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Sample records for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

  1. Differential diagnosis of focal pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, T. M.; Moojen, T. M.; van Geenen, R.; Rauws, E. A.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiation of focal, chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic cancer (PAC) poses a diagnostic dilemma. Both conditions may present with the same symptoms and signs. The complexity of differential diagnosis is enhanced because PAC is frequently associated with secondary inflammatory changes

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia

  3. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Churl Min; Kim, Ho Kyun; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Soon Yong; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1982-01-01

    Seventeen cases of cancers in and adjacent to the pancreas were studied by high resolution and wide field real time ultrasonographic scanner with 3.5 MHz linear array electronically focusing transducer. The result were as follows: 1. In a total of 17 cases, 7 cases were pancreatic cancers and the rests were 3 cases of ampulla of Vaster cancer, 3 cases of distal CBD cancers, and 4 cases of metastatic cancers, respectively. 2. Pancreatic cancers were located mainly in head portion, and metastatic cancers were noted in head, tail, and retropancreatic areas. 3. The sizes of all distal CBD cancer were less than 1.8 cm, usually smaller than other tumors, and the size of metastatic cancers were variable (1-6 cm). 4. The shape, margin, contour and echogenicity of the tumors were variable. 5. Pancreatic duct showed marked dilatation in one of pancreatic cancer, and mild dilatation in one of ampulla of Vater cancer. 6. The caliber of extrahepatic duct were moderately or markedly dilated in nearly all cases except 2 cases of pancreatic body cancer. 7. The pancreatic margin is partially obliterated in pancreatic and ampulla of Vater cancers but not in distal CBD cancer. 8. Gallbladder enlargement is secondary change due to the obstruction of extrahepatic bile duct. 9. Effects on the vessels are due to not only direct mass effect but direct invasion resulting in obliteration. The most commonly involved vessels are spleno-portal junction, splenic vein and portal vein. In case of pancreatic cancer in uncinate process, the superior mesenteric vessels are displaced anteriorly. 10. Surrounding metastatic lesions were suspected in pancreatic and ampulla of Vater cancer, but not seen in distal CBD cancer. 11. Ascites were seen in only two cases of metastasis

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iglesias García

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 4%, without significant changes over the last 50 years. This poor survival rate and bad prognosis are associated with the diagnosis of advanced-stage disease, which precludes the only potential curative treatment - surgical resection. In this setting, the main objective in the management of pancreatic cancer is to perform an early diagnosis and a correct staging of the disease. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS appears to be an essential tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. EUS diagnostic accuracy for detecting pancreatic tumors ranges from 85 to 100%, clearly superior to other imaging techniques. EUS accuracy for the local staging of pancreatic cancer ranges from 70 to 90%, superior or equivalent to other imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration allows a cyto-histological diagnosis in nearly 90% of cases, with a very low complication rate. At present, the formal indications for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration are the necessity of palliative treatment or whenever the possibility of neoadjuvant treatment is present. It could be also indicated to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma from other pancreatic conditions, like lymphoma, metastasis, autoimmune pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis. We can conclude that EUS is an essential tool in the management of patients with pancreatic tumors.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iglesias García

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 4%, without significant changes over the last 50 years. This poor survival rate and bad prognosis are associated with the diagnosis of advanced-stage disease, which precludes the only potential curative treatment - surgical resection. In this setting, the main objective in the management of pancreatic cancer is to perform an early diagnosis and a correct staging of the disease. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS appears to be an essential tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. EUS diagnostic accuracy for detecting pancreatic tumors ranges from 85 to 100%, clearly superior to other imaging techniques. EUS accuracy for the local staging of pancreatic cancer ranges from 70 to 90%, superior or equivalent to other imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration allows a cyto-histological diagnosis in nearly 90% of cases, with a very low complication rate. At present, the formal indications for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration are the necessity of palliative treatment or whenever the possibility of neoadjuvant treatment is present. It could be also indicated to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma from other pancreatic conditions, like lymphoma, metastasis, autoimmune pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis. We can conclude that EUS is an essential tool in the management of patients with pancreatic tumors.

  6. Computer-aided diagnosis of pancreatic and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Luis Lancho Tofé

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available When we talk about cancer diagnosis the most important thing is early diagnosis to prevent cancer cells from spreading. We may also consider the high cost of diagnostic tests. Our approach seeks to address both problems. It uses a software based on Bayesian networks that simulates the causeeffect relationships and gets the chance of suffering a pancreatic cancer or lung cancer. This software would support doctors and save a lot of time and resources.

  7. Multislice CT for preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Akihiko; Ishihara, Shin; Ito, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the ability of multislice (MS) CT to visualize and diagnose the progression of pancreatic cancer. With regard to local progression, good diagnosis was possible for detecting the invasion of the intrapancreatic bile duct, duodenum, portal vein, arteries and other organs, and liver metastasis. Sensitivity was high but specificity was not good for detecting the invasion of the anterior and posterior pancreatic tissue. This is thought to be because of the positive diagnosis with pancreatitis that accompanies cancer. Pancreatic plexus invasion was also thought to be a cause of the lipid elevation of the nerve plexus and decreased sensitivity accompanying pancreatitis. Identification of cancer invasion and tumor periphery changes based on concomitant pancreatitis also depends on the amount of fibrous stroma, but this will require further investigation. Factors other than the size of lymph node metastases also need to be investigated. MS-CT can provide detailed volume data in a short time and making it an essential test in diagnosing the stage of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  8. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

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    Bournet, Barbara [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Pointreau, Adeline; Delpu, Yannick; Selves, Janick; Torrisani, Jerome [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Buscail, Louis, E-mail: buscail.l@chu-toulouse.fr [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Cordelier, Pierre [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-24

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  9. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bournet, Barbara; Pointreau, Adeline; Delpu, Yannick; Selves, Janick; Torrisani, Jerome; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer

  10. Discussion of difficult problems of early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Xiaozhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a common malignant neoplasm of the pancreas with an extremely high mortality. Currently, the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is still not ideal. Attention should be paid to some clinical warning symptoms, such as unexplained abdominal and back pain, jaundice, and unexpected diabetes. Additionally, the combined use of CA19-9, CEA, and other tumor markers, the attention to biochemical indicators, the detection of mutation in KAI1 or p53 gene, and the exploration of the value of miRNA in clinical diagnosis are of great significance. On the other hand, ultrasound, CT, MRCP, ERCP, PET-CT, and other imaging methods, as well as effective collection of cytology specimens, should be performed. Thus, there is hope for the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer and early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Sawaki, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Chang, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the strategy for improving the poor prognosis of the pancreatic (P) cancer by its early imaging diagnosis followed by resection, based on recent findings on its high risk group. Epidemiological studies have revealed that patients with diabetes, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucious tumor, P cyst, familial history of P cancer, and hereditary P cancer syndrome are involved in the high risk group of P cancer. Imaging diagnosis with CT and/or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) followed by histological confirmation for resection can be a useful approach to improve the prognosis in those high risk, asymptomatic individuals with abnormal levels of P enzyme and tumor marker, and with US findings of P ductal dilation and cyst. The guideline 2006 for P cancer by Japan Pancreas Society shows the algorithm leading to the final diagnosis for the positive high risk group: firstly, CT and/or MRCP (MR cholangiopancreatography (CP)); or, in case of uncertainty, EUS and/or ERCP (E retrograde CP) and/or PET; and finally, cytological, histological diagnosis. The newer approach proposed recently for the group is: multi detector row (MD)-CT and EUS; then cytodiagnosis guided by ERCP and/or with fine needle aspiration by EUS, also a promising early diagnosis. As well, molecular biological approaches are supposedly useful for the future diagnosis. (R.T.)

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of pancreatitis and cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyareva, I.I.; Gajsenko, A.V.; Putseva, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fibrin fibrinogen splitting products (FSP), radioimmune trypsine, C-peptide and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in the blood of 82 patients with acute pancreatitis (edematous and hemorrhagic), and chronic recurrent pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, 42 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 34 patients with cancer of the pancreas (stages 3-4) and 22 healthy persons were studied. Results indicate a high diagnostic value of determination FSP, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with acute pancreatitis and chronic recurring pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with chronic pancreatitis associated with severe exocrinous insufficiency of the pancreas, KA 19-9 in patients with cancer of the pancreas

  13. Molecular biology-based diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hayato; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Mainly described are author's investigations of the title subject through clinical and basic diagnosis/therapeutic approach. Based on their consideration of carcinogenesis and pathological features of pancreatic cancer (PC), analysis of expression of cancer-related genes in clinically available samples like pancreatic juice and cells biopsied can result in attaining their purposes. Desmoplasia, a pathological feature of PC, possibly induces resistance to therapy and one of strategies is probably its suppression. Targeting stem cells of the mesenchyma as well as those of PC is also a strategy in future. Authors' studies have revealed that quantitation of hTERT (coding teromerase) mRNA levels in PC cells micro-dissected from cytological specimens is an accurate molecular biological diagnostic method applicable clinically. Other cancer-related genes are also useful for the diagnosis and mucin (MUC) family genes are shown to be typical ones for differentiating the precancerous PC, PC and chronic pancreatisis. Efficacy of standard gemcitabine chemotherapy can be individualized with molecular markers concerned to metabolism of the drug like dCK. Radiotherapy/radio-chemotherapy are not so satisfactory for PC treatment now. Authors have found elevated MMP-2 expression and HGF/c-Met signal activation in irradiated PC cells, which can increase the invasive capability; and stimulation of phosphorylation and activation of c-Met/MARK in co-culture of irradiated PC cells with messenchymal cells from PC, which possibly leads to progression of malignancy of PC through their interaction, of which suppression, therefore, can be a new approach to increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. Authors are making effort to introducing adenovirus therapy in clinic; exempli gratia (e.g.), the virus carrying wild type p53, a cancer-suppressive gene, induces apoptosis of PC cells often having its mutated gene. (T.T.)

