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Sample records for papillomavirus e6 proteins

  1. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-01-01

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition

  2. Association of papillomavirus E6 proteins with either MAML1 or E6AP clusters E6 proteins by structure, function, and evolutionary relatedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Brimer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Papillomavirus E6 proteins bind to LXXLL peptide motifs displayed on targeted cellular proteins. Alpha genus HPV E6 proteins associate with the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP (UBE3A, by binding to an LXXLL peptide (ELTLQELLGEE displayed by E6AP, thereby stimulating E6AP ubiquitin ligase activity. Beta, Gamma, and Delta genera E6 proteins bind a similar LXXLL peptide (WMSDLDDLLGS on the cellular transcriptional co-activator MAML1 and thereby repress Notch signaling. We expressed 45 different animal and human E6 proteins from diverse papillomavirus genera to ascertain the overall preference of E6 proteins for E6AP or MAML1. E6 proteins from all HPV genera except Alpha preferentially interacted with MAML1 over E6AP. Among animal papillomaviruses, E6 proteins from certain ungulate (SsPV1 from pigs and cetacean (porpoises and dolphins hosts functionally resembled Alpha genus HPV by binding and targeting the degradation of E6AP. Beta genus HPV E6 proteins functionally clustered with Delta, Pi, Tau, Gamma, Chi, Mu, Lambda, Iota, Dyokappa, Rho, and Dyolambda E6 proteins to bind and repress MAML1. None of the tested E6 proteins physically and functionally interacted with both MAML1 and E6AP, indicating an evolutionary split. Further, interaction of an E6 protein was insufficient to activate degradation of E6AP, indicating that E6 proteins that target E6AP co-evolved to separately acquire both binding and triggering of ubiquitin ligase activation. E6 proteins with similar biological function clustered together in phylogenetic trees and shared structural features. This suggests that the divergence of E6 proteins from either MAML1 or E6AP binding preference is a major event in papillomavirus evolution.

  3. Biophysical characterization of the complex between human papillomavirus E6 protein and synapse-associated protein 97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine Ngang; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus exhibits complex interaction patterns with several host proteins and their roles in HPV mediated oncogenesis have proved challenging to study. Here we use several biophysical techniques to explore the binding of E6 to the three PDZ domains of the tumor......, this quaternary complex has the same apparent hydrodynamic volume as the unliganded PDZ region, suggesting that a conformational change occurs in the PDZ region upon binding, a conclusion supported by kinetic experiments. Using NMR, we discovered a new mode of interaction between E6 and PDZ: a subset of residues...

  4. The PDZ Ligand Domain of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Protein Is Required for E6's Induction of Epithelial Hyperplasia In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Marie L.; Nguyen, Minh M.; Lee, Denis; Griep, Anne E.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agent of warts. Infections with high-risk HPVs are associated with anogenital and head and neck cancers. One of the viral genes responsible for HPV's oncogenic activity is E6. Mice expressing the HPV-16 E6 protein in their epidermis (K14E6WT) develop epithelial hyperplasia and squamous carcinomas. Numerous cellular proteins interact with E6, some of which can be grouped based on common amino acid motifs in their E6-binding domains. One such group, the PDZ partners, including hDLG, hSCRIBBLE, MUPP1, and MAGI, bind to the carboxy-terminal four amino acids of E6 through their PDZ domains. E6's interaction with the PDZ partners leads to their degradation. Additionally, E6's binding to PDZ proteins has been correlated with its ability to transform baby rat kidney cells in tissue culture and to confer tumorigenicity onto cells in xenograft experiments. To address whether the ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain partners is necessary for E6 to confer epithelial hyperproliferation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express in stratified squamous epithelia a mutant of E6 lacking the last six amino acids at its carboxyl terminus, E6Δ146-151, from the human keratin 14 (K14) promoter. The K14E6Δ146-151 mice exhibit a radiation response similar to that of the K14E6WT mice, demonstrating that this protein, as predicted, retains an ability to inactivate p53. However, the K14E6Δ146-151 mice fail to display epithelial hyperplasia. These results indicate that an interaction of E6 with PDZ partners is necessary for its induction of epithelial hyperplasia. PMID:12768014

  5. Mutagenic Potential ofBos taurus Papillomavirus Type 1 E6 Recombinant Protein: First Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomavirus (BPV is considered a useful model to study HPV oncogenic process. BPV interacts with the host chromatin, resulting in DNA damage, which is attributed to E5, E6, and E7 viral oncoproteins activity. However, the oncogenic mechanisms of BPV E6 oncoprotein per se remain unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic potential of Bos taurus papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1 E6 recombinant oncoprotein by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMNA and comet assay (CA. Peripheral blood samples of five calves were collected. Samples were subjected to molecular diagnosis, which did not reveal presence of BPV sequences. Samples were treated with 1 μg/mL of BPV-1 E6 oncoprotein and 50 μg/mL of cyclophosphamide (positive control. Negative controls were not submitted to any treatment. The samples were submitted to the CBMNA and CA. The results showed that BPV E6 oncoprotein induces clastogenesis per se, which is indicative of genomic instability. These results allowed better understanding the mechanism of cancer promotion associated with the BPV E6 oncoprotein and revealed that this oncoprotein can induce carcinogenesis per se. E6 recombinant oncoprotein has been suggested as a possible vaccine candidate. Results pointed out that BPV E6 recombinant oncoprotein modifications are required to use it as vaccine.

  6. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein Activates mTORC1 Signaling and Increases Protein Synthesis ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Spangle, Jennifer M.; Münger, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase acts as a cellular rheostat that integrates signals from a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways that sense growth factor and nutrient availability as well as intracellular energy status. It was previously reported that the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein may activate the S6 protein kinase (S6K) through binding and E6AP-mediated degradation of the mTOR inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) (Z. Lu, X. Hu, Y....

  7. Genus beta human papillomavirus E6 proteins vary in their effects on the transactivation of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth A; Walther, Johanna; Javanbakht, Hassan; Howley, Peter M

    2014-08-01

    The genus beta human papillomaviruses (beta HPVs) cause cutaneous lesions and are thought to be involved in the initiation of some nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), particularly in patients with the genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). We have previously reported that at least two of the genus beta HPV E6 proteins bind to and/or increase the steady-state levels of p53 in squamous epithelial cells. This is in contrast to a well-characterized ability of the E6 proteins of cancer-associated HPVs of genus alpha HPV, which inactivate p53 by targeting its ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the transactivation of p53 target genes following DNA damage. We find that the E6 proteins from diverse beta HPV species and types vary in their capacity to block the induction of MDM2, p21, and proapoptotic genes after genotoxic stress. We conclude that some genus beta HPV E6 proteins inhibit at least some p53 target genes, although perhaps not by the same mechanism or to the same degree as the high-risk genus alpha HPV E6 proteins. This study addresses the ability of various human papillomavirus E6 proteins to block the activation of p53-responsive cellular genes following DNA damage in human keratinocytes, the normal host cell for HPVs. The E6 proteins encoded by the high-risk, cancer-associated HPV types of genus alpha HPV have a well-established activity to target p53 degradation and thereby inhibit the response to DNA damage. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta HPV E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the ability of p53 to transactivate downstream genes following DNA damage. We find that some, but not all, genus beta HPV E6 proteins can block the transactivation of some p53 target genes. This differential response to DNA damage furthers the understanding of cutaneous HPV biology and may help to explain the

  8. The human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein activates mTORC1 signaling and increases protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangle, Jennifer M; Münger, Karl

    2010-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase acts as a cellular rheostat that integrates signals from a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways that sense growth factor and nutrient availability as well as intracellular energy status. It was previously reported that the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein may activate the S6 protein kinase (S6K) through binding and E6AP-mediated degradation of the mTOR inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) (Z. Lu, X. Hu, Y. Li, L. Zheng, Y. Zhou, H. Jiang, T. Ning, Z. Basang, C. Zhang, and Y. Ke, J. Biol. Chem. 279:35664-35670, 2004; L. Zheng, H. Ding, Z. Lu, Y. Li, Y. Pan, T. Ning, and Y. Ke, Genes Cells 13:285-294, 2008). Our results confirmed that HPV16 E6 expression causes an increase in mTORC1 activity through enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR and activation of downstream signaling pathways S6K and eukaryotic initiation factor binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). However, we did not detect a decrease in TSC2 levels in HPV16 E6-expressing cells. We discovered, however, that HPV16 E6 expression causes AKT activation through the upstream kinases PDK1 and mTORC2 under conditions of nutrient deprivation. We show that HPV16 E6 expression causes an increase in protein synthesis by enhancing translation initiation complex assembly at the 5' mRNA cap and an increase in cap-dependent translation. The increase in cap-dependent translation likely results from HPV16 E6-induced AKT/mTORC1 activation, as the assembly of the translation initiation complex and cap-dependent translation are rapamycin sensitive. Lastly, coexpression of the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins does not affect HPV16 E6-induced activation of mTORC1 and cap-dependent translation. HPV16 E6-mediated activation of mTORC1 signaling and cap-dependent translation may be a mechanism to promote viral replication under conditions of limited nutrient supply in differentiated, HPV oncoprotein-expressing proliferating cells.

  9. The E7 protein of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus immortalizes normal rabbit keratinocytes and reduces pRb levels, while E6 cooperates in immortalization but neither degrades p53 nor binds E6AP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzenmueller, Tina; Matthaei, Markus; Muench, Peter; Scheible, Michael; Iftner, Angelika; Hiller, Thomas; Leiprecht, Natalie; Probst, Sonja; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer and are associated with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. A suitable animal model for papillomavirus-associated skin carcinogenesis is the infection of domestic rabbits with the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV). As the immortalizing activity of CRPV genes in the natural target cells remains unknown, we investigated the properties of CRPV E6 and E7 in rabbit keratinocytes (RK) and their influence on the cell cycle. Interestingly, CRPV E7 immortalized RK after a cellular crisis but showed no such activity in human keratinocytes. Co-expressed CRPV E6 prevented cellular crisis. The HPV16 or CRPV E7 protein reduced rabbit pRb levels thereby causing rabbit p19 ARF induction and accumulation of p53 without affecting cellular proliferation. Both CRPV E6 proteins failed to degrade rabbit p53 in vitro or to bind E6AP; however, p53 was still inducible by mitomycin C. In summary, CRPV E7 immortalizes rabbit keratinocytes in a species-specific manner and E6 contributes to immortalization without directly affecting p53

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 E2 and E6 are RNA-binding proteins and inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs with suboptimal splice sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodaghi, Sohrab; Jia Rong; Zheng Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome expresses six regulatory proteins (E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, and E7) which regulate viral DNA replication, gene expression, and cell function. We expressed HPV16 E2, E4, E6, and E7 from bacteria as GST fusion proteins and examined their possible functions in RNA splicing. Both HPV16 E2, a viral transactivator protein, and E6, a viral oncoprotein, inhibited splicing of pre-mRNAs containing an intron with suboptimal splice sites, whereas HPV5 E2 did not. The N-terminal half and the hinge region of HPV16 E2 as well as the N-terminal and central portions of HPV16 E6 are responsible for the suppression. HPV16 E2 interacts with pre-mRNAs through its C-terminal DNA-binding domain. HPV16 E6 binds pre-mRNAs via nuclear localization signal (NLS3) in its C-terminal half. Low-risk HPV6 E6, a cytoplasmic protein, does not bind RNA. Notably, both HPV16 E2 and E6 selectively bind to the intron region of pre-mRNAs and interact with a subset of cellular SR proteins. Together, these findings suggest that HPV16 E2 and E6 are RNA binding proteins and might play roles in posttranscriptional regulation during virus infection

  11. The human papillomavirus type 11 and 16 E6 proteins modulate the cell-cycle regulator and transcription cofactor TRIP-Br1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Takhar, Param Parkash S; Degenkolbe, Roland; Heng Koh, Choon; Zimmermann, Holger; Maolin Yang, Christopher; Guan Sim, Khe; I-Hong Hsu, Stephen; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The genital human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a taxonomic group including HPV types that preferentially cause genital and laryngeal warts ('low-risk types'), such as HPV-6 and HPV-11, or cancer of the cervix and its precursor lesions ('high-risk types'), such as HPV-16. The transforming processes induced by these viruses depend on the proteins E5, E6, and E7. Among these oncoproteins, the E6 protein stands out because it supports a particularly large number of functions and interactions with cellular proteins, some of which are specific for the carcinogenic HPVs, while others are shared among low- and high-risk HPVs. Here we report yeast two-hybrid screens with HPV-6 and -11 E6 proteins that identified TRIP-Br1 as a novel cellular target. TRIP-Br1 was recently detected by two research groups, which described two separate functions, namely that of a transcriptional integrator of the E2F1/DP1/RB cell-cycle regulatory pathway (and then named TRIP-Br1), and that of an antagonist of the cyclin-dependent kinase suppression of p16INK4a (and then named p34SEI-1). We observed that TRIP-Br1 interacts with low- and high-risk HPV E6 proteins in yeast, in vitro and in mammalian cell cultures. Transcription activation of a complex consisting of E2F1, DP1, and TRIP-Br1 was efficiently stimulated by both E6 proteins. TRIP-Br1 has an LLG E6 interaction motif, which contributed to the binding of E6 proteins. Apparently, E6 does not promote degradation of TRIP-Br1. Our observations imply that the cell-cycle promoting transcription factor E2F1/DP1 is dually targeted by HPV oncoproteins, namely (i) by interference of the E7 protein with repression by RB, and (ii) by the transcriptional cofactor function of the E6 protein. Our data reveal the natural context of the transcription activator function of E6, which has been predicted without knowledge of the E2F1/DP1/TRIP-Br/E6 complex by studying chimeric constructs, and add a function to the limited number of transforming properties shared

  12. E6 variants of human papillomavirus 18 differentially modulate the protein kinase B/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (akt/PI3K) signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Paredes, Adriana; Cruz-Hernandez, Erick de la; Martinez-Ramirez, Imelda; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Lizano, Marcela

    2009-01-01

    Intra-type genome variations of high risk Human papillomavirus (HPV) have been associated with a differential threat for cervical cancer development. In this work, the effect of HPV18 E6 isolates in Akt/PKB and Mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPKs) signaling pathways and its implication in cell proliferation were analyzed. E6 from HPV types 16 and 18 are able to bind and promote degradation of Human disc large (hDlg). Our results show that E6 variants differentially modulate hDlg degradation, rebounding in levels of activated PTEN and PKB. HPV18 E6 variants are also able to upregulate phospho-PI3K protein, strongly correlating with activated MAPKs and cell proliferation. Data was supported by the effect of E6 silencing in HPV18-containing HeLa cells, as well as hDlg silencing in the tested cells. Results suggest that HPV18 intra-type variations may derive in differential abilities to activate cell-signaling pathways such as Akt/PKB and MAPKs, directly involved in cell survival and proliferation

  13. E6AP is Required for Human Papillomavirus type 16 E6 to Cause Cervical Cancer in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shai, Anny; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses cause certain anogenital and head and neck cancers. E6, one of three potent HPV oncogenes that contribute to the development of these malignancies, is a multifunctional protein with many biochemical activities. Among these activities are its ability to bind and inactivate the cellular tumor suppressor p53, induce expression of telomerase, and bind to various other proteins including Bak, E6BP1, E6TP1, and proteins that contain PDZ domains such as hScrib and hDlg. Many of these activities are thought to contribute to E6’s role in carcinogenesis. E6’s interaction with many of these cellular proteins, including p53, leads to their destabilization. This property is mediated at least in part through E6’s ability to recruit the ubiquitin ligase, E6AP into complexes with these cellular proteins resulting in their ubiquitin–mediated degradation by the proteasome. In this study, we address the requirement for E6AP in mediating E6's acute and oncogenic phenotypes, including induction of epithelial hyperplasia, abrogation of DNA damage response and induction of cervical cancer. Loss of E6AP had no discernable effect on E6's ability to induce hyperplasia or abrogate DNA damage responses, akin to what we had earlier observed in the mouse epidermis. Nevertheless, in cervical carcinogenesis studies, there was a complete loss of E6’s oncogenic potential in mice nulligenic for E6AP. Thus, E6AP is absolutely required for E6 to cause cervical cancer. PMID:20530688

  14. Dual expression of Epstein-Barr virus, latent membrane protein-1 and human papillomavirus-16 E6 transform primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts through NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabuku, Tetsuya; Tamanaha, Ayumi; Kitamura, Bunta; Tanabe, Yasuka; Tawata, Natsumi; Ikehara, Fukino; Arakaki, Kazunari; Kinjo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in patients with oral cancer in Okinawa, southwest islands of Japan, has led to the hypothesis that carcinogenesis is related to EBV and HPV co-infection. To explore the mechanisms of transformation induced by EBV and HPV co-infection, we analyzed the transformation of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing EBV and HPV-16 genes, alone or in combination. Expression of EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) alone or in combination with HPV-16 E6 increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, whereas single expression of EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), or HPV-16 E6 did not. Co-expression of LMP-1 and E6 induced anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in nude mice, whereas expression of LMP-1 alone did not. Although the singular expression of these viral genes showed increased DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR), co-expression of LMP-1 and E6 did not induce DDR, which is frequently seen in cancer cells. Furthermore, co-expression of LMP-1 with E6 increased NF-κB signaling, and the knockdown of LMP-1 or E6 in co-expressing cells decreased cell proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and NF-κB activation. These data suggested that expression of individual viral genes is insufficient for inducing transformation and that co-expression of LMP-1 and E6, which is associated with suppression of DDR and increased NF-κB activity, lead to transformation. Our findings demonstrate the synergistic effect by the interaction of oncogenes from different viruses on the transformation of primary MEFs.

  15. Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16), HPV-18, and HPV-31 E6 Override the Normal Phosphoregulation of E6AP Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Jayashree; Banks, Lawrence

    2017-11-15

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins recruit the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP/UBE3A to target cellular substrates for proteasome-mediated degradation, and one consequence of this activity is the E6 stimulation of E6AP autoubiquitination and degradation. Recent studies identified an autism-linked mutation within E6AP at T485, which was identified as a protein kinase A phosphoacceptor site and which could directly regulate E6AP ubiquitin ligase activity. In this study, we have analyzed how T485-mediated regulation of E6AP might affect E6 targeting of some of its known substrates. We show that modulation of T485 has no effect on the ability of E6 to direct either p53 or Dlg for degradation. Furthermore, T485 regulation has no effect on HPV-16 or HPV-31 E6-induced autodegradation of E6AP but does affect HPV-18 E6-induced autodegradation of E6AP. In cells derived from cervical cancers, we find low levels of both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated E6AP in the nucleus. However, ablation of E6 results in a dramatic accumulation of phospho-E6AP in the cytoplasm, whereas nonphosphorylated E6AP accumulates primarily in the nucleus. Interestingly, E6AP phosphorylation at T485 confers association with 14-3-3 proteins, and this interaction seems to be important, in part, for the ability of E6 to recruit phospho-E6AP into the nucleus. These results demonstrate that HPV E6 overrides the normal phosphoregulation of E6AP, both in terms of its enzymatic activity and its subcellular distribution. IMPORTANCE Recent reports demonstrate the importance of phosphoregulation of E6AP for its normal enzymatic activity. Here, we show that HPV E6 is capable of overriding this regulation and can promote degradation of p53 and Dlg regardless of the phosphorylation status of E6AP. Furthermore, E6 interaction with E6AP also significantly alters how E6AP is subject to autodegradation and suggests that this is not a simple stimulation of an already-existing activity but rather a

  16. Analysis of the roles of E6 binding to E6TP1 and nuclear localization in the human papillomavirus type 31 life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choongho; Wooldridge, Tonia R.; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2007-01-01

    The E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomaviruses provide important functions not only for malignant transformation but also in the productive viral life cycle. E6 proteins have been shown to bind to a number of cellular factors, but only a limited number of analyses have investigated the effects of these interactions on the viral life cycle. In this study, we investigated the consequences of HPV 31 E6 binding to E6TP1, a putative Rap1 GAP protein. HPV 16 E6 has been shown to bind as well as induce the rapid turnover of E6TP1, and similar effects were observed with HPV 31 E6. Mutation of amino acid 128 in HPV 31 E6 was found to abrogate the ability to bind and degrade E6TP1 but did not alter binding to another α-helical domain protein, E6AP. When HPV 31 genomes containing mutations at amino acid 128 were transfected into human keratinocytes, the viral DNAs were not stably maintained as episomes indicating the importance of this residue for pathogenesis. Many E6 binding partners including E6TP1 are cytoplasmic proteins, but E6 has been also reported to be localized to the nucleus. We therefore investigated the importance of E6 localization to the nucleus in the viral life cycle. Using a fusion of E6 to Green Fluorescent Protein, we mapped one component of the nuclear localization sequences to residues 121 to 124 of HPV 31 E6. Mutation of these residues in the context of the HPV 31 genome abrogated the ability for episomes to be stably maintained and impaired the ability to extend the life span of cells. These studies identify two activities of HPV 31 E6 that are important for its function in the viral life cycle and for extension of cell life span

  17. Human Papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E 7 proteins alter NF-kB in cultured cervical epithelial cells and inhibition of NF-kB promotes cell growth and immortalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermark, Erik R.; Deluca, Krysta A.; Gardner, Courtney R.; Marker, Daniel F.; Schreiner, Cynthia N.; Strickland, David A.; Wilton, Katelynn M.; Mondal, Sumona; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2012-01-01

    The NF-kB family of transcription factors regulates important biological functions including cell growth, survival and the immune response. We found that Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 and E6/E7 proteins inhibited basal and TNF-alpha-inducible NF-kB activity in human epithelial cells cultured from the cervical transformation zone, the anatomic region where most cervical cancers develop. In contrast, HPV-16 E6 regulated NF-kB in a cell type- and cell growth-dependent manner. NF-kB influenced immortalization of cervical cells by HPV16. Inhibition of NF-kB by an IkB alpha repressor mutant increased colony formation and immortalization by HPV-16. In contrast, activation of NF-kB by constitutive expression of p65 inhibited proliferation and immortalization. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-kB by HPV-16 E6/E7 contributes to immortalization of cells from the cervical transformation zone. PMID:22284893

  18. Adenovirus type 5 E1A and E6 proteins of low-risk cutaneous beta-human papillomaviruses suppress cell transformation through interaction with FOXK1/K2 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorek, Jessica; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Subramanian, T; Vijayalingam, S; Lomonosova, Elena; Zhao, Ling-Jun; Mymryk, Joe S; Schmitt, Kimberly; Chinnadurai, G

    2010-03-01

    The adenovirus (Adv) oncoprotein E1A stimulates cell proliferation and inhibits differentiation. These activities are primarily linked to the N-terminal region (exon 1) of E1A, which interacts with multiple cellular protein complexes. The C terminus (exon 2) of E1A antagonizes these processes, mediated in part through interaction with C-terminal binding proteins 1 and 2 (CtBP1/2). To identify additional cellular E1A targets that are involved in the modulation of E1A C-terminus-mediated activities, we undertook tandem affinity purification of E1A-associated proteins. Through mass spectrometric analysis, we identified several known E1A-interacting proteins as well as novel E1A targets, such as the forkhead transcription factors, FOXK1/K2. We identified a Ser/Thr-containing sequence motif in E1A that mediated interaction with FOXK1/K2. We demonstrated that the E6 proteins of two beta-human papillomaviruses (HPV14 and HPV21) associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis also interacted with FOXK1/K2 through a motif similar to that of E1A. The E1A mutants deficient in interaction with FOXK1/K2 induced enhanced cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. The hypertransforming activity of the mutant E1A was suppressed by HPV21 E6. An E1A-E6 chimeric protein containing the Ser/Thr domain of the E6 protein in E1A interacted efficiently with FOXK1/K2 and inhibited cell transformation. Our results suggest that targeting FOXK1/K2 may be a common mechanism for certain beta-HPVs and Adv5. E1A exon 2 mutants deficient in interaction with the dual-specificity kinases DYRK1A/1B and their cofactor HAN11 also induced increased cell proliferation and transformation. Our results suggest that the E1A C-terminal region may suppress cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation through interaction with three different cellular protein complexes: FOXK1/K2, DYRK(1A/1B)/HAN11, and CtBP1/2.

  19. Telomerase activation by the E6 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhutz, A J; Foster, S A; McDougall, J K

    1996-03-07

    Activation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that synthesizes telomere repeat sequences, is linked to cell immortalization and is characteristic of most cell lines and tumours. Here we show that expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 protein activates telomerase in early-passage human keratinocytes and mammary epithelial cells. This activation was observed in cells pre-crisis, that is, before they became immortal, and occurred within one passage of retroviral infection with vectors expressing HPV-16 E6. Studies using HPV-16 E6 mutants showed that there was no correlation between the ability of the mutants to activate telomerase and their ability to target p53 for degradation, suggesting that telomerase activation by HPV-16 E6 is p53 independent. Keratinocytes expressing wild-type HPV-16 E6 have an extended lifespan, but do not become immortal, indicating that telomerase activation and E6-mediate degradation of p53 are insufficient for their immortalization. These results show that telomerase activation is an intrinsic, but insufficient, component of transformation by HPV.

  20. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6-specific antitumor immunity is induced by oral administration of HPV16 E6-expressing Lactobacillus casei in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Kim, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Il-Han; Yang, Jai-Myung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Park, Jong-Sup; Poo, Haryoung

    2010-11-01

    Given that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) against the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 (HPV16 E6) protein is important for eradication of HPV16 E6-expressing cancer cells in the cervical mucosa, the HPV16 E6 protein may be a target for the mucosal immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Here, we expressed the HPV16 E6 antigen on Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and investigated E6-specific CMI following oral administration of the L. casei-PgsA-E6 to mice. Surface expression of HPV16 E6 antigens was confirmed and mice were orally inoculated with the L. casei-PgsA or the L. casei-PgsA-E6. Compared to the L. casei-PgsA-treated mice, significantly higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA were observed in L. casei-PgsA-E6-immunized mice; these differences were significantly enhanced after boost. Consistent with this, systemic and local CMI were significantly increased after the boost, as shown by increased counts of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in splenocytes, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and vaginal samples. Furthermore, in the TC-1 tumor model, animals receiving the orally administered L. casei-PgsA-E6 showed reduced tumor size and increased survival rate versus mice receiving control (L. casei-PgsA) immunization. We also found that L. casei-PgsA-E6-induced antitumor effect was decreased by in vivo depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells. Collectively, these results indicate that the oral administration of lactobacilli bearing the surface-displayed E6 protein induces T cell-mediated cellular immunity and antitumor effects in mice.

  1. human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Recent work has uncovered new cellular partners for these .... Hence it is evident that a fine balance exists between these that govern ... still suggest that E7 can have a more global effect on the general .... towards malignancy), increases life span of the cells. E6 ..... nism when expressed alone in HPV positive/negative cell.

  2. Rare human papillomavirus 16 E6 variants reveal significant oncogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasino Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether low prevalence human papillomavirus (HPV 16 E6 variants differ from high prevalence types in their functional abilities. We evaluated functions relevant to carcinogenesis for the rarely-detected European variants R8Q, R10G and R48W as compared to the commonly detected L83V. Human immortalized keratinocytes (NIKS stably transduced with the E6 variants were used in most functional assays. Low and high prevalence E6 variants displayed similar abilities in abrogation of growth arrest and inhibition of p53 elevation induced by actinomycin D. Differences were detected in the abilities to dysregulate stratification and differentiation of NIKS in organotypic raft cultures, modulate detachment induced apoptosis (anoikis and hyperactivate Wnt signaling. No distinctive phenotype could be assigned to include all rare variants. Like L83V, raft cultures derived from variants R10G and R48W similarly induced hyperplasia and aberrantly expressed keratin 5 in the suprabasal compartment with significantly lower expression of keratin 10. Unlike L83V, both variants, and particularly R48W, induced increased levels of anoikis upon suspension in semisolid medium. R8Q induced a unique phenotype characterized by thin organotypic raft cultures, low expression of keratin 10, and high expression of keratins 5 and 14 throughout all raft layers. Interestingly, in a reporter based assay R8Q exhibited a higher ability to augment TCF/β-catenin transcription. The data suggests that differences in E6 variant prevalence in cervical carcinoma may not be related to the carcinogenic potential of the E6 protein.

  3. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R. [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A., E-mail: rkatzen@uw.edu [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  4. Modulation of DNA methylation by human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Prakriti; Ganguly, Pooja; Ganguly, Niladri

    2018-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double stranded circular DNA viruses that infect cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Almost 99% of cervical cancer has a HPV infection. The early oncoproteins E6 and E7 are important in this cellular transformation process. Epigenetic mechanisms have long been known to result in decisive alterations in DNA, leading to alterations in DNA-protein interactions, alterations in chromatin structure and compaction and significant alterations in gene expression. The enzymes responsible for these epigenetic modifications are DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs), histone acetylases and deacetylases. Epigenetics has an important role in cancer development by modifying the cellular micro environment. In this review, the authors discuss the role of HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 in modulating the epigenetic mechanisms inside the host cell. The oncoproteins induce the expression of DNMTs which lead to aberrant DNA methylations and disruption of the normal epigenetic processes. The E7 oncoprotein may additionally directly bind and induce methyl transferase activity of the enzyme. These modulations lead to altered gene expression levels, particularly the genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle and cell adhesion. In addition, the present review discusses how epigenetic mechanisms may be targeted for possible therapeutic interventions for HPV mediated cervical cancer. PMID:29285184

  5. Intracellular scFvs against the viral E6 oncoprotein provoke apoptosis in human papillomavirus-positive cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, Magali; Boulade-Ladame, Charlotte; Mailly, Laurent; Weiss, Etienne; Orfanoudakis, Georges; Deryckere, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 (16E6) is involved in the tumorigenesis of human cervical cells by targeting numerous cellular proteins. We have designed a strategy for neutralizing 16E6 based on the intracellular expression of single-chain Fv antibodies (scFvs) specific to 16E6. Recombinant adenovirus vectors were constructed to allow expression of two 16E6-binding scFvs and one 16E6-non-binding scFv in HPV16-positive and -negative cells. Expression of the scFvs provoked two types of effects: (i) inhibition of proliferation of all cell lines tested, this aspecific toxicity being likely due to the aggregation of unfolded scFvs; and (ii) apoptosis observed only in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines after expression of 16E6-binding scFvs, this specific effect being proportional to the intracellular solubility of the scFvs. These data demonstrate the feasibility of intracellular immunization with anti-16E6 scFvs and highlight the importance of the solubility of the intracellular antibodies

  6. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Massimi, Paola; Lizano, Marcela; Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6 ⁎ . Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8

  7. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Massimi, Paola [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Lizano, Marcela, E-mail: lizanosoberon@gmail.com [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Banks, Lawrence, E-mail: banks@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  8. Direct Human Papillomavirus E6 Whole-Cell Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Objective Measurement of E6 Oncoproteins in Cytology Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi-Shan; Smith-McCune, Karen; Darragh, Teresa M.; Lai, Yvonne; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Chang, Ting-Chang; Guo, Hsiao-Yun; Kesler, Tiea; Carter, Alicia; Castle, Philip E.; Cheng, Shuling

    2012-01-01

    A novel, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a non-type-specific anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 antibody was tested on 182 residual cytological specimens. For samples with a designation of more severe than cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3+), 83% tested positive for E6; in a subset with paired testing for E6 ELISA and HPV DNA, 72% tested E6 positive and 92% tested high-risk (HR)-HPV DNA positive (P = 0.2). Among the women with a less than CIN3 diag...

  9. The synergistic transactivation of the hepatitis B viral (HBV) pregenomic promoter by the E6 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 E6) with HBV X protein was mediated through the AP1 site of E element in the enhancer I (EnI) in human liver cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Choi, B H; Rho, H M

    1999-11-01

    Infection by HBV of a cell already infected with other viral species or vice versa has been suggested as being involved in hepatocellular carcinoma. Using the CAT assay method, we investigated the interactive roles of HBx and potentially oncogenic and transactivating viral early proteins such as Ad5 E1A, HPV-16 E6, and SV40 T ag. In the presence of HBx, only HPV-16 E6 showed significant synergistic transactivation of EnI. We further investigated the function of the HPV-16 E6 using deletion, heterologous promoter, and mutation analyses on the EnI promoter. The results showed that the synergistic effect was mediated through the AP1 site of the E element in EnI by the direct activation of AP1 and support the idea that the infection by HBV of the cell with other viral species such as HPV-16 could increase the transcription activity of the HBV and other oncogenes containing an AP1 site in the promoter. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Evidence for Alteration of EZH2, BMI1, and KDM6A and Epigenetic Reprogramming in Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6/E7-Expressing Keratinocytes ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hyland, Paula L.; McDade, Simon S.; McCloskey, Rachel; Dickson, Glenda J.; Arthur, Ken; McCance, Dennis J.; Patel, Daksha

    2011-01-01

    A number of epigenetic alterations occur in both the virus and host cellular genomes during human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis, and investigations of such alterations, including changes in chromatin proteins and histone modifications, have the potential to lead to therapeutic epigenetic reversion. We report here that transformed HPV16 E6/E7-expressing primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) (E6/E7 cells) demonstrate increased expression of the PRC2 methyltransferase EZH2...

  11. Ultrasensitive quantitation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene sequences by nested real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Revilla Rubén

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed an ultrasensitive method based on conventional PCR preamplification followed by nested amplification through real time PCR (qPCR in the presence of the DNA intercalating agent EvaGreen. Results Amplification mixtures calibrated with a known number of pHV101 copies carrying a 645 base pair (bp-long insert of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E6 oncogene were used to generate the E6-1 amplicon of 645 bp by conventional PCR and then the E6-2 amplicon of 237 bp by nested qPCR. Direct and nested qPCR mixtures for E6-2 amplification corresponding to 2.5 × 102-2.5 × 106 initial pHV101 copies had threshold cycle (Ct values in the ranges of 18.7-29.0 and 10.0-25.0, respectively. The Ct of qPCR mixtures prepared with 1/50 volumes of preamplified mixtures containing 50 ng of DNA of the SiHa cell line (derived from an invasive cervical cancer with one HPV16 genome per cell was 19.9. Thermal fluorescence extinction profiles of E6-2 amplicons generated from pHV101 and SiHa DNA were identical, with a peak at 85.5°C. Conclusions Our method based on conventional preamplification for 15 cycles increased 10,750 times the sensitivity of nested qPCR for the quantitation of the E6 viral oncogene and confirmed that the SiHa cell line contains one E6-HPV16 copy per cell.

  12. 78 FR 42530 - Prospective Grant of an Exclusive License: Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 and E6 Peptides for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... peptide from HPV 16. E6 peptide vaccines are potentially prophylactic or therapeutic for cervical cancer... Exclusive License: Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 and E6 Peptides for Cervical Cancer Vaccine Development AGENCY... principal place of business in Augusta, Georgia. The United States of America is an assignee to the patent...

  13. E6 and E7 Gene Polymorphisms in Human Papillomavirus Types-58 and 33 Identified in Southwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuyi Chen

    Full Text Available Cancer of the cervix is associated with infection by certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV. The gene variants differ in immune responses and oncogenic potential. The E6 and E7 proteins encoded by high-risk HPV play a key role in cellular transformation. HPV-33 and HPV-58 types are highly prevalent among Chinese women. To study the gene intratypic variations, polymorphisms and positive selections of HPV-33 and HPV-58 E6/E7 in southwest China, HPV-33 (E6, E7: n = 216 and HPV-58 (E6, E7: n = 405 E6 and E7 genes were sequenced and compared to others submitted to GenBank. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by Maximum-likelihood and the Kimura 2-parameters methods by MEGA 6 (Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6.0. The diversity of secondary structure was analyzed by PSIPred software. The selection pressures acting on the E6/E7 genes were estimated by PAML 4.8 (Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximun Likelihood version4.8 software. The positive sites of HPV-33 and HPV-58 E6/E7 were contrasted by ClustalX 2.1. Among 216 HPV-33 E6 sequences, 8 single nucleotide mutations were observed with 6/8 non-synonymous and 2/8 synonymous mutations. The 216 HPV-33 E7 sequences showed 3 single nucleotide mutations that were non-synonymous. The 405 HPV-58 E6 sequences revealed 8 single nucleotide mutations with 4/8 non-synonymous and 4/8 synonymous mutations. Among 405 HPV-58 E7 sequences, 13 single nucleotide mutations were observed with 10/13 non-synonymous mutations and 3/13 synonymous mutations. The selective pressure analysis showed that all HPV-33 and 4/6 HPV-58 E6/E7 major non-synonymous mutations were sites of positive selection. All variations were observed in sites belonging to major histocompatibility complex and/or B-cell predicted epitopes. K93N and R145 (I/N were observed in both HPV-33 and HPV-58 E6.

  14. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression.

  15. Sonoporation delivery of monoclonal antibodies against human papillomavirus 16 E6 restores p53 expression in transformed cervical keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Togtema

    Full Text Available High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV, such as HPV16, have been found in nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Therapies targeted at blocking the HPV16 E6 protein and its deleterious effects on the tumour suppressor pathways of the cell can reverse the malignant phenotype of affected keratinocytes while sparing uninfected cells. Through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between engineering and biology, a novel, non-invasive intracellular delivery method for the HPV16 E6 antibody, F127-6G6, was developed. The method employs high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU in combination with microbubbles, in a process known as sonoporation. In this proof of principle study, it was first demonstrated that sonoporation antibody delivery into the HPV16 positive cervical carcinoma derived cell lines CaSki and SiHa was possible, using chemical transfection as a baseline for comparison. Delivery of the E6 antibody using sonoporation significantly restored p53 expression in these cells, indicating the antibody is able to enter the cells and remains active. This delivery method is targeted, non-cytotoxic, and non-invasive, making it more easily translatable for in vivo experiments than other transfection methods.

  16. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Gene Alone Is Sufficient To Induce Carcinomas in Transgenic Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shiyu; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of certain human cancers. HPV type 16 (HPV16) is the papillomavirus most frequently associated with cervical cancer in women. The E6 and E7 genes of HPV are expressed in cells derived from these cancers and can transform cells in tissue culture. Animal experiments have demonstrated that E6 and E7 together cause tumors. We showed previously that E6 and E7 together or E7 alone could induce skin tumors in mice when these genes were expressed in the basal epithelia of the skin. In this study, we investigated the role that the E6 gene plays in carcinogenesis. We generated K14E6 transgenic mice, in which the HPV16 E6 gene was directed in its expression by the human keratin 14 promoter (hK14) to the basal layer of the epidermis. We found that E6 induced cellular hyperproliferation and epidermal hyperplasia and caused skin tumors in adult mice. Interestingly, the tumors derived from E6 were mostly malignant, as opposed to the tumors from E7 mice, which were mostly benign. This result leads us to hypothesize that E6 may contribute differently than E7 to HPV-associated carcinogenesis; whereas E7 primarily contributes to the early stages of carcinogenesis that lead to the formation of benign tumors, E6 primarily contributes to the late stages of carcinogenesis that lead to malignancy. PMID:10364340

  17. Humoral immune response against proteins E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma patients positive for human papilloma virus type 16 during treatment and follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baay, M. F.; Duk, J. M.; Burger, M. P.; de Bruijn, H. W.; Stolz, E.; Herbrink, P.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the humoral immune response to transforming proteins E6 and E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 before and after treatment and during follow-up, consecutive serum samples from 36 cervical cancer patients whose tumours were found to contain human papillomavirus type 16 DNA by use of the

  18. Humoral immune response against proteins E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma patients positive for human papilloma virus type 16 during treatment and follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baay, MFD; Duk, JM; Burger, MPM; de Bruijn, HWA; Stolz, E; Herbrink, P

    To investigate the humoral immune response to transforming proteins E6 and E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 before and after treatment and during follow-up, consecutive serum samples from 36 cervical cancer patients whose tumours were found to contain human papillomavirus type 16 DNA by use of the

  19. Regulation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Omar Muñoz Bello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling pathways are the mechanisms by which cells transduce external stimuli, which control the transcription of genes, to regulate diverse biological effects. In cancer, distinct signaling pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, have been implicated in the deregulation of critical molecular processes that affect cell proliferation and differentiation. For example, changes in β-catenin localization have been identified in Human Papillomavirus (HPV-related cancers as the lesion progresses. Specifically, β-catenin relocates from the membrane/cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that this transcription regulator participates in cervical carcinogenesis. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins are responsible for the transforming activity of HPV, and some studies have implicated these viral oncoproteins in the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Nevertheless, new interactions of HPV oncoproteins with cellular proteins are emerging, and the study of the biological effects of such interactions will help to understand HPV-related carcinogenesis. Viruses 2015, 7 4735 This review addresses the accumulated evidence of the involvement of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  20. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    J. Biosci. 34(1), March 2009. 1. Introduction. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a double-stranded DNA virus that ..... contact and loss of cell polarity (Watson et al 2003; Thomas ..... Arrand JR 1995 Translation of the human papillomavirus type 16.

  1. Immortalization of normal human embryonic fibroblasts by introduction of either the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 or E7 gene alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akito; Kumakura, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Minoru; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2003-09-01

    The ability of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 or E7 gene to induce immortalization of normal human embryonic fibroblast WHE-7 cells was examined. WHE-7 cells at 9 population doublings (PD) were infected with retrovirus vectors encoding either HPV-16 E6 or E7 alone or both E6 and E7 (E6/E7). One of 4 isolated clones carrying E6 alone became immortal and is currently at >445 PD. Four of 4 isolated clones carrying E7 alone escaped from crisis and are currently at >330 PD. Three of 5 isolated clones carrying E6/E7 were also immortalized and are currently at >268 PD. The immortal clone carrying E6 only and 2 of the 3 immortal clones carrying E6/E7 expressed a high level of E6 protein, and all the immortal clones carrying E7 alone and the other immortal clone carrying E6/E7 expressed a high level of E7 protein when compared to their mortal or precrisis clones. The immortal clones expressing a high level of E6 or E7 protein were positive for telomerase activity or an alternative mechanism of telomere maintenance, respectively, known as ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). All the mortal or precrisis clones were negative for both phenotypes. All the immortal clones exhibited abrogation of G1 arrest after DNA damage by X-ray irradiation. The expression of INK4a protein (p16(INK4a)) was undetectable in the E6-infected mortal and immortal clones, whereas Rb protein (pRb) was hyperphosphorylated only in the immortal clone. The p16(INK4a) protein was overexpressed in all the E7-infected immortal clones and their clones in the pre-crisis period as well as all the E6/E7-infected mortal and immortal clones, but the pRb expression was downregulated in all of these clones. These results demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that HPV-16 E6 or E7 alone can induce immortalization of normal human embryonic fibroblasts. Inactivation of p16(INK4a)/pRb pathways in combination with activation of a telomere maintenance mechanism is suggested to be necessary for

  2. A high-throughput cellular assay to quantify the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A subset of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), known as the high-risk types, are the causative agents of cervical cancer and other malignancies of the anogenital region and oral mucosa. The capacity of these viruses to induce cancer and to immortalize cells in culture relies in part on a critical function of their E6 oncoprotein, that of promoting the poly-ubiquitination of the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53 and its subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Here, we describe a cellular assay to measure the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different HPV types. This assay is based on a translational fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (Rluc-p53) that remains sensitive to degradation by high-risk E6 and whose steady-state levels can be accurately measured in standard luciferase assays. The p53-degradation activity of any E6 protein can be tested and quantified in transiently transfected cells by determining the amount of E6-expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 luciferase activity (50 % effective concentration [EC50]). The high-throughput and quantitative nature of this assay makes it particularly useful to compare the p53-degradation activities of E6 from several HPV types in parallel.

  3. Avian papillomaviruses: the parrot Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV genome has a unique organization of the early protein region and is phylogenetically related to the chaffinch papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenson A Bennett

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An avian papillomavirus genome has been cloned from a cutaneous exophytic papilloma from an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus. The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV were determined. This PePV sequence represents the first complete avian papillomavirus genome defined. Results The PePV genome (7304 basepairs differs from other papillomaviruses, in that it has a unique organization of the early protein region lacking classical E6 and E7 open reading frames. Phylogenetic comparison of the PePV sequence with partial E1 and L1 sequences of the chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs papillomavirus (FPV reveals that these two avian papillomaviruses form a monophyletic cluster with a common branch that originates near the unresolved center of the papillomavirus evolutionary tree. Conclusions The PePV genome has a unique layout of the early protein region which represents a novel prototypic genomic organization for avian papillomaviruses. The close relationship between PePV and FPV, and between their Psittaciformes and Passeriformes hosts, supports the hypothesis that papillomaviruses have co-evolved and speciated together with their host species throughout evolution.

  4. Photodynamic tissue adhesion with chlorin(e6) protein conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, J; Veloso, A A; Tolentino, F; Hasan, T; Hamblin, M R

    1999-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that a photodynamic laser-activated tissue solder would perform better in sealing scleral incisions when the photosensitizer was covalently linked to the protein than when it was noncovalently mixed. Conjugates and mixtures were prepared between the photosensitizer chlorin(e6) and various proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and gelatin) in different ratios and used to weld penetrating scleral incisions made in human cadaveric eyes. A blue-green (488-514 nm) argon laser activated the adhesive, and the strength of the closure was measured by increasing the intraocular pressure until the wound showed leakage. Both covalent conjugates and noncovalent mixtures showed a light dose-dependent increase in leaking pressure. A preparation of albumin chlorin(e6) conjugate with additional albumin added (2.5 protein to chlorin(e6) molar ratio) showed significantly higher weld strength than other protein conjugates and mixtures. This is the first report of dye-protein conjugates as tissue solders. These conjugates may have applications in ophthalmology.

  5. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamura, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.altamura@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Corteggio, Annunziata, E-mail: ancorteg@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Pacini, Laura, E-mail: PaciniL@students.iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Conte, Andrea, E-mail: andreaconte88@hotmail.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria, E-mail: gmpieran@unina.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tommasino, Massimo, E-mail: tommasinom@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Accardi, Rosita, E-mail: accardir@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Borzacchiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: borzacch@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. - Highlights: • FcaPV2 E6 binds to and deregulates feline p53 protein. • FcaPV2 E7 binds to and deregulates feline pRb protein. • FcaPV2 oncogenes inhibit UVB-induced apoptosis. • FcaPV2 E6E7 and E7 increase the lifespan of primary cells. • FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 are expressed at the mRNA level in feline SCC in vivo.

  6. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV) targeting human papillomavirus (HPV). Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7) via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus. PMID:26343186

  7. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  8. Unique genome organization of non-mammalian papillomaviruses provides insights into the evolution of viral early proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Ruoppolo, Valeria; Schmidt, Annie; Lescroël, Amelie; Jongsomjit, Dennis; Elrod, Megan; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Dugger, Katie M; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G; Varsani, Arvind

    2017-07-01

    The family Papillomaviridae contains more than 320 papillomavirus types, with most having been identified as infecting skin and mucosal epithelium in mammalian hosts. To date, only nine non-mammalian papillomaviruses have been described from birds ( n  = 5), a fish ( n  = 1), a snake ( n  = 1), and turtles ( n  = 2). The identification of papillomaviruses in sauropsids and a sparid fish suggests that early ancestors of papillomaviruses were already infecting the earliest Euteleostomi. The Euteleostomi clade includes more than 90 per cent of the living vertebrate species, and progeny virus could have been passed on to all members of this clade, inhabiting virtually every habitat on the planet. As part of this study, we isolated a novel papillomavirus from a 16-year-old female Adélie penguin ( Pygoscelis adeliae ) from Cape Crozier, Ross Island (Antarctica). The new papillomavirus shares ∼64 per cent genome-wide identity to a previously described Adélie penguin papillomavirus. Phylogenetic analyses show that the non-mammalian viruses (expect the python, Morelia spilota , associated papillomavirus) cluster near the base of the papillomavirus evolutionary tree. A papillomavirus isolated from an avian host (Northern fulmar; Fulmarus glacialis ), like the two turtle papillomaviruses, lacks a putative E9 protein that is found in all other avian papillomaviruses. Furthermore, the Northern fulmar papillomavirus has an E7 more similar to the mammalian viruses than the other avian papillomaviruses. Typical E6 proteins of mammalian papillomaviruses have two Zinc finger motifs, whereas the sauropsid papillomaviruses only have one such motif. Furthermore, this motif is absent in the fish papillomavirus. Thus, it is highly likely that the most recent common ancestor of the mammalian and sauropsid papillomaviruses had a single motif E6. It appears that a motif duplication resulted in mammalian papillomaviruses having a double Zinc finger motif in E6. We

  9. Unique genome organization of non-mammalian papillomaviruses provides insights into the evolution of viral early proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Ruoppolo, Valeria; Schmidt, Annie; Lescroël, Amelie; Jongsomjit, Dennis; Elrod, Megan; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Dugger, Katie M.; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G.; Varsani, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    The family Papillomaviridae contains more than 320 papillomavirus types, with most having been identified as infecting skin and mucosal epithelium in mammalian hosts. To date, only nine non-mammalian papillomaviruses have been described from birds (n = 5), a fish (n = 1), a snake (n = 1), and turtles (n = 2). The identification of papillomaviruses in sauropsids and a sparid fish suggests that early ancestors of papillomaviruses were already infecting the earliest Euteleostomi. The Euteleostomi clade includes more than 90 per cent of the living vertebrate species, and progeny virus could have been passed on to all members of this clade, inhabiting virtually every habitat on the planet. As part of this study, we isolated a novel papillomavirus from a 16-year-old female Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) from Cape Crozier, Ross Island (Antarctica). The new papillomavirus shares ∼64 per cent genome-wide identity to a previously described Adélie penguin papillomavirus. Phylogenetic analyses show that the non-mammalian viruses (expect the python, Morelia spilota, associated papillomavirus) cluster near the base of the papillomavirus evolutionary tree. A papillomavirus isolated from an avian host (Northern fulmar; Fulmarus glacialis), like the two turtle papillomaviruses, lacks a putative E9 protein that is found in all other avian papillomaviruses. Furthermore, the Northern fulmar papillomavirus has an E7 more similar to the mammalian viruses than the other avian papillomaviruses. Typical E6 proteins of mammalian papillomaviruses have two Zinc finger motifs, whereas the sauropsid papillomaviruses only have one such motif. Furthermore, this motif is absent in the fish papillomavirus. Thus, it is highly likely that the most recent common ancestor of the mammalian and sauropsid papillomaviruses had a single motif E6. It appears that a motif duplication resulted in mammalian papillomaviruses having a double Zinc finger motif in E6. We estimated the

  10. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 and E7 Oncoproteins Act Synergistically to Cause Head and Neck Cancer in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Sean; Strati, Katerina; Shin, Myeong Kyun; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) contribute to cervical and other anogenital cancers, and they are also linked etiologically to a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). We previously established a model for HPV-associated HNSCC in which we treated transgenic mice expressing the papillomaviral oncoproteins with the chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). We found that the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was highly potent in causing HNSCC, and its dominance masked any potential oncogenic contribution of E6, a second papillomaviral oncoprotein commonly expressed in human cancers. In the current study, we shortened the duration of treatment with 4-NQO to reduce the incidence of cancers and discovered a striking synergy between E6 and E7 in causing HNSCC. Comparing the oncogenic properties of wild-type versus mutant E6 genes in this model for HNSCC uncovered a role for some but not other cellular targets of E6 previously shown to contribute to cervical cancer. PMID:20797753

  11. Genetic immunization against cervical carcinoma : induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity with a recombinant alphavirus vector expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Pries, F; Bungener, L; Kraak, M; Regts, J; Wilschut, J

    infection of genital epithelial cells with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 is closely associated with the development of cervical carcinoma. The transforming potential of these high-risk HPVs depends on the expression of the E6 and E7 early viral gene products. Since the expression of E6

  12. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K.; Delury, Craig P.; Davies, Nicholas J.; Weston, Christopher J.; Miah, Mohammed A.L.; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L.

