home parenteral nutrition after hospital discharge was higher than those who stayed in-hospital (log rank = 7.090, p = 0.008). Survival in patients who started chemotherapy during or after parenteral nutrition was higher than those who did not so (log rank = 17.316, p Parenteral nutrition in patients with advanced cancer and intestinal occlusion is safe, and in tho se who respond to chemotherapy, further administration of home parenteral nutrition together with chemotherapy may enhance prolonged survival. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunnaja, Salim; Cuviello, Andrea; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations. PMID:23429491

  2. Ceramide in lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition: an innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groener, Johanna E.; Serlie, Mireille J.; Poppema, Aldi; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease is a prevalent and severe complication of long term parenteral nutrition. We present here for the first time data on the presence of ceramide, a bioactive compound involved in a variety of metabolic processes, in different lipid emulsions used in

  3. Rhinosinusitis associated with post-dental extraction chronic oroantral fistula: outcomes of non-surgical management comprising antibiotics and local decongestion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A K; Sinha, V R; Nilakantan, A; Singh, D K

    2016-06-01

    A non-surgical approach for managing rhinosinusitis associated with chronic oroantral fistula resulting from tooth extraction was evaluated. Twenty-six consecutive patients (15 males and 11 females) aged 28-72 years (mean, 49.81 years) were administered local decongestion therapy for 2 weeks and antibiotics for 10 days. Patients showing a reduction in Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 22 scores after two weeks continued to receive local decongestion therapy weekly for up to six weeks, while those not showing any improvement underwent surgical management. At 2 weeks, 17 patients (65.38 per cent) showed an improvement in rhinosinusitis (33.39 per cent mean reduction in Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 22 scores). The primary determinant of response was fistula size. At 6 weeks, sinusitis resolved completely in all 17 patients, and the fistula closed in 16 of these. Final Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 22 and Lund-Mackay scores showed no significant difference between the surgically treated and non-surgically treated groups. Local decongestion therapy along with antibiotics may promote resolution in this subset of rhinosinusitis patients.

  4. Alternatives to antibiotics-a pipeline portfolio review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, Lloyd; Bax, Richard; Clokie, Martha; Dawson, Mike; Fairhead, Heather; Fischetti, Vincent A; Foster, Simon; Gilmore, Brendan F; Hancock, Robert E W; Harper, David; Henderson, Ian R; Hilpert, Kai; Jones, Brian V; Kadioglu, Aras; Knowles, David; Ólafsdóttir, Sigríður; Payne, David; Projan, Steve; Shaunak, Sunil; Silverman, Jared; Thomas, Christopher M; Trust, Trevor J; Warn, Peter; Rex, John H

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics have saved countless lives and enabled the development of modern medicine over the past 70 years. However, it is clear that the success of antibiotics might only have been temporary and we now expect a long-term and perhaps never-ending challenge to find new therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A broader approach to address bacterial infection is needed. In this Review, we discuss alternatives to antibiotics, which we defined as non-compound approaches (products other than classic antibacterial agents) that target bacteria or any approaches that target the host. The most advanced approaches are antibodies, probiotics, and vaccines in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. This first wave of alternatives to antibiotics will probably best serve as adjunctive or preventive therapies, which suggests that conventional antibiotics are still needed. Funding of more than £1·5 billion is needed over 10 years to test and develop these alternatives to antibiotics. Investment needs to be partnered with translational expertise and targeted to support the validation of these approaches in phase 2 trials, which would be a catalyst for active engagement and investment by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Only a sustained, concerted, and coordinated international effort will provide the solutions needed for the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  6. Neonatal Escherichia coli Bloodstream Infections: Clinical Outcomes and Impact of Initial Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Stephen P; Thaden, Joshua T; Ericson, Jessica E; Cross, Heather; Messina, Julia; Clark, Reese H; Fowler, Vance G; Benjamin, Daniel K; Hornik, Christoph P; Smith, P Brian

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli is a common cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in infants and is associated with high mortality and morbidity among survivors. The clinical significance of antibiotic resistance and timing of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in this population is poorly understood. We identified all infants with E. coli BSIs discharged from 77 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group in 2012. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between 30-day mortality and ampicillin-resistant E. coli BSI, as well as the number of active empiric antimicrobial agents administered, controlling for gestational age, small-for-gestational age status, early-onset versus late-onset BSI, oxygen requirement, ventilator support and inotropic support on the day of the first positive blood culture. We identified 258 episodes of E. coli BSI, including 123 (48%) ampicillin-resistant isolates. Unadjusted 30-day mortality did not significantly differ between infants with ampicillin-resistant versus ampicillin-susceptible E. coli BSI [11 of 123 (9%) vs. 7 of 135 (5%); P = 0.33; adjusted odds ratio = 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 0.39, 4.77)]. Among ampicillin-resistant E. coli BSIs, 30-day mortality was not significantly lower for infants treated with at least one empiric antimicrobial active against ampicillin-resistant E. coli versus infants receiving no active empiric agent [adjusted odds ratio = 1.50 (0.07, 33.6)]. In this population of infants with E. coli BSI, ampicillin resistance was not associated with significantly increased mortality. Among the subset of infants with ampicillin-resistant E. coli, appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower mortality.

  7. Switching Between Antibiotics Among Danish Children 0-4 Years of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilev, Mette; Thomsen, Reimar W; Aabenhus, Rune

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Denmark, the use of amoxicillin is widespread among children, despite phenoxymethylpenicillin being recommended as first-line therapy. The reason for this apparent discrepancy is not fully understood. We aimed at evaluating prescribing patterns of antibiotics among Danish children...... aged 0-4 years, with emphasis on incidence of treatment episodes, choice of initial antibiotic treatment and switching patterns between different types of antibiotics. METHODS: We identified all children ≤4 years who filled a prescription of antibiotics from 2000-2015 according to the nationwide Danish...... National Prescription Registry. We estimated the incidence rate of episodes treated with antibiotics and the choice of initial antibiotic treatment over time. Further, we assessed the cumulative risk of switching within 0-3 days after initiating therapy. RESULTS: We identified 3,481,684 antibiotic...

  8. Rapid parenteral rehydration in children with dehydration due to acute diarrheal disease Hidratación parenteral rápida en pacientes deshidratados por enfermedad diarreica aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Bastidas

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Between May and July 1987, we studied 36 children with second or third degree dehydration secondary to acute diarrheal disease of less than one week duration; they had no serious associated problems. Parenteral rehydration was carried out with a solution similar in composition to the one recommended by the World Health Organization for Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT. Rehydration was achieved in 30 patients within 6 hours and In 3 more within 12 hours; there were no cases of hypernatremia or hyperkalemia. It is concluded that parenteral rehydration with a solution similar to the one employed for ORT is an adequate alternative when oral rehydration is not indicated in children with diarrheal disease.

    Entre mayo y julio de 1987 se estudiaron 36 niños que ingresaron al Hospital Infantil de Medellín con deshidratación de segundo o tercer grado, secundaria a enfermedad diarreica de evolución menor de una semana y sin enfermedad grave asociada. La hidratación se llevó a cabo parenteralmente empleando una mezcla de composición similar a la que recomienda la Organización Mundial de la Salud para la Terapia de Rehidratación Oral (TRO. Se logró la hidratación en un lapso de 6 horas en 30 de los 36 pacientes y en 3 más en las siguientes 6 horas; no se produjeron casos de hipernatremia ni de hiperkalemia. Se concluye que la hidratación parenteral, con una solución de composición similar a la de la TRO, es una alternativa adecuada cuando no está indicada la hidratación oral del niño con enfermedad diarreica.

  9. Comparison Between Premixed and Compounded Parenteral Nutrition Solutions in Hospitalized Patients Requiring Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Colleen; Allard, Johane; Raman, Maitreyi

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) may be provided through compounded or premixed solutions. To determine the proportion of stable custom-compounded PN prescriptions that would fit within a 20% deviance of an existing premixed PN solution. A retrospective study design was used. Inpatients who received PN in non-critical care units in the preceding year were screened for eligibility. Results are reported descriptively as means (95% confidence intervals) and proportions. We reviewed 97 PN prescriptions that met inclusion criteria. Stable hospital PN prescriptions compared with the reference premixed prescription provided 1838 (1777-1898) vs 1843 (1781-1905) kcal/d, P = .43; dextrose, 266 (254-277) vs 225 (216-234) g/d, P magnesium, 5.4 (4.8-5.4) vs 7.6 (7.4-7.9) mmol/L. Calories and protein were remarkably similar, but dextrose, lipid, and electrolytes differed between hospital PN and the reference premixed prescription. We believe that there may be a role for premixed solutions in quaternary centers in stable non-critically ill patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Intensive medicine - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreymann, G; Adolph, M; Druml, W; Jauch, K W

    2009-11-18

    In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN) should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5-7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day), carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy) and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy) as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  11. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. [Endoprosthesis Infections - Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy Common Guidelines of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology and the Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, D; Balejová, M; Horníková, M; Chrdle, A; Mallátová, N; Nyč, O; Chmelík, V; Gallo, J; Jahoda, D; Stehlík, J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study aims to articulate regional guidelines for curative and suppressive antibiotic therapy of total joint replacement infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS When developing the standard, used as source materials were the published foreign guidelines for antibiotic therapy of prosthetic joint infections, the analysis of resistance of bacterial strains conducted in the Hospital in České Budějovice, a.s. and the assessment of strain resistance for the Czech Republic published by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net). Considered was also the availability of individual antibiotics in the Czech Republic and restricted prescription according to the Summary of Product Characteristics as specified in the State Institute for Drug Control marketing authorisation. The expert group composed of orthopaedists, microbiologists and infectious disease specialists elaborated the basic antibiotic guideline for choosing an appropriate antibiotic/antifungal drug based on the usual susceptibility, its dose and dosage interval for initial and continuation therapy. The comments of individual specialists were gradually incorporated therein and in case of doubts majority rule was applied. The drafted document was sent for peer reviews to clinical orthopaedic, infectious disease and microbiological centres, whose comments were also incorporated and the finalised document was submitted for evaluation to specialised medical societies. RESULTS The outcome is the submitted guideline for antibiotic curative and suppressive therapy suitable for managing the prosthetic joint infections, which was approved by the committee of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology andthe Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně. DISCUSION Curative therapy of total joint replacement infections consists primarily in surgical treatment and has to be accompanied by adequate antibiotic therapy administered

  13. Chronic bacterial prostatitis: efficacy of short-lasting antibiotic therapy with prulifloxacin (Unidrox®) in association with saw palmetto extract, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin (Lactorepens®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Ferro, Matteo; Tricarico, Stefano; Del Giudice, Francesco; Matei, Deliu Victor; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Gentile, Vincenzo; De Berardinis, Ettore

    2014-07-19

    Bacterial prostatitis (BP) is a common condition accounting responsible for about 5-10% of all prostatitis cases; chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) classified as type II, are less common but is a condition that significantly hampers the quality of life, (QoL) because not only is it a physical condition but also a psychological distress. Commonly patients are treated with antibiotics alone, and in particular fluoroquinolones are suggested by the European Urology guidelines. This approach, although recommended, may not be enough. Thus, a multimodal approach to the prolonged antibiotic therapy may be helpful. 210 patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were positive to Meares-Stamey test and symptoms duration was > 3 months. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long lasting therapy with a fluoroquinolone in association with a nutraceutical supplement (prulifloxacin 600 mg for 21 days and an association of Serenoa repens 320 mg, Lactobacillus Sporogens 200 mg, Arbutin 100 mg for 30 days). Patients were randomized in two groups (A and B) receiving respectively antibiotic alone and an association of antibiotic plus supplement. Biological recurrence at 2 months in Group A was observed in 21 patients (27.6%) and in Group B in 6 patients (7.8%). Uropathogens found at the first follow-up were for the majority Gram - (E. coli and Enterobacter spp.). A statistically significant difference was found at the time of the follow-up between Group A and B in the NIH-CPSI questionnaire score, symptoms evidence and serum PSA. Broad band, short-lasting antibiotic therapy in association with a nutritional supplement (serenoa repens, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin) show better control and recurrence rate on patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitits in comparison with antibiotic treatment alone. NCT02130713. Date of trial Registration: 30/04/2014.

  14. [Clinical outcomes of parenterally administered shuxuetong--analysis of hospital information system data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Yang, Hu; Zhuang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Hospital information system data of cerebral infaction patients who received parenterally administered Shuxuetong was analyzed. This provided frequency data regarding patients' conditions and related information in order to provide a clinical reference guide. In this study, HIS data from 18 hospitals was analyzed. Patients receiving parenterally administered Shuxuetong for the treatment of cerebral infarction were included. Information on age, gender, costsand route of administration were collated. The average age of patients was 66 years old. Days of hospitalization ranged from 15 to 28 days. The majority of patients were classified as having phlegm and blood stasis syndrome, which is inaccordance with the indications for this drug. The most commonly used drugs used in combination with parenterally administered Shuxuetong were: aspirin, insulin and heparin. Patients with cerebral infarction crowd using parenterally administered Shuxuetong were a mostly elderly population, with an average age of 66. Although generally use was in accordance with indications, dosage, and route of administration, there were however some discrepancies. Therefore, doctors need to pay close attention to guidelines and closely observe patients when using parenterally administered Shuxuetong and to consider both the clinical benefits and risks.

  15. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  17. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Sanchez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations.

  18. Intestine, immunity, and parenteral nutrition in an era of preferred enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith; Demehri, Farokh R; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    To review the benefits of enteral nutrition in contrast to the inflammatory consequences of administration of parenteral nutrition and enteral deprivation. To present the most recent evidence for the mechanisms of these immunologic changes and discuss potential areas for modification to decrease infectious complications of its administration. There is significant data supporting the early initiation of enteral nutrition in both medical and surgical patients unable to meet their caloric goals via oral intake alone. Despite the preference for enteral nutrition, some patients are unable to utilize their gut for nutritious gain and therefore require parenteral nutrition administration, along with its infectious complications. The mechanisms behind these complications are multifactorial and have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent study utilizing both animal and human models has provided further information regarding parenteral nutrition's deleterious effect on intestinal epithelial barrier function along with the complications associated with enterocyte deprivation. Changes associated with parenteral nutrition administration and enteral deprivation are complex with multiple potential areas for modification to allow for safer administration. Recent discovery of the mechanisms behind these changes present exciting areas for future study as to make parenteral nutrition administration in the enterally deprived patient safer.

  19. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy

  20. Evidence for the use of parenteral nutrition in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-02-01

    During hospitalization in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), critically ill children are fed artificially. Administered via the preferred enteral route, caloric targets are often not reached. Hence, parenteral nutrition is given to this patient population. In this review we analyzed the available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that supports the use of parenteral nutrition in children during critical illness. A search strategy in Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBASE was created and trial registries were screened to identify the relevant RCTs. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials, involved pediatric patients admitted to PICU, and compared different dosing/compositions of parenteral nutrition. Descriptive studies and reviews were excluded. Of the 584 articles identified by the search strategy, only 114 articles were retained after title screening. Further abstract and full text screening identified 6 small RCTs that compared two dosing/composition strategies of parenteral nutrition. These trials reported differences in surrogate endpoints without an effect on hard clinical endpoints. The RCTs observed improvements in these surrogate endpoints with the use of more calories or when parenteral glutamine or fish oil was added. The few RCTs suggest that surrogate endpoints can be affected by providing parenteral nutrition to critically ill children, but the studies were not statistically powered to draw meaningful clinical conclusions. Large RCTs with clinically relevant outcome measures are urgently needed to support the current nutritional guidelines that advise the use of parenteral nutrition in the PICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Data on gut metagenomes of the patients with Helicobacter pylori infection before and after the antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana E. Glushchenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy can lead to the disruption of gut microbiota community with possible negative outcomes for human health. One of the diseases for which the treatment scheme commonly included antibiotic intake is Helicobacter pylori infection. The changes in taxonomic and functional composition of microbiota in patients can be assessed using “shotgun” metagenomic sequencing. Ten stool samples were collected from 4 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection before and directly after the H. pylori eradication course. Additionally, for two of the subjects, the samples were collected 1 month after the end of the treatment. The samples were subject to “shotgun” (whole-genome metagenomic sequencing using Illumina HiSeq platform. The reads are deposited in the ENA (project ID: PRJEB18265.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus: methicillin-susceptible S. aureus to methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Susan J; Tice, Alan

    2010-09-15

    The evolution of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has demanded serious review of antimicrobial use and development of new agents and revised approaches to prevent and overcome drug resistance. Depending on local conditions and patient risk factors, empirical therapy of suspected S. aureus infection may require coverage of drug-resistant organisms with newer agents and novel antibiotic combinations. The question of treatment with inappropriate antibiotics raises grave concerns with regard to methicillin-resistant S. aureus selection, overgrowth, and increased virulence. Several strategies to reduce the nosocomial burden of resistance are suggested, including shortened hospital stays and outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy of the most serious infections.

  3. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  4. Steroidal compounds in commercial parenteral lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn(®) II, Liposyn(®) III, Lipofundin(®) MCT, Lipofundin(®) N, Structolipid(®), Intralipid(®), Ivelip(®) and ClinOleic(®). Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  5. A procalcitonin-based algorithm to guide antibiotic therapy in secondary peritonitis following emergency surgery: a prospective study with propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Shuo; Huang, Shie-Shian; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lee, Chun-Hui; Jwo, Shyh-Chuan; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Huang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT)-based algorithms have been used to guide antibiotic therapy in several clinical settings. However, evidence supporting PCT-based algorithms for secondary peritonitis after emergency surgery is scanty. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a PCT-based algorithm could safely reduce antibiotic exposure in this population. From April 2012 to March 2013, patients that had secondary peritonitis diagnosed at the emergency department and underwent emergency surgery were screened for eligibility. PCT levels were obtained pre-operatively, on post-operative days 1, 3, 5, and 7, and on subsequent days if needed. Antibiotics were discontinued if PCT was Advanced age, coexisting pulmonary diseases, and higher severity of illness were significantly associated with longer durations of antibiotic use. The PCT-based algorithm safely reduces antibiotic exposure in this study. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm our findings and incorporate cost-effectiveness analysis. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000601831.