  14. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  15. Differential diagnosis of pancreas cancer and chronic pancreatitis in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Saitou, Hiroya; Hiromura, Tadao; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Masahiro; Morita, Yutaka; Irie, Goro

    1987-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of pancreas cancer and chronic pancreatitis in Computed Tomography. CT pictures of 46 cases of pancreas cancer and 16 cases of chronic pancreatitis were reviewed to clarify a way of differential diagnosis of these two disorders. The conclusion obtained in this study is as below. 1) Well-defined cystic central low density is a sign of chronic pancreatitis, and in the other hand, the solid central low density is a sign of pancreas cancer. 2) Effect of contrast enhancement was greater in chronic pancreatitis than in pancreas cancer. 3) Possibility of pancreas cancer is high in a case which has a sign of vascular involvement but no definite sign of tumor. 4) Sensitivity, specificity, total accuracy is 76.7 %, 87.5 %, 75.8 % respectively. (author)

  16. Results of diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kazue; Okuaki, Koji; Ito, Masami; Katakura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1981-01-01

    Results of examination of pancreatic diseases, especially pancreatic cancer, conducted by CT during the past 3 years are summarized. The EMI CT Type 5000 or 5005 were used. During the 3 years from September 1976 to August 1979, a total of 1961 patients were examined by CT, and the upper abdomen was examined in 772 of these patients. In 97 patients, positive findings were obtained in the CT image of the pancreas. In 52 of these patients, the findings were confirmed operatively or by autopsy. Though cancer of the pancreas was diagnosed by CT in 30 patients, it was confirmed in 20 by surgical operation and in 1 by autopsy. Of the 9 misdiagnosed cases, 4 were cases of infiltration of the pancreas by carcinoma of the stomach or bile duct, and the other 5 were one case each of lipoma of the abdominal wall, normal pancreas, hyperplasia of Langerhans's islets of the pancreas tail, abscess between the pancreas and the posterior wall of the stomach, and choledocholithiasis. A case diagnosed by CT as cholelithiasis was a carcinoma measuring 5 x 5 x 6 cm located on the head of the pancreas, complicated by choledocholithiasis. The 22 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas were 9 with lesions less than 3.5 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm in size who could be radically operated, 6 who underwent exploratory laparotomy or autopsy, and 7 in whom operation was impossible. False negative and false positive CT results are also discussed. (author)

  17. Potential Applications of Nanotechnology for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

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    Joshua eMcCarroll

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in our understanding of pancreatic cancer and the emerging concept of personalized medicine for the treatment of this disease, it is still the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world. It is established that pancreatic cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease with a complex tumor microenvironment. Indeed the extensive stroma surrounding the cancer cells has been shown to be important in promoting tumor growth and metastases, as well as sequestering chemotherapeutic agents consequently decreasing delivery to the tumor cells. Nanotechnology has come to the forefront in the areas of medical diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic drug delivery. This review will focus on the potential applications of nanotechnology for diagnosis, imaging, and delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Usefulness and limitations in clinical reality''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Saga, Tsuneo; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fujimoto, Koji; Doi, Ryuichiro; Imamura, Masayuki; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    The present review will provide an overview of the literature concerning the FDG PET diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and a summary from our experience of 231 cases of pancreatic lesions. FDG PET can effectively differentiate pancreatic cancer from benign lesion with high accuracy. Newly-developed PET scanners can detect small pancreatic cancers, up to 7 mm in diameter, by their high resolution, which could make a great contribution to the early detection of resectable and potentially curable pancreatic cancers. FDG PET is useful and cost-beneficial in the pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer because an unexpected distant metastasis can be detected by whole-body PET in about 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. However, there are some drawbacks in PET diagnosis. A relatively wide overlap has been reported between semiquantitative uptake values obtained in cancers and those in inflammatory lesions. As for false-positive cases, active and chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes show high FDG accumulation and mimic pancreatic cancer with a shape of focal uptake. There were 8 false negative cases in the detection of pancreatic cancer by FDG PET, up to 33 mm in diameter, mainly because of their poor cellularity in cancer tissues. In addition, there are 19% of cancer cases with a decline in FDG uptake from 1 hr to 2 hr scan. FDG PET was recently applied to and was shown to be feasible in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions, such as intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Further investigations are required to clarify the clinical value of FDG PET in predicting prognosis of the pancreatic patients. (author) 124 refs

  19. Spiral (Helical) computed tomographic imaging for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer. Vascular and pancreatic invasions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, Masanori

    1997-01-01

    The development of several imaging techniques for diagnosing bile duct cancer have improved, however, its diagnosis at the early stage is still difficult. We discuss the significance of the spiral (helical) computed tomography (SCT) imaging for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer at an early stage. We performed, as a preoperative examination, SCT under intravenous angiography (IV-SCT) for all cases, which included 233 cases of benign bile duct diseases, 42 cases of gallbladder cancer and 22 cases of bile duct cancer. The accuracy rate of diagnosis ability of 42 cases of gallbladder cancer by IV-SCT was 91%, and that of portal vein invasion was 91%. In the cases of bile duct cancer, IV-SCT showed destructive images of the bile duct wall and the tumor images invaded into the pancreatic parenchyma, in the cases of invasion at the splenic vein and confluence site of the portal vein, IV-SCT gave clearer 3D images than conventional angiography. The accuracy rate of diagnosing pancreatic invasion in bile duct cancer by IV-SCT was 80%. However, it is still difficult to determine completely the layer structures of the bile duct and the invasion into the walls along the long axis. As the future development of SCT for the diagnosis of bile duct cancer, we expect further progression of diagnosis ability of bile duct cancer and the invasion level by the applying high resolution thin-section CT images or endoscopical images of the luminal organs in examining the bile duct. (K.H.)

  20. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

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    Stephen J. Lanspa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Systemic therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrezalova Vochyanova, I.; Salek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth comment cause of cancer-related death in men. Most patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed at advanced, non-resectable stage. Late detection, early metastases, difficult surgical approached, cancer resistant to systemic chemo and radiotherapy - all contribute to its in faust prognosis. Only about 5 % of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Gemcitabine - based combination treatments is the standard for advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of fluorouracil, folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin led to median survival of 11 months. No standard second-line treatment exists for pancreatic cancer. (author)

  2. PANCREATIC CANCER

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    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  3. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  4. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Assef, Mauricio Saab [Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Cesário Motta Jr. #61 Cep: 01221-020, São Paulo (Brazil); Raimondo, Massimo, E-mail: raimondo.massimo@mayo.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States)

    2011-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used.

  5. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used

  6. Incidence of and risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yujin; Kamisawa, Terumi; Anjiki, Hajime; Takuma, Kensuke; Egawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer sometimes occurs during the course of chronic pancreatitis. This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer associated with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatic cancer developing in 218 patients with chronic pancreatitis and clinical features of the chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer were studied. Nine patients developed pancreatic cancer. Average period from the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was 9.6 years. All pancreatic cancers were diagnosed at an advanced stage. Only 2 patients had been followed-up periodically. There were no significant differences between chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer and those who did not in male/female ratio (3.5 vs. 8), average age on diagnosis (65.0 vs. 56.5), alcoholic/non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (1.6 vs. 2.6), smoking habits (62.5% vs. 70.7%), diabetes mellitus (77.8% vs. 54.4%), and continued alcohol drinking (37.5% vs. 53.1%). Over the period examined, 4% of chronic pancreatitis patients developed pancreatic cancer. Sex ratio, onset age, etiology, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and continued alcohol drinking were not significant risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis patients. Periodic follow-up due to the possibility of pancreatic cancer is necessary in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  7. Problems in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer as seen in the autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goseki, Norihide; Okamoto, Atsutake; Onodera, Tokio; Tabata, Ikuo; Takizawa, Toichiro; Koike, Morio; Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Kamimae, Goro

    1984-01-01

    The results obtained from a pathological study of the cancer spread, postoperative recurrence and intraoperative radiotherapy in 68 autopsy cases of pancreatic cancer were as follows: 1) The study of pancreatic cancer was conducted by classifying the cases according to the location of the cancer; uncus, head, body and tail. Difference was seen in the mode of cancer spread and also in the clinical symptoms among the pancreatic cancers in each location. Especially, it was maintained that cancer in the uncus should be treated independently from the cancer in the head. 2) There was no difference in the mode of cancer spread between postoperative recurrence or intraoperative radiotherapy cases and non-operated or non-intraoperative radiotherapy cases. Moreover, it suggested one side of difficulty of the surgical treatment, that is, all cases considered curative operation were performed through histological study of the resected specimen at operation have had retroperitoneal recurrence. 3) By histological study of autopsy cases of intraoperative radiotherapy, it was suggested that cancer cells remained or regrew in the periphery of the radiotherapy field, which is a meaningful finding for evaluating intraoperative radiotherapy in the future. (author)

  8. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Wilson, Jeremy S; Smith, Ross C

    2017-08-21

    In 2015, the Australasian Pancreatic Club (APC) published the Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (http://pancreas.org.au/2016/01/pancreatic-exocrine-insufficiency-guidelines). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when normal digestion cannot be sustained due to insufficient pancreatic digestive enzyme activity. This may be related to a breakdown, at any point, in the pancreatic digestive chain: pancreatic stimulation; synthesis, release or transportation of pancreatic enzymes; or synchronisation of secretions to mix with ingested food. Main recommendations: The guidelines provide advice on diagnosis and management of PEI, noting the following: A high prevalence of PEI is seen in certain diseases and conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and pancreatic surgery. The main symptoms of PEI are steatorrhoea or diarrhoea, abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss. These symptoms are non-specific and often go undetected and untreated. PEI diagnosis is predominantly based on clinical findings and the presence of underlying disease. The likelihood of PEI in suspected patients has been categorised into three groups: definite, possible and unlikely. If left untreated, PEI may lead to complications related to fat malabsorption and malnutrition, and have an impact on quality of life. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains the mainstay of PEI treatment with the recommended adult initial enzyme dose being 25 000-40 000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 75 000-80 000 units of lipase per meal. Adjunct acid-suppressing therapy may be useful when patients still experience symptoms of PEI on high dose PERT. Nutritional management by an experienced dietitian is essential. Changes in management as a result of these guidelines: These are the first guidelines to classify PEI as being definite, possible or unlikely, and provide a diagnostic algorithm to

  9. Differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer from other solid tumours arising from the periampullary area on MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Suk Ki [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Departments of Radiology, Daejin Medical Center, Seognam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Hoon; Joo, Ijin; Jeon, Ju Hyun; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Sook [Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 266 Munhwa-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate CT features and differential diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to other solid tumours arising in the periampullary area. One hundred and ninety-five patients with pathologically proven, solid periampullary tumours, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 98), neuroendocrine tumours (n = 52), gastrointestinal stromal tumours (n = 31), and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (n = 14), underwent preoperative CT. Two radiologists reviewed CT features and rated the possibility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Statistically common findings for pancreatic adenocarcinoma included: patient age >50 years; ill-defined margin; completely solid mass; homogeneous enhancement; hypoenhancement on arterial and venous phases; atrophy; and duct dilatation. Statistically common findings for GIST included: heterogeneous enhancement; hyperenhancement on arterial and venous phases; rim enhancement; and prominent feeding arteries. The hyperenhancement on arterial and venous phases is statistically common in NET, and heterogeneous enhancement, hypoenhancement on the arterial and venous phases are statistically common in SPN. Diagnostic performance of CT for differentiating pancreatic adenocarcinomas from other solid periampullary tumours was 0.962 and 0.977 with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.824). CT is useful not only for differentiating pancreatic adenocarcinoma form other solid tumours but also for differentiating between other solid tumours, including NET, SPN, and GIST, arising in the periampullary area. (orig.)

  10. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    : Death is monitored using data from the Danish Civil Registry. This registry monitors the survival status of the Danish population, and the registration is virtually complete. All data in the database are audited by all participating institutions, with respect to baseline characteristics, key indicators......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients...... with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations...