    2017-01-01

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification. PMID:28061478

  13. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K; Delury, Craig P; Davies, Nicholas J; Weston, Christopher J; Miah, Mohammed A L; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L; Higgs, Martin R; Roberts, Sally

    2017-03-21

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification.

  14. Evidence for Alteration of EZH2, BMI1, and KDM6A and Epigenetic Reprogramming in Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6/E7-Expressing Keratinocytes ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Paula L.; McDade, Simon S.; McCloskey, Rachel; Dickson, Glenda J.; Arthur, Ken; McCance, Dennis J.; Patel, Daksha

    2011-01-01

    A number of epigenetic alterations occur in both the virus and host cellular genomes during human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis, and investigations of such alterations, including changes in chromatin proteins and histone modifications, have the potential to lead to therapeutic epigenetic reversion. We report here that transformed HPV16 E6/E7-expressing primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) (E6/E7 cells) demonstrate increased expression of the PRC2 methyltransferase EZH2 at both the mRNA and protein levels but do not exhibit the expected increase in trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) compared to normal keratinocytes. In contrast, these cells show a reduction in global H3K27me3 levels in vitro, as well as upregulation of the KDM6A demethylase. We further show for the first time that transformation with the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes also results in an increase in phosphorylated EZH2 serine 21 (P-EZH2-Ser21), mediated by active Akt, and in a downregulation of the PRC1 protein BMI1 in these cells. High-grade squamous cervical intraepithelial lesions also showed a loss of H3K27me3 in the presence of increased expression of EZH2. Correlating with the loss of H3K27me3, E6/E7 cells exhibited derepression of specific EZH2-, KMD6A-, and BMI1-targeted HOX genes. These results suggest that the observed reduction in H3K27me3 may be due to a combination of reduced activities/levels of specific polycomb proteins and increases in demethylases. The dysregulation of multiple chromatin proteins resulting in the loss of global H3K27me3 and the transcriptional reprogramming in HPV16 E6/E7-infected cells could provide an epigenetic signature associated with risk and/or progression of HPV16-associated cancers, as well as the potential for epigenetic reversion in the future. PMID:21865393

  15. Evidence for alteration of EZH2, BMI1, and KDM6A and epigenetic reprogramming in human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7-expressing keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Paula L; McDade, Simon S; McCloskey, Rachel; Dickson, Glenda J; Arthur, Ken; McCance, Dennis J; Patel, Daksha

    2011-11-01

    A number of epigenetic alterations occur in both the virus and host cellular genomes during human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis, and investigations of such alterations, including changes in chromatin proteins and histone modifications, have the potential to lead to therapeutic epigenetic reversion. We report here that transformed HPV16 E6/E7-expressing primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) (E6/E7 cells) demonstrate increased expression of the PRC2 methyltransferase EZH2 at both the mRNA and protein levels but do not exhibit the expected increase in trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) compared to normal keratinocytes. In contrast, these cells show a reduction in global H3K27me3 levels in vitro, as well as upregulation of the KDM6A demethylase. We further show for the first time that transformation with the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes also results in an increase in phosphorylated EZH2 serine 21 (P-EZH2-Ser21), mediated by active Akt, and in a downregulation of the PRC1 protein BMI1 in these cells. High-grade squamous cervical intraepithelial lesions also showed a loss of H3K27me3 in the presence of increased expression of EZH2. Correlating with the loss of H3K27me3, E6/E7 cells exhibited derepression of specific EZH2-, KMD6A-, and BMI1-targeted HOX genes. These results suggest that the observed reduction in H3K27me3 may be due to a combination of reduced activities/levels of specific polycomb proteins and increases in demethylases. The dysregulation of multiple chromatin proteins resulting in the loss of global H3K27me3 and the transcriptional reprogramming in HPV16 E6/E7-infected cells could provide an epigenetic signature associated with risk and/or progression of HPV16-associated cancers, as well as the potential for epigenetic reversion in the future.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus type 18 E6 and E7-specific CD4+ T-helper 1 immunity in relation to health versus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welters, Marij J. P.; van der Logt, Pauline; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Kwappenberg, Kitty M. C.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Kenter, Gemma G.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Offringa, Rienk

    2006-01-01

    The most common high-risk human papillomavirus types, HPV16 and 18, differ markedly with respect to their interaction with the host. Clearance of HPV18 infections generally takes longer and HPV18-positive cancers have a poorer prognosis. We therefore evaluated Th1-type immunity against the E6 and E7

  17. Identification and characterization of a cluster of transcription start sites located in the E6 ORF of human papillomavirus type 16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Hansen, Christina N

    2003-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the prototype strain among the malignant types of HPV in the western world. The main promoter, P97, located in front of the E6 ORF, has been shown to control expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7. These oncogenes are expressed continuously in HPV-16......-transformed cells. In contrast to malignant HPV types, non-malignant HPV types have separate promoters driving the expression of E6 and E7. Experiments have shown that the translation of E7 is more efficient from monocistronic than bicistronic transcripts encoding both E6 and E7. Here, identification...... of a cluster of transcription start sites located in the E6 ORF of HPV-16 is presented. Transcripts from this region contain the E7 ORF as the first reading frame. The cluster consists of multiple transcription start sites located around nt 441. Additional transcription start sites were identified in a cluster...

  18. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil); Sichero, Laura [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Centre for Translational Research in Oncology, Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo (ICESP), São Paulo (Brazil); Boccardo, Enrique [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo., São Paulo (Brazil); Villa, Luisa Lina [Department of Radiology and Oncology, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Rahal, Paula, E-mail: rahalp@yahoo.com.br [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  19. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Sichero, Laura; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa Lina; Rahal, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  20. Rat primary embryo fibroblast cells suppress transformation by the E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 in somatic hybrid cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyasaka, M; Takami, Y; Inoue, H; Hakura, A

    1991-01-01

    The E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) transform established lines of rat cells but not rat cells in primary culture irrespective of the expression of the two genes. The reason for this difference between the susceptibilities of cell lines and primary cells was examined by using hybrid cells obtained by somatic cell fusion of rat cell lines transformed by the E6 and E7 genes of HPV-16 and freshly isolated rat embryo fibroblast cells. In these hybrid cells, transformed ph...

  1. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  2. Degradation of p53 by human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins shows a stronger correlation with phylogeny than oncogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiping Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV E6 induced p53 degradation is thought to be an essential activity by which high-risk human Alphapapillomaviruses (alpha-HPVs contribute to cervical cancer development. However, most of our understanding is derived from the comparison of HPV16 and HPV11. These two viruses are relatively distinct viruses, making the extrapolation of these results difficult. In the present study, we expand the tested strains (types to include members of all known HPV species groups within the Alphapapillomavirus genus.We report the biochemical activity of E6 proteins from 27 HPV types representing all alpha-HPV species groups to degrade p53 in human cells. Expression of E6 from all HPV types epidemiologically classified as group 1 carcinogens significantly reduced p53 levels. However, several types not associated with cancer (e.g., HPV53, HPV70 and HPV71 were equally active in degrading p53. HPV types within species groups alpha 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 share a most recent common ancestor (MRCA and all contain E6 ORFs that degrade p53. A unique exception, HPV71 E6 ORF that degraded p53 was outside this clade and is one of the most prevalent HPV types infecting the cervix in a population-based study of 10,000 women. Alignment of E6 ORFs identified an amino acid site that was highly correlated with the biochemical ability to degrade p53. Alteration of this amino acid in HPV71 E6 abrogated its ability to degrade p53, while alteration of this site in HPV71-related HPV90 and HPV106 E6s enhanced their capacity to degrade p53.These data suggest that the alpha-HPV E6 proteins' ability to degrade p53 is an evolved phenotype inherited from a most recent common ancestor of the high-risk species that does not always segregate with carcinogenicity. In addition, we identified an amino-acid residue strongly correlated with viral p53 degrading potential.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Synergistic Therapeutic Effect of Cisplatin with Human Papillomavirus16 E6/E7 CRISPR/Cas9 on Cervical Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 is one of the major etiologic factors of cervical cancer. Our study aims to investigate the potentiality of the antiviral clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated Cas9 system (CRISPR/Cas9 targeting the E6 and E7 oncogenes of HPV16 as a potential chemosensitizer of cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II; CDDP for cervical cancer. METHODS: Specifically, the therapeutic efficacy of combination of CDDP and HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 was assessed in cervical cancer cells and cervical cancer xenograft models. RESULTS: In vitro experiments showed that long-term exposure of SiHa cells to the HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 induced apoptosis, and its pro-apoptosis effect became more obvious when combined with CDDP. In vivo study found the efficacy of the combination of HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 and CDDP were superior to either of the treatments in term of apoptosis induction and metastasis inhibition. CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results suggested that HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 could be an effective sensitizer of CDDP chemotherapy in cervical cancer.

  4. Cervical Cancers Require the Continuous Expression of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein Even in the Presence of the Viral E6 Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Sean F.; Park, Soyeong; Schweizer, Johannes; Berard-Bergery, Marthe; Pitot, Henry C.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV), such as HPV-16, are etiologic agents of a variety of anogenital and oral malignancies, including nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Cervical cancers arising in transgenic mice that express HPV-16 E7 in an inducible manner require the continuous expression of E7 for their maintenance. However, in HPV-associated cancers in vivo, E6 and E7 invariably are co-expressed. In this study, we investigated whether cervical cancers rely on the continuous expression of E7 in the context of constitutively expressed E6. We placed the inducible HPV-16 E7 transgene onto a background in which HPV-16 E6 was constitutively expressed. In transgenic mice with high-grade cervical dysplastic lesions and cervical cancer, repressing the expression of E7 led to the regression of all cancers and the vast majority of high-grade dysplastic lesions. In addition, cervical cancers were occasionally observed in transgenic mice in which E7 was repressed and then re-expressed. Our findings therefore indicate that even in the presence of constitutively expressed E6, the continuous expression of E7 is required for the maintenance of cervical cancers and most precancerous lesions. These data have important implications for the potential clinical use of drugs designed to inhibit the expression and/or function of E7 to treat HPV-associated cancers. PMID:22700879

  5. Evaluation of immunological cross-reactivity between clade A9 high-risk human papillomavirus types on the basis of E6-Specific CD4+ memory T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hende, Muriel; Redeker, Anke; Kwappenberg, Kitty M. C.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Oostendorp, Jaap; Valentijn, A. Rob P. M.; Fathers, Loraine M.; Welters, Marij J. P.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Kenter, Gemma G.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Offringa, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) T cell responses against the E6 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 5 closely related members of clade A9 (HPV31, 33, 35, 52, and 58) were charted in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from healthy subjects and patients who underwent HPV16 E6/E7-specific vaccination.

  6. Genetic variability in E6 and E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus Type 16 from Congolese cervical cancer isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Boumba, Luc Magloire Anicet; Assoumou, Samira Zoa; Hilali, Lahoucine; Mambou, Jean Victor; Moukassa, Donatien; Ennaji, Mustapha Moulay

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular epidemiological studies showed that some variants of HPV-16, distributed geographically, would present a higher risk of causing cervical cancer. This study aimed to analyze nucleotide changes of HPV-16 E6 and E7 genomic regions from infected Southwestern Congolese women. Methods DNA of twenty HPV-16 isolates was analyzed by amplifying the E6 and E7 genes using type-specific primers PCR and direct sequencing. The sequences obtained were aligned with the HPV-16 GenBank ...

  7. Irradiation And Papillomavirus E2 Proteins On Hela Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi, B.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to relatively high doses ionizing radiation activates cellular responses that impair cell survival. These responses, for which the p53 protein plays a central role, form the basis for cancer radiotherapy. However, the efficacy of radiation treatments on cell killing is often reduced as a consequence of the frequent inactivation of the p53 protein in cancer cells. Loss of p53 protein is associated with later stages of most human tumors and resistance to anticancer agents. Carcinomas are frequent malignant tumors in humans. The majority of cervical carcinomas are etiologically linked to the presence of HPV virus (Human Papillomavirus). In carcinoma tumor cells, as well as in their derived-cell lines such as HeLa cells, the p53 protein is generally not detected due to its degradation by the product of the HPV-associated oncogenic E6 gene. Another characteristic of HPV-positive cervical cancer cells is the loss of the regulatory viral E2 gene expression as a consequence of viral DNA integration into the cellular genome. Reintroduction of E2 expression in HeLa cells reactivates p53, due to a negative effect on the expression of E6 protein, with a concomitant arrest of cell proliferation at the phase G1 of the cell cycle and delay in cell division via the repression of E2F-target genes. To elucidate whether reactivation of p53 would improve the cell killing effect of ionizing radiation in cancer cells, we studied the combined effects of radiation and E2 expression on the cell cycle distribution in HeLa cells

  8. Molecular screening of compounds to the predicted Protein-Protein Interaction site of Rb1-E7 with p53- E6 in HPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Faraz; Sanehi, Parvish; Rawal, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is malignant neoplasm of the cervix uteri or cervical area. Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) which are heterogeneous groups of small double stranded DNA viruses are considered as the primary cause of cervical cancer, involved in 90% of all Cervical Cancers. Two early HPV genes, E6 and E7, are known to play crucial role in tumor formation. E6 binds with p53 and prevents its translocation and thereby inhibit the ability of p53 to activate or repress target genes. E7 binds to hypophosphorylated Rb and thereby induces cells to enter into premature S-phase by disrupting Rb-E2F complexes. The strategy of the research work was to target the site of interaction of Rb1 -E7 & p53-E6. A total of 88 compounds were selected for molecular screening, based on comprehensive literature survey for natural compounds with anti-cancer activity. Molecular docking analysis was carried out with Molegro Virtual Docker, to screen the 88 chosen compounds and rank them according to their binding affinity towards the site of interaction of the viral oncoproteins and human tumor suppressor proteins. The docking result revealed that Nicandrenone a member of Withanolides family of chemical compounds as the most likely molecule that can be used as a candidate drug against HPV induced cervical cancer. Abbreviations HPV - Human Papiloma Virus, HTSP - Human Tumor Suppressor Proteins, VOP - Viral oncoproteins. PMID:22829740

  9. Hepatitis C virus induces E6AP-dependent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Munakata

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-strand RNA virus that frequently causes persistent infections and is uniquely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. While the mechanism(s by which the virus promotes cancer are poorly defined, previous studies indicate that the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B, forms a complex with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb, targeting it for degradation, activating E2F-responsive promoters, and stimulating cellular proliferation. Here, we describe the mechanism underlying pRb regulation by HCV and its relevance to HCV infection. We show that the abundance of pRb is strongly downregulated, and its normal nuclear localization altered to include a major cytoplasmic component, following infection of cultured hepatoma cells with either genotype 1a or 2a HCV. We further demonstrate that this is due to NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb and its subsequent degradation via the proteasome. The NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb requires the ubiquitin ligase activity of E6-associated protein (E6AP, as pRb abundance was restored by siRNA knockdown of E6AP or overexpression of a dominant-negative E6AP mutant in cells containing HCV RNA replicons. E6AP also forms a complex with pRb in an NS5B-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pRb in which the HCV NS5B protein traps pRb in the cytoplasm, and subsequently recruits E6AP to this complex in a process that leads to the ubiquitination of pRb. The disruption of pRb/E2F regulatory pathways in cells infected with HCV is likely to promote hepatocellular proliferation and chromosomal instability, factors important for the development of liver cancer.

  10. Computational identification, characterization and validation of potential antigenic peptide vaccines from hrHPVs E6 proteins using immunoinformatics and computational systems biology approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Khan

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs are the most prevalent viruses in human diseases including cervical cancers. Expression of E6 protein has already been reported in cervical cancer cases, excluding normal tissues. Continuous expression of E6 protein is making it ideal to develop therapeutic vaccines against hrHPVs infection and cervical cancer. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis of multiple hrHPVs to predict the most potential prophylactic peptide vaccines. In this study, immunoinformatics approach was employed to predict antigenic epitopes of hrHPVs E6 proteins restricted to 12 Human HLAs to aid the development of peptide vaccines against hrHPVs. Conformational B-cell and CTL epitopes were predicted for hrHPVs E6 proteins using ElliPro and NetCTL. The potential of the predicted peptides were tested and validated by using systems biology approach considering experimental concentration. We also investigated the binding interactions of the antigenic CTL epitopes by using docking. The stability of the resulting peptide-MHC I complexes was further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results highlighted the regions from 46-62 and 65-76 that could be the first choice for the development of prophylactic peptide vaccines against hrHPVs. To overcome the worldwide distribution, the predicted epitopes restricted to different HLAs could cover most of the vaccination and would help to explore the possibility of these epitopes for adaptive immunotherapy against HPVs infections.

  11. Production of recombinant proteins GST L1, E6 and E7 tag HPV 16 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-04

    Feb 4, 2009 ... targeting the viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 are markers for HPV-associated ... Luminex XYP plate handler, Luminex SD sheath fluid delivery system, a Pentium 4 .... expression mediated by a potato virus X derived vector of the E7 protein .... inflammation, and antioxidant nutrients – assessing their roles as.

  12. Production of recombinant proteins GST L1, E6 and E7 tag HPV 16 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work recombinant proteins were produced for used in LUMINEX in order to undergo serological study of Tunisian female population. HPV types 16 L1, E6 and E7 sequences fused to their 3'-end to a sequence encoding the terminal undecapeptide of the SV40 large T-antigen (tag) were isolated from plasmids ...

  13. Intracellular human papillomavirus E6, E7 mRNA quantification predicts CIN 2+ in cervical biopsies better than Papanicolaou screening for women regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierry, Deirdre; Weiss, Gerald; Lack, Benjamin; Chen, Victor; Fusco, Judy

    2012-08-01

    Cervical cancer screening in women younger than 30 years relies on cervical cytology because of the poor performance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing in this age group. To determine the performance of in-cell HPV E6, E7 mRNA quantification (HPV OncoTect) for the detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women younger than 30 years. We analyzed 3133 cytology specimens from a screening population of women aged 19-75 years investigate HPV OncoTect as a triage/secondary screening test for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology in women younger than 30 years. Test results were compared to histology in 246 cases. The sensitivity of E6, E7 mRNA was 89% for CIN 2+ and 100% for CIN 3+ lesions in women 30 years and older. In women younger than 30 years, the sensitivity of E6, E7 mRNA for CIN 2+ lesions was 88% for CIN 2+ and 92% for CIN 3+ lesions. Abnormal cytology (≥ASCUS) exhibited a sensitivity of 89% for CIN 2+ and 100% for CIN 3+ in women 30 years and older and 96% sensitivity for CIN 2+ and 93% sensitivity for CIN 3+ in women younger than 30. The specificity of E6, E7 mRNA was >80% for CIN 2+ and CIN 3+ in both groups of women compared to a specificity of abnormal cytology of ASCUS/LSIL triage in women including those younger than 30 years.

  14. Single-tube multiplex PCR using type-specific E6/E7 primers and capillary electrophoresis genotypes 21 human papillomaviruses in neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warenholt Janina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 type-specific oncogenes are required for cervical carcinogenesis. Current PCR protocols for genotyping high-risk HPV in cervical screening are not standardized and usually use consensus primers targeting HPV capsid genes, which are often deleted in neoplasia. PCR fragments are detected using specialized equipment and extra steps, including probe hybridization or primer extension. In published papers, analytical sensitivity is typically compared with a different protocol on the same sample set. A single-tube multiplex PCR containing type-specific primers was developed to target the E6/E7 genes of two low-risk and 19 high-risk genotypes (HPV6, 11 and 16, 18, 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 70, 73 and 82 and the resulting short fragments were directly genotyped by high-resolution fluorescence capillary electrophoresis. Results The method was validated using long oligonucleotide templates, plasmid clones and 207 clinical samples of DNA from liquid-based cytology, fresh and formalin-fixed specimens and FTA Microcards® imprinted with cut tumor surfaces, swabbed cervical cancers or ejected aspirates from nodal metastases of head and neck carcinomas. Between one and five long oligonucleotide targets per sample were detected without false calls. Each of the 21 genotypes was detected in the clinical sample set with up to five types simultaneously detected in individual specimens. All 101 significant cervical neoplasias (CIN 2 and above, except one adenocarcinoma, contained E6/E7 genes. The resulting genotype distribution accorded with the national pattern with HPV16 and 18 accounting for 69% of tumors. Rare HPV types 70 and 73 were present as the sole genotype in one carcinoma each. One cervical SCC contained DNA from HPV6 and 11 only. Six of twelve oropharyngeal cancer metastases and three neck metastases of unknown origin bore E6/E7 DNA; all but one were HPV16. One neck

  15. UV Radiation Activates Toll-Like Receptor 9 Expression in Primary Human Keratinocytes, an Event Inhibited by Human Papillomavirus 38 E6 and E7 Oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Laura; Ceraolo, Maria Grazia; Venuti, Assunta; Melita, Giusi; Hasan, Uzma A; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types belonging to the beta genus of the HPV phylogenetic tree synergize with UV radiation in the development of skin cancer. Accordingly, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins from some beta HPV types are able to deregulate pathways related to immune response and cellular transformation. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), in addition to playing a role in innate immunity, has been shown to be involved in the cellular stress response. Using primary human keratinocytes as experimental models, we have shown that UV irradiation (and other cellular stresses) activates TLR9 expression. This event is closely linked to p53 activation. Silencing the expression of p53 or deleting its encoding gene affected the activation of TLR9 expression after UV irradiation. Using various strategies, we have also shown that the transcription factors p53 and c-Jun are recruited onto a specific region of the TLR9 promoter after UV irradiation. Importantly, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins from beta HPV38, by inducing the accumulation of the p53 antagonist ΔNp73α, prevent the UV-mediated recruitment of these transcription factors onto the TLR9 promoter, with subsequent impairment of TLR9 gene expression. This study provides new insight into the mechanism that mediates TLR9 upregulation in response to cellular stresses. In addition, we show that HPV38 E6 and E7 are able to interfere with this mechanism, providing another explanation for the possible cooperation of beta HPV types with UV radiation in skin carcinogenesis. IMPORTANCE Beta HPV types have been suggested to act as cofactors in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by altering several cellular mechanisms activated by UV radiation. We show that the expression of TLR9, a sensor of damage-associated molecular patterns produced during cellular stress, is activated by UV radiation in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). Two transcription factors known to be activated by UV radiation, p53

  16. Acute dose and low dose-rate irradiation of carcinoma cells expressing human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins - the significance of p53, Rb and G1 arrest status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Shao, Y.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The development of carcinomas in a number of sites including the cervix, vulva and anus have been associated with cellular infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV), including HPV 16 and HPV 18. The mechanism by which these viruses contribute to tumor development or progression seems in part to be related to the integration of the viral genome into the host cells DNA, and the binding of p53 protein by the HPV E6 oncoprotein as well as the binding of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and Rb-like proteins by the HPV E7 oncoprotein. These interactions lead to loss of p53 and Rb function including loss of the G 1 cell cycle checkpoint. Although it is believed that both p53 and Rb play a role in the radiosensitivity of the cell, whether alteration in either protein enhances or diminishes cellular radiation response is not clear from the literature. Because HPV-associated tumors such as cervical cancer are often treated with acute dose and/or low dose-rate radiation, we set out to evaluate the radiation response of several carcinoma cell sublines expressing either oncogenic E6 or E7 to both types of radiation, and to determine if p53/Rb dependent G 1 arrest is an important determinant of cell fate after irradiation. Materials and Methods: We have previously developed a series of RKO colorectal carcinoma cell sublines expressing both low-risk (HPV 11) and high-risk (HPV 16) E6 and E7 genes. p53-dependent G 1 arrest is intact in RKO parental cells and cells expressing low-risk E6 proteins, while the G 1 arrest is abrogated in cells expressing high-risk E6 or E7. Clonogenic survival was assessed after exposure to acute dose (1 Gy/min) and low dose-rate (0.25 Gy/hour) radiation. The radiobiologic parameters α, β and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) were determined. SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting was carried out to assess both p53 and p21 WAF1/CIP1 levels after exposure to radiation. Flow cytometry was performed before and after exposure to low dose-rate radiation to

  17. Role of the ubiquitin ligase E6AP/UBE3A in controlling levels of the synaptic protein Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnle, Simone; Mothes, Benedikt; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; Scheffner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the ubiquitin ligase E6 associated protein (E6AP) encoded by the UBE3A gene has been associated with development of the Angelman syndrome. Recently, it was reported that in mice, loss of E6AP expression results in increased levels of the synaptic protein Arc and a concomitant impaired synaptic function, providing an explanation for some phenotypic features of Angelman syndrome patients. Accordingly, E6AP has been shown to negatively regulate activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and it has been suggested that E6AP targets Arc for ubiquitination and degradation. In our study, we provide evidence that Arc is not a direct substrate for E6AP and binds only weakly to E6AP, if at all. Furthermore, we show that down-regulation of E6AP expression stimulates estradiol-induced transcription of the Arc gene. Thus, we propose that Arc protein levels are controlled by E6AP at the transcriptional rather than at the posttranslational level. PMID:23671107

  18. A promoter within the E6 ORF of human papillomavirus type 16 contributes to the expression of the E7 oncoprotein from a monocistronic mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Hansen, Christina N; Vinther, Jeppe

    2003-01-01

    RNA that encodes E7 as the first open reading frame (ORF) has been identified. We recently identified a transcription initiation site within the E6 ORF of HPV-16 at nt 542. In the present study we have characterized the P542 promoter, which putatively controls monocistronic expression of E7. The monocistronic m...... from nt 226 to 409. Furthermore, the translation initiation of E7 is most abundant from the monocistronic mRNA. We have also shown that the P542 promoter is downregulated by the transcription factor activator protein 4 (AP-4) and the differentiation-dependent factor hSkn-1a, both binding downstream...... of the transcription initiation site. In conclusion, we have found that P542 is a relatively weak promoter compared with P97 and may be downregulated in differentiated epithelial cells....

  19. Production of Human Papilloma Virus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein as a Recombinant Protein in Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshahabi, H; Soleimanjahi, H; Pourpak, Z; Meshkat, Z; Hassan, ZM

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most important and widespread cancer which affects women. There are several causes of cervical cancer; among them HPV types 16 and 18 are the most prominent ones which are recurrent and persistent infections. These genotypes are currently about 70% of cervical cancer causes in developing countries. Due to the importance of these viruses in cervical cancer, we pioneered the production of Human Papilloma Virus type16 E6 oncoprotein as a recombinant protein in order to develop a vaccine. Two HPV oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are consistently expressed in HPV-associated cancer cells and are responsible for malignant transformation. These oncogenic proteins represent ideal target antigens for developing vaccine and immunotherapeutic strategies against HPV-associated neoplasm. Methods In the present study, the cloned E6-oncoprotein of HPV16 in pTZ57R/T-E6 vector was used to produce professional expression vector. The target gene was subcloned in a eukaryotic expression vector. The pcDNA3-E6 vector was propagated in E.coli strain DH5α and transfected into CHO cells 72 hours post-transfection. Results The transfected cells were harvested; mRNA detection and the interest protein production were confirmed by western blot analysis using specific anti E6 monoclonal antibody. Conclusion HPV16-E6 target protein recognized by specific antibody could be an appropriate form of protein, which can be used for further studies. Due to potential effect of this protein, its DNA construction can be used for DNA vaccine in future studies. PMID:25780534

  20. Human papillomavirus 16 E2-, E6- and E7-specific T-cell responses in children and their mothers who developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia during a 14-year follow-up of the Finnish Family HPV cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimaa, Hanna-Mari; Paaso, Anna E; Welters, Marij J P; Grénman, Seija E; Syrjänen, Kari J; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Syrjänen, Stina M

    2014-02-13

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has traditionally been regarded as a sexually transmitted disease (STD), but recent evidence implicates that an infected mother can transmit HPV to her newborn during pregnancy, at delivery, perinatal period or later. Given the lack of any studies on HPV-specific immune responses in children, we conducted HPV16-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) monitoring of the mother-child pairs with known oral and genital HPV follow-up (FU) data since the delivery. In the Finnish Family HPV Study, 10 out of 331 mothers developed incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) during their 14-year FU. Our hypothesis according to the common dogma is that there is no HPV16 specific immune response in offspring of the CIN mother as she/he has not started the sexual life yet. We used overlapping 30-35 mer peptides covering the entire HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 protein sequences. Assays for lymphocyte proliferation capacity, cytokine production and HPV16-specific Foxp3 + CD25 + CD4+ regulatory T-cells were performed. HPV16-specific proliferative T-cell responses were broader in children than in their mothers. Nine of 10 children had responses against both E2 peptide pools compared to only 4 of the 10 mothers. Six of the 10 children and only 2 mothers displayed reactivity to E6 and/or E7. The cytokine levels of IL-2 (p = 0.023) and IL-5 (p = 0.028) induced by all peptide pools, were also higher among children than their mothers. The children of the mothers with incident CIN3 had significantly higher IFN-γ (p = 0.032) and TNF-α (p = 0.008) levels than other children. Our study is the first to show that also children could have HPV-specific immunity. These data indicate that the children have circulating HPV16-specific memory T-cells which might have been induced by previous HPV16 exposure or ongoing HPV 16 infection.

  1. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joshua W. [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Roden, Richard B.S., E-mail: roden@jhmi.edu [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

  2. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies

  3. Human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogenes promote mouse ear regeneration by increasing the rate of wound re-epithelization and epidermal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Concepción; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Oktaba, Katarzyna; Ocádiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Gariglio, Patricio; Covarrubias, Luis

    2008-12-01

    Mammals have limited regeneration capacity. We report here that, in transgenic mice (Tg(bK6-E6/E7)), the expression of the E6/E7 oncogenes of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) under the control of the bovine keratin 6 promoter markedly improves the mouse's capacity to repair portions of the ear after being wounded. Increased repair capacity correlates with an increased number of epidermal proliferating cells. In concordance with the expected effects of the E6 and E7 oncogenes, levels of p53 decreased and those of p16 in epidermal cells increased. In addition, we observed that wound re-epithelization proceeded faster in transgenic than in wild-type animals. After the initial re-epithelization, epidermal cell migration from the intact surrounding tissue appears to be a major contributor to the growing epidermis, especially in the repairing tissue of transgenic mice. We also found that there is a significantly higher number of putative epidermal stem cells in Tg(bK6-E6/E7) than in wild-type mice. Remarkably, hair follicles and cartilage regenerated within the repaired ear tissue, without evidence of tumor formation. We propose that the ability to regenerate ear portions is limited by the capacity of the epidermis to repair itself and grow.

  4. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Clinical Value of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA Assay as a Triage Test for Cervical Cytology and HPV DNA Test ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Vocaturo, Amina; Caraceni, Donatella; French, Deborah; Rosini, Sandra; Zappacosta, Roberta; Terrenato, Irene; Ciccocioppo, Lucia; Frega, Antonio; Rossi, Paolo Giorgi

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA is more specific than testing for HPV DNA. A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the PreTect HPV-Proofer E6/E7 mRNA assay (Norchip) as a triage test for cytology and HPV DNA testing. This study analyzed 1,201 women, 688 of whom had a colposcopy follow-up and 195 of whom had histology-confirmed high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (CIN2+). The proportion of positive results and the sensitivity and specificity for CIN2+ were determined for HPV mRNA in comparison to HPV DNA and cytology. All data were adjusted for follow-up completeness. Stratified by cytological grades, the HPV mRNA sensitivity was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 63 to 94%) in ASC-US (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), 62% (95% CI = 47 to 75%) in L-SIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion), and 67% (95% CI = 57 to 76%) in H-SIL (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The corresponding figures were 99, 91, and 96%, respectively, for HPV DNA. The specificities were 82, 76, and 45%, respectively, for HPV mRNA and 29, 13, and 4%, respectively, for HPV DNA. Used as a triage test for ASC-US and L-SIL, mRNA reduced colposcopies by 79% (95% CI = 74 to 83%) and 69% (95% CI = 65 to 74%), respectively, while HPV DNA reduced colposcopies by 38% (95% CI = 32 to 44%) and by 15% (95% CI = 12 to 19%), respectively. As a HPV DNA positivity triage test, mRNA reduced colposcopies by 63% (95% CI = 60 to 66%), having 68% sensitivity (95% CI = 61 to 75%), whereas cytology at the ASC-US+ threshold reduced colposcopies by 23% (95% CI = 20 to 26%), showing 92% sensitivity (95% CI = 87 to 95%). In conclusion, PreTect HPV-Proofer mRNA can serve as a better triage test than HPV DNA to reduce colposcopy referral in both ASC-US and L-SIL. It is also more efficient than cytology for the triage of HPV DNA-positive women. Nevertheless, its low sensitivity demands a strict follow-up of

  5. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana, E-mail: skangina@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); DeSmet, Marsha, E-mail: mdesmet@iupui.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Thomas, Yanique, E-mail: ysthomas@umail.iu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Morgan, Iain M., E-mail: immorgan@vcu.edu [VCU Philips Institute for Oral Health Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Androphy, Elliot J., E-mail: eandro@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  6. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; DeSmet, Marsha; Thomas, Yanique; Morgan, Iain M.; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication

  7. Lopinavir up-regulates expression of the antiviral protein ribonuclease L in human papillomavirus-positive cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Gavin; Oliver, Anthony W; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Richard, Christina; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir has selective toxicity against human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cervical carcinoma cells via an unknown mechanism. SiHa cervical carcinoma cells were stably transfected with the proteasome sensor vector pZsProSensor-1 to confirm lopinavir inhibits the proteasome in these cells. The Panorama Xpress profiler 725 antibody array was then used to analyse specific changes in protein expression in lopinavir-treated versus control untreated SiHa cells followed by PCR and western blotting. Colorimetric growth assays of lopinavir-treated E6/E7 immortalised versus control human keratinocytes were performed. Targeted small interfering RNA gene silencing followed by growth assay comparison of lopinavir-treated/untreated SiHa cells was also used. Lopinavir induced an increase in the fluorescence of pZsProSensor-1 transfected SiHa cells, indicative of proteasomal inhibition. Ribonuclease L (RNASEL) protein was shown to be up-regulated in lopinavir-treated SiHa cells, which was confirmed by PCR and western blot. Targeted silencing of RNASEL reduced the sensitivity of SiHa cells to lopinavir. Selective toxicity against E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes versus control cells was also seen with lopinavir and was associated with up-regulated RNASEL expression. These data are consistent with the toxicity of lopinavir against HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cells being related to its ability to block viral proteasome activation and induce an up-regulation of the antiviral protein RNASEL. This is supported by the drug's selective toxicity and up-regulation of RNASEL in E6/E7 immortalised keratinocytes combined with the increased resistance to lopinavir observed in SiHa cells following silencing of RNASEL gene expression.

  8. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  9. Incoming human papillomavirus 16 genome is lost in PML protein-deficient HaCaT keratinocytes.

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    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Keiffer, Timothy R; Guion, Lucile G M; DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Scott, Rona S; Sapp, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) target promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) during infectious entry and PML protein is important for efficient transcription of incoming viral genome. However, the transcriptional down regulation was shown to be promoter-independent in that heterologous promoters delivered by papillomavirus particles were also affected. To further investigate the role of PML protein in HPV entry, we used small hairpin RNA to knockdown PML protein in HaCaT keratinocytes. Confirming previous findings, PML knockdown in HaCaT cells reduced HPV16 transcript levels significantly following infectious entry without impairing binding and trafficking. However, when we quantified steady-state levels of pseudogenomes in interphase cells, we found strongly reduced genome levels compared with parental HaCaT cells. Because nuclear delivery was comparable in both cell lines, we conclude that viral pseudogenome must be removed after successful nuclear delivery. Transcriptome analysis by gene array revealed that PML knockdown in clonal HaCaT cells was associated with a constitutive interferon response. Abrogation of JAK1/2 signaling prevented genome loss, however, did not restore viral transcription. In contrast, knockdown of PML protein in HeLa cells did not affect HPV genome delivery and transcription. HeLa cells are transformed by HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7, which have been shown to interfere with the JAK/Stat signaling pathway. Our data imply that PML NBs protect incoming HPV genomes. Furthermore, they provide evidence that PML NBs are key regulators of the innate immune response in keratinocytes. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are important for antiviral defense. Many DNA viruses target these subnuclear structures and reorganize them. Reorganization of PML NBs by viral proteins is important for establishment of infection. In contrast, HPVs require the presence of PML protein for efficient transcription of incoming viral genome. Our

  10. Curcumin modulates cellular AP-1, NF-kB, and HPV16 E6 proteins in oral cancer.

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    Mishra, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyagi, Abhishek; Kohaar, Indu; Hedau, Suresh; Bharti, Alok C; Sarker, Subhodeep; Dey, Dipankar; Saluja, Daman; Das, Bhudev

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the natural antioxidant curcumin on the HPV16-positive oral carcinoma cell line 93VU147T and demonstrated that curcumin is not only a potent inhibitor for the activity of host nuclear transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kB but it also selectively suppresses transcription of the HPV16/E6 oncogene during the carcinogenic process in oral cancer cells. This study suggests a therapeutic potential of curcumin for high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV)-infected oral cancers.

  11. A prime/boost strategy using DNA/fowlpox recombinants expressing the genetically attenuated E6 protein as a putative vaccine against HPV-16-associated cancers.

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    Bissa, Massimiliano; Illiano, Elena; Pacchioni, Sole; Paolini, Francesca; Zanotto, Carlo; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Massa, Silvia; Franconi, Rosella; Radaelli, Antonia; Venuti, Aldo

    2015-03-05

    Considering the high number of new cases of cervical cancer each year that are caused by human papilloma viruses (HPVs), the development of an effective vaccine for prevention and therapy of HPV-associated cancers, and in particular against the high-risk HPV-16 genotype, remains a priority. Vaccines expressing the E6 and E7 proteins that are detectable in all HPV-positive pre-cancerous and cancer cells might support the treatment of HPV-related lesions and clear already established tumors. In this study, DNA and fowlpox virus recombinants expressing the E6F47R mutant of the HPV-16 E6 oncoprotein were generated, and their correct expression verified by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Immunization protocols were tested in a preventive or therapeutic pre-clinical mouse model of HPV-16 tumorigenicity using heterologous (DNA/FP) or homologous (DNA/DNA and FP/FP) prime/boost regimens. The immune responses and therapeutic efficacy were evaluated by ELISA, ELISPOT assays, and challenge with TC-1* cells. In the preventive protocol, while an anti-E6-specific humoral response was just detectable, a specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell response was elicited in immunized mice. After the challenge, there was a delay in cancer appearance and a significant reduction of tumor volume in the two groups of E6-immunized mice, thus confirming the pivotal role of the CD8(+) T-cell response in the control of tumor growth in the absence of E6-specific antibodies. In the therapeutic protocol, in-vivo experiments resulted in a higher number of tumor-free mice after the homologous DNA/DNA or heterologous DNA/FP immunization. These data establish a preliminary indication for the prevention and treatment of HPV-related tumors by the use of DNA and avipox constructs as safe and effective immunogens following a prime/boost strategy. The combined use of recombinants expressing both E6 and E7 proteins might improve the antitumor efficacy, and should represent an important approach to

  12. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

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    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of E6-p53 interactions in Cervical Cancer

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    Khattak, Faryal; Haseeb, Muhammad; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I; Ullah, Mukhtar

    2017-04-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women throughout the world. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 viral protein plays an essential role in proteasomal degradation of the cancer suppressant protein p53. As a result, p53 negative regulation and apoptosis relevant activities are abrogated, facilitating development of cervical cancer. Methods: A mathematical model of E6-p53 interactions was developed using mathematical laws. In-silico simulations were carried out on CellDesigner and as a test case the small molecule drug RITA was considered for its ability to rescue the functions of tumor suppressor p53 by inhibiting E6 mediated proteasomal degradation. Results: Using a computational model we scrutinized how p53 responds to RITA, and chemical reactions of this small molecule drug were incorporated to perceive the full effects. The evolved strategy allowed the p53 response and rescue of its tumor suppressor function to be delineated, RITA being found to block p53 interactions with E6 associated proteins. Conclusion: We could develop a model of E6-p53 interactions with incorporation of actions of the small molecule drug RITA. Suppression of E6 associated proteins by RITA induces accumulation of tumor suppressant p53. Using CellDesigner to encode the model ensured that it can be easily modified and extended as more data become available. This strategy should play an effective role in the development of therapies against cancer. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Minor Capsid Protein L2 Polytope Induces Broad Protection against Oncogenic and Mucosal Human Papillomaviruses.

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    Pouyanfard, Somayeh; Spagnoli, Gloria; Bulli, Lorenzo; Balz, Kathrin; Yang, Fan; Odenwald, Caroline; Seitz, Hanna; Mariz, Filipe C; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Müller, Martin

    2018-02-15

    The amino terminus of the human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid protein L2 contains a major cross-neutralization epitope which provides the basis for the development of a broadly protecting HPV vaccine. A wide range of protection against different HPV types would eliminate one of the major drawbacks of the commercial, L1-based prophylactic vaccines. Previously, we have reported that insertion of the L2 epitope into a scaffold composed of bacterial thioredoxin protein generates a potent antigen inducing comprehensive protection against different animal and human papillomaviruses. We also reported, however, that although protection is broad, some oncogenic HPV types escape the neutralizing antibody response, if L2 epitopes from single HPV types are used as immunogen. We were able to compensate for this by applying a mix of thioredoxin proteins carrying L2 epitopes from HPV16, -31, and -51. As the development of a cost-efficient HPV prophylactic vaccines is one of our objectives, this approach is not feasible as it requires the development of multiple good manufacturing production processes in combination with a complex vaccine formulation. Here, we report the development of a thermostable thioredoxin-based single-peptide vaccine carrying an L2 polytope of up to 11 different HPV types. The L2 polytope antigens have excellent abilities in respect to broadness of protection and robustness of induced immune responses. To further increase immunogenicity, we fused the thioredoxin L2 polytope antigen with a heptamerization domain. In the final vaccine design, we achieve protective responses against all 14 oncogenic HPV types that we have analyzed plus the low-risk HPVs 6 and 11 and a number of cutaneous HPVs. IMPORTANCE Infections by a large number of human papillomaviruses lead to malignant and nonmalignant disease. Current commercial vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively protect against some HPV types but fail to do so for most others. Further, only

  15. Optimization of heterologous DNA-prime, protein boost regimens and site of vaccination to enhance therapeutic immunity against human papillomavirus-associated disease.

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    Peng, Shiwen; Qiu, Jin; Yang, Andrew; Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Wang, Joshua W; Chang, Yung-Nien; Brayton, Cory; Roden, Richard B S; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the primary etiologic factor of cervical cancer as well as subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The two HPV viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are uniquely and consistently expressed in all HPV infected cells and are therefore promising targets for therapeutic vaccination. Both recombinant naked DNA and protein-based HPV vaccines have been demonstrated to elicit HPV-specific CD8+ T cell responses that provide therapeutic effects against HPV-associated tumor models. Here we examine the immunogenicity in a preclinical model of priming with HPV DNA vaccine followed by boosting with filterable aggregates of HPV 16 L2E6E7 fusion protein (TA-CIN). We observed that priming twice with an HPV DNA vaccine followed by a single TA-CIN booster immunization generated the strongest antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response compared to other prime-boost combinations tested in C57BL/6 mice, whether naïve or bearing the HPV16 E6/E7 transformed syngeneic tumor model, TC-1. We showed that the magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response generated by the DNA vaccine prime, TA-CIN protein vaccine boost combinatorial strategy is dependent on the dose of TA-CIN protein vaccine. In addition, we found that a single booster immunization comprising intradermal or intramuscular administration of TA-CIN after priming twice with an HPV DNA vaccine generated a comparable boost to E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses. We also demonstrated that the immune responses elicited by the DNA vaccine prime, TA-CIN protein vaccine boost strategy translate into potent prophylactic and therapeutic antitumor effects. Finally, as seen for repeat TA-CIN protein vaccination, we showed that the heterologous DNA prime and protein boost vaccination strategy is well tolerated by mice. Our results provide rationale for future clinical testing of HPV DNA vaccine prime, TA-CIN protein vaccine boost immunization regimen for the control of HPV-associated diseases.

  16. Molecular Docking Explains Atomic Interaction between Plant-originated Ligands and Oncogenic E7 Protein of High Risk Human Papillomavirus Type 16

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    Satish Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in women worldwide, particularly in the developing countries. In the last few decades, various compounds from plant origin such as Curcumin, Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, Jaceosidin, Resveratrol etc. have been used as anti cancer therapeutic agents. Different studies have shown these plant-originated compounds are able to suppress HPV infection. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of high-risk HPV play a key role in HPV related cancers. In this study, we explored these ligands from plants origin against E7 oncoprotein of high risk HPV 16, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor pRb protein. A robust homology model of HPV 16 E7 was built to foresee the interaction mechanism of E7 oncoprotein with these ligands using structure-based drug designing approach. Docking studies demonstrate the interaction of these ligands with pRb binding site of E7 protein by residues Tyr52, Asn53, Val55, Phe57, Cys59, Ser63, Thr64, Thr72, Arg77, Glu80 and Asp81 and help restoration of pRb functioning. This in silico based atomic interaction between these ligands and E7 protein may assist in validating the plant-originated ligands as effective drugs against HPV.

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Mark; Öhlschläger, Peter; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alloza, Leonor; Marzábal, Pablo; Meyers, Ann E; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize γ-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs

  18. Expression of a recombinant Human papillomavirus 16 E6GT oncoprotein fused to N- and C-termini of Potato virus X coat protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovská, Noemi; Moravec, Tomáš; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Plchová, Helena; Synková, Helena; Poláková, I.; Dušková, M.; Šmahel, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2013), s. 81-90 ISSN 0167-6857 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Transient expression * Molecular farming * Potato virus X Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2013

  19. Observations on the expression of human papillomavirus major capsid protein in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chang-Yi; Fu, Bing-Bing; Li, Zhi-Ying; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Li, Jia-Hua; Tang, Gui-Cheng; Xiao, Shuo-Shuang

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the nature of the inclusion bodies that have been found in HeLa cells (cervical cancer immortal cell line) by electron microscope and to determine whether the major capsid protein (L1) of human papillomavirus (HPV) can be expressed in HPV-positive uterine cervix cancer cells. HPV L1 protein expression in HeLa cells was detected with anti-HPV L1 multivalent mice monoclonal antibody and rabbit polyclonal anti-HPV L1 antibody by ELISA, light microscope immunohistochemistry, electron microscope immunocytochemistry and Western blotting assays. Reverse transcriptional PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the transcription of L1 mRNA in HeLa cells. The immortalized human keratinocyte HeCat was used as the negative control. HPV L1 proteins reacted positively in the lysate of HeLa cells by ELISA assays. HRP labeled light microscope immunohistochemistry assay showed that there was a strong HPV L1 positive reaction in HeLa cells. Under the electron microscope, irregular shaped inclusion bodies, assembled by many small and uniform granules, had been observed in the cytoplasm of some HeLa cells. These granules could be labeled by the colloidal gold carried by HPV L1 antibody. The Western blotting assay showed that there was a L1 reaction strap at 80-85 kDa in the HeLa cell lysates, hence demonstrating the existence of HPV18 L1 in HeLa cells. RT-PCR assay showed that the L1 mRNA was transcribed in HeLa cells. The inclusion bodies found in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells are composed of HPV18 L1 protein. Since HeLa cell line is a type of cervical cancer cells, this implies that HeLa cells have the ability to express HPV L1 proteins.

  20. Prime-boost therapeutic vaccination in mice with DNA/DNA or DNA/Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing the Human Papilloma Virus type 16 E6 and E7 mutated proteins fused to the coat protein of Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiano, Elena; Bissa, Massimiliano; Paolini, Francesca; Zanotto, Carlo; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Franconi, Rosella; Radaelli, Antonia; Venuti, Aldo

    2016-10-02

    The therapeutic antitumor potency of a prime-boost vaccination strategy was explored, based on the mutated, nontransforming forms of the E6 (E6 F47R ) and E7 (E7 GGG ) oncogenes of Human Papilloma Virus type 16 (HPV16), fused to the Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) sequence. Previous data showed that CP fusion improves the immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens and may thus increase their efficacy. After verifying the correct expression of E6 F47R CP and E7 GGG CP inserted into DNA and Fowlpox virus recombinants by Western blotting and immunofluorescence, their combined use was evaluated for therapy in a pre-clinical mouse model of HPV16-related tumorigenicity. Immunization protocols were applied using homologous (DNA/DNA) or heterologous (DNA/Fowlpox) prime-boost vaccine regimens. The humoral immune responses were determined by ELISA, and the therapeutic efficacy evaluated by the delay in tumor appearance and reduced tumor volume after inoculation of syngeneic TC-1* tumor cells. Homologous DNA/DNA genetic vaccines were able to better delay tumor appearance and inhibit tumor growth when DNAE6 F47R CP and DNAE7 GGG CP were administered in combination. However, the heterologous DNA/Fowlpox vaccination strategy was able to delay tumor appearance in a higher number of animals when E6 F47R CP and in particular E7 GGG CP were administered alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heterologous production of human papillomavirus type-16 L1 protein by a lactic acid bacterium

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    Bermúdez-Humarán Luis G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of vaccine antigens in lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a safe and cost-effective alternative to traditional expression systems. In this study, we investigated i the expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 L1 major capsid protein in the model LAB Lactococcus lactis and ii the ability of the resulting recombinant strain to produce either capsomer-or virus-like particles (VLPs. Results and conclusion HPV-16 L1 gene was cloned into two vectors, pCYT and pSEC, designed for controlled intra- or extracellular heterologous expression in L. lactis, respectively. The capacity of L. lactis harboring either pCYT:L1 or pSEC:L1 plasmid to accumulate L1 in the cytoplasm and supernatant samples was confirmed by Western blot assays. Electron microscopy analysis suggests that, L1 protein produced by recombinant lactococci can self-assemble into structures morphologically similar to VLPs intracellularly. The presence of conformational epitopes on the L. lactis-derived VLPs was confirmed by ELISA using an anti-HPV16 L1 capsid antigen antibody. Our results support the feasibility of using recombinant food-grade LAB, such as L. lactis, for the production of L1-based VLPs and open the possibility for the development of a new safe mucosal vector for HPV-16 prophylactic vaccination.