  6. Antibiotics for treating lower urinary tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Anita; Mori, Rintaro; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Tullus, Kjell

    2012-08-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants and children. Lower UTI is the most commonly presenting and in the majority of cases can be easily treated with a course of antibiotic therapy with no further complications. A number of antimicrobials have been used to treat children with lower UTIs; however is it unclear what are the specific benefits and harms of such treatments. This review aims to summarise the benefits and harms of antibiotics for treating lower UTI in children. We searched the Renal Group's Specialised Register (April 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5), MEDLINE OVID SP (from 1966), and EMBASE OVID SP (from 1988) without language restriction. Date of last search: May 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in which antibiotic therapy was used to treat bacteriologically proven, symptomatic, lower UTI in children aged zero to 18 years in primary and community healthcare settings were included. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and the results expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Sixteen RCTs, analysing 1,116 children were included. Conventional 10-day antibiotic treatment significantly increased the number of children free of persistent bacteriuria compared to single-dose therapy (6 studies, 228 children: RR 2.01, 95%CI 1.06 to 3.80). No heterogeneity was observed. Persistent bacteriuria at the end of treatment was reported in 24% of children receiving single-dose therapy compared to 10% of children who were randomised to 10-day therapy. There were no significant differences between groups for persistent symptoms, recurrence following treatment, or re-infection following treatment. There was insufficient data to analyse the effect of antibiotics on renal parenchymal damage, compliance, development of resistant organisms or adverse events. Despite

  7. Kidney failure related to broad-spectrum antibiotics in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ulrik Stæhr; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    To explore whether a strategy of more intensive antibiotic therapy leads to emergence or prolongation of renal failure in intensive care patients.......To explore whether a strategy of more intensive antibiotic therapy leads to emergence or prolongation of renal failure in intensive care patients....

  8. [Reasons for inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in a high-complexity pediatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvinsky, Silvina; Mónaco, Andrea; Pérez, Guadalupe; Taicz, Moira; Inda, Laura; Kijko, Ivana; Constanzo, Patricia; Bologna, Rosa

    2011-12-01

    Determine the reasons for inappropriate prescription of antibiotics and identify opportunities to improve prescription of these drugs in pediatric patients hospitalized in intermediate and intensive care units. A prospective, descriptive longitudinal study was conducted of pediatric patients in intermediate and intensive care units who received parenteral administration of antibiotics, with the exception of newborns, burn unit patients, and surgical prophylaxis patients. A univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed. A total of 376 patients with a median of age of 50 months were studied (interquartile range [IQR] 14.5-127 months). Out of the total patients studied, 75% had one or more underlying conditions. A total of 40.6% of these patients had an oncologic pathology and 33.5% had neurological conditions. The remaining 25.9% had other underlying conditions. Antibiotic treatment was inappropriate in 35.6% of the patients studied (N = 134). In 73 (54.4%) of the 134 cases, inappropriate use was due to the type of antibiotic prescribed, the dose administered, or the treatment period. The 61 (45.5%) remaining cases did not require antibiotic treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the risk factors for inappropriate use of antibiotics were: administration of ceftriaxone OR 2 (95% CI, 1.3-3.7; P = 0.02); acute lower respiratory tract infection OR 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.3; P < 0.04); onset of fever of unknown origin in hospital inpatients OR 5.55 (95% CI, 2.5-12; P < 0.0001); and febrile neutropenia OR 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.7; P = 0.009). Inappropriate use of antibiotics was less common in the clinical conditions that were well-characterized. Prescribing practices that could be improved were identified through the preparation and circulation of guidelines for antibiotic use in hospital inpatients.

  9. A prospective randomized cohort study evaluating 3 weeks vs 6 weeks of oral antibiotic treatment in the setting of "maximal medical therapy" for chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, Satyan B; Taylor, Robert J; Miller, Justin D; Ambrose, Emily C; Rawal, Rounak B; Ebert, Charles S; Senior, Brent A; Zanation, Adam M

    2015-09-01

    Surprisingly, little literature exists evaluating the optimal duration of antibiotic treatment in "maximal medical therapy" for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). As such, we investigated whether 3 weeks vs 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy resulted in significant differences in clinical response. A prospective, randomized cohort study was performed with patients assigned to 3-week or 6-week cohorts. Our primary outcome was failure of "maximal medical therapy" and surgical recommendation. Secondary outcomes included changes in pretherapy and posttherapy scores for the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI), Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS), and computed tomography (CT)-based Lund-Mackay (LM) evaluation. Analyses were substratified based on presence of nasal polyps. Forty patients were randomized to the 3-week or 6-week treatment cohorts, with near-complete clinical follow-up achieved. No significant difference was found between the proportion of patients who failed medical therapy and were deemed surgical candidates between the 2 cohorts (71% vs 68%, p = 1.000). No significant difference was found in the change of RSDI or CSS scores in the 3 vs 6 weeks of treatment groups (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]; RSDI: 9.62 ± 4.14 vs 1.53 ± 4.01, p = 0.868; CSS: 5.75 ± 4.36 vs 9.65 ± 5.34, p = 0.573). Last, no significant difference was found in the change of LM scores (3.35 ± 1.11 vs 1.53 ± 0.81, p = 0.829). Based on this data, there is little difference in clinical outcomes between 3 weeks vs 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment as part of "maximal medical therapy" for CRS. Increased duration of antibiotic treatment theoretically may increase risk from side effects and creates higher healthcare costs. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Hematologic disorders in trauma patients during parenteral alimentation with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faintuch, J; Machado, F K; Freire, A N; Reis, J R; Machado, M; Pinto, L P; Ramos, S M; Loebens, M; Jovchelevich, V; Pinotti, H W

    1996-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with lipids is a well-accepted modality of metabolic support in seriously ill trauma patients. Intolerance to lipid administration is unusual when dosage limits are not exceeded, and few hematologic disturbances have been recorded with modern fat emulsions. In the course of intravenous alimentation of six adults admitted for traumatic lesions, eosinophilia with or without leukocytopenia was noticed after periods of four days to five weeks. Principal clinical events and hematologic derangements were documented in this population. Sepsis was not always present in the patients by the time of the complication, and in those that did require antibiotics and other drugs, the prescription remained unchanged along the episode. Discontinuation of the nutritional regimen with lipids was followed by normalization of the hematologic profile, suggesting that an acute or sub-acute allergic reaction was responsible. The appearance of skin rash in two occasions reinforces this hypothesis, and the possibility of hemophagocytosis merits consideration in two of the cases who displayed reversible acute leukocytopenia. It is concluded that blood cell aberrations are possible during intravenous feeding with lipids in trauma subjects, but tend to respond to suppression of the lipid-containing nutritional prescription.

  11. Parenteral nutrition combined with rice soup can be a safe and effective intervention for congenital chylous ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Yan, Weihui; Lu, Lina; Tao, Yijing; Lu, Wei; Chen, Yingwei; Tang, Qingya; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites in the neonatal period is a rare entity. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), medium chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet, octreotide and repeated paracentesis are regarded as appropriate medical treatment for congenital chylous ascites, and surgery is recommended when conservative therapy has failed. We present two cases in which ascites were confirmed via an abdominal sonogram and diagnostic paracentesis. In our clinical experience, rice soup combined with PN can be a safe and effective intervention.

  12. Iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy: The role of parenteral iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Umo I

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality remain major challenges in the delivery of safe maternity care worldwide. Anaemia in pregnancy is an important contributor to this dismal picture, especially where blood transfusion services are poorly developed. An early diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy using the new generation dextran-free parenteral iron preparations can save lives and reduce morbidity in selected pregnancies. It is time to cast aside the fears associated with the use of the old parenteral iron preparations which were associated a high incidence of anaphylaxis, and embrace the use of new parenteral iron products which have better side effect profiles and can deliver total dose infusions without the need for test dosing. In selected women, the benefits of this treatment far outweigh any disadvantages.

  13. Modeling antibiotic treatment in hospitals: A systematic approach shows benefits of combination therapy over cycling, mixing, and mono-drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepekule, Burcu; Uecker, Hildegard; Derungs, Isabel; Frenoy, Antoine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Multiple treatment strategies are available for empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitals, but neither clinical studies nor theoretical investigations have yielded a clear picture when which strategy is optimal and why. Extending earlier work of others and us, we present a mathematical model capturing treatment strategies using two drugs, i.e the multi-drug therapies referred to as cycling, mixing, and combination therapy, as well as monotherapy with either drug. We randomly sample a large parameter space to determine the conditions determining success or failure of these strategies. We find that combination therapy tends to outperform the other treatment strategies. By using linear discriminant analysis and particle swarm optimization, we find that the most important parameters determining success or failure of combination therapy relative to the other treatment strategies are the de novo rate of emergence of double resistance in patients infected with sensitive bacteria and the fitness costs associated with double resistance. The rate at which double resistance is imported into the hospital via patients admitted from the outside community has little influence, as all treatment strategies are affected equally. The parameter sets for which combination therapy fails tend to fall into areas with low biological plausibility as they are characterised by very high rates of de novo emergence of resistance to both drugs compared to a single drug, and the cost of double resistance is considerably smaller than the sum of the costs of single resistance.

  14. The efficacy of hypotonic and near-isotonic saline for parenteral fluid therapy given at low maintenance rate in preventing significant change in plasma sodium in post-operative pediatric patients: protocol for a prospective randomized non-blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stigzelius Shayarina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality observed in post-operative pediatric patients receiving intravenous maintenance fluid therapy. If plasma sodium concentration (p-Na+ declines to levels below 125 mmol/L in vs. restricted rate of infusion and the composition of solutions used for parenteral maintenance fluid therapy (hypotonic vs. isotonic solutions contribute to the development of hyponatremia. So far, there is no definitive pediatric data to support a particular choice of parenteral fluid for maintenance therapy in post-surgical patients. Methods/Design Our prospective randomized non-blinded study will be conducted in healthy children and adolescents aged 1 to 14 years who have been operated for acute appendicitis. Patients will be randomized either to intravenous hypotonic (0.23% or 0.40% sodium chloride in glucose, respectively or near-isotonic (0.81% sodium chloride in glucose solution given at approximately three-fourths of the average maintenance rate. The main outcome of interest from this study is to evaluate 24 h post-operatively whether differences in p-Na+ between treatment groups are large enough to be of clinical relevance. In addition, water and electrolyte balance as well as regulatory hormones will be measured. Discussion This study will provide valuable information on the efficacy of hypotonic and near-isotonic fluid therapy in preventing a significant decrease in p-Na+. Finally, by means of careful electrolyte and water balance and by measuring regulatory hormones our results will also contribute to a better understanding of the physiopathology of post-operative changes in p-Na+ in a population at risk for hyponatremia. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered with the current controlled trials registry; registry number: ISRCTN43896775.

  15. Clinical relevance of trace element measurement in patients on initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salota, Rashim; Omar, Sohail; Sherwood, Roy A; Raja, Kishor; Vincent, Royce P

    2016-11-01

    Background and Aims Serum zinc, copper and selenium are measured in patients prior to commencing on parenteral nutrition; however, their interpretation can be difficult due to acute phase reactions. We assessed (i) the relationship of raised C-reactive protein with trace elements and albumin (ii) benefits of measuring trace elements when C-reactive protein is raised in patients requiring short-term parenteral nutrition. Methods Samples were collected for zinc, copper, selenium and albumin at baseline and then every two weeks and correlated with C-reactive protein results in patients on parenteral nutrition. Results were categorized into four groups based on the C-reactive protein concentrations: (i)  0.05), whereas selenium and albumin were lower in the group with C-reactive protein > 40 mg/L ( P parenteral nutrition, measurement of C-reactive protein is essential when interpreting zinc and selenium but not copper results. Routine measurement of trace elements prior to commencing parenteral nutrition has to be considered on an individual basis in patients with inflammation.

  16. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Fábio Guilherme

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  17. Antibiotic resistance patterns of community-acquired urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux receiving prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Horng; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Su, Lin-Hui; Tsau, Yong-Kwei; Lin, Chi-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2008-12-01

    The goal was to examine bacterial antimicrobial resistance of recurrent urinary tract infections in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis because of primary vesicoureteral reflux. We reviewed data retrospectively for children with documented vesicoureteral reflux in 2 hospitals during a 5-year follow-up period. The patients were receiving co-trimoxazole, cephalexin, or cefaclor prophylaxis or prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics (alternative monotherapy). Demographic data, degree of vesicoureteral reflux, prophylactic antibiotics prescribed, and antibiotic sensitivity results of first urinary tract infections and breakthrough urinary tract infections were recorded. Three hundred twenty-four patients underwent antibiotic prophylaxis (109 with co-trimoxazole, 100 with cephalexin, 44 with cefaclor, and 71 with alternative monotherapy) in one hospital and 96 children underwent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in the other hospital. Breakthrough urinary tract infections occurred in patients from both hospitals (20.4% and 25%, respectively). Escherichia coli infection was significantly less common in children receiving antibiotic prophylaxis, compared with their initial episodes of urinary tract infection, at both hospitals. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis were more likely to have an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organism for breakthrough urinary tract infections, compared with children with co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to almost all antibiotics decreased with cephalosporin prophylaxis when recurrent urinary tract infections developed. The extent of decreased susceptibilities was also severe for prophylaxis with a sequence of different antibiotics. However, antimicrobial susceptibilities decreased minimally in co-trimoxazole prophylaxis groups. Children receiving cephalosporin prophylaxis are more likely to have extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria or multidrug-resistant uropathogens

  18. Inhaled Antibiotics for Ventilator-Associated Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lucy B

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are creating a challenge for physicians treating the critically ill. As new antibiotics lag behind the emergence of worsening resistance, intensivists in countries with high rates of extensively drug-resistant bacteria are turning to inhaled antibiotics as adjunctive therapy. These drugs can provide high concentrations of drug in the lung that could not be achieved with intravenous antibiotics without significant systemic toxicity. This article summarizes current evidence describing the use of inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Preliminary data suggest aerosolized antimicrobials may effectively treat resistant pathogens with high minimum inhibitory concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Nosocomial Clostridium difficile diarrhea--adverse effect of antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeni, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    C. difficile is recognised as the main cause for colitis in hospitalised patients which are treated with antibiotics, chemotherapics or other drugs that disturb intestinal microbiota. Thus, a rapid and correct diagnostic of Clostridium difficile infections is essential for preventing nosocomial infection spread. Empiric therapy, regardless of the laboratory investigation results, is inadequate, especially in epidemic situations, as not all the cases of diarrhoea are due to C. difficile infection. Other risk factors for CDAD (Clostridiumn difficile Associated Diseases might be: prolonged hospitalization or residency in an asylum, age, existence of a severe chronic disease in the background nasogastric intubation, anti-ulcer drugs, at less extent gastrointestinal surgery, other immunosuppresive compounds etc. In our country, C. difficile infection is rather frequent in adults, though it is not always reported by clinicians. The circulation of endemic rybotype 027 in Romania is not well documented, the rybotype being extremely virulent and spread in other European countries. Hence the importance of extending the diagnostic capacity of C. difficile infection in order to allow detection of this rybotype among the strains isolated in our country.

  20. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, P.O.; Damber, J.E.; Hagerman, I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events...

  1. Reversal of growth arrest in adolescents with Crohn's disease after parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, T; Rosenberg, F; Nemchausky, G; Elson, C; Rosenberg, I

    1976-06-01

    Growth arrest and delayed onset of puberty often complicate childhood onset Crohn's disease of the small bowel (granulomatous enteritis). Nutritional deficits arising from inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased caloric needs may contribute to growth retardation. To assess whether a sustained high caloric and nitrogen intake could reestablish growth, 4 children with extensive Crohn's disease of the small bowel were studied before and after parenteral alimentation which was instituted for symtomatic disease control. Weight gain, positive nitrogen balance, and improved nutritional status were achieved during parenteral alimentation in each patient. In 2 patients weight gain was sustained using oral nutritional supplements, and a substantial increase in linear skeletal growth continued in the ensuing months. One patient entered puberty within 4 months of parenteral alimentation and another had the onset of menarche and the development of secondary sex characteristics 4 months after parenteral alimentation and resection of diseased bowel. Growth may be reestablished in some growth-arrested children if intake is sufficient to establish a sustained positive caloric and nitrogen balance. Nutritional requirements imposed by the demands of growth and active disease and often compounded by the catabolic effects of corticosteroids may be excessive; growth may occur only if these needs are met orally and/or parenterally.

  2. Chemical Incompatibility of Parenteral Drug Admixtures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-21

    Sep 21, 1974 ... made of a single drug injection at a separate locus. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1951 ... and nursing staff with the difficulties of administering safe parenteral ... needle and infusion bottle, but this practice is not common in South Africa.