  11. Pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.; Fisher, B.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic advances of the last 30 years have left unchanged the course and prognosis of carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas. The most important reasons for this are the anatomic location and biologic nature of the tumor. An additional factor of importance is the consistently reported 4 to 9 month delay in diagnosis, also unchanged in 30 years. Recent controversy has developed concerning the mainstay of our current surgical treatment surgical treatment, the Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy and its modifications, and its role as the most efficacious surgical approach to this disease. It is the purpose of this paper to review and summarize the clinical characteristics of carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas and to review and reassess the standard operative approach. Cancer of the head, body, and tail of the pancreas will be considered together because they have many features in common

  12. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Yukihiro; Ueda, Noriyuki; Takasago, Noritsugu; Minemoto, Hiromasa; Namiki, Masayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  13. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  14. pancreatic steatosis: diagnosis and clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Daðdeviren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic steatosis (PS, with increased use of abdominal imaging in recent years generally appears as incidental. But it is a condition that is often overlooked. The reason for this is not yet fully demonstrated the clinical significance of PS while. However, in recent years, there are some studies conducted on the relationship with ps and other disease such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In this review, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and clinical characteristics of ps were evaluated in the light of recent literature and current approaches. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 107-112

  15. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  16. Applicative Value of Serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 in Diagnosis and Prognosis for Patients with Pancreatic Cancer Treated by Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu-Lei; Lan, Chao; Pei, Hui; Yang, Shuang-Ning; Liu, Yan-Fen; Xiao, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the application value of serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 in diagnosis and prognosis of pancreatic cancer cases treated with concurrent chemotherapy. 52 patients with pancreatic cancer, 40 with benign pancreatic diseases and 40 healthy people were selected. The electrochemiluminescence immunoassay method was used for detecting levels of CA19-9, CEA and CA125, and a CanAg CA242 enzyme linked immunoassay kit for assessing the level of CA242. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for analyzing the prognostic factors of patients with pancreatic cancer. The Cox proportional hazard model was applied for analyzing the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidential interval (CI) for survival time of patients with pancreatic cancer. The levels of serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 in patients with pancreatic cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign pancreatic diseases and healthy people (PCEA. The specificity of CA242 is the highest, followed by CA125, CEA and CA19-9. The sensitivity and specificity of joint detection of serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125and CA242 were 90.4% and 93.8%, obviously higher than single detection of those markers in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The median survival time of 52 patients with pancreatic cancer was 10 months (95% CI7.389~12.611).. Patients with the increasing level of serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125, CA242 had shorter survival times (P=0.047. 0.043, 0.0041, 0.029). COX regression analysis showed that CA19-9 was an independent prognostic factor for patients with pancreatic cancer (P=0.001, 95%CI 2.591~38.243). The detection of serum tumor markers (CA19.9, CEA, CA125 and CA242) is conducive to the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and joint detection of tumor markers helps improve the diagnostic efficiency. Moreover, CA19-9 is an independent prognostic factor for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  17. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  18. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  19. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  20. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis decreases the risk for pancreatic cancer: a multicenter retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Junji; Tanaka, Masao; Ohtsuka, Takao; Tokunaga, Shoji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is suggested to be one of the risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the high incidence of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis in Japan and to determine the factors associated with the risk for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The working group of the Research Committee of Intractable Disease supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan carried out a nationwide survey to investigate the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This retrospective study included patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis who had had at least 2 years of follow-up. They were contacted through 22 Japanese referral centers experienced in the management of chronic pancreatitis. The standardized incidence ratio (95 CI) of pancreatic cancer was 11.8 (7.1-18.4). The incidence of pancreatic cancer was significantly lower in patients who had received surgery for chronic pancreatitis than in those who had not undergone surgery (hazard ratio estimated by Cox regression 0.11; 95% CI, 0.0014-0.80; P = .03). Patients who continued to drink alcohol after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis showed a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer than those who stopped drinking after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 5.07; 95% CI, 1.13-22.73; P = .03). This study confirmed that chronic pancreatitis is an important risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Patients who underwent surgery for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis had significantly lower incidences of pancreatic cancer. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis may inhibit the development of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    . The introduction of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration allows a preoperative diagnosis in patients with resectable cancer, as well as a confirmation of diagnosis before chemoradiotherapy for those that are not. This comprehensive review highlighted the diagnostic capabilities of EUS including the newest refinements...

  2. The epidemiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes of hospital admission in the United States. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Pancreatic cancer is associated with a high mortality rate and is one of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect the black population more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter the progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  4. Hypermutation in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Humphris, Jeremy L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J.; Johns, Amber L.; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K.; Miller, David K.; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S.; Quinn, Michael C.J.; Bruxner, Timothy J.C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechan...

  5. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  6. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tumor markers CA19-9, CA242 and CEA in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Yang, Jun; Li, Hongjuan; Wu, Yihua; Zhang, Honghe; Chen, Wenhu

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis and early detection is crucial for improving patient prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the sensitivity and specificity of single test of CA19-9, CA242, and CEA, as well as combination test in pancreatic cancer detection. We searched PubMed, Embase, Medline, and Wanfang databases for studies that evaluated the diagnostic validity of CA19-9, CA242, and CEA between January 1990 and September 2014. Data were analyzed by Meta-Disc and STATA software. A total of 21 studies including 3497 participants, which fulfilled the inclusion criteria were considered for analysis. The pooled sensitivities for CA19-9, CA242, and CEA were 75.4 (95% CI: 73.4-77.4), 67.8 (95% CI: 65.5-70), and 39.5 (95% CI: 37.3-41.7), respectively. The pooled specificities of CA19-9, CA242, and CEA were 77.6 (95% CI: 75.4-79.7), 83 (95% CI: 81-85), and 81.3 (95% CI: 79.3-83.2), respectively. Parallel combination of CA19-9+CA242 has a higher sensitivity (89, 95% CI: 80-95) without impairing the specificity (75, 95% CI: 67-82). Our meta-analysis showed that CA242 and CA19-9 have better performance in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer than CEA. Furthermore, parallel combination test of CA19-9+CA242 could be of better diagnostic value than individual CA242 or CA19-9 test.

  8. Diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautz, W.; Skalej, M.; Kalender, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on CT scanners with continuously rotating measurement systems enable volume scanning of a body section when used with continuous patient transport (spiral CT). Because of its relatively small volume, the complete pancreas can be scanned in a single breathhold. For pancreatic examinations, 1 continuous, 1- second scans with a table feed of 10 mm/sec were obtained on a Siemens SOMATOM Plus. Contrast material (50 mL) was power injected immediately before the start of measurements. CT images were reconstructed from the volume data set at 2-mm intervals. Fifty-six patients with pancreatitis, carcinoma or metastases of the pancreas; endocrine-active tumors; or Echinococcus were examined with both conventional and spiral CT

  9. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis decreased when the lag period was increased to 5 years (EE: 7.90; 95% CI: 4.26-14.66) or a minimum of 9 years (EE: 3.53; 95% CI: 1.69-7.38). In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, but the association diminishes with long-term follow-up. Five years after diagnosis, chronic pancreatitis patients have a nearly eight-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that common practice on inducing a 2-year lag period in these studies may not be sufficient. We also recommend a close follow-up in the first years following a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to avoid overlooking a pancreatic cancer.

  11. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  13. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yayoi; Hamano, Hideaki; Oguchi, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been widely used for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Because autoimmune pancreatitis is easily misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer and can be tested for by FDG-PET analysis based on the presence of suspected pancreatic cancer, we attempted to clarify the differences in FDG-PET findings between the two conditions. We compared FDG-PET findings between 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and 26 patients with pancreatic cancer. The findings were evaluated visually or semiquantitatively using the maximum standardized uptake value and the accumulation pattern of FDG. FDG uptake was found in all 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas it was found in 19 of 26 patients (73.1%) with pancreatic cancer. An accumulation pattern characterized by nodular shapes was significantly more frequent in pancreatic cancer, whereas a longitudinal shape indicated autoimmune pancreatitis. Heterogeneous accumulation was found in almost all cases of autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas homogeneous accumulation was found in pancreatic cancer. Significantly more cases of pancreatic cancer showed solitary localization, whereas multiple localization in the pancreas favored the presence of autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG uptake by the hilar lymph node was significantly more frequent in autoimmune pancreatitis than in pancreatic cancer, and uptake by the lachrymal gland, salivary gland, biliary duct, retroperitoneal space, and prostate were seen only in autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG-PET is a useful tool for differentiating autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer, if the accumulation pattern and extrapancreatic involvement are considered. IgG4 measurement and other current image tests can further confirm the diagnosis. (author)

  15. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  16. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  17. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  19. Pancreatic cancer: any prospects for prevention?

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, A.

    1999-01-01

    Primary prevention of pancreatic cancer and public health measures to reduce its incidence are dependent on data from epidemiological studies. Currently, the only definite risk factor is smoking, although a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may be protective. The K-ras mutation may have a role in diagnosis and screening.


Keywords: pancreatic cancer; epidemiology; risk factors; smoking; diet; alcohol

  20. Out-FOXing Pancreatic Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancer types worldwide with increasing incidence and mortality rates in the United States. Consequently, it is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2020. Poor patient outcomes are due to a combination of diagnosis at an advanced stage and a lack of effective treatments. However, a better understanding of the molecular pathways at work in pancreatic cancers may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  1. Current status and progress of pancreatic cancer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Quan-Jun; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2015-07-14

    Cancer is currently one of the most important public health problems in the world. Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with poor prognosis. As in most other countries, the health burden of pancreatic cancer in China is increasing, with annual mortality rates almost equal to incidence rates. The increasing trend of pancreatic cancer incidence is more significant in the rural areas than in the urban areas. Annual diagnoses and deaths of pancreatic cancer in China are now beyond the number of cases in the United States. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates that cases in China account for 19.45% (65727/337872) of all newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 19.27% (63662/330391) of all deaths from pancreatic cancer worldwide. The population's growing socioeconomic status contributes to the rapid increase of China's proportional contribution to global rates. Here, we present an overview of control programs for pancreatic cancer in China focusing on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we describe key epidemiological, demographic, and socioeconomic differences between China and developed countries. Facts including no nationwide screening program for pancreatic cancer, delay in early detection resulting in a late stage at presentation, lack of awareness of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese population, and low investment compared with other cancer types by government have led to backwardness in China's pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment. Finally, we suggest measures to improve health outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients in China.

  2. The Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio at Diagnosis Is Significantly Associated with Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Piciucchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR, the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI, the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC prognosis. However, most studies have investigated patients undergoing surgery, and few of them have compared these scores. We aimed at evaluating the association between inflammatory-based scores and PDAC prognosis. In a single center cohort study, inflammatory-based scores were assessed at diagnosis and their prognostic relevance as well as that of clinic-pathological variables were evaluated through multiple logistic regression and survival probability analysis. In 206 patients, age, male sex, tumor size, presence of distant metastasis, access to chemotherapy, and an NLR > 5 but not other scores were associated with overall survival (OS at multivariate analysis. Patients with an NLR < 5 had a median survival of 12 months compared to 4 months in those with an NLR > 5. In the 81 patients with distant metastasis at diagnosis, an NLR > 5 resulted in the only variable significantly associated with survival. Among patients with metastatic disease who received chemotherapy, the median survival was 3 months in patients with an NLR > 5 and 7 months in those with an NLR < 5. The NLR might drive therapeutic options in PDAC patients, especially in the setting of metastatic disease.