  2. Use of human papillomavirus DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry to detect and predict anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

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    Nittaya Phanuphak

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM are at high risk of having anal cancer. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL is the precursor of anal cancer. We explored the use of different biomarkers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infection and HPV-mediated cell transformation to detect and predict HSIL among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled and followed for 12 months. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA with biopsies were performed at every visit along with anal sample collection for cytology, high-risk HPV DNA genotyping, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry. Performance characteristics and area under the receiver operator characteristics curve were calculated for these biomarkers at baseline, and Cox regression compared the usefulness of these biomarkers in predicting incident HSIL. High-risk HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry each identified 43-46% of MSM whose baseline test positivity would trigger HRA referral. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity (64.7% and correctly classified the highest number of prevalent HSIL cases. With the exception of p16 immunochemistry, most tests showed significant increases in sensitivity but decreases specificity versus anal cytology, while the overall number of correctly classified cases was not significantly different. Baseline or persistent type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA was the only test significantly predicting incident histologic HSIL within 12 months in models adjusted for HIV status and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions at baseline.Countries with a high HIV prevalence among MSM and limited HRA resources may consider using biomarkers to identify individuals at high risk of HSIL. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity for prevalent HSIL detection regardless of HIV status, whereas type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA performed best in predicting development of incident HSIL within 12 months.

  3. Infection with the oncogenic human papillomavirus type 59 alters protein components of the cornified cell envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, Elizabeth; Brown, Darron R.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of the genital tract with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to proliferative and dysplastic epithelial lesions. The mechanisms used by the virus to escape the infected keratinocyte are not well understood. Infection of keratinocytes with HPV does not cause lysis, the mechanism used by many viruses to release newly formed virions. For HPV 11, a type associated with a low risk of neoplastic disease, the cornified cell envelope (CCE) of infected keratinocytes is thin and fragile, and transcription of loricrin, the major CCE protein, is reduced. The effects of high-risk HPV infection on components of the CCE have not been previously reported. HPV 59, an oncogenic genital type related to HPV types 18 and 45 was identified in a condylomata acuminata lesion. An extract of this lesion was used to infect human foreskin fragments, which were grown in athymic mice as xenografts. Continued propagation using extracts of xenografts permitted growth of additional HPV 59-infected xenografts. CCEs purified from HPV 59-infected xenografts displayed subtle morphologic abnormalities compared to those derived from uninfected xenografts. HPV 59-infected xenografts revealed dysplastic-appearing cells with mitotic figures. Detection of loricrin, involucrin, and cytokeratin 10 was reduced in HPV 59-infected epithelium, while small proline-rich protein 3 (SPR3) was increased. Reduction in loricrin was most apparent in regions of epithelium containing abundant HPV 59 DNA. Compared to uninfected epithelium, loricrin transcription was decreased in HPV 59-infected epithelium. We conclude that HPV 59 shares with HPV 11 the ability to alter CCE components and to specifically reduce transcription of the loricrin gene. Because loricrin is the major CCE protein, a reduction in this component could alter the physical properties of the CCE, thus facilitating virion release

  4. Low- and high-risk human papillomavirus E7 proteins regulate p130 differently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow-Laing, Lisa; Chen Wei; Roman, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The E7 protein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR HPVs) targets pRb family members (pRb, p107 and p130) for degradation; low-risk (LR) HPV E7 only targets p130 for degradation. The effect of HR HPV 16 E7 and LR HPV 6 E7 on p130 intracellular localization and half-life was examined. Nuclear/cytoplasmic fractionation and immunofluorescence showed that, in contrast to control and HPV 6 E7-expressing cells, a greater amount of p130 was present in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 16 E7. The half-life of p130, relative to control cells, was decreased in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 6 E7 or HPV 16 E7, but only decreased by HPV 6 E7 in the nucleus. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation extended the half-life of p130, regardless of intracellular localization. These results suggest that there may be divergent mechanisms by which LR and HR HPV E7 target p130 for degradation.

  5. A novel papillomavirus in Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) faeces sampled at the Cape Crozier colony, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsani, Arvind; Kraberger, Simona; Jennings, Scott; Porzig, Elizabeth L; Julian, Laurel; Massaro, Melanie; Pollard, Annie; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G

    2014-06-01

    Papillomaviruses are epitheliotropic viruses that have circular dsDNA genomes encapsidated in non-enveloped virions. They have been found to infect a variety of mammals, reptiles and birds, but so far they have not been found in amphibians. Using a next-generation sequencing de novo assembly contig-informed recovery, we cloned and Sanger sequenced the complete genome of a novel papillomavirus from the faecal matter of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) nesting on Ross Island, Antarctica. The genome had all the usual features of a papillomavirus and an E9 ORF encoding a protein of unknown function that is found in all avian papillomaviruses to date. This novel papillomavirus genome shared ~60 % pairwise identity with the genomes of the other three known avian papillomaviruses: Fringilla coelebs papillomavirus 1 (FcPV1), Francolinus leucoscepus papillomavirus 1 (FlPV1) and Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus 1. Pairwise identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis of the major capsid protein gene clearly indicated that it represents a novel species, which we named Pygoscelis adeliae papillomavirus 1 (PaCV1). No evidence of recombination was detected in the genome of PaCV1, but we did detect a recombinant region (119 nt) in the E6 gene of FlPV1 with the recombinant region being derived from ancestral FcPV1-like sequences. Previously only paramyxoviruses, orthomyxoviruses and avian pox viruses have been genetically identified in penguins; however, the majority of penguin viral identifications have been based on serology or histology. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a papillomavirus associated with a penguin species. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. The Subcellular Localisation of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV 16 E7 Protein in Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Perturbation by RNA Aptamers

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    Özlem Cesur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, affecting both men and women. High-risk oncogenic types are responsible for almost 90% of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers including cervical cancer. Some of the HPV “early” genes, particularly E6 and E7, are known to act as oncogenes that promote tumour growth and malignant transformation. Most notably, HPV-16 E7 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, promoting its degradation, leading to cell cycle dysregulation in infected cells. We have previously shown that an RNA aptamer (termed A2 selectively binds to HPV16 E7 and is able to induce apoptosis in HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma cell lines (SiHa through reduction of E7 levels. In this study, we investigated the effects of the A2 aptamer on E7 localisation in order to define its effects on E7 activity. We demonstrate for the first time that E7 localised to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that A2 enhanced E7 localisation in the ER and that the A2-mediated reduction of E7 was not associated with proteasomal degradation. These data suggest that A2 perturbs normal E7 trafficking through promoting E7 ER retention.

  7. Human papillomavirus type 59 immortalized keratinocytes express late viral proteins and infectious virus after calcium stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, Elizabeth E.; Qadadri, Brahim; Brown, Calla R.; Brown, Darron R.

    2003-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 59 (HPV 59) is an oncogenic type related to HPV 18. HPV 59 was recently propagated in the athymic mouse xenograft system. A continuous keratinocyte cell line infected with HPV 59 was created from a foreskin xenograft grown in an athymic mouse. Cells were cultured beyond passage 50. The cells were highly pleomorphic, containing numerous abnormally shaped nuclei and mitotic figures. HPV 59 sequences were detected in the cells by DNA in situ hybridization in a diffuse nuclear distribution. Southern blots were consistent with an episomal state of HPV 59 DNA at approximately 50 copies per cell. Analysis of the cells using a PCR/reverse blot strip assay, which amplifies a portion of the L1 open reading frame, was strongly positive. Differentiation of cells in monolayers was induced by growth in F medium containing 2 mM calcium chloride for 10 days. Cells were harvested as a single tissue-like sheet, and histologic analysis revealed a four-to-six cell-thick layer. Transcripts encoding involucrin, a cornified envelope protein, and the E1-circumflexE4 and E1-circumflexE4-circumflexL1 viral transcripts were detected after several days of growth in F medium containing 2 mM calcium chloride. The E1-circumflexE4 and L1 proteins were detected by immunohistochemical analysis, and virus particles were seen in electron micrographs in a subset of differentiated cells. An extract of differentiated cells was prepared by vigorous sonication and was used to infect foreskin fragments. These fragments were implanted into athymic mice. HPV 59 was detected in the foreskin xenografts removed 4 months later by DNA in situ hybridization and PCR/reverse blot assay. Thus, the complete viral growth cycle, including production on infectious virus, was demonstrated in the HPV 59 immortalized cells grown in a simple culture system

  8. Gene silencing of HPV16 E6/E7 induced by promoter-targeting siRNA in SiHa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, D; Lu, W; Ye, F; Hu, Y; Xie, X

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, transcriptional gene silencing induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was found in mammalian and human cells. However, previous studies focused on endogenous genes. Methods: In this study, we designed siRNA targeting the promoter of human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 and transfected it into the cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression were detected in cells treated by promoter-targeting siRNA. Futhermore, cellular growth, proliferation, apoptos...

  9. Characterization of the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) papillomavirus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D; Bankhead, Troy

    2014-01-10

    The papillomaviruses comprise a large group of viruses that cause proliferations of the stratified squamous epithelium of skin and mucosa in a variety of animals. An earlier report identified a novel papillomavirus of the North American beaver, Castor canadensis (CcanPV1) that was associated with cutaneous exophytic lesions. In the current study, we determined the sequence of the complete 7435 basepair genome of CcanPV1. The genome contains an Upstream Regulatory Region located between the end of L1 and the start of E6, and seven canonical papillomavirus open reading frames encoding five early (E6, E7, E1, E2, and E4) and two late (L2 and L1) proteins. No E5 open reading frame was detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the CcanPV1 genome places the virus between the genera Kappapapillomavirus and Mupapillomavirus. Analyses of the papillomavirus genomes detected in different species of the order Rodentia indicate these viruses do not form a monophyletic clade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-Risk Human Papillomaviral Oncogenes E6 and E7 Target Key Cellular Pathways to Achieve Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo-Teh, Nicole S L; Ito, Yoshiaki; Jha, Sudhakar

    2018-06-08

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has been linked to several human cancers, the most prominent of which is cervical cancer. The integration of the viral genome into the host genome is one of the manners in which the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 achieve persistent expression. The most well-studied cellular targets of the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are p53 and pRb, respectively. However, recent research has demonstrated the ability of these two viral factors to target many more cellular factors, including proteins which regulate epigenetic marks and splicing changes in the cell. These have the ability to exert a global change, which eventually culminates to uncontrolled proliferation and carcinogenesis.

  11. Subcellular Trafficking of the Papillomavirus Genome during Initial Infection: The Remarkable Abilities of Minor Capsid Protein L2

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    Samuel K. Campos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2012, our understanding of human papillomavirus (HPV subcellular trafficking has undergone a drastic paradigm shift. Work from multiple laboratories has revealed that HPV has evolved a unique means to deliver its viral genome (vDNA to the cell nucleus, relying on myriad host cell proteins and processes. The major breakthrough finding from these recent endeavors has been the realization of L2-dependent utilization of cellular sorting factors for the retrograde transport of vDNA away from degradative endo/lysosomal compartments to the Golgi, prior to mitosis-dependent nuclear accumulation of L2/vDNA. An overview of current models of HPV entry, subcellular trafficking, and the role of L2 during initial infection is provided below, highlighting unresolved questions and gaps in knowledge.

  12. Direct binding of retromer to human papillomavirus type 16 minor capsid protein L2 mediates endosome exit during viral infection.

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    Andreea Popa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking of human papillomaviruses to the Golgi apparatus during virus entry requires retromer, an endosomal coat protein complex that mediates the vesicular transport of cellular transmembrane proteins from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane. Here we show that the HPV16 L2 minor capsid protein is a retromer cargo, even though L2 is not a transmembrane protein. We show that direct binding of retromer to a conserved sequence in the carboxy-terminus of L2 is required for exit of L2 from the early endosome and delivery to the trans-Golgi network during virus entry. This binding site is different from known retromer binding motifs and can be replaced by a sorting signal from a cellular retromer cargo. Thus, HPV16 is an unconventional particulate retromer cargo, and retromer binding initiates retrograde transport of viral components from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network during virus entry. We propose that the carboxy-terminal segment of L2 protein protrudes through the endosomal membrane and is accessed by retromer in the cytoplasm.

  13. Human papillomavirus E5 oncoproteins bind the A4 endoplasmic reticulum protein to regulate proliferative ability upon differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotnik Halavaty, Katarina; Regan, Jennifer; Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis, E-mail: l-laimins@northwestern.edu

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and link their life cycles to epithelial differentiation. The HPV E5 protein plays a role in the productive phase of the HPV life cycle but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We identify a new binding partner of E5, A4, using a membrane-associated yeast-two hybrid system. The A4 protein co-localizes with HPV 31 E5 in perinuclear regions and forms complexes with E5 and Bap31. In normal keratinocytes, A4 is found primarily in basal cells while in HPV positive cells high levels of A4 are seen in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Reduction of A4 expression by shRNAs, enhanced HPV genome amplification and increased cell proliferation ability following differentiation but this was not seen in cells lacking E5. Our studies suggest that the A4 protein is an important E5 binding partner that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation ability upon differentiation. - Highlights: • A4 associates with HPV 31 E5 proteins. • A4 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum. • HPV proteins induce A4 expression in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. • E5 is important for proliferation ability of differentiating HPV positive cells.

  14. EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR AND HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV L1 CAPSID PROTEIN IN CERVICAL SQUAMOUS INTRAEPITHELIAL LESIONS

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    Balan Raluca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the immunohistochemical pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs in correlation with L1 HPV capsid protein, in order to determine the relationship between EGFR expression and the infection status of human papillomavirus (HPV. The study included 40 cases, 24 LSIL (low grade SIL (CIN1, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 16 HSIL (high grade SIL (6 cases of CIN2 and 10 cases of CIN3. The immunoexpression of L1 HPV protein was assessed on conventional cervico-vaginal smears and EGFR was immunohistochemically evaluated on the corresponding cervical biopsies. The HPV L1 capsid protein was expressed in 45.83% of LSIL and 25% of HSIL. EGFR was overexpressed in 62,4% of HSIL (58,4% CIN2 and 41,6% CIN3 and 37,6% LSIL. The immunoexpression of L1 HPV has clinical application in the progression assessment of the cervical precancerous lesions without a correlation to the grade of the cervical SIL. EGFR is expressed by all proliferating squamous epithelial cells, thus corresponding with the grade of SIL. The evaluation of EGFR status, correlated with L1 HPV protein expression, can provide useful data of progression risk of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions

  15. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Serour, Francis [Department of Pediatric Surgery, The E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon (Israel); Chaouat, Malka [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Karem, Jerusalem (Israel); Gonen, Pinhas [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Tommasino, Massimo [International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon (France); Sherman, Levana [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling.

  16. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna; Serour, Francis; Chaouat, Malka; Gonen, Pinhas; Tommasino, Massimo; Sherman, Levana

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling

  17. GRIM-19 disrupts E6/E6AP complex to rescue p53 and induce apoptosis in cervical cancers.

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    Ying Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies showed a down-regulation of GRIM-19 in primary human cervical cancers, and restoration of GRIM-19 induced tumor regression. The induction of tumor suppressor protein p53 ubiquitination and degradation by E6 oncoportein of high risk-HPV through forming a stable complex with E6AP is considered as a critical mechanism for cervical tumor development. The aims of this study were to determine the potential role of GRIM-19 in rescuing p53 protein and inducing cervical cancer cell apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The protein levels of GRIM-19 and p53 were detected in normal cervical tissues from 45 patients who underwent hysterectomy for reasons other than neoplasias of either the cervix or endometrium, and cervical cancer tissues from 60 patients with non-metastatic squamous epithelial carcinomas. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay were performed to examine the interaction of GRIM-19 with 18E6 and E6AP in vivo and in vitro respectively. The competition of 18E6 with E6AP in binding GRIM-19 by performing competition pull-down assays was designed to examine the disruption of E6/E6AP complex by GRIM-19. The augment of E6AP ubiquitination by GRIM-19 was detected in vivo and in vitro ubiquitination assay. The effects of GRIM-19-dependent p53 accumulation on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis were explored by MTT, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy respectively. The tumor suppression was detected by xenograft mouse model. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The levels of GRIM-19 and p53 were concurrently down regulated in cervical cancers. The restoration of GRIM-19 can induce ubiquitination and degradation of E6AP, and disrupt the E6/E6AP complex through the interaction of N-terminus of GRIM-19 with both E6 and E6AP, which protected p53 from degradation and promoted cell apoptosis. Tumor xenograft studies also revealed the suppression of p53 degradation in presence of GRIM-19. These data

  18. Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Kwon, Hyockman

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. → BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. → BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. → BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. → BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin structure or nuclear motor

  19. HPV8-E6 Interferes with Syntenin-2 Expression through Deregulation of Differentiation, Methylation and Phosphatidylinositide-Kinase Dependent Mechanisms

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    Benjamin Marx

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV of genus alpha contain a short peptide sequence at the carboxy-terminus, the PDZ binding domain, with which they interact with the corresponding PDZ domain of cellular proteins. Interestingly, E6 proteins from papillomaviruses of genus beta (betaPV do not encode a comparable PDZ binding domain. Irrespective of this fact, we previously showed that the E6 protein of HPV8 (betaPV type could circumvent this deficit by targeting the PDZ protein Syntenin-2 through transcriptional repression (Lazic et al., 2012. Despite its high binding affinity to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, very little is known about Syntenin-2. This study aimed to extend the knowledge on Syntenin-2 and how its expression is controlled. We now identified that Syntenin-2 is expressed at high levels in differentiating and in lower amounts in keratinocytes cultured in serum-free media containing low calcium concentration. HPV8-E6 led to a further reduction of Syntenin-2 expression only in cells cultured in low calcium. In the skin of patients suffering from Epidermodysplasia verruciformis, who are predisposed to betaPV infection, Syntenin-2 was expressed in differentiating keratinocytes of non-lesional skin, but was absent in virus positive squamous tumors. Using 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine, which causes DNA demethylation, Syntenin-2 transcription was profoundly activated and fully restored in the absence and presence of HPV8-E6, implicating that E6 mediated repression of Syntenin-2 transcription is due to promoter hypermethylation. Since Syntenin-2 binds to PI(4,5P2, we further tested whether the PI(4,5P2 metabolic pathway might govern Syntenin-2 expression. PI(4,5P2 is generated by the activity of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase type I (PIP5KI or phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate-4-kinase type II (PIP4KII isoforms α, β and γ. Phosphatidylinositide kinases have recently been identified as

  20. HPV16 E6 and E6AP differentially cooperate to stimulate or augment Wnt signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sominsky, Sophia; Kuslansky, Yael; Shapiro, Beny; Jackman, Anna; Haupt, Ygal; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Sherman, Levana

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway. We showed that E6 levels are markedly reduced in cells in which Wnt signaling is activated. Coexpression of wild-type or mutant E6AP (C820A) in Wnt-activated cells stabilized E6 and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin/TCF transcription. Expression of E6AP alone in nonstimulated cells elevated β-catenin level, promoted its nuclear accumulation, and activated β-catenin/TCF transcription. A knockdown of E6AP lowered β-catenin levels. Coexpression with E6 intensified the activities of E6AP. Further experiments proved that E6AP/E6 stabilize β-catenin by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. This function was dependent on the catalytic activity of E6AP, the kinase activity of GSK3β and the susceptibility of β-catenin to GSK3β phosphorylation. Thus, this study identified E6AP as a novel regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, capable of cooperating with E6 in stimulating or augmenting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby possibly contributing to HPV carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • The roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway were investigated. • E6AP stabilizes E6 and enhances E6 activity in augmentation of Wnt signaling. • E6AP cooperates with E6 to stabilize β-catenin and stimulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. • E6AP and E6 act through different mechanisms to augment or stimulate Wnt signaling

  1. HPV16 E6 and E6AP differentially cooperate to stimulate or augment Wnt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sominsky, Sophia, E-mail: sophia.tab@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kuslansky, Yael, E-mail: ykuslansky@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shapiro, Beny, E-mail: benyshap@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Jackman, Anna, E-mail: jackman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haupt, Ygal, E-mail: ygal.haupt@petermac.org [Research Division, The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina, E-mail: arina@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sherman, Levana, E-mail: lsherman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    The present study investigated the roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway. We showed that E6 levels are markedly reduced in cells in which Wnt signaling is activated. Coexpression of wild-type or mutant E6AP (C820A) in Wnt-activated cells stabilized E6 and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin/TCF transcription. Expression of E6AP alone in nonstimulated cells elevated β-catenin level, promoted its nuclear accumulation, and activated β-catenin/TCF transcription. A knockdown of E6AP lowered β-catenin levels. Coexpression with E6 intensified the activities of E6AP. Further experiments proved that E6AP/E6 stabilize β-catenin by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. This function was dependent on the catalytic activity of E6AP, the kinase activity of GSK3β and the susceptibility of β-catenin to GSK3β phosphorylation. Thus, this study identified E6AP as a novel regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, capable of cooperating with E6 in stimulating or augmenting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby possibly contributing to HPV carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • The roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway were investigated. • E6AP stabilizes E6 and enhances E6 activity in augmentation of Wnt signaling. • E6AP cooperates with E6 to stabilize β-catenin and stimulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. • E6AP and E6 act through different mechanisms to augment or stimulate Wnt signaling.

  2. [Molecular aspects of human papillomaviruses and their relation to uterine cervix cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrancá, A; Gariglio, P V

    1993-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (wart viruses) are responsible for the development of benign and malignant epithelial lesions in mammals. More than 60 different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been isolated to date. Some of them are major candidates as etiologic agents in cervical cancer. DNA from HPV types 16, 18 and 33 is usually found integrated in about 90 percent of genital carcinomas. Integration of the viral DNA into the cellular genome may be an important step towards the development of malignancy. Two early genes of HPVs (E6 y E7) are involved in cellular transformation. Another early gene (E2) participates in gene control by directly binding to conserved DNA motifs in the viral genome. Several protein factors of viral and cellular origin interact with the regulatory region of HPVs and participate in the regulation transcription of oncogenes E6 and E7. Cellular factors, such as immune system and oncogene and anti-oncogene alterations, seem to play an important role in papillomavirus-associated cervical carcinogenesis.

  3. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

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    Mallory E. Harden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs. While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation.

  4. Evasion of host immune defenses by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Joseph A; Warren, Cody J; Pyeon, Dohun

    2017-03-02

    A majority of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are asymptomatic and self-resolving in the absence of medical interventions. Various innate and adaptive immune responses, as well as physical barriers, have been implicated in controlling early HPV infections. However, if HPV overcomes these host immune defenses and establishes persistence in basal keratinocytes, it becomes very difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. The HPV oncoproteins E5, E6, and E7 are important in regulating host immune responses. These oncoproteins dysregulate gene expression, protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and cellular trafficking of critical host immune modulators. In addition to the HPV oncoproteins, sequence variation and dinucleotide depletion in papillomavirus genomes has been suggested as an alternative strategy for evasion of host immune defenses. Since anti-HPV host immune responses are also considered to be important for antitumor immunity, immune dysregulation by HPV during virus persistence may contribute to immune suppression essential for HPV-associated cancer progression. Here, we discuss cellular pathways dysregulated by HPV that allow the virus to evade various host immune defenses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  6. Alternative Z ' bosons in E 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Erler, Jens

    2015-10-01

    We classify the quantum numbers of the extra U(1)' symmetries contained in E 6. In particular, we categorize the cases with rational charges and present the full list of models which arise from the chains of the maximal subgroups of E 6. As an application, the classification allows us to determine all embeddings of the Standard Model fermions in all possible decompositions of the fundamental representation of E 6 under its maximal subgroups. From this we find alternative chains of subgroups for Grand Unified Theories. We show how many of the known models including some new ones appear in alternative breaking patterns. We also use low energy constraints coming from parity-violating asymmetry measurements and atomic parity non-conservation to set limits on the E 6 motivated parameter space for a Z ' boson mass of 1.2 TeV. We include projected limits for the present and upcoming QWEAK, MOLLER and SOLID experiments.

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español In Chamorro In Urdu In Vietnamese HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  9. The high-risk HPV E6 target scribble (hScrib is required for HPV E6 expression in cervical tumour-derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kranjec

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins to target cellular proteins which harbor PDZ domains is believed to play an important role in the virus life cycle and to influence the ability of these viruses to bring about malignant transformation. Whilst many of these PDZ proteins are potential tumour suppressors, involved in the control of cell polarity and cell-contact, recent studies suggest that mislocalisation or overexpression might result in the emergence of oncogenic functions. This has been shown most clearly for two E6 targets, hDlg and hScrib. In this study we show that hScrib plays such a role in HeLa cells, where its expression is required for maintaining high levels of HPV-18 E6 protein. Loss of hScrib has no effect on E6 stability but results in lower levels of E6 transcription and a reduced rate of E6 translation. We further show that, in the context of cervical tumour-derived cell lines, both hScrib and E6 cooperate in the activation of the S6 kinase signaling pathway, and thereby contribute towards maintaining high rates of protein translation. These results indicate that the residual hScrib that is present within HPV transformed cells is pro-oncogenic, and highlights the dual functions of E6 cell polarity targets. Keywords: HPV E6, hScrib, S6 kinase, Protein translation

  10. The E5 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 perturbs MHC class II antigen maturation in human foreskin keratinocytes treated with interferon-γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Benyue; Li Ping; Wang Exing; Brahmi, Zacharie; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Blum, Janice S.; Roman, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens are expressed on human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) following exposure to interferon gamma. The expression of MHC class II proteins on the cell surface may allow keratinocytes to function as antigen-presenting cells and induce a subsequent immune response to virus infection. Invariant chain (Ii) is a chaperone protein which plays an important role in the maturation of MHC class II molecules. The sequential degradation of Ii within acidic endocytic compartments is a key process required for the successful loading of antigenic peptide onto MHC class II molecules. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E5 can inhibit the acidification of late endosomes in HFKs, the E5 protein may be able to affect proper peptide loading onto the MHC class II molecule. To test this hypothesis, HFKs were infected with either control virus or a recombinant virus expressing HPV16 E5 and the infected cells were subsequently treated with interferon-γ. ELISAs revealed a decrease of MHC class II expression on the surface of E5-expressing cells compared with control virus-infected cells after interferon treatment. Western blot analysis showed that, in cells treated with interferon gamma, E5 could prevent the breakdown of Ii and block the formation of peptide-loaded, SDS-stable mature MHC class II dimers, correlating with diminished surface MHC class II expression. These data suggest that HPV16 E5 may be able to decrease immune recognition of infected keratinocytes via disruption of MHC class II protein function

  11. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins

  12. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (hrHPV) E6/E7 mRNA Testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer for Detection of Cervical High-Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cancer among hrHPV DNA-Positive Women with Normal Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkaart, D. C.; Heideman, D. A. M.; Coupe, V. M. H.; Brink, A. A. T. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; Skomedal, H.; Karlsen, F.; Morland, E.; Snijders, P. J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether high-risk HPV (hrHPV) mRNA detection by PreTect HPV-Proofer can be used to stratify hrHPV DNA-positive women of different cytology classes for risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (cervical precancer or cancer, i.e., cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher [≥CIN2]). A total of 375 women participating in population-based screening, with a GP5+/6+-PCR hrHPV DNA-positive cervical scrape with normal cytology (n = 202), borderline or mild dyskaryosis (BMD) (n = 88), or moderate dyskaryosis or worse (>BMD) (n = 85), were enrolled. Cervical scrapes were additionally subjected to HPV16/18/31/33/45 E6/E7 mRNA analysis by PreTect HPV-Proofer (mRNA test). Referral and follow-up policies were based on cytology, hrHPV DNA, and mRNA testing. The primary study endpoint was the number of ≥CIN2 detected within 3 years of follow-up. The mRNA positivity increased with the severity of cytological abnormality, ranging from 32% (64/202) in hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology to 47% (41/88) in BMD and 68% (58/85) in >BMD groups (P cytology, i.e., 0.55 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34 to 0.76) in mRNA-positive versus 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.33) in mRNA-negative women. In hrHPV DNA-positive women with BMD or >BMD, the result of the mRNA test did not influence the ≥CIN2 risk. In conclusion, mRNA testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer might be of value to select hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology in need of immediate referral for colposcopy. PMID:22553244

  13. Retinol as a micronutrients related to cervical local immunity: The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha specifically stimulated with E6 epitope of human papillomavirus type-16 and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cell in natural history of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, T. W.; Aziz, M. F.; Ibrahim, F.; Andrijono

    2017-08-01

    Retinol is one of the antioxidant micronutrients that plays essential roles in the immune system, by preventing the persistence of modulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cytokines production. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α) is an acute pro-inflammatory cytokine which has many crucial roles in controlling HPV. In contrast, when persistent infection occurs, TNF-α induces carcinogenesis. The ratio of CD4+ cells to CD8+ T cells and adequate TNF-α production in acute HPV infection are key points for clearance. The aim of this research is to analyze the sufficiency level of retinol deposit, the expression of TNF-α, and the ratio of CD4+: CD8+ T cells in a normal cervix, clearance and persistent HPV subclinical infection, and cervical cancer group. The sufficiency level of retinol deposit was analyzed from peripheral blood using the ELISA method. The cervico-vaginal secretions, which were incubated for 24 hours, were stimulated specifically by E6 epitope HPV type-16, measuring TNF-α expression semi-quantitatively by the ELISpot method and CD4+/CD8+ T cells quantitatively by flowcytometry method. The sufficient level of retinol deposit in a normal cervix, clearance HPV subclinical infection, persistent, and cervical cancer group was 85%, 75% (OR 1.89), 33.3% (OR 11.33), and 75% (OR 1.89), respectively. The expression of TNF-α in normal cervix group was 10%, while for cervical cancer it was 75% (OR 27.00; p CD4+: CD8+ T cells in the normal cervix and cervical cancer group was 10% and 25% (OR 0.33). There was no high ratio of CD4+: CD8+ T cells in clearance (OR 1.22) and persistent (OR 0.95) HPV subclinical infection groups. This study was able to prove that the normal cervix group has the highest retinol deposit sufficiency level and the cervical cancer group has the highest TNF-α expression (OR 27; p < 0.001). The lowest of retinol deposit sufficiency level was not in cervical cancer, but in the persistent HPV subclinical infection group (OR 11.33). There was

  14. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagayasu Egawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  15. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  16. Efficacy of human papillomavirus l1 protein vaccines (cervarix and gardasil in reducing the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Haghshenas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV can induce cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. Vaccination against HPV can play an important role in CIN prevention. This study aims to estimate the efficacy of L1 protein vaccines (Cervarix and Gardasil in CIN 1, 2, 3 risk reduction using meta-analysis. Relevant articles were identified by two independent researchers searching international databanks. After application of inclusion/exclusion criteria and quality assessment, eligible articles were entered into the final meta-analysis. Inverse variance method and fixed effect model were used to combine the results of the primary studies. The heterogeneity between the results was assessed using Cochrane and I2 indices. Of 11,530 evidence identified during the primary search, three papers were found eligible for meta-analysis, including 7213 participants in the intervention groups and 7170 healthy controls. The efficacy (95% confidence interval of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18 monovalent and quadrivalent vaccines against CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3 were estimated as of 95% (88–98, 97% (85–99, and 95% (78–99, respectively. This study showed that L1 protein vaccines Cervarix and Gardasil are highly protective vaccines playing an effective role in the prevention of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18 which are responsible for CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3.

  17. E6 signatures in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordes, J.

    1987-02-01

    The effect of neutral massive gauge bosons in atoms is considered in the framework of models inspired by superstring theories with low energy group E 6 . Significant deviations from the prediction of the standard model are found in non-spinless light atoms. In models with two massive neutral gauge bosons the deviations are particularly important in Hydrogen if the ratio between the physical boson masses is < or approx., 3. (author)

  18. Flavor structure of E6 GUT models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Hidetoshi; Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2010-01-01

    In E 6 grand unified theory with SU(2) H family symmetry, the spontaneous CP violation can solve the supersymmetric CP problem. The scenario predicts V ub -O(λ 4 ) instead of O(λ 3 ), which is the naively expected value, because of cancellation at the leading order. Since the experimental value of V ub is O(λ 4 ), it is important to consider the reason and the conditions for the cancellation. In this paper, we provide a simple reason for the cancellation and show that in some E 6 models, such cancellation requires that the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the adjoint Higgs does not break U(1) B-L . Note that the direction of the VEV plays an important role in solving the doublet-triplet splitting problem by the Dimopoulos-Wilczek mechanism. In this E 6 model, the direction of the adjoint Higgs VEV can be measured experimentally by measuring the size of V ub -O(λ 4 ). (author)

  19. Positive and negative regulation of cell proliferation by E2F-1: influence of protein level and human papillomavirus oncoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melillo, R M; Helin, K; Lowy, D R

    1994-01-01

    E2F-1 is a member of a family of transcription factors implicated in the activation of genes required for the progression through the S phase of the cell cycle. We have examined the biological activities of E2F-1 with short-term colony-forming assays and long-term immortalization assays. High...... to immortalize NHFKs, or by a transdominant p53 mutant. High levels of E2F-1 also inhibited growth of primary and established fibroblasts. The growth-inhibitory activity required the DNA binding function of E2F-1 but not its transactivation or pRB binding activities. A positive role for lower levels of E2F-1...... in NHFK immortalization was established by examining the ability of E2F-1 to complement HPV16 E7 mutants that were unable to cooperate with HPV16 E6 to immortalize NHFKs. Although E2F-1 was unable by itself to cooperate with E6, it did, in conjunction with E6, complement a p24GLY mutant of E7...

  20. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclophilins facilitate dissociation of the human papillomavirus type 16 capsid protein L1 from the L2/DNA complex following virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Williams, Carlyn; Kim, Seong Man; Garcea, Robert L; Sapp, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, that encapsidate a chromatinized, circular double-stranded DNA genome. At the outset of infection, the interaction of HPV type 16 (HPV16) (pseudo)virions with heparan sulfate proteoglycans triggers a conformational change in L2 that is facilitated by the host cell chaperone cyclophilin B (CyPB). This conformational change results in exposure of the L2 N terminus, which is required for infectious internalization. Following internalization, L2 facilitates egress of the viral genome from acidified endosomes, and the L2/DNA complex accumulates at PML nuclear bodies. We recently described a mutant virus that bypasses the requirement for cell surface CyPB but remains sensitive to cyclosporine for infection, indicating an additional role for CyP following endocytic uptake of virions. We now report that the L1 protein dissociates from the L2/DNA complex following infectious internalization. Inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CyPs blocked dissociation of L1 from the L2/DNA complex. In vitro, purified CyPs facilitated the dissociation of L1 pentamers from recombinant HPV11 L1/L2 complexes in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, CyPs released L1 capsomeres from partially disassembled HPV16 pseudovirions at slightly acidic pH. Taken together, these data suggest that CyPs mediate the dissociation of HPV L1 and L2 capsid proteins following acidification of endocytic vesicles.

  2. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Unselected SurePath Samples Using the APTIMA HPV mRNA Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte M

    2013-01-01

    The APTIMA Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay detects E6/E7 mRNA from 14 human papillomavirus genotypes. Horizon was a population-based split-sample study among well-screened women, with an aim to compare APTIMA, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and liquid-based cytology (LBC) using SurePath samples. APTIMA...

  3. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HPV is sexually transmitted and the viral DNA replicates extrachromosomally. The virus is non-enveloped and has an icosahedral capsid. There are approximately 118 types of HPV, which are characterized as high-risk or low-risk types. High-risk HPVs cause malignant transformation while the low-risk ones cause benign ...

  4. Analysis of the role of the gene coding the Amyloid-Precursor Protein Binding Protein 1 (APP-BP1) in the radio-sensitivity of epidermoid carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract infected by the human papillomavirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guihard, S.; Altmeyer, A.; Ramolu, L.; Macabre, C.; Abecassis, J.; Noel, G.; Jung, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    As the human papillomavirus (HPV) is at the origin of 25% of upper aero-digestive tract cancers, and as these tumours present an increased radio-sensitivity compared to other tumours, probably due to a greater transcriptional activity of p53, the authors report the study on the influence of a decrease of the expression of the APP-BP1 in these tumours which could favour a radio-induced apoptosis. By using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), they assessed the APP-BP1 expression levels as well as expression levels of transcriptions coding onco-proteins known to be over-expressed in HPV+ tumours. They compared the radio-sensitivities of HPV+ and HPV- cells, the first one appearing to be greater than the second one. Short communication

  5. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis

  6. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  7. The Cellular DNA Helicase ChlR1 Regulates Chromatin and Nuclear Matrix Attachment of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 Protein and High-Copy-Number Viral Genome Establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Leanne; McFarlane-Majeed, Laura; Campos-León, Karen; Roberts, Sally; Parish, Joanna L

    2017-01-01

    In papillomavirus infections, the viral genome is established as a double-stranded DNA episome. To segregate the episomes into daughter cells during mitosis, they are tethered to cellular chromatin by the viral E2 protein. We previously demonstrated that the E2 proteins of diverse papillomavirus types, including bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16), associate with the cellular DNA helicase ChlR1. This virus-host interaction is important for the tethering of BPV E2 to mitotic chromatin and the stable maintenance of BPV episomes. The role of the association between E2 and ChlR1 in the HPV16 life cycle is unresolved. Here we show that an HPV16 E2 Y131A mutant (E2 Y131A ) had significantly reduced binding to ChlR1 but retained transcriptional activation and viral origin-dependent replication functions. Subcellular fractionation of keratinocytes expressing E2 Y131A showed a marked change in the localization of the protein. Compared to that of wild-type E2 (E2 WT ), the chromatin-bound pool of E2 Y131A was decreased, concomitant with an increase in nuclear matrix-associated protein. Cell cycle synchronization indicated that the shift in subcellular localization of E2 Y131A occurred in mid-S phase. A similar alteration between the subcellular pools of the E2 WT protein occurred upon ChlR1 silencing. Notably, in an HPV16 life cycle model in primary human keratinocytes, mutant E2 Y131A genomes were established as episomes, but at a markedly lower copy number than that of wild-type HPV16 genomes, and they were not maintained upon cell passage. Our studies indicate that ChlR1 is an important regulator of the chromatin association of E2 and of the establishment and maintenance of HPV16 episomes. Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a major cause of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. During infection, the circular DNA genome of HPV persists within the nucleus, independently of the host cell chromatin. Persistence of infection

  8. Prevention of carcinoma of cervix with human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavarasana, S; Kalasapudi, R S; Rao, T D; Thirumala, S

    2000-01-01

    Carcinoma of cervix is the most common cancer found among the women of India. Though cervical cytology screening was effective in preventing carcinoma of cervix in developed nations, it is considered unsuitable in developing countries. Recent research has established an etiological link between human papillomavirus infection and carcinoma of cervix. In this review, an attempt is made to answer the question, 'whether carcinoma of cervix can be prevented with human papillomavirus vaccine?' Literature search using Pubmed and Medline was carried out and relevant articles were reviewed. There is ample experimental evidence to show that DNA of human papillomavirus integrates with cervical cell genome. Viral genes E6 and E7 of HPV type 16 and 18 inactivate p53 function and Rb gene, thus immortalize the cervical epithelial cells. Recombinant vaccines blocked the function of E6 and E7 genes preventing development of papillomas in animals. Vaccination with HPV-VLPs encoding for genes of E6 and E7 neutralizes HPV integrated genome of malignant cells of uterine cervix. Based on experimental evidence, it is possible to prevent carcinoma of cervix with human papillomavirus vaccine, Further research is necessary to identify a effective and safe HPV vaccine, routes of administration and characteristics of potential beneficiaries.

  9. Vaccines against papillomavirus infections and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villa Luisa Lina

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the second cause of cancer-related deaths in women, the higher incidence being observed in developing countries. Infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV is considered the major risk factor for the development of malignancies in the uterine cervix. However, HPV is considered to be a necessary but not sufficient cause for cervical cancer and, therefore, other factors contribute to the carcinogenic process, both present in the environment and from the host. Studies performed in animals, and more recently in humans, indicate that vaccination against the capsid proteins of the virus can prevent efficiently from infection. Furthermore, therapeutic vaccines are under investigation aiming the regression of papillomavirus induced tumors. The scientific basis for the development of papillomavirus vaccines and present status of clinical trials will be addressed in this chapter.

  10. A central region in the minor capsid protein of papillomaviruses facilitates viral genome tethering and membrane penetration for mitotic nuclear entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inci Aydin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Incoming papillomaviruses (PVs depend on mitotic nuclear envelope breakdown to gain initial access to the nucleus for viral transcription and replication. In our previous work, we hypothesized that the minor capsid protein L2 of PVs tethers the incoming vDNA to mitotic chromosomes to direct them into the nascent nuclei. To re-evaluate how dynamic L2 recruitment to cellular chromosomes occurs specifically during prometaphase, we developed a quantitative, microscopy-based assay for measuring the degree of chromosome recruitment of L2-EGFP. Analyzing various HPV16 L2 truncation-mutants revealed a central chromosome-binding region (CBR of 147 amino acids that confers binding to mitotic chromosomes. Specific mutations of conserved motifs (IVAL286AAAA, RR302/5AA, and RTR313EEE within the CBR interfered with chromosomal binding. Moreover, assembly-competent HPV16 containing the chromosome-binding deficient L2(RTR313EEE or L2(IVAL286AAAA were inhibited for infection despite their ability to be transported to intracellular compartments. Since vDNA and L2 were not associated with mitotic chromosomes either, the infectivity was likely impaired by a defect in tethering of the vDNA to mitotic chromosomes. However, L2 mutations that abrogated chromatin association also compromised translocation of L2 across membranes of intracellular organelles. Thus, chromatin recruitment of L2 may in itself be a requirement for successful penetration of the limiting membrane thereby linking both processes mechanistically. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the association of L2 with mitotic chromosomes is conserved among the alpha, beta, gamma, and iota genera of Papillomaviridae. However, different binding patterns point to a certain variance amongst the different genera. Overall, our data suggest a common strategy among various PVs, in which a central region of L2 mediates tethering of vDNA to mitotic chromosomes during cell division thereby coordinating membrane

  11. Association of antibody to E2 protein of human papillomavirus and p16INK4A with progression of HPV-infected cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Swangphon, Piyawut; Luanratanakorn, Sanguanchoke; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee; Tungsiriwattana, Thumwadee; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Burassakarn, Ati; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2018-05-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 and L1 proteins are expressed in cervical cells during the lytic stage of infection. Overexpression of p16 INK4A is a biomarker of HPV-associated cervical neoplasia. This study investigated antibodies to HPV16 E2, HPV16 L1, and p16 INK4A in sera from women with no squamous intraepithelial lesion (No-SIL) of the cervix, low-grade SIL, high-grade SIL, and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies in sera were determined by western blot. Among 116 samples, 69 (60%) were HPV DNA-positive. Percentages seropositive for anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies were 39.6, 22.4, and 23.3%, respectively. Anti-E2 antibody was significantly correlated with HPV DNA-positive cases. Eighty-seven women (75%) were regarded as infected with HPV, having at least one positive result from HPV DNA, L1, or E2 antibody. Antibody to p16 INK4A was associated with HPV infection (odds = 5.444, 95% CI 1.203-24.629, P = 0.028) and precancerous cervical lesions (odds = 5.132, 95% CI 1.604-16.415, P = 0.006). Interestingly, the concurrent detection of anti-E2 and -p16 INK4A antibodies was significantly associated with HPV infection (odds = 1.382, 95% CI 1.228-1.555, P = 0.044). These antibodies might be good candidate biomarkers for monitoring HPV-associated cervical lesion development to cancer.

  12. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for developing them, such as taking oral contraceptives . A safety review of Gardasil in Denmark and ... and venous thromboembolic adverse events after immunisation of adolescent girls with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in Denmark ...

  13. Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle

  14. Expression of Human papillomavirus 16 E7ggg oncoprotein on N- and C-terminus of Potato virus X coat protein in bacterial and plant cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plchová, Helena; Moravec, Tomáš; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Folwarczna, Jitka; Čeřovská, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 2 (2011), s. 146-152 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Bacterial expression * Human papillomavirus * Oncoprotein E7 Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.587, year: 2011

  15. A new cell culture model to genetically dissect the complete human papillomavirus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Myers, Julia E; Keiffer, Timothy R; DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Polk, Paula; Bodily, Jason M; Scott, Rona S; Sapp, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we describe a novel infection model that achieves highly efficient infection of primary keratinocytes with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). This cell culture model does not depend on immortalization and is amenable to extensive genetic analyses. In monolayer cell culture, the early but not late promoter was active and yielded a spliced viral transcript pattern similar to HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes. However, relative levels of the E8^E2 transcript increased over time post infection suggesting the expression of this viral repressor is regulated independently of other early proteins and that it may be important for the shift from the establishment to the maintenance phase of the viral life cycle. Both the early and the late promoter were strongly activated when infected cells were subjected to differentiation by growth in methylcellulose. When grown as organotypic raft cultures, HPV16-infected cells expressed late E1^E4 and L1 proteins and replication foci were detected, suggesting that they supported the completion of the viral life cycle. As a proof of principle that the infection system may be used for genetic dissection of viral factors, we analyzed E1, E6 and E7 translation termination linker mutant virus for establishment of infection and genome maintenance. E1 but not E6 and E7 was essential to establish infection. Furthermore, E6 but not E7 was required for episomal genome maintenance. Primary keratinocytes infected with wild type HPV16 immortalized, whereas keratinocytes infected with E6 and E7 knockout virus began to senesce 25 to 35 days post infection. The novel infection model provides a powerful genetic tool to study the role of viral proteins throughout the viral life cycle but especially for immediate early events and enables us to compare low- and high-risk HPV types in the context of infection.

  16. A new cell culture model to genetically dissect the complete human papillomavirus life cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe a novel infection model that achieves highly efficient infection of primary keratinocytes with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16. This cell culture model does not depend on immortalization and is amenable to extensive genetic analyses. In monolayer cell culture, the early but not late promoter was active and yielded a spliced viral transcript pattern similar to HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes. However, relative levels of the E8^E2 transcript increased over time post infection suggesting the expression of this viral repressor is regulated independently of other early proteins and that it may be important for the shift from the establishment to the maintenance phase of the viral life cycle. Both the early and the late promoter were strongly activated when infected cells were subjected to differentiation by growth in methylcellulose. When grown as organotypic raft cultures, HPV16-infected cells expressed late E1^E4 and L1 proteins and replication foci were detected, suggesting that they supported the completion of the viral life cycle. As a proof of principle that the infection system may be used for genetic dissection of viral factors, we analyzed E1, E6 and E7 translation termination linker mutant virus for establishment of infection and genome maintenance. E1 but not E6 and E7 was essential to establish infection. Furthermore, E6 but not E7 was required for episomal genome maintenance. Primary keratinocytes infected with wild type HPV16 immortalized, whereas keratinocytes infected with E6 and E7 knockout virus began to senesce 25 to 35 days post infection. The novel infection model provides a powerful genetic tool to study the role of viral proteins throughout the viral life cycle but especially for immediate early events and enables us to compare low- and high-risk HPV types in the context of infection.

  17. Morphoproteomics, E6/E7 in-situ hybridization, and biomedical analytics define the etiopathogenesis of HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma and provide targeted therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert E; Naqvi, Syed; McGuire, Mary F; Buryanek, Jamie; Karni, Ron J

    2017-08-17

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an etiopathogenetic factor in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes are instrumental in promoting proliferation and blocking differentiation leading to tumorigenesis. Although surgical intervention can remove such tumors, the potential for an etiologic field effect with recurrent disease is real. A downstream effector of E7 oncoprotein, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), is known to promote proliferation and to pose a block in differentiation and in turn, could lead to HPV-induced malignant transformation. However, the EZH2 pathway is amenable to low toxicity therapies designed to promote differentiation to a more benign state and prevent recurrent disease by inhibiting the incorporation of HPV into the genome. This is the first study using clinical specimens to demonstrate EZH2 protein expression in oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC). The study included eight patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, confirmed p16INK4a- positive by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The tissue expression of E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by RNAscope® in-situ hybridization technology. Expression of EZH2, Ki-67, and mitotic indices were assessed by morphoproteomic analysis. Biomedical analytics expanded the results with data from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and KEGG databases to construct a molecular network pathway for further insights. Expression of E6 and E7 oncogenes in p16INK4a- positive oropharyngeal carcinoma was confirmed. EZH2 and its correlates, including elevated proliferation index (Ki-67) and mitotic progression were also present. Biomedical analytics validated the relationship between HPV- E6 and E7 and the expression of the EZH2 pathway. There is morphoproteomic and mRNA evidence of the association of p16INK4a-HPV infection with the E6 and E7 oncogenes and the expression of EZH2, Ki-67 and mitotic progression in oropharyngeal carcinoma. The molecular network biology was confirmed by

  18. Efficient expression of Human papillomavirus 16 E7 oncoprotein fused to C-terminus of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein using molecular chaperones in Escherichia coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folwarczna, Jitka; Moravec, Tomáš; Plchová, Helena; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Čeřovská, Noemi

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2012), s. 152-157 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525; GA ČR GAP501/12/1761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Bacterial expression * Human papillomavirus * E7 oncoprotein Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2012

  19. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope fused to N- and C-terminus of coat protein of Potato virus X in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovská, Noemi; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Moravec, Tomáš; Plchová, Helena; Folwarczna, Jitka; Synková, Helena; Ryšlavá, H.; Ludvíková, V.; Šmahel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 1 (2012), s. 125-133 ISSN 0250-5991 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0973; GA ČR GA521/09/1525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Human papillomavirus (HPV-16) * L2-and E7-derived epitopes * transient expression Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.759, year: 2012

  20. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women.