  3. [Peripherally inserted central catheter antibiotic therapy for cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betegnie, A-L; Cracowski, C; Bedouch, P; Segond, C; Robein-Dobremez, M-J; Pin, I; Allenet, B

    2014-11-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are more and more used for intravenous antibiotic infusions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in the Grenoble area (France). The aim of this study was to assess the use of this technique in this indication. 1. Retrospective evaluation of 102 consecutive PICC insertions over 3years and the incidence of adverse events during the therapy. 2. Prospective evaluation of 12 patient's satisfaction and their nurses over a 3-month period. 3. Comparative analysis of single domiciliary treatment costs using PICC versus peripheral catheter (PC). 102 PICC insertions were attempted in 31 patients. Seven failures and 7 complications occurred during the treatment requiring removal of the PICC, i.e. an overall success rate of 86.2% (88/102). Pain during PICC introduction was 4.2/10 (visual analogical scale). Mean satisfaction levels during therapy were 9.3/10 for patients and 8.7/10 for nurses. Compared with PC, all the patients said that PICC was "more comfortable". Differential costs of treatment with PC and with PICC at home were estimated at 57.15€ and 590.16€ respectively. PICC is an alternative to CP for intravenous antibiotherapy in CF patients, providing better safety and comfort. PICC use should be promoted in this indication. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of Piggyback Electrolytes for Patients Receiving Individually Prescribed vs Premixed Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Rebecca A; Curtis, Caitlin S; Leverson, Glen E; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2015-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is available as individualized prescriptions frequently prepared with an automated compounding device or as commercially prepared premixed solutions. Our institution exclusively used individualized PN until an amino acid shortage forced a temporary switch to premixed solutions. In general, premixed solutions contain lower electrolyte levels than individualized formulations prescribed for patients with normal organ function. We aimed to quantify supplemental intravenous piggyback (IVPB) electrolyte use in adult patients receiving individualized and premixed PN and to quantify any effect on difference in the cost of therapy. We compared use of supplemental IVPB electrolytes administered to patients receiving PN during consecutive periods prior to and during the amino acid shortage. Electrolyte IVPBs tabulated were potassium chloride, 10 and 20 mEq; magnesium sulfate, 2 g and 4 g; potassium phosphate, 7.5 and 15 mmol; and sodium phosphate, 7.5 and 15 mmol IVPB. There was no statistical difference in the number of PN formulations administered per day during each period (14.7 ± 3.9 vs 14.0 ± 2.6, individualized vs premixed, respectively). Total IVPB electrolytes prescribed per day increased significantly from the individualized PN period to the premixed PN period (7.03 ± 3.8 vs 13.8 ± 6.8; P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Empirical mono- versus combination antibiotic therapy in adult intensive care patients with severe sepsis – A systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Karl Fredrik Lennart; Perner, Anders; Hylander Møller, Morten

    2017-01-01

    assessment and trial sequential analysis (TSA). We included randomised clinical trials (RCT) assessing empirical mono-antibiotic therapy versus a combination of two or more antibiotics in adult ICU patients with severe sepsis. We exclusively assessed patient-important outcomes, including mortality. Two...... reviewers independently evaluated studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated and the risk of random errors was assessed by TSA. Results Thirteen RCTs (n = 2633) were included; all were judged as having high risk...... of bias. Carbapenems were the most frequently used mono-antibiotic (8 of 13 trials). There was no difference in mortality (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.95–1.29; p = 0.19) or in any other patient-important outcomes between mono- vs. combination therapy. In TSA of mortality, the Z-curve reached the futility area...

  6. Approach to osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded PMMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentao, Zhang; Lei, Guangyu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Song, Tao; Fan, Jinzhu

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of osteomyelitis infection, local antibiotic impregnated delivery systems are commonly used as a promising and effective approach to deliver high antibiotic concentrations at the infection site. The objective of this review was to provide a literature review regarding approach to osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded PMMA. Literature study regarding osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded carriers using key terms Antibiotic, osteomyelitis, biodegradable PMMA through published articles. Hands searching of bibliographies of identified articles were also undertaken. We concluded that Antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads are useful options for the treatment of osteomyelitis for prolonged drug therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photodynamic and antibiotic therapy impair the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecium in a whole animal insect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Chibebe Junior

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium has emerged as one of the most important pathogens in healthcare-associated infections worldwide due to its intrinsic and acquired resistance to many antibiotics, including vancomycin. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT is an alternative therapeutic platform that is currently under investigation for the control and treatment of infections. PDT is based on the use of photoactive dye molecules, widely known as photosensitizer (PS. PS, upon irradiation with visible light, produces reactive oxygen species that can destroy lipids and proteins causing cell death. We employed Galleria mellonella (the greater wax moth caterpillar fatally infected with E. faecium to develop an invertebrate host model system that can be used to study the antimicrobial PDT (alone or combined with antibiotics. In the establishment of infection by E. faecium in G. mellonella, we found that the G. mellonella death rate was dependent on the number of bacterial cells injected into the insect hemocoel and all E. faecium strains tested were capable of infecting and killing G. mellonella. Antibiotic treatment with ampicillin, gentamicin or the combination of ampicillin and gentamicin prolonged caterpillar survival infected by E. faecium (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0001, respectively. In the study of antimicrobial PDT, we verified that methylene blue (MB injected into the insect followed by whole body illumination prolonged the caterpillar survival (P = 0.0192. Interestingly, combination therapy of larvae infected with vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, with antimicrobial PDT followed by vancomycin, significantly prolonged the survival of the caterpillars when compared to either antimicrobial PDT (P = 0.0095 or vancomycin treatment alone (P = 0.0025, suggesting that the aPDT made the vancomycin resistant E. faecium strain more susceptible to vancomycin action. In summary, G. mellonella provides an invertebrate model host to

  8. Sterilization of solutions for parenterals products. Problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanelys Montes-González

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The solutions for the formulation of parenteral products must be sterile before the aseptic formulation process. For this reason, different methods of sterilization referred in the literature are analyzed. Thermodynamic criteria that rule the sterilization are presented. Furthermore, previous experiences in the sterilization of solutions for the formulation of parental products in an autoclave are analyzed, that take large time of processing and only low volumes of solution can be handled. Using jacketed stirred tanks for the sterilization may solve the problem and, therefore, criteria for the design of the later that allow to process high volumes of solution for the formulation of parenteral products are shown.

  9. Use of nasopharyngeal culture to determine appropriateness of antibiotic therapy in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stella; Woodbury, Kristin; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2013-04-01

    Rhinosinusitis is one of the top 5 diagnoses for which an antibiotic is prescribed, often without a clear bacterial etiology. This study evaluated whether nasopharyngeal culture and gram stain could serve as a surrogate for endoscopically obtained middle meatal cultures in directing appropriate therapy for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS). This study also investigated the utility of a rapid sinus test screen in differentiating bacterial from nonbacterial rhinosinusitis. Thirty-one adult patients met inclusion criteria for ABRS. Samples were obtained from both the middle meatus and nasopharynx for Gram stain and culture. Nasal mucous samples were tested with a rapid sinus test strip measuring pH, levels of protein, nitrites, and leukocyte esterase. Sixty-one percent (61%) of nasopharyngeal and 48% of middle meatal samples grew pathogenic bacteria. The concordance rate was 84% between the 2 sites (p = 0.0006). The following pathogenic organisms were detected: Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. For nasopharyngeal samples, reliance on Gram stain alone exhibited a sensitivity of 31% and specificity of 100% and, similarly, for middle meatus samples, 47% and 93%, respectively. The rapid sinus test revealed a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 7%. Nasopharyngeal and middle meatal cultures exhibited high concordance for pathogenic bacteria. Gram stain exhibited moderate sensitivity and excellent specificity. Nasopharyngeal cultures could provide a viable method, especially in a primary care setting, for determining the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy. The rapid sinus test's lack of specificity precluded its utility in the differentiation between bacterial and nonbacterial rhinosinusitis. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat A. Siddiqui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  11. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  12. Antibiotics resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A limited number of antibiotics are recommended for the therapy of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections due to therapy difficulties caused by its numerous mechanisms of resistance. Objectives: In this study conducted over a period of approximately 5 years we aimed to determine resistance rates of S.

  13. Antibiotic therapy for stable non-CF bronchiectasis in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjaellegaard, Katrine; Sin, Melda Dönmez; Browatzki, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    To provide an update on efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatments for stable non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis (BE). Systematic review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines was done. Twenty-six studies (1.898 patients) fulfilled......, exacerbations and QoL, whereas studies on aztreonam revealed no significant clinical improvements in the outcomes of interest, including exacerbation rate. Adverse events, including bronchospasm, have been reported in association with tobramycin and aztreonam. Several antibiotic treatment regimens have been...... shown to improve QoL and exacerbation rate, whereas findings regarding sputum production, lung function and admissions have been conflicting. Evidence-based treatment algorithms for antibiotic treatment of stable non-CF BE will have to await large-scale, long-term controlled studies....

  14. Changes in Bacterial Resistance Patterns of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Rationale for Empirical Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, İbrahim; Çiçek, Neslihan; Güven, Serçin; Altuntaş, Ülger; Bıyıklı, Neşe; Yıldız, Nurdan; Alpay, Harika

    2017-09-29

    The causative agent spectrum and resistance patterns of urinary tract infections in children are affected by many factors. To demonstrate antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections and changing ratio in antibiotic resistance by years. Retrospective cross-sectional study. We analysed antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated Gram (-) bacteria during the years 2011-2014 (study period 2) in children with urinary tract infections. We compared these findings with data collected in the same centre in 2001-2003 (study period 1). Four hundred and sixty-five uncomplicated community-acquired Gram (-) urinary tract infections were analysed from 2001-2003 and 400 from 2011-2014. Sixty-one percent of patients were female (1.5 girls : 1 boy). The mean age of children included in the study was 3 years and 9 months. Escherichia coli was the predominant bacteria isolated during both periods of the study (60% in study period 1 and 73% in study period 2). Bacteria other than E. coli demonstrated a higher level of resistance to all of the antimicrobials except trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than E. coli bacteria during the years 2011-2014. In our study, we found increasing resistance trends of urinary pathogens for cefixime (from 1% to 15%, pUrinary pathogens showed a decreasing trend for nitrofurantoin (from 17% to 7%, p=0.0001). No significant trends were detected for ampicillin (from 69% to 71%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (from 44% to 43%), cefazolin (from 39% to 32%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (from 32% to 31%), cefuroxime (from 21% to 18%) and ceftriaxone (from 10% to 14%) between the two periods (p>0.05). In childhood urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance should be evaluated periodically and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be decided according to antibiotic sensitivity results.

  15. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  16. Parenteral nutrition facilitates activation of coagulation but not of fibrinolysis during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Braxton, C. C.; Coyle, S. M.; Roth, M.; ten Cate, J. W.; Lowry, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and bacterial infections are common complications of parenteral nutrition. To test the hypothesis that infection facilitates activation of coagulation during parenteral nutrition, healthy subjects were intravenously injected with endotoxin (2 ng/kg) after they had received either 1

  17. Pharmaco-economic evaluation of antibiotic therapy strategies in DRG-based healthcare systems - a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke MH

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cost of treatments especially in conditions where multiresistant bacteria are involved are a major issue in times where in most developed countries in the world payment systems based on diagnoses-related-groups (DRG are in place. There is great evidence that especially the length of stay in hospital (LOS, the time in the intensive care unit (ICU-days and the hours of mechanical ventilation (HMV are major cost drivers. While established methods of pharmacoeconomical analyses focus on the efficiency of drugs from healthcare system perspective, these data are often not sufficient for improving treatment strategies in a given hospital context. We developed a system that allows the analysis of patients with severe infections on the basis of routine data that is also used for reimbursement. These data contain a lot of information concerning the clinical conditions. By using the ICD-coding we developed an algorithm which allows the detection of patients with infections and gives information on the potential financial outcome of these patients. By using the analysis it is possible to identify subsets of infections and the patient records that had a potentially negative DRG-result, i.e. the costs are higher than the reimbursement. When identified the patient records undergo a peer review, where the clinical situation and the antibiotic therapy are reviewed by medical experts. In case simulations it is possible to find out if a different therapeutic approach, e.g. by different choices in initial (empirical antibiotic treatment would have caused other outcomes. Data driven analyses together with peer reviews of patient records are a useful tool to examine antibiotic treatment strategies and to establish changes that again can be reviewed on a regular basis. Doing this a continous improvement process can be established in hospitals which can lead to a better balance of clinical and economical outcomes in patients with severe infections

  18. Antibiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Prantera, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by an altered composition of gut microbiota (dysbiosis) that may contribute to their development. Antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora, and a link between antibiotic use and onset of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, has been reported. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) could be an etiologic agent of CD has not been confirmed by a large study on patients treated by an association of antibiotics active against MAP. The observations supporting a role of intestinal microbiota in CD pathogenesis provide the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal flora through the employment of antibiotics. However, current data do not strongly support a therapeutic benefit from antibiotics, and there is still controversy regarding their use as primary therapy for treatment of acute flares of CD, and for postoperative recurrence prevention. Nevertheless, clinical practice and some studies suggest that a subgroup of patients with colonic involvement, early disease, and abnormal laboratory test of inflammation may respond better to antibiotic treatment. Since their long-term use is frequently complicated by a high rate of side effects, the use of antibiotics that work locally appears to be promising.

  19. Risk factors associated with bacteriological cure, new infection, and incidence of clinical mastitis after dry cow therapy with three different antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundelach, Yasmin; Kalscheuer, Elke; Hamann, Henning; Hoedemaker, Martina

    2011-09-01

    Factors affecting bacteriological cure rates (BCR) and new intramammary infections (IMI) during the dry period as well as clinical mastitis (CM) during early lactation were investigated in 414 German Holstein dairy cows receiving dry cow therapy. Cows were treated with either benethamine benzylpenicillin (300,000 IU), penethamate hydriodide (100,000 IU), and framycetin sulphate (100 mg, n = 136), or cefquinome (150 mg, n = 135), or benzathine cloxacillin (1,280 mg, n = 143). Overall BCR, IMI, and CM at parturition were 86.4%, 20.7%, and 4.3%, respectively. The three antibiotic treatments differed only in BCR, with cloxacillin yielding better results than the others. Udder quarters from cows with > 4 lactations had a higher risk of IMI and CM at calving. Chronic changes in udder tissues were linked to a lower BCR and were associated with a higher risk of CM during early lactation. The risk of CM at calving was higher in udder quarters with unspecific or subclinical mastitis before drying off. In conclusion, with antibiotic dry cow therapy, age and health status of the udder appear to be major determinants of IMI and CM during the dry period and early lactation, while BCR was associated with the antibiotic type and udder tissue status.

  20. Compatibility of 5-fluorouracil and total parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, T C; Clibon, U; Page, C P; Cruz, A B

    1982-01-01

    The physicochemical stability and availability of 0.1% 5-fluorouracil solutions in D5W and a typical total parenteral nutrition solution (hypertonic dextrose and crystalline amino acids) were studied in both glass and Viaflex delivery systems. Serial samples collected over a 48-hour period were assayed for 5-fluorouracil concentration using a high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Changes in the pH as well as precipitate formation were also investigated. There was no reduction in the amount of 5-fluorouracil at 48 hours in either the glass or plastic system, regardless of whether the drug was added to D5W or to the total parenteral nutrition solution. No pH changes or precipitates were observed. These findings indicate that 5-fluorouracil is compatible with and available from total parenteral solutions of hypertonic dextrose and amino acid in both plastic and glass containers. Use of such a system would allow for (1) a reduction in vascular access in patients receiving both treatments and (2) continued administration of nutritional support without the requirement for additional fluid volume.

  1. Intensive medicine – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreymann, G.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5–7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day, carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  2. Bactericidal antibiotics induce programmed metabolic toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn D. Rowan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The misuse of antibiotics has led to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance in clinically important pathogens. These resistant infections are having a significant impact on treatment outcomes and contribute to approximately 25,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. If additional therapeutic options are not identified, the number of annual deaths is predicted to rise to 317,000 in North America and 10,000,000 worldwide by 2050. Identifying therapeutic methodologies that utilize our antibiotic arsenal more effectively is one potential way to extend the useful lifespan of our current antibiotics. Recent studies have indicated that modulating metabolic activity is one possible strategy that can impact the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. In this review, we will address recent advances in our knowledge about the impacts of bacterial metabolism on antibiotic effectiveness and the impacts of antibiotics on bacterial metabolism. We will particularly focus on two studies, Lobritz, et al. (PNAS, 112(27: 8173-8180 and Belenky et al. (Cell Reports, 13(5: 968–980 that together demonstrate that bactericidal antibiotics induce metabolic perturbations that are linked to and required for bactericidal antibiotic toxicity.

  3. The relationship between antibiotic therapy in early childhood and the symptoms of allergy in children aged 6-8 years - the questionnaire study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborski, Filip; Tomaszewska, Aneta; Komorowski, Jarosław; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr; Białoszewski, Artur Z; Walkiewicz, Artur; Lusawa, Adam; Szymański, Jakub; Opoczyńska, Dagmara; Drużba, Michał; Borowicz, Jacek; Lipiec, Agnieszka; Kapalczynski, Wojciech J; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2012-09-01

    Studies based on the ISAAC questionnaire suggest a correlation between the use of antibiotics and the prevalence of asthma and allergy in children aged 6-7 years. The number of courses of antibiotic therapy is an important factor. To investigate the relationship between the use of antibiotics during the first years of life and the prevalence of allergy and asthma among children (aged 6-8 years) in the urban population of Poland. A survey-based study with a self-completed questionnaire. The respondents were parents of children aged 6-8 years living in Warszawa, Poland. 1461 completed questionnaires were collected. Asthma was declared in 4.3% of the children. Wheezing and/or sibilant rhonchi within 12 months before the study was observed in 13.5% of the cases. Asthma medication was taken by 21.8% of the children. Allergic rhinitis was declared in 18.7% of the children. Problems with sneezing, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion not associated with cold or fever were observed in 40.7% of the children. The analysis of the odds ratios between the use of antibiotics and the symptoms of allergic diseases revealed a clear correlation. The highest odds ratio was observed between the completion of over three courses of antibiotic therapy prior to the age of 12 months and the declaration of one of the following: asthma (OR = 5.59, 95% CI: 2.6-12.01), wheezing and/or sibilant rhonchi (OR = 4.68, 95% CI: 3.01-7.27) and taking medicines for breathlessness (OR = 5.12, 95% CI: 3.42-7.68). There is a direct relationship between antibiotic use in the first 3 years of life and asthma and allergy symptoms in children aged 6-8 years old.

  4. Inhaled Antibiotics in the Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Kuzovlev; V. V. Moroz; A. M. Golubev; S. G. Polovnikov

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units. Rational antibiotic therapy is the basis for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. There is currently a challenge of the pathogens of nosocomial pneumonia being resistant to most of the antibiotics recommended for its treatment. Inhaled antibiotics used in combination with systemic drugs are an effective and safe treatment for nosocomial pneumonia. This review of literature characterizes the current possibi...