  3. Clinical study on the efficacy of contrast enhanced CT scan for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. With special reference to the evaluation of new CT findings useful for differentiation from tumor-forming pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Naotaka; Saisho, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ohto, Masao

    1995-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PCA) and tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP) is made based on early-phase staining pattern in contrast enhanced X-ray CT (CE-CT). In the present study, I evaluated also late-phase findings and findings by tumor diameter and identified new CE-CT findings useful for differential diagnosis. CE-CT findings useful for the diagnosis of small pancreatic cancer were also evaluated. Included in the present study were 68 PCA cases and 39 TFP cases examined in this and affiliated facilities over the last 11 years. In the early phase, density in tumorous areas was useful for differentiating PCA and TFP, because 94 % of tumorous areas showed hypodensity in PCA, while 85 % showed isodensity in TFP. However, differentiation was difficult due to hypodensity, similar to PCA, in the remaining 15% of TFP. The following five findings were found to be PCA-specific with specificity rates of 95% and over: non-staining area (early phase), hyperdensity spot and line (early phase), hyperdensity zone (early and late phase) and hyperdensity (late phase). The diagnosis of PCA could be made more accurately using these findings. The incidence of non-staining area or hyperdensity spot and line, early-phase findings, was also useful for diagnosis, as it increased with the tumor size, from 13 % when the tumor size was 20 mm or smaller to 80% when it was 21 mm or larger. The incidence of late-phase hyperdensity or hyperdensity zone was higher for smaller tumors: 71% for tumors of 20mm or smaller. Therefore, hyperdensity in tumorous areas in the late phase is thought to be useful in the diagnosis of small pancreatic cancer. (author)

  4. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  5. Current knowledge on pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eIovanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the deregulation of many signalling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signalling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovanna, Juan [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France); Mallmann, Maria Cecilia [Centre d’Investigation Clinique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gonçalves, Anthony [Département d’Oncologie Médicale, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Turrini, Olivier [Département de Chirurgie Oncologique, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Dagorn, Jean-Charles, E-mail: juan.iovanna@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France)

    2012-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  9. Apoptosis: Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalthoff Holger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis, because of late diagnosis and lack of response to chemo- and/or radiation therapies. Resistance to apoptosis mainly causes this insensitivity to conventional therapies. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a central regulator of tissue homeostasis. Certain genetic disturbances of apoptotic signaling pathways have been found in carcinomas leading to tumor development and progression. In the past few years, the knowledge about the complex pathways of apoptosis has strongly increased and new therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge are being developed. This review will focus on the role of apoptotic proteins contributing to pancreatic cancer development and progression and will demonstrate possible targets to influence this deadly disease.

  10. Diagnosis and management of chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V; Toskes, P

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis represents a condition that is challenging for clinicians secondary to the difficulty in making an accurate diagnosis and the less than satisfactory means of managing chronic pain. This review emphasises the various manifestations that patients with chronic pancreatitis may have and describes recent advances in medical and surgical therapy. It is probable that many patients with chronic abdominal pain are suffering from chronic pancreatitis that is not appreciated. As the...

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic pancreatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Akihiko; Isayama, Kenji; Nakatani, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of traumatic pancreatic injury in the acute stage is difficult to establish blood tests and abdominal findings alone. Moreover, to determine treatment strategies, it is important not only that a pancreatic injury is diagnosed but also whether a pancreatic ductal injury can be found. At our center, to diagnose isolated pancreatic injuries, we actively perform endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in addition to abdominal CT at the time of admission. For cases with complications such as abdominal and other organ injuries, we perform a laparotomy to ascertain whether a pancreatic duct injury is present. In regard to treatment options, for grade III injuries to the pancreatic body and tail, we basically choose distal pancreatectomy, but we also consider the Bracy method depending on the case. As for grade III injuries to the pancreatic head, we primarily choose pancreaticoduodenectomy, but also apply drainage if the situation calls for it. However, pancreatic injuries are often complicated by injuries of other regions of the body. Thus, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic injury should be based on a comprehensive decision regarding early prioritization of treatment, taking hemodynamics into consideration after admission, and how to minimize complications such as anastomotic leak and pancreatic fistulas. (author)

  12. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Indicative findings of pancreatic cancer in prediagnostic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Choi, Jin-Young; Hong, Hye-Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We examined 20 prediagnostic CTs from 16 patients for whom the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was delayed until full diagnostic CT was performed. Three radiologists independently reviewed the prediagnostic CTs along with 50 CTs of control subjects, including patients without pancreatic disease (n = 38) or with chronic pancreatitis without calcification visible on CT (n=12). The reviewers recorded the presence of biliary or pancreatic ductal dilation, interruption of the pancreatic duct, distal parenchymal atrophy, contour abnormality and focal hypoattenuation. Frequency, sensitivity and specificity of the significant findings were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was performed. Findings indicative of pancreatic cancer were seen on 85% (17/20) of the prediagnostic CTs. Patients with pancreatic cancer were significantly (p<0.05) more likely to show focal hypoattenuation, pancreatic duct dilation, interruption of the pancreatic duct, and distal parenchymal atrophy, with sensitivities and specificities of 75%/84%, 50%/78%, 45%/82% and 45%/96%, respectively. Focal hypoattenuation and distal parenchymal atrophy were the independent predictors of pancreatic cancer with odds ratios of 20.92 and 11.22, respectively. In conclusion, focal hypoattenuation and pancreatic duct dilation with or without interruption, especially when accompanied by distal parenchymal atrophy, were the most useful findings for avoiding delayed diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (orig.)

  14. Differential diagnosis of small solid pancreatic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph Frank; Sahai, Anand Vasante; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is typically diagnosed at a late stage. Little is known about the incidental finding of early-stage PDAC. The aim of the current study was to determine the etiology of small solid pancreatic lesions (≤15 mm) to optimize clinical......-enhanced US allowed differential diagnosis of PDAC and non-PDAC in 189 of 219 patients (86%). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 40% of patients with small solid pancreatic lesions had very early stage PDAC. Approximately 60% of small solid pancreatic lesions ≤15 mm are not PDAC and, therefore, do not require radical...

  15. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  16. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by spiral angio CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kohi; Nakao, Norio; Takayasu, Yukio; Okawa, Tomohisa

    1995-01-01

    Spiral angio were performed with injection of 30 ml of contrast material at a rate of 1 ml/sec with a scan delay of 6 sec through catheter into the celiac artery while the blood flow of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was occluded by the inflated balloon catheter. Spiral CT scans were obtained using Somatom Plus (Siemens). Parameter for spiral CT were 24-sec acquisition time, 5 mm collimation, 5 mm/sec table incrementation. Reconstructions were performed every 5 mm. Pancreatic cancers were characteristically depicted with spiral angio CT as hypodensity relative to normal enhanced pancreatic parenchyma. On dynamic angio CT studies performed in pancreatic cancers, the area of cancer and normal parenchyma had maximum level of enhancement at 10-15 sec after injection of contrast material via catheter into the celiac, and there was no difference in enhancement between tumor and normal parenchyma. On the other hand, the lesions of cancer were revealed as hypodensity with spiral angio CT. In case of chronic pancreatitis, the enhancement of the entire pancreas obtained with spiral angio CT was homogeneous. Insulinoma in the tail of pancreas was detected by spiral angio CT but was not detected by both selective angiography and conventional CT. Three-dimensional (3-D) rendering spiral angio CT data shows the extent of vascular involvement by pancreatic cancer and provides useful information for surgical planning. Spiral angio CT is the most useful procedure for diagnosis of pancreatic tumor. (author)

  17. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  18. Pancreatic cancer and depression: myth and truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various studies reported remarkable high incidence rates of depression in cancer patients compared with the general population. Pancreatic cancer is still one of the malignancies with the worst prognosis and therefore it seems quite logical that it is one of the malignancies with the highest incidence rates of major depression. However, what about the scientific background of this relationship? Is depression in patients suffering from pancreatic cancer just due to the confrontation with a life threatening disease and its somatic symptoms or is depression in this particular group of patients a feature of pancreatic cancer per se? Discussion Several studies provide evidence of depression to precede the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and some studies even blame it for its detrimental influence on survival. The immense impact of emotional distress on quality of life of cancer patients enhances the need for its early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Knowledge about underlying pathophysiological mechanisms is required to provide the optimal therapy. Summary A review of the literature on this issue should reveal which are the facts and what is myth.

  19. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  20. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  1. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, Young Hwan [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  2. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  3. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C.; Mornex, F.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  5. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, María José; Saez, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sabat, Miriam; López-Ben, Santiago; de Llorens, Rafael; Aleixandre, Rosa Núria; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies. CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls. The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC) of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients. Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  6. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Ferri

    Full Text Available There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies.CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls.The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients.Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis: An illustrated guide to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, R.D.; Rofe, C.J.; Bryant, T.J.C.; Hacking, C.N.; Stedman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of “IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease” has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated

  8. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  9. Increased pancreatic cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Michael; Børge Johannesen, Tom; Gilbert, Ethel S; Stovall, Marilyn; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Rajaraman, Preetha; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Aleman, Berthe M P; Andersson, Michael; Curtis, Rochelle E; Dores, Graça M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Hall, Per; Holowaty, Eric J; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Langmark, Frøydis; Lynch, Charles F; Pukkala, Eero; Storm, Hans H; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Morton, Lindsay M; Fossa, Sophie D; Travis, Lois B

    2016-09-27

    Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated among testicular cancer (TC) survivors. However, the roles of specific treatments are unclear. Among 23 982 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1947-1991, doses from radiotherapy to the pancreas were estimated for 80 pancreatic cancer patients and 145 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Cumulative incidence of second primary pancreatic cancer was 1.1% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. Radiotherapy (72 (90%) cases and 115 (80%) controls) was associated with a 2.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-7.8) increased risk. The OR increased linearly by 0.12 per Gy to the pancreas (P-trendcancer risk, and persists for over 20 years. These excesses, although small, should be considered when radiotherapy with exposure to the pancreas is considered for newly diagnosed patients. Additional data are needed on the role of chemotherapy.

  10. Potentials of plasma NGAL and MIC-1 as biomarker(s in the diagnosis of lethal pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhwinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is lethal malignancy with very high mortality rate. Absence of sensitive and specific marker(s is one of the major factors for poor prognosis of PC patients. In pilot studies using small set of patients, secreted acute phase proteins neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL and TGF-β family member macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1 are proposed as most potential biomarkers specifically elevated in the blood of PC patients. However, their performance as diagnostic markers for PC, particularly in pre-treatment patients, remains unknown. In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of NGAL and MIC-1, their levels were measured in plasma samples from patients with pre-treatment PC patients (n = 91 and compared it with those in healthy control (HC individuals (n = 24 and patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n = 23. The diagnostic performance of these two proteins was further compared with that of CA19-9, a tumor marker commonly used to follow PC progression. The levels of all three biomarkers were significantly higher in PC compared to HCs. The mean (± standard deviation, SD plasma NGAL, CA19-9 and MIC-1 levels in PC patients was 111.1 ng/mL (2.2, 219.2 U/mL (7.8 and 4.5 ng/mL (4.1, respectively. In comparing resectable PC to healthy patients, all three biomarkers were found to have comparable sensitivities (between 64%-81% but CA19-9 and NGAL had a higher specificity (92% and 88%, respectively. For distinguishing resectable PC from CP patients, CA19-9 and MIC-1 were most specific (74% and 78% respectively. CA19-9 at an optimal cut-off of 54.1 U/ml is highly specific in differentiating resectable (stage 1/2 pancreatic cancer patients from controls in comparison to its clinical cut-off (37.1 U/ml. Notably, the addition of MIC-1 to CA19-9 significantly improved the ability to distinguish resectable PC cases from CP (p = 0.029. Overall, MIC-1 in combination with CA19-9 improved the diagnostic

  11. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sun exposure has been associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Skin exposure to solar ultra-violet B radiation induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D (D) and is considered the primary contributor to vitamin D status in most populations. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25-(OH) D3-1α-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25-dihydroxy(OH)2 D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic fun...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seong Ku; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Yong Dae; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Soo yong

    1983-01-01

    The pancreatic fracture, known also as complete transection of the pancreas, is severe injury of the pancreas characterized by complete vertical transection of its body overlying the body of the vertebra. The authors diagnosed three cases of traumatic fracture of the pancreas by ultrasonography and these were confirmed surgically. Ultrasonography disclosed an anechoic fluid collection between the separated parenchyma of the body of the pancreas anterior to the superior mesenteric artery. The remaining pancreas enlarged diffusely and decreased in echogenecity. Associated feature was accumulation of fluid in the lesser sac and the peritoneal cavity

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer: innovative applications beyond the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Joseph; Kistler, C Andrew; Yan, Linda; Dargan, Andrew; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2016-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become a mainstay in assisting in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. In addition, EUS provides a modality to treat chronic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis. Currently, there is growing data and utilization of EUS in more diverse and innovative applications aimed at providing more sophisticated diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic options for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS delivery of chemotherapy, viral and biological vectors and fiducial markers may eventually revolutionize the way clinicians approach the care of a patient with pancreatic cancer.