  1. HPV E6 and E7 in hypoxia mediated tumorigenesis in cervical epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Charlotte Y.; Tsai, Mitchell; Graeber, Thomas G.; Peehl, Donna M.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: In our previous work, we found that hypoxia induces apoptosis in oncogenically transformed rodent cells and loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene significantly reduces hypoxia induced cell death. In this report, we show that transformation of wild-type p53 expressing primary cervical epithelial cells with the E6 and E7 genes from high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 dramatically enhances their susceptibility to hypoxia induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Sub confluent primary normal human cervical epithelial cells and normal human fibroblasts were infected with retroviral vectors containing HPV16 E6 and E7 and the neomycin selectable marker using previously described techniques. Clones were selected and isolated in neomycin containing media. Exponentially growing cells were treated with hypoxia (0.02% O 2 ) using specially designed chambers, irradiated (800 cGy) using a cesium source, or grown under aerobic conditions (20% O 2 ) as a control. After treatment, cells were stained with Hoescht and propidium iodide and viewed with a fluorescent microscope for analysis of apoptotic cells. To determine increase in expression of p53, immuno blots were performed using whole cell extracts. Results: After a 48 hour exposure to hypoxic conditions, 40% of E6 and E7 transformed cervical cells exhibit morphologic features indicative of apoptosis, compared to 5% of untransformed cervical cells. Exposure of HPV E6 and E7 transformed cells to ionizing radiation, however, did not initiate apoptosis. Immunoblot assays show induction of p53 under hypoxic conditions but not by ionizing radiation, indicating that hypoxia is able to induce p53 in the presence of E6 and that hypoxia activates p53 by a pathway which is distinct from that of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, hypoxia did not induce apoptosis in normal human fibroblasts transformed with E6 and E7, suggesting that the cellular response to hypoxia is influenced by the cell type. Conclusion: These results

  2. In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Shuai; Hua, Ling; Takahashi, Y.; Narita, S.; Liu, Yun-Hui; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 and targeting E6, E7 transcript. • CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21, reduced the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. • Finding inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9. • CRISPR/Cas9 will be a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. - Abstract: Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy

  3. In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, Shuai [Baoji Maternal and Child Health Hospital, 2 Xinjian Road East, WeiBin District, Baoji City, 721000, Shanxi Province (China); Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hua, Ling [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Takahashi, Y.; Narita, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Liu, Yun-Hui [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Li, Yan [Baoji Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No 43, BaoFu Road, Baoji City, Shanxi Province (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 and targeting E6, E7 transcript. • CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21, reduced the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. • Finding inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9. • CRISPR/Cas9 will be a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. - Abstract: Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy.

  4. E6-lepton mixing and lepton magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendramin, I.

    1988-01-01

    The contributions to the lepton magnetic moment due to the E 6 -exotic fermions and an extra vector boson Z' have been considered. Using the experimental limits on the E 6 -lepton mixing angles, these contributions are at least one order of magnitude smaller than the standard-model ones

  5. Activities of E7 promoters in the human papillomavirus type 16 genome during cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Nielsen, Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, one of the most common cancer forms diagnosed in women is cervical cancer induced by infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) with HPV type 16 (HPV-16) being the most frequently identified. The oncogenicity is caused mainly by expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 leadin...

  6. Alternative Z"′ bosons in E_6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Erler, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We classify the quantum numbers of the extra U(1)"′ symmetries contained in E_6. In particular, we categorize the cases with rational charges and present the full list of models which arise from the chains of the maximal subgroups of E_6. As an application, the classification allows us to determine all embeddings of the Standard Model fermions in all possible decompositions of the fundamental representation of E_6 under its maximal subgroups. From this we find alternative chains of subgroups for Grand Unified Theories. We show how many of the known models including some new ones appear in alternative breaking patterns. We also use low energy constraints coming from parity-violating asymmetry measurements and atomic parity non-conservation to set limits on the E_6 motivated parameter space for a Z"′ boson mass of 1.2 TeV. We include projected limits for the present and upcoming QWEAK, MOLLER and SOLID experiments.

  7. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Omarova

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane, applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters.

  8. Enhanced anti-tumor effect of a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 oncoproteins genetically fused to the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Diniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer DNA vaccines have attracted growing interest as a simple and non-invasive method for both the treatment and prevention of tumors induced by human papillomaviruses. Nonetheless, the low immunogenicity of parenterally administered vaccines, particularly regarding the activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses, suggests that further improvements in both vaccine composition and administration routes are still required. In the present study, we report the immune responses and anti-tumor effects of a DNA vaccine (pgD-E7E6E5 expressing three proteins (E7, E6, and E5 of the human papillomavirus type 16 genetically fused to the glycoprotein D of the human herpes simplex virus type 1, which was administered to mice by the intradermal (id route using a gene gun. A single id dose of pgD-E7E6E5 (2 µg/dose induced a strong activation of E7-specific interferon-γ (INF-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and full prophylactic anti-tumor effects in the vaccinated mice. Three vaccine doses inhibited tumor growth in 70% of the mice with established tumors. In addition, a single vaccine dose consisting of the co-administration of pgD-E7E6E5 and the vector encoding interleukin-12 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects and conferred protection to 60 and 50% of the vaccinated mice, respectively. In conclusion, id administration of pgD-E7E6E5 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the DNA vaccine, representing a promising administration route for future clinical trials.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel type of human papillomavirus 160 isolated from a flat wart of an immunocompetent patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Mitsuishi

    Full Text Available More than 150 types of Human papillomaviruses (HPVs have been isolated from numerous cutaneous and/or mucosal lesions. Flat wart samples on the face from 36 immunocompetent patients were collected and screened for HPV. From one sample, we cloned a putative novel genotype. The novel type consisted of 7779 bp in length with a GC content of 47.1%, containing open reading frames for putative early proteins (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7 and two late proteins (L1 and L2. Homology searches and phylogenetic analyses indicated that it belonged to Alphapapillomavirus (Alpha-PV species 2 and most closely resembled HPV 3. The virus fulfilled the definition of a novel type, and was named HPV 160 by the Reference Center for Papillomaviruses. The putative E7 protein of HPV 160 as well as HPV 29, 77, and 78 contained the Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu pRB-binding motif but other Alpha-PV species 2 (HPV 3, 10, 28, 94, 117, and 125 did not have this conserved motif.

  10. Expressions of HPV 16-E6 in Esophageal Carcinoma and its Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The role of (Human Papilloma Virus HPV in cancer of certain anatomical location, such as cervix, has been widely recognized. The present study was conducted to explore the association between HPV 16-E6 protein and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: SP immunohistochemical method was used to examine the expression of HPV 16-E6 in 50 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 10 cases of normal esophageal squamous cell and 10 cases of adjacent tissue. Results: The expression of HPV 16-E6 was significantly higher in esophageal carcinoma than in normal esophageal mucosa and in adjacent tissue. The expressions of HPV 16-E6 had significant correlation with invasive depth (P<0.05, but not with patient age, lymph node metastasis, tumor size (P>0.05. Conclusion: HPV 16-E6 can promote the growth and metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and can be a prognostic factor of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i4.12970 JCMS Nepal 2014; 10(4:1-5 

  11. A supersymmetric standard model from a local E6 GUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, Felix Klaus

    2012-02-01

    In this thesis we have investigated to what extent the exceptional Lie-group E 6 can serve as unified gauge group. In the presence of the full E 6 matter content, unifcation can be realized by increasing the degree of gauge symmetry above some intermediate scale. We found that a full E 6 gauge invariant theory is disfavoured by phenomenological observations like proton stability and the smallness of flavour changing neutral currents. An appropriate framework to embed E 6 into a model for particle physics are higher dimensional orbifold constructions, where E 6 is the gauge group in the bulk and the intermediate symmetry group is the common subset of E 6 subgroups residing at the fixed-points of the orbifold. In this way the degree of symmetry in four space-time dimensions is reduced, such that the operators leading to the aforementioned dsastrous phenomenological consequences can be forbidden independently. In order to derive the implications of the model for the current experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we developed an automated spectrum generator. It uses Monte-Carlo Markov-Chain techniques to cope with the high dimensionality of the space of input parameters and the complex interdependencies in the evolution of the Lagrangian parameters from the orbifold compactification scale to the TeV scale. For the spectra obtained with this program, we performed Monte-Carlo simulations of the production and decay of the Z ' boson stemming from the additional U(1) ' , using our own implementation of the model into the event generator WHIZARD.

  12. A novel murine model for evaluating bovine papillomavirus prophylactics/therapeutics for equine sarcoid-like tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Lies; Woodham, Andrew W; Da Silva, Diane M; Martens, Ann; Meyer, Evelyne; Kast, W Martin

    2015-09-01

    Equine sarcoids are highly recurrent bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-induced fibroblastic neoplasms that are the most common skin tumours in horses. In order to facilitate the study of potential equine sarcoid prophylactics or therapeutics, which can be a slow and costly process in equines, a murine model for BPV-1 protein-expressing equine sarcoid-like tumours was developed in mice through stable transfection of BPV-1 E5 and E6 in a murine fibroblast tumour cell line (K-BALB). Like equine sarcoids, these murine tumour cells (BPV-KB) were of fibroblast origin, were tumorigenic and expressed BPV-1 proteins. As an initial investigation of the preclinical potential of this tumour model for equine sarcoids prophylactics, mice were immunized with BPV-1 E5E6 Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles, prior to BPV-KB challenge, which resulted in an increased tumour-free period compared with controls, indicating that the BPV-KB murine model may be a valuable preclinical alternative to equine clinical trials.

  13. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo

  14. E6D25E, HPV16 Asian variant shows specific proteomic pattern correlating in cells transformation and suppressive innate immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopjitt, Peechanika; Pientong, Chamsai; Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Haonon, Ornuma; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kikawa, Satomi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kiyono, Tohru; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2016-01-01

    HPV16 Asian variant (HPV16As) containing E6D25E oncogene, is commonly associated with cervical cancers of Asian populations. To explore a mechanism of E6D25E oncoprotein in carcinogenesis, we compared protein profiles in human keratinocytes expressing E6D25E with E6 of HPV16 prototype (E6Pro). A human cervical keratinocyte cell line, HCK1T, was transduced with retroviruses containing E6D25E or E6Pro genes. Biological properties of E6D25E or E6Pro transduced HCK1T cells were characterized. Protein profiles of the transduced HCK1T cells were analyzed using 2D-PAGE and characterized by mass spectrometry and western blotting. Reactomes of modulated proteins were analyzed by using the Reactome Knowledgebase. The E6D25E and E6Pro oncoproteins were comparable for their abilities to degrade p53 and suppress the induction of p21, and induce cell proliferation. Interestingly, the protein profiles of the HCK1T cells transduced with E6D25E showed specific proteomic patterns different from those with E6Pro. Among altered proteins, more than 1.5-fold up- or down- regulation was observed in E6D25E-expressing cells for gp96 and keratin7 which involved in activation of TLR signaling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells, respectively. This report describes new cellular proteins specifically targeted by E6D25E oncoprotein that may contribute to impair immune response against viral infection and cell transformation associated with oncogenic property of HPV16As variant. - Highlights: • E6D25E HPV16 specifically modulates protein profile of human keratinocytes. • E6D25E HPV16 modulates protein profile which involves in TLR signalling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells. • E6D25E oncoprotein may correlate to impair of immune response against viral infection and cells transformation.

  15. E6D25E, HPV16 Asian variant shows specific proteomic pattern correlating in cells transformation and suppressive innate immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopjitt, Peechanika; Pientong, Chamsai; Sunthamala, Nuchsupha [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); HPV & EBV and Carcinogenesis Research Group, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Haonon, Ornuma; Boonmars, Thidarut [Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Kikawa, Satomi; Nakahara, Tomomi [Division of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru, E-mail: tkiyono@ncc.go.jp [Division of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 (Japan); Ekalaksananan, Tipaya, E-mail: tipeka@kku.ac.th [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); HPV & EBV and Carcinogenesis Research Group, Khon Kaen University (Thailand)

    2016-09-09

    HPV16 Asian variant (HPV16As) containing E6D25E oncogene, is commonly associated with cervical cancers of Asian populations. To explore a mechanism of E6D25E oncoprotein in carcinogenesis, we compared protein profiles in human keratinocytes expressing E6D25E with E6 of HPV16 prototype (E6Pro). A human cervical keratinocyte cell line, HCK1T, was transduced with retroviruses containing E6D25E or E6Pro genes. Biological properties of E6D25E or E6Pro transduced HCK1T cells were characterized. Protein profiles of the transduced HCK1T cells were analyzed using 2D-PAGE and characterized by mass spectrometry and western blotting. Reactomes of modulated proteins were analyzed by using the Reactome Knowledgebase. The E6D25E and E6Pro oncoproteins were comparable for their abilities to degrade p53 and suppress the induction of p21, and induce cell proliferation. Interestingly, the protein profiles of the HCK1T cells transduced with E6D25E showed specific proteomic patterns different from those with E6Pro. Among altered proteins, more than 1.5-fold up- or down- regulation was observed in E6D25E-expressing cells for gp96 and keratin7 which involved in activation of TLR signaling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells, respectively. This report describes new cellular proteins specifically targeted by E6D25E oncoprotein that may contribute to impair immune response against viral infection and cell transformation associated with oncogenic property of HPV16As variant. - Highlights: • E6D25E HPV16 specifically modulates protein profile of human keratinocytes. • E6D25E HPV16 modulates protein profile which involves in TLR signalling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells. • E6D25E oncoprotein may correlate to impair of immune response against viral infection and cells transformation.

  16. Cell-mediated immune response: a clinical review of the therapeutic potential of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-12-01

    This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. A focused and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two to four times. The vaccines contained different combinations of HPV16 and HPV18 and early proteins, E6 and E7. The primary outcome was the cell-mediated immune response. Correlation to clinical outcome (histopathology) and human leukocyte antigen genes were secondary endpoints. All vaccines triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). Prophylactic HPV vaccines have been introduced to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in young women. Women already infected with HPV could benefit from a therapeutic HPV vaccination. Hence, it is important to continue the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines to lower the rate of HPV-associated malignancies and crucial to evaluate vaccine efficacy clinically. This clinical review represents an attempt to elucidate the theories supporting the development of an HPV vaccine with a therapeutic effect on human papillomavirus-induced malignancies of the cervix. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Novel snake papillomavirus does not cluster with other non-mammalian papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian E; Favrot, Claude; Ackermann, Mathias; Gull, Jessica; Vetsch, Elisabeth; Tobler, Kurt

    2011-09-12

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are associated with the development of neoplasias and have been found in several different species, most of them in humans and other mammals. We identified, cloned and sequenced PV DNA from pigmented papilloma-like lesions of a diamond python (Morelia spilota spilota). This represents the first complete PV genome discovered in a Squamata host (MsPV1). It consists of 7048 nt and contains the characteristic open reading (ORF) frames E6, E7, E1, E2, L1 and L2. The L1 ORF sequence showed the highest percentage of sequence identities to human PV5 (57.9%) and Caribbean manatee (Trichechus manatus) PV1 (55.4%), thus, establishing a new clade. According to phylogenetic analysis, the MsPV1 genome clusters with PVs of mammalian rather than sauropsid hosts.

  18. Rapid enrichment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific polyclonal T cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Annemieke; van der Hulst, Jeanette M.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Vermeij, Pieter; Offringa, Rienk; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). Cervical cancer is associated with an ineffective host immune response against the HPV16 oncoproteins, characterized by the lack of the strong E6-specific T-helper type 1 (Th1) immunity that is generally present in

  19. E6 and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, M. J.; Ferrara, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent investigations have established an analogy between the entropy of four-dimensional supersymmetric black holes in string theory and entanglement in quantum information theory. Examples include: (1) N=2 STU black holes and the tripartite entanglement of three qubits (2-state systems), where the common symmetry is [SL(2)] 3 and (2) N=8 black holes and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits where the common symmetry is E 7 superset of [SL(2)] 7 . Here we present another example: N=8 black holes (or black strings) in five dimensions and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits (3-state systems), where the common symmetry is E 6 superset of [SL(3)] 3 . Both the black hole (or black string) entropy and the entanglement measure are provided by the Cartan cubic E 6 invariant. Similar analogies exist for magic N=2 supergravity black holes in both four and five dimensions

  20. Highly potent and specific siRNAs against E6 or E7 genes of HPV16- or HPV18-infected cervical cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J T-C; Kuo, T-F; Chen, Y-J; Chiu, C-C; Lu, Y-C; Li, H-F; Shen, C-R; Cheng, A-J

    2010-01-01

    Infection with high-risk types (type 16 or type 18) of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) increases a patient's risk of cervical cancer. Given the importance of the cervix and the severe side effects resulting from traditional cancer therapies, this study aimed to achieve targeted inhibition of viral oncogenes in tumor cells using small interfering RNAs (siRNA). To accomplish this, we developed nine siRNAs against either the E6 or E7 genes of HPV-16 or HPV-18 in several combinations, yielding siRN...

  1. Dark matter, mirror world, and E6 unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Ch. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.

    2009-01-01

    The idea that the ordinary (O) and mirror (M) worlds exist simultaneously is developed. It is shown that, in the case of a violated mirror parity (MP), the renormalization-group evolution of the coupling constants, which is represented in the O world by the dependence α i -1 (μ) (μ is an energy variable), is not identical to the evolution of the coupling constants α' i -1 (μ) in the M world. Here, the index i labels the symmetry group under consideration, while a dash labels quantities defined in the M world. It is assumed that E 6 unification predicted by superstring theory restores MP at the unification scale M SGUT ∼ 10 18 GeV, this inevitably leading to the difference in the violation of E 6 unification in the O and M worlds at lower energies: E 6 → SO(10) x U(1) Z and E' 6 → SU(6)' x SU(2)' Z . Considering only asymptotically free theories, we present the evolution of all the inverse coupling constants α i -1 (μ) in the one-loop approximation. In dealing with the M world involving MP violation, we then arrive at the model of the accelerating expansion of our Universe, where the axion ('acceleron') belongs to the SU(2)' Z group of the M world. The coupling constant g' Z , which grows indefinitely at the scale Λ' Z ∼ 10 -3 eV, is associated with this group. Within this theory, our Universe is in the false vacuum of the M world, in agreement with the phenomenologically observed cosmological constant of about (3 x 10 -3 eV) 4 .

  2. Dark matter in a constrained E6 inspired SUSY model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athron, P.; Harries, D.; Nevzorov, R.; Williams, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate dark matter in a constrained E 6 inspired supersymmetric model with an exact custodial symmetry and compare with the CMSSM. The breakdown of E 6 leads to an additional U(1) N symmetry and a discrete matter parity. The custodial and matter symmetries imply there are two stable dark matter candidates, though one may be extremely light and contribute negligibly to the relic density. We demonstrate that a predominantly Higgsino, or mixed bino-Higgsino, neutralino can account for all of the relic abundance of dark matter, while fitting a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs and evading LHC limits on new states. However we show that the recent LUX 2016 limit on direct detection places severe constraints on the mixed bino-Higgsino scenarios that explain all of the dark matter. Nonetheless we still reveal interesting scenarios where the gluino, neutralino and chargino are light and discoverable at the LHC, but the full relic abundance is not accounted for. At the same time we also show that there is a huge volume of parameter space, with a predominantly Higgsino dark matter candidate that explains all the relic abundance, that will be discoverable with XENON1T. Finally we demonstrate that for the E 6 inspired model the exotic leptoquarks could still be light and within range of future LHC searches.

  3. Preon Model and Family Replicated E_6 Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa V. Laperashvili

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we suggested a new preon model of composite quark-leptons and bosons with the 'flipped' $E_6imes widetilde{E_6}$ gauge symmetry group. We assumed that preons are dyons having both hyper-electric $g$ and hyper-magnetic $ilde g$ charges, and these preons-dyons are confined by hyper-magnetic strings which are an ${f N}=1$ supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. In the present paper we show that the existence of the three types of strings with tensions $T_k=k T_0$ $(k = 1,2,3$ producing three (and only three generations of composite quark-leptons, also provides three generations of composite gauge bosons ('hyper-gluons' and, as a consequence, predicts the family replicated $[E_6]^3$ unification at the scale $sim 10^{17}$ GeV. This group of unification has the possibility of breaking to the group of symmetry: $ [SU(3_C]^3imes [SU(2_L]^3imes [U(1_Y]^3 imes [U(1_{(B-L}]^3$ which undergoes the breakdown to the Standard Model at lower energies. Some predictive advantages of the family replicated gauge groups of symmetry are briefly discussed.

  4. High E6 Gene Expression Predicts for Distant Metastasis and Poor Survival in Patients With HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khwaja, Shariq S.; Baker, Callie; Haynes, Wesley; Spencer, Christopher R.; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Adkins, Douglas R. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Nussenbaum, Brian [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chernock, Rebecca D. [Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lewis, James S. [Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Wang, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwang@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)–positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have a favorable prognosis. As a result, de-escalation clinical trials are under way. However, approximately 10% of patients will experience distant recurrence even with standard-of-care treatment. Here, we sought to identify novel biomarkers to better risk-stratify HPV-positive patients with OPSCC. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on HPV-positive OPSCC primary tumor specimens from patients with and without distant metastasis (DM). Results: RNA-seq analysis of 39 HPV-positive OPSCC specimens revealed that patients with DM had 2-fold higher E6 gene expression levels than did patients without DM (P=.029). This observation was confirmed in a validation cohort comprising 93 patients with HPV-positive OPSCC. The mean normalized E6 expression level in the 17 recurring primary specimens was 13 ± 2 compared with 8 ± 1 in the remaining 76 nonrecurring primaries (P=.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis established an E6 expression level of 7.3 as a cutoff for worse recurrence-free survival (RFS). Patients from this cohort with high E6 gene expression (E6-high) (n=51, 55%) had more cancer-related deaths (23% vs 2%, P<.001) and DM (26% vs 5%, P<.001) than did patients with low E6 gene expression (E6-low) (n=42, 45%). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that E6-high had worse RFS (95% vs 69%, P=.004) and cancer-specific survival (97% vs 79%, P=.007). E6-high maintained statistical significance in multivariate regression models balancing surgery, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and smoking status. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that tumors with high E6 expression were associated with P53, epidermal growth factor receptor, activating transcription factor-2, and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways. Conclusion: High E6 gene expression

  5. E6 exotic quark production in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    We examine the possibility of producing exotic quarks from E 6 theories via flavor changing couplings in high energy ep collisions at HERA and the proposed LEP x LHC. We find that the rate is rather small and very mixing angle dependent. Assuming maximal mixing, the production rates are ≅10 to 30 events per year at HERA (for masses up to 100 GeV) and ≅200 events per year at LEP x LHC (for masses up to 300 GeV)

  6. Flux breaking of E6 in the generalised Hosotani model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, A.

    1989-01-01

    To break gauge symmetries in the Hosotani model, it is necessary to include periodic (Dirac) fermions and/or antiperiodic scalars which transform as single-valued faithful representations of the adjoint group. With this in mind, an E 6 Yang-Mills theory minimally coupled to periodic adjoint and antiperiodic fundamental fermions is examined. On breaking, even though the full rank six residual group depends on the numbers of spacetime dimensions and fermion families, the fundamental fermions surviving compactification only transform non-trivially under the omnipresent [SU(3)] 2 or SU(6) subgroup factors. (orig.)

  7. The Tetraspanin CD151 in Papillomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze D. Scheffer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV are non-enveloped DNA tumor viruses that infect skin and mucosa. The most oncogenic subtype, HPV16, causes various types of cancer, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. During the multistep process of infection, numerous host proteins are required for the delivery of virus genetic information into the nucleus of target cells. Over the last two decades, many host-cell proteins such as heparan sulfate proteoglycans, integrins, growth factor receptors, actin and the tetraspanin CD151 have been described to be involved in the process of infectious entry of HPV16. Tetraspanins have the ability to organize membrane microdomains and to directly influence the function of associated molecules, including binding of receptors to their ligands, receptor oligomerization and signal transduction. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on CD151, and CD151-associated partners during HPV infection and discuss the underlying mechanisms.

  8. On generalized Melvin solution for the Lie algebra E6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S.V.; Ivashchuk, V.D.

    2017-01-01

    A multidimensional generalization of Melvin's solution for an arbitrary simple Lie algebra G is considered. The gravitational model in D dimensions, D ≥ 4, contains n 2-forms and l ≥ n scalar fields, where n is the rank of G. The solution is governed by a set of n functions H s (z) obeying n ordinary differential equations with certain boundary conditions imposed. It was conjectured earlier that these functions should be polynomials (the so-called fluxbrane polynomials). The polynomials H s (z), s = 1,.., 6, for the Lie algebra E 6 are obtained and a corresponding solution for l = n = 6 is presented. The polynomials depend upon integration constants Q s , s = 1,.., 6. They obey symmetry and duality identities. The latter ones are used in deriving asymptotic relations for solutions at large distances. The power-law asymptotic relations for E 6 -polynomials at large z are governed by the integer-valued matrix ν = A -1 (I + P), where A -1 is the inverse Cartan matrix, I is the identity matrix and P is a permutation matrix, corresponding to a generator of the Z 2 -group of symmetry of the Dynkin diagram. The 2-form fluxes Φ s , s = 1,.., 6, are calculated. (orig.)

  9. Metastatic MHC class I-negative mouse cells derived by transformation with human papillomavirus type 16

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahel, M.; Sobotková, E.; Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana; Žák, R.; Ludvíková, V.; Mikyšková, Romana; Kovařík, J.; Jelínek, F.; Povýšil, C.; Marinov, J.; Vonka, V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 3 (2001), s. 374-380 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5900; GA MZd NC5526; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA312/98/0826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : human papillomavirus * E6/E7 oncogenes * cell transformation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.942, year: 2001

  10. Human papillomaviruses and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies

  11. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Jindra

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c. prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease.

  12. A doxology to Christ (Rev. 1:5e-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. de Smidt

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Revelation 1:5e-6 is a doxology, an eulogy on the characteristics (attributes of Christ. Christ’s churches celebrate the enduring love of Christ, who by a once-and-for-all historical act redeemed them from enslavement to sin. Through this redemptive achievement Christ obtained royal and priestly prerogatives for believers in the present. The meaning of this doxology is investigated from a “heilgeschichtlich” and covenantal context. The acts of Christ are framed by the acts of God; God thus is the “Principium Essendi”. The point of departure in this article is that an ontological relationship exists between the theologia naturalis and the theologia supra- naturalis in the final phase of God’s kingdom.

  13. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly L. Bristol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1, does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  14. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Molly L; Wang, Xu; Smith, Nathan W; Son, Minkyeong P; Evans, Michael R; Morgan, Iain M

    2016-06-22

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1), does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  15. Prognostic relevance of human papillomavirus L1 capsid protein detection within mild and moderate dysplastic lesions of the cervix uteri in combination with p16 biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilfrich, Ralf; Hariri, Jalil

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To proof the prognostic relevance of HPV L1 capsid protein detection on colposcopically-guided punch biopsies in combination with p16. STUDY DESIGN: Sections of colposcopically-guided punch biopsies from 191 consecutive cases with at least 5 years of follow-up were stained with HPV L1 ...

  16. Human Papillomavirus Regulates HER3 Expression in Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Targeted HER3 Therapy in HPV+ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Toni M; Hartmann, Stefan; Bhola, Neil E; Peyser, Noah D; Li, Hua; Zeng, Yan; Isaacson Wechsler, Erin; Ranall, Max V; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; LaVallee, Theresa M; Jordan, Richard C K; Johnson, Daniel E; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2017-06-15

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 plays an etiologic role in a growing subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), where viral expression of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins is necessary for tumor growth and maintenance. Although patients with HPV + tumors have a more favorable prognosis, there are currently no HPV-selective therapies. Recent studies identified differential receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) profiles in HPV + versus HPV - tumors. One such RTK, HER3, is overexpressed and interacts with phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in HPV + tumors. Therefore, we investigated the role of HPV oncoproteins in regulating HER3-mediated signaling and determined whether HER3 could be a molecular target in HPV + HNSCC. Experimental Design: HER3 was investigated as a molecular target in HPV + HNSCC using established cell lines, patient-derived xenografts (PDX), and human tumor specimens. A mechanistic link between HPV and HER3 was examined by augmenting E6 and E7 expression levels in HNSCC cell lines. The dependency of HPV + and HPV - HNSCC models on HER3 was evaluated with anti-HER3 siRNAs and the clinical stage anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody KTN3379. Results: HER3 was overexpressed in HPV + HNSCC, where it was associated with worse overall survival in patients with pharyngeal cancer. Further investigation indicated that E6 and E7 regulated HER3 protein expression and downstream PI3K pathway signaling. Targeting HER3 with siRNAs or KTN3379 significantly inhibited the growth of HPV + cell lines and PDXs. Conclusions: This study uncovers a direct relationship between HPV infection and HER3 in HNSCC and provides a rationale for the clinical evaluation of targeted HER3 therapy for the treatment of HPV + patients. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); 3072-83. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Animal models of papillomavirus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, M Saveria

    2002-11-01

    Tumorigenesis due to papillomavirus (PV) infection was first demonstrated in rabbits and cattle early last century. Despite the evidence obtained in animals, the role of viruses in human cancer was dismissed as irrelevant. It took a paradigm shift in the late 1970s for some viruses to be recognised as 'tumour viruses' in humans, and in 1995, more than 60 years after Rous's first demonstration of CRPV oncogenicity, WHO officially declared that 'HPV-16 and HPV-18 are carcinogenic to humans'. Experimental studies with animal PVs have been a determining factor in this decision. Animal PVs have been studied both as agents of disease in animals and as models of human PV infection. In addition to the study of PV infection in whole animals, in vitro studies with animal PV proteins have contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms of cell transformation. Animal PVs cause distressing diseases in both farm and companion animals, such as teat papillomatosis in cattle, equine sarcoids and canine oral papillomatosis and there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of these problematic infections. Persistent and florid teat papillomatosis in cows can lead to mastitis, prevent the suckling of calves and make milking impossible; heavily affected animals are culled and so occasionally are whole herds. Equine sarcoids are often recurrent and untreatable and lead to loss of valuable animals. Canine oral papillomatosis can be very extensive and persistent and lead to great distress. Thus the continuing research in the biology of animal PVs is amply justified. BPVs and CRPV have been for many years the model systems with which to study the biology of HPV. Induction of papillomas and their neoplastic progression has been experimentally demonstrated and reproduced in cattle and rabbits, and virus-cofactor interactions have been elucidated in these systems. With the advancements in molecular and cell culture techniques, the direct study of HPV has become less

  18. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • As 2 O 3 inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As 2 O 3 is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As 2 O 3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As 2 O 3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As 2 O 3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As 2 O 3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As 2 O 3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer

  19. NF-Y loss triggers p53 stabilization and apoptosis in HPV18-positive cells by affecting E6 transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Benatti, Paolo; Basile, Valentina; Dolfini, Diletta; Belluti, Silvia; Tomei, Margherita; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the high risk HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins induces the transformation of epithelial cells, through the disruption of p53 and Rb function. The binding of cellular transcription factors to cis-regulatory elements in the viral Upstream Regulatory Region (URR) stimulates E6/E7 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the CCAAT-transcription factor NF-Y binds to a non-canonical motif within the URR and activates viral gene expression. In addition, NF-Y indirectly up-regulat...

  20. Human Papillomavirus Antibodies and Future Risk of Anogenital Cancer : A Nested Case-Control Study in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreimer, Aimee R.; Brennan, Paul; Kuhs, Krystle A. Lang; Waterboer, Tim; Clifford, Gary; Franceschi, Silvia; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Riboli, Elio; Castellsague, Xavier; Hildesheim, Allan; Fortner, Renee Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Palli, Domenico; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Panico, Salvatore; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Mesrine, Sylvie; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.; Cross, Amanda J.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Vineis, Paolo; Larranaga, Nerea; Pala, Valeria; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Tumino, Rosario; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Travis, Ruth C.; Ramon Quiros, J.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Pawlita, Michael; Johansson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) causes cancer at several anatomic sites. In the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition study, HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present more than 10 years before oropharyngeal cancer diagnosis and was nearly absent in controls. The

  1. The clinical value of HPV E6/E7 and STAT3 mRNA detection in cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yibing; Shen, Zongji

    2018-02-11

    To explore the value of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mRNA detection in the screening of cervical lesions. 192 patients with abnormal ThinPrep cytology test (TCT) results and/or high-risk HPV infection were screened to identify possible cervical lesions in cases. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathology. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to detect and qualify the mRNAs of HPV E6/E7, STAT3, and Survivin in cervical exfoliated cells. In addition, the performance of separate and combined mRNA detection methods were compared with TCT, HR-HPV DNA schemes respectively. 1. Compared with HPVE6/E7 and STAT3 mRNA methods, Survivin mRNA assay had poor specificity (Sp), Youden index (YI) and concordance rate. 2. HPV E6/E7, STAT3, and STAT3 + HR-HPV methods had the best Sp, concordance rate and positive predictive value (PPV) for cervical lesions screening and atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) triage. For screening of high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or greater (HSILs+), no difference was observed in the Se of mRNA detection methods in comparison with that of TCT, HR-HPV and TCT + HR-HPV, whereas the false positive rate (FPR) decreased by 41.48%/55.99%/17.19% and the colposcopy referral rate reduced by about 20.00%/25.00%/11.17%. For triage of women with ASCUS, no difference was observed in the Se of mRNA detection methods as compared to that of HR-HPV (χ 2  = 1.05, P > 0.75), while the FPR decreased by 45.83%/37.50%/41.66% and the colposcopy referral rate reduced by 32.42%/22.60%/25.28%, respectively. The Se, YI, and PPV of the combined methods increased in comparison to each method alone. 3. Compared with the TCT + HR-HPV method, HPV E6/E7 + STAT3 method had perfect Sp (95.92%) and PPV (95.40%) for screening HSILs+, the FPR and colposcopy referral rate decreased by 31.06% and 22.48% respectively. 1. The expression of HPV E6/E

  2. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: High-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Michael; DiFatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed ...

  3. Mechanisms of virus immune evasion lead to development from chronic inflammation to cancer formation associated with human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senba, Masachika; Mori, Naoki

    2012-10-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has developed strategies to escape eradication by innate and adaptive immunity. Immune response evasion has been considered an important aspect of HPV persistence, which is the main contributing factor leading to HPV-related cancers. HPV-induced cancers expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are potentially recognized by the immune system. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are patrolled by natural killer cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively. This system of recognition is a main target for the strategies of immune evasion deployed by viruses. The viral immune evasion proteins constitute useful tools to block defined stages of the MHC class I presentation pathway, and in this way HPV avoids the host immune response. The long latency period from initial infection to persistence signifies that HPV evolves mechanisms to escape the immune response. It has now been established that there are oncogenic mechanisms by which E7 binds to and degrades tumor suppressor Rb, while E6 binds to and inactivates tumor suppressor p53. Therefore, interaction of p53 and pRb proteins can give rise to an increased immortalization and genomic instability. Overexpression of NF-κB in cervical and penile cancers suggests that NF-κB activation is a key modulator in driving chronic inflammation to cancer. HPV oncogene-mediated suppression of NF-κB activity contributes to HPV escape from the immune system. This review focuses on the diverse mechanisms of the virus immune evasion with HPV that leads to chronic inflammation and cancer.

  4. NF-Y loss triggers p53 stabilization and apoptosis in HPV18-positive cells by affecting E6 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Basile, Valentina; Dolfini, Diletta; Belluti, Silvia; Tomei, Margherita; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-07-19

    The expression of the high risk HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins induces the transformation of epithelial cells, through the disruption of p53 and Rb function. The binding of cellular transcription factors to cis-regulatory elements in the viral Upstream Regulatory Region (URR) stimulates E6/E7 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the CCAAT-transcription factor NF-Y binds to a non-canonical motif within the URR and activates viral gene expression. In addition, NF-Y indirectly up-regulates HPV18 transcription through the transactivation of multiple cellular transcription factors. NF-YA depletion inhibits the expression of E6 and E7 genes and re-establishes functional p53. The activation of p53 target genes in turn leads to apoptotic cell death. Finally, we show that NF-YA loss sensitizes HPV18-positive cells toward the DNA damaging agent Doxorubicin, via p53-mediated transcriptional response.

  5. Initial preclinical safety of non-replicating human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein-coated baculovirus vector-based vaccines against human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Su-Eun; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Soondong; Cho, Hee-Jeong; Byun, Youngro; Kim, Sujeong; Kim, Young Bong; Choi, Yongseok; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope protein-coated, baculovirus vector-based HPV 16 L1 (AcHERV-HPV16L1) is a non-replicating recombinant baculoviral vaccine. Here, we report an initial evaluation of the preclinical safety of AcHERV-HPV16L1 vaccine. In an acute toxicity study, a single administration of AcHERV-HPV16L1 DNA vaccine given intramuscularly (i.m.) to mice at a dose of 1 × 10(8) plaque-forming units (PFU) did not cause significant changes in body weight compared with vehicle-treated controls. It did cause a brief increase in the weights of some organs on day 15 post-treatment, but by day 30, all organ weights were not significantly different from those in the vehicle-treated control group. No hematological changes were observed on day 30 post-treatment. In a range-finding toxicity study with three doses of 1 × 10(7) , 2 × 10(7) and 5 × 10(7) PFU once daily for 5 days, the group treated with 5 × 10(7) PFU showed a transient decrease in the body weights from day 5 to day 15 post-treatment, but recovery to the levels similar to those in the vehicle-treated control group by post-treatment day 20. Organ weights were slightly higher for lymph nodes, spleen, thymus and liver after repeated dosing with 5 × 10(7) PFU on day 15, but had normalized by day 30. Moreover, repeated administration of AcHERV-HPV16L1 did not induce myosin-specific autoantibody in serum, and did not cause immune complex deposition or tissue damage at injection sites. Taken together, these results provide preliminary evidence of the preclinical safety of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 DNA vaccines in mice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Study of association and molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in breast cancer of Indian patients: Clinical and prognostic implication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saimul Islam

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV causes tumors primarily Cervical cancer. Recently, inconsistent reports came up in Breast cancer (BC too. In India, despite treatment 70,218 BC patients die each year. So, we explored the association of HPV, if any, with BC prognosis in Indian pre-therapeutic (PT and Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT patients with subsequent analysis of HPV profile.HPV prevalence was checked and analysis of physical status, copy number, genome variation, promoter methylation and expression (mRNA and protein of the prevalent subtype was done.High prevalence of HPV was observed in both PT (64.0% and NACT (71.0% cases with significant association with younger (20-45 yrs PT patients. Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly increased from adjacent normal breast (9.5%, 2/21, fibro adenomas (30%, 3/10 to tumors (64.8%, 203/313 samples. In both PT and NACT cases, HPV16 was the most prevalent subtype (69.0% followed by HPV18 and HPV33. Survival analysis illustrated hrHPV infected PT patients had worst prognosis. So, detailed analysis of HPV16 profile was done which showed Europian-G350 as the most frequent HPV16 variant along with high rate of integration. Moreover, low copy number and hyper-methylation of P97 early promoter were concordant with low HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression. Notably, four novel variations (KT020838, KT020840, KT020841 and KT020839 in the LCR region and two (KT020836 and KT020837 in the E6 region were identified for the first time along with two novel E6^E7*I (KU199314 and E6^E7*II (KU199315 fusion transcript variants.Thus, significant association of hrHPV with prognosis of Indian BC patients led to additional investigation of HPV16 profile. Outcomes indicated a plausible role of HPV in Indian BC patients.

  7. Rescue of p53 function by small-molecule RITA in cervical carcinoma by blocking E6-mediated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Carolyn Ying; Szekely, Laszlo; Bao, Wenjie; Selivanova, Galina

    2010-04-15

    Proteasomal degradation of p53 by human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 oncoprotein plays a pivotal role in the survival of cervical carcinoma cells. Abrogation of HPV-E6-dependent p53 destruction can therefore be a good strategy to combat cervical carcinomas. Here, we show that a small-molecule reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA) is able to induce the accumulation of p53 and rescue its tumor suppressor function in cells containing high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 by inhibiting HPV-E6-mediated proteasomal degradation. RITA blocks p53 ubiquitination by preventing p53 interaction with E6-associated protein, required for HPV-E6-mediated degradation. RITA activates the transcription of proapoptotic p53 targets Noxa, PUMA, and BAX, and repressed the expression of pro-proliferative factors CyclinB1, CDC2, and CDC25C, resulting in p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, RITA showed substantial suppression of cervical carcinoma xenografts in vivo. These results provide a proof of principle for the treatment of cervical cancer in a p53-dependent manner by using small molecules that target p53. (c)2010 AACR.

  8. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination.

  9. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Mokili

    Full Text Available As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome and 63.1% (L1 sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4 and a non-coding long control region (LCR between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses.

  10. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H; Burk, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  11. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H.; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution. PMID:26086730

  12. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koenraad Van Doorslaer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  13. Risk of progression of early cervical lesions is associated with integration and persistence of HPV-16 and expression of E6, Ki-67, and telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Vega-Peña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL are the earliest lesions of the uterine cervix, the persistence and integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV as type 16, which promotes the development of more aggressive lesions. Aim: To select more aggressive lesions with tendency to progress to invasive cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 cytological specimens in liquid base (Liqui-PREP were analyzed: 25 specimens were with no signs of SIL (NSIL and without HPV; 25 NSIL with HPV-16, and 25 with both LSIL and HPV-16. The expression of Ki-67, telomerase, and viral E6 was evaluated by immunocytochemistry; and the detection of viral DNA was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs for genotyping or sequencing of HPV-16. The physical state of HPV-16 was evaluated by in situ hybridization with amplification with tyramide. Results: Of the total group, 58.6% had LSIL associated with persistence and of these 59.3% was associated with integrated state of HPV as intense expression of E6, Ki-67 (P = 0.013, P = 0.055 has except for the expression of telomerase present a non-significant association (P<0.341. Conclusions: Overexpression of E6 and Ki-67 is associated with the integration of HPV-16, favoring viral persistence, and increasing the risk of progression in women with NSIL and LSIL.

  14. E6 as biogas highway from Gothenburg to Oslo. Final report; E6 som biogassvei fra Goeteborg til Oslo. Sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadal, Hanne Lerche; Morken, John; Lileng, Knut

    2009-07-01

    The main goal of the project has been to contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from road transport in the transition from fossil fuels to biogas. Biogas Fredrikstad AS has been the project owner, with FREVAR KF and Borgbuss AS as partners on the user side. Oestfold Research has been project manager with the University of Life Sciences (UMB) as part responsible for R&D efforts. Biogas Fredrikstad AS established in 2001 the first manufacturing plant and filling station for biogas as fuel. The project was supported by the Road Directorate through the support system for environmental friendly transport. The biogas produced from sewage sludge and biogas substrate (based on food waste). Based on the desire to establish a more accessible filling station in Fredrikstad, and to increase knowledge and competence in general about biogas as bio propellant, the project 'E6 as biogas highway from Gothenburg to Oslo' was granted as a RENERGI and SkatteFUNN project. The project started 1.1.2006 and ended 31.12.2008. The project has achieved useful synergies with relevant other projects that have taken place in parallel. Based on an overall assessment of costs, availability, opportunities for land area, etc, new filling station for biogas in Fredrikstad are planned and designed at the rotary intersection at the eastern bridgehead of Fredrikstad bridge. All permits in connection with the establishment of new filling station is available. In anticipation of the top financing, the start of the construction phase has been somewhat offset in time. It is applied for funds to support the establishment of the filling station from the newly created TransNova. The project has assessed and documented several conditions regarding use of biogas as a fuel, including: Environmental issues with the use of biogas as fuel; Potential and status of biogas production in Norway; Production of biogas in Fredrikstad and input to the optimization of the process of FREVAR KF; Driving

  15. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, Eric; Lambert, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq

  16. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, Eric [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lambert, Paul F., E-mail: plambert@wisc.edu [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  17. Comparison of Real-Time Multiplex Human Papillomavirus (HPV) PCR Assays with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra Assay▿

    OpenAIRE

    Else, Elizabeth A.; Swoyer, Ryan; Zhang, Yuhua; Taddeo, Frank J.; Bryan, Janine T.; Lawson, John; Van Hyfte, Inez; Roberts, Christine C.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time type-specific multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in samples collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). Additional multiplex (L1, E6, and E7 open reading frame [ORF]) or duplex (E6 and E7 ORF) HPV PCR assays were developed to detect high-risk HPV types, including HPV type 31 (HPV31), HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58, and H...

  18. Understanding the Role of Intrinsic Disorder of Viral Proteins in the Oncogenicity of Different Types of HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, Elvira Regina; Giuliatti, Silvana

    2018-01-09

    Intrinsic disorder is very important in the biological function of several proteins, and is directly linked to their foldability during interaction with their targets. There is a close relationship between the intrinsically disordered proteins and the process of carcinogenesis involving viral pathogens. Among these pathogens, we have highlighted the human papillomavirus (HPV) in this study. HPV is currently among the most common sexually transmitted infections, besides being the cause of several types of cancer. HPVs are divided into two groups, called high- and low-risk, based on their oncogenic potential. The high-risk HPV E6 protein has been the target of much research, in seeking treatments against HPV, due to its direct involvement in the process of cell cycle control. To understand the role of intrinsic disorder of the viral proteins in the oncogenic potential of different HPV types, the structural characteristics of intrinsically disordered regions of high and low-risk HPV E6 proteins were analyzed. In silico analyses of primary sequences, prediction of tertiary structures, and analyses of molecular dynamics allowed the observation of the behavior of such disordered regions in these proteins, thereby proving a direct relationship of structural variation with the degree of oncogenicity of HPVs. The results obtained may contribute to the development of new therapies, targeting the E6 oncoprotein, for the treatment of HPV-associated diseases.

  19. Nucleotide sequences of cDNAs for human papillomavirus type 18 transcripts in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yutaka; Tsunokawa, Youko; Takebe, Naoko; Terada, Masaaki; Sugimura, Takashi; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1988-01-01

    HeLa cells expressed 3.4- and 1.6-kilobase (kb) transcripts of the integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 genome. Two types of cDNA clones representing each size of HPV type 18 transcript were isolated. Sequence analysis of these two types of cDNA clones revealed that the 3.4-kb transcript contained E6, E7, the 5' portion of E1, and human sequence and that the 1.6-kb transcript contained spliced and frameshifted E6 (E6 * ), E7, and human sequence. There was a common human sequence containing a poly(A) addition signal in the 3' end portions of both transcripts, indicating that they were transcribed from the HPV genome at the same integration site with different splicing. Furthermore, the 1.6-kb transcript contained both of the two viral TATA boxes upstream of E6, strongly indicating that a cellular promoter was used for its transcription

  20. E6 unification model building. III. Clebsch-Gordan coefficients in E6 tensor products of the 27 with higher dimensional representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Gregory W.; Blazek, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    E 6 is an attractive group for unification model building. However, the complexity of a rank 6 group makes it nontrivial to write down the structure of higher dimensional operators in an E 6 theory in terms of the states labeled by quantum numbers of the standard model gauge group. In this paper, we show the results of our computation of the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the products of the 27 with irreducible representations of higher dimensionality: 78, 351, 351 ' , 351, and 351 ' . Application of these results to E 6 model building involving higher dimensional operators is straightforward

  1. Development of a PCR Assay to detect Papillomavirus Infection in the Snow Leopard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Curtis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs are a group of small, non-encapsulated, species-specific DNA viruses that have been detected in a variety of mammalian and avian species including humans, canines and felines. PVs cause lesions in the skin and mucous membranes of the host and after persistent infection, a subset of PVs can cause tumors such as cervical malignancies and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in humans. PVs from several species have been isolated and their genomes have been sequenced, thereby increasing our understanding of the mechanism of viral oncogenesis and allowing for the development of molecular assays for the detection of PV infection. In humans, molecular testing for PV DNA is used to identify patients with persistent infections at risk for developing cervical cancer. In felids, PVs have been isolated and sequenced from oral papillomatous lesions of several wild species including bobcats, Asian lions and snow leopards. Since a number of wild felids are endangered, PV associated disease is a concern and there is a need for molecular tools that can be used to further study papillomavirus in these species. Results We used the sequence of the snow leopard papillomavirus UuPV1 to develop a PCR strategy to amplify viral DNA from samples obtained from captive animals. We designed primer pairs that flank the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes and amplify two DNA fragments encompassing these genes. We detected viral DNA for E6 and E7 in genomic DNA isolated from saliva, but not in paired blood samples from snow leopards. We verified the identity of these PCR products by restriction digest and DNA sequencing. The sequences of the PCR products were 100% identical to the published UuPV1 genome sequence. Conclusions We developed a PCR assay to detect papillomavirus in snow leopards and amplified viral DNA encompassing the E6 and E7 oncogenes specifically in the saliva of animals. This assay could be utilized for the molecular

  2. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  3. The E5 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating ...

  4. ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 E7 RELATED TO CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL DATA IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAAY, MFD; DUK, JM; BURGER, MPM; WALBOOMERS, J; TERSCHEGGET, J; GROENIER, KH; DEBRUIJN, HWA; STOLZ, E; HERBRINK, P

    Aims-To investigate the correlation between antibodies to the transforming protein E7 of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and clinicopathological indices in women with cervical squamous carcinoma. Methods-A synthetic peptide of the HPV type 16 E7 protein (amino acids 6 to 35) was used to screen

  5. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  6. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  7. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  8. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sq how to do kids infect kids links & resources M.O.V.E. parents for prevention ... go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  9. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... getvaxed about GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles ... free-of-charge. Branded videos contain the "PKIDs.ORG" end slate; unbranded videos are provided for organizations ...