  5. Analysis of antibiotic consumption in burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam, Somayeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection control is very important in burn care units, because burn wound infection is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among burn patients. Thus, the appropriate prescription of antibiotics can be helpful, but unreasonable prescription can have detrimental consequences, including greater expenses to patients and community alike. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of antibiotic therapy on the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 525 strains of and were isolated from 335 hospitalized burn patients. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed after identification the strains. The records of patients were audited to find the antibiotic used.The results indicated that is the most prevalent Gram-negative bacteria. Further, it showed a relation between abuse of antibiotics and emergence of antibiotic resistance. Control of resistance to antibiotics by appropriate prescription practices not only facilitates prevention of infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR microorganisms, but it can also decrease the cost of treatment.

  6. Dynamic energy budget approach to evaluate antibiotic effects on biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnir, Bjorn; Carpio, Ana; Cebrián, Elena; Vidal, Perfecto

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying the action of antibiotics on biofilms is essential to devise therapies against chronic infections. Biofilms are bacterial communities attached to moist surfaces, sheltered from external aggressions by a polymeric matrix. Coupling a dynamic energy budget based description of cell metabolism to surrounding concentration fields, we are able to approximate survival curves measured for different antibiotics. We reproduce numerically stratified distributions of cell types within the biofilm and introduce ways to incorporate different resistance mechanisms. Qualitative predictions follow that are in agreement with experimental observations, such as higher survival rates of cells close to the substratum when employing antibiotics targeting active cells or enhanced polymer production when antibiotics are administered. The current computational model enables validation and hypothesis testing when developing therapies.

  7. O significado da nutrição parenteral para o cliente no contexto hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Helena Aires de Freitas Lopes

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade de compreender o significado da nutrição parenteral para o cliente no contexto hospitalar surgiu das nossas inquietações diante do cuidado de enfermagem. Realizaram-se observações participantes, entrevistas e anotações de campo junto a sete clientes hospitalizados, que se encontravam sob nutrição parenteral. O sentido das investigações foi centrado na indagação: como você está se sentindo com a nutrição parenteral? Os dados foram analisados numa abordagem interacionista, mostrando as dificuldades enfrentadas pelos clientes na assistência hospitalar, como percebiam eles a nutrição parenteral e que significados eram atribuídos a essa terapêutica. O estudo revelou os sentimentos, comportamentos e atitudes relacionados aos aspectos biológico, emocional e sócio-cultural do cliente, ligados à nutrição parenteral, demonstrando, também as limitações impostas ao cliente sob esse tratamento, bem como as dificuldades na assistência de enfermagem.

  8. Pulmonary nodules secondary to total parenteral alimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, B.A.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-year-old male, who had a retroperitoneal alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and was on total parenteral alimentation (TPN) developed muliple pulmonary nodules, indistinguishable from metastases. These proved to be multiple lipid emboli on open biopsy. (orig.)

  9. Minimizing systemic infection during complete parenteral alimentation of small infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A regimen of parenteral alimentation for infants was designed to eliminate as many factors responsible for infection as possible. The most important features of the feeding regimen were as follows. (1) Infants were fed via indwelling silastic catheters inserted into the superior vena cava or the right atrium by a cutdown operation. (2) The parenteral feeding was fat free to simplify the administration system. Y connectors and 2- or 3-way taps were avoided. (3) Extreme care was taken of junctions within the infusion system. Only certain members of the hospital staff were allowed to break such junctions, e.g. during the changing of packs of solution or of the giving sets. These junctions were sprayed with antibacterial aerosols. (4) The hypertonic solutions of nutrients were prepared in plastic packs, which do not require ventilation. The infusion system was therefore not contaminated by the entry of unsterile outside air. (5) The infused solutions were passed through 0·22 μm millipore filters before entering the patient's blood stream. There was an infection rate of 9% which was less than the 25 to 45% infection rate previously reported during parenteral feeding through indwelling venous catheters, and is also less than that associated with ventriculoatrial shunts for hydrocephalus. There was no case of systemic candidiasis, which is the most frequent and most serious infection associated with parenteral feeding. PMID:4206445

  10. [INHALED ANTIBIOTICS IN TREATMENT OF NOSOCOMIAL PNEUMONIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovlev, A N; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care units. Currently the problem of resistance of noso-comial pathogens to miost of antibiotics is crucial. Using of inhaled antibiotics in combination with intravenous drugs is eff ective and safe method for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. The literature review describes current opportunities of ihhaled antibiotic therapy of nosocomial pneumonia, descriptions of drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment. Special attention is paid for using inhaled aminoglycosides for nosocomial pneumonia.

  11. Antibiotic polymeric nanoparticles for biofilm-associated infection therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles are highly attractive as drug delivery vehicles due to their high structural integrity, stability during storage, ease of preparation and functionalization, and controlled release capability. Similarly, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, which retain the benefits of polymeric nanoparticles plus the enhanced biocompatibility and prolonged circulation time owed to the lipids, have recently emerged as a superior alternative to polymeric nanoparticles. Drug nanoparticle complex prepared by electrostatic interaction of oppositely charged drug and polyelectrolytes represents another type of polymeric nanoparticle. This chapter details the preparation, characterization, and antibiofilm efficacy testing of antibiotic-loaded polymeric and hybrid nanoparticles and antibiotic nanoparticle complex.

  12. Assessing the appropriateness of parenteral nutrition use in hospitalized patients. A comparison on parenteral nutrition bag prescription in different wards and nutritional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponta, Monica Laura; Rabbione, Laura; Borgio, Cristina; Quirico, Eliana; Patrito, Elena; Petrachi, Maria Novella; Girotto, Elisabetta; Sillano, Marisa; Geninatti, Silvio; Zanardi, Michela; Pezzana, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    Our aim is to assess parenteral nutrition (PN) bag prescription in hospitalized patients and evaluate clinical outcomes linked to PN therapy. We performed an observational longitudinal retrospective study on PN prescription in a General Public Hospital in Turin, Italy, on ninety-five patients receiving PN prescribed by the Nutrition Support Team (NST). We described patients' demography and assessed nutritional outcomes, as well as PN bag prescription in different wards. Medians were calculated for several clinical parameters before and after PN therapy. A z-test for proportions has been performed to better understand the impact of various conditions on clinical outcomes and to compare differences between administered nutrients and required amounts. The NST resulted responsible for only 18% of bags prescribed in the geriatrics ward and for 48% in the surgery wards. PN was not able to fulfill nutritional requirements resulting in a median lack of 3.1 calories and 0.23 g of proteins per kilogram of reference body weight per day. Despite this, PN therapy was able to improve total blood proteins and calcium blood levels in our cohort. The NST changed the prescription in 55.8% of the pre-existing PN regimens. More strict adherence to guidelines is needed in order to maximize effectiveness of PN and observe a positive impact on clinical parameters. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling economic implications of alternative treatment strategies for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Nikhil; Ward, Alexandra J; Pelligra, Christopher G; Kongnakorn, Thitima; Fan, Weihong; LaPensee, Kenneth T

    2014-10-01

    The economic implications from the US Medicare perspective of adopting alternative treatment strategies for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) are substantial. The objective of this study is to describe a modeling framework that explores the impact of decisions related to both the location of care and switching to different antibiotics at discharge. A discrete event simulation (DES) was developed to model the treatment pathway of each patient through various locations (emergency department [ED], inpatient, and outpatient) and the treatments prescribed (empiric antibiotic, switching to a different antibiotic at discharge, or a second antibiotic). Costs are reported in 2012 USD. The mean number of days on antibiotic in a cohort assigned to a full course of vancomycin was 11.2 days, with 64% of the treatment course being administered in the outpatient setting. Mean total costs per patient were $8671, with inpatient care accounting for 58% of the costs accrued. The majority of outpatient costs were associated with parenteral administration rather than drug acquisition or monitoring. Scenarios modifying the treatment pathway to increase the proportion of patients receiving the first dose in the ED, and then managing them in the outpatient setting or prescribing an oral antibiotic at discharge to avoid the cost associated with administering parenteral therapy, therefore have a major impact and lower the typical cost per patient by 11-20%. Since vancomycin is commonly used as empiric therapy in clinical practice, based on these analyses, a shift in treatment practice could result in substantial savings from the Medicare perspective. The choice of antibiotic and location of care influence the costs and resource use associated with the management of ABSSSIs. The DES framework presented here can provide insight into the potential economic implications of decisions that modify the treatment pathway.

  14. [Evidence-based aspects of clinical mastitis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansion-de Vries, E M; Hoedemaker, M; Krömker, V

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most common and expensive diseases in dairy cattle. The decision to treat clinical mastitis is usually made without any knowledge of the etiology, and can therefore only be evidence-based to a limited extent. Evidence-based medicine relies essentially on a combination of one's own clinical competence and scientific findings. In mastitis therapy, those insights depend mostly on pathogen-specific factors. Therefore, in evidence-based therapeutic decision making the pathogen identification should serve as a basis for the consideration of scientifically validated therapeutic concepts. The present paper considers evidence-based treatment of clinical mastitis based on a literature review. The authors conclude that an anti-inflammatory treatment using an NSAID should be conducted regardless of the pathogen. However, the choice of an antibiotic therapy depends on the mastitis causative pathogen, clinical symptoms and the animal itself. In principle, a local antibiotic treatment should be chosen for mild and moderate mastitis. It should be noted, that the benefit of an antibiotic therapy for coliform infections is questionable. With knowledge concerning the pathogen, it appears entirely reasonable to refrain from an antibiotic therapy. For severe (i.   e. feverish) mastitis, a parenteral antibiotic therapy should be selected. An extension of the antibiotic therapy beyond the manufacturer's information is only reasonable for streptococcal infections. It is important to make the decision on a prolonged antibiotic therapy only with the knowledge of the mastitis-causative pathogen. In terms of the therapy of a staphylococcus or streptococcus infection, a narrow-spectrum antibiotic from the penicillin family should be adopted when selecting the active agents.

  15. Use of antibiotic beads to salvage infected breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Rami D; Ingargiola, Michael; Sanati-Mehrizy, Paymon; Torina, Philip J; Harmaty, Marco A

    2017-10-01

    When an implant becomes infected, implant salvage is often performed where the implant is removed, capsulectomy is performed, and a new implant is inserted. The patient is discharged with a PICC line and 6-8 weeks of intravenous (IV) antibiotics. This method has variable success and subjects the patient to long-term systemic antibiotics. In the 1960s, the use of antibiotic-impregnated beads for the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis was described. These beads deliver antibiotic directly to the site of the infection, thereby eliminating the complications of systemic IV antibiotics. This study aimed to present a case series illustrating the use of STIMULAN calcium sulfate beads loaded with vancomycin and tobramycin to increase the rate of salvage of the infected implant and forgo IV antibiotics. A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who were treated at Mount Sinai Hospital for implant infection with salvage and antibiotic beads. Twelve patients were identified, 10 of whom had breast cancer. Comorbidities included hypertension, smoking, and immunocompromised status. Infections were noted anywhere from 5 days to 8 years postoperatively. Salvage was successful in 9 out of the 12 infected implants using antibiotic bead therapy without home IV antibiotics. The use of antibiotic beads is promising for salvaging infected breast implants without IV antibiotics. Seventy-five percent of the implants were successfully salvaged. Of the three patients who had unsalvageable implants, one was infected with antibiotic-resistant Rhodococcus that was refractory to bead therapy and one was noncompliant with postoperative instructions. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Who Can Have Parenteral Antibiotics at Home?: A Prospective Observational Study in Children with Moderate/Severe Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Laila F; Hopper, Sandy M; Babl, Franz E; Bryant, Penelope A

    2016-03-01

    The benefits of treating children at home or in an ambulatory setting have been well documented. We aimed to describe the characteristics and evaluate the outcomes of children with moderate/severe cellulitis treated at home with intravenous (IV) ceftriaxone via direct referral from the Emergency Department to a hospital-in-the-home (HITH) program. Patients aged 3 months to 18 years with moderate/severe cellulitis referred from a tertiary pediatric Emergency Department to HITH from September 2012 to January 2014 were prospectively identified. Data collection included demographics, clinical features, microbiological characteristics and outcomes. To ensure home treatment did not result in inferior outcomes, these patients were retrospectively compared with patients who were hospitalized for IV flucloxacillin, the standard-of-care over the same period. The primary outcome was home treatment failure necessitating hospital admission. Secondary outcomes included antibiotic changes, complications, length of stay and cost. Forty-one (28%) patients were treated on HITH and 103 (72%) were hospitalized. Compared with hospitalized patients, HITH patients were older (P antibiotic changes was similar in both groups (5% vs. 7%, P = 0.67), as was IV antibiotic duration (2.3 vs. 2.5 days, P = 0.23). Older children with moderate/severe limb cellulitis without systemic symptoms can be treated at home. To ascertain if this practice can be applied more widely, a comparative prospective, ideally randomized, study is needed.

  17. Synthetic membrane-targeted antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vooturi, S K; Firestine, S M

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance continues to evolve and presents serious challenges in the therapy of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The rise of resistant strains like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) suggests that antimicrobial resistance is an inevitable evolutionary response to antimicrobial use. This highlights the tremendous need for antibiotics against new bacterial targets. Agents that target the integrity of bacterial membrane are relatively novel in the clinical armamentarium. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide is a classical example of membrane-bound antibiotic. Nature has also utilized this tactic. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are found in all kingdoms, function primarily by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane. AMPs have several advantages over existing antibiotics including a broad spectrum of activity, rapid bactericidal activity, no cross-resistance with the existing antibiotics and a low probability for developing resistance. Currently, a small number of peptides have been developed for clinical use but therapeutic applications are limited because of poor bioavailability and high manufacturing cost. However, their broad specificity, potent activity and lower probability for resistance have spurred the search for synthetic mimetics of antimicrobial peptides as membrane-active antibiotics. In this review, we will discuss the different classes of synthetic membrane-bound antibiotics published since 2004.

  18. Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estmann, Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    to diagnosis and clinical course. METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part...

  19. A New Approach for the Discovery of Antibiotics by Targeting Non-Multiplying Bacteria: A Novel Topical Antibiotic for Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmin; Shamaei-Tousi, Alireza; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    In a clinical infection, multiplying and non-multiplying bacteria co-exist. Antibiotics kill multiplying bacteria, but they are very inefficient at killing non-multipliers which leads to slow or partial death of the total target population of microbes in an infected tissue. This prolongs the duration of therapy, increases the emergence of resistance and so contributes to the short life span of antibiotics after they reach the market. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria from the onset of an antibiotic development program is a new concept. This paper describes the proof of principle for this concept, which has resulted in the development of the first antibiotic using this approach. The antibiotic, called HT61, is a small quinolone-derived compound with a molecular mass of about 400 Daltons, and is active against non-multiplying bacteria, including methicillin sensitive and resistant, as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin-carrying Staphylococcus aureus. It also kills mupirocin resistant MRSA. The mechanism of action of the drug is depolarisation of the cell membrane and destruction of the cell wall. The speed of kill is within two hours. In comparison to the conventional antibiotics, HT61 kills non-multiplying cells more effectively, 6 logs versus less than one log for major marketed antibiotics. HT61 kills methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus in the murine skin bacterial colonization and infection models. No resistant phenotype was produced during 50 serial cultures over a one year period. The antibiotic caused no adverse affects after application to the skin of minipigs. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria using this method should be able to yield many new classes of antibiotic. These antibiotics may be able to reduce the rate of emergence of resistance, shorten the duration of therapy, and reduce relapse rates. PMID:20676403

  20. The role of procalcitonin as a guide for the diagnosis, prognosis, and decision of antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Abd El-Azeem

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: Serum PCT level could be used as a novel marker of lower respiratory tract bacterial infections for diagnosis, prognosis and follow up of therapy. This reduces side-effects of an unnecessary antibiotic use, lowers costs, and in the long-term, leads to diminishing drug resistance.

  1. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION REGARDING ANTIBIOTICS AMONG POLISH PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are drugs often used. This drugs used without legitimate indications or incorrectly may cause not satisfactory clinical results. It is therefore important for the society members to be aware of what is an antibiotic and which benefits and risks its use may bring. The survey was conducted in 2010. Objective of the study was to obtain information on the current knowledge and beliefs about antibiotic therapy of Poles. The research material consisted of 609 questionnaires and interviews, conducted among the adult population residing in the Lublin voivodeship. The study shows that rural inhabitants don't know the term herbal medicine or antibiotic more often than inhabitants in the city. Similarly, they more often don't know the action of antibiotics as well as use them less frequently. Poles treat them as an emergency exit if they are not helped by home treatments. There was a problem of overuse of antibiotics, related to young people, which were busy and have no time for illness. Self-medication in the antibiotic therapy also occurs and is caused, among others, by undisciplined patients. The respondents admited that they have antibiotics from the previous treatment, from pharmacy, or from family or friends. However, residents of rural areas using an antibiotic most frequently, cited a pharmacy as the source of this drug. Other issues dealt within this study generally doesn't differ for rural inhabitants from the data obtained among the urban population.

  2. Antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile, and short-chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, H; Tvede, M; Mortensen, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that Clostridium difficile and decreased colonic production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) cause the development of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. We therefore wanted to investigate the effects of an intensive and uniform antibiotic therapy on faecal SCFAs...... concentrations. C. difficile, and extent of diarrhoea. METHODS: Fifteen liver-transplanted patients who received oral bowel flora suppression therapy (6.3 g cefuroxime, 0.6 g tobramycin, and 0.5 g nystatin three times daily) were studied for 12 days before and 12 days after discontinuation of therapy. RESULTS...