  15. A Case of Pancreatic Cancer in the Setting of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Nondiagnostic Serum Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju D. Chandrasegaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP often mimics pancreatic cancer. The diagnosis of both conditions is difficult preoperatively let alone when they coexist. Several reports have been published describing pancreatic cancer in the setting of AIP. Case Report. The case of a 53-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and radiological features of autoimmune pancreatitis, with a “sausage-shaped” pancreas and bulky pancreatic head with portal vein impingement, is presented. He had a normal serum IgG4 and only mildly elevated Ca-19.9. Initial endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS- guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA of the pancreas revealed an inflammatory sclerosing process only. A repeat EUS guided biopsy following biliary decompression demonstrated both malignancy and features of autoimmune pancreatitis. At laparotomy, a uniformly hard, bulky pancreas was found with no sonographically definable mass. A total pancreatectomy with portal vein resection and reconstruction was performed. Histology revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreatic head and autoimmune pancreatitis and squamous metaplasia in the remaining pancreas. Conclusion. This case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties in a patient with pancreatic cancer in the setting of serum IgG4-negative, Type 2 AIP.

  16. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weble, Tanja Cruusberg; Bjerregaard, Jon Kroll; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor the evolution of the incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark over 70 years. We also compared registrations of pancreatic cancer in a nationwide population-based database, the Danish Cancer Registry, and a clinical database, the Danish Pancreatic...... Cancer Database, in 2012-2013. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Registrations of pancreatic cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry over 1943-2012 were used to calculate age-specific incidence rates per 100 000 person years by sex and age in 5-year period, weighted by the Segi World Standard Population for age...... standardization. We used absolute numbers from the Cancer Registry and the Pancreatic Cancer Database, including distribution of topography of cancers registered in 2012-2013, to compare registration in the two data sources. RESULTS: The incidence rates of pancreatic cancer among Danish men increased until 1968...

  18. Appearance of the aging pancreas on CT scans: Implications in diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, G.R.; Francis, I.R.; Glazer, G.M.; Trenkner, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Because early pancreatic cancer may not appear on CT as a frank mass, the CT-based diagnosis relies on detection of subtle changes such as focal loss of lobulation or asymmetry in the distribution of tissue. The author studied the normal pancreas in 140 patients of different ages to determine if there is an overlap in the appearance of the normal aging pancreas and subtle signs of pancreatic cancer. Both contour lobulation and fatty infiltration were found to increase with age and involved the pancreatic body and tail more than the head. These normal age-related changes should be recognized to avoid overdiagnosing pancreatic head masses

  19. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  20. [Pancreatic injuries: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chèvre, F; Tschantz, P

    2001-05-01

    Traumatic lesions of the pancreas are rare (3-12% of abdominal trauma). In Central Europe most of them are due to blunt trauma. We reviewed the series from four university and one central hospitals in Switzerland over a period of ten to twenty years. Among these 75 cases, 84% were consecutive to blunt trauma. All the cases with an open injury were operated on rapidly. 15 patients with blunt trauma were treated conservatively. Out of the 58 operated patients, 20 had a caudal resection, 3 a pancreatico-jejunal anastomosis and 1 a duodeno-pancreatectomy. The others were drained. Nine patients died, 5 of them as a direct consequence of the pancreatic lesions. The morbidity was high (48%). After an open abdominal trauma, or when the patient remains unstable after blunt trauma an emergency laparotomy should be undertaken. It can lead to damage control surgery as a first step when the general and local conditions are bad. When the patient is hemodynamicaly stable, a conservative approach should be considered. The best diagnostic tools are repeated CT-scan and amylasemia. A differed operation is indicated only if the general and local condition deteriorate.

  1. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  2. Contemporary Management of Localized Resectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, Anuhya; Tella, Sri Harsha; Goyal, Gaurav; Ma, Wen Wee; Mahipal, Amit

    2018-01-20

    Pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Surgical resection with negative margins still constitutes the cornerstone of potentially curative therapy, but is possible only in 15-20% of patients at the time of initial diagnosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the neoadjuvant approach may improve R0 resection rate in localized resectable and borderline resectable diseases, and potentially downstage locally advanced disease to achieve surgical resection, though the impact on survival is to be determined. Despite advancements in the last decade in developing effective combinational chemo-radio therapeutic options, preoperative treatment strategies, and better peri-operative care, pancreatic cancer continues to carry a dismal prognosis in the majority. Prodigious efforts are currently being made in optimizing the neoadjuvant therapy with a better toxicity profile, developing novel agents, imaging techniques, and identification of biomarkers for the disease. Advancement in our understanding of the tumor microenvironment and molecular pathology is urgently needed to facilitate the development of novel targeted and immunotherapies for this setting. In this review, we detail the current literature on contemporary management of resectable, borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with a focus on future directions in the field.

  3. Possibilities of radiologic diagnosis of pancreatic calcinosis and chronic calculous pancreatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, A.S.; Sivash, Eh.S.; Kudryavtseva, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis of the pancreatic gland calculous damage as well as chronic pancreatitis have been studied in 23 patients. A methodologic approach to examination of this group of patients was defined. Posteroanterior radiography has been shown to be of decisive importance in diagnosis of the calcified pancreatic gland. Duodenography and choleduodenography both considerably promote recognition of chronic pancreatitis. The radiologic method also allows one to reveal a series of complications: the common bile duct compression, duodenal stenosis, pancreatic tumor in the presence of chronic pancreatitis, malabsorption syndrome

  4. New insights into pancreatic cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, M

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease. Over the last few years, there have been important advances in the molecular and biological understanding of pancreatic cancer. This included understanding of the genomic complexity of the disease, the role of pancreatic cancer stem cells, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment, and the unique metabolic adaptation of pancreas cancer cells to obtain nutrients under hypoxic environment. In this paper, we review the most salient developments in these few areas.

  5. Diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis by measurement of microRNA abundance in blood and tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Bauer

    Full Text Available A solid process for diagnosis could have a substantial impact on the successful treatment of pancreatic cancer, for which currently mortality is nearly identical to incidence. Variations in the abundance of all microRNA molecules from peripheral blood cells and pancreas tissues were analyzed on microarrays and in part validated by real-time PCR assays. In total, 245 samples from two clinical centers were studied that were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or chronic pancreatitis and from healthy donors. Utilizing the minimally invasive blood test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and the corresponding area under the curve (AUC analysis demonstrated very high sensitivity and specificity of a distinction between healthy people and patients with either cancer or chronic pancreatitis; respective AUC values of 0.973 and 0.950 were obtained. Confirmative and partly even more discriminative diagnosis could be performed on tissue samples with AUC values of 1.0 and 0.937, respectively. In addition, discrimination between cancer and chronic pancreatitis was achieved (AUC = 0.875. Also, several miRNAs were identified that exhibited abundance variations in both tissue and blood samples. The results could have an immediate diagnostic value for the evaluation of tumor reoccurrence in patients, who have undergone curative surgical resection, and for people with a familial risk of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Prospective assessment of the influence of pancreatic cancer resection on exocrine pancreatic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkens, E C M; Cahen, D L; de Wit, J; Looman, C W N; van Eijck, C; Bruno, M J

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine insufficiency frequently develops in patients with pancreatic cancer owing to tumour ingrowth and pancreatic duct obstruction. Surgery might restore this function by removing the primary disease and restoring duct patency, but it may also have the opposite effect, as a result of resection of functional parenchyma and anatomical changes. This study evaluated the course of pancreatic function, before and after pancreatic resection. This prospective cohort study included patients with tumours in the pancreatic region requiring pancreatic resection in a tertiary referral centre between March 2010 and August 2012. Starting before surgery, exocrine function was determined monthly by measuring faecal elastase 1 levels (normal value over 0.200 µg per g faeces). Endocrine function, steatorrhoea-related symptoms and bodyweight were also evaluated before and after surgery. Subjects were followed from diagnosis until 6 months after surgery, or until death. Twenty-nine patients were included, 12 with pancreatic cancer, 14 with ampullary carcinoma and three with bile duct carcinoma (median tumour size 2.6 cm). Twenty-six patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and three distal pancreatectomy. Thirteen patients had exocrine insufficiency at preoperative diagnosis. After a median follow-up of 6 months, this had increased to 24 patients. Diabetes was present in seven patients at diagnosis, and developed in one additional patient within 1 month after surgery. Most patients with tumours in the pancreatic region requiring pancreatic resection either had exocrine insufficiency at diagnosis or became exocrine-insufficient soon after surgical resection. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  8. Hedgehog signaling and therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the role that the hedgehog signaling pathway has in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. METHOD: PubMed search (2000-2010) and literature based references. RESULTS: Firstly, in 2009 a genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers found that a core set of 12 cellular signaling pathways including hedgehog were genetically altered in 67-100% of cases. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo studies of treatment with cyclopamine (a naturally occurring antagonist of the hedgehog signaling pathway component; Smoothened) has shown that inhibition of hedgehog can abrogate pancreatic cancer metastasis. Thirdly, experimental evidence has demonstrated that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is correlated with desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer. This is important because targeting the Shh pathway potentially may facilitate chemotherapeutic drug delivery as pancreatic cancers tend to have a dense fibrotic stroma that extrinsically compresses the tumor vasculature leading to a hypoperfusing intratumoral circulation. It is probable that patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer will derive the greatest benefit from treatment with Smoothened antagonists. Fourthly, it has been found that ligand dependent activation by hedgehog occurs in the tumor stromal microenvironment in pancreatic cancer, a paracrine effect on tumorigenesis. Finally, in pancreatic cancer, cells with the CD44+CD24+ESA+ immunophenotype select a population enriched for cancer initiating stem cells. Shh is increased 46-fold in CD44+CD24+ESA+ cells compared with normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Medications that destruct pancreatic cancer initiating stem cells are a potentially novel strategy in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Aberrant hedgehog signaling occurs in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and therapeutics that target the transmembrane receptor Smoothened abrogate hedgehog signaling and may improve the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  9. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi; Ito, Tetsuhide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  10. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy.

  11. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for BRCA2 gene mutations. We advise that people speak with a trained cancer genetics counselor before undergoing genetic ... and PALB2 gene mutations. We advise that people speak with a trained cancer genetics counselor before undergoing genetic ...

  12. Screening Technologies for Target Identification in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michl, Patrick, E-mail: michlp@med.uni-marburg.de; Ripka, Stefanie; Gress, Thomas; Buchholz, Malte [Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, University Hospital, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldinger Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany)

    2010-12-29

    Pancreatic cancer exhibits an extraordinarily high level of resistance to almost any kind of systemic therapy evaluated in clinical trials so far. Therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently required. High-throughput screens have emerged as an important tool to identify putative targets for diagnosis and therapy in an unbiased manner. More than a decade ago, microarray technology was introduced to identify differentially expressed genes in pancreatic cancer as compared to normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and other cancer types located in close proximity to the pancreas. In addition, proteomic screens have facilitated the identification of differentially secreted proteins in body fluids of pancreatic cancer patients, serving as possible biomarkers. Recently, RNA interference-based loss-of-function screens have been used to identify functionally relevant genes, whose knock-down has impact on pancreatic cancer cell viability, thereby representing potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes recent results of transcriptional, proteomic and functional screens in pancreatic cancer and discusses potentials and limitations of the respective technologies as well as their impact on future therapeutic developments.