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause serious health problems, including ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  11. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  12. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  13. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira, E-mail: zak_ana@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar, E-mail: odelmoralh@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás, E-mail: nvillega@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo, E-mail: ahidalgo@inmegen.gob.mx [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena, E-mail: sromero_cordoba@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  14. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Júnior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Júnior, João Lídio S G V; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L; de Sá, Lilian Rose M

    2016-08-18

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. Copyright © 2016 Silvestre et al.

  15. Clinical performance of a human papillomavirus messenger RNA test (Aptima HPV Assay) on residual material from archived 3-year-old PreservCyt samples with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Marianne; Ornskov, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is widely used in the triage of women with a borderline smear result but the efficiency of testing women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) is less clear, mainly because of lack of specificity. New HPV tests are emerging, which detect E6/E7...

  16. Human papillomavirus and genital cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapose Alwyn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections world-wide. Low-risk HPV-types are associated with genital warts. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV-types is associated with genital cancers. Smoking and HIV infection have consistently been associated with longer duration of HPV infection and risk for genital cancer. There is an increasing incidence of anal cancers, and a close association with HPV infection has been demonstrated. Receptive anal sex and HIV-positive status are associated with a high risk for anal cancer. Two HPV vaccines are now available and offer protection from infection by the HPV-types included in the vaccine. This benefit is maximally seen in young women who were uninfected prior to vaccination.

  17. Human papillomavirus associated oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanicka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is substantial epidemiological, molecular-pathological and experimental evidence indicating that some of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), especially HPV type 16, are etiologically related to a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, in particular, those arising from the oropharynx. Incidence of oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in direct opposition to a decreasing incidence of all other head and neck cancers. The prognosis of patients with HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer is significantly better compare to patients with non associated oropharyngeal cancers. Patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer respond better to radiotherapy, surgery, chemoradiotherapy. Therefore, the presence of HPV in tumor is the most important prognostic factor in patients with oropharyngeal cancers. These findings have prompted the need for change of treatment strategies in these patients. The goal is selective de-intensified treatment stratified for HPV status. (author)

  18. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv.html . CDC review information for HPV (Human Papillomavirus) ...

  19. A prospective study of women with ASCUS or LSIL pap smears at baseline and HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive: a 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, M T; Ferrara, M; Fava, V; Barrasso, G; Panella, M M

    2018-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is used in the triage of women with a borderline smear result. The efficiency of testing women with a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) is less clear. For this reason we used a new HPV test that detects E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA), which might have a higher specificity. The objective of this prospective study was to assess whether HPV E6/E7 mRNA positivity in women with ASCUS and LSIL at baseline, is able to predict those women who have a high risk of developing a histological cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2) or worse lesion. We took into consideration the women's age and HPV DNA genotype and followed them up for 3 years. Cervical samples from women with high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) DNA-positive ASCUS (n = 90) or LSIL (n = 222) were tested for the presence of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA and the women were monitored for the development of histopathologically verified CIN2+. Thirteen patients with ASCUS and 17 with LSIL did not complete follow-up. All patients with LSIL and ASCUS, enrolled in this study, had confirmed lesions at the colposcopic examination. Follow-up was available for 312 women, 193 were positive in the HR-HPV DNA test and 93 had a HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive test. Finally, 22 women positive in the HPV DNA test for high-risk genotypes and with positive E6/E7 mRNA had a histologically confirmed CIN2+. Only two cases with negative HPV E6/E7 mRNA had CIN2+. The study shows that women positive in the HPV E6/E7 mRNA test have a greater risk of malignant progression of cervical lesions and therefore deserve greater attention and earlier check-ups.

  20. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design.

  1. Comparative transforming potential of different human papillomaviruses associated with non-melanoma skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimi, Paola; Thomas, Miranda; Bouvard, Veronique; Ruberto, Irene; Campo, M. Saveria; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that infect mucosal epithelia are the causative agents of cervical cancer. In contrast, the association of cutaneo-tropic HPV types with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is less well defined. In this study, we have analysed the in vitro transforming potential of various cutaneous HPV types. Using oncogene cooperation assays with activated ras, we have shown that diverse cutaneous types, including 12, 14, 15, 24, 36 and 49, have significant transforming potential. Interestingly, most of this activity appears to be encoded by the E6 gene product. In contrast, the common HPV-10 exhibits no significant transforming potential in these assays. This difference may be a reflection of different patterns of cellular localization, with transforming E6s being nuclear and non-transforming being cytoplasmic. These results provide molecular support for a role of these viruses in the development of certain human malignancies

  2. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  3. Raman chemical mapping reveals site of action of HIV protease inhibitors in HPV16 E6 expressing cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jarvis, Roger M; Allwood, J William; Batman, Gavin; Moore, Rowan E; Marsden-Edwards, Emma; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N; Goodacre, Royston

    2010-12-01

    It has been shown that the HIV protease inhibitors indinavir and lopinavir may have activity against the human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16 inhibiting HPV E6-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53 in cultured cervical carcinoma cells. However, their mode and site of action is unknown. HPV-negative C33A cervical carcinoma cells and the same cells stably transfected with E6 (C33AE6) were exposed to indinavir and lopinavir at concentrations of 1 mM and 30 μM, respectively. The intracellular distribution of metabolites and metabolic changes induced by these treatments were investigated by Raman microspectroscopic imaging combined with the analysis of cell fractionation products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A uniform cellular distribution of proteins was found in drug-treated cells irrespective of cell type. Indinavir was observed to co-localise with nucleic acid in the nucleus, but only in E6 expressing cells. Principal components analysis (PCA) score maps generated on the full Raman hypercube and the corresponding PCA loadings plots revealed that the majority of metabolic variations influenced by the drug exposure within the cells were associated with changes in nucleic acids. Analysis of cell fractionation products by LC-MS confirmed that the level of indinavir in nuclear extracts was approximately eight-fold greater than in the cytoplasm. These data demonstrate that indinavir undergoes enhanced nuclear accumulation in E6-expressing cells, which suggests that this is the most likely site of action for this compound against HPV.

  4. Productive infection of bovine papillomavirus type 2 in the placenta of pregnant cows affected with urinary bladder tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperto, Sante; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Corteggio, Annunziata; Tatè, Rosarita; Cermola, Michele; Paciello, Orlando; Roperto, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are believed to be highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within stratified epithelia. In vitro, various PVs appear to complete their entire life-cycle in different trophoblastic cell lines. In this study, infection by and protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) in the uterine and chorionic epithelium of the placenta has been described in four cows suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. E5 oncoprotein was detected both by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemically. It appears to be complexed and perfectly co-localized with the activated platelet-derived growth factor ß receptor (PDGFßR) by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The activated PDGFßR might be involved in organogenesis and neo-angiogenesis rather than in cell transformation during pregnancy. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection has been detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the uterine and chorionic epithelium. Trophoblastic cells appear to be the major target for L1 protein expression. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be expressed during a productive infection, has been detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected viral particles in nuclei of uterine and chorionic epithelium. This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the placenta of pregnant cows can occur in vivo.

  5. Transduction of the E6 and E7 genes of epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomaviruses alters human keratinocyte growth and differentiation in organotypic cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxman, I. L.; Mulder, L. H.; Noya, F.; de Waard, V.; Gibbs, S.; Broker, T. R.; ten Kate, F.; Chow, L. T.; ter Schegget, J.

    2001-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papilloma virus DNA has been detected in skin cancers, in premalignant and benign skin lesions, and in plucked hairs from immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients. The role of epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papilloma virus in

  6. Vacinas contra o Papilomavirus humano Vaccines against human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Roberto Nadal

    2006-09-01

    outras doenças anogenitais associadas à infecção pelo HPV.Papillomavirus infection is more common in young sexually active people. It is so prevalent that from 75% to 80% of this population will be infected in their lifetime. Most lesions will be eradicated spontaneously at the point of not being detected even with the most sensible methods. Persistent infections with oncogenic HPV increase intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer risks. Two ways of prevention may be proposed: screening for precursor lesions and immunization against HPV, to avoid them. Although anogenital cancer incidence is decreasing with screening methods, costs are high and emotional disturbance may be caused by an abnormal result. So, vaccines to prevent diseases associated to HPV must be available. In the last decade, clinical tests began with several vaccines targeting the most frequent HPV types. The goal of prophylactic vaccines is to prevent primary or persistent HPV infections, and thus prevent cervical cancer and/or genital warts and the aim of the therapeutic types is to prevent progression of HPV infection, induce regression of intraepithelial neoplasia or condylomata, or eradicate residual cervical cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines in late stages of clinical testing are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs when expressed in recombinant systems, resulting in strong adaptive immune responses that are capable of neutralizing subsequent natural infections. Some studies observed 100% efficacy in preventing clinical disease for specific HPV types at least 5 years after immunization. Vaccines that target E6 and E7 proteins also represent an important strategy to control HPV-associated lesions and are in test in animal models. HPV vaccines seem to be more effective when administered prior to initiation of sexual activity, and vaccination campaigns should target preadolescent and adolescent populations. It is expected that with good coverage of the

  7. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Amrita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  8. Public awareness of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuschieri, K S; Horne, A W; Szarewski, A; Cubie, H A

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to review the evidence relating to the level of awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population and the implications for the potential introduction of HPV vaccination and HPV testing as part of screening. PubMed search performed on terms: 'HPV education', 'HPV awareness' 'Genital Warts Awareness' Results: Public awareness of HPV is generally very low, particularly with respect to its relation to abnormal smears and cervical cancer although knowledge levels vary to some extent according to sociodemographic characteristics. There is also much confusion around which types cause warts and the types that can cause cancer. The sexually transmissible nature of the infection is of major concern and confusion to women. Due to the lack of current awareness of HPV, significant education initiatives will be necessary should HPV vaccination and/or HPV testing be introduced. Organized edification of health-care workers and the media, who constitute the two most preferred sources of information, will be crucial.

  9. Adolescent Male Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian C. Nanagas MD, MSc

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine male vaccination rates with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4 before and after the October 2011 national recommendation to routinely immunize adolescent males. Methods. We reviewed HPV4 dose 1 (HPV4-1 uptake in 292 adolescent males in our urban clinic prior to national recommendations and followed-up for HPV4 series completion rates. After national recommendation, 248 urban clinic and 247 suburban clinic males were reviewed for HPV4-1 uptake. Factors associated with HPV4-1 refusal were determined with multiple logistic regression. Results. Of the initial 292 males, 78% received HPV4-1 and 38% received the 3-dose series. After recommendation, HPV4-1 uptake was 59% and 7% in urban and suburban clinics, respectively. Variables associated with HPV4-1 uptake/refusal included time period, race, type of insurance, and receipt of concurrent vaccines. Conclusions. HPV4-1 vaccination rates in our urban clinic were high before and after routine HPV vaccine recommendations for adolescent males. Our vaccination rates were much higher than in a suburban practice.

  10. Detection and analysis of human papillomavirus 16 and 18 homologous DNA sequences in oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, S; Tsuji, T; Li, X; Mizugaki, Y; Hayatsu, Y; Shinozaki, F

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 was investigated in oral lesions of the population of northeast China including squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), candida leukoplakias, lichen planuses and papillomas, by southern blot hybridization with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified HPV16 and 18 E6 DNA was analyzed by cycle sequence. HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 45 SCCs (31.1%). HPV18 E6 DNA and HPV16 E6. DNA were detected in 24.4% and 20.0% of SCCs. respectively. Dual infection of both HPV 16 and HPV 18 was detected in 6 of 45 SCCs (13.3%), but not in other oral lesions. HPV 18 E6 DNA was also detected in 2 of 3 oral candida leukoplakias, but in none of the 5 papillomas. Our study indicated that HPV 18 infection might be more frequent than HPV 16 infection in oral SCCs in northeast Chinese, dual infection of high risk HPV types was restricted in oral SCCs, and that HPV infection might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candida leukoplakia.

  11. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Waiz, M.; Al-Saadi, Rabab N.; Al-Saadi, Zahida A.; Al-Rawi, Faiza A.

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study to investigate a group of Iraqi woman with proved genital vulval warts, to seek evidence of human papillomavirus infection in apparently normal looking cervixes and to investigate the natural history of infection. From December 1997 to August 1998, 20 women with vulval warts were enrolled along with 20 aged-matched control cases without warts. Their ages ranged between 19-48 years with a mean of 30.4 years, (+/- standard deviation = 2.3) for patients and 18-48 years with a mean of 29.7 (+/- standard deviation = 2.7) for the control group. General and gynecological examinations were carried out. Cervical swabs for associated genital infection, papilloma smears, speculoscopy and directed punch biopsies were carried out to detect subclinical human papillomavirus infections of the cervix and associated intraepithelial neoplasm. Cytology results showed that 11 (55%) of patients had evidence of cervical infection by human papillomavirus, 6 (30%) showed mild dysplastic changes, 3 (15%) showed moderate dysplastic changes, whilst 2 (10%) showed no dysplastic changes. Speculoscopy and acetowhitening was positive in 11 (55%) and collated histological results showed evidence of human papillomavirus infection in 9 patients (45%). As for the control group one case (5%) had evidence of human papillomavirus infection. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection is more common than was previously thought among Iraqi women. It may appear alone or in association with vulval or exophytic cervical warts, or both, and may be more common than the clinically obvious disease. Speculoscopy as an adjunctive method to colposcopy was found to be a simple and an easy to perform technique. Its combination with cytology gave relatively good results when it was used as a triage instrument, and may have a more promising performance in the future. (author)

  12. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer.......HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  13. E6-associated transcription patterns in human papilloma virus 16-positive cervical tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kezhi; Lu, Xulian; Chen, Jun; Zou, Ruanmin; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The change in transcription pattern induced by post-transcriptional RNA splicing is an important mechanism in the regulation of the early gene expression of human papilloma virus (HPV). The present study was conducted to establish a method to specifically amplify HPV-16 E6-associated transcripts. The E6-related transcripts from 63 HPV-16-positive cervical tumor tissue samples were amplified, consisting of eight cases of low-risk intraepithelial lesions, 38 cases of high-risk intraepithelial lesions and 17 cases of cervical cancer (CxCa). The appropriate amplified segments were recovered following agarose gel electrophoresis, and subjected to further sequencing and sequence alignment analysis. Six groups of E6 transcription patterns were identified from HPV-16-positive cervical tumor tissue, including five newly-discovered transcripts. Different HPV-16 E6-associated transcription patterns were detected during the development of CxCa. Over the course of the progression of the low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to CxCa, the specific HPV-16 E6-associated transcription patterns and the dominant transcripts were all different. As indicated by this study, the transcription pattern of the E6 early gene of HPV-16 was closely associated with the stages of cervical carcinogenesis, and may also be involved in the development of CxCa.

  14. Pathogenesis of human papillomavirus-associated mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Ian J; Coleman, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a necessary cause of carcinoma of the cervix and other mucosal epithelia. Key events in high-risk HPV (HRHPV)-associated neoplastic progression include persistent infection, deregulated expression of virus early genes in basal epithelial cells and genomic instability causing secondary host genomic imbalances. There are multiple mechanisms by which deregulated virus early gene expression may be achieved. Integration of virus DNA into host chromosomes is observed in the majority of cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), although in ∼15% of cases the virus remains extrachromosomal (episomal). Interestingly, not all integration events provide a growth advantage to basal cervical epithelial cells or lead to increased levels of the virus oncogenes E6 and E7, when compared with episome-containing basal cells. The factors that provide a competitive advantage to some integrants, but not others, are complex and include virus and host contributions. Gene expression from integrated and episomal HRHPV is regulated through host epigenetic mechanisms affecting the virus long control region (LCR), which appear to be of functional importance. New approaches to treating HRHPV-associated mucosal neoplasia include knockout of integrated HRHPV DNA, depletion of virus transcripts and inhibition of virus early gene transcription through targeting or use of epigenetic modifiers. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Localization of Bovine Papillomavirus Nucleic Acid in Equine Sarcoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, A M; Zhu, K W; Dela Cruz, F N; Affolter, V K; Pesavento, P A

    2016-05-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPV1/BPV2) have long been associated with equine sarcoids; deciphering their contribution has been difficult due to their ubiquitous presence on skin and in the environment, as well as the lack of decent techniques to interrogate their role in pathogenesis. We have developed and characterized an in situ hybridization (ISH) assay that uses a pool of probes complementary to portions of the E5, E6, and E7 genes. This assay is highly sensitive for direct visualization of viral transcript and nucleic acid in routinely processed histopathologic samples. We demonstrate here the visualization of BPV nucleic acid in 18 of 18 equine sarcoids, whereas no detectable viral DNA was present in 15 of 15 nonsarcoid controls by this technique. In nearly 90% (16/18) of the sarcoids, 50% or more of the fibroblastic cell nuclei distributed throughout the neoplasm had detectable hybridization. In the remaining 2 cases, fewer than half of the fibroblastic cells contained detectable hybridization, but viral nucleic acid was also detected in epithelial cells of the sebaceous glands, hair follicles and epidermis. A sensitive ISH assay is an indispensable addition to the molecular methods used to detect viral nucleic acid in tissue. We have used this technique to determine the specific cellular localization and distribution of BPV in a subset of equine sarcoids. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Incidence trends in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Slovenia, 1983-2009: role of human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojan, Primož; Zadnik, Vesna; Šifrer, Robert; Lanišnik, Boštjan; Didanović, Vojislav; Jereb, Sara; Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Gale, Nina

    2015-12-01

    An increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) was observed in several population-based registries and has been attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the present study, we aimed to assess the contribution of HPV infection to the burden of mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Slovenia. For this purpose, data from the nationwide Cancer Registry of Slovenia for cases diagnosed between 1983 and 2009 were analyzed to determine time trends of age-adjusted incidence rates and survival in terms of annual percentage change (APC) for HNSCC in potentially HPV-related and HPV-unrelated sites. In addition, determination of p16 protein, HPV DNA and E6/E7 mRNA was performed in a cohort of OPSCC patients identified from the prospective database for the years 2007-2008. In total, 2,862 cases of HNSCC in potentially HPV-related sites and 7,006 cases in potentially HPV-unrelated sites were identified with decreased incidence observed over the time period in both groups (-0.58; 95 % CI -1.28 to -0.13 and -0.90; 95 % CI -1.23 to -0.57). Regardless of the group, incidence trends for both genders showed a significant decrease in men and increase in women. In a cohort of 99 OPSCC patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2008, 20 (20.2 %) patients had HPV positive tumors and exhibited a superior outcome compared to HPV-negative patients. In conclusion, results of the epidemiologic and histopathologic study confirmed that HPV infection had no major impact on the incidence trends in the Slovenian patients with HNSCC and, specifically, OPSCC during the studied period.

  17. Human Papillomavirus types distribution among women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among females in Angola and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for the development of pre-cancerous squamous intraepithelial lesions. The diversity and frequency of HPV types in Angola has yet to be reported. Aim: to determine the ...

  18. Human papillomavirus DNA in aerodigestive squamous carcinomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of 10 oesophageal and 10 laryngeal squamous carcinomas was examined by means of immuno cytochemistry and in situ DNA hybridisation to demonstrate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Changes in the epithelium adjacent to the carcinoma were found in 5 of 10 oesophageal and 7 of 10 laryngeal ...

  19. Human papillomavirus genotypes and clinical management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral disease in the world. HPV infection of the genital epithelium is associated with genital warts and malignancies of the lower genital tract. Objectives. To describe the distribution, phenotypic appearance and HPV type ...

  20. Asociación molecular entre los papilomavirus y el cáncer de cérvix Molecular association between papillomavirus and cervix cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa la patogénesis del condiloma y el cáncer inducidos por los papilomavirus (PVH, que puede resumirse así: a través de microheridas en el epitelio, el virus infecta las células basa les y en el proceso de cicatrización se activa la proliferación celular con lo que se permite iniciar el ciclo de replicación viral; el producto del gen viral E7 se une a la proteína celular Rb, liberando el factor E2F que induce a la célula a entrar en el ciclo de división. El estado proliferativo debería ser contrarrestado por una respuesta apoptótica que es mediada, en este tipo de células, por la proteína p53. El gen viral E6 inactiva esta proteína con lo que se permite la aparición del condiloma por desequilibrio entre la proliferación y la apoptosis. En el contexto de una replicación celular activa e incontrolada y con la proteína p53 inactivada para cumplir sus funciones proapoptóticas y reparadoras, es muy alta la probabilidad de aparición de una célula maligna. Este panorama se hace más complejo cuando los virus, eventualmente, se integran al genoma celular (10 que es más frecuente en el PVH tipo 18. En este caso el gen regulador E2 se inactiva y consecuentemente aumentan las proteínas E6 y E7. A review is presented on the pathogenesis of condiloma and cancer induced by papillomavirus infection: through minimal epithelial wounds these viruses reach basal cells; cell proliferation is activated in the healing process thereby allowing the viral replication cycle to take place. The product of viral gen E7 joins Rb cell protein releasing the factor (E2F that induces cell division. Proliferation should be opposed by apoptosis mediated by cell protein p53 but viral gen E6 inactivates the latter leading to an imbalance between cell division and death. With the occurrence of active, uncontrolled cell division the likelihood of malignancy development becomes high.

  1. The combinational effect of E6/E7 siRNA and anti-miR-182 on apoptosis induction in HPV16-positive cervical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamidreza; Lotfi, Abbas Sahebghadam; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Mehrani, Hossein; Amani, Jafar; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Hojati, Zahra; Kamali, Mehdi

    2018-06-06

    In the present research, we assumed that reducing the amounts of E6 and E7 oncoproteins by a specific siRNA sequence and recovering p53 and RB proteins, along with the recovery of the FOXO1 protein by applying anti-miR-182, would increase apoptosis and reduce proliferation rate in cancer cells. The HPV16-positive CaSki cervical cancer cell line was used. 48 hours after transfection of siRNA for targeting E6 and E7 oncoproteins and anti-miR-182, expression of its cellular targets p53, p21 and FOXO1 was assessed by real-time PCR, western blot analysis and immunocytofluorescence staining. In all treatments, apoptosis rate and viability were evaluated using Annexin-V-FITC apoptosis detection kits and MTT assays, respectively. Among the designed siRNAs, E6-1 and E7-2 proved the most effective in reducing E6 and E7 expressions by increasing the apoptotic rates to 12.4% and 16%, respectively, after 48 hours. Also, using anti-miR-182 increased apoptotic rate to 12.7% 48 hours after transfection of cervical cancer cells. The combinational use of either E6-1 or E7-2 siRNAs with anti-miR-182 resulted in a rise in apoptosis to 19.3% and 26%, respectively, higher than those obtained from the individual application of either without anti-miR-182. The simultaneous use of siRNA E6-1 and siRNA E7-2 with cisplatin increased sensitivity to cisplatin and reduced the viability of the cancer cells as compared to the use of cisplatin alone. The simultaneous use of cisplatin and anti-miR-182 had no considerable effect on viability or apoptosis rate compared to cisplatin alone.

  2. The influence of proteasome inhibitor MG132, external radiation and unlabeled antibody on the tumor uptake and biodistribution of 188Re-labeled anti-E6 C1P5 antibody in cervical cancer in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaeton, Rébécca; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered a necessary step for the development of cervical cancer and >95% of all cervical cancers have detectable HPV sequences. We have recently demonstrated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) which targeted viral oncoprotein E6 in treatment of experimental cervical cancer We hypothesized that pre-treatment of tumor cells with various agents which cause cell death and/or elevation of E6 levels would increase the accumulation of radiolabeled antibodies to E6 in cervical tumors. Methods HPV-16 positive CasKi cells were treated in vitro with up to 6 Gy of external radiation, or proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or unlabeled anti-E6 antibody C1P5 and cell death was assessed. Biodistribution of 188Rhenium (188Re)-labeled C1P5 antibody was performed in both control and radiation MG-132 treated CasKi tumor-bearing nude mice. Results . 188Re-C1P5 antibody demonstrated tumor specificity and very low uptake and fast clearance from the major organs. The amount of tumor uptake was enhanced by MG-132 but was unaffected by pre-treatment with radiation. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated an unanticipated effect of unlabeled antibody on the amount of cell death, a finding that was suggested by our previous in vivo studies in CasKi tumor model. Conclusion We demonstrated that pre-treatment of cervical tumors with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and with unlabeled antibody to E6 can serve as a means to generate non-viable cancer cells and to elevate the levels of target oncoproteins in the cells for increasing the accumulation of targeted radiolabeled antibodies in tumors. These results favor further development of RIT of cervical cancers targeting viral antigens. PMID:20127955

  3. New World hantaviruses activate IFNlambda production in type I IFN-deficient vero E6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Prescott

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses indigenous to the New World are the etiologic agents of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS. These viruses induce a strong interferon-stimulated gene (ISG response in human endothelial cells. African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells are used to propagate hantaviruses as well as many other viruses. The utility of the Vero E6 cell line for virus production is thought to owe to their lack of genes encoding type I interferons (IFN, rendering them unable to mount an efficient innate immune response to virus infection. Interferon lambda, a more recently characterized type III IFN, is transcriptionally controlled much like the type I IFNs, and activates the innate immune system in a similar manner.We show that Vero E6 cells respond to hantavirus infection by secreting abundant IFNlambda. Three New World hantaviruses were similarly able to induce IFNlambda expression in this cell line. The IFNlambda contained within virus preparations generated with Vero E6 cells independently activates ISGs when used to infect several non-endothelial cell lines, whereas innate immune responses by endothelial cells are specifically due to viral infection. We show further that Sin Nombre virus replicates to high titer in human hepatoma cells (Huh7 without inducing ISGs.Herein we report that Vero E6 cells respond to viral infection with a highly active antiviral response, including secretion of abundant IFNlambda. This cytokine is biologically active, and when contained within viral preparations and presented to human epithelioid cell lines, results in the robust activation of innate immune responses. We also show that both Huh7 and A549 cell lines do not respond to hantavirus infection, confirming that the cytoplasmic RNA helicase pathways possessed by these cells are not involved in hantavirus recognition. We demonstrate that Vero E6 actively respond to virus infection and inhibiting IFNlambda production in these cells might increase their utility

  4. Interferon-β induced microRNA-129-5p down-regulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression by targeting SP1 in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV can cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cancer. Down-regulation of E6 and E7 expression may be responsible for the positive clinical outcomes observed with IFN treatment, but the molecular basis has not been well determined. As miRNAs play an important role in HPV induced cervical carcinogenesis, we hypothesize that IFN-β can regulate the expressions of specific miRNAs in cervical cancer cells, and that these miRNAs can mediate E6 and E7 expression, thus modulate their oncogenic potential. In this study, we found that miR-129-5p to be a candidate IFN-β inducible miRNA. MiR-129-5p levels gradually decrease with the development of cervical intraepithelial lesions. Manipulation of miR-129-5p expression in Hela cells modulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression. Exogenous miR-129-5p inhibits cell proliferation in Hela cells, promotes apoptosis and blocks cell cycle progression in Hela cells. SP1 is a direct target of miR-129-5p in Hela cells. This study is the first report of a cellular miRNA with anti-HPV activity and provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms between the HPV and the IFN system in host cells at the miRNA level.

  5. Signatures of exotic fermions and other new ''low-energy'' phenomena in superstring E6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1986-03-01

    Superstring theories have drawn renewed attention to the exceptional group E 6 as a grand unified theory. We discuss the extra U(1) symmetries (beyond that in the standard SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model) that arise when E 6 is broken in such theories. These extra U(1)'s must lead to at least one extra neutral gauge boson, called Z', for which we give mass limits and branching ratios. Neutral current effects of this Z' and its direct production are discussed briefly. Finally, some signatures are noted of exotic fermions to which Z' can decay

  6. The association between human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walvik, Lena; Svensson, Amanda Björk; Friborg, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    carcinoma using the Bradford Hill criteria. The strength of the association is supported by, detection of human papillomavirus infection and antibodies prior to oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This is furthermore reinforced by the absence of human papillomavirus DNA in healthy tonsils...... incidence in human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is associated with sexual behaviour. These associations have been repeatedly observed and are in accordance with our current knowledge. The time relation between cause and effect remains the main challenge, due to the lack...... of well-defined premalignant lesions. However, a causal relationship between human papillomavirus infection and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma seems evident....

  7. An enhanced heterologous virus-like particle for human papillomavirus type 16 tumour immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairunadwa Jemon

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk, cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPV and is the second highest cause of cancer deaths in women globally. The majority of cervical cancers express well-characterized HPV oncogenes, which are potential targets for immunotherapeutic vaccination. Here we develop a rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccine designed for immunotherapy against HPV16 positive tumours. An RHDV-VLP, modified to contain the universal helper T cell epitope PADRE and decorated with an MHC I-restricted peptide (aa 48-57 from the HPV16 E6, was tested for its immunotherapeutic efficacy against the TC-1 HPV16 E6 and E7-expressing tumour in mice. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE was administered therapeutically for the treatment of a pre-existing TC-1 tumour and was delivered with antibodies either to deplete regulatory T cells (anti-CD25 or to block T cell suppression mediated through CTLA-4. As a result, the tumour burden was reduced by around 50% and the median survival time of mice to the humane endpoint was almost doubled the compared to controls. The incorporation of PADRE into the RHDV-VLP was necessary for an E6-specific enhancement of the anti-tumour response and the co-administration of the immune modifying antibodies contributed to the overall efficacy of the immunotherapy. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE shows immunotherapeutic efficacy, prolonging survival for HPV tumour-bearing mice. This was enhanced by the systemic administration of immune-modifying antibodies that are commercially available for use in humans. There is potential to further modify these particles for even greater efficacy in the path to development of an immunotherapeutic treatment for HPV precancerous and cancer stages.

  8. Prevalence of the integration status for human papillomavirus 16 in esophageal carcinoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Shen, Haie; Li, Ji; Hou, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ke; Li, Jintao

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the etiology of esophageal cancer (EC) related with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Fresh surgically resected tissue samples and clinical information were obtained from 189 patients. Genomic DNA was extracted, and HPV was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with HPV L1 gene primers of MY09/11; HPV16 was detected using HPV16 E6 type-specific primer sets. Copies of HPV16 E2, E6, and the human housekeeping gene β-actin were tested using quantitative PCR to analyze the relationship between HPV16 integration and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the relationship between the HPV16 integration status and clinical information of patients. Of the 189 samples, 168 HPV-positive samples were detected, of which 76 were HPV16 positive. Among the HPV16 positive samples, 2 cases (E2/E6 ratio>1) were 2.6% (2/76) purely episomal, 65 (E2/E6 ratio between 0 and 1) were 85.6% (65/76) mixture of integrated and episomal, and 9 (E2/E6 ratio=0) were 11.8% (9/76) purely integrated. The results indicate that integration of HPV16 was more common in the host genome than in the episome genome. The prevalence rate of HPV16 integration is increasing with the pathological stage progression of esophageal carcinoma (EC). A high prevalence of HPV16 suggested that HPV16 has an etiological effect on the progress of EC. Integration of HPV16 is more common than episome genome in the host cells, indicating that continuous HPV infection is the key to esophageal epithelial cell malignant conversion and canceration.

  9. Occupational Analysis Products: Operations Management- AFSC 3E6X1 (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    computer laser optical disc (CD-ROM); 4 3/4 in.; 23.4 MB. SYSTEMS DETAIL NOTE: ABSTRACT: This is a report of an occupational survey of the Operations ... Management (AFSC 3E6X1, OSSN 2560, Feb 04) career ladder, conducted by the Occupational Analysis Flight, AFOMS. The OSR reports the findings of current

  10. Superstring motivated gauge models based on a rank six subgroup of E6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarides, G.; Panagiotakopoulos, C.; Shafi, Q.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss gauge models based on a superstring motivated rank six subgroup of E 6 . Lepton number is an accidental unbroken symmetry of the models which leads to an essential stable proton. One of the neutral gauge bosons couples to B-L and may have mass below a TeV. (orig.)

  11. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Stillo, Michela; Carrillo Santisteve, Paloma; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Between 2006 and 2009, two different human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccines were licensed for use: a quadrivalent (qHPVv) and a bivalent (bHPVv) vaccine. Since 2008, HPV vaccination programmes have been implemented in the majority of the industrialized countries. Since 2013, HPV vaccination has been part of the national programs of 66 countries including almost all countries in North America and Western Europe. Despite all the efforts made by individual countries, coverage ra...

  12. Functional Crosstalk between Human Papillomaviruses and Lentiviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Pryszlak, Anna Marta

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and human immunodeficiency virus‐1 (HIV‐1) are human pathogens of high biomedical significance worldwide. Interestingly, increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that individuals with active HPV infections possess an enhanced risk of being infected by HIV‐1. These findings raise the possibility that HPVs may directly or indirectly increase the pathogenicity of lentiviruses, such as HIV‐1. Using a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus‐G‐(VSV‐G)‐pseudotype...

  13. Characterization of two novel cutaneous human papillomaviruses, HPV93 and HPV96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Hazard, Kristina; Eliasson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Two novel human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV93 and HPV96, with genomes of 7450 and 7438 bp, respectively, are described. The L1 open reading frame of HPV93 showed highest identity to HPV24 (79%) and that of HPV96 had highest identity to HPV92 (71%). Real-time PCR for HPV92, 93 and 96 on stripped ...... per 45 cells to one copy per 10,000 cells. The E7 proteins of HPV92, 93 and 96 were found to bind the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). These results suggest a possible role for these HPV types in skin carcinogenesis that deserves further study....

  14. Role of Human Papillomavirus in Penile Carcinomas Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, Laia; Cubilla, Antonio; Halec, Gordana; Kasamatsu, Elena; Quirós, Beatriz; Masferrer, Emili; Tous, Sara; Lloveras, Belén; Hernández-Suarez, Gustavo; Lonsdale, Ray; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Alejo, Maria; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Laco, Jan; Guimerà, Nuria; Poblet, Enrique; Lombardi, Luis E; Bergeron, Christine; Clavero, Omar; Shin, Hai-Rim; Ferrera, Annabelle; Felix, Ana; Germar, Julieta; Mandys, Vaclav; Clavel, Christine; Tzardi, Maria; Pons, Luis E; Wain, Vincent; Cruz, Eugenia; Molina, Carla; Mota, Jose D; Jach, Robert; Velasco, Julio; Carrilho, Carla; López-Revilla, Ruben; Goodman, Marc T; Quint, Wim G; Castellsagué, Xavier; Bravo, Ignacio; Pawlita, Michael; Muñoz, Nubia; Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Invasive penile cancer is a rare disease with an approximately 22 000 cases per year. The incidence is higher in less developed countries, where penile cancer can account for up to 10% of cancers among men in some parts of Africa, South America, and Asia. To describe the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA prevalence, HPV type distribution, and detection of markers of viral activity (ie, E6*I mRNA and p16(INK4a)) in a series of invasive penile cancers and penile high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSILs) from 25 countries. A total of 85 penile HGSILs and 1010 penile invasive cancers diagnosed from 1983 to 2011 were included. After histopathologic evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping were performed using the SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system, v.1 (Laboratory Biomedical Products, Rijswijk, The Netherlands). HPV DNA-positive cases were additionally tested for oncogene E6*I mRNA and all cases for p16(INK4a) expression, a surrogate marker of oncogenic HPV activity. HPV DNA prevalence and type distributions were estimated. HPV DNA was detected in 33.1% of penile cancers (95% confidence interval [CI], 30.2-36.1) and in 87.1% of HGSILs (95% CI, 78.0-93.4). The warty-basaloid histologic subtype showed the highest HPV DNA prevalence. Among cancers, statistically significant differences in prevalence were observed only by geographic region and not by period or by age at diagnosis. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both HPV-positive cancers (68.7%) and HGSILs (79.6%). HPV6 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.7%). The p16(INK4a) upregulation and mRNA detection in addition to HPV DNA positivity were observed in 69.3% of HGSILs, and at least one of these HPV activity markers was detected in 85.3% of cases. In penile cancers, these figures were 22.0% and 27.1%, respectively. About a third to a fourth of penile cancers were related to HPV when considering HPV DNA detection alone or adding an HPV

  15. Absence of an association of human polyomavirus and papillomavirus infection with lung cancer in China: a nested case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombara, Danny V.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Carter, Joseph J.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Weiss, Noel S.; Hughes, James P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Taylor, Philip R.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of human polyomavirus (HPyV) infection and lung cancer are limited and those regarding the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and lung cancer have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a nested case–control study to assess the association between incident lung cancer of various histologies and evidence of prior infection with HPyVs and HPVs. We selected serum from 183 cases and 217 frequency matched controls from the Yunnan Tin Miner’s Cohort study, which was designed to identify biomarkers for early detection of lung cancer. Using multiplex liquid bead microarray (LBMA) antibody assays, we tested for antibodies to the VP1 structural protein and small T antigen (ST-Ag) of Merkel cell, KI, and WU HPyVs. We also tested for antibodies against HPV L1 structural proteins (high-risk types 16, 18, 31, 33, 52, and 58 and low-risk types 6 and 11) and E6 and E7 oncoproteins (high risk types 16 and 18). Measures of antibody reactivity were log transformed and analyzed using logistic regression. We found no association between KIV, WUV, and MCV antibody levels and incident lung cancer (P-corrected for multiple comparisons >0.10 for all trend tests). We also found no association with HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, 52, and 58 seropositivity (P-corrected for multiple comparisons >0.05 for all). Future studies of infectious etiologies of lung cancer should look beyond HPyVs and HPVs as candidate infectious agents. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2381-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. New signals for vector-like down-type quark in U(1) of E_6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kasinath; Li, Tianjun; Nandi, S.; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    We consider the pair production of vector-like down-type quarks in an E_6 motivated model, where each of the produced down-type vector-like quark decays into an ordinary Standard Model light quark and a singlet scalar. Both the vector-like quark and the singlet scalar appear naturally in the E_6 model with masses at the TeV scale with a favorable choice of symmetry breaking pattern. We focus on the non-standard decay of the vector-like quark and the new scalar which decays to two photons or two gluons. We analyze the signal for the vector-like quark production in the 2γ +≥ 2j channel and show how the scalar and vector-like quark masses can be determined at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Dimensional reduction of exceptional E6,E8 gauge groups and flavour chirality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ten-dimensional Yang - Mills gauge theories based on the exceptional groups E 6 and E 8 are reduced to four-dimensional flavour-chiral Yang - Mills - Higgs theories where the extra six dimensions are identified with the compact G 2 /SU(3) and SO(7)/SO(6) coset spaces. A ten-dimensional E 8 theory leads to three families of SU(5), one of which lies in the 144-dimensional representation of SO(10)

  18. Single W production from heavy Z decay in E6 theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1987-02-01

    We examine the production of single W bosons in the decay of heavy Z bosons, which are present in the low energy limit of E 6 grand unified theories, via the process Z' → W + l - anti nu/sub l/. The branching ratio for this process is found to be sensitive to the Z'-fermion couplings as well as the amount of mixing between Z' and the usual standard model Z over a wide range of Z' masses

  19. Human papillomavirus and tumours of the eye region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian

    2005-01-01

    ophthalmology, lacrimal sac, tear sac, papilloma, carcinoma, papillomavirus, HPV, polymerase chain reaction, PCR, RNA, DNA, in situ hybridisation, aetiology, conjunctiva, dysplasia, sex, age, distribution......ophthalmology, lacrimal sac, tear sac, papilloma, carcinoma, papillomavirus, HPV, polymerase chain reaction, PCR, RNA, DNA, in situ hybridisation, aetiology, conjunctiva, dysplasia, sex, age, distribution...

  20. IFN-β antiproliferative effect and miRNA regulation in Human Papilloma Virus E6- and E7-transformed keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiantore, Maria Vincenza; Mangino, Giorgio; Iuliano, Marco; Zangrillo, Maria Simona; De Lillis, Ilaria; Vaccari, Gabriele; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer although other types of cancers are associated with HPV infection. Type I Interferons can interfere with HPV E6- and/or E7-dependent transformation and can affect microRNA (miRNA) expression. Cancer cells show a specific pattern of miRNA expression and HPVs are able to modulate miRNAs expressed in infected cells. Keratinocytes transduced with E6 and E7 from mucosal HPV-16 or cutaneous HPV-38 (K16 and K38) were studied to analyze the involvement of HPV oncoproteins in the anti-proliferative activity of IFN-β. In view of our previous data showing senescence induction by the cytokine in K38 cells, we observe that IFN-β treatment leads to p53-indipendent apoptosis in K16 cells whereas induces senescence in K16 cells if E6 is silenced and p53 expression is restored. The levels of selected miRNAs, deregulated in K16 and K38 cells, can be modulated by IFN-β when E6 and E7 proteins of HPV-16, but not HPV-38, are expressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  2. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Patel, Hetalkumar D; Sapp, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  3. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  4. The fanconi anemia pathway limits human papillomavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Morreale, Richard J; Werner, Stephen P; Higginbotham, Jennifer M; Laimins, Laimonis A; Lambert, Paul F; Brown, Darron R; Gillison, Maura L; Nuovo, Gerard J; Witte, David P; Kim, Mi-Ok; Davies, Stella M; Mehta, Parinda A; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Wells, Susanne I

    2012-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) deregulate epidermal differentiation and cause anogenital and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The E7 gene is considered the predominant viral oncogene and drives proliferation and genome instability. While the implementation of routine screens has greatly reduced the incidence of cervical cancers which are almost exclusively HPV positive, the proportion of HPV-positive head and neck SCCs is on the rise. High levels of HPV oncogene expression and genome load are linked to disease progression, but genetic risk factors that regulate oncogene abundance and/or genome amplification remain poorly understood. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized at least in part by extreme susceptibility to SCCs. FA results from mutations in one of 15 genes in the FA pathway, whose protein products assemble in the nucleus and play important roles in DNA damage repair. We report here that loss of FA pathway components FANCA and FANCD2 stimulates E7 protein accumulation in human keratinocytes and causes increased epithelial proliferation and basal cell layer expansion in the HPV-positive epidermis. Additionally, FANCD2 loss stimulates HPV genome amplification in differentiating cells, demonstrating that the intact FA pathway functions to restrict the HPV life cycle. These findings raise the possibility that FA genes suppress HPV infection and disease and suggest possible mechanism(s) for reported associations of HPV with an FA cohort in Brazil and for allelic variation of FA genes with HPV persistence in the general population.

  5. Photochemical Targeting Of Phagocytic Trabecular Meshwork Cells Using Chlorin E6 Coupled Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latina, M. A.; Kobsa, P. H.; Rakestraw, S. L.; Crean, E. A.; Hasan, T.; Yarmush, M. L.

    1989-03-01

    We have investigated a novel and efficient delivery system utilizing photosensitizer-coupled-latex microspheres to photochemically target and kill phagocytic trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. TM cells are the most actively phagocytic cells within the anterior chamber of the eye and are located within an optically accessible discrete band. This delivery system, along with the property of cell photocytosis, will achieve double selectivity by combining preferential localization of the photosensitizer to the target cells with spatial localization of illumination on the target cells. All experiments were performed with preconfluent bovine TM cells, 3rd to 4th passage, plated in 15 mm wells. Chlorin e6 monoethylene diamine monoamide was conjugated to the surface of 1.0 Am MX Duke Scientific fluorescent latex microspheres. Spectroscopic analysis revealed an average of 1.3 x 10 -17 moles of chlorin e6 per microsphere. TM cells were incubated for 18 hours with 5 x 10 7 microspheres/ml in MEM with 10% FCS, washed with MEM, and irradiated through fresh media using an argon-pumped dye laser emitting .2 W at 660 nm. A dose-survival study indicated that energy doses of 10 J/cm2 or greater resulted in greater than 95% cell death as determined by ethidium bromide exclusion. Cell death could be demonstrated as early as 4 hours post-irradiation. TM cells incubated with a solution of chlorin e6 at a concentration equal to that conjugated to the microspheres showed no cell death. Unirradiated controls also showed no cell death.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria using polyethylenimine-chlorin(e6) conjugates: Effect of polymer molecular weight, substitution ratio of chlorin(e6) and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyi; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Xuan, Yi; Azhibek, Dulat; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) is a novel technique to treat local infections. Previously we reported that the attachment of chlorin(e6) to polyethylenimine (PEI) polymers to form PEI-ce6 conjugates is an effective way to improve ce6 PDT activity against bacteria. The aim of this work was to explore how the polymer molecular weight, substitution ratio (SR) of ce6 and pH value affect the PDT efficacy. We have synthesized PEI-ce6(10) (MW = 60,000, SR = 1) and PEI-ce6(11) (MW = 60,000, SR = 5) and compared these with the previous PEI-ce6(9) (MW = 10,000, SR = 1). We tested the PDT efficacy of these three conjugates against Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and E. fecalis) at three different pH values (5.0, 7.4, 10.0) that may affect the charge on both the bacterial cells and on the conjugate (that has both basic and acidic groups). PEI-ce6(9) and PEI-ce6(10) were the most effective against these tested bacteria. The PDT effect of all three conjugates depended on pH values. The effective order was pH = 10.0 > pH = 7.4 > pH = 5.0 on E. coli. For S. aureus and E. fecalis the order was pH = 5.0 > pH = 10.0 > pH = 7.4. PEI-ce6(11) PDT activity was worse than PEI-ce6(10) activity which is probably connected to the fact that ce6 molecules are self-quenched within the PEI-ce6(11) molecule. Ce6 quenching within the PEI-ce6 molecules was proved by analyzing fluorescence spectra of PEI-ce6 conjugates at different pH values. There were no differences in bacterial uptake between different pH values in three PEI-ce6 conjugates. We assume high pH (rather than low pH as was hypothesized) disaggregates the conjugates, so the higher pH was more effective than the lower pH against E. coli. But for Gram-positive bacteria, low pH was more effective possibly due to more overall positive charge on the conjugate. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Optimization of multimeric human papillomavirus L2 vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashini Jagu

    Full Text Available We sought to define the protective epitopes within the amino terminus of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 minor capsid protein L2. Passive transfer of mice with rabbit antisera to HPV16 L2 peptides 17-36, 32-51 and 65-81 provided significant protection against vaginal HPV16 challenge, whereas antisera to 47-66, 108-120 or 373-392 did not. Vaccination with L1 virus-like particles induces a high titer, but generally type-restricted neutralizing antibody response. Conversely, vaccination with L2 11-88, especially multimers thereof, induces antibodies that neutralize a broad range of papillomavirus types, albeit at lower titers than for L1 VLP. With the intent of enhancing the immunogenicity and the breadth of protection by focusing the immune response to the key protective epitopes, we designed L2 fusion proteins consisting of residues ∼11-88 of eight divergent mucosal HPV types 6, 16, 18, 31, 39, 51, 56, 73 (11-88×8 or residues ∼13-47 of fifteen HPV types (13-47×15. The 11-88×8 was significantly more immunogenic than 13-47×15 in Balb/c mice regardless of the adjuvant used, suggesting the value of including the 65-81 protective epitope in the vaccine. Since the L2 47-66 peptide antiserum failed to elicit significant protection, we generated an 11-88×8 construct deleted for this region in each subunit (11-88×8Δ. Mice were vaccinated with 11-88×8 and 11-88×8Δ to determine if deletion of this non-protective epitope enhanced the neutralizing antibody response. However, 11-88×8Δ was significantly less immunogenic than 11-88×8, and even the addition of a known T helper epitope, PADRE, to the construct (11-88×8ΔPADRE failed to recover the immunogenicity of 11-88×8 in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that while L2 47-66 is not a critical protective or T helper epitope, it nevertheless contributes to the immunogenicity of the L2 11-88×8 multimer vaccine.

  8. Vectorlike particles, Z′ and Yukawa unification in F-theory inspired E6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Karozas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the low energy implications of an F-theory inspired E6 model whose breaking yields, in addition to the MSSM gauge symmetry, a Z′ gauge boson associated with a U(1 symmetry broken at the TeV scale. The zero mode spectrum of the effective low energy theory is derived from the decomposition of the 27 and 27‾ representations of E6 and we parametrise their multiplicities in terms of a minimum number of flux parameters. We perform a two-loop renormalisation group analysis of the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the effective theory model and estimate lower bounds on the new vectorlike particles predicted in the model. We compute the third generation Yukawa couplings in an F-theory context assuming an E8 point of enhancement and express our results in terms of the local flux densities associated with the gauge symmetry breaking. We find that their values are compatible with the ones computed by the renormalisation group equations, and we identify points in the parameter space of the flux densities where the t−b−τ Yukawa couplings unify.

  9. Vectorlike particles, Z‧ and Yukawa unification in F-theory inspired E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karozas, Athanasios; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2018-03-01

    We explore the low energy implications of an F-theory inspired E6 model whose breaking yields, in addition to the MSSM gauge symmetry, a Z‧ gauge boson associated with a U (1) symmetry broken at the TeV scale. The zero mode spectrum of the effective low energy theory is derived from the decomposition of the 27 and 27 ‾ representations of E6 and we parametrise their multiplicities in terms of a minimum number of flux parameters. We perform a two-loop renormalisation group analysis of the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the effective theory model and estimate lower bounds on the new vectorlike particles predicted in the model. We compute the third generation Yukawa couplings in an F-theory context assuming an E8 point of enhancement and express our results in terms of the local flux densities associated with the gauge symmetry breaking. We find that their values are compatible with the ones computed by the renormalisation group equations, and we identify points in the parameter space of the flux densities where the t - b - τ Yukawa couplings unify.

  10. Update of KASHIL-E6 library for shielding analysis and benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Kil, C. S.; Jang, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    For various shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications, a pseudo-problem-independent neutron-photon coupled MATXS-format library based on the last release of ENDF/B-VI has been generated as a part of the update program for KASHIL-E6, which was based on ENDF/B-VI.5. It has VITAMIN-B6 neutron and photon energy group structures, i.e., 199 groups for neutron and 42 groups for photon. The neutron and photon weighting functions and the Legendre order of scattering are same as KASHIL-E6. The library has been validated through some benchmarks: the PCA-REPLICA and NESDIP-2 experiments for LWR pressure vessel facility benchmark, the Winfrith Iron88 experiment for validation of iron data, and the Winfrith Graphite experiment for validation of graphite data. These calculations were performed by the TRANSXlDANTSYS code system. In addition, the substitutions of the JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.0 data for Fe, Cr, Cu and Ni, which are very important nuclides for shielding analyses, were investigated to estimate the effects on the benchmark calculation results

  11. The 3' region of Human Papillomavirus type 16 early mRNAs decrease expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, J.; Rosenstierne, M.W.; Kristiansen, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Background: High risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infects mucosal surfaces and HR-HPV infection is required for development of cervical cancer. Accordingly, enforced expression of the early HR-HPV proteins can induce immortalisation of human cells. In most cervical cancers and cervical cancer...... cell lines the HR-HPV double stranded DNA genome has been integrated into the host cell genome. Methods: We have used a retroviral GUS reporter system to generate pools of stably transfected HaCaT and SiHa cells. The HPV-16 early sequences that are deleted upon integration of the HPV-16 genome...