  3. Effects of prophylactic antibiotics on wound infection in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Hemati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wound infection is one of the most common complications of surgical procedures.At present, different procedures are used to reduce wound infection including prophylactic antibiotics.Since laparoscopy controls the most sources of wound infection such as mechanical factors, the role ofprophylactic antibiotic therapy may be in doubt. In this study, we evaluated the antibiotic effects inprevention of wound infection in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.Methods and Materials: In this double-blind clinical trial study, patients who were candidate forlaparoscopic cholecystectomy were divided randomly into two groups: antibiotic receivers (38patients and placebo (Normal Saline receivers (32 patients group. The patients were visited in 24hours, 4-7, 10-15 and 30 days after surgery for wound infection and then 2 groups compared.Results: The study showed that there were no significant differences between two groups withrespect to age, body mass index and smoking. In addition, no wound infection was observed in first 24hours, 4-7, 10-15 and 30 days after operation in both groups.Conclusion: The findings showed that prophylactic antibiotic therapy in laparoscopiccholecystectomy has no effect on the incidence of wound infection. Therefore, it is suggested thatprophylactic antibiotic therapy does not use in laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of producingantibiotic resistance, unnecessary complications and also reducing economical costs.

  4. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M.; Pironi, L.; Bozzetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) was introduced as a treatment modality in the early 1970s primarily for the treatment of chronic intestinal failure in patients with benign disease. The relatively low morbidity and mortality associated with HPN has encouraged its widespread use in western countries....... Thus there is huge clinical experience, but there are still few controlled clinical studies of treatment effects and management of complications. The purpose of these guidelines is to highlight areas of good practice and promote the use of standardized treatment protocols between centers...

  5. Prospective evaluation of antibiotic treatment for urological procedure in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglinski, L; Rouzaud, C; Even, A; Bouchand, F; Davido, B; Duran, C; Salomon, J; Perronne, C; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E; Dinh, A

    2016-09-01

    Patients presenting with neurogenic bladder often require urological procedures (urodynamic testing and botulinum toxin injections) and a preventive antibiotic therapy. We aimed to assess the efficacy of this little known strategy in a cohort of patients. All patients presenting with neurogenic bladder who underwent urological procedure were included in the study. They received an antibiotic therapy in accordance with the urine cytobacteriological examination results. The antibiotic therapy was initiated two days before the procedure and prolonged up until two days after the procedure if the culture was positive. Patients were treated with a single dose of fosfomycin-trometamol in case of a negative culture. The main study outcome was the occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI), defined by a positive urine culture and symptoms, up until 14 days after the procedure. A total of 80 urological procedures were performed. Mean patient age was 47±13.1 years (sex ratio 1.22); 59 (73.8%) presented with asymptomatic bacteriuria before the procedure. Nine (11.1%) UTIs were recorded on Day 14, of which one (1.2%) was febrile. Two patients required an additional curative antibiotic therapy. No patient was hospitalized. Overall, 77.8% of UTIs were cured without antibiotic therapy. Screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before urological procedures seems unnecessary and vainly exposes this population at high risk of infectious diseases to antibiotic therapies. This data should be confirmed by a randomized clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Every antibiotic, every day: Maximizing the impact of prospective audit and feedback on total antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Tonya J; Decloe, Melissa; Gill, Suzanne; Ho, Grace; McCready, Janine; Powis, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The success of antimicrobial stewardship is dependent on how often it is completed and which antimicrobials are targeted. We evaluated the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in three non-ICU settings where all systemic antibiotics, regardless of spectrum, were targeted on the first weekday after initiation. Prospective audit and feedback (PAAF) was initiated on the surgical, respiratory, and medical wards of a community hospital on July 1, 2010, October 1, 2010, and April 1, 2012, respectively. We evaluated rates of total antibiotic use, measured in days on therapy (DOTs), among all patients admitted to the wards before and after PAAF initiation using an interrupted time series analysis. Changes in antibiotic costs, rates of C. difficile infection (CDI), mortality, readmission, and length of stay were evaluated using univariate analyses. Time series modelling demonstrated that total antibiotic use decreased (± standard error) by 100 ± 51 DOTs/1,000 patient-days on the surgical wards (p = 0.049), 100 ± 46 DOTs/1,000 patient-days on the respiratory ward (p = 0.029), and 91 ± 33 DOTs/1,000 patient-days on the medical wards (p = 0.006) immediately following PAAF initiation. Reductions in antibiotic use were sustained up to 50 months after intervention initiation, and were accompanied by decreases in antibiotic costs. There were no significant changes to patient outcomes on the surgical and respiratory wards following intervention initiation. On the medical wards, however, readmission increased from 4.6 to 5.6 per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.043), while mortality decreased from 7.4 to 5.0 per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.001). CDI rates showed a non-significant declining trend after PAAF initiation. ASPs can lead to cost-effective, sustained reductions in total antibiotic use when interventions are conducted early in the course of therapy and target all antibiotics. Shifting to such a model may help strengthen the effectiveness of ASPs in non

  7. Attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, A; Simpson, J M; Armour, C L

    1999-06-01

    Antibiotic therapy in hospitals has substantial impact on patient outcome and the pharmacy drug budget. Antibiotic policies have been implemented by some hospitals to improve the quality of patient outcome and cost of antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic policies impose certain requirements on pharmacists and physicians. Pharmacists' and physicians' attitudes to and opinions about antibiotic policies are likely to affect the usefulness of such policies. To determine the attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in New South Wales (NSW) hospitals. Pharmacists and physicians in NSW public hospitals were surveyed to determine their attitudes to and opinions on antibiotic policies. A simple one-stage cluster sample of 241 pharmacists and a two-stage cluster sample of 701 physicians were obtained. Factor analysis was used to identify the attitudinal dimensions. General linear modelling was used to investigate the effects of predictor variables on outcome variables. The response rates were 91% and 77% for pharmacists and physicians, respectively. Factor analysis identified three dimensions of attitude to antibiotic policies: that they encourage rational antibiotic use; that they improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing and that they are associated with some problems. The reliability of these factors (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.71 to 0.74, and was 0.90 for the overall attitude scale. Pharmacists and physicians had a positive overall attitude to antibiotic policies. Whereas physicians recognize that antibiotic policies improve the quality of prescribing, this was highly correlated with identification of problems (alpha = 0.71). In urban hospitals, pharmacists were more likely than physicians to associate antibiotics with problems. There was a positive overall attitude to hospital antibiotic policies expressed by pharmacists and physicians.

  8. Safety of home parenteral nutrition during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilla, Miriam; Ławiński, Michał; Cohen, Jonathan; Hadar, Eran; Kagan, Ilya; Perkewick, Marek; Singer, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of total parenteral nutrition which is lipid-based given throughout pregnancy to patients unable to obtain adequate nutrition by the oral route. In this study we examined the use of lipid-based home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 7 pregnant women, commenced either before or during pregnancy, and their intra-pregnant course as well as a 2-year follow-up of their offspring is described. HPN was formulated on an individual basis and protein administered in a dose of 0.8-1.1 g/kg during the three trimesters. Lipid emulsions included long chain triglycerides or olive-oil based formulae and all patients received trace elements. Data were collected during the course of pregnancy and at birth while infants were followed for a period of between 6 months and 2 years using medical records and questionnaires. In total, we studied 9 pregnancies (in 7 women). HPN was administered for a median of 9 months (range 3-9 months). The mean energy provided during the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester was 9297 ± 2797 kcal/week, 9148 ± 2629 kcal/week and 8564 ± 4059 kcal/week resp. The mean increase in weight during the pregnancy was 9 ± 5 Kg. The only complications noted during the pregnancy consisted of 3 episodes of catheter-related infections which were successfully treated by antibiotics. The infants were born after a mean of 38.00 ± 1.55 weeks of gestation, with a mean first minute Apgar score of 8.7 ± 1.8 which increased to 9.8 ± 0.4 after 10 min. The mean infant birth weight was 2.45 ± 0.37 kg. No complications were noted at birth apart from one infant who suffered from torticollis which resolved spontaneously. During follow up, a decrease in hemoglobin related to low iron levels was noted in 1 infant, 2 infants were noted to be allergic to pollen and one underwent a scrotal hernia reduction. No developmental problems have been observed, neither physiological nor psychomotor, over the 2-year follow-up period. The authors

  9. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  10. Inflammation, Antibiotics, and Diet as Environmental Stressors of the Gut Microbiome in Pediatric Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Chen, Eric Z; Baldassano, Robert N; Otley, Anthony R; Griffiths, Anne M; Lee, Dale; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey; Friedman, Elliot S; Hoffmann, Christian; Albenberg, Lindsey; Sinha, Rohini; Compher, Charlene; Gilroy, Erin; Nessel, Lisa; Grant, Amy; Chehoud, Christel; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2015-10-14

    Abnormal composition of intestinal bacteria--"dysbiosis"-is characteristic of Crohn's disease. Disease treatments include dietary changes and immunosuppressive anti-TNFα antibodies as well as ancillary antibiotic therapy, but their effects on microbiota composition are undetermined. Using shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we analyzed fecal samples from a prospective cohort of pediatric Crohn's disease patients starting therapy with enteral nutrition or anti-TNFα antibodies and reveal the full complement and dynamics of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses during treatment. Bacterial community membership was associated independently with intestinal inflammation, antibiotic use, and therapy. Antibiotic exposure was associated with increased dysbiosis, whereas dysbiosis decreased with reduced intestinal inflammation. Fungal proportions increased with disease and antibiotic use. Dietary therapy had independent and rapid effects on microbiota composition distinct from other stressor-induced changes and effectively reduced inflammation. These findings reveal that dysbiosis results from independent effects of inflammation, diet, and antibiotics and shed light on Crohn disease treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. August 2014 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: the use of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. This month's journal club reviewed the role of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease. Macrolide usage was suggested from observational studies in Japan in diffuse panbroncholitis, a disorder associated with chronic respiratory infection, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1. Clinical improvement was noted despite doses of antibiotics well below the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the antibiotic. This suggested the antibiotic was likely working by an anti-inflammatory effect. These observations were extended to cystic fibrosis (CF where prophylactic macrolide therapy in CF patients infected with Pseudomonas has become standard therapy (2. More recently, low dose macrolide therapy has been applied to non-CF lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchiectasis and asthma. Time did not permit a review of all studies so a representative sample was discussed. In patients with COPD, the four randomized, placebo-controlled trials reviewed all suggested that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduced COPD exacerbations (3-5. This ...

  12. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  13. Multiple Genetic Analysis System-Based Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing in Helicobacter pylori and High Eradication Rate With Phenotypic Resistance-Guided Quadruple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Ji, Danian; Huang, Renxiang; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yiqin; Xiang, Ping; Kong, Mimi; Nan, Li; Zeng, Xianping; Wu, Yong; Bao, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major factor for eradication failure. Molecular tests including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and dual priming oligonucleotide-PCR (DPO-PCR) play critical roles in the detection of antibiotic susceptibility; however, limited knowledge is known about application of multiple genetic analysis system (MGAS) in the area of H. pylori identification and antibiotics resistance detection.The aim of this study is to determine the antibiotics resistance using different molecular tests and evaluate the treatment outcomes of E-test-based genotypic resistance.A total of 297 patients with dyspepsia complaint were recruited for gastroscopies. Ninety patients with H. pylori culture positive were randomly divided into 2 groups (test group and control group). E-test, general PCR, and MGAS assay were performed in test group. Patients in control group were treated with empirical therapy (rabeprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin [AMX] + clarithromycin [CLR]), whereas patients in test group received quadruple therapy based on E-test results twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The eradication effect of H. pylori was confirmed by C-urea breath test after at least 4 weeks when treatment was finished.Rapid urease test showed 46.5% (128/297) patients with H. pylori infection, whereas 30.3% (90/297) patients were H. pylori culture positive. E-test showed that H. pylori primary resistance rate to CLR, AMX, metronidazole, tetracycline, and levofloxacin (LVX) was 40.0% (18/45), 4.4% (2/45), 53.3% (24/45), 0% (0/45), and 55.6% (25/45), respectively. In addition, there are many multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, and the MDR strains have higher minimum inhibitory concentration than their single-drug resistant counterparts. Considering E-test as the reference test, the sensitivities of general PCR and MGAS in detecting CLR resistance were 83.3% (15/18) and 94.4% (17

  14. Probiotics in antibiotic associated diarrhea in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics that disturb the gastrointestinal microbiota is associated with diarrhea, which occurs in up to half of treated children. Symptoms are usually mild and children do not need hospitalization. Probiotics are live microorganisms, which restore intestinal microbiota during antibiotic therapy through different mechanisms such as stimulation of immunity, secretion of anti-inflammatory factors, and production of antimicrobial substances. The use of different strains of probiotics in antibiotic-associated diarrhea was evaluated in several studies in adults but less frequently in pediatric population. They also confirmed the value of probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children, particularly Lactobacillus strain GG and Saccharomyces boulardii. The use of probiotics in childhood is safe. A proper strain must be introduced at the beginning of antibiotic treatment in a sufficient concentration.

  15. Impact of antibiotic administration on blood culture positivity at the beginning of sepsis: a prospective clinical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Christian S; Fuchs, Christian; Gründling, Matthias; Vollmer, Marcus; Bast, Juliane; Bohnert, Jürgen A; Zimmermann, Kathrin; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Rehberg, Sebastian; Kuhn, Sven-Olaf

    2018-06-04

    Sepsis guidelines recommend obtaining blood cultures before starting anti-infective therapy in patients with sepsis. However, little is known how antibiotic treatment prior to sampling affects bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to compare the results of blood cultures drawn prior to and under antibiotic therapy. Prospective clinical cohort study of septic patients. Adult ICU patients with 2 or 3 blood culture (BC) sets at the beginning of sepsis between 2010 and 2017 were included. Patients with blood culture samplings obtained prior to antibiotic therapy were compared to patients with samplings under antibiotic therapy. Blood culture positivity, defined as microbiological pathogen finding, was compared between the groups. Logistic regression was performed to adjust the impact of different factors with respect to blood culture positivity. In total, 559 patients with 1364 blood culture sets at the beginning of sepsis were analyzed. BC positivity was 50.6% (78/154) among septic patients who did not receive antibiotics and only 27.7% (112/405) in those who were already under antibiotics (Pcultures under antibiotic therapy is associated with a significant loss of pathogen detection. This strongly emphasizes the current recommendation to obtain blood cultures prior to antibiotic administration in patients with sepsis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Antibiotic treatment and mortality in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis or bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thønnings, S; Knudsen, J D; Schønheyder, H C; Søgaard, M; Arpi, M; Gradel, K O; Østergaard, C

    2016-08-01

    Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections carry a high mortality despite antibiotic treatment. The rareness of the infection makes it difficult to improve antibiotic treatment through randomized clinical trials. This observational study investigated clinical features and outcome of invasive L. monocytogenes infections including the efficacy of empiric and definitive antibiotic therapies. Demographic, clinical and biochemical findings, antibiotic treatment and 30-day mortality for all episodes of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and/or meningitis were collected by retrospective medical record review in the North Denmark Region and the Capital Region of Denmark (17 hospitals) from 1997 to 2012. Risk factors for 30-day all-cause mortality were assessed by logistic regression. The study comprised 229 patients (median age: 71 years), 172 patients had bacteraemia, 24 patients had meningitis and 33 patients had both. Significant risk factors for 30-day mortality were septic shock (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.4), altered mental state (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.1). Cephalosporins accounted for 90% of inadequately treated cases. Adequate definitive antibiotic treatment was administered to 195 patients who survived the early period (benzylpenicillin 72, aminopenicillin 84, meropenem 28, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 6, and piperacillin/tazobactam 5). Definitive antibiotic treatment with benzylpenicillin or aminopenicillin resulted in a lower 30-day mortality in an adjusted analysis compared with meropenem (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.8). In conclusion, inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy and definitive therapy with meropenem were both associated with significantly higher 30-day mortality. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brief Parenteral Nutrition Accelerates Weight Gain, Head Growth Even in Healthy VLBWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Naho; Belfort, Mandy B.; McCormick, Marie C.; Mori, Rintaro; Noma, Hisashi; Kusuda, Satoshi; Fujimura, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Whether parenteral nutrition benefits growth of very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants in the setting of rapid enteral feeding advancement is unclear. Our aim was to examine this issue using data from Japan, where enteral feeding typically advances at a rapid rate. Methods We studied 4005 hospitalized VLBW, very preterm (23–32 weeks' gestation) infants who reached full enteral feeding (100 ml/kg/day) by day 14, from 75 institutions in the Neonatal Research Network Japan (2003–2007). Main outcomes were weight gain, head growth, and extra-uterine growth restriction (EUGR, measurement parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for maternal, infant, and institutional characteristics, infants who received parenteral nutrition had greater weight gain [0.09 standard deviation (SD), 95% CI: 0.02, 0.16] and head growth (0.16 SD, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.28); lower odds of EUGR by head circumference (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.88). No statistically significant difference was seen in the proportion of infants with EUGR at discharge. SGA infants and infants who took more than a week until full feeding had larger estimates. Discussion Even in infants who are able to establish enteral nutrition within 2 weeks, deprivation of parenteral nutrition in the first weeks of life could lead to under nutrition, but infants who reached full feeding within one week benefit least. It is important to predict which infants are likely or not likely to advance on enteral feedings within a week and balance enteral and parenteral nutrition for these infants. PMID:24586323

  18. The use of antibiotics based on prescriptions dispenced in pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Vadapalaitė-Mašalienė, Vilma

    2017-01-01

    The Use of Antibiotics Based on Prescriptions Dispenced in Pharmacies SUMMARY Baronienė J., Vadapalaitė-Mašalienė V. The use of antibiotics based on prescriptions dispenced in pharmacies: pharmacy master's thesis. Vilnius University, faculty of medicine – Vilnius, 2017. – 43 p. Antibiotics are not a cure-all. There are many diseases that are insurmountable without antibiotics: these diseases are caused by bacteria. Antibacterial therapy prevents from complications and sometimes saves lives. H...