  13. Screening Technologies for Target Identification in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michl, Patrick; Ripka, Stefanie; Gress, Thomas; Buchholz, Malte

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer exhibits an extraordinarily high level of resistance to almost any kind of systemic therapy evaluated in clinical trials so far. Therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently required. High-throughput screens have emerged as an important tool to identify putative targets for diagnosis and therapy in an unbiased manner. More than a decade ago, microarray technology was introduced to identify differentially expressed genes in pancreatic cancer as compared to normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and other cancer types located in close proximity to the pancreas. In addition, proteomic screens have facilitated the identification of differentially secreted proteins in body fluids of pancreatic cancer patients, serving as possible biomarkers. Recently, RNA interference-based loss-of-function screens have been used to identify functionally relevant genes, whose knock-down has impact on pancreatic cancer cell viability, thereby representing potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes recent results of transcriptional, proteomic and functional screens in pancreatic cancer and discusses potentials and limitations of the respective technologies as well as their impact on future therapeutic developments

  14. Value of computed tomography as a screening examination of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Katsushi; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    The abdominal CT films of 50 patients were reviewed by ten radiologists to evaluate the role of CT examination in the screening of pancreatic cancer. The 50 patients consisted of 10 with pancreatic cancer, 8 with other pancreatic abnormalities, and 32 with normal pancreas. Ten radiologists were divided into two groups according to their experience in evaluating CT examinations, an experienced group and an unexperienced group, respectively. In the detectability of pancreatic abnormality, the experienced group showed a sensitivity of 72.2% and a specificity of 86.2%. The unexperienced group showed a sensitivity of 70.9% and a specificity of 72.0%. In the detectability of pancreatic cancer, the experienced group showed a sensitivity of 62.0% and a specificity of 83.4%. The unexperienced group showed a sensitivity of 66.0% and a specificity of 81.8%. In the localization of the pancreatic cancer, there was no difference between the two groups. Pancreatic abnormality can be detected with high accuracy, but diagnosis of the nature of pancreatic cancer is difficult. Experience in evaluating CT examinations elevates the detectability of pancreatic abnormality but does not elevate the detectability of pancreatic cancer. These results suggest the difficulty in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  15. Pancreatic cancer accompanied by a moderate-sized pseudocyst with extrapancreatic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkura, Yu; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuda, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Fujii, Takeshi; Watanabe, Goro

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer accompanied by a moderate-sized pseudocyst with extrapancreatic growth is extremely rare. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer on preoperative imaging is difficult when the pancreatic parenchyma is compressed by a pseudocyst and becomes unclear. Despite advances in imaging techniques, accurate preoperative diagnosis of cystic lesions of the pancreas remains difficult. In this case, it was challenging to diagnose pancreatic cancer preoperatively as we could not accurately assess the pancreatic parenchyma, which had been compressed by a moderate-sized cystic lesion with extrapancreatic growth. A 63-year-old woman underwent investigations for epigastric abdominal pain. She had no history of pancreatitis. Although we suspected pancreatic ductal carcinoma with a pancreatic cyst, there was no mass lesion or low-density area suggestive of pancreatic cancer. We did not immediately suspect pancreatic cancer, as development of a moderate-sized cyst with extrapancreatic growth is extremely rare and known tumor markers were not elevated. Therefore, we initially suspected that a massive benign cyst (mucinous cyst neoplasm, serous cyst neoplasm, or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm) resulted in stenosis of the main pancreatic duct. We were unable to reach a definitive diagnosis prior to the operation. We had planned a pancreaticoduodenectomy to reach a definitive diagnosis. However, we could not remove the tumor because of significant invasion of the surrounding tissue (portal vein, superior mesenteric vein, etc.). The fluid content of the cyst was serous, and aspiration cytology from the pancreatic cyst was Class III (no malignancy), but the surrounding white connective tissue samples were positive for pancreatic adenocarcinoma on pathological examination during surgery. We repeated imaging (CT, MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, etc.) postoperatively, but there were neither mass lesions nor a low-density area suggestive of pancreatic cancer. In retrospect, we think

  16. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Karandish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  17. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%-3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis, classification, and new genetic developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, B; Whitcomb, D C

    2001-02-01

    The utilization of recent advances in molecular and genomic technologies and progress in pancreatic imaging techniques provided remarkable insight into genetic, environmental, immunologic, and pathobiological factors leading to chronic pancreatitis. Translation of these advances into clinical practice demands a reassessment of current approaches to diagnosis, classification, and staging. We conclude that an adequate pancreatic biopsy must be the gold standard against which all diagnostic approaches are judged. Although computed tomography remains the initial test of choice for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, the roles of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are considered. Once chronic pancreatitis is diagnosed, proper classification becomes important. Major predisposing risk factors to chronic pancreatitis may be categorized as either (1) toxic-metabolic, (2) idiopathic, (3) genetic, (4) autoimmune, (5) recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, or (6) obstructive (TIGAR-O system). After classification, staging of pancreatic function, injury, and fibrosis becomes the next major concern. Further research is needed to determine the clinical and natural history of chronic pancreatitis developing in the context of various risk factors. New methods are needed for early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, and new therapies are needed to determine whether interventions will delay or prevent the progression of the irreversible damage characterizing end-stage chronic pancreatitis.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer: Multicenter Prospective Data Collection and Analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Balázs, Anita; Kui, Balázs; Gódi, Szilárd; Szücs, Ákos; Szentesi, Andrea; Szentkereszty, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Vincze, Áron; Czimmer, József; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szabó, Imre; Izbéki, Ferenc; Halász, Adrienn; Leindler, László; Farkas, Gyula; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. There is very limited information available regarding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of pancreatic cancer in Central Europe. The purpose of the study was to prospectively collect and analyze data of pancreatic cancer in the Hungarian population. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group (HPSG) organized prospective, uniform data collection. Altogether 354 patients were enrolled from 14 Hungarian centers. Chronic pancreatitis was present in 3.7% of the cases, while 33.7% of the patients had diabetes. Family history for pancreatic cancer was positive in 4.8%. The most frequent presenting symptoms included pain (63.8%), weight loss (63%) and jaundice (52.5%). The reported frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower than expected (28.5% and 27.4%, respectively). The majority of patients (75.6%) were diagnosed with advanced disease. Most patients (83.6%) had a primary tumor located in the pancreatic head. The histological diagnosis was ductal adenocarcinoma in 90.7% of the cases, while neuroendocrine tumor was present in 5.3%. Biliary stent implantation was performed in 166 patients, 59.2% of them received metal stents. Primary tumor resection was performed in 60 (16.9%) patients. Enteral or biliary bypass was done in 35 and 49 patients, respectively. In a multivariate Cox-regression model, smoking status and presence of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors for overall survival. We report the first data from a large cohort of Hungarian pancreatic cancer patients. We identified smoking status and chemotherapy as independent predictors in this cohort.

  20. Selected medical conditions and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H

    2012-01-01

    We review the current evidence for associations of several medical conditions with risk of pancreatic cancer, including allergies, pancreatitis, gall bladder disease, cholecystectomy, ulcers, gastrectomy, appendectomy, and tonsillectomy. There are consistent findings of reduced risk associated with presence of self-reported allergies, particularly hay fever but not asthma; data on other allergies are limited and inconclusive. Several studies provide evidence that patients with pancreatic cancer are more likely than comparison groups to report pancreatitis. Those studies that investigated the time between onset of pancreatitis and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer found that risk estimates declined with longer periods of time; however, increased risks were noted for long-term pancreatitis, indicating that this condition is both a risk factor and a sign of early disease. Increased risk was reported in association with cholelithiasis, but the few studies that considered time before diagnosis of cancer did not find increased risk for cholelithiasis diagnosed in the more distant past. There is weak evidence that cholecystectomy 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis is related to risk, but this is based on only a few studies. There is no consistent association between ulcers and risk, while gastrectomy may increase risk. Overall, study of these conditions, particularly those that are rare, presents methodologic challenges. Time between diagnoses is likely to be important but is not considered in most studies. Lack of adequate control in several studies for risk factors such as smoking and heavy alcohol use also makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about these results. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Design of a nanoplatform for treating pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manawadu, Harshi Chathurangi

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Asymptomatic early cancer stages and late diagnosis leads to very low survival rates of pancreatic cancers, compared to other cancers. Treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer are limited to chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, as surgical removal of the cancerous tissue becomes impossible at later stages. Therefore, there's a critical need for innovative and improved chemotherapeutic treatment of (late) pancreatic cancers. It is mandatory for successful treatment strategies to overcome the drug resistance associated with pancreatic cancers. Nanotechnology based drug formulations have been providing promising alternatives in cancer treatment due to their selective targeting and accumulation in tumor vasculature, which can be used for efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors and metastases. The research of my thesis is following the principle approach to high therapeutic efficacy that has been first described by Dr. Helmut Ringsdorf in 1975. However, I have extended the use of the Ringsdorf model from polymeric to nanoparticle-based drug carriers by exploring an iron / iron oxide nanoparticle based drug delivery system. A series of drug delivery systems have been synthesized by varying the total numbers and the ratio of the tumor homing peptide sequence CGKRK and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin at the surfaces of Fe/Fe3O 4-nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of these nanoformulations was tested against murine pancreatic cancer cell lines (Pan02) to assess their therapeutic capabilities for effective treatments of pancreatic cancers. Healthy mouse fibroblast cells (STO) were also tested for comparison, because an effective chemotherapeutic drug has to be selective towards cancer cells. Optimal Experimental Design methodology was applied to identify the nanoformulation with the highest therapeutic activity. A statistical analysis method known as response

  2. [Non surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiberg, H; Gerard, B; Hendlisz, A; Jagodzinski, R

    1997-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease difficult to treat. Diagnosis is late, cancer remaining clinically unapparent even if locally advanced or metastatic. Few patients can be submitted to curative surgery. Even if resection is possible, 5-year survival varies from 0% to 18% according to series. Some data suggest that chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy could influence disease free survival but a benefit on overall survival has not been demonstrated. For locally advanced disease, the results of a trial published in 1968, showed that a combination of radiotherapy and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) improved median survival as compared to radiotherapy alone (5.5 versus 10 months). Since then, no progress has been achieved. At the present time, survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer cannot be improved. Very recently, a new agent, gemcitabine, has been compared to 5FU. Criteria for activity were based on clinical improvement analgesia consumption, performance status and weight gain. Twenty-four percent of the patients treated with gemcitabine had a clinical benefit as compared to 5% for those treated with 5FU. Other studies comparing chemotherapy to best supportive care show a significant decrease of depression and anxiety as well as an improvement in quality of life for patients being treated.

  3. Immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroldi, Francesca; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Despite the identification of some efficient drugs for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, this tumor remains one of the most lethal cancers and is characterized by a strong resistance to therapies. Pancreatic cancer has some unique features including the presence of a microenvironment filled with immunosuppressive mediators and a dense stroma, which is both a physical barrier to drug penetration and a dynamic entity involved in immune system control. Therefore, the immune system has been hypothesized to play an important role in pancreatic cancer. Thus, therapies acting on innate or adaptive immunity are being investigated. Here, we review the literature, report the most interesting results and hypothesize future treatment directions.