  12. Human papillomavirus 33 worldwide genetic variation and associated risk of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Boon, Debby; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D.; De Vuyst, Hugo; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 33, a member of the HPV16-related alpha-9 species group, is found in approximately 5% of cervical cancers worldwide. The current study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of HPV33 and to explore the association of HPV33 variants with the risk for cervical cancer. Taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank, we sequenced the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 213 HPV33-positive cervical samples from 30 countries. We identified 28 HPV33 variants that formed 5 phylogenetic groups: the previously identified A1, A2, and B (sub) lineages and the novel A3 and C (sub)lineages. The A1 sublineage was strongly over-represented in cervical cases compared to controls in both Africa and Europe. In conclusion, we provide a classification system for HPV33 variants based on the sequence of E6 and E7 and suggest that the association of HPV33 with cervical cancer may differ by variant (sub)lineage. PMID:24314666

  13. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  14. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Zappacosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+. p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure.

  15. Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization and p16/Ki67 Dual Staining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Specimens: Correlation with HPV-DNA Test, E6/E7 mRNA Test, and Potential Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Colasante, Antonella; Viola, Patrizia; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Capanna, Serena; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Rosini, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Although HPV-DNA test and E6/E7 mRNA analyses remain the current standard for the confirmation of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in cytological specimens, no universally adopted techniques exist for the detection of HPV in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Particularly, in routine laboratories, molecular assays are still time-consuming and would require a high level of expertise. In this study, we investigated the possible use of a novel HPV tyramide-based chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) technology to locate HPV on tissue specimens. Then, we evaluate the potential usefulness of p16INK4a/Ki-67 double stain on histological samples, to identify cervical cells expressing HPV E6/E7 oncogenes. In our series, CISH showed a clear signal in 95.2% of the specimens and reached a sensitivity of 86.5%. CISH positivity always matched with HPV-DNA positivity, while 100% of cases with punctated signal joined with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). p16/Ki67 immunohistochemistry gave an interpretable result in 100% of the cases. The use of dual stain significantly increased the agreement between pathologists, which reached 100%. Concordance between dual stain and E6/E7 mRNA test was 89%. In our series, both CISH and p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain demonstrated high grade of performances. In particular, CISH would help to distinguish episomal from integrated HPV, in order to allow conclusions regarding the prognosis of the lesion, while p16INK4a/Ki67 dual stain approach would confer a high level of standardization to the diagnostic procedure. PMID:24369532

  16. Characterization of a transcriptional promoter of human papillomavirus 18 and modulation of its expression by simian virus 40 and adenovirus early antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, F.; Heard, J.M.; Dartmann, K.; Yaniv, M.

    1987-01-01

    RNA present in cells derived from cervical carcinoma that contained human papillomavirus 18 genomes was initiated in the 1.053-kilobase BamHI fragment that covered the complete noncoding region of this virus. When cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, this viral fragment directed the expression of the bacterial enzyme only in the sense orientation. Initiation sites were mapped around the ATG of open reading frame E6. This promoter was active in some human and simian cell lines, and its expression was modulated positively by simian virus 40 large T antigen and negatively by adenovirus type 5 E1a antigen

  17. Papillomavirus E2 induces senescence in HPV-positive cells via pRB- and p21CIP-dependent pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, Susanne I.; Francis, Delicia A.; Karpova, Alla Y.; Dowhanick, Jennifer J.; Benson, John D.; Howley, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    A hallmark of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated carcinogenesis is the integration of the viral DNA into the cellular genome, usually accompanied by the loss of expression of the viral E2 gene. E2 binds to and represses the viral promoter directing expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. The re-introduction and expression of exogenous E2 in HPV-positive cancer cells results in cellular growth arrest, while growth in the context of exogenous E2 can be restored through the expression of exoge...

  18. E2, E4, and E6 statistical decay spectra in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.; Dias, H.

    1989-01-01

    Statistical decay spectra for the decay of giant resonances in 208 Pb by one neutron emission are calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism and the experimental levels of the residual nucleus. The predicted decay spectra are compared with available experimental results. It is shown that the decay spectra are sensitive to multipole ad-mixtures of the excited state and can be used to study such admixtures. The available experimental data for the decay of the E2 resonances in 208 Pb contain spurious peaks that do not belong to the spectrum of 207 Pb. Theuuncertainty of the experimental data make it impossible to decide whether the decay is purely E2 or a mixture of 80% E2 plus 20% E6. (author) [pt

  19. Higgs boson production via Z, W bosons and toponium in the E6 superstring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Whisnant, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examine the production of light Higgs bosons associated with electroweak symmetry-breaking in an E 6 superstring model in Z ω HZ * decays, in e + e - annihilation and in toponium decays. They find that the couplings of the lightest scalar Higgs boson H 1 0 in these models are very similar to those of the standard Higgs boson unless the pseudoscalar P 0 in the model has mass ≤ M z . Possible new modes for Higgs boson production not found in the standard model are presented. The authors give simple analytic expressions for the Higgs boson masses and mixing angles in the limit that the extra Z' gauge boson is heavy which clearly shows the production mechanisms that are favored for a given set of model parameters

  20. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types 11, 16 and 18 in cervical swabs. A study of 1362 pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørding, U.; Iversen, A.K.N.; Sebbelov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Med. mikrobiologi, papillomavirus, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, filter in situ hybridisation......Med. mikrobiologi, papillomavirus, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, filter in situ hybridisation...

  2. School-based human papillomavirus vaccination: An opportunity to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School-based human papillomavirus vaccination: An opportunity to increase knowledge about cervical cancer and improve uptake of ... Poor knowledge about cervical cancer plays a role in limiting screening uptake. HPV ... Article Metrics.

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA with in situ hybridisation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral squamous carcinoma in the west of the Northern ... Immunocytochemistry for viral antigen was negative in all the specimens. HPV-18 was ...

  4. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosa Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa, whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67% patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS (median 4.59 years compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P=0.0381. In multivariate analysis age (P<0.001, Gleason score (P<0.001, nuclear grading (P=0.002, and HPV status (P=0.034 were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis.

  5. Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection Induces VAP-Dependent Endosomal Tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Abida; Massimi, Paola; Pim, David; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Banks, Lawrence

    2018-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection involves complex interactions with the endocytic transport machinery, which ultimately facilitates the entry of the incoming viral genomes into the trans -Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent nuclear entry during mitosis. The endosomal pathway is a highly dynamic intracellular transport system, which consists of vesicular compartments and tubular extensions, although it is currently unclear whether incoming viruses specifically alter the endocytic machinery. In this study, using MICAL-L1 as a marker for tubulating endosomes, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a profound alteration in global levels of endocytic tubulation. In addition, we also show a critical requirement for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored protein VAP in this process. VAP plays an essential role in actin nucleation and endosome-to-Golgi transport. Indeed, the loss of VAP results in a dramatic decrease in the level of endosomal tubulation induced by incoming HPV-16 virions. This is also accompanied by a marked reduction in virus infectivity. In VAP knockdown cells, we see that the defect in virus trafficking occurs after capsid disassembly but prior to localization at the trans -Golgi network, with the incoming virion-transduced DNA accumulating in Vps29/TGN46-positive hybrid vesicles. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that infection with HPV-16 virions induces marked alterations of endocytic transport pathways, some of which are VAP dependent and required for the endosome-to-Golgi transport of the incoming viral L2/DNA complex. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus infectious entry involves multiple interactions with the endocytic transport machinery. In this study, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a dramatic increase in endocytic tubulation. This tubulation requires ER-associated VAP, which plays a critical role in ensuring the delivery of cargoes from the endocytic compartments to the trans -Golgi network. Indeed, the loss of

  6. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Antonia; Pozzi, Eleana; Pacchioni, Sole; Zanotto, Carlo; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli

    2010-04-21

    Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP) recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6) and E7 (FPE7) transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  7. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacchioni Sole

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6 and E7 (FPE7 transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  8. Human papillomavirus type 16 molecular variants in Guarani Indian women from Misiones, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonon, Sergio Andrés; Basiletti, Jorge; Badano, Ines; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Villa, Luisa Lina; Teyssie, Angélica Rita; Picconi, María Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    To identify human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 and L1 molecular variants infecting Guarani Indian women settled in Misiones, Argentina, a region with a high prevalence of cervical cancer. Some intratypic molecular variants of HPV16 have been associated with greater oncogenic risk, but their implication in the etiology of cervical cancer is still uncertain. Seventy HPV16 positive cervical samples from Guarani Indian women settled in two different areas of Misiones, Argentina, (34 from the northern area and 36 from the central area), were analyzed. Thirty-seven had normal cytology, 18 had a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL), and 15 a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL). HPV16 E6 and L1 molecular variants were identified by PCR, followed by dot blot hybridization with 23 and 12 biotinylated oligonucleotide probes, respectively. The frequency of HPV16 variants over the Guarani population was 51% EP (European prototype), 32% E-350G, 9% Af1-a (African 1), 4% E-6862C, 3% Af2-a, and 1% AA-a (Asian-American). The distribution of variants was not homogeneous in the two areas under analysis, with the northern area being more diverse showing 74% of European variants, while the central area presented exclusively E variants. No statistically significant association was found between any particular variant and grade of cervical lesion. This study reports for the first time HPV16 E6 and L1 molecular variants infecting women from an aboriginal community inhabiting a rainforest region of South America. The presence of E class variants could be attributed primarily to contacts with the Spanish conquerors, and Af variants from African slaves introduced later in the South American continent.

  9. Biological relevance of human papillomaviruses in vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Quiros, Beatriz; Clavero, Omar; Höfler, Daniela; Alejo, Maria; Quint, Wim; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    The carcinogenic role of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in the increasing subset of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and vulvar cancer in young women has been established. However, the actual number of vulvar cancer cases attributed to HPV is still imprecisely defined. In an attempt to provide a more precise definition of HPV-driven vulvar cancer, we performed HPV-type-specific E6*I mRNA analyses available for 20 HR-/possible HR (pHR)-HPV types, on tissue samples from 447 cases of vulvar cancer. HPV DNA genotyping was performed using SPF10-LiPA 25 assay due to its high sensitivity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Data on p16 INK4a expression was available for comparative analysis via kappa statistics. The use of highly sensitive assays covering the detection of HPV mRNA in a broad spectrum of mucosal HPV types resulted in the detection of viral transcripts in 87% of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers. Overall concordance between HPV mRNA+ and p16 INK4a upregulation (strong, diffuse immunostaining in >25% of tumor cells) was 92% (K=0.625, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.531-0.719). Among these cases, 83% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA+ and p16 INK4a + and 9% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA- and p16 INK4a -. Our data confirm the biological role of HR-/pHR-HPV types in the great majority of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers, resulting in an HPV-attributable fraction of at least 21% worldwide. Most HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers were associated with HPV16 (85%), but a causative role for other, less frequently occurring mucosal HPV types (HPV26, 66, 67, 68, 70 and 73) was also confirmed at the mRNA level for the first time. These findings should be taken into consideration for future screening options as HPV-associated vulvar preneoplastic lesions have increased in incidence in younger women and require different treatment than vulvar lesions that develop from rare autoimmune-related mechanisms in older women.

  10. Human papillomavirus 16 infection predicts poor outcome in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

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    Xi R

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ruxing Xi,1 Xiaozhi Zhang,1 Xin Chen,1 Shupei Pan,1 Beina Hui,1 Li Zhang,1 Shenbo Fu,1 Xiaolong Li,2 Xuanwei Zhang,1 Tuotuo Gong,1 Jia Guo,1 Shaomin Che1 1Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The People’s Liberation Army 323 Hospital, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China Background: Previous studies indicate that human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 infection plays a pivotal role in the etiology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. We aim to detect the influence of HPV16 infection on ESCC patient prognosis. Patients and methods: Immunohistochemical staining for HPV16 E6 oncoprotein, the low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K was performed on 103 archived surgical specimens from patients with ESCC and 54 control samples from patients with benign esophageal tumor or inflammatory lesions. All patients were from the Shaan Xi Province, People’s Republic of China. Results: HPV16 E6 expression was significantly higher in the ESCC group (P<0.05. HPV16 E6 expression was significantly higher in men than in women (P<0.05. p75NTR expression was higher in those aged >56 years (P<0.05. PI3K expression was higher in those with a more advanced histopathological grade (P<0.05. There was a positive correlation between HPV16 E6 and p75NTR expression (r=0.547, P<0.001 and between p75NTR and PI3K expression (r=0.364, P<0.001. In 100 evaluable patients, the 5-year overall survival (OS rate was 11%. In patients with ESCC, HPV16 E6 and PI3K expression were negatively correlated with the 3-year OS (P<0.05, 5-year OS (P<0.05, and progression-free survival (P<0.05. Conclusion: HPV16 infection likely contributes to the etiology of ESCC patients in Shaan Xi, People’s Republic of China. HPV16 infection status and PI3K expression levels could be useful for predicting prognosis in patients with ESCC. Keywords: low-affinity p75

  11. [Experimental study on carcinogenesis by human papillomavirus type 8 E7 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 5 and HPV8 are often detected in skin cancers developed in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis, as well as in skin cancers developed in immunosuppressed patients. In the present study, in order to examine the transforming activity of the HPV8E7 gene, the HPV8E7 and HPV8E6/E7 genes were cloned into the expression vector (pcD2-Y), under the SV40 enhancer/promoter to construct pcD2-8E7 and pcD2-8E6/E7, respectively. The E7 and E6/E7 genes of genital high-risk HPV16 were also cloned into pcD2-Y to construct pcD2-16E7 and pcD2-16E6/E7, respectively. They were tested for their ability to collaboratively transform primary rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) with activated H-ras gene. Transfection experiments of REFs having an activated H-ras gene revealed that pcD2-8E7, as well as pcD2-16E7 and pcD2-16E6/E7, induced transformation of cells in G418-resistant colonies at efficiencies of 11.9%, 43.0% and 53.0%, respectively. Transformed cell lines induced by activated H-ras gene and pcD2-8E7 or pcD2-16E7 were named 8RE and 16RE cell lines, respectively. Tumor induction in syngeneic newborn rats by injected the 8RE cells was higher than that of the 16RE cells. In cytological and histological examination, the 8RE cell lines and their induced tumors were different from the 16RE cell lines and their induced tumors. The 8RE cell lines showed the characteristic transformation with efficient growth ability on plastic and colony formation in 0.3% soft agar. These results support the hypothesis that the HPV8E7 gene plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of skin cancers.

  12. Misconception: human papillomavirus vaccine and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Christine L; Hanley, Chassidy J; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera

    2014-02-01

    This study sought to determine if parents of males express concerns about vaccine-associated infertility (VAI) with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and to understand the impact of those concerns. Parents of sons were surveyed to determine VAI concerns. Logistic regression was used to find if parents worried about VAI had lower knowledge of HPV disease, more concern for side effects, lacked information about vaccination, or had lower intention to vaccinate. In all, 39% of parents were worried about VAI. Parents worried about VAI had similar knowledge of HPV compared with other parents. Parents worried about VAI had twice the odds of agreeing the vaccine may cause side effects and agreeing they did not have enough information compared to their counterparts. Parents worried about VAI less often intended to vaccinate sons than other parents. These findings suggest many parents worry about VAI in sons with HPV vaccine.

  13. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  15. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuovo, G.J.; Pedemonte, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion

  16. The interplay of UV and cutaneous papillomavirus infection in skin cancer development.

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    Daniel Hasche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs are considered as cofactors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC development, especially in association with UVB. Extensively studied transgenic mouse models failed to mimic all aspects of virus-host interactions starting from primary infection to the appearance of a tumor. Using the natural model Mastomys coucha, which reflects the human situation in many aspects, we provide the first evidence that only UVB and Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV infection strongly promote NMSC formation. Using UVB exposures that correspond to UV indices of different geographical regions, irradiated animals developed either well-differentiated keratinizing squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs, still supporting productive infections with high viral loads and transcriptional activity, or poorly differentiated non-keratinizing SCCs almost lacking MnPV DNA and in turn, early and late viral transcription. Intriguingly, animals with the latter phenotype, however, still showed strong seropositivity, clearly verifying a preceding MnPV infection. Of note, the mere presence of MnPV could induce γH2AX foci, indicating that viral infection without prior UVB exposure can already perturb genome stability of the host cell. Moreover, as shown both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, MnPV E6/E7 expression also attenuates the excision repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers upon UVB irradiation, suggesting a viral impact on the DNA damage response. While mutations of Ras family members (e.g. Hras, Kras, and Nras were absent, the majority of SCCs harbored-like in humans-Trp53 mutations especially at two hot-spots in the DNA-binding domain, resulting in a loss of function that favored tumor dedifferentiation, counter-selective for viral maintenance. Such a constellation provides a reasonable explanation for making continuous viral presence dispensable during skin carcinogenesis as observed in patients with NMSC.

  17. [Genetics and susceptibility to human papillomaviruses: epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a disease model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Gérard

    2010-06-01

    The outcomes of infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV), both oncogenic and non oncogenic, show major interindividual variability The underlying genetic factors and mechanisms are poorly known, but their complexity is illustrated by epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with a high risk of non melanoma skin cancer. This model disease is characterized by abnormal susceptibility to widespread betapapillomaviruses, including HPV-5, a virus associated with EV cancers. Most cases of EV are caused by a mutation that inactivates either of two related genes, EVER1 and EVER2. This inactivation likely compensates for the absence of a viral gene (E5 or E8) essential for HPV pathogenicity. Proteins E5 and E8 interfere with the interaction between EVER proteins and ZnT1, a zinc transporter EV is thus likely to represent a primary defect of intrinsic (constitutive) immunity or innate immunity to betapapillomaviruses, involving modulation of zinc homeostasis upon keratinocyte infection. It remains to be established which cellular genes are involved in intrinsic, innate or acquired immune responses to other human papillomaviruses, including oncogenic genital types.

  18. Augmentation of cellular and humoral immune responses to HPV16 and HPV18 E6 and E7 antigens by VGX-3100

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    Matthew P Morrow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a multicomponent DNA immunotherapy for the treatment of Human Papillomavirus (HPV16/18-positive CIN2/3 in a phase 1 clinical trial. Here, we report on the ability to boost immune responses with an additional dose of VGX-3100. Patients completing our initial phase 1 trial were offered enrollment into a follow on trial consisting of a single boost dose of VGX-3100. Data show both cellular and humoral immune responses could be augmented above pre-boost levels, including the induction of interferon (IFNγ production, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα production, CD8+ T cell activation and the synthesis of lytic proteins. Moreover, observation of antigen-specific regulation of immune-related gene transcripts suggests the induction of a proinflammatory response following the boost. Analysis of T cell receptor (TCR sequencing suggests the localization of putative HPV-specific T cell clones to the cervical mucosa, which underscores the putative mechanism of action of lesion regression and HPV16/18 elimination noted in our double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2B trial. Taken together, these data indicate that VGX-3100 drives the induction of robust cellular and humoral immune responses that can be augmented by a fourth “booster” dose. These data could be important in the scope of increasing the clinical efficacy rate of VGX-3100.

  19. Optimizing the Activation of Chlorin e6 Utilizing Upconversion Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Julio C.; Pedraza, Francisco J.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Current cancer therapy techniques, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, possess several drawbacks including lack of selectivity resulting in harmful side effects. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the fastest emerging techniques due to its many advantages, including the use of nonionizing radiation, targeted delivery, and controlled doses. In PDT, photosensitizers (PSs) are activated inside targeted cells to produce irreversible damage inducing cell death. Since most PSs operate in the visible range, it is difficult to activate them due to the high attenuation of soft tissue. Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNP) are able to absorb in the NIR region, where light is less attenuated, and emit in the visible range, resulting in deeper tissue penetration. UCNPs are able to assist with the activation of the PS by energy transfer when the PS is conjugated onto the UCNP. Chlorin e6 (Ce6) is a commonly used PSs due to its ability to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is one of the main processes utilized in PDT. The UCNP studied contain a combination of rare earth doped ions including Erbium, Thulium, and Holmium precisely doped into the host nanocrystal to improve upconversion emission and energy transfer. The work presented will focus on exploring the factors that affect the activation of Ce6. The results will include the enhancement of Ce6 activation and ROS release when conjugated onto a rare earth-doped UCNP. This research was funded by NSF-PREM Grant No. DMR -0934218 and RISE Grant No. GM 060655.

  20. F4 , E6 and G2 exceptional gauge groups in the vacuum domain structure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaei, Amir; Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh

    2018-03-01

    Using a vacuum domain structure model, we calculate trivial static potentials in various representations of F4 , E6, and G2 exceptional groups by means of the unit center element. Due to the absence of the nontrivial center elements, the potential of every representation is screened at far distances. However, the linear part is observed at intermediate quark separations and is investigated by the decomposition of the exceptional group to its maximal subgroups. Comparing the group factor of the supergroup with the corresponding one obtained from the nontrivial center elements of S U (3 ) subgroup shows that S U (3 ) is not the direct cause of temporary confinement in any of the exceptional groups. However, the trivial potential obtained from the group decomposition into the S U (3 ) subgroup is the same as the potential of the supergroup itself. In addition, any regular or singular decomposition into the S U (2 ) subgroup that produces the Cartan generator with the same elements as h1, in any exceptional group, leads to the linear intermediate potential of the exceptional gauge groups. The other S U (2 ) decompositions with the Cartan generator different from h1 are still able to describe the linear potential if the number of S U (2 ) nontrivial center elements that emerge in the decompositions is the same. As a result, it is the center vortices quantized in terms of nontrivial center elements of the S U (2 ) subgroup that give rise to the intermediate confinement in the static potentials.

  1. Study of Higgs self couplings of a supersymmetric E6 model at the international linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. W.; Han, K. D.; Lee, J. I.; Oh, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the Higgs self couplings of a supersymmetric E 6 model that has two Higgs doublets and two Higgs singlets. The lightest scalar Higgs boson in the model may be heavier than 112 GeV, at the one-loop level, where the negative results for the Higgs search at the LEP2 experiments are taken into account. The contributions from the top and scalar top quark loops are included in the radiative corrections to the one-loop mass of the lightest scalar Higgs boson in the effective potential approximation. The effect of the Higgs self couplings may be observed in the production of the lightest scalar Higgs bosons in e + e - collisions at the International Linear Collider (ILC) via the double Higgs-strahlung process. For the center of mass energy of 500 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 500 fb -1 and an efficiency of 20%, we expect that at least 5 events of the lightest scalar Higgs boson may be produced at the ILC via the double Higgs-strahlung process.

  2. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

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    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  3. First-void urine: A potential biomarker source for triage of high-risk human papillomavirus infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keer, Severien; Pattyn, Jade; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Ieven, Margareta; Van Damme, Pierre; Vorsters, Alex

    2017-09-01

    Great interest has been directed towards the use of first-void urine as a liquid biopsy for high-risk human papillomavirus DNA testing. Despite the high correlations established between urinary and cervical infections, human papillomavirus testing is unable to distinguish between productive and transforming high-risk infections that have the tendency to progress to cervical cancer. Thus far, investigations have been primarily confined to the identification of biomarkers for triage of high-risk human papillomavirus-positive women in cervicovaginal specimens and tissue biopsies. This paper reviews urinary biomarkers for cervical cancer and triage of high-risk human papillomavirus infections and elaborates on the opportunities and challenges that have emerged regarding the use of first-void urine as a liquid biopsy for the analysis of both morphological- (conventional cytology and novel immunohistochemical techniques) and molecular-based (HPV16/18 genotyping, host/viral gene methylation, RNA, and proteins) biomarkers. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Web of Science for studies investigating the use of urine as a biomarker source for cervical cancer screening. Five studies were identified reporting on biomarkers that are still in preclinical exploratory or clinical assay development phases and on assessments of non-invasive (urine) samples. Although large-scale validation studies are still needed, we conclude that methylation of both host and viral genes in urine has been proven feasible for use as a molecular cervical cancer triage and screening biomarker in phase two studies. This is especially promising and underscores our hypothesis that human papillomavirus DNA and candidate human and viral biomarkers are washed away with the initial, first-void urine, together with exfoliated cells, debris and impurities that line the urethra opening. Similar to the limitations of self-collected cervicovaginal samples, first-void urine will likely not fulfil the

  4. Mouse papillomavirus infections spread to cutaneous sites with progression to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cooper, Timothy K; Balogh, Karla K; Christensen, Neil D; Myers, Roland; Majerciak, Vladimir; Gotte, Deanna; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Jiafen

    2017-09-25

    We report secondary cutaneous infections in the mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1)/mouse model. Our previous study demonstrated that cutaneous MmuPV1 infection could spread to mucosal sites. Recently, we observed that mucosal infections could also spread to various cutaneous sites including the back, tail, muzzle and mammary tissues. The secondary site lesions were positive for viral DNA, viral capsid protein and viral particles as determined by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy analyses, respectively. We also demonstrated differential viral production and tumour growth at different secondarily infected skin sites. For example, fewer viral particles were detected in the least susceptible back tissues when compared with those in the infected muzzle and tail, although similar amounts of viral DNA were detected. Follow-up studies demonstrated that significantly lower amounts of viral DNA were packaged in the back lesions. Lavages harvested from the oral cavity and lower genital tracts were equally infectious at both cutaneous and mucosal sites, supporting the broad tissue tropism of this papillomavirus. Importantly, two secondary skin lesions on the forearms of two mice displayed a malignant phenotype at about 9.5 months post-primary infection. Therefore, MmuPV1 induces not only dysplasia at mucosal sites such as the vagina, anus and oral cavity but also skin carcinoma at cutaneous sites. These findings demonstrate that MmuPV1 mucosal infection can be spread to cutaneous sites and suggest that the model could serve a useful role in the study of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of papillomavirus.

  5. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  6. In vitro studies of chlorin e6-assisted photodynamic inactivation of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Mohrbacher, C.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bauer-Marschall, Ina; Krickhahn, C.; Stachon, A.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP), a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium located in gastric mucosa, plays an im- portant role in gastro carcinogenesis. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance, photodynamic inactivation of bacteria presents a new approach to treat bacterial infections, like HP. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the irradiation conditions for a complete inactivation of HP with the photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). The HP strain CCUG 38770 (Culture Collection, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) was routinely cultured under microaerophilic conditions, suspended in sodium chloride, incubated with Ce6 and irradiated briefly with red light of the appropriate wavelength of λ = 660 nm. Series of measurements of different Ce6-concentrations (0.1 μM - 100 μM) were carried out, whereby the incubation time was kept constant at 1 min. The absorbed energy dose has been selected in varying the irradiation time (1 s - 300 s) and the power density (4.5 mW/cm2 - 31 mW/cm2 ). Quantification of inactivation was performed by enumeration of the grown colonies. In addition, the accumulation of Ce6 in HP cells was studied more precisely by uorescence spectroscopy. With a Ce6 concentration of 100 μM and a power density of 9 mW cm2 , a 6-log10 reduction in the survival rate of HP was achieved within 30 seconds of irradiation. In conclusion the most relevant factor for the inactivation of HP is the exposure time of irradiation, followed by the concentration of Ce6 and the light intensity. Further studies with HP strains obtained from patient specimens are under current investigation.

  7. Bioaugmentation with endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii enhances metal rhizoaccumulation in host Sedum plumbizincicola

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    Ying eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of hyperaccumulator–endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn and Pb. Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn ˃ Cd ˃ Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants.

  8. Role of Ultraviolet Radiation in Papillomavirus-Induced Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayushi Uberoi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses are causally associated with 5% of human cancers. The recent discovery of a papillomavirus (MmuPV1 that infects laboratory mice provides unique opportunities to study the life cycle and pathogenesis of papillomaviruses in the context of a genetically manipulatable host organism. To date, MmuPV1-induced disease has been found largely to be restricted to severely immunodeficient strains of mice. In this study, we report that ultraviolet radiation (UVR, specifically UVB spectra, causes wild-type strains of mice to become highly susceptible to MmuPV1-induced disease. MmuPV1-infected mice treated with UVB develop warts that progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Our studies further indicate that UVB induces systemic immunosuppression in mice that correlates with susceptibility to MmuPV1-associated disease. These findings provide new insight into how MmuPV1 can be used to study the life cycle of papillomaviruses and their role in carcinogenesis, the role of host immunity in controlling papillomavirus-associated pathogenesis, and a basis for understanding in part the role of UVR in promoting HPV infection in humans.

  9. Longitudinal Psychosocial Adjustment of Women to Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Yun; Wang, Wei-Ming; Fetzer, Susan Jane; Cheng, Ya-Min; Hsu, Keng-Fu

    2018-05-29

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychosocial adjustment trajectory, focusing on psychological distress, sexual relationships and health care information, as well as factors which have an impact on adjustment on receiving a positive diagnosis of human papillomavirus infection. Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection in females. To date, knowledge of the longitudinal psychosocial response to the diagnosis of human papillomavirus is limited. A prospective longitudinal design was conducted with a convenience sample. Women aged 20-65 years old were followed at one, 6 and 12 months after a diagnosis of HPV. Participants completed measures of initial emotional distress and followed-up psychosocial adjustment. A mixed-effects model was applied to analyze the longitudinal changes in psychosocial adjustment. Seventy human papillomavirus positive women participated in the study with nearly 20% of the women reporting emotional distress during their first visit. Mixed-effects model analyses showed that a trajectory of psychosocial adjustment in health care orientation, sexual relationship and psychosocial distress occur from one to 6 months after HPV diagnosis. However, a declining trend from 6-12 months was significant in health care orientation. Initial emotional distress was associated with changes in psychological adjustment. Psychosocial adjustment to human papillomavirus was worse at one month compared with 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. Healthcare providers should offer health information and psychosocial support to women according to their disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of Ultraviolet Radiation in Papillomavirus-Induced Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberoi, Aayushi; Yoshida, Satoshi; Frazer, Ian H.; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses are causally associated with 5% of human cancers. The recent discovery of a papillomavirus (MmuPV1) that infects laboratory mice provides unique opportunities to study the life cycle and pathogenesis of papillomaviruses in the context of a genetically manipulatable host organism. To date, MmuPV1-induced disease has been found largely to be restricted to severely immunodeficient strains of mice. In this study, we report that ultraviolet radiation (UVR), specifically UVB spectra, causes wild-type strains of mice to become highly susceptible to MmuPV1-induced disease. MmuPV1-infected mice treated with UVB develop warts that progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Our studies further indicate that UVB induces systemic immunosuppression in mice that correlates with susceptibility to MmuPV1-associated disease. These findings provide new insight into how MmuPV1 can be used to study the life cycle of papillomaviruses and their role in carcinogenesis, the role of host immunity in controlling papillomavirus-associated pathogenesis, and a basis for understanding in part the role of UVR in promoting HPV infection in humans. PMID:27244228

  11. Serology for human papillomavirus Serología para el virus del papiloma humano

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    Pierre Coursaget

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties with serology for papillomavirus are associated with the large number of human papillomavirus, cross-reactions between papillomavirus, and to the diversity of lesions and target sites for infection. In addition, the expression of the papillomavirus in the superficial layers of the epithelium gives rise to the weak presentation to immunocompetent cells of viral antigens, which in turn gives rise to a weak serological response. Distinct efforts have been made in previous decades to develop more specific and sensitive serological assays. These former studies use fusion proteins and synthetic peptides, although they remain on the whole uninteresting, due to their lack of sensitivity and specificity. Only in the last few years, and principally due to the advent of various virus-like particles (VLP, have more sensitive and specific assays become available.Las limitaciones para la utilización de la serología para el estudio del virus del papiloma humano con fines clínicos están asociadas con la gran variedad de subtipos humanos, con las reacciones cruzadas que existen entre diversos genotipos, la diversidad de lesiones precursoras de cáncer y con los sitios blancos de infección. Asimismo, la expresión del virus del papiloma humano en las capas superficiales del epitelio dan origen a una débil presentación de células inmunocompetentes de antígenos virales, lo cual origina una elevación de la respuesta serológica. Distintos esfuerzos se han realizado en décadas previas para desarrollar ensayos serológicos más específicos y sensibles. En muchas investigaciones se ha utilizado una fusión de proteínas y péptidos sintéticos que tienen como principal limitación su escasa sensibilidad y especificidad. Sólo en los últimos años, y principalmente debido al arribo de partículas parecidas a este virus, tenemos disponibles ensayos más sensibles y específicos, ampliamente descritos en este artículo.

  12. Towards a “Sample-In, Answer-Out” Point-of-Care Platform for Nucleic Acid Extraction and Amplification: Using an HPV E6/E7 mRNA Model System

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    Anja Gulliksen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of a “proof-of-principle” hands-free and self-contained diagnostic platform for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 mRNA in clinical specimens. The automated platform performs chip-based sample preconcentration, nucleic acid extraction, amplification, and real-time fluorescent detection with minimal user interfacing. It consists of two modular prototypes, one for sample preparation and one for amplification and detection; however, a common interface is available to facilitate later integration into one single module. Nucleic acid extracts (n=28 from cervical cytology specimens extracted on the sample preparation chip were tested using the PreTect HPV-Proofer and achieved an overall detection rate for HPV across all dilutions of 50%–85.7%. A subset of 6 clinical samples extracted on the sample preparation chip module was chosen for complete validation on the NASBA chip module. For 4 of the samples, a 100% amplification for HPV 16 or 33 was obtained at the 1 : 10 dilution for microfluidic channels that filled correctly. The modules of a “sample-in, answer-out” diagnostic platform have been demonstrated from clinical sample input through sample preparation, amplification and final detection.

  13. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillo, Michela; Carrillo Santisteve, Paloma; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Between 2006 and 2009, two different human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccines were licensed for use: a quadrivalent (qHPVv) and a bivalent (bHPVv) vaccine. Since 2008, HPV vaccination programmes have been implemented in the majority of the industrialized countries. Since 2013, HPV vaccination has been part of the national programs of 66 countries including almost all countries in North America and Western Europe. Despite all the efforts made by individual countries, coverage rates are lower than expected. Vaccine safety represents one of the main concerns associated with the lack of acceptance of HPV vaccination both in the European Union/European Economic Area and elsewhere. Safety data published on bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines, both in pre-licensure and post-licensure phase, are reviewed. Based on the latest scientific evidence, both HPV vaccines seem to be safe. Nevertheless, public concern and rumors about adverse events (AE) represent an important barrier to overcome in order to increase vaccine coverage. Passive surveillance of AEs is an important tool for detecting safety signals, but it should be complemented by activities aimed at assessing the real cause of all suspect AEs. Improved vaccine safety surveillance is the first step for effective communication based on scientific evidence.

  14. Oropharyngeal perinatal colonization by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torices, María Soledad; Corrales-Millan, Rocío; Hijona-Elosegui, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common human sexually transmitted disease. It is clinically relevant because this condition is necessary for the development of epithelial cervical cancer, and it is also a factor closely associated with the occurrence of diverse tumours and various benign and malignant lesions of the head and neck area. The infective mechanism in most of these cases is associated with sexual intercourse, but there is recent scientific evidence suggesting that HPV infection may also be acquired by other routes of infection not necessarily linked to sexual contact. One of them is vertical transmission from mother to child, either during pregnancy or at the time of delivery. The aim of our research was to study maternal-foetal HPV transmission during childbirth in detail, establishing the rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV in vaginal deliveries. The presence and type of HPV viral DNA at the time of delivery in samples of maternal cervical secretions, amniotic fluid, venous cord blood samples and neonatal oropharynx in pregnant women (and their babies) were determined. The rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV colonization in vaginal deliveries was 58.24%. The maternal and neonatal HPV colonization mechanism is essentially, but not exclusively, transvaginal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  15. [Human papillomavirus nonavalent vaccine. Update 2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F X; Moreno, D; Redondo, E; Torné, A

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of 5% of human cancers. HPV infection is necessary for the development of cervical cancer and is responsible of a variable percentage of cancers of anus, vulva, vagina, penis, and oropharynx. Since 2007, 2 vaccines against HPV have been commercially available in Spain: bivalent (HPV types 16/18), and tetravalent (HPV types 6/11/16/18). In order to extend the protection afforded by HPV vaccines, a clinical program was launched in 2006 for the new nonavalent vaccine, including 9 HPV types (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). These types are responsible for 90% of cervical cancers, 82% of high-grade ano-genital pre-cancerous lesions, and 90% of genital warts. The purpose of this publication is to provide healthcare professionals with the scientific evidence that supports the new vaccine, as well as the clinical value that it offers in our environment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011-2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time.

  17. Modular organizations of novel cetacean papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschling, Marc; Bravo, Ignacio G; Schulz, Eric; Bracho, Maria A; Deaville, Rob; Jepson, Paul D; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2011-04-01

    The phylogenetic position of cetacean papillomaviruses (PVs: Omikron-PVs and Upsilon-PVs) varies depending on the region of the genome analysed. They cluster together with Alpha-PVs when analysing early genes and with Xi-PVs and Phi-PVs when analysing late genes. We cloned and sequenced the complete genomes of five novel PVs, sampled from genital and oesophageal lesions of free-ranging cetaceans: Delphinus delphis (DdPV1), Lagenorhynchus acutus (TtPV3 variant), and Phocoena phocoena (PphPV1, PphPV2, and PphPV3). Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches, all cetacean PVs constituted a monophyletic group with Alpha-, Omega-, and Dyodelta-PVs as inferred from E1-E2 early genes analyses, thus matching the shared phenotype of mucosal tropism. However, cetacean PVs, with the exception of PphPV3, were the closest relatives of Xi-PVs and Phi-PVs in L2-L1 late genes analyses, isolated from cow and goat, thus reflecting the close relationship between Cetacea and Artiodactyla. Our results are compatible with a recombination between ancestral PVs infecting the Cetartiodactyla lineage. Our study supports a complex evolutionary scenario with multiple driving forces for PV diversification, possibly including recombination and also interspecies transmission. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Papillomavirus and Vaccination in Cervical Cancer

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    Kung-Liahng Wang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is not only the most frequently reported cancer among women, but also the most common female genital tract neoplasm in Taiwan. Early detection is effective, because the development, maintenance and progression of precursor lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] evolve slowly into invasive cancer, typically over a period of more than 10 years. It is now recognized that human papillomavirus (HPV infection is a necessary cause for over 99% of cervical cancer cases. Advances in the understanding of the causative role of HPV in the etiology of high-grade cervical lesions (CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer have led to the development, evaluation and recommendation of HPV-based technologies for cervical cancer prevention and control. The prevention of HPV infection before the onset of CIN is now possible with recently available prophylactic HPV vaccines, e.g. the quadrivalent Gardasil (Merck & Co., NJ, USA and bivalent Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, London, UK. This review article provides an up-to-date summary of recent studies and available information concerning HPV and vaccination in cervical cancer.

  19. Human papillomavirus enigmas and persistent questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Edridge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s the association between cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV has been known. Zur Hausen’s belatedly awarded Nobel prize bears testament to this. We know that HPV is associated with cervical cancer, vulval cancer, anal cancer, vulvovaginal warts, and other non-gynaecological cancers. The place of HPV in the modern management of gynaecology may at first seem clear. Vaccination with the bivalent vaccine against HPV 16 and 18 (Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK may prevent cervical, vulval and some anal cancers; vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil, Merck may prevent those conditions plus warts. The 9-valent vaccine (Gardasil 9, Merck is currently recommended, as are the other two, by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG.[1] The UK initiated vaccination with the bivalent vaccine and now recommends the quadrivalent vaccine.[2] So far studies have demonstrated a significant decrease in dysplasia and warts, particularly in HPV- naive subjects. Whether these benefits translate to the prevention of cervical and other cancers has not yet been shown, but if one considers the natural history of the progression of dysplasia to cancer, this is quite reasonably presumed.

  20. Papillomavirus DNA in sperm from infertile patients

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    William Gennari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomaviruses (HPV are causative agents of sexually transmitted disease that affect both men and women (6, 7.The genus includes more than 150 types divided in according to different tropism for skin surfaces and paved mucosal epithelia. Although HPV infection has a very high incidence in both sexes, HPV infection in men is often neglected because of its transitory nature and its lack of clinical relevance.The HPV infection in males was found to be borne by the anal region, perineum, scrotum, urethra and glans. The persistence of the virus in these sites of infection has been linked both to male infertility and to the development of neoplasia in genital areas and not. In addition, several studies have documented the presence of HPV in the semen but with conflicting results regarding the location of the virus in the various components of semen (5, 9,10. The objective of this study was to highlight the presence of HPV DNA in the sperm of patients waiting for a Medically Assisted Procreation and to evaluate if there is a correlation between the semen parameters (motility, concentration and morphology of spermatozoa and HPV infection.

  1. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 16 pseudovirus containing histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kwag, Hye-Lim; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-08-27

    Pseudoviruses (PsVs) that encapsidate a reporter plasmid DNA have been used as surrogates for native human papillomavirus (HPV), whose continuous production is technically difficult. HPV PsVs have been designed to form capsids made up of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid proteins L2. HPV PsVs have been produced in 293TT cells transfected with plasmid expressing L1 and L2 protein and plasmid containing the reporter gene. Several studies have suggested that naturally occurring HPV virions contain cellular histones, and histones have also been identified in mature HPV PsVs. However, the effect of the histones on the properties of the PsVs has not been investigated. Using heparin chromatography, we separated mature HPV type 16 PsVs into three fractions (I, II, and III) according to their heparin-binding affinities. The amounts of cellular histone and cellular nucleotides per PsV were found to increase in the order fraction I, II and III. It appeared that PsVs in fraction I contains just small amount of cellular histone in Western blot analysis. The proportions of the three fractions in PsV preparations were 83.4, 7.5, and 9.1 % for fraction I, II, and III PsVs, respectively. In the electron microscope PsVs in fraction I appeared to have a more condensed structure than those in fractions II and III. Under the electron microscope fraction II and III PsVs appeared to be covered by substantial amounts of cellular histone while there was no visible histone covering PsVs of fraction I. Also the levels of reporter gene expression in infections of fraction II and III PsVs to 293TT cells were significantly lower than those in infections of fraction I PsV, and fraction II and III particles had significantly reduced immunogenicity. Our findings suggest that the involvement of large amounts of cellular histones during PsV formation interferes with the structural integrity of the PsVs and affects their immunogenicity. The fraction I particle therefore has the most

  2. The role of human papillomavirus in p16-positive oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belobrov, Simone; Cornall, Alyssa M; Young, Richard J; Koo, Kendrick; Angel, Christopher; Wiesenfeld, David; Rischin, Danny; Garland, Suzanne M; McCullough, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence and frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) nucleic acid in p16-positive oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), to assess whether the virus was transcriptionally active and to assess the utility of p16 overexpression as a surrogate marker for HPV in OSCC. Forty-six OSCC patients treated between 2007 and 2011 with available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens were included. Twenty-three patients were positive for p16 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and these were matched with 23 patients with p16-negative tumours. Laser capture microdissection of the FFPE OSCC tissues was undertaken to isolate invasive tumour tissue. DNA was extracted and tested for high-risk HPV types using a PCR-ELISA method based on the L1 SPF10 consensus primers, and a real-time PCR method targeting HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 region. Genotyping of HPV-positive cases was performed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay (Inno-LiPA). RNAScope ® (a chromogenic RNA in situ hybridization assay) was utilized to detect E6/E7 mRNA of known high-risk HPV types for detection of transcriptionally active virus. HPV DNA was found in 3 OSCC cases, all of which were p16 IHC-positive. Two cases were genotyped as HPV-16 and one as HPV-33. Only one of the HPV-16 cases was confirmed to harbour transcriptionally active virus via HPV RNA ISH. We have shown that the presence of transcriptionally active HPV rarely occurs in OSCC and that p16 is not an appropriate surrogate marker for HPV in OSCC cases. We propose that non-viral mechanisms are responsible for the majority of IHC p16 overexpression in OSCC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Vero E6 cells over-expressing SARS-CoV S2 subunit: Insights on viral regulation of apoptosis and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Y.-S.; Yip, C.-W.; Hon, C.-C.; Chow, Ken Y.C.; Ma, Iris C.M.; Zeng Fanya; Leung, Frederick C.C.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that over-expression of spike protein (S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or its C-terminal subunit (S2) is sufficient to induce apoptosis in vitro. To further investigate the possible roles of S2 in SARS-CoV-induced apoptosis and pathogenesis of SARS, we characterized the host expression profiles induced upon S2 over-expression in Vero E6 cells by oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Possible activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in S2 expressing cells was suggested, as evidenced by the up-regulation of cytochrome c and down-regulation of the Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic members. Inhibition of Bcl-2-related anti-apoptotic pathway was further supported by the diminution of S2-induced apoptosis in Vero E6 cells over-expressing Bcl-xL. In addition, modulation of CCN E2 and CDKN 1A implied the possible control of cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase. This study is expected to extend our understanding on the pathogenesis of SARS at a molecular level

  4. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus: Application of CRISPR/Cas9 Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

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    Shuai Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs cause different types of cancer especially cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 based cancer therapies since the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are exclusively expressed in cancerous cells. Sequence-specific gene knockdown/knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, CRISPR/Cas9-based targeting therapy requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo to eliminate the potential off-target effects, necessitates verification of the delivery vehicles and the combinatory use of conventional therapies with CRISPR/Cas9 to ensure the feasibility and safety. In this review we discuss the potential of combining CRISPR/Cas9 with other treatment options as therapies for oncogenic HPVs-associated carcinogenesis. and present our assessment of the promising path to the development of CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic strategies for clinical settings.

  5. Replication and interaction of herpes simplex virus and human papillomavirus in differentiating host epithelial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Craig; Andreansky, Samita S.; Courtney, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the interactions and consequences of superinfecting and coreplication of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human epithelial organotypic (raft) culture tissues. In HPV-positive tissues, HSV infection and replication induced significant cytopathic effects (CPE), but the tissues were able to recover and maintain a certain degree of tissue integrity and architecture. HPV31b not only maintained the episomal state of its genomic DNA but also maintained its genomic copy number even during times of extensive HSV-induced CPE. E2 transcripts encoded by HPV31b were undetectable even though HPV31b replication was maintained in HSV- infected raft tissues. Expression of HPV31b oncogenes (E6 and E7) was also repressed but to a lesser degree than was E2 expression. The extent of CPE induced by HSV is dependent on the magnitude of HPV replication and gene expression at the time of HSV infection. During active HSV infection, HPV maintains its genomic copy number even though genes required for its replication were repressed. These studies provide new insight into the complex interaction between two common human sexually transmitted viruses in an in vitro system, modeling their natural host tissue in vivo

  6. Potentially large contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from weak-isosinglet squarks in E6 superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    We examine contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon from weak-isosinglet squarks found in E 6 superstring models. We find that such contributions are up to 2 orders of magnitude larger than those previously calculated and correspondingly require smaller Yukawa couplings in order to maintain agreement with the measured muon anomalous magnetic moment

  7. Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Ignacio G; Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-28

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  8. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Multivalent human papillomavirus l1 DNA vaccination utilizing electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihyuck Kwak

    Full Text Available Naked DNA vaccines can be manufactured simply and are stable at ambient temperature, but require improved delivery technologies to boost immunogenicity. Here we explore in vivo electroporation for multivalent codon-optimized human papillomavirus (HPV L1 and L2 DNA vaccination.Balb/c mice were vaccinated three times at two week intervals with a fusion protein comprising L2 residues ∼11-88 of 8 different HPV types (11-88×8 or its DNA expression vector, DNA constructs expressing L1 only or L1+L2 of a single HPV type, or as a mixture of several high-risk HPV types and administered utilizing electroporation, i.m. injection or gene gun. Serum was collected two weeks and 3 months after the last vaccination. Sera from immunized mice were tested for in-vitro neutralization titer, and protective efficacy upon passive transfer to naive mice and vaginal HPV challenge. Heterotypic interactions between L1 proteins of HPV6, HPV16 and HPV18 in 293TT cells were tested by co-precipitation using type-specific monoclonal antibodies.Electroporation with L2 multimer DNA did not elicit detectable antibody titer, whereas DNA expressing L1 or L1+L2 induced L1-specific, type-restricted neutralizing antibodies, with titers approaching those induced by Gardasil. Co-expression of L2 neither augmented L1-specific responses nor induced L2-specific antibodies. Delivery of HPV L1 DNA via in vivo electroporation produces a stronger antibody response compared to i.m. injection or i.d. ballistic delivery via gene gun. Reduced neutralizing antibody titers were observed for certain types when vaccinating with a mixture of L1 (or L1+L2 vectors of multiple HPV types, likely resulting from heterotypic L1 interactions observed in co-immunoprecipitation studies. High titers were restored by vaccinating with individual constructs at different sites, or partially recovered by co-expression of L2, such that durable protective antibody titers were achieved for each type

  10. Detection of human papillomavirus in oral warts using in situ hybridization

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    Suzana Orsini Machado de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus is a group of DNA epitheliotrophic viruses associated with the etiology of benign and malignant oral warts. More than 100 types have been identified and among them, 24 have been found into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze human papillomavirus prevalence and its subtypes in 50 oral warts, of which 20 were squamous papillomas, 17 condylomaacuminatum and 13 verruca vulgaris. Method: In situ hybridization was used with biotinylated DNA probes for wide-spectrum HPV and with specific probes for human papillomavirus 6/11, human papillomavirus 16/18 and human papillomavirus 31/33. Results: Human papillomavirus was present in ten (20% of the 50 oral wart cases, 03 (3/20 squamous papillomas, 05 (5/17 condyloma acuminatum and 02 (2/13 verruca vulgaris. Of these, 8 (16% were positive to the HPV probe 6/11 being 5 condyloma acuminatum, 1 squamous papilloma and 2 verruca vulgaris. Three cases (6% demonstrated positivity to the human papillomavirus probe 16/18, with 2 being cases of condyloma and the other a case of squamous papilloma. Of the six positive cases to the human papillomavirus probe 31/33, (12% 4 were condyloma acuminatum and 2 squamous papillomas. Conclusion: The human papillomavirus expression (20% found in this study was low, but within the average found in the literature. Nonetheless, in addition to in situ hybridization, other methods may be necessary for confirming the presence of human papillomavirus.