  19. Early Post Operative Enteral Versus Parenteral Feeding after Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadtaghi Rajabi Mashhadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is reported to be high. In particular, patients with esophageal cancer are prone to malnutrition, due to preoperative digestive system dysfunctions and short-term non-oral feeding postoperatively. Selection of an appropriate method for feeding in the postoperative period is important in these patients.   Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with esophageal cancer who had undergone esophagectomy between September 2008 and October 2009 were randomly assigned into either enteral feeding or parenteral feeding groups, with the same calorie intake in each group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C3, C4 and hs-C-reactive protein          (hs-CRP, as well as the rate of surgical complications, restoration of bowel movements and cost was assessed in each group.   Results: Our results showed that there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum albumin, prealbumin or transferrin. However, C3 and C4 levels were significantly higher in the enteral feeding group compared with the parenteral group, while hs-CRP level was significantly lower in the enteral feeding group. Bowel movements were restored sooner and costs of treatment were lower in the enteral group. Postoperative complications did not differ significantly between the groups. There was one death in the parenteral group 10 days after surgery due to myocardial infarction.   Conclusion:  The results of our study showed that enteral feeding can be used effectively in the first days after surgery, with few early complications and similar nutritional outcomes compared with the parenteral method. Enteral feeding was associated with reduced inflammation and was associated with an improvement in immunological responses, quicker return of bowel movements, and reduced costs in comparison with parenteral feeding.

  20. Low-dose antibiotics: current status and outlook for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antimicrobial therapy is a key factor in our success against pathogens poised to ravage at risk or infected individuals. However, we are currently at a watershed point as we face a growing crisis of antibiotic resistance among diverse pathogens. One area of intense interest is the impact of the a......Antimicrobial therapy is a key factor in our success against pathogens poised to ravage at risk or infected individuals. However, we are currently at a watershed point as we face a growing crisis of antibiotic resistance among diverse pathogens. One area of intense interest is the impact...... of the application of antibiotics for uses other than the treatment of patients and the association with such utilization with emerging drug resistance. This Research Topic “Low- dose antibiotics: current status and outlook for the future” in Frontiers in Microbiology: Antimicrobials, Resistance and Chemotherapy...

  1. Antibiotic stewardship in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Vecino-Moreno, Milly; De La Hoz, Juan M; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to be associated with significant mortality and morbidity. As with other infectious diseases, in recent years there has been a marked increase in resistance to the antibiotics commonly used against the pathogens that cause CAP. Antimicrobial stewardship denotes coordinated interventions to improve and measure the appropriate use of antibiotics by encouraging the selection of optimal drug regimens. Areas covered: Several elements can be applied to antibiotic stewardship strategies for CAP in order to maintain or improve patient outcomes. In this regard, antibiotic de-escalation, duration of antibiotic treatment, adherence to CAP guidelines recommendations about empirical treatment, and switching from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy may each be relevant in this context. Antimicrobial stewardship strategies, such as prospective audit with intervention and feedback, clinical pathways, and dedicated multidisciplinary teams, that have included some of these elements have demonstrated improvements in antimicrobial use for CAP without negatively affecting clinical outcomes. Expert commentary: Although there are a limited number of randomized clinical studies addressing antimicrobial stewardship strategies in CAP, there is evidence that antibiotic stewardship initiatives can be securely applied, providing benefits to both healthcare systems and patients.

  2. Delivery of vitamins E and C from parenteral alimentation solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, J P; Borum, P R; Duke, E A

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that substantial losses of fat-soluble (FS) vitamin A from parenteral alimentation solution occur due to adsorption in the intravenous tubing and photodegradation in the bottle. This study assessed the delivery of other vitamins, viz, FS vitamin E and water-soluble (WS) vitamin C, from parenteral alimentation solution. The solution containing 2.0 ml/L of an aqueous multivitamin infusion was infused at a constant rate of 10 ml/h using a standard intravenous administration set. Multiple aliquots of the solution from the bottle and the effluent obtained sequentially in a 24-h period were analyzed for concentrations of vitamins E and C. Both vitamins remained relatively stable in the bottle. A significant amount (12%) of vitamin E was lost in the intravenous tubing. No losses of vitamin C were incurred in the intravenous tubing. The data suggest that delivery of FS vitamin E from parenteral alimentation solutions is less than optimum because of adsorptive losses. Similar losses are not encountered with WS vitamin C.

  3. Febrile neutropenia in paediatric peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, in vitro sensitivity data and clinical response to empirical antibiotic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.H.; Nasim, S.; Ahmed, A.; Irfan, M.; Ishaque, A.; Farzana, T.; Panjwani, V.K.; Taj, M.; Shamsi, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    To find the in-vitro sensitivity data and clinical response in order to determine the changes required in empiric antibiotic therapy for management of febrile neutropenia in paediatric patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. All patients were treated according to institutional protocol for febrile neutropenia. Empirical antibiotics include Ceftriaxone and Amikacin. In non-responders, changes made included Imipenem and Amikacin, Piperacillin Tazobactum/Tiecoplanin or Vancomycin/Cloxacilin/Ceftazidime. In non-responders, amphotaracin was added until recovery. Out of 52 patients, 5 did not develop any fever; in the remaining 47 patients there were 57 episodes of febrile neutropenia. The mean days of febrile episodes were 4.71 (range 3-8). Fever of unknown origin (FUO) occurred in 31 (54.3%) episodes. Microbiologically documented infection (MDI) occurred in 17 (29.8%) episodes of fever. Clinically documented infection (CDI) occurred in 9 (15.7%) episodes. Gram-negative organisms were isolated in 10 while gram-positive organisms in 7. Klebseilla, S. aureus were the most common isolates. Empirical therapy was effective in 12 of the 33 (36%) episodes. Out of 28, 26 (92%) responded to Imipenem/Amikacin as second line therapy while those who received any other second line combination, only 11 out of 22 (50%) showed response. Systemic Amphotericin was used in 4 patients, 2 responded. Infection related mortality rate was 4%. (author)

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascellino, Maria Teresa; Porowska, Barbara; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Oliva, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori ( Hp ) eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach) is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016) are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently approved in Japan, is also considered to be a promising solution for Hp eradication, even for clarithromycin-resistant strains. Furthermore, there is growing interest in finding new therapeutic strategies, such as the development of vaccines or the use of natural resources, including

  5. [Routine comparison of trace element deficiencies during parenteral alimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Cailar, J; Mathieu-Daudé, J C; Kienlen, J; Béssou, D; Griffe, O; Bélé-Binda

    1977-01-01

    In 50 patients aged between 3 and 84 years treated in a multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit and receiving parenteral alimentation, deficiency in certain trace elements or electrolytes (Cu++, Zn++, Mn++, Co++, PO-4, Mg++) was prevented or treated by the administration of a glucose solution (MB 147 G) enriched in trace elements. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate, on the basis of assay of serum levels of the trace elements involved, with the exception of Mn and Co, the effectiveness of treatment. Reference values were determined on the one hand in healthy individuals for normal figures and secondly on subjects included in the study, already on parenteral alimentation for several days, before treatment with MB 147 G, in order to demonstrate the existence of a deficiency (patient control values). In the case of PO--4, however, the patient control values concerned at one and the same time subjects in the study before treatment with MB 147 G and other patients receiving parenteral alimentation who were not part of the trial. MB 147 G solution was presented in units of 500 ml associated with glucose of varying concentrations (15 p. 100, 30 p. 100, 50 p. 100). The average daily amount administered, over a period of 236 days, was 3 unites per 24 hours, corresponding to an intake of copper of 3.78 mg, 3.90 mg of zinc, 0.20 mg of manganese, 0.24 mg of cobalt, 363 mg of magnesium, 240 mg of calcium and 15 mEz of phosphates. The results show that levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and phosphates were low during parenteral alimentation. The administration of MB 147 G resulted in a significant increase in these values, without there being any evidence of accumulation.

  6. Basis for selecting optimum antibiotic regimens for secondary peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Emilio; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Gilsanz, Fernando; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Adequate management of severely ill patients with secondary peritonitis requires supportive therapy of organ dysfunction, source control of infection and antimicrobial therapy. Since secondary peritonitis is polymicrobial, appropriate empiric therapy requires combination therapy in order to achieve the needed coverage for both common and more unusual organisms. This article reviews etiological agents, resistance mechanisms and their prevalence, how and when to cover them and guidelines for treatment in the literature. Local surveillances are the basis for the selection of compounds in antibiotic regimens, which should be further adapted to the increasing number of patients with risk factors for resistance (clinical setting, comorbidities, previous antibiotic treatments, previous colonization, severity…). Inadequate antimicrobial regimens are strongly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Awareness of resistance epidemiology and of clinical consequences of inadequate therapy against resistant bacteria is crucial for clinicians treating secondary peritonitis, with delicate balance between optimization of empirical therapy (improving outcomes) and antimicrobial overuse (increasing resistance emergence).

  7. [Nationwide sensitivity surveillance of ciprofloxacin and various parenteral antibiotics against bacteria isolated from patients with severe infections--the first Ciproxan IV special investigation in 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Yamanaka, Kiyoharu; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Naoki; Uehara, Nobuyuki; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Hayashi, Mutsumu; Hirakata, Yoichi

    2003-12-01

    The parenteral injection of ciprofloxacin (CPFX), a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, was approved in September 2000 and a re-examination period of 6 years was set at that time. As a special investigation to apply for re-examination of this drug, it has been planned to conduct 3 nationwide surveillances during the re-examination period by collecting clinically isolated bacteria from patients with severe infections, to whom the drug was mainly indicated, and examining drug susceptibilities of the bacteria to various parenteral antimicrobial drugs including CPFX. This time, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various parenteral antimicrobial drugs including CPFX against 1,220 strains isolated from patients with severe infections by the micro-liquid dilution method and compared susceptibilities of various clinically isolated bacteria to CPFX with those to other antimicrobial drugs. Gram-positive bacteria were less susceptible to CPFX than to carbapenems except 2 bacterial species, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus avium but susceptibilities of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis to CPFX were comparable to those to cefozopran. Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to CPFX did not differ among ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC of ABPC: MIC of ABPC: 0.25-2 micrograms/ml) and ABPC-resistant S. pneumoniae (MIC of ABPC: > or = 4 micrograms/ml) MIC90 of CPFX: 1 microgram/ml) and a decrease in the antimicrobial activity seen among cephem and carbapenem antimicrobial drugs against penicillin-intermediate strains was not noted with CPFX. Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to CPFX similarly to carbapenems and the MIC90 values of CPFX were in the range from MIC90 was 2 micrograms/ml. CPFX also showed the lowest MIC90 value (0.5 microgram/ml) against beta-lactam-resistant P. aeruginosa among the drugs examined. When extended-spectrum beta

  8. Comparative study of the efficacy of topical steroid and antibiotic combination therapy versus oral antibiotic alone when treating acute rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hennawi, D M; Ahmed, M R; Farid, A M; Al Murtadah, A M

    2015-05-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis arises as a consequence of viral rhinitis, and bacterial infection can subsequently occur. Intranasal antibiotics as an adjunct to corticosteroids usually demonstrate the greatest symptom relief. We wanted to clinically evaluate the effects of a topical antibiotic and steroid combination administered intranasally, versus an oral antibiotic alone when treating acute rhinosinusitis. Forty patients with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis were divided into two groups. Group A received an antibiotic and steroid combination (ofloxacin 0.26 per cent and dexamethasone 0.053 per cent nasal drops) for 10 days, administered intranasally (5 drops in each nostril/8 hours). Group B, the control group, received an oral antibiotic alone (amoxicillin 90 mg/kg). Eight hours after commencing treatment, facial pain was more severe in group B and nasal obstruction was reduced in both groups. Ten days after commencing treatment, anterior nasal discharge was 0.15 per cent in group A and absent in group B. The application of a topical antibiotic and steroid combination into the nasal cavity is an effective way of treating uncomplicated, acute bacterial rhinosinusitis with the theoretical advantages of easy administration, high local drug concentration and minimal systemic adverse effects.

  9. Antibiotic-impregnated calcium phosphate cement as part of a comprehensive treatment for patients with established orthopaedic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Iwakura, Takashi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of established orthopaedic infection is challenging. While the main focus of treatment is wide surgical debridement, systemic and local antibiotic administration are important adjuvant therapies. Several reports have described the clinical use of antibiotic-impregnated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) to provide local antibiotic therapy for bone infections. However, these were all individual case reports, and no case series have been reported. We report a case series treated by a single surgeon using antibiotic-impregnated CPC as part of a comprehensive treatment plan in patients with established orthopaedic infection. We enrolled 13 consecutive patients with osteomyelitis (n = 6) or infected non-union (n = 7). Implantation of antibiotic-impregnated CPC was performed to provide local antibiotic therapy as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that also included wide surgical debridement, systemic antibiotic therapy, and subsequent second-stage reconstruction surgery. We investigated the rate of successful infection eradication and systemic/local complications. The concentration of antibiotics in the surgical drainage fluids, blood, and recovered CPC (via elution into a phosphate-buffered saline bath) were measured. The mean follow-up period after surgery was 50.4 (range, 27-73) months. There were no cases of infection recurrence during follow-up. No systemic toxicity or local complications from the implantation of antibiotic-impregnated CPC were observed. The vancomycin concentration in the fluid from surgical drainage (n = 6) was 527.1 ± 363.9 μg/mL on postoperative day 1 and 224.5 ± 198.4 μg/mL on postoperative day 2. In patients who did not receive systemic vancomycin therapy (n = 3), the maximum serum vancomycin level was antibiotic-impregnated CPC is an option to provide local antibiotic therapy as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Interventions on Metabolism: Making Antibiotic-Susceptible Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baquero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics act on bacterial metabolism, and antibiotic resistance involves changes in this metabolism. Interventions on metabolism with drugs might therefore modify drug susceptibility and drug resistance. In their recent article, Martin Vestergaard et al. (mBio 8:e01114-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01114-17 illustrate the possibility of converting intrinsically resistant bacteria into susceptible ones. They reported that inhibition of a central metabolic enzyme, ATP synthase, allows otherwise ineffective polymyxin antibiotics to act on Staphylococcus aureus. The study of the intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens has shown that several metabolic genes, including multigene transcriptional regulators, contribute to antibiotic resistance. In some cases, these genes only marginally increase antibiotic resistance, but reduced levels of susceptibility might be critical in the evolution or resistance under low antibiotic concentrations or in the clinical response of highly resistant bacteria. Drug interventions on bacterial metabolism might constitute a critical adjuvant therapy in combination with antibiotics to ensure susceptibility of pathogens with intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistance.

  11. Factors Associated With Treatment Failure of Infected Pressure Sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugun, Kheeldass; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Kressmann, Benjamin; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Suvà, Domizio; Modarressi, Ali; Uçkay, Ilker

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we assess interdisciplinary surgical and medical parameters associated to recurrences of infected pressure ulcers. There is a little in the published literature regarding factors associated with the outcome of treatment of infected pressure ulcers. We undertook a single-center review of spinal injured adults hospitalized for an infected pressure ulcer or implant-free osteomyelitis and reviewed the literature on this topic from 1990-2015. We found 70 lesions in 31 patients (52 with osteomyelitis) who had a median follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 4 months to 19 years). The median duration of antibiotic therapy was 6 weeks, of which 1 week was parenteral. Clinical recurrence after treatment was noted in 44 infected ulcers (63%), after a median interval of 1 year. In 86% of these recurrences, cultures yielded a different organism than the preceding episode. By multivariate analyses, the following factors were not significantly related to recurrence: number of surgical interventions (hazard ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.5-1.5); osteomyelitis (hazard ratio 1.5; 0.7-3.1); immune suppression; prior sacral infections, and duration of total (or just parenteral) antibiotic sue. Patients with antibiotic treatment for 12 weeks (χ test; P = 0.90). In patients with infected pressure ulcers, clinical recurrence occurs in almost two-thirds of lesions, but in only 14% with the same pathogen(s). The number of surgical debridements, flap use, or duration of antibiotic therapy was not associated with recurrence, suggesting recurrences are caused by reinfections caused by other extrahospital factors.

  12. [Clinical evaluation of flomoxef in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, H; Arimasu, O; Sugamata, K; Shiraishi, H; Kobayashi, M; Fujii, R; Mashiko, J; Nagao, Y; Okamoto, Y

    1987-08-01

    Flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S), a new parenteral oxacephem antibiotic, was evaluated for its safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics in children. Twenty-six patients with bacterial infections were treated with FMOX. Clinical efficacy rate was 92% and bacteriological cure rate was 85%. Three cases of infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were cured with FMOX therapy. No severe adverse reactions or abnormalities of laboratory test data were associated with FMOX therapy, although loose stools and diarrhea occurred frequently (23%). Serum half-lives of FMOX after a single bolus injection of 9 infants and children were 0.77 +/- 0.31 hour and excretion into urine was rapid. From these experiences, FMOX appeared to be a safe and effective antibiotic when used in children with susceptible bacterial infections.

  13. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  14. Costs, quality of life and treatment compliance associated with antibiotic therapies in patients with cystic fibrosis: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jennifer R; Toy, Edmond L; Sacco, Patricia; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2008-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common incurable hereditary disease in the US. Persistent respiratory infection is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. This study aimed to review the literature on economic and quality of life outcomes and treatment compliance associated with antibiotic therapies for cystic fibrosis patients. A systematic literature review was conducted using keyword searches of the MEDLINE database and selected conference abstracts. The review covered studies published between January 1990 and May 2007. Evidence suggests that inhaled tobramycin, a key chronic suppressive therapy, can reduce other healthcare costs. The main determinants of the cost of care include disease severity and respiratory infection. Costs vary widely by country. There is evidence that inhaled tobramycin and oral azithromycin improve quality of life and that treatment setting and patient convenience may also impact on quality of life. Antibiotic treatment compliance varied significantly and depended on the method of measurement, with more subjective measures tending to be higher. This review concludes by offering directions for future research.