  4. Cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Dorothea; Tjaden, Christine; Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience reduced physical fitness due to the disease itself as well as treatment-related side effects. However, studies on physical fitness in pancreatic cancer patients are missing. Therefore, we assessed cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength of pancreatic cancer patients. We included 65 pancreatic cancer patients, mostly after surgical resection. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and 6-min walk test (6MWT). Hand-held dynamometry was used to evaluate isometric muscle strength. Physical fitness values were compared to reference values of a healthy population. Associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables with patients' physical fitness were analyzed using multiple regression models. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak, 20.5 ± 6.9 ml/min/kg) was significantly lower (-24%) compared to healthy reference values. In the 6MWT pancreatic cancer patients nearly reached predicted values (555 vs. 562 m). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the upper (-4.3%) and lower extremities (-13.8%) were significantly lower compared to reference values. Overall differences were larger in men than those in women. Participating in regular exercise in the year before diagnosis was associated with greater VO 2 peak (p fitness with regard to both cardiorespiratory function and isometric muscle strength, already in the early treatment phase (median 95 days after surgical resection). Our findings underline the need to investigate exercise training in pancreatic cancer patients to counteract the loss of physical fitness.

  5. Progress in diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Tao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis that originates from an autoimmune-mediated mechanism. AIP has unique radiological, serological, and histopathological features, often accompanied by peripancreatic lesions. AIP may be easily confused with pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. It is necessary to diagnose AIP while integrating a variety of clinical indicators. Steroid therapy should be performed for patients diagnosed with AIP, and surgical treatment can be selected if necessary.

  6. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira-Cunha, Melissa; Newman, William G.; Siriwardena, Ajith K.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  8. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  9. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors : comparison of MR pancreatography(MRP) and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Ki Suh; Seo, Jung Hoon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Bok; Chung, Jae Joon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance pancreatography(MRP) is a non-invasive imaging technique for visualization of the pancreatic duct system, and is similar to those obtained by means of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP). To determine the role of MRP in the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, the diagnostic confidence and imaginal difference of MRP and ERP were compared. Twenty patients(13 male and 7 female, mean age 59 years) with pancreatic tumors underwent MRP and ERP. The former involved the use of a single shot fast spin-echo sequence on a 1.5T system. All images were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist, working together. Both MRP and ERP were compared for separate visualization of the head, body and tail portion of the pancreatic duct, and scored as excellent (4), good (3), fair (2), poor (1), or no visualization (0). In addition, the overall diagnostic confidence of both modalities was graded subjectively from non-diagnoses (0) to definite information (4). The final diagnoses derived from surgical findings (n=9) or imaging findings and clinical follow-up (n=7) were as follows : pancreatic cancer (n=12), mucin-producing pancreatic cancer (n=2), mucinous ductectatic tumor (n=4), serous cystadenoma (n=2). To assess the statistical significance of difference, the paired t-test was used. Mean scores of visualization of the pancreatic duct by MRP and ERP were 2.91 and 3.15 in the pancreatic head (p=NS), 3.11 and 2.18 in the pancreatic body (p=NS), and 3.07 and 1.09 in the pancreatic tail (p<0.01). The mean score of diagnostic confidence was 4.03 for MRP and 2.51 for ERP, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). In 11 patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct due to malignant lesions, MRP visualized the duct both proximally and distally to the site of obstruction, while ERP visualized only the distal duct to the site of obstruction. MRP was also better at defining the extent of tumor by visualization of surrounding pancreatic

  10. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features

  11. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R

    2006-12-15

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features.

  12. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  13. Current radiotherapeutic approaches to pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is not a radioresistant neoplasm, as was once believed. The data now suggest that in some instances this cancer may be radiocurable. This fact seems to justify the risk of pancreatic biopsy even in the face of unresectable disease, for it is well known that many benign conditions imitate pancreatic cancer. Clinical benefit from radiation for pancreatic cancer treatment is dose related. Careful delineation of tumor margins, precision treatment planning, and precision dose delivery can minimize damage to adjacent normal tissues. Interstitial implantation and intraoperative electron beam therapy are being studied as methods of accurate dose delivery for pancreatic cancer. Fractionation studies and high LET studies are in embryonic stages. Combined modality regimens may have much to offer in terms of improved palliation and survival for patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

  14. A diagnostic pitfall: pancreatic tuberculosis, not pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, D.O.; Mukhtar, A.A.M.; Philip, I.O.

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common forms of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis and is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality globally. Tuberculosis can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus, the peritoneum, liver, spleen and the pancreatobiliary system. The occurrence of abdominal TB is independent of pulmonary disease in most patients, with a reported incidence of co-existing pulmonary disease varying from 6 to 38% worldwide. We report a case of pancreatic tuberculosis also involving the vertebrae, which was initially treated as a case of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  15. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  17. Hybrid kappa\\lambda antibody is a new serological marker to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Mingju; Li, Wenli; Yi, Lang; Yu, Songlin; Fan, Gaowei; Lu, Tian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guojing; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Jiansheng; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-06-08

    The only generally accepted serological marker currently used for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is IgG4. Our aim was mainly to determine whether hybrid κ\\λ antibody can help to diagnose AIP and to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure the levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in human sera. Sera were obtained from 338 patients, including 61 with AIP, 74 with pancreatic cancer, 50 with acute pancreatitis, 40 with ordinary chronic pancreatitis, 15 with miscellaneous pancreatic diseases, and 98 with normal pancreas. Our study showed levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in the AIP group were significantly higher than in the non-AIP group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the diagnosis of AIP were 80.3%, 91%, 66.2% and 95.5% respectively. Furthermore, the combined measurement of serum hybrid κ\\λ antibody and IgG4 tended to increase the sensitivity although the difference was not statistically significant (90.2% vs. 78.7%, P = 0.08), compared to measurement of IgG4 alone. Our findings suggest that hybrid κ\\λ antibody could be a new serological marker to diagnose AIP and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

  18. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer After a Primary Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Anton P; Bakker, Olaf J; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Hagenaars, Julia C J P; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; Bollen, Thomas L; van Eijck, Casper H

    2017-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis may be the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of pancreatic cancer after a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Between March 2004 and March 2007, all consecutive patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis were prospectively registered. Follow-up was based on hospital records audit, radiological imaging, and patient questionnaires. Outcome was stratified based on the development of chronic pancreatitis. We included 731 patients. The median follow-up time was 55 months. Progression to chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 51 patients (7.0%). In this group, the incidence rate per 1000 person-years for developing pancreatic cancer was 9.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-35.7). In the group of 680 patients who did not develop chronic pancreatitis, the incidence rate per 1000 person-years for developing pancreatic cancer in this group was 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.3). Hence, the rate ratio of pancreatic cancer was almost 9 times higher in patients who developed chronic pancreatitis compared with those who did not (P = 0.049). Although a first episode of acute pancreatitis may be related to pancreatic cancer, this risk is mainly present in patients who progress to chronic pancreatitis.

  19. External beam radiotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nishio, Masamichi; Narimatsu, Naoto; Ogawa, Hajime; Betsuyaku, Takashi; Hirata, Kouji; Ikeda, Shigeyuki (Sapporo National Hospital (Japan). Hokkaido Cancer Center)

    1992-04-01

    Between 1980 to 1989, 24 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (10 with localized tumor alone and 14 with distant metastases) have been treated with external beam radiation at Sapporo National Hospital, Hokkaido Cancer Center. Response rate of pancreatic tumor treated with external beam radiation was 33.3% (7/21) with no complete response. Median survival time of the patients with localized tumor was 10 months and that of the patients with distant metastases was 3 months. Relief of pain occurred in 92.9% (12/13) of patients having pain due to pancreatic tumor and in 75% (3/4) of patients having pain due to bone metastases. Major complication was gastric ulcer which developed in 5 patients of 21 patients given stomach irradiation. We concluded that unresectable pancreatic cancer would be frequently indicated for radiotherapy. (author).

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    1987-01-01

    Fifty patients with various pancreatic diseases and 22 without pancreatic disease were studied by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare its diagnostic capability with that by an X-ray CT scan. To differentiate pancreas clearly from the bowel, an iron solution was orally administered as contrast medium, resulting in a usefullness, especially to differentiate the head of the pancreas from the bowel. The head of the pancreas could be identified in 89 % after iron solution but only in 62 % without it. MRI was inferior to CT in terms of visualization of the pancreatic duct and pancreatic stones, but was superior in a visualization of vessels around the pancreas. MRI was considered to be useful for a detection of carcinoma infiltrating to vessels. Pancreatic carcinoma was differentiated from chronic pancreatitis in terms of a local enlargement and disappearance of fat around the pancreas shown on MRI findings. The present results also showed statistically significant differences in T 1 relaxation times among normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, suggesting a useful marker in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. (author)

  1. Targeting Apoptosis Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The ability to escape apoptosis or programmed cell death is a hallmark of human cancers, for example pancreatic cancer. This can promote tumorigenesis, since too little cell death by apoptosis disturbs tissue homeostasis. Additionally, defective apoptosis signaling is the underlying cause of failure to respond to current treatment approaches, since therapy-mediated antitumor activity requires the intactness of apoptosis signaling pathways in cancer cells. Thus, the elucidation of defects in the regulation of apoptosis in pancreatic carcinoma can result in the identification of novel targets for therapeutic interference and for exploitation for cancer drug discovery

  2. Targeting Apoptosis Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulda, Simone [Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Komturstr. 3a, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2011-01-11

    The ability to escape apoptosis or programmed cell death is a hallmark of human cancers, for example pancreatic cancer. This can promote tumorigenesis, since too little cell death by apoptosis disturbs tissue homeostasis. Additionally, defective apoptosis signaling is the underlying cause of failure to respond to current treatment approaches, since therapy-mediated antitumor activity requires the intactness of apoptosis signaling pathways in cancer cells. Thus, the elucidation of defects in the regulation of apoptosis in pancreatic carcinoma can result in the identification of novel targets for therapeutic interference and for exploitation for cancer drug discovery.

  3. [Clinical significance of the tests used in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, G; Emanuelli, G

    1976-11-14

    Different methods available for investigating patients for pancreatic disease are discussed. They first include measurement of pancreatic enzymes in biological fluids. Basal amylase and/or lipase in blood are truly diagnostic in acute pancreatitis but their utility is low in chronic pancreatic diseases. Evocative tests have been performed to increase the sensitivity of blood enzyme measurement. The procedure is based on enzyme determination following administration of pancreozymin and secretin, and offers a valuable aid in diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and cancer of the pancreas. They are capable of discerning pancreatic lesions but are not really discriminatory because similar changes are observed in both diseases. The measurement of urinary enzyme levels in patients with acute pancreatitis is a sensitive indicator of disease. The urinary amylase excretion rises to abnormal levels and persists at significant values for a longer period of time than the serum amylase in acute pancreatitis. The fractional urinary amylase escretion seems to be more sensitive than daily urinary measurement. The pancreatic exocrin function can be assessed by examining the duodenal contents after intravenous administration of pancreozymin and secretin. Different abnormal secretory patterns can be determinated. Total secretory deficiency is observed in patients with obstruction of excretory ducts by tumors of the head of the pancreas and in the end stage of chronic pancreatitis. Low volume with normal bicarbonate and enzyme concentration is another typical pattern seen in neoplastic obstruction of escretory ducts. In chronic pancreatitis the chief defect is the inability of the gland to secrete a juice with a high bicarbonate concentration; but in the advanced stage diminution of enzyme and volume is also evident. Diagnostic procedures for pancreatic diseases include digestion and absorption tests. The microscopic examination and chemical estimation of the fats in stool specimens in

  4. EUS – Fine- Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalogeraki Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solid masses of the pancreas represent a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms of the exocrine and endocrine tissues of the pancreas. A tissue diagnosis is often required to direct therapy in the face of uncertain diagnosis or if the patient is not a surgical candidate either due to advanced disease or comorbidities. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS is a relatively new technology that employs endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound (US. EUS involves imaging of the pancreatic head and the uncinate from the duodenum and imaging of the body and tail from the stomach. It has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. It is superior to extracorporeal US and computed tomographic (CT scans, especially when the pancreatic tumor is smaller than 2-3 cm. Although EUS is highly sensitive in detecting pancreatic solid masses, its ability to differentiate between inflammatory masses and malignant disease is limited. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP brushing, CT-guided biopsies, and transabdominal ultrasound (US have been the standard nonsurgical methods for obtaining a tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions, but a substantial false-negative rate has been reported. Transabdominal US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB has been used for tissue diagnosis in patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. It has been shown to be highly specific, with no false-positive diagnoses. With the advent of curvilinear echoendoscopes, transgastric and transduodenal EUS-FNAB of the pancreas have become a reality EUS with FNAB has revolutionized the ability to diagnose and stage cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and assess the pancreas. Gastrointestinal cancers can be looked at with EUS and their depth of penetration into the intestinal wall can be determined. Any suspicious appearing lymph nodes can be biopsied using EUS/FNAB. The pancreas is another organ that is well visualized with EUS. Abnormalities

  5. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer: how useful is it in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Smyrniotis, Vasileios

    2012-07-10

    During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Reports about clinical implications of molecular biology in patients with pancreatic cancer were retrieved from PubMed. These reports were selected on the basis of their clinical relevance, and the data of their publication (preferentially within the last 5 years). Emphasis was placed on reports investigating diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Molecular biology can be used to identify individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. Intensive surveillance is indicated in these patients to detect pancreatic neoplasia ideally at a preinvasive stage, when curative resection is still possible. Molecular biology can also be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, with molecular analysis on samples of biologic material, such as serum or plasma, duodenal fluid or preferentially pure pancreatic juice, pancreatic cells or tissue, and stools. Molecular indices have also prognostic significance. Finally, molecular biology may have therapeutic implications by using various therapeutic approaches, such as antiangiogenic factors, purine synthesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, factors modulating tumor-stroma interaction, inactivation of the hedgehog pathway, gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, immunotherapy (both passive as well as active) etc. Molecular biology may have important clinical implications in patients with pancreatic cancer and represents one of the most active areas on cancer research. Hopefully clinical applications of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer will expand in the future, improving the

  6. Lipase or amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ola Z; Bhayana, Vipin

    2017-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rapid onset of inflammation of the pancreas causing mild to severe life threatening conditions [1, 2]. In Canada, acute pancreatitis is the 5th most expensive digestive disease in Canada with a considerable economic burden on the health care system [3]. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is usually based on the presence of abdominal pain and elevated levels of serum amylase and/or lipase. Many health care centers use either serum amylase, lipase or both to diagnose acute pancreatitis without considering which one could provide a better diagnostic accuracy. The aim of this review is to investigate whether serum lipase alone is a sufficient biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. We have examined various studies looking at the utilization, sensitivity, specificity and cost associated savings of lipase and amylase in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. When comparing different studies, serum lipase offers a higher sensitivity than serum amylase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Lipase also offers a larger diagnostic window than amylase since it is elevated for a longer time, thus allowing it to be a useful diagnostic biomarker in early and late stages of acute pancreatitis. Several recent evidence-based guidelines recommend the use of lipase over amylase. Nevertheless, both lipase and amylase alone lack the ability to determine the severity and etiology of acute pancreatitis. The co-ordering of both tests has shown little to no increase in the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Thus, unnecessary testing and laboratory expenditures can be reduced by testing lipase alone. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined roentgenoultrasonic diagnosis of false pancreatic cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrov, Eh.Ya.; Beresneva, Eh.A.; Chervonenkis, A.V.; Morozova, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and ultrasound semiotics of false pancreatic cysts in 21 patients have been described. Such a study proves to be highly informative permitting early detection of false pancreatic cysts and observation of the stages of their formation and development of complications. The ultrasound method has advantages for the investigation of patients in early time of false cyst formation and provides an opportunity to detect formations of minimum sizes

  8. Differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct at dynamic CT, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and MR cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jihun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Asanbyeongwon-gil 86, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To compare findings at dynamic computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct (CBD), and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ERC and MRC in differentiating between the two diseases. Bile duct changes at dynamic CT, ERC and MRC were compared in 58 patients with SC-AIP and CBD involvement and 93 patients with periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. Two radiologists rated their confidence in differentiating between the two diseases and the diagnostic performances of ERC and MRC were compared. At CT, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with intrapancreatic CBD involvement, thinner CBD walls, concentric wall thickening, smooth outer margins, and lower degrees of upstream ductal dilatation and contrast enhancement (P {<=} 0.05) than CBD cancer. At ERC and MRC, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with smooth margins, gradual and symmetric narrowing, multifocal involvement and hourglass appearance (P {<=} 0.027) than CBD cancer. MRC showed good diagnostic performance comparable to ERC. Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC can be helpful in distinguishing SC-AIP from periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC in differentiating between the two diseases. (orig.)

  9. Differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct at dynamic CT, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and MR cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Jihun

    2012-01-01

    To compare findings at dynamic computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct (CBD), and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ERC and MRC in differentiating between the two diseases. Bile duct changes at dynamic CT, ERC and MRC were compared in 58 patients with SC-AIP and CBD involvement and 93 patients with periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. Two radiologists rated their confidence in differentiating between the two diseases and the diagnostic performances of ERC and MRC were compared. At CT, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with intrapancreatic CBD involvement, thinner CBD walls, concentric wall thickening, smooth outer margins, and lower degrees of upstream ductal dilatation and contrast enhancement (P ≤ 0.05) than CBD cancer. At ERC and MRC, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with smooth margins, gradual and symmetric narrowing, multifocal involvement and hourglass appearance (P ≤ 0.027) than CBD cancer. MRC showed good diagnostic performance comparable to ERC. Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC can be helpful in distinguishing SC-AIP from periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC in differentiating between the two diseases. (orig.)

  10. Radiation diagnosis of different forms of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stashuk, G.A.; Dubrova, S.Eh.; Emel'yanova, L.N.; Tripatkhi, S.

    1999-01-01

    Using the data on 123 patient with different forms of pancreatitis the ultrasonic and computerized tomographic semiotics of these states is described. It is shown that ultrasonography and computerized tomography are highly informative in diagnosis of different forms of the disease and its complications. Both methods not only assess the pancreatic parenchyma state, the spreading of process into adjacent anatomic structures, but also the dynamic control and perform diagnostic and treatment measures under visual control [ru

  11. Nutritional links to plausible mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer: a conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, R Jean; Srivastava, Sudhir; Milner, John A; Ross, Sharon A

    2003-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is one of most catastrophic and least understood of cancers. Evidence from clinical studies indicates that the development of pancreas cancer progresses over many years before symptoms appear. Most people with pancreatic cancer die within six months of diagnosis. The lack of early disease markers, the paucity of direct subject/patient interview data and limited availability of high quality biological samples have slowed progress toward identifying environmental and genetic disease risk factors. Much remains to be learned about the development of pancreatic cancer and about potential interventions for disease prevention. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies examining risk factors for pancreatic cancer supply little consistent or strong evidence to provide a cohesive prevention strategy for this cancer, but offer clues for future research concerning the prevention and early detection of this devastating disease. This Executive Summary provides background discussion on pancreatic cancer and summaries of each of the topics discussed at the workshop, including 1) Molecular aspects, 2) Dietary and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, 3) The metabolic hypothesis for pancreatic cancer, 4) Preclinical studies on pancreatic cancer, 5) Methylation, 6) Oxidative stress and 7) Biomarker Profiling. This document also contains a compilation of recommendations for future research, concluding remarks, a list of speakers and participants attending the workshop, and a selection of key references to aid future research into nutritional links to mechanisms underlying pancreas cancer. The recommendations section suggests gaps in current knowledge and articulates future directions for this area of investigation.

  12. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  13. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  14. Assessment value of quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Xia Lei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the assessment value of the quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer. Methods: A total of 58 patients with space-occupying pancreatic lesions were divided into 20 patients with pancreatic cancer and 38 patients with benign pancreatic lesions after pancreatic CT perfusion. Patients with pancreatic cancer received palliative surgery, and the cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue specimens were collected during operation. The differences in pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and serum tumor marker levels were compared between patients with pancreatic cancer and patients with benign pancreatic lesions, mRNA expression levels of malignant molecules in pancreatic cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue were further determined, and the correlation between pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and malignant degree of pancreatic cancer was analyzed. Results: CT perfusion scanning BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were lower than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions; serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels were higher than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions (P<0.05; mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin in pancreatic cancer tissue samples were higher than those in paracarcinoma tissue samples, and mRNA expression levels of P53 and Bax were lower than those in para-carcinoma tissue samples (P<0.05; CT perfusion scanning parameters BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were negatively correlated with CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels in serum as well as mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin in pancreatic cancer tissue, and positively correlated with mRNA expression levels of P53 and Bax in pancreatic cancer tissue (P<0.05. Conclusions: Pancreatic CT perfusion scanning is a reliable way to judge the malignant degree of pancreatic cancer and plays a

  15. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP, characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP, with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse.

  16. New perspectives for radiosensitization in pancreatic carcinoma: A review of mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis; Mecanismes de carcinogenese des cancers du pancreas: quelles pistes pour la radiosensibilisation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Fernet, M.; Favaudon, V. [Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Monnier, L.; Touboul, E. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The 5-year overall survival is less than 5 %. This very poor prognosis can be explained both by late diagnosis and by treatment resistance, including resistance to radiation therapy. A better understanding of the pancreatic tumorigenesis and knowledge of the most frequent mutations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (KRAS, p16, TP53, Smad4) open new perspectives for the development of more effective treatments. This review presents the major genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer that could be targeted to improve radiosensitization. (authors)

  17. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martinez-Useros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  18. Role of adipocytokines and its correlation with endocrine pancreatic function in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorowska, Anita; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kaczka, Aleksandra; Borkowska, Anna; Czupryniak, Leszek; Małecka-Panas, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Some authors suggest that adipocytokines contribute to the induction of pancreatic carcinogenesis as well as the development of endocrine insufficiency. We evaluate the circulating concentrations of leptin, resistin and visfatin in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer (PC) and relationship between serum adipocytokines level and clinicopathological features of PC. Moreover the usefulness of those adipocytokines as possible biomarkers of endocrine pancreatic function in PC has been assessed. The pilot study group consisted of 45 individuals (mean age 65.6 ± 11.5 years, BMI 21.8 ± 3.4 kg/m(2)) with newly diagnosed PC (within last 1-3 months) and 13 healthy individuals with age, gender and BMI matched to the study group. Among PC patients 18 (40%) had recently diagnosed diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, resistin, visfatin concentrations were determined with ELISA (R&D Systems, Phoenix Pharmaceuticals) and insulin by RIA (DakoCytomation). Patients with PC as compared to controls had significantly lower plasma leptin (40.6 ± 21.3 vs 63.2 ± 16.3 pg/mL; p pancreatic cancer are characterized with lower level of leptin. This pilot study showed significantly higher resistin concentrations in patients with PC in comparison to healthy controls, which may be helpful in PC early diagnosis. Changes in leptin and resistin level in PC are not likely related to endocrine disorders. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PET-PANC: multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and health economic analysis study