  11. Human Papilloma Virus 16 E6 RNA Interference Enhances Cisplatin and Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Shinta; Hougardy, Brigitte M. T.; Meersma, Gert J.; Schaap, Bessel; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; de Jong, Steven

    In cervical cancer, the p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor pathways are disrupted by the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, because E6 targets p53 and E7 targets pRb for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. We have investigated whether E6 suppression with small

  12. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers.

  13. Therapeutic Vaccine Against Primate Papillomavirus Infections of the Cervix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Mariya, Silmi

    2017-01-01

    Currently available prophylactic vaccines have no therapeutic efficacy for preexisting human papillomavirus (HPVs) infections, do not target all oncogenic HPVs and are insufficient to eliminate the burden of HPV induced cancer. We aim to develop an alternative HPV vaccine which is broadly effective...

  14. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lesions.[7,8] Among these, at least 15 are considered high‑risk. HPV (HR‑HPV) and are strongly associated with progression. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or Without Cervical Lesions in. Northeast Brazil. Fernandes JV, Carvalho MGF1, de Fernandes TAAM2, Araújo JMG, Azevedo PRM3,.

  15. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated...

  16. Age-specific prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study describes the age-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cytological abnormalities among this urban and peri-urban population. Method. Over the period March 2009 - September 2011, 1 524 women attending public sector primary healthcare clinics were invited to

  17. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Acceptability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and has been implicated in over 70% of cases of cervical cancer. This study assessed the knowledge of HPV infection and acceptability of HPV vaccination among nursing students in Benin City. Methodology: A ...

  18. Health-economic modelling of human Papillomavirus vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Tjalke Arend

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinatie van 12-jarige meisjes tegen het humaan papillomavirus (HPV) dat baarmoederhalskanker kan veroorzaken, blijkt effectief en kosteneffectief te zijn. UMCG-onderzoeker Tjalke Westra rekende met behulp van modellen de lange termijn effecten door van verschillende HPV-vaccinatiescenario’s

  19. An Overview of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vichnin, Michelle; Bonanni, Paolo; Klein, Nicola P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) type 6/11/16/18 vaccine (GARDASIL/SILGARD®) has been licensed in many countries around the world for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers and precancers, as well as external genital warts causally related to HPV types 6...

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of High Risk Human Papillomavirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in northern Nigeria, yet the pattern of infection with human papillomavirus, the principal aetiologic agent is unknown. This was a preliminary study conducted in two referral hospitals in order to establish base-line data on the prevalence and risk factors for the infection in ...

  1. Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for squamous cell cervical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Keywords. Cervical cancer; co-factors; human papillomavirus; tar-based vaginal douche; tobacco smoke; wood smoke. Author Affiliations. Christina Bennett1 Allen E Kuhn2 Harry W Haverkos3. Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5149, USA; Suite 300, Hamilton Mason Road ...

  2. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W

    1994-01-01

    sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace......Epidemiological features suggest that the risk of testicular cancer may be related to exposure to unknown infectious agents, including viruses. Therefore a series of twenty specimens of testicular germ cell tumours, including preinvasive carcinoma in-situ, were tested for the presence of DNA...... of EBV DNA was revealed in one of two experiments. These samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining with specific antibodies raised against the EBV protein products and in-situ hybridization with specific molecular probes, and were confirmed to be negative. The study indicates...

  3. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  4. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Dietlen, F; Cano-Contreras, A D; Sánchez-Maza, Y J; Espinosa-González, J M; Vázquez-Prieto, M Á; Valdés-de la O, E J; Díaz-Roesch, F; Carrasco-Arroniz, M Á; Cruz-Palacios, A; Grube-Pagola, P; Sumoza-Toledo, A; Vivanco-Cid, H; Mellado-Sánchez, G; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Silva-Cañetas, C S; Carrillo-Toledo, M G; Lagunes-Torres, R; Amieva-Balmori, M; Gómez-Castaño, P C; Reyes-Huerta, J U; Remes-Troche, J M

    2018-02-15

    Cancer is the result of the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It has recently been related to viral infections, one of which is human papillomavirus. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with digestive system cancers. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on patients with gastrointestinal cancer at 2public healthcare institutes in Veracruz. Two tumor samples were taken, one for histologic study and the other for DNA determination of human papillomavirus and its genotypes. Anthropometric variables, risk factors, sexual habits, tumor location, and histologic type of the cancer were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were determined using the SPSS version 24.0 program. Fifty-three patients were studied. They had gastrointestinal cancer located in: the colon (62.26%), stomach (18.87%), esophagus (7.55%), rectum (7.55%), and small bowel (3.77%). Human papillomavirus was identified in 11.32% of the patients, 66.7% of which corresponded to squamous cell carcinoma and 33.3% to adenocarcinoma. Only genotype 18 was identified. Mean patient age was 61.8±15.2 years, 56.60% of the patients were men, and 43.40% were women. A total of 15.8% of the patients had a family history of cancer and 31.6% had a personal history of the disease, 38.6% were tobacco smokers, and 61.4% consumed alcohol. Regarding sex, 5.3% of the patients said they were homosexual, 3.5% were bisexual, 29.8% engaged in oral sex, and 24.6% in anal sex. Our study showed that human papillomavirus infection was a risk factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancer, especially of squamous cell origin. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Human papillomavirus serologic follow-up response and relationship to survival in head and neck cancer: a case-comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamšíková Eva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus high risk (HPV-HR type 16 is a significant risk factor for head and neck cancers (HNC independent of tobacco and alcohol. The purpose of this study was to determine whether antibody levels to the HPV-16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 measured in sera collected at baseline (BL prior to treatment and at two post-treatment follow-up (FU visits were associated with HNC risk factors or prognosis. Methods Presence of antibodies to HPV-16 E6 and E7 was evaluated in 109 newly diagnosed HNC cases with BL and FU blood samples, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results HPV-16 E6 and/or E7 seropositive HNC cases were associated with higher risk in younger patients (≤ 55 years, more sexual partners (≥ 10, oropharyngeal cancer, worse stage at diagnosis, poorer grade, and nodal involvement. Between BL and FU (median = 8.3 months, there were decreased antibody levels for seropositive E6 (73% vs. 27%, p = 0.02 and seropositive E7 patients (65% vs. 35%, p = 0.09 with 5% of BL E6 and 35% of BL E7 seropositive patients converting to negative status at FU. Overall mortality (OM was significantly worse among BL E6 seronegative patients than among BL seropositive patients (40.2% vs.13.6%, p = 0.01. There were no disease specific (DS deaths among BL E6 seropositive vs. 24% in BL E6 seronegative patients (p = 0.01. BL E7 seronegative patients also had higher mortality than BL seropositive patients (OM: 38.2% vs. 20.0%, p = 0.04; DS: 22.5% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.07. Conclusion These findings are the first to follow post-treatment OD levels of HPV-16 E6 and E7 in HNC and suggest that these HPV antibodies may be potential prognostic markers of survival in HNC patients.

  6. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC), differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses. The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. Our

  7. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of KLF4 by High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses Is Necessary for the Differentiation-Dependent Viral Life Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Kumar Gunasekharan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are epithelial tropic viruses that link their productive life cycles to the differentiation of infected host keratinocytes. A subset of the over 200 HPV types, referred to as high-risk, are the causative agents of most anogenital malignancies. HPVs infect cells in the basal layer, but restrict viral genome amplification, late gene expression, and capsid assembly to highly differentiated cells that are active in the cell cycle. In this study, we demonstrate that HPV proteins regulate the expression and activities of a critical cellular transcription factor, KLF4, through post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Our studies show that KLF4 regulates differentiation as well as cell cycle progression, and binds to sequences in the upstream regulatory region (URR to regulate viral transcription in cooperation with Blimp1. KLF4 levels are increased in HPV-positive cells through a post-transcriptional mechanism involving E7-mediated suppression of cellular miR-145, as well as at the post-translational level by E6-directed inhibition of its sumoylation and phosphorylation. The alterations in KLF4 levels and functions results in activation and suppression of a subset of KLF4 target genes, including TCHHL1, VIM, ACTN1, and POT1, that is distinct from that seen in normal keratinocytes. Knockdown of KLF4 with shRNAs in cells that maintain HPV episomes blocked genome amplification and abolished late gene expression upon differentiation. While KLF4 is indispensable for the proliferation and differentiation of normal keratinocytes, it is necessary only for differentiation-associated functions of HPV-positive keratinocytes. Increases in KLF4 levels alone do not appear to be sufficient to explain the effects on proliferation and differentiation of HPV-positive cells indicating that additional modifications are important. KLF4 has also been shown to be a critical regulator of lytic Epstein Barr virus (EBV replication

  8. Vimentin Modulates Infectious Internalization of Human Papillomavirus 16 Pseudovirions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Georgia; Graham, Lisa M; Lang, Dirk M; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Bergant Marušič, Martina; Katz, Arieh A

    2017-08-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, with virtually all cases of cervical cancer being attributable to infection by oncogenic HPVs. However, the exact mechanism and receptors used by HPV to infect epithelial cells are controversial. The current entry model suggests that HPV initially attaches to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) at the cell surface, followed by conformational changes, cleavage by furin convertase, and subsequent transfer of the virus to an as-yet-unidentified high-affinity receptor. In line with this model, we established an in vitro infection system using the HSPG-deficient cell line pgsD677 together with HPV16 pseudovirions (HPV16-PsVs). While pgsD677 cells were nonpermissive for untreated HPV16-PsVs, furin cleavage of the particles led to a substantial increase in infection. Biochemical pulldown assays followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that furin-precleaved HPV16-PsVs specifically interacted with surface-expressed vimentin on pgsD677 cells. We further demonstrated that both furin-precleaved and uncleaved HPV16-PsVs colocalized with surface-expressed vimentin on pgsD677, HeLa, HaCaT, and NIKS cells, while binding of incoming viral particles to soluble vimentin protein before infection led to a substantial decrease in viral uptake. Interestingly, decreasing cell surface vimentin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in HeLa and NIKS cells significantly increased HPV16-PsV infectious internalization, while overexpression of vimentin had the opposite effect. The identification of vimentin as an HPV restriction factor enhances our understanding of the initial steps of HPV-host interaction and may lay the basis for the design of novel antiviral drugs preventing HPV internalization into epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Despite HPV being a highly prevalent sexually transmitted virus causing significant disease burden worldwide, particularly cancer of the cervix, cell surface

  9. Mechanisms of hyperthermia induced radiatiosensitization for treatment of human papillomavirus positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Arlene; Leeuwen, Caspar van; Stalpers, Lukas; Rodermond, Hans; Kok, Petra; Crezee, Hans; Franken, Nicolaas

    2016-01-01

    HPV is associated with cervical cancer, the third most common cancer in women. In over 70% of cervical cancers, the high-risk HPV-types 16 and 18 are found. In these tumors, functionality of p53 is suppressed by the presence of protein E6. Hyperthermia is a clinical application of heat in which tumour temperatures are raised to 40-43°C and combined hyperthermia with radiation is very effective in the treatment of cervical cancer

  10. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  11. Identification of a novel bat papillomavirus by metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Tse

    Full Text Available The discovery of novel viruses in animals expands our knowledge of viral diversity and potentially emerging zoonoses. High-throughput sequencing (HTS technology gives millions or even billions of sequence reads per run, allowing a comprehensive survey of the genetic content within a sample without prior nucleic acid amplification. In this study, we screened 156 rectal swab samples from apparently healthy bats (n = 96, pigs (n = 9, cattles (n = 9, stray dogs (n = 11, stray cats (n = 11 and monkeys (n = 20 using a HTS metagenomics approach. The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus (PV, Miniopterus schreibersii papillomavirus type 1 (MscPV1, with L1 of 60% nucleotide identity to Canine papillomavirus (CPV6, was identified in a specimen from a Common Bent-wing Bat (M. schreibersii. It is about 7.5kb in length, with a G+C content of 45.8% and a genomic organization similar to that of other PVs. Despite the higher nucleotide identity between the genomes of MscPV1 and CPV6, maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the L1 gene sequence showed that MscPV1 and Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus (EdPV1 are most closely related. Estimated divergence time of MscPV1 from the EdPV1/MscPV1 common ancestor was approximately 60.2-91.9 millions of years ago, inferred under strict clocks using the L1 and E1 genes. The estimates were limited by the lack of reliable calibration points from co-divergence because of possible host shifts. As the nucleotide sequence of this virus only showed limited similarity with that of related animal PVs, the conventional approach of PCR using consensus primers would be unlikely to have detected the novel virus in the sample. Unlike the first bat papillomavirus RaPV1, MscPV1 was found in an asymptomatic bat with no apparent mucosal or skin lesions whereas RaPV1 was detected in the basosquamous carcinoma of a fruit bat Rousettus aegyptiacus. We propose MscPV1 as the first member of the novel Dyolambda-papillomavirus genus.

  12. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-08-31

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking.

  13. Glucocorticoid regulation of a novel HPV-E6-p53-miR-145 pathway modulates invasion and therapy resistance of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming; Du, Libin; Liu, Dan; Qian, Lu; Hu, Meiru; Yu, Ming; Yang, Zhengyan; Zhao, Mingzhen; Chen, Changguo; Guo, Liang; Wang, Lina; Song, Lun; Ma, Yuanfang; Guo, Ning

    2012-10-01

    Glucocorticoids are stress-responsive neuroendocrine mediators and play an important role in malignant progression, especially in solid tumours. We demonstrate a novel mechanism by which glucocorticoids modulate p53-dependent miR-145 expression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells through induction of E6 proteins. We found that expression of miR-145 was reduced in cervical cancer tissues. Cortisol induced HPV-E6 expression and suppressed p53 and miR-145 in cervical cancer cells. MiR-145 expression in cervical cancer cells was wild-type p53-dependent, and cortisol-induced down-regulation of miR-145 expression prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, whereas over-expression of miR-145 enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin and reversed the chemoresistance induced by glucocorticoids. We also show that miR-145 augments the effects of p53 by suppressing the inhibitors of p53 in cervical cancer cells, suggesting that miR-145 plays a role in p53 tumour suppression. Finally, we demonstrate that miR-145 inhibits both the motility and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Our findings identify a novel pathway through which the neuroendocrine macroenvironment affects cervical tumour growth, invasion and therapy resistance and show that miR-145 may serve as a target for cervical cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Melendy, Thomas; Archambault, Jacques

    2016-01-06

    The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed for the structural

  15. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. IMPORTANCE While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed

  16. Host control of human papillomavirus infection and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorbar, John

    2018-02-01

    Most human papillomaviruses cause inapparent infections, subtly affecting epithelial homeostasis, to ensure genome persistence in the epithelial basal layer. As with conspicuous papillomas, these self-limiting lesions shed viral particles to ensure population level maintenance and depend on a balance between viral gene expression, immune cell stimulation and immune surveillance for persistence. The complex immune evasion strategies, characteristic of high-risk HPV types, also allow the deregulated viral gene expression that underlies neoplasia. Neoplasia occurs at particular epithelial sites where vulnerable cells such as the reserve or cuboidal cells of the cervical transformation zone are found. Beta papillomavirus infection can also predispose an individual with immune deficiencies to the development of cancers. The host control of HPV infections thus involves local interactions between keratinocytes and the adaptive immune response. Effective immune detection and surveillance limits overt disease, leading to HPV persistence as productive microlesions or in a true latent state. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Comparison of HPV detection technologies: Hybrid capture 2, PreTect HPV-Proofer and analysis of HPV DNA viral load in HPV16, HPV18 and HPV33 E6/E7 mRNA positive specimens.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing using molecular methods in liquid based cytology (LBC) specimens may be useful as an adjunct to cervical screening by cytology. We compared the positivity rate of the commercially available HPV DNA method hybrid capture 2 (hc2) and the commercially available E6\\/E7 mRNA method PreTect HPV-Proofer in cytological specimens (n=299). LBC specimens collected (n=299) represented the following cervical cytological disease categories: Normal (n=60), borderline nuclear abnormalities (BNA) (n=34), CIN1 (n=121), CIN2 (n=60), CIN3 (n=24). Overall, 69% (205\\/299) of the cases were positive by hc2 and 38% (112\\/299) of the cases were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. Concordance rates between the two tests were highest in the high-grade cytology cases (CIN2: 67% and CIN3: 83%) and the normal cytology cases (88%) and lowest in the BNA and CIN1 categories (56% and 52%). HPV DNA viral load analyses were carried out on HPV16 (n=55), HPV18 (n=9) and HPV33 (n=13) samples that were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. The sensitivity and specificity of PreTect HPV-Proofer and the hc2 DNA test for the detection of high-grade cytology (i.e. CIN2+) were 71.4% and 75.8% vs 100% and 43.7%, respectively. The relatively low detection rate observed by PreTect HPV-Proofer in the whole range of cytological positive cases, combined with a relatively higher specificity and PPV, suggests that PreTect HPV-Proofer may be more useful than hc2 for triage and in predicting high-grade disease.

  18. MG132 plus apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody cooperate to restore p53 activity inducing autophagy and p53-dependent apoptosis in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; García-Villa, Enrique; Arellano-Gaytán, Magaly; Contreras-Ochoa, Carla O; Dimas-González, Jisela; López-Arellano, María E; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Gariglio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    The E6 oncoprotein can interfere with the ability of infected cells to undergo programmed cell death through the proteolytic degradation of proapoptotic proteins such as p53, employing the proteasome pathway. Therefore, inactivation of the proteasome through MG132 should restore the activity of several proapoptotic proteins. We investigated whether in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes (KE6 cells), the restoration of p53 levels mediated by MG132 and/or activation of the CD95 pathway through apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody are responsible for the induction of apoptosis. We found that KE6 cells underwent apoptosis mainly after incubation for 24 h with MG132 alone or APO-1 plus MG132. Both treatments activated the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Autophagy was also activated, principally by APO-1 plus MG132. Inhibition of E6-mediated p53 proteasomal degradation by MG132 resulted in the elevation of p53 protein levels and its phosphorylation in Ser46 and Ser20; the p53 protein was localized mainly at nucleus after treatment with MG132 or APO-1 plus MG132. In addition, induction of its transcriptional target genes such as p21, Bax and TP53INP was observed 3 and 6 h after treatment. Also, LC3 mRNA was induced after 3 and 6 h, which correlates with lipidation of LC3B protein and induction of autophagy. Finally, using pifithrin alpha we observed a decrease in apoptosis induced by MG132, and by APO-1 plus MG132, suggesting that restoration of APO-1 sensitivity occurs in part through an increase in both the levels and the activity of p53. The use of small molecules to inhibit the proteasome pathway might permit the activation of cell death, providing new opportunities for CC treatment.

  19. The association of human papillomavirus vaccination with sexual behaviours and human papillomavirus knowledge: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Victoria A H; Patel, Ajay S; Allen, Felicity L; Keeping, Sam T; Carroll, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2008 introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme for adolescent girls in the UK, parents and other groups have expressed fears that immunisation condones sexual activity, promotes promiscuity and encourages risky sexual behaviour. This study aimed to explore whether HPV vaccination programmes have increased knowledge surrounding HPV and associated disease and whether uptake has influenced sexual behaviour. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO electronic databases were interrogated. Studies of behaviour, attitudes and knowledge associated with HPV vaccination (or vaccination intent) in subjects of any age and gender in programmes reflective of UK practice were included in the review (n = 58). The evidence regarding the association of HPV vaccination with high-risk sexual behaviour was varied, primarily due to the heterogeneous nature of the included studies. Young females typically exhibited better knowledge than males, and vaccinated respondents (or those with vaccination intent) had higher levels of knowledge than the unvaccinated. However, knowledge surrounding HPV and genital warts was generally poor. This review highlights the need to provide effective education regarding the HPV vaccine and HPV-associated disease to adolescents of vaccination age, nurses, teachers, parents and guardians to ultimately allow informed decisions to be made regarding receipt of the HPV vaccine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The human papillomavirus immunisation programme and sexual behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has caused some parents to report concern that their daughters may change their sexual behaviour following vaccination. This concern consistently relates to vaccination acceptance, but had not been investigated in detail. Accordingly, five studies addressed the thesis objective: to explore parents’ concern about adolescent sexual behaviour following HPV vaccination in the context of the UK immunisation programme and to ...

  1. Variables associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance by men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G; Waller, Jennifer L; Miller, Jeremiah; Patel, Pratik; Price, George A; Jackson, Lanier; Wilson, Courtesia

    2009-01-01

    To determine correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance for men. A convenience sample of men aged 18 to 45 years read a one-page information sheet about HPV and the HPV vaccine, then completed a 29-item questionnaire. chi(2) tests were used to determine whether differences in demographic, sexual, and vaccine-related variables existed between levels of wanting the HPV vaccine. Positive correlates of HPV vaccine acceptance included higher education (P acceptance of the HPV vaccine by men.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about human papillomavirus in educated adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Reyes Elkin Mauricio; Miranda Machado Pablo Andrés; Borre Arrieta Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: cervical cancer (CC) is the second most frequent cancer in women in theworld, South America and Colombia. It represents the fourth cause of death by cancerin the world, the third cause in South America and the first cause in Colombia. The interesanprincipalrisk factor is the persistent infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). TheCC can be prevented and the patient can be treated if it is detected early.Objective: to establish the knowledge, attitudes and practices about Hu...

  3. Knowledge and attitudes about human papillomavirus and vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Priscila Mendonça Carneiro da; Silva, Izabele Maria Barbosa; Interaminense, Iris Nayara da Conceição Souza; Linhares, Francisca Márcia Pereira; Serrano, Solange Queiroga; Pontes, Cleide Maria

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Uncover knowledge and attitudes of girls, mothers, teachers and health professionals about human papillomavirus and vaccination. Method: A qualitative study carried out by means of focus groups in public elementary schools and health units of Sanitary District IV from Recife-PE, Brazil, between June and July 2015. The sample was six schoolchildren, ten adolescents, nine mothers, ten teachers, thirteen health professionals and seven community health agents. Speeches were ...

  4. Transmissioon of and infektion with human papillomavirus in the oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anne; Grønhøj, Christian; Lajer, Christel

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal cancer is rising in the Western world, but little is known about transmission of the infection and the premalignant phase of the disease. In this article there is an overview of current knowledge with focus on transmission of HP...... and risk factors which may lead to persistent infection and eventually cancer. Furthermore, there is a discussion about issues concerning the ability to measure and detect infection and the premalignant stadium in the oropharyngeal tissue....

  5. E6 based mechanism for the generation of fermion electric dipole moments: An application to the solar neutrino puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grifols, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the electric dipole moments (EDM) of fermions generated by CP-violating phases associated to the new Yukawa couplings involving heavy matter E 6 fields predicted in the framework of superstring theories. While for neutron and electron it is not strictly necessary to resort to a superstring scenario to get a substantial EDM, in the neutrino case a sizeable EDM is a distinctive feature of the superstring. We thus focus on the neutrino EDM and discuss its relevance for the solution of the solar neutrino problem. (orig.)

  6. Immunogenicity of dendritic cell-based HPV16 E6/E7 peptide vaccines: CTL activation and protective effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Reiniš, Milan; Bubeník, Jan; Jandlová, Táňa; Bieblová, Jana; Vonka, V.; Velek, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2004), s. 184-193 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA MZd NR7807; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA ČR GA301/04/0492; GA AV ČR KSK5011112 Grant - others:Fogarty International Center(US) D43 TW000233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV16 E6/E7 peptides * dendritic cell s * cytotoxic lymphocytes Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2004

  7. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas, but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa 17-36 on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross- protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76, while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target

  8. Human papillomavirus type-18 prevalence in oesophageal cancer in the Chinese population: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L W; Zhang, S K; Liu, S Z; Chen, Q; Zhang, M; Quan, P L; Lu, J B; Sun, X B

    2016-02-01

    Globally, the prevalence of oesophageal cancer cases is particularly high in China. Since 1982, oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has been hypothesized as a risk factor for oesophageal cancer, but no firm evidence of HPV infection in oesophageal cancer has been established to date. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to estimate the high-risk HPV-18 prevalence of oesophageal cancer in the Chinese population. Eligible studies published from 1 January 2005 to 12 July 2014 were retrieved via computer searches of English and Chinese literature databases (including Medline, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform). A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled prevalence and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 2556 oesophageal cancer cases from 19 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the pooled HPV-18 prevalence in oesophageal cancer cases was 4·1% (95% CI 2·7-5·5) in China, 6·1% (95% CI 2·9-9·3) in fresh or frozen biopsies and 4·0% (95% CI 2·3-5·8) in paraffin-embedded fixed biopsies, 8·2% (95% CI 4·6-11·7) by the E6/E7 region and 2·2% (95% CI 0·9-3·6) by the L1 region of the HPV gene. This meta-analysis indicated that China has a moderate HPV-18 prevalence of oesophageal cancer compared to cervical cancer, although there is variation between different variables. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of HPV in oesophagus carcinogenesis with careful consideration of study design and laboratory detection method, providing more accurate assessment of HPV status in oesophageal cancer.

  9. Quantitation of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Plasma of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hongbin; Banh, Alice; Kwok, Shirley; Shi Xiaoli; Wu, Simon; Krakow, Trevor; Khong, Brian; Bavan, Brindha; Bala, Rajeev; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Colevas, Dimitrios; Pourmand, Nader; Koong, Albert C.; Kong, Christina S.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA can be detected in the plasma of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and to monitor its temporal change during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We used polymerase chain reaction to detect HPV DNA in the culture media of HPV-positive SCC90 and VU147T cells and the plasma of SCC90 and HeLa tumor-bearing mice, non-tumor-bearing controls, and those with HPV-negative tumors. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to quantify the plasma HPV DNA in 40 HPV-positive OPC, 24 HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients and 10 non-cancer volunteers. The tumor HPV status was confirmed by p16 INK4a staining and HPV16/18 polymerase chain reaction or HPV in situ hybridization. A total of 14 patients had serial plasma samples for HPV DNA quantification during radiotherapy. Results: HPV DNA was detectable in the plasma samples of SCC90- and HeLa-bearing mice but not in the controls. It was detected in 65% of the pretreatment plasma samples from HPV-positive OPC patients using E6/7 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. None of the HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients or non-cancer controls had detectable HPV DNA. The pretreatment plasma HPV DNA copy number correlated significantly with the nodal metabolic tumor volume (assessed using 18 F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The serial measurements in 14 patients showed a rapid decline in HPV DNA that had become undetectable at radiotherapy completion. In 3 patients, the HPV DNA level had increased to a discernable level at metastasis. Conclusions: Xenograft studies indicated that plasma HPV DNA is released from HPV-positive tumors. Circulating HPV DNA was detectable in most HPV-positive OPC patients. Thus, plasma HPV DNA might be a valuable tool for identifying relapse.

  10. Significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, E.M.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Kvinnsland, S.; Holm, R.; Nesland, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 has previously been found in 19/41 breast carcinomas (46%) in women with a history of HPV 16 positive CIN III lesions. There was no significant difference in distribution of histological subtypes, mean or median tumour diameter or number of regional lymph node metastases in the HPV positive and HPV negative breast carcinoma groups. P53, p21 and c-erbB-2 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in the HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas. There was a significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity between HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas (p=0.0091 and p=0.0040), with a significant less detectable p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in the HPV 16 positive cases. There was also a significant difference in the coexpression of p53/p21 between the HPV 16 positive and HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas (p=0.002). No significant difference in immunostaining for c-erbB-2 protein in the two groups was found (p=0.15), or for the coexpression of p53/c-erbB-2 (p=0.19). The significantly lower expression of p53 and p21 proteins in HPV 16 positive than in HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas supports the hypothesis of inactivation and degradation of wild-type p53 proteins by HPV 16 E6 and that p53 mutation is not necessary for transformation in the HPV 16 positive cases. (orig.)

  11. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines.An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein.The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  12. T Cells that Recognize HPV Protein Can Target Virus-Infected Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. An approach that may be applied to a wider array of cancers involves modifying peripheral blood T cells with chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors (TCR) that target specific tumor antigens. Unfortunately, epithelial cancers, which are the vast majority of cancers diagnosed, have proven difficult to treat this way because most identified antigens are shared with healthy tissues and targeting them leads to toxic side effects. However, cancers caused by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, including cervical, head and neck, anal, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers, may be particularly amenable to the latter form of ACT since the E6 and E7 viral proteins are essential for cancer formation but are not produced in normal tissues. To test this idea, Christian Hinrichs, M.D., and his colleagues examined tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from a patient who experienced a prolonged disease-free period after her second surgical removal of metastatic anal cancer in the hopes of identifying a TCR against one of the HPV oncoproteins.

  13. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    malignant cervical samples ... low- and high-risk HPV genotypes without identifying ... Since these samples were not from “healthy .... major capsid protein, any variation in its coding sequence is .... worldwide: a meta-analysis; Br. J. Cancer 88 63–73.

  14. Immunization with mutant HPV16 E7 protein inhibits the growth of TC-1 cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Li; Ma, Zhong-Liang; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 oncogenic proteins, E6 and E7, are co-expressed in the majority of HPV16-induced cervical cancer cells. Thus, the E6 and E7 proteins are good targets for developing therapeutic vaccines for cervical cancer. In the present study, immunization with the mutant non-transforming HPV16 E7 (mE7) protein was demonstrated to inhibit the growth of TC-1 cells in the TC-1 mouse model. The HPV16 mE7 gene was amplified by splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction using pET-28a(+)-E7 as a template, and the gene was cloned into pET-28a(+) to form pET-28a(+)-mE7. Compared with the E7 protein, mE7 lacks amino acid residues 94-98, and at residue 24, there is a Cys to Gly substitution. pET-28a(+)-mE7 was then introduced into Escherichia coli Rosetta. The expression of mE7 was induced by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. The mE7 protein was purified using Ni-NTA agarose and detected by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. In the tumor prevention model, no tumor was detected in the mice vaccinated with the mE7 protein. After 40 days, the tumor-free mice and control mice were challenged with 2×10 5 TC-1 cells. All control mice developed tumors six days later, but mE7 immunized mice were tumor free until 90 days. In the tumor therapy model, the TC-1 cells were initially injected subcutaneously, and the mice were subsequently vaccinated. Vaccination against the mE7 protein may significantly inhibit TC-1 cell growth compared to the control. These results demonstrated that immunization with the HPV16 mE7 protein elicited a long-term protective immunity against TC-1 tumor growth and generated a significant inhibition of TC-1 growth in a TC-1 mouse model.

  15. Quantification of a Novel Photosensitizer of Chlorin e6-C15-Monomethyl Ester in Beagle Dog Plasma Using HPLC: Application to Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuxiu Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorin e6-C15-monomethyl ester (CMME is a novel photosensitizer, which is synthetized from the degradation products of silkworm excrement. Preclinical studies on the promising photosensitizer CMME are necessary to determine its therapeutic efficacy and druglikeness. A high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC–UV method was established for the determination of CMME in beagle dog plasma. The sample preparation involved a protein-precipitation method with acetonitrile after the addition of tanshinone IIA as an internal standard (IS. CMME and the IS were separated on a Diamonsil C18 (2 column (100 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm with a isocratic system of methanol–water containing 20 mM ammonium acetate with 0.3% glacial acetic acid (85:15, v/v. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min with UV detection using a wavelength of 400 nm. The method was sensitive enough with a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ of 0.05 μg/mL and had a good linearity (r2 > 0.999 over the linear range of 0.05–5.00 μg/mL. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies ranged from 98.5% to 102.8% and precisions (RSD were within 6.8%. The validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of CMME after intravenous administration of single and multiple doses in beagle dogs.

  16. [Influence of physiologic 17 beta-estradiol concentrations on gene E6 expression in HVP type 18 in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubińska-Parol, Izabella; Gasowska, Urszula; Rzymowska, Jolanta; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Many recent studies indicate that long term use of contraceptives is a strong risk factor in the development of cervical cancer. Steroid hormones, in persistent papilloma virus infection act on various levels, one of them is enhancing transforming activity of the virus. The aim of the study was to estimate if physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol could influence expression of viral transforming genes. HeLa cell lines were incubated with three different physiological concentrations and and on the third day of incubation the level of E6 gene expression was determined. Results show no differences in expression between the control culter, and cultures incubated with physiological concentrations. It indicates that normal levels of 17 beta-estradiol don't play role in transforming process but it also shows need to analyse higher levels of hormones by quantitative analyses in prospective studies.

  17. Design of a Circularly Polarized Galileo E6-Band Textile Antenna by Dedicated Multiobjective Constrained Pareto Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaut Dierck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing textile antennas for real-life applications requires a design strategy that is able to produce antennas that are optimized over a wide bandwidth for often conflicting characteristics, such as impedance matching, axial ratio, efficiency, and gain, and, moreover, that is able to account for the variations that apply for the characteristics of the unconventional materials used in smart textile systems. In this paper, such a strategy, incorporating a multiobjective constrained Pareto optimization, is presented and applied to the design of a Galileo E6-band antenna with optimal return loss and wide-band axial ratio characteristics. Subsequently, different prototypes of the optimized antenna are fabricated and measured to validate the proposed design strategy.

  18. Identification of E6-generated Z' from combined CHARM II, LEP 1, SLC high-precision measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, B.W.; Renard, F.M.; Verzegnassi, C.

    1988-01-01

    We show that a combined analysis of three specific longitudinal polarization asymmetries in electron-positron annihilation on Z 0 resonance, of the mass ratio M w /M z and of the neutrino-electron neutral cross-section ratio, which could be measured in the near future at SLC, LEP, ACOL and CHARM II, would lead to a well-defined identification of a single new E 6 -generated Z'. In particular, it might be possible to disentangle a superstring-inspired model from other currently considered possibilities down to values of the mixing angle vertical strokeθ η vertical stroke = 0.02 and, at the same time, to fix the mass ratio ε = M Z 2 /Msub(Z') 2 with known accuracy. (orig.)

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Chlorin e6-Cobalt Bis(Dicarbollide Conjugate in Balb/c Mice with Engrafted Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Volovetsky

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The necessary precondition for efficient boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is control over the content of isotope 10B in the tumor and normal tissues. In the case of boron-containing porphyrins, the fluorescent part of molecule can be used for quantitative assessment of the boron content. Study Objective: We performed a study of the biodistribution of the chlorin e6-Cobalt bis(dicarbollide conjugate in carcinoma-bearing Balb/c mice using ex vivo fluorescence imaging, and developed a mathematical model describing boron accumulation and release based on the obtained experimental data. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on Balb/c tumor-bearing mice (CT-26 tumor model. A solution of the chlorin e6-Cobalt bis(dicarbollide conjugate (CCDC was injected into the blood at a dose of 10 mg/kg of the animal’s weight. Analysis of the fluorescence signal intensity was performed at several time points by spectrofluorimetry in blood and by laser scanning microscopy in muscle, liver, and tumor tissues. The boron content in the same samples was determined by mass spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma. Results: Analysis of a linear approximation between the fluorescence intensity and boron content in the tissues demonstrated a satisfactory value of approximation reliability with a Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient of r = 0.938, p < 0.01. The dynamics of the boron concentration change in various organs, calculated on the basis of the fluorescence intensity, enabled the development of a model describing the accumulation of the studied compound and its distribution in tissues. The obtained results reveal a high level of correspondence between the model and experimental data.

  20. Genome analysis of two type 6 echovirus (E6) strains recovered from sewage specimens in Greece in 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulou, Zaharoula; Pliaka, Vaia; Tsakogiannis, Dimitris; Ruether, Irina G A; Komiotis, Dimitris; Gartzonika, Constantina; Levidiotou-Stefanou, Stamatina; Markoulatos, Panayotis

    2012-04-01

    Echovirus 6 (E6) is one of the main enteroviral serotypes that was isolated from cases of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis during the last years in Greece. Two E6 (LR51A5 and LR61G3) were isolated from the sewage treatment plant unit in Larissa, Greece, in May 2006, 1 year before their characterization from aseptic meningitis cases. The two isolates were initially found to be intra-serotypic recombinants in the genomic region VP1, a finding that initiated a full genome sequence analysis. In the present study, nucleotide, amino acid, and phylogenetic analyses for all genomic regions were conducted. For the detection of recombination events, Simplot and bootscan analyses were carried out. The continuous phylogenetic relationship in 2C-3D genomic region of strains LR51A5 and LR61G3 with E30 isolated in France in 2002-2005 indicated that the two strains were recombinants. SimPlot and Bootscan analyses confirmed that LR51A5 and LR61G3 carry an inter-serotypic recombination in the 2C genomic region. The present study provide evidence that recombination events occurred in the regions VP1 (intraserotypic) and non-capsid (interserotypic) during the evolution of LR51A5 and LR61G3, supporting the statement that the genomes of circulating enteroviruses are a mosaic of genomic regions of viral strains of the same or different serotypes. In conclusion, full genome sequence analysis of circulating enteroviral strains is a prerequisite to understand the complexity of enterovirus evolution.

  1. The PTPN14 Tumor Suppressor Is a Degradation Target of Human Papillomavirus E7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalmás, Anita; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Basukala, Om; Massimi, Paola; Mittal, Suruchi; Kónya, József; Banks, Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways ensuring cell growth is essential for the proliferative competence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cells. Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are key regulators of cellular growth control pathways. A recently identified potential cellular target of HPV E7 is the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14, which is a potential tumor suppressor and is linked to the control of the Hippo and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we show that the E7 proteins of both high-risk and low-risk mucosal HPV types can interact with PTPN14. This interaction is independent of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and involves residues in the carboxy-terminal region of E7. We also show that high-risk E7 induces proteasome-mediated degradation of PTPN14 in cells derived from cervical tumors. This degradation appears to be independent of cullin-1 or cullin-2 but most likely involves the UBR4/p600 ubiquitin ligase. The degree to which E7 downregulates PTPN14 would suggest that this interaction is important for the viral life cycle and potentially also for the development of malignancy. In support of this we find that overexpression of PTPN14 decreases the ability of HPV-16 E7 to cooperate with activated EJ-ras in primary cell transformation assays. IMPORTANCE This study links HPV E7 to the deregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase signaling pathways. PTPN14 is classified as a potential tumor suppressor protein, and here we show that it is very susceptible to HPV E7-induced proteasome-mediated degradation. Intriguingly, this appears to use a mechanism that is different from that employed by E7 to target pRb. Therefore, this study has important implications for our understanding of the molecular basis for E7 function and also sheds important light on the potential role of PTPN14 as a tumor suppressor. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by keratinocyte growth conditions is overcome by E6 and E7 from HPV16, but not HPV8 and HPV38: Characterization of global transcription profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Chiorino, Giovanna; Scatolini, Maria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth properties of primary human keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7 proteins, which are from either the β- or α-genotypes, under different culture conditions. We demonstrated that keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7, from both HPV8 and 38, irreversibly underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) when grown on plastic with FAD medium (F12/DMEM/5%FBS). Expression of E6/E7 from HPV16 was capable of fully overcoming the FAD-induced EMT. Immortalization was only observed in HPV16-transduced cell lines, while the more proliferating phenotype of both KerHPV8 and 38 was mainly related to FAD-induced EMT. Microarray analysis of exponentially growing cells identified 146 cellular genes that were differentially regulated in HPV16 compared to HPV8- and 38-transduced cells. A large accumulation of transcripts associated with epidermal development and differentiation was observed in HPV16-transduced cells, whereas transcripts of genes involved in the extracellular matrix, multicellular organismal processes, and inflammatory response were affected in HPV8 and 38-transduced cells.

  3. Safety and Efficacy Data on Vaccines and Immunization to Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kash

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the causal association between human papillomavirus (HPV and cervical cancer, efforts to develop an effective prophylactic vaccine to prevent high-risk HPV infections have been at the forefront of modern medical research. HPV causes 530,000 cervical cancer cases worldwide, which is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in women; a worldwide collaboration among epidemiologists, molecular biologists, vaccinologists, virologists, and clinicians helped lead to the development of two highly effective prophylactive HPV vaccines. The first, Gardasil, is a quadrivalent vaccine made up of recombinant HPV L1 capsid proteins from the two high-risk HPV types (16/18 responsible for 70% of cervical cancer cases as well as two low-risk HPV types (6/11 which are the causative agent for genital warts. The second, Cervarix, is a bivalent vaccine that was FDA approved three years after Gardasil and is also composed of L1 capsid proteins from HPV types 16/18. This review article focuses on the safety and efficacy data of both FDA-approved vaccines, as well as highlighting a few advances in future HPV vaccines that show promise in becoming additional treatment options for this worldwide disease.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity often overexpresses p16 but is rarely driven by human papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafereo, Mark E.; Xu, Li; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Viamonte, Carlo A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal and prognostic factor for oropharyngeal cancer, but its role in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) is unclear. We sought to clarify HPV's role in SCCOC. Materials and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed SCCOC (N=460) were prospectively recruited, treated, and followed at one institution. p16/HPV status was determined by p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) (N=210), PCR-based HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA testing (N=403), and/or HPV in situ hybridization (ISH) (N=178). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests were used to compare survival by p16/HPV status. Results p16 expression was detected in 30% of tumors (62/210) and HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA in 28% (114/403), although correlation between these two assays was poor (r=−0.01). Patients with p16-positive tumors were more likely to be younger and have primary tumors of the oral tongue. Only 4% of tumors (7/171) were positive for HPV by ISH. Comparisons of patients with p16-positive and p16-negative tumors, patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by PCR, and patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by ISH showed no significant differences in disease-specific or disease-free survival by p16/HPV status. When we applied a more stringent definition of HPV positivity based on a combination of assay results, only 10 of 166 tumors were HPV positive, and there were no significant differences in demographic, exposure, clinical, or survival characteristics between these patients and the 156 HPV-negative patients. Conclusions Very few patients with SCCOC have HPV-driven tumors. SCCOC that overexpresses p16 may be a unique subset deserving of further study. PMID:27086486

  5. Beta genus papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Peter M; Pfister, Herbert J

    2015-05-01

    A role for the beta genus HPVs in keratinocyte carcinoma (KC) remains to be established. In this article we examine the potential role of the beta HPVs in cancer revealed by the epidemiology associating these viruses with KC and supported by oncogenic properties of the beta HPV proteins. Unlike the cancer associated alpha genus HPVs, in which transcriptionally active viral genomes are invariably found associated with the cancers, that is not the case for the beta genus HPVs and keratinocyte carcinomas. Thus a role for the beta HPVs in KC would necessarily be in the carcinogenesis initiation and not in the maintenance of the tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel HPV 16 L1-based chimeric virus-like particle containing E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes permits highly specific detection of antibodies in patients with CIN 1 and HPV-16 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Osorio Edelmiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of IgG antibodies to HPV-16 L1-virus like particles (VLPs in serum has been reported as a result of persistent exposure to the virus and as a marker of disease progression. However, detection of VLP-specific antibodies in sera does not always indicate a malignant lesion as positive results may also be due to a nonmalignant viral infection. Furthermore, malignant lesions are associated with an increased antibody titer for E6 and E7 proteins. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA using a novel chimeric virus-like particle (cVLP encoding an L1 protein fused with a string of HPV-16 E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes to its C-terminus to be used for detection of HPV-16 specific antibodies in patients with cervical intraepithelial lesion grade 1 (CIN 1. Results The sera of 30 patients with CIN 1 who also tested positive for HPV-16 DNA and of 30 age-matched normal donors negative for HPV infection were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies specific for either VLP-L1 (HPV-16 L1, gVLP (derived from Gardasil, or cVLP by ELISA. The cVLP-reactive sera yielded two distinct groups of results: (H reactivity levels that presented very strong cVLP-specific titers, and (L reactivity levels with significantly lower titers similar to those obtained with VLP-L1 and gVLP antigens. Additionally, the sera that presented the higher cVLP titers closely matched those that had significantly stronger reactivity to E6 and E7 epitopes. Interestingly, the samples with the highest titers corresponded to patients with the higher numbers of sexual partners and pregnancies. On the other hand only 4 out of the 12 sera that harbored antibodies with VLP neutralizing ability corresponded to the group with high cVLP antibody titers. Conclusion We report for the first time that chimeric particles containing HPV-16 L1 protein fused with E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes enable much better detection of IgG antibodies in the sera of CIN 1 patients

  7. Porokeratoma: A Possible Association with Human Papillomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Caseiro Silverio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratoma is a rare, relatively newly described and still unclear entity. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old male patient who presented with four well-defined, verrucous and hyperkeratotic lesions. Microscopically, one of the lesions showed acanthopapillomatosis overlying compact orthokeratosis. Prominent broad and confluent cornoid lamellae were present, with no granular layer and some dyskeratotic keratinocytes. PCR sequencing and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 in the lesion. The association of porokeratoma and HPV infection has not previously been reported.

  8. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the incidence of cervical cancer, but has a low sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and requires frequent testing. Several HPV tests have become available commercially. They appear to be more sensitive for high-grade CIN, and may further reduce the incidence of cervical cancer......Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...

  9. Vaccines for human papillomavirus infection: A critical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Amiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article takes a critical look at the pros and cons of human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines. There is enough evidence to suggest that the prophylactic vaccines are efficacious in preventing various benign and malignant conditions (including cervical cancers caused by HPV. Even though the vaccine is costly, hypothetical analysis has shown that HPV vaccination will be cost effective in the long run. Therapeutic HPV vaccines used to treat established disease are still undergoing evaluation in clinical studies, and results seem to be encouraging. Although several countries have started mandatory vaccination programs with the prophylactic HPV vaccines, conservatives have voiced concerns regarding the moral impact of such vaccination programs.

  10. Human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Raquel dos Santos; de França, Talita Ribeiro Tenório; Ferreira, Dennis de Carvalho; Ribeiro, Camila Maria Beder; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify studies conducted on the oral Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in children. An electronic database search was performed using the terms 'oral HPV' and 'children'. The studies on the prevalence of oral HPV in children worldwide, descriptive studies, case reports, studies on the association of oral HPV and risk factors and transmission of HPV were included. The presence of HPV in oral mucosa of children should be investigated in virtue of the various forms of transmission, and the possibility of sexual abuse eliminated, and also of its possible relation with oral carcinoma pathogenesis in children. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Overview of the Global Vaccination against Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of the current status of the vaccination against Human Papillomavirus (HPV in the world. It describes different approaches to expanding the coverage with HPV vaccination at different national levels by inclusion of the vaccine in National Immunization Programmes. Moreover, the principal ways of project financing in different regions of the world are referred to. The results of the implemented vaccination against HPV in the pioneer countries provide the conclusions on the current situation of HPV vaccination in the world and strategies demonstrating its effectiveness.

  12. Progression from productive infection to integration and oncogenic transformation in human papillomavirus type 59-immortalized foreskin keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartz, Helena; Lehr, Elizabeth; Zhang, Benyue; Roman, Ann; Brown, Darron R

    2005-05-25

    Studies of changes in the virus and host cell upon progression from human papillomavirus (HPV) episomal infection to integration are critical to understanding HPV-related malignant transformation. However, there exist only a few in vitro models of both productive HPV infection and neoplastic progression on the same host background. We recently described a unique foreskin keratinocyte cell line (ERIN 59) that contains HPV 59 (a close relative of HPV 18). Early passages of ERIN 59 cells (passages 9-13) contained approximately 50 copies of episomes/cell, were feeder cell-dependent, and could be induced to differentiate and produce infectious virus in a simple culture system. We now report that late passage cells (passages greater than 50) were morphologically different from early passage cells, were feeder cell independent, and did not differentiate or produce virus. These late passage cells contained HPV in an integrated form. An integration-derived oncogene transcript was expressed in late passage cells. The E2 open reading frame was interrupted in this transcript at nucleotide 3351. Despite a lower viral genome copy number in late passage ERIN 59 cells, expression of E6/E7 oncogene transcripts was similar to early passage cells. We conclude that ERIN 59 cells are a valuable cell line representing a model of progression from HPV 59 episomal infection and virus production to HPV 59 integration and associated oncogenic transformation on the same host background.

  13. Physical status of human papillomavirus integration in cervical cancer is associated with treatment outcome of the patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into the host genome is a critical aetiological event in the progression from normal cervix to intraepithelial neoplasm, and finally to invasive cervical cancer. However, there has been little work on how HPV integration status relates to treatment outcome for cervical carcinomas. In the current study, HPV E2 and E6 gene copy numbers were measured in 111 cervical cancer tissues using real-time QPCR. Integration patterns were divided into four groups: single copy-integrated with episomal components (group 1, single copy-integrated without episomal components (group 2, multicopy tandem repetition-integrated (group 3, and low HPV (group 4 groups. A relapse-predicting model was constructed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to classify patients into different risk groups for disease-free survival (DFS. The model was internally validated using bootstrap resampling. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression patterns in relation to the different integration groups. DFS rate was inferior in the order of the patients in group 4, group 2/3, and group 1. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic grade, clinical stage group, and integration pattern were significant prognostic factors for poor DFS. The current prognostic model accurately predicted the risk of relapse, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.74 (bootstrap corrected, 0.71. In conclusion, these data suggest that HPV integration pattern is a potent prognostic factor for tailored treatment of cervical cancer.

  14. Expression of Mitochondrial Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Is Modulated by High Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Oncogenes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Claudio; Campos, América; Vidaurre, Soledad; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Boccardo, Enrique; Burzio, Verónica A.; Varas, Manuel; Villegas, Jaime; Villa, Luisa L.; Valenzuela, Pablo D. T.; Socías, Miguel; Roberts, Sally; Burzio, Luis O.