  15. [A pilot study of antibiotic cycling for the treatment of febrile neutropenia patients with hematological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Kinoshita, Keiichi; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Tsutani, Hiroshi; Ueda, Takanori

    2004-03-01

    Two antibiotics recommended by the guideline of Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) were selected for treatment of febrile neutropenia, and these paired antibiotics were changed periodically three times. The clinical efficacy of each antibiotic was retrospectively evaluated at the end of the final period. There was no significant difference about efficacy rate between two kinds of antibiotics in the same sequential period. However, the efficacy rate has been rising and febrile duration has been shortening by degrees. Only a few drug resistant bacteria were recognized by the surveillance culture during antibiotic cycling. Recently, antibiotic cycling therapy has attracted attention especially in the ICU. However, a clinical study of treatment for febrile neutropenia has not been reported. Our trial suggests that cycling therapy may be useful for febrile neutropenia. However, Some deviation in the patients characteristics of each period may affect the result. It seems that further examination is necessary about usefullness of the cycling therapy for febrile neutropenia.

  16. Efficacy of Antibiotic Suppressive Therapy in Patients with a Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Nijman, Jasperina M; Kampinga, Greetje A; van Assen, Sander; Jutte, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: For chronic prosthetic joint infections (PJI), complete removal of the infected prosthesis is necessary in order to cure the infection. Unfortunately, a subgroup of patients is not able to undergo a revision surgery due to high surgical risk. Alternatively, these patients can be treated with antibiotic suppressive therapy (AST) to suppress the infection. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of AST. Methods: We retrospectively collected data (period 2009-2015) from patients with a PJI (of hip, knee or shoulder) who were treated with AST at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. AST was defined as antibiotic treatment for PJI that was started after the usual 3 months of antibiotic treatment. The time of follow-up was defined from the time point AST was started. Treatment was considered as failed, when the patient still experienced joint pain, when surgical intervention (debridement, removal, arthrodesis or amputation) was needed to control the infection and/or when death occurred due to the infection. Results: We included 21 patients with a median age of 67 years (range 21 - 88) and with a median follow-up of 21 months (range 3 - 81). Coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) (n=6), S. aureus (n=6) and polymicrobial flora (n=4) were the most frequently found causative pathogens. Most patients with CNS and S. aureus were treated with minocycline (67%) and clindamycin (83%) as AST, respectively. Overall, treatment was successful in 67% of patients. Failure was due to persistent joint pain (n=1), surgical intervention because of an uncontrolled infection (n=3), and death due the infection (n=3). We observed a treatment success of 90% in patients with a 'standard' prosthesis (n=11), compared to only 50% in patients with a tumor-prosthesis (n=10). Also, treatment was successful in 83% of patients with a CNS as causative microorganism for the infection, compared to 50% in patients with a S. aureus . Patients who failed on AST had a

  17. Evaluation of a polyherbal topical aerosol spray as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Selvam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the polyherbal topical aerosol spray Wisprec and reg; Advanced (M/S. Natural Remedies Private Limited, India as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows. A total of 41 dairy cows suffering from clinical mastitis were selected, and Wisprec and reg; Advanced was sprayed on mastitis affected quarters of udder two times a day along with a parenteral antibiotic till complete recovery. The rectal temperature, pain on palpation of udder, swelling of udder, consistency of milk, recovery period and product satisfaction score were assessed to evaluate the efficacy of Wisprec and reg; Spray. Topical application of Wisprec and reg; Advanced Spray have shown a significant improvement (p<0.001 in alleviation of rectal temperature, pain on palpation of udder and swelling of udder, and the consistency of milk was restored to normal after 3 to 4 days of treatment. The results demonstrate that the Wisprec and reg; Advanced spray could be considered as an alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis of dairy cows. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 285-290

  18. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  19. Office-based treatment and outcomes for febrile infants with clinically diagnosed bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbuhl, Lynn M; Newman, Thomas B; Pantell, Robert H; Finch, Stacia A; Wasserman, Richard C

    2008-11-01

    The goals were to describe the (1) frequency of sepsis evaluation and empiric antibiotic treatment, (2) clinical predictors of management, and (3) serious bacterial illness frequency for febrile infants with clinically diagnosed bronchiolitis seen in office settings. The Pediatric Research in Office Settings network conducted a prospective cohort study of 3066 febrile infants (or=38 degrees C) in 219 practices in 44 states. We compared the frequency of sepsis evaluation, parenteral antibiotic treatment, and serious bacterial illness in infants with and without clinically diagnosed bronchiolitis. We identified predictors of sepsis evaluation and parenteral antibiotic treatment in infants with bronchiolitis by using logistic regression models. Practitioners were less likely to perform a complete sepsis evaluation, urine testing, and cerebrospinal fluid culture and to administer parenteral antibiotic treatment for infants with bronchiolitis, compared with those without bronchiolitis. Significant predictors of sepsis evaluation in infants with bronchiolitis included younger age, higher maximal temperature, and respiratory syncytial virus testing. Predictors of parenteral antibiotic use included initial ill appearance, age of urinary tract infection (n = 167). In office settings, serious bacterial illness in young febrile infants with clinically diagnosed bronchiolitis is uncommon. Limited testing for bacterial infections seems to be an appropriate management strategy.

  20. Product quality of parenteral vancomycin products in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, S; Madurawe, R D; Zuk, S M; Khan, S R; Ellison, C D; Faustino, P J; Mans, D J; Trehy, M L; Hadwiger, M E; Boyne, M T; Biswas, K; Cox, E M

    2012-06-01

    In response to concerns raised about the quality of parenteral vancomycin products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the product quality of all FDA-approved parenteral vancomycin products available in the United States. Product quality was evaluated independently at two FDA Office of Testing and Research (FDA-OTR) sites. In the next phase of the investigation, being done in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the in vivo activity of these products will be evaluated in an appropriate animal model. This paper summarizes results of the FDA investigation completed thus far. One site used a validated ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography method (OTR-UPLC), and the second site used the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for related substances provided in the British Pharmacopeia (BP) monograph for vancomycin intravenous infusion. Similar results were obtained by the two FDA-OTR laboratories using two different analytical methods. The products tested had 90 to 95% vancomycin B (active component of vancomycin) by the BP-HPLC method and 89 to 94% vancomycin by OTR-UPLC methods. Total impurities were 5 to 10% by BP-HPLC and 6 to 11% by OTR-UPLC methods. No single impurity was >2.0%, and the CDP-1 level was ≤ 2.0% across all products. Some variability in impurity profiles of the various products was observed. No adverse product quality issues were identified with the six U.S. vancomycin parenteral products. The quality parameters of all parenteral vancomycin products tested surpassed the United States Pharmacopeia acceptance criteria. Additional testing will characterize in vivo performance characteristics of these products.

  1. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality and...: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral...

  2. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A.; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. ► Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. ► Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  3. Iodine Supplementation for Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A

    2016-04-01

    Patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) are among a group at risk of developing iodine deficiency. Supplementation with iodine in this population has been debated in a number of studies, resulting in variable clinical practices. The Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition recommends a dose of 1 mcg/kg/d of parenteral iodine for patients receiving PN. At our institution, PN trace elements do not include iodine, although this is not the case internationally. Our study sought to assess iodine levels and thyroid function in a cohort of PN-dependent pediatric patients. A retrospective analysis studied 32 pediatric patients with a variety of medical diagnoses who received PN as a primary means of nutrition for 6 months or longer. Patients received variable proportions of their total caloric intake as PN, which ranged from 14%-100%. Iodine and thyroid function levels were obtained by serum sampling. No patient in our cohort of 32 demonstrated thyroid dysfunction or developed iodine deficiency. The length of time on PN and the percentage of total nutrition intake as PN were not associated with iodine levels (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Topical antibiotics as a major contextual hazard toward bacteremia within selective digestive decontamination studies: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, James C

    2014-12-31

    Among methods for preventing pneumonia and possibly also bacteremia in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, Selective Digestive Decontamination (SDD) appears most effective within randomized concurrent controlled trials (RCCT's) although more recent trials have been cluster randomized. However, of the SDD components, whether protocolized parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis (PPAP) is required, and whether the topical antibiotic actually presents a contextual hazard, remain unresolved. The objective here is to compare the bacteremia rates and patterns of isolates in SDD-RCCT's versus the broader evidence base. Bacteremia incidence proportion data were extracted from component (control and intervention) groups decanted from studies investigating antibiotic (SDD) or non-antibiotic methods of VAP prevention and summarized using random effects meta-analysis of study and group level data. A reference category of groups derived from purely observational studies without any prevention method under study provided a benchmark incidence. Within SDD RCCTs, the mean bacteremia incidence among concurrent component groups not exposed to PPAP (27 control; 17.1%; 13.1-22.1% and 12 intervention groups; 16.2%; 9.1-27.3%) is double that of the benchmark bacteremia incidence derived from 39 benchmark groups (8.3; 6.8-10.2%) and also 20 control groups from studies of non-antibiotic methods (7.1%; 4.8 - 10.5). There is a selective increase in coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa among bacteremia isolates within control groups of SDD-RCCT's versus benchmark groups with data available. The topical antibiotic component of SDD presents a major contextual hazard toward bacteremia against which the PPAP component partially mitigates.

  5. Antibiotic sensitivity and resistance in children with urinary tract infection in Sanliurfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhandan, Mahmut; Güzel, Bülent; Oymak, Yeşim; Çiftçi, Halil

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate antibiotic resistance in the province of Şanliurfa and to observe any difference between antibiotic resistance rates. The study comprised 107 children who presented at the pediatric polyclinic with complaints of urinary tract infection with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection and whose urine cultures exhibited bacterial growth. The patients were analyzed with respect to the frequency of proliferating pathogens, sensitivity to the antibiotics used and the rates of developed resistance to the antibiotics. A total of 107 patients aged between 1 year and 15 years were included in the study, encompassing 14 (13.1%) males and 93 (86.9%) females. According to the urine culture results, proliferation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was observed in 69 (64.5%), Klebsiella spp. in 13 (12.1%), Proteus mirabilis in 9 (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus in 5 (4.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (4.7%), Acinetobacter spp. in 3 (2.8%) and Enterococcus spp. in 3 (2.8%) patients. For proliferating E. coli, high resistance rates to ceftriaxone (39.5%), nitrofurantoin (19.7%), ampicillin-sulbactam (64.1%), co-trimoxazole (41.5%), amoxicillinclavulanate (51.7%) and cefuroxime (38.1%) were observed. All of isolated microorganisms were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate, co-trimoxazole, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime and cefoxitin in decreasing frequencies. The most effective antimicrobial agents were determined to be imipenem, sulpera-zone, quinolone and aminoglycosides. In our region, parenteral antibiotics that should be selected for the empirical treatment of UTIs in all age groups are the aminoglycosides and 3(rd) generation cephalosporines. In contrast to other studies, these results suggest that co-trimoxazole should be used for children aged 0-1, and 2(nd) generation cephalosporins should be used for the oral treatment of children aged 1-5 due to the low rate of resistance to nitrofurantoin in patients aged over 5 years.

  6. Antibiotic-loaded poly(trimethylene carbonate) degradation, release and staphylococcal biofilm inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin, Otto Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Infections localised to bone (osteomyelitis) rapidly progress to a chronic state in which bacteria form organised communities (biofilms) where they are protected from host defences and antibiotic therapy. Treatment requires surgery followed by systemic and/or local application of antibiotics. With

  7. Resistance Elasticity of Antibiotic Demand in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, Thomas; Hagist, Christian; Kaier, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is still an unresolved problem worldwide. In intensive care units (ICUs), first-line antibiotic therapy is highly standardized and widely empiric while treatment failure because of AMR often has severe consequences. Simultaneously, there is a limited number of reserve antibiotics, whose prices and/or side effects are substantially higher than first-line therapy. This paper explores the implications of resistance-induced substitution effects in ICUs. The extent of such substitution effects is shown in a dynamic fixed effect regression analysis using a panel of 66 German ICUs with monthly antibiotic use and resistance data between 2001 and 2012. Our findings support the hypothesis that demand for reserve antibiotics substantially increases when resistance towards first-line agents rises. For some analyses the lagged effect of resistance is also significant, supporting the conjecture that part of the substitution effect is caused by physicians changing antibiotic choices in empiric treatment by adapting their resistance expectation to new information on resistance prevalence. The available information about resistance rates allows physicians to efficiently balance the trade-off between exacerbating resistance and ensuring treatment success. However, resistance-induced substitution effects are not free of charge. These effects should be considered an indirect burden of AMR. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Pattern of Antibiotic Prescribing by Dental Practitioners in Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Marina; Perković, Ivana; Romić, Martina; Simeon, Paris; Matijević, Jurica; Mehičić, Goranka Prpić; Krmek, Silvana Jukić

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial resistance is considered a consequence of misuse or overuse of antibiotics. Dentistry significantly contributes to this increasing public health problem. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the pattern of antibiotics prescribed by Croatian dentists in Zagreb area. Out of 220 Doctors of Dental Medicine (DMDs) from Zagreb 110 responded to survey. Prior to the research an ethical approval was obtained. Participants were directly contacted. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: general data on DMDs and the part concerning indications, duration, type and dosage of antibiotic therapy. Data were processed using MS Excel and SPSS for Windows, Version 17.0. Statistical significance was tested by Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's rank correlation at the level of statistical significance p<0.05. During the period of two months, the doctors prescribed antibiotics to 1,500 patients, 690 (46%) were men and 810 (54%) women. The most often prescribed antibiotics were penicillin (72.5% of patients), represented mostly by amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid (57.6%). The most common indication for the prescribed antibiotics was periapical or periodontal abscess (44%). Definite clinical indication (71.2%) was stated as the most common reason for antibiotic prescription. Antibiotic therapy usually lasted 7 days (62.9%). The doctors prescribed daily doses of antibiotics according to the instructions for the use of specific drugs. The examined subjects prescribe antibiotics according to the curriculum taught at the School of Dental Medicine for majority of types, doses and duration of the treatments, although antibiotics over-prescription in cases without medical indication was observed. The national guidelines on antibiotic regimens are required in order to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2015.

  9. Efficacy of antibiotic treatment of implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus infections with moxifloxacin, flucloxacillin, rifampin, and combination therapy: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greimel, Felix; Scheuerer, Christine; Gessner, Andre; Simon, Michaela; Kalteis, Thomas; Grifka, Joachim; Benditz, Achim; Springorum, Hans-Robert; Schaumburger, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of antibiotic monotherapy and combination therapy in the treatment of implant-associated infection by Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated in an animal study. The femoral medullary cavity of 66 male Wistar rats was contaminated with S. aureus (ATCC 29213) and a metal device was implanted, of which 61 could be evaluated. Six treatment groups were studied: flucloxacillin, flucloxacillin in combination with rifampin, moxifloxacin, moxifloxacin in combination with rifampin, rifampin, and a control group with aqua. The treatment was applied for 14 days. After euthanasia, the bacterial counts in the periprosthetic bone, the soft tissue, and the implant-associated biofilm were measured. Both antibiotic combination treatments (moxifloxacin plus rifampin and flucloxacillin plus rifampin) achieved a highly significant decrease in microbial counts in the bone and soft tissue and in the biofilm. Mono-antibiotic treatments with either moxifloxacin or flucloxacillin were unable to achieve a significant decrease in microbial counts in bone and soft tissue or the biofilm, whilst rifampin was able to reduce the counts significantly only in the biofilm. Antibiotic resistance was measured in 1/3 of the cases in the rifampin group, whereas no resistance was measured in all other groups. The results show that combinations of both moxifloxacin and flucloxacillin plus rifampin are adequate for the treatment of periprosthetic infections due to infections with S. aureus , whereas monotherapies are not effective or not applicable due to the rapid development of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, moxifloxacin is an effective alternative in combination with rifampin for the treatment of implant-associated infections.

  10. Case Report: Dual nebulised antibiotics among adults with cystic fibrosis and chronic Pseudomonas infection [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exacerbations in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psae infection are usually treated with dual intravenous antibiotics for 14 days, despite the lack of evidence for best practice. Intravenous antibiotics are commonly associated with various systemic adverse effects, including renal failure and ototoxicity. Inhaled antibiotics are less likely to cause systematic adverse effects, yet can achieve airway concentrations well above conventional minimum inhibitory concentrations. Typically one inhaled antibiotic is used at a time, but dual inhaled antibiotics (i.e. concomitant use of two different inhaled antibiotics may have synergistic effect and achieve better results in the treatment of exacerbations. We presented anecdotal evidence for the use of dual inhaled antibiotics as an acute treatment for exacerbations, in the form of a case report. A female in her early thirties with CF and chronic Psae infection improved her FEV1 by 5% and 2% with two courses of dual inhaled antibiotics to treat exacerbations in 2016. In contrast, her FEV1 changed by 2%, –2%, 0% and 2%, respectively, with four courses of dual intravenous antibiotics in 2016. Baseline FEV1 was similar prior to all six courses of treatments. The greater FEV1 improvements with dual inhaled antibiotics compared to dual intravenous antibiotics suggest the potential role of using dual inhaled antibiotics to treat exacerbations among adults with CF and chronic Psae infection, especially since a greater choice of inhaled anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is now available. A previous study in 1985 has looked at the concomitant administration of inhaled tobramycin and carbenicillin, by reconstituting antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. To our knowledge, this is the first literature to describe the concomitant use of two different antibiotics specifically developed for delivery via the inhaled route.

  11. ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF ABSCESS OF THE LUNG AND BRONCHIECTASIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, William L.

    1952-01-01

    Since the fusospirochetal group of bacteria are the commonest etiologic agents in abscess of the lung, aqueous crystalline penicillin is the agent of first choice in the majority of cases. Streptomycin is indicated for a small group of cases in which Klebsiella is the etiologic agent. Aureomycin, chloramphenicol or terramycin may produce an excellent therapeutic response either initially or after therapeutic failure with penicillin. Administration of antibiotics by inhalation should be carried out in conjunction with systemic forms of treatment. In the treatment of bronchiectasis, the antibiotics are most useful in the control of acute exacerbations of pulmonary infection which punctuate the course of this disease. PMID:14935877

  12. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  13. [Staff accreditation in parenteral nutrition production in hospital pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrignaud, S; Le Pêcheur, V; Jouan, G; Valy, S; Clerc, M-A

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to provide staff accreditation methodology to harmonize and secure practices for parenteral nutrition bags preparation. The methodology used in the present study is inspired from project management and quality approach. Existing training supports were used to produce accreditation procedure and evaluation supports. We first defined abilities levels, from level 1, corresponding to accredited learning agent to level 3, corresponding to expert accredited agent. Elements assessed for accreditation are: clothing assessment either by practices audit or by microbiologic test, test bags preparation and handling assessment, bag production to assess aseptic filling for both manual or automatized method, practices audit, number of days of production, and non-conformity following. At Angers Hospital, in 2014, production staff is composed of 12 agents. Staff accreditation reveals that 2 agents achieve level 3, 8 agents achieve level 2 and 2 agents are level 1. We noted that non-conformity decreased as accreditation took place from 81 in 2009 to 0 in 2014. To date, there is no incident due to parenteral bag produced by Angers hospital for neonatal resuscitation children. Such a consistent study is essential to insure a secured nutrition parenteral production. This also provides a satisfying quality care for patients. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Nutritional status and hyperglycemia in the peritransplant period: a review of associations with parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verdi Schumacher

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment option for various hematological diseases. This therapy involves complex procedures and is associated with several systemic complications. Due to the toxic effects of the conditioning regimen used in allogeneic transplantations, patients frequently suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications and are unable to feed themselves properly. This complex clinical scenario often requires specialized nutritional support, and despite the increasing number of studies available, many questions remain regarding the best way to feed these patients. Parenteral nutrition has been traditionally indicated when the effects on gastrointestinal mucosa are significant; however, the true benefits of this type of nutrition in reducing clinical complications have been questioned. Hyperglycemia is a common consequence of parenteral nutrition that seems to be correlated to poor transplantation outcomes and a higher risk of infections. Additionally, nutrition-related pre-transplantation risk factors are being studied, such as impaired nutritional status, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and obesity. This review aims to discuss some of these recent issues. A real case of allogeneic transplant was used to illustrate the scenario and to highlight the most important topics that motivated this literature review.

  15. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug therapy in headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    All physicians will encounter patients with headaches. Primary headache disorders are common, and often disabling. This paper reviews the principles of drug therapy in headache in adults, focusing on the three commonest disorders presenting in both primary and secondary care: tension-type headache, migraine and cluster headache. The clinical evidence on the basis of which choices can be made between the currently available drug therapies for acute and preventive treatment of these disorders is presented, and information given on the options available for the emergency parenteral treatment of refractory migraine attacks and cluster headache. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  17. TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION (TPN: ROLE OF RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2 AND CYANOCOBALAMIN (VITAMIN B12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Shiekh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Total parenteral nutrition (TPN replaces and maintains essential nutrients in patients in whom oral or tube feedings are contraindicated or inadequate. A nutritional assessment must be carried out before initiating TPN in order to determine nutritional needs and any metabolic changes due to the patient’s underlying condition, medications or concurrent therapies. In addition to carbohydrates, proteins and fats, certain amounts of micronutirents are also added to TPN solutions. These micronutrients include electrolytes, vitamins, and trace minerals. This review highlights some basic concepts regarding the use and formulation of TPNs along with their advantages and disadvantages and the importance of water soluble vitamins B2 and B12 in human nutrition.

  18. High-dose antibiotic therapy is superior to a 3-drug combination of prostanoids and lipid A derivative in protecting irradiated canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.S.; Srinivasan, V.; Toles, R.E.; Miner, V.L.; Jackson, W.E.; Seed, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop non-toxic radioprotectors. We tested the efficacy of a 3-drug combination (3-DC) of iloprost, misoprostol, and 3D-MPL (3-deacylated monophosphoryl lipid A) and the effects of postirradiation clinical support with high doses of antibiotics and blood transfusion. Canines were given 3-DC or the vehicle and exposed to 3.4 Gy or 4.1 Gy of 60 Co radiation. Canines irradiated at 4.1 Gy were also given clinical support, which consisted of blood transfusion and antibiotics (gentamicin, and cefoxitin or cephalexin). Peripheral blood cell profile and 60-day survival were used as indices of protection. At 3.4 Gy, 3-DC- or vehicle-treated canines without postirradiation clinical support survived only for 10 to 12 days. Fifty percent of the canines treated with 3-DC or vehicle and provided postirradiation clinical support survived 4.1-Gy irradiation. Survival of canines treated with vehicle before irradiation significantly correlated with postirradiation antibiotic treatments, but not with blood transfusion. The recovery profile of peripheral blood cells in 4.1 Gy-irradiated canines treated with vehicle and antibiotics was better than drug-treated canines. These results indicate that therapy with high doses of intramuscular aminoglycoside antibiotic (gentamicin) and an oral cephalosporin (cephalexin) enhanced survival of irradiated canines. Although blood transfusion correlated with survival of 3-DC treated canines, there were no additional survivors with 3-DC treated canines than the controls. (author)

  19. Management of Pediatric Perforated Appendicitis: Comparing Outcomes Using Early Appendectomy Versus Solely Medical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, William; Rebillot, Katie; Ukwuoma, Onyinyechi; Saracino, Christine; Iskhakov, Arthur

    2017-10-01

    There is controversy regarding whether children with perforated appendicitis should receive early appendectomy (EA) versus medical management (MM) with antibiotics and delayed interval appendectomy. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes of children with perforated appendicitis who receive EA versus MM. Case review of consecutive children appendicitis who received either EA or MM during an 8-year period. Criteria for hospital discharge included patient being afebrile for at least 24 hours, pain-free and able to tolerate oral intake. Of 203 patients diagnosed with perforated appendicitis, 122 received EA and 81 received MM. All received parenteral antibiotic therapy initiated in the emergency department and continued during hospitalization. There were no significant differences between groups in mean patient age, mean complete blood count total white blood cells count, gender distribution, rates of emergency department fever or rates of intra-abdominal infection (abscess or phlegmon) identified on admission. Compared with patients receiving MM, those receiving EA experienced significantly fewer (1) days of hospitalization, parenteral antibiotic therapy and in-hospital fever; (2) radiographic studies, percutaneous drainage procedures and placement of central venous catheters performed; (3) post admission intra-abdominal complications and (4) unscheduled repeat hospitalizations after hospital discharge. Only 1 EA-managed patient developed a postoperative wound infection. Children with perforated appendicitis who receive EA experience significantly less morbidity and complications versus those receiving MM. The theoretical concern for enhanced morbidity associated with EA management of perforated appendicitis is not supported by our analysis.

  20. Changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients and brush border glycoproteins after total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S; Tanaka, S; Yoshioka, M; Serizawa, H; Tashiro, H; Shiozaki, H; Imaeda, H; Tsuchiya, M

    1992-01-01

    The effect of total parenteral nutrition on nutrients absorption and glycoprotein changes of brush border membrane was examined in rat small intestine. In total parenteral nutrition rats, a marked decrease in activity of brush border enzymes was observed mainly in the proximal and middle segments of the intestine. Galactose perfusion of jejunal segment showed that hexose absorption was significantly inhibited, while intestinal absorption of glycine or dipeptide, glycylglycine was not significantly affected by total parenteral nutrition treatment. When brush border membrane glycoprotein profile was examined by [3H]-glucosamine or [3H]-fucose incorporation into jejunal loops, significant changes were observed in the glycoprotein pattern of brush border membrane especially in the high molecular weight range over 120 kDa after total parenteral nutrition treatment, suggesting strong dependency of glycoprotein synthesis on luminal substances. Molecular weight of sucrase isomaltase in brush border membrane detected by specific antibody showed no significant difference, however, in total parenteral nutrition and control rats. Also, molecular weight of specific sodium glucose cotransporter of intestinal brush border membrane detected by selective photoaffinity labelling was not altered in total parenteral nutrition rats. It may be that prolonged absence of oral food intake may produce significant biochemical changes in brush border membrane glycoprotein and absorptive capacity of small intestine, but these changes were not observed in all brush border membrane glycoproteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1582592

  1. Quality of Life and Nutrition Condition of Patients Improve Under Home Parenteral Nutrition: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Jutta; Seipt, Claudia; Markowski, Andrea; Luettig, Birgit; Schettler, Anika; Momma, Michael; Schneider, Andrea S

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage cancer and advanced chronic bowel disease are often malnourished, which has a negative effect on patients' outcome, well-being, and activity. It is inconclusive whether these patients benefit from home parenteral nutrition. This prospective exploratory study investigates its influence on nutrition state, muscle strength, mobility, and quality of life. Patients ≥18 years old with an indication for home parenteral nutrition were included and followed for 2-24 months. Nutrition parameters, activity, and quality of life were assessed. Forty-eight patients participated (mean age 11.5 years), and 85% were severely malnourished (subjective global assessment score, class C). Four weeks after parenteral nutrition, patients with tumors demonstrated a deterioration in phase angle (from 3.9 to 3.4) and extracellular mass:body cell mass ratio (from 1.6 to 2.1), while patients with bowel disease improved (from 3.4 to 4.0 and 2.1 to 1.6, respectively); grip strength remained constant in both groups (difference: 1.11 and -2.11, respectively). Activity improved in patients with bowel disease but stayed the same in the tumor group (P = .02 and P = .33, respectively). When the groups were pooled, emotional and social functioning domain scores (P parenteral nutrition. Both groups seem to benefit from home parenteral nutrition without harmful side effects. If the indication is determined early, the patients' disease course could perhaps be improved. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascellino MT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Teresa Mascellino,1 Barbara Porowska,2 Massimiliano De Angelis,1 Alessandra Oliva1 1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Cardio-Thoracic, Vascular, General Surgery and of Organ Transplants, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy Abstract: In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori (Hp eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016 are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI, bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently

  3. Conclusions to the first Baxter-Senpe workshop on: ready-to-use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    García de Lorenzo Mateos, A.; Bermejo Vicedo, T.; Gómez Candela, C.; Planas Vila, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conclusiones de la Mesa de Trabajo sobre productos listos para su uso (RTU) en nutrición parenteral. Se efectúa una aproximación a la definición y a las ventajas en comparación con otros modelos de nutrición parenteral. Destacan los aspectos relacionados con la gestión, composición de la RTU e indicaciones tanto intrahospitalarias como domiciliarias.Conclusions to the workshop on ready-to use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition. An approximation is done to the definition and advantages in...

  4. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R

    2007-07-18

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is recognized as a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. The aim of this review is to establish the efficacy of antibiotic therapy for C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), to identify the most effective antibiotic treatment for CDAD in adults and to determine the need for stopping the causative antibiotic during therapy. MEDLINE (1966 to 2006), EMBASE (1980 to 2006), Cochrane Central Database of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane IBD Review Group Specialized Trials Register were searched using the following search terms: "pseudomembranous colitis and randomized trial"; "Clostridium difficile and randomized trial"; "antibiotic associated diarrhea and randomized trial". Only randomized, controlled trials assessing antibiotic treatment for CDAD were included in the review. Probiotic trials are excluded. The following outcomes were sought: initial resolution of diarrhea; initial conversion of stool to C. difficile cytotoxin and/or stool culture negative; recurrence of diarrhea; recurrence of fecal C. difficile cytotoxin and/or positive stool culture; patient response to cessation of prior antibiotic therapy; sepsis; emergent surgery: fecal diversion or colectomy; and death. Data were analyzed using the MetaView statistical package in Review Manager. For dichotomous outcomes, relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived from each study. When appropriate, the results of included studies were combined for each outcome. For dichotomous outcomes, pooled RR and 95% CI were calculated using a fixed effect model, except where significant heterogeneity was detected, at which time the random effects model was used. Data heterogeneity was calculated using MetaView. Twelve studies (total of 1157 participants) involving patients with diarrhea who recently received antibiotics for an infection other than C. difficile were included. The definition of diarrhea ranged from at least two loose stools

  5. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  6. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  7. [When enteral nutrition is not possible in intensive care patients: whether to wait or use parenteral nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, Q L M; Pickkers, P

    2016-01-01

    - Overfeeding of critically ill patients is associated with a higher incidence of infections and an increased length of ventilation. However, trophic nutrition or permissive underfeeding appears to have no negative effect on the patient and may even provide a survival benefit.- Initiation of enteral nutrition within 24-48 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission may reduce the number of complications and increase the chance of survival.- Total parenteral nutrition is associated with a higher risk of infections than enteral nutrition. This seems to be related to the higher calorie intake with parenteral nutrition rather than the route of administration.- In previously well-nourished patients, in whom enteral nutrition is only partially successful, it is safe to wait for up to 8 days before initiating supplemental parenteral nutrition.- In critically ill children, it is also safe to start supplemental parenteral nutrition at a late (on the 8th day after admission) rather than an early stage (within 24 hours of admission). Late supplemental parenteral nutrition may even result in fewer infectious complications and shorter hospitalisation.

  8. Antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients receiving CRRT: underdosing is overprevalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susan J; Mueller, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Published CRRT drug dosing algorithms and other dosing guidelines appear to result in underdosed antibiotics, leading to failure to attain pharmacodynamic targets. High mortality rates persist with inadequate antibiotic therapy as the most important risk factor for death. Reasons for unintended antibiotic underdosing in patients receiving CRRT are many. Underdosing may result from lack of the recognition that better hepatic function in AKI patients yields higher nonrenal antibiotic clearance compared to ESRD patients. Other factors include the variability in body size and fluid composition of patients, the serious consequence of delayed achievement of antibiotic pharmacodynamic targets in septic patients, potential subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations at the infection site, and the influence of RRT intensity on antibiotic concentrations. Too often, clinicians weigh the benefits of overcautious antibiotic dosing to avoid antibiotic toxicity too heavily against the benefits of rapid attainment of therapeutic antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients receiving CRRT. We urge clinicians to prescribe antibiotics aggressively for these vulnerable patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Procalcitonin Testing to Guide Antibiotic Therapy in Acute Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Mueller, Beat

    2018-03-06

    Is the use of procalcitonin for guiding antibiotic decisions in patients with acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections associated with improved clinical outcomes compared with usual care? Among patients with varying types and severity of acute respiratory infection, using procalcitonin to guide decisions about antibiotics is associated with lower rates of antibiotic exposure, antibiotic-related adverse effects, and mortality.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landecker, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their own previous concepts. Archival work with stored soil and clinical samples produces a record described here as 'the biology of history': the physical registration of human history in bacterial life. This account thus foregrounds the importance of understanding both the materiality of history and the historicity of matter in theories and concepts of life today.

  11. [Perspective applications of multi-species probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiĭ, Iu P; Zakharenko, S M; Fominykh, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The problem of antibiotic-associated conditions is one of the most actual problems of clinical practice. The antibiotic-associated diarrhea is a multidisciplinary problem. Investigations of the small intestine microecological status and assessment of microflora at the patients receiving antibiotics testifies to dysbiosis existence. In article results of open-label investigation of a multispecies probiotic RioFlora Balance using for antibiotic-associated diarrhea prophylaxis in patients used antibacterial therapy are presented.

  12. A Review of the Parenteral Nutrition Supply Service in an Irish Neonatal Unit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2018-06-01

    Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU) patients have individual nutritional requirements often requiring Patient Specific Parenteral Nutrition (PSPN). From October 2015, the national PSPN compounding service availability changed from 7 days per week service to 5 days per week (i.e. no weekend and limited bank holiday ordering available). The aim of this study was to examine the introduction of a 5 day only PSPN supply on neonatal patient parenteral nutrition availability in a tertiary NICU.

  13. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A. [Department of Medicine, Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, College of Medicine, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Yap, Sook Fan [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Pre-Clinical Sciences, University of Tunku Abdul Rahman (Malaysia); Ngeow, Yun Fong [Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chin, Khew-Voon, E-mail: khew-voon.chin@utoledo.edu [Department of Medicine, Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, College of Medicine, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  14. Challenges of Empirical Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M.C. Rodrigues, MBChB, MRCPCH

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Effective and timely treatment is required for CAP and empirical antibiotics are evidence-based and appropriate in most settings. However, better diagnostics and education to target treatment may help to prevent antibiotic resistance. Ensuring the secure financing of clean food and water, sanitation, and public health infrastructure are also required to reduce the burden of disease in children in developing countries.

  15. Early antibiotic treatment for BAL-confirmed ventilator-associated pneumonia: a role for routine endotracheal aspirate cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Fabrice; Franceschini, Bruno; Berger, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Gainnier, Marc; Sainty, Jean-Marie; Papazian, Laurent

    2005-02-01

    To test whether routine quantitative cultures of endotracheal aspirates obtained before the onset of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) could help to predict the causative microorganisms and to select early appropriate antimicrobial therapy before obtaining BAL culture results. Prospective observational study. French medical ICU. A total of 299 patients received mechanical ventilation for at least 48 h. Endotracheal aspiration (EA) was performed twice weekly in all mechanically ventilated patients. A diagnosis of VAP was made by BAL culture. Only the EA performed just before the suspicion of VAP (EA-pre) were evaluated. This strategy (ie, the EA-pre-based strategy) was compared with an antibiotic therapy that would have been prescribed if the recommendations of both the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Trouillet et al (Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1998; 157:531-539) had been applied. VAP was diagnosed (by BAL culture) in 41 of the 75 patients in whom BAL was performed. Among the 41 BAL specimens that were positive for VAP, EA-pre had identified the same microorganisms (with the same antibiotic resistance patterns) in 34 cases (83%). In one case, EA-pre was not available at the time BAL was performed (a case of early-onset VAP), but the empiric antibiotic therapy was adequate. While EA-pre did not give the same results as the BAL culture, the antibiotic therapy based on the results of the EA-pre was adequate in four other cases. Finally, antibiotic therapy was delayed in only two cases. Antibiotic treatment was therefore adequate in 38 of the 40 assessable cases (95%). If the Trouillet-based strategy had been used, the antibiotic treatment would have been adequate in 34 of the 41 cases (83%; p = 0.15 [vs EA-pre strategy]). Based on the ATS classification, the antibiotic treatment would have been adequately prescribed in only 28 of the 41 cases (68%; p = 0.005 [vs EA-pre strategy]). Routine EA performed twice a week makes it possible to prescribe adequate