    2012-01-01

    The study of RNA and DNA oncogenic viruses has proved invaluable in the discovery of key cellular pathways that are rendered dysfunctional during cancer progression. An example is high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent of cervical cancer. The role of HPV oncogenes in cellular immortalization and transformation has been extensively investigated. We reported the differential expression of a family of human mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) between normal and cancer cells. Normal cells express a sense mitochondrial ncRNA (SncmtRNA) that seems to be required for cell proliferation and two antisense transcripts (ASncmtRNAs). In contrast, the ASncmtRNAs are down-regulated in cancer cells. To shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs, we studied human keratinocytes (HFK) immortalized with HPV. Here we show that immortalization of HFK with HPV-16 or 18 causes down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs and induces the expression of a new sense transcript named SncmtRNA-2. Transduction of HFK with both E6 and E7 is sufficient to induce expression of SncmtRNA-2. Moreover, E2 oncogene is involved in down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs. Knockdown of E2 in immortalized cells reestablishes in a reversible manner the expression of the ASncmtRNAs, suggesting that endogenous cellular factors(s) could play functions analogous to E2 during non-HPV-induced oncogenesis. PMID:22539350

  15. Expression of mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is modulated by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Claudio; Campos, América; Vidaurre, Soledad; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Boccardo, Enrique; Burzio, Verónica A; Varas, Manuel; Villegas, Jaime; Villa, Luisa L; Valenzuela, Pablo D T; Socías, Miguel; Roberts, Sally; Burzio, Luis O

    2012-06-15

    The study of RNA and DNA oncogenic viruses has proved invaluable in the discovery of key cellular pathways that are rendered dysfunctional during cancer progression. An example is high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent of cervical cancer. The role of HPV oncogenes in cellular immortalization and transformation has been extensively investigated. We reported the differential expression of a family of human mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) between normal and cancer cells. Normal cells express a sense mitochondrial ncRNA (SncmtRNA) that seems to be required for cell proliferation and two antisense transcripts (ASncmtRNAs). In contrast, the ASncmtRNAs are down-regulated in cancer cells. To shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs, we studied human keratinocytes (HFK) immortalized with HPV. Here we show that immortalization of HFK with HPV-16 or 18 causes down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs and induces the expression of a new sense transcript named SncmtRNA-2. Transduction of HFK with both E6 and E7 is sufficient to induce expression of SncmtRNA-2. Moreover, E2 oncogene is involved in down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs. Knockdown of E2 in immortalized cells reestablishes in a reversible manner the expression of the ASncmtRNAs, suggesting that endogenous cellular factors(s) could play functions analogous to E2 during non-HPV-induced oncogenesis.

  16. Sentimentos vivenciados por mulheres submetidas a tratamento para Papillomavirus Humano Sentimientos vivenciados por mujeres sometidas a Tratamiento para el Papillomavirus Humano Feelings experienced by women submitted to a treatment for Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Santos de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A carência de informações sobre o papillomavirus humano pode gerar idéias errôneas sobre o tratamento, o que interfere no contexto sócio-familiar da mulher. Com o objetivo de conhecer os sentimentos vivenciados por mulheres submetidas a tratamento de lesões por papillomavirus humano, foi realizada uma pesquisa qualitativa de natureza exploratória com 12 mulheres, baseada na obtenção e análise de depoimentos por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada. As informações foram analisadas de acordo com a literatura e dispostas em duas temáticas: Reações emocionais e Repercussões no relacionamento. Conclui-se que a mulher que está sendo submetida a tratamento de lesões por papillomavirus humano necessita de cuidados, por parte dos enfermeiros, como forma de melhor enfrentar esse período a qual está vivenciando.La carencia de informaciones sobre el papillomavirus humano puede generar ideas erradas sobre el tratamiento, lo que interfiere en el contexto social y familiar de la mujer. Con el objetivo de conocer los sentimientos vividos por mujeres sometidas a tratamiento de lesiones por papillomavirus humanos, fue realizada una investigación cualitativa de naturaleza exploratoria con 12 mujeres, basada en la obtención y análisis de deposiciones por medio de entrevistas medio-estructurada. Las informaciones fueran analizadas conforme con la literatura y dispuestas en dos temáticas: Reacciones emocionales y Repercusiones en el reracionamiento. Concluyese que la mujer que esta siendo sometida al tratamiento de lesiones por papillomavirus humano necesita de cuidados, por parte de los enfermeros, como forma de mejor enfrentar ese periodo el cual esta viviendo.The lack of information on the papillomavirus human can generate misconception on the treatment interfering in the familiar and social context of the woman. With the purpose to know the feelings experienced by women submitted to treatment of lesions by human papillomavirus, was carried

  17. p16 expression is not associated with human papillomavirus in urinary bladder squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Riley E; Hu, Yingchuan; Kum, Jennifer B; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Maclennan, Gregory T; Idrees, Muhammad T; Emerson, Robert E; Ulbright, Thomas M; Grignon, David G; Eble, John N; Cheng, Liang

    2012-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is unusual and of unknown etiology. There is a well-established association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of cervical and head/neck squamous cell carcinomas. However, the role of HPV in the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is uncertain. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible role of HPV in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and to determine if p16 expression could serve as a surrogate marker for HPV in this malignancy. In all, 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation were investigated. HPV infection was analyzed by both in situ hybridization at the DNA level and immunohistochemistry at the protein level. p16 protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA and protein were not detected in 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (0%, 0/42) or 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation (0%, 0/15). p16 expression was detected in 13 cases (31%, 13/42) of squamous cell carcinoma and 9 cases (33%, 9/27) of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. There was no correlation between p16 expression and the presence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. Our data suggest that HPV does not play a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. p16 expression should not be used as a surrogate marker for evidence of HVP infection in either squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation as neither HVP DNA nor protein is detectable in these neoplasms.

  18. Leptogenesis as an origin of hot dark matter and baryon asymmetry in the E6 inspired SUSY models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, R.

    2018-04-01

    We explore leptogenesis within the E6 inspired U (1) extension of the MSSM in which exact custodial symmetry forbids tree-level flavour-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. This supersymmetric (SUSY) model involves extra exotic matter beyond the MSSM. In the simplest phenomenologically viable scenarios the lightest exotic fermions are neutral and stable. These states should be substantially lighter than 1eV forming hot dark matter in the Universe. The low-energy effective Lagrangian of the SUSY model under consideration possesses an approximate global U(1)E symmetry associated with the exotic states. The U(1)E symmetry is explicitly broken because of the interactions between the right-handed neutrino superfields and exotic matter supermultiplets. As a consequence the decays of the lightest right-handed neutrino/sneutrino give rise to both U(1)E and U(1) B - L asymmetries. When all right-handed neutrino/sneutrino are relatively light ∼106-107GeV the appropriate amount of the baryon asymmetry can be induced via these decays if the Yukawa couplings of the lightest right-handed neutrino superfields to the exotic matter supermultiplets vary between ∼10-4-10-3.

  19. WAF1 induction and infection by HPV E6 as a determinants of radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Oka, Atsutoshi; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To establish a new predictor of outcome for human cervical carcinoma treatment, the relationship between WAF1 mRNA levels during treatment, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor radiosensitivity were investigated. Forty patients with uterine cervical carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Only those patients who beard wild-type p53 were included into present clinical trial. p53 status was investigated using SSCP analysis. HPV E6 was determined by PCR, WAF1 mRNA was estimated by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients achieved complete response (CR), 11 patients achieved partial response (PR), and 8 patients had no change (NC). The increase in WAF1 mRNA after irradiation at 10.8 Gy positively correlated both with better treatment response and improved survival. Although the infection by HPV did not directly influence on the survival rate, it decreased the inducibility of WAF1. p53-dependent activation of WAF1 gene expression during treatment may be a strong determinant of the efficacy of cervical cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  20. WAF1 induction and infection by HPV E6 as a determinants of radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harima, Yoko; Oka, Atsutoshi; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1998-01-01

    To establish a new predictor of outcome for human cervical carcinoma treatment, the relationship between WAF1 mRNA levels during treatment, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor radiosensitivity were investigated. Forty patients with uterine cervical carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Only those patients who beard wild-type p53 were included into present clinical trial. p53 status was investigated using SSCP analysis. HPV E6 was determined by PCR, WAF1 mRNA was estimated by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients achieved complete response (CR), 11 patients achieved partial response (PR), and 8 patients had no change (NC). The increase in WAF1 mRNA after irradiation at 10.8 Gy positively correlated both with better treatment response and improved survival. Although the infection by HPV did not directly influence on the survival rate, it decreased the inducibility of WAF1. p53-dependent activation of WAF1 gene expression during treatment may be a strong determinant of the efficacy of cervical cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas sequencing data reveals novel properties of the human papillomavirus 16 genome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nulton, Tara J; Olex, Amy L; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Morgan, Iain M; Windle, Brad

    2017-03-14

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is detected in up to 80% of oropharyngeal carcinomas (OPC) and this HPV positive disease has reached epidemic proportions. To increase our understanding of the disease, we investigated the status of the HPV16 genome in HPV-positive head and neck cancers (HNC). Raw RNA-Seq and Whole Genome Sequence data from The Cancer Genome Atlas HNC samples were analyzed to gain a full understanding of the HPV genome status for these tumors. Several remarkable and novel observations were made following this analysis. Firstly, there are three main HPV genome states in these tumors that are split relatively evenly: An episomal only state, an integrated state, and a state in which the viral genome exists as a hybrid episome with human DNA. Secondly, none of the tumors expressed high levels of E6; E6*I is the dominant variant expressed in all tumors. The most striking conclusion from this study is that around three quarters of HPV16 positive HNC contain episomal versions of the viral genome that are likely replicating in an E1-E2 dependent manner. The clinical and therapeutic implications of these observations are discussed.

  2. Recommendations of technical specifications for ethanol and its blends (E6) and the infrastructure for their management in Mexico; Recomendaciones de especificaciones tecnicas para el etanol y sus mezclas (E6) y la infraestructura para su manejo en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the importance and benefits of using ethanol-gasoline blend as a substitute for pure gasoline. It presents data of global ethanol market, as well as major producers, processes involved for different raw materials and productivity indicators. It discusses the main properties to be monitored in ethanol and the importance of each one. It also examines the impact of the addition of ethanol in automotive gasoline and the influence of each property in the operation of the cars and the environment. It presents an assessment of the international specifications anhydrous ethanol used in the United States, Brazil and the European Union as well as suggestions for limits harmonization of the main parameters and methodologies, from recently published studies (White Paper-Bioetahnol Guidelines Task Force and to Ethanol from Worldwide Fuel Charter Committee). It includes the specification of Brazilian gasoline, added with 25% of ethanol (E25). It suggests an anhydrous ethanol specification and a specification for gasoline mixtures / ethanol E6 for implementation in Mexico. It presents a prioritization of laboratory testing methods for ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in three categories, indicating the most appropriate test to be used at different points in the distribution chain of products. It discusses the impact of ethanol on the distribution facilities for fuels, actions to control potential problems, selection of materials and equipment, safety procedures and presents the mixing gasoline / ethanol. It also describes the Brazilian system of production / distribution of fuels and the experience of this country to control fuel quality from the legislation. It includes a table with the top teams, their costs, Brazilian suppliers and a list of Brazilian standards for fuel storage and transport. Finally, we present some suggestions that may be important to ensure the evolution of specifications of ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in the course of the

  3. [High oncogenic risk human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, O B; Sinyakova, L A; Gundorova, L V; Kosov, V A; Kosova, I V; Pogodina, I E; Kolbasov, D N

    2017-07-01

    To determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) of high oncogenic risk in the development of urinary bladder cancer. 100 patients (72 men and 28 women) aged 38 to 90 years (mean age 65+/-10 years) diagnosed with bladder cancer were examined and underwent treatment. Clinical assessment was complemented by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of antiviral antibodies to herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), urethra scraping for detecting high oncogenic risk HPV. Tumor tissue was sampled for PCR virus detection. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to evaluate the components of lymphocyte-plasmocyte and leukocyte infiltrates and cytopathic changes in tumor tissue. There were positive correlations between cytopathic cell changes (koylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions, as manifestations of HPV) and the level of antiviral antibodies, the presence of viruses in the tumor, as well as with the components of the lymphoid-plasmocyte infiltrate. Negative correlations were found between the presence of papillomatosis and the above changes. Human papillomavirus is believed to be a trigger for the initiation of a tumor in young patients with a latent infection (CMV and EBV, HSV, HPV). Cytopathic changes (kylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions) were associated with the activity and morphological features of herpes-viral infections. Their degree varied depending on the stage of the process, but not on the anaplasia degree. Papillomatosis is associated with a more favorable course of the tumor process.

  4. Economic evaluation of human papillomavirus vaccination in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Choi, Yoon Hong; Edmunds, W John

    2008-07-17

    To assess the cost effectiveness of routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls against human papillomavirus infection in the United Kingdom. Economic evaluation. UK. Population Schoolgirls aged 12 or older. Costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for a range of vaccination options. Vaccinating 12 year old schoolgirls with a quadrivalent vaccine at 80% coverage is likely to be cost effective at a willingness to pay threshold of pound30,000 (euro37,700; $59,163) per QALY gained, if the average duration of protection from the vaccine is more than 10 years. Implementing a catch-up campaign of girls up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective. Vaccination of boys is unlikely to be cost effective. A bivalent vaccine with the same efficacy against human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 costing pound13- pound21 less per dose (depending on the duration of vaccine protection) may be as cost effective as the quadrivalent vaccine although less effective as it does not prevent anogenital warts. Routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls combined with an initial catch-up campaign up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective in the UK. The results are robust to uncertainty in many parameters and processes. A key influential variable is the duration of vaccine protection.

  5. Distribution of human papilloma virus type 16 E6/E7 gene mutation in cervical precancer or cancer: A case control study in Guizhou Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingjie; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qizhu

    2016-02-01

    HPV-16 varies geographically and is correlated with cervical cancer genesis and progression. This study aimed to determine the distribution of HPV-16 E6/E7 genetic variation in patients with invasive cervical cancer or precancer in Guizhou Province, China. A case-control study was designed, and the distribution of HPV-16 E6/E7 genetic variation was compared among women with cervical cancer, precancer, and sexually active without cervical lesion. HPV infection was detected through flow-through hybridization and gene chip techniques to determine the prevalence of HPV 16 E6/E7 genetic variation. Among 90 specimens (30 cervical cancer, 30 precancer, 30 controls), 81 were subjected to HPV-16 E6/E7 gene sequencing. The rates of DNA sequence mutation and amino acid mutation were 76.5% (62/81) and 66.7% (54/81), respectively. Both E6 and E7 genes showed higher mutation rate than their prototypes. The prevalence of E6/E7 mutation significantly differed between the cervical cancer and the controls (P prevalent in cervical cancer or precancer than those in the controls. The possible correlation between genetic variation and cancerigenesis may be used to design an HPV vaccine for cervical carcinoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil® Vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  8. HPV vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-cervarix.html . CDC review information for HPV Cervarix® ...

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  10. IL-17 suppresses immune effector functions in human papillomavirus-associated epithelial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosmann, Christina; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Bridge, Jennifer A; Frazer, Ian H; Blumenthal, Antje

    2014-09-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) causes epithelial hyperplasia that can progress to cancer and is thought to depend on immunosuppressive mechanisms that prevent viral clearance by the host. IL-17 is a cytokine with diverse functions in host defense and in the pathology of autoimmune disorders, chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer. We analyzed biopsies from patients with HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 and murine skin displaying HPV16 E7 protein-induced epithelial hyperplasia, which closely models hyperplasia in chronic HPV lesions. Expression of IL-17 and IL-23, a major inducer of IL-17, was elevated in both human HPV-infected and murine E7-expressing lesions. Using a skin-grafting model, we demonstrated that IL-17 in HPV16 E7 transgenic skin grafts inhibited effective host immune responses against the graft. IL-17 was produced by CD3(+) T cells, predominantly CD4(+) T cells in human, and CD4(+) and γδ T cells in mouse hyperplastic lesions. IL-23 and IL-1β, but not IL-18, induced IL-17 production in E7 transgenic skin. Together, these findings demonstrate an immunosuppressive role for IL-17 in HPV-associated epithelial hyperplasia and suggest that blocking IL-17 in persistent viral infection may promote antiviral immunity and prevent progression to cancer. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Isolation of three novel rat and mouse papillomaviruses and their genomic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Schulz

    Full Text Available Despite a growing knowledge about the biological diversity of papillomaviruses (PV, only little is known about non-human PV in general and about PV mice models in particular. We cloned and sequenced the complete genomes of two novel PV types from the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus; RnPV2 and the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus; AsPV1 as well as a novel variant of the recently described MmuPV1 (originally designated as MusPV from a house mouse (Mus musculus; MmuPV1 variant. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses using a systematically representative set of 79 PV types, including the novel sequences. As inferred from concatenated amino acid sequences of six proteins, MmuPV1 variant and AsPV1 nested within the Beta+Xi-PV super taxon as members of the Pi-PV. RnPV2 is a member of the Iota-PV that has a distant phylogenetic position from Pi-PV. The phylogenetic results support a complex scenario of PV diversification driven by different evolutionary forces including co-divergence with hosts and adaptive radiations to new environments. PV types particularly isolated from mice and rats are the basis for new animal models, which are valuable to study PV induced tumors and new treatment options.

  12. Genetic variations in the DNA replication origins of human papillomavirus family correlate with their oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2018-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) encompass a large family of viruses that range from benign to highly carcinogenic. The crucial differences between benign and carcinogenic types of HPV remain unknown, except that the two HPV types differ in the frequency of DNA replication. We have systematically analyzed the mechanism of HPV DNA replication initiation in low-risk and high-risk HPVs. Our results demonstrate that HPV-encoded E2 initiator protein and its four binding sites in the replication origin play pivotal roles in determining the destiny of the HPV-infected cell. We have identified strain-specific single nucleotide variations in E2 binding sites found only in the high-risk HPVs. We have demonstrated that these variations result in attenuated formation of the E2-DNA complex. E2 binding to these sites is linked to the activation of the DNA replication origin as well as initiation of DNA replication. Both electrophoretic mobility shift assay and atomic force microscopy studies demonstrated that binding of E2 from either low- or high-risk HPVs with variant binding sequences lacked multimeric E2-DNA complex formation in vitro. These results provided a molecular basis of differential DNA replication in the two types of HPVs and pointed to a correlation with the development of cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein causes a delay in repair of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Wook; Nickel, Kwangok P.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and methods: Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results: HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions: Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC

  14. Incoming human papillomavirus type 16 genome resides in a vesicular compartment throughout mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Luszczek, Wioleta; Keiffer, Timothy R; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G M; Sapp, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    During the entry process, the human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is trafficked to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), whereupon it enters the nucleus during mitosis. We previously demonstrated that the minor capsid protein L2 assumes a transmembranous conformation in the TGN. Here we provide evidence that the incoming viral genome dissociates from the TGN and associates with microtubules after the onset of mitosis. Deposition onto mitotic chromosomes is L2-mediated. Using differential staining of an incoming viral genome by small molecular dyes in selectively permeabilized cells, nuclease protection, and flotation assays, we found that HPV resides in a membrane-bound vesicle until mitosis is completed and the nuclear envelope has reformed. As a result, expression of the incoming viral genome is delayed. Taken together, these data provide evidence that HPV has evolved a unique strategy for delivering the viral genome to the nucleus of dividing cells. Furthermore, it is unlikely that nuclear vesicles are unique to HPV, and thus we may have uncovered a hitherto unrecognized cellular pathway that may be of interest for future cell biological studies.

  15. Roles of human papillomavirus infection and stathmin in the pathogenesis of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Lin, Dong; Xiong, Xi-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate roles of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and stathmin in sinonasal inverted papilloma (SNIP). HPV DNA detection was performed by the fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Stathmin protein expression was investigated by the immunohistochemistry method and mRNA expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were assessed by real-time PCR in SNIP and control subjects. The positive rate of HPV DNA detected in SNIP was about 53.6% (15 of 28). Recurrent cases showed a higher rate of HPV infection compared with initial cases and higher Krouse stage (T3 + T4) cases showed higher rate of HPV infection than lower Krouse stage (T1 + T2) cases. Stronger expression of stathmin, Kif2a, and cyclin D1 were observed in SNIP, especially HPV(+) SNIP. HPV infection was closely associated with recurrence and progression of SNIP. Stathmin is a valuable prognostic marker and could be considered as a therapeutic target in patients with SNIP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Infections and Cancer Stem Cells of Tumors from the Uterine Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Jacqueline; Ruíz, Graciela; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Different rate of development of productive infections (as low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias), or high grade lesions and cervical malignant tumors associated with infections of the Transformation zone (TZ) by High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV), could suggest that different epithelial host target cells could exist. If there is more than one target cell, their differential infection by HR-HPV may play a central role in the development of cervical cancer. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support in several solid tumors, including cervical cancer (CC). According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, CC can now be considered a disease in which stem cells of the TZ are converted to cervical cancer stem cells by the interplay between HR-HPV viral oncogenes and cellular alterations that are thought to be finally responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Current studies of CSC could provide novel insights regarding tumor initiation and progression, their relation with viral proteins and interplay with the tumor micro-environment. This review will focus on the biology of cervical cancer stem cells, which might contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for cervical tumor development. PMID:23341858

  17. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific 3 H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase

  18. History of human papillomavirus, warts and cancer: what do we know today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onon, Toli S

    2011-10-01

    Human papillomavirus has been a cause of infection in humans for thousands of years. The history of papillomaviruses, knowledge of their causative role in benign and malignant disease, and their structural characteristics have led to the development of vaccines to prevent cervical and anogenital cancers. Many questions remain unanswered before HPV vaccines can be optimised; however, the concept of virtual eradication of cervical cancer is not impossible, and remains a realistic aspiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinicopathological aspects and prevalence of human papillomavirus in anal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tayla Mesquita Aguiar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anal cancer is relatively rare; however, its incidence has increased in recent years. Several risk factors are associated with the development of anal cancer, including age older than 50 years, low-fiber diet, chronic anal fistulas, smoking, multiple partners, anal intercourse practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection and immunosuppression. However, the presence of human papillomavirus represents the main risk factor for the development of anal cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological aspects of a series of patients with anal carcinomas diagnosed in Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiânia-Goiás, as well as the prevalence of human papillomavirus genome in these tumors. Clinical, pathological and socio-demographic data were collected from the respective medical files and paraffin blocks containing anal carcinomas specimens were used for DNA extraction and detection of human papillomavirus, by means of polymerase chain reaction, using short PCR fragment primers. Forty-three cases were selected and had the data analyzed, while 38 cases were tested for human papillomavirus genome detection. Among the evaluated patients, 62.8% were women; 53.4% of tumors were squamous cell carcinoma and 46.5% of the patients were aged between 60 and 75 years. Risk factors, such as smoking (39.5% and alcoholism (20.9% were recorded in the studied group. Lymph node metastases were detected in 30.2% of cases and 7.0% had distant metastasis. The detection of human papillomavirus DNA was positive in 76% of cases assessed and this was significantly associated with squamous cell carcinomas. Aggressive behavior and advanced stage of anal cancer described in this study highlight the need for preventive measures that contemplate these tumors, including vaccination against human papillomavirus. Resumo: O câncer anal é relativamente raro, entretanto, sua incidência aumentou nos últimos anos. Vários fatores de risco são associados ao

  20. Recommendations of technical specifications for ethanol and its blends (E6) and the infrastructure for their management in Mexico; Recomendaciones de especificaciones tecnicas para el etanol y sus mezclas (E6) y la infraestructura para su manejo en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the importance and benefits of using ethanol-gasoline blend as a substitute for pure gasoline. It presents data of global ethanol market, as well as major producers, processes involved for different raw materials and productivity indicators. It discusses the main properties to be monitored in ethanol and the importance of each one. It also examines the impact of the addition of ethanol in automotive gasoline and the influence of each property in the operation of the cars and the environment. It presents an assessment of the international specifications anhydrous ethanol used in the United States, Brazil and the European Union as well as suggestions for limits harmonization of the main parameters and methodologies, from recently published studies (White Paper-Bioetahnol Guidelines Task Force and to Ethanol from Worldwide Fuel Charter Committee). It includes the specification of Brazilian gasoline, added with 25% of ethanol (E25). It suggests an anhydrous ethanol specification and a specification for gasoline mixtures / ethanol E6 for implementation in Mexico. It presents a prioritization of laboratory testing methods for ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in three categories, indicating the most appropriate test to be used at different points in the distribution chain of products. It discusses the impact of ethanol on the distribution facilities for fuels, actions to control potential problems, selection of materials and equipment, safety procedures and presents the mixing gasoline / ethanol. It also describes the Brazilian system of production / distribution of fuels and the experience of this country to control fuel quality from the legislation. It includes a table with the top teams, their costs, Brazilian suppliers and a list of Brazilian standards for fuel storage and transport. Finally, we present some suggestions that may be important to ensure the evolution of specifications of ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in the course of the

  1. MVA E2 recombinant vaccine in the treatment of human papillomavirus infection in men presenting intraurethral flat condyloma: a phase I/II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran Y Carvajal, Antonio; de la Garza, Alfonso; Cruz Quiroz, Benitez Jose Cecilio; Vazquez Zea, Eduardo; Díaz Estrada, Ismael; Mendez Fuentez, Ernesto; López Contreras, Mario; Andrade-Manzano, Alejandro; Padilla, Santiago; Varela, Axel Ramírez; Rosales, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    examination after 4 weeks of MVA E2 treatment. These patients showed complete elimination of flat condyloma in the urethra and no acetowhite spots were detected over the prepuce. In two other patients the acetowhite spots and flat condyloma did not diminish. All patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and E2 protein, and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Viral DNA was not detected in MVA E2-treated patients. In the control group, 13 of 20 patients were free of lesions. Three of these patients had recurrence of lesions after 3 months of treatment and none of the patients developed specific antibodies against cancer cells. In contrast, patients treated with MVA E2 did not show any recurrence of lesions after 1 year of treatment. In addition, none of the patients had local or systemic adverse effects according to the WHO classification 1-4. Therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 proved to be very effective in stimulating the immune system against papillomavirus, and in generating regression of flat condyloma lesions in men.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  3. Immune evasion mechanisms of human papillomavirus: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Alina; Riemer, Angelika B

    2018-01-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most frequently sexually transmitted agent in the world. It can cause cervical and other anogenital malignancies, and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV has the unique ability to persist in the host's epithelium for a long time-longer than most viruses do-which is necessary to complete its replication cycle. To this end, HPV has developed a variety of immune evasion mechanisms, which unfortunately also favor the progression of the disease from infection to chronic dysplasia and eventually to cancer. This article summarizes the current knowledge about HPV immune evasion strategies. A special emphasis lies in HPV-mediated changes of the antigen processing machinery, which is generating epitopes for T cells and contributes to the detectability of infected cells. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Human papillomavirus vaccination in the prevention of cervical neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Astbury, Katharine

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women worldwide. Although the introduction of comprehensive screening programs has reduced the disease incidence in developed countries, it remains a major problem in the developing world. The recent licensing of 2 vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and HPV-18, the viruses responsible for 70% of cervical cancer cases, offers the hope of disease prevention. In this article, we review the role of HPV in the etiology of cervical cancer and the evidence to support the introduction of vaccination programs in young women and discuss the potential obstacles to widespread vaccination. In addition, we discuss the issues that remain to be elucidated, including the potential need for booster doses of the vaccine and the role of concomitant vaccination in men.

  5. Novel laboratory mouse papillomavirus (MusPV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, A; Ghim, S; Joh, J; Chepkoech, I; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, J P

    2011-03-01

    Most papillomaviruses (PVs) are oncogenic. There are at least 100 different human PVs and 65 nonhuman vertebrate hosts, including wild rodents, which have species-specific PV infections. Florid papillomatosis arose in a colony of NMRI-Foxn1(nu)/Foxn1(nu) (nude) mice at the Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer in India. Lesions appeared at the mucocutaneous junctions of the nose and mouth. Histologically, lesions were classical papillomas with epidermal hyperplasia on thin fibrovascular stalks in a verrucous pattern. Koilocytotic cells were observed in the stratum granulosum of the papillomatous lesions. Immunohistochemically, these abnormal cells were positive for PV group-specific antigens. With transmission electron microscopy, virus particles were observed in crystalline intranuclear inclusions within keratinocytes. The presence of a mouse PV, designated MusPV, was confirmed by amplification of PV DNA with degenerative primers specific for PVs. This report is the first of a PV and its related disease in laboratory mice.

  6. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Human papillomavirus type 45 propagation, infection, and neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Wilson, Susan; Mullikin, Brian; Suzich, JoAnn; Meyers, Craig

    2003-01-01

    The organotypic (raft) culture system has allowed the study of the entire differentiation-dependent life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including virion morphogenesis. We introduced linearized HPV45 genomic DNA into primary keratinocytes, where it recircularized and maintained episomally at a range of 10-50 copies of HPV genomic DNA. Following epithelial stratification and differentiation in organotypic culture, virion morphogenesis occurred. HPV45 virions were purified from raft cultures and were able to infect keratinocytes in vitro. By testing a panel of HPV VLP antisera, we were able to demonstrate that the infection was neutralized not only with human HPV45 VLP-specific antiserum, but also with human HPV18 VLP-specific antiserum, demonstrating serological cross-reactivity between HPV18 and HPV45

  8. Human papillomavirus: cause of epithelial lacrimal sac neoplasia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian; von Buchwald, Christian; Cassonnet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac are rare but important entities that may carry grave prognoses. In this study the prevalence and possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac were evaluated. METHODS: Five papillomas and six...... 11 RNA was demonstrated in two papillomas. CONCLUSIONS: By analysing 11 epithelial lacrimal sac papillomas and carcinomas using PCR, DNA ISH and RNA ISH, we found HPV DNA in all investigated transitional epithelium tumours of the lacrimal sac. HPV RNA was present in two of eight epithelial lacrimal...... sac tumours positive for HPV DNA. As RNA degrades fast in paraffin-embedded tissue, only a small fraction of DNA-positive tumours can be expected to be RNA-positive. We therefore suggest that HPV infection is associated with the development of lacrimal sac papillomas and carcinomas....

  9. Social representations of human papillomavirus in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Carolina; Acosta, Jesús; Díaz Del Castillo, Adriana; Tovar, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Identifying DNA of Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been proposed as a new screening method for cervical cancer control. Conventionally, health education for screening programs is based on scientific information without considering any community cognitive processes. We examine HPV social representations of 124 men and women from diverse educational status living in Bogotá, Colombia. The social representation of HPV involves a series of figurative nuclei derived from meanings linked to scientific information. While women focused on symbols associated to contagion, men focused on its venereal character. Figurative nuclei also included long-term uncertainty, need or urgent treatment, and feelings of imminent death associated with cancer and chronic sexually transmitted infections. The social representation of HPV impeded many participants from clearly understanding written information about HPV transmission, clearance, and cancer risk; they are built into a framework of values, which must be deconstructed to allow women full participation in HPV screening programs.

  10. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination.

  11. Vaccines against papillomavirus infections and disease Vacunas contra el virus del papiloma humano y cáncer cervical invasor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lina Villa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the second cause of cancer-related deaths in women, the higher incidence being observed in developing countries. Infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV is considered the major risk factor for the development of malignancies in the uterine cervix. However, HPV is considered to be a necessary but not sufficient cause for cervical cancer and, therefore, other factors contribute to the carcinogenic process, both present in the environment and from the host. Studies performed in animals, and more recently in humans, indicate that vaccination against the capsid proteins of the virus can prevent efficiently from infection. Furthermore, therapeutic vaccines are under investigation aiming the regression of papillomavirus induced tumors. The scientific basis for the development of papillomavirus vaccines and present status of clinical trials will be addressed in this chapter.El cáncer de células escamosas del cérvix uterino es la segunda causa de muerte relacionada con cáncer en mujeres en el mundo; la incidencia más alta se ha observado en países en desarrollo. La infección con tipos oncogénicos de virus de papiloma humano es considerado el factor de riesgo principal para el desarrollo de malignidad en el cérvix uterino. Sin embargo, el virus es considerado una causa necesaria pero no suficiente para desarrollo de cáncer cervical y, por lo tanto, existen otros factores en el ambiente y en el huésped que contribuyen al proceso carcinogénico. Estudios desarrollados en animales, y más recientemente en humanos, indican que la vacunación en contra de la cápside de las proteínas del virus puede prevenir eficientemente la infección en forma profiláctica; además, las vacunas terapéuticas están bajo investigación con el propósito de promover regresión de los tumores inducidos por virus de papiloma humano. Las bases científicas de las vacunas desarrolladas contra este

  12. Health awareness among young women vaccinated against human papillomavirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bąk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Genital human papillomavirus (HPV infections are essentials factors in the development of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus vaccines can contribute to reducing the high incidence of this disease, provided that this form of prophylaxis is commonly accepted. Participation in vaccinations is restricted by the belief that their implementation and consequent feeling of safety will reduce women’s participation in other forms of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis and will encourage them to be sexually promiscuous. Aim of the research study : To determine the awareness of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis among young women vaccinated against HPV by comparing them with a group of unvaccinated women. Material and methods: The survey covered a group of 210 young women in the age range 18 to 20 years, who were vaccinated against HPV. Within the framework of comparison, the survey covered a group of 255 young HPV-unvaccinated women, adequately selected in respect of age and education. Results: The HPVvaccinated women declared participation in medical check-ups and cytological tests no less frequently than the unvaccinated women. In both groups, the usage of condoms, sexual partners hygiene, monogamy and smoking abstinence were determined as behaviours limiting the occurrence of cervical carcinoma. Conclusions: Awareness of the application of supplementary prophylaxis of cervical carcinoma was high among the HPV vaccinated woman and did not differ from the unvaccinated woman’s awareness. Young women did not show a tendency for promiscuous behaviours, and were more likely touse condoms in the prevention of cervical carcinoma than were the unvaccinated woman.

  13. Human Papillomavirus - Prevalence of High-Risk and Low-Risk Types among Females Aged 14-59 Years, National Health and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 45. Human Papillomavirus — Prevalence of High-risk and Low-risk ... on the STD Data and Statistics page . * HPV = human papillomavirus. NOTE: Error bars indicate 95% confidence interval. ...

  14. Phenomenological analysis of supersymmetric σ-models on coset spaces SO(10)/U(5) and E6/[SO(10)xU(1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyawelo, T.S.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss some phenomenological aspects of gauged supersymmetric σ-models on homogeneous coset-spaces E 6 /[SO(10)xU(1)] and SO(10)/U(5) which are some of the most interesting for phenomenology. We investigate in detail the vacuum configurations of these models, and study the resulting consequences for supersymmetry breaking and breaking of the internal symmetry. Some supersymmetric minima for both models with gauged full isometry groups E 6 and SO(10) are physically problematic as the Kaehler metric becomes singular ad hence the kinetic terms of the Goldstone boson multiplets vanish. This leads us to introduce recently proposed soft supersymmetry-breaking mass terms which displace the minimum away from the singulax point. A non-singular Kaehler metric breaks the linear subgroup SO(10)xU(1) of the E 6 model spontaneously. The particle spectrum of all these different models is computed. (author)

  15. Novel anti-metastatic action of cidofovir mediated by inhibition of E6/E7, CXCR4 and Rho/ROCK signaling in HPV tumor cells.

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    Abdessamad Amine

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is frequently associated with HPV infection. The expression of E6 and E7 HPV oncoproteins is a key factor in its carcinogenicity and might also influence its virulence, including metastatic conversion. The cellular mechanisms involved in metastatic spread remain elusive, but pro-adhesive receptors and their ligands, such as SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 are implicated. In the present study, we assessed the possible relationship between SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 signaling, E6/E7 status and the metastatic process. We found that SDF-1alpha stimulated the invasion of E6/E7-positive cancer cell lines (HeLa and TC-1 in Matrigel though CXCR4 and subsequent Rho/ROCK activation. In pulmonary metastatic foci generated by TC-1 cells IV injection a high proportion of cells expressed membrane-associated CXCR4. In both cases models (in vitro and in vivo cell adhesion and invasion was abrogated by CXCR4 immunological blockade supporting a contribution of SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 to the metastatic process. E6 and E7 silencing using stable knock-down and the approved anti-viral agent, Cidofovir decreased CXCR4 gene expression as well as both, constitutive and SDF-1alpha-induced cell invasion. In addition, Cidofovir inhibited lung metastasis (both adhesion and invasion supporting contribution of E6 and E7 oncoproteins to the metastatic process. Finally, potential signals activated downstream SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 and involved in lung homing of E6/E7-expressing tumor cells were investigated. The contribution of the Rho/ROCK pathway was suggested by the inhibitory effect triggered by Cidofovir and further confirmed using Y-27632 (a small molecule ROCK inhibitor. These data suggest a novel and highly translatable therapeutic approach to cervix cancer, by inhibition of adhesion and invasion of circulating HPV-positive tumor cells, using Cidofovir and/or ROCK inhibition.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Infection Among 2460 Men in Denmark: Prevalence in Relation to Age Using 2 Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebnes, Julie Buchholt; Munk, Christian; Nøhr, Bugge; Nielsen, Ann; Jørgensen, Hans Ole; Iftner, Thomas; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to understand the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in both men and women, to prevent the increasing HPV-related disease burden in men. Data on HPV prevalence among men in the general population are limited. In this cross-sectional population-based study, we aimed to estimate genital HPV infection prevalence in Danish men using 2 different test methods. Penile swab samples from 2460 male employees and conscripts at military barracks in Denmark were tested for HPV DNA with the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) method, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, Inno-LiPA. The overall and age- and type-specific prevalence of HPV infection with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and the correlation between the 2 assays was assessed. The overall HPV prevalence was 22.2% (95% CI, 20.6-23.9) in the HC2 test and 41.8% (95% CI, 39.9-43.8) with PCR. Of the PCR-positive samples, 50.9% were negative in the HC2 test. Of 183 PCR-positive samples that could not be genotyped (HPVX), 88.0% (95% CI, 83.2-92.7) were HC2 negative. The most prevalent types were HPV-51, HPV-16, HPV-66, HPV-53, and HPV-6. The prevalence of high-risk and low-risk HPV peaked among men aged 20 to 29 years, whereas the HPVX prevalence increased with age. Human papillomavirus is highly prevalent in the general male population of Denmark, with HPV-16 and HPV-51 being the most prevalent. Polymerase chain reaction detects twice as many positive samples as HC2 but includes HPVX, possibly representing cutaneous HPV types found on normal genital skin.

  17. Large scale genotype comparison of human papillomavirus E2-host interaction networks provides new insights for e2 molecular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Muller

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPV cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the early proteins expressed by HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential (designated high-risk HPV or HR-HPV. To advance the global understanding of HPV pathogenesis, we mapped the virus/host interaction networks of the E2 regulatory protein from 12 genotypes representative of the range of HPV pathogenicity. Large-scale identification of E2-interaction partners was performed by yeast two-hybrid screenings of a HaCaT cDNA library. Based on a high-confidence scoring scheme, a subset of these partners was then validated for pair-wise interaction in mammalian cells with the whole range of the 12 E2 proteins, allowing a comparative interaction analysis. Hierarchical clustering of E2-host interaction profiles mostly recapitulated HPV phylogeny and provides clues to the involvement of E2 in HPV infection. A set of cellular proteins could thus be identified discriminating, among the mucosal HPV, E2 proteins of HR-HPV 16 or 18 from the non-oncogenic genital HPV. The study of the interaction networks revealed a preferential hijacking of highly connected cellular proteins and the targeting of several functional families. These include transcription regulation, regulation of apoptosis, RNA processing, ubiquitination and intracellular trafficking. The present work provides an overview of E2 biological functions across multiple HPV genotypes.

  18. Large scale genotype comparison of human papillomavirus E2-host interaction networks provides new insights for e2 molecular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Mandy; Jacob, Yves; Jones, Louis; Weiss, Amélie; Brino, Laurent; Chantier, Thibault; Lotteau, Vincent; Favre, Michel; Demeret, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the early proteins expressed by HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential (designated high-risk HPV or HR-HPV). To advance the global understanding of HPV pathogenesis, we mapped the virus/host interaction networks of the E2 regulatory protein from 12 genotypes representative of the range of HPV pathogenicity. Large-scale identification of E2-interaction partners was performed by yeast two-hybrid screenings of a HaCaT cDNA library. Based on a high-confidence scoring scheme, a subset of these partners was then validated for pair-wise interaction in mammalian cells with the whole range of the 12 E2 proteins, allowing a comparative interaction analysis. Hierarchical clustering of E2-host interaction profiles mostly recapitulated HPV phylogeny and provides clues to the involvement of E2 in HPV infection. A set of cellular proteins could thus be identified discriminating, among the mucosal HPV, E2 proteins of HR-HPV 16 or 18 from the non-oncogenic genital HPV. The study of the interaction networks revealed a preferential hijacking of highly connected cellular proteins and the targeting of several functional families. These include transcription regulation, regulation of apoptosis, RNA processing, ubiquitination and intracellular trafficking. The present work provides an overview of E2 biological functions across multiple HPV genotypes.

  19. Human papillomavirus infects placental trophoblast and Hofbauer cells, but appears not to play a causal role in miscarriage and preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambühl, Lea M M; Leonhard, Anne K; Widen Zakhary, Carina; Jørgensen, Annemette; Blaakaer, Jan; Dybkaer, Karen; Baandrup, Ulrik; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sørensen, Suzette

    2017-10-01

    Recently, an association between human papillomavirus infection and both spontaneous abortion and spontaneous preterm delivery was suggested. However, the reported human papillomavirus prevalence in pregnant women varies considerably and reliable conclusions are difficult. We aimed to investigate human papillomavirus infection in placental tissue of a Danish study cohort. Furthermore, we studied the cellular localization of human papillomavirus. In this prospective case-control study, placental tissue was analyzed for human papillomavirus infection by nested PCR in the following four study groups: full-term delivery (n = 103), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 69), elective abortion (n = 54), and spontaneous abortion (n = 44). Moreover, human papillomavirus cellular target was identified using in situ hybridization. Human papillomavirus prevalence in placental tissue was 8.7% in full-term deliveries, 8.8% in spontaneous preterm deliveries, 10.9% in spontaneous abortions, and 20.4% in elective abortions. Twelve different human papillomavirus types were detected, and placental human papillomavirus infection was associated to a disease history of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus DNA was identified in trophoblast cells, cells of the placental villi mesenchyme including Hofbauer cells, and in parts of the encasing endometrium. Placental human papillomavirus infections are not likely to constitute a risk factor for spontaneous preterm labor or spontaneous abortions in the Danish population, although an effect of human papillomavirus DNA in placental cells cannot be excluded. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Maintenance of vascular endothelial cell-specific properties after immortalization with an amphotrophic replication-deficient retrovirus containing human papilloma virus 16 E6/E7 DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontijn, R.; Hop, C.; Brinkman, H. J.; Slater, R.; Westerveld, A.; van Mourik, J. A.; Pannekoek, H.

    1995-01-01

    Primary human vascular endothelial cells were immortalized by the integration of a single DNA copy of an amphotrophic, replication-deficient retrovirus containing the E6/E7 genes of human papilloma virus. To date, the resulting cell lines, designated EC-RF7 and EC-RF24, have been cultured for more

  1. The BPS spectrum of the 4d {N}=2 SCFT's H 1, H 2, D 4, E 6, E 7, E 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, Sergio; Del Zotto, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Extending results of 1112.3984, we show that all rank 1 {N}=2 SCFT's in the sequence H 1, H 2, D 4 E 6, E 7, E 8 have canonical finite BPS chambers containing precisely 2 h(F) = 12(∆ - 1) hypermultiplets. The BPS spectrum of the canonical BPS chambers saturates the conformal central charge c, and satisfies some intriguing numerology.

  2. Preventing human papillomavirus-related cancers: we are all in this together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Sarah; Scarinci, Isabel; Kimberlin, David; Straughn, J Michael

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus-related cancers, which include cervical, vulvovaginal, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers, are on the rise in the United States. Although the human papillomavirus vaccine has been on the market for 10 years, human papillomavirus vaccination rates are well below national goals. Research identified many barriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus vaccination, and provider recommendation remains the most important factor in parental and patient decisions to vaccinate. While much of the burden of human papillomavirus vaccine provision falls on pediatricians and primary care providers, they cannot do it alone. As clinicians who care for a large proportion of human papillomavirus-related conditions, obstetrician-gynecologists and other women's health care providers must share the responsibility for vaccination of eligible patients. Obstetrician-gynecologists can support the efforts to eradicate human papillomavirus-related disease in their patients and their families via multiple avenues, including providing the human papillomavirus vaccine and being community leaders in support of vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular methods for the detection of human papillomavirus infection: new insights into their role in diagnostics and epidemiological surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Piana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs comprise more than 180 genotypes. HPV infection is mainly diagnosed by molecular methods. The aim of our study was to review the main molecular methods used to diagnose HPV infection, underscoring their characteristics. Several methods have been developed for molecular diagnosis of Papilloma infection, such as those based on PCR technique. Another commercial non-PCR based diagnostic method is Hybrid Capture test; it is the only commercially available HPV DNA detection test approved by the FDA. Several Authors have suggested that viral load and E6/E7 transcripts could be used as surrogate markers of persistent HPV infection, being more specific predictors of progressive disease than the simple presence of HPV DNA. Validating clinical sensitivity and specificity of each technique and improving the interpretation of the results are essential; consequently, there is a clear need for well characterized international quality control panels to compare the various diagnostic methods. HPV DNA testing could be useful both as a primary screening test, alone or in combination with a Pap smear, for the early detection of cervical cancer precursors, and as triage test to select women with minor cytological abnormalities who will need further follow-up and to predict possible treatment failure in women with diagnosed high-grade intraepithelial lesions who have undergone excisional therapy. In the next future surveillance for HPV infections, based on these molecular methods, could represent an important step for the development of primary and secondary prophylactic interventions, such as new vaccines targeted to genotypes who might replace those previously prevalent.

  4. Human papillomavirus type 16 variants in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma in San Luis Potosí City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Revilla, Rubén; Pineda, Marco A; Ortiz-Valdez, Julio; Sánchez-Garza, Mireya; Riego, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Background In San Luis Potosí City cervical infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) associated to dysplastic lesions is more prevalent in younger women. In this work HPV16 subtypes and variants associated to low-grade intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) of 38 women residing in San Luis Potosí City were identified by comparing their E6 open reading frame sequences. Results Three European (E) variants (E-P, n = 27; E-T350G, n = 7; E-C188G, n = 2) and one AA-a variant (n = 2) were identified among the 38 HPV16 sequences analyzed. E-P variant sequences contained 23 single nucleotide changes, two of which (A334G, A404T) had not been described before and allowed the phylogenetic separation from the other variants. E-P A334G sequences were the most prevalent (22 cases, 57.9%), followed by the E-P Ref prototype (8 cases, 21.1%) and E-P A404T (1 case, 2.6%) sequences. The HSIL + ICC fraction was 0.21 for the E-P A334G variants and 0.00 for the E-P Ref variants. Conclusion We conclude that in the women included in this study the HPV16 E subtype is 19 times more frequent than the AA subtype; that the circulating E variants are E-P (71.1%) > E-T350G (18.4%) > E-C188G (5.3%); that 71.0% of the E-P sequences carry the A334G single nucleotide change and appear to correspond to a HPV16 variant characteristic of San Luis Potosi City more oncogenic than the E-P Ref prototype. PMID:19216802

  5. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Danielewski

    Full Text Available Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP (n = 17, genital warts (n = 43, anal cancer (n = 6 and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5, was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65% clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02. Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these

  6. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus cervical infection in female kidney graft recipients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Bronislawa; Mazanowska, Natalia; Ekiel, Alicja M; Durlik, Magdalena; Martirosian, Gayane; Wielgos, Mirosław; Kaminski, Pawel

    2012-06-18

    Immunosuppressive therapy protects the transplanted organ but predisposes the recipient to chronic infections and malignancies. Transplant patients are at risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer resulting from an impaired immune response in the case of primary infection or of reactivation of a latent infection with human papillomavirus of high oncogenic potential (HR-HPV). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HR-HPV cervical infections and CIN in 60 female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age in comparison to that in healthy controls. Cervical swabs were analyzed for the presence of HR-HPV DNA. HR-HPV-positive women remained under strict observation and were re-examined after 24 months for the presence of transforming HR-HPV infection by testing for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA. All the HR-HPV-positive patients were scheduled for further diagnostic tests including exfoliative cytology, colposcopy and cervical biopsy. The prevalence of HR-HPV did not differ significantly between the study group and the healthy controls (18% vs 25%, p = 0.37). There was no correlation between HR-HPV presence and the immunosuppresive regimen, underlying disease, graft function or time interval from transplantation. A higher prevalence of HR-HPV was observed in females who had had ≥ 2 sexual partners in the past. Among HR-HPV-positive patients, two cases of CIN2+ were diagnosed in each group. In the course of follow-up, transforming HR-HPV infections were detected in two kidney recipients and in one healthy female. Histologic examination confirmed another two cases of CIN2+ developing in the cervical canal. Female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age are as exposed to HR-HPV infection as are healthy individuals. Tests detecting the presence of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA offer a novel diagnostic opportunity in those patients, especially in those cases where lesions have developed in the cervical canal.

  7. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus cervical infection in female kidney graft recipients: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak Bronislawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunosuppressive therapy protects the transplanted organ but predisposes the recipient to chronic infections and malignancies. Transplant patients are at risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cervical cancer resulting from an impaired immune response in the case of primary infection or of reactivation of a latent infection with human papillomavirus of high oncogenic potential (HR-HPV. Methods The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HR-HPV cervical infections and CIN in 60 female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age in comparison to that in healthy controls. Cervical swabs were analyzed for the presence of HR-HPV DNA. HR-HPV-positive women remained under strict observation and were re-examined after 24 months for the presence of transforming HR-HPV infection by testing for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA. All the HR-HPV-positive patients were scheduled for further diagnostic tests including exfoliative cytology, colposcopy and cervical biopsy. Results The prevalence of HR-HPV did not differ significantly between the study group and the healthy controls (18% vs 25%, p = 0.37. There was no correlation between HR-HPV presence and the immunosuppresive regimen, underlying disease, graft function or time interval from transplantation. A higher prevalence of HR-HPV was observed in females who had had ≥2 sexual partners in the past. Among HR-HPV-positive patients, two cases of CIN2+ were diagnosed in each group. In the course of follow-up, transforming HR-HPV infections were detected in two kidney recipients and in one healthy female. Histologic examination confirmed another two cases of CIN2+ developing in the cervical canal. Conclusions Female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age are as exposed to HR-HPV infection as are healthy individuals. Tests detecting the presence of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA offer a novel diagnostic opportunity in those patients, especially in those cases where lesions have

  8. Zinc finger arrays binding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 genomic DNA: precursors of gene-therapeutics for in-situ reversal of associated cervical neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV types 16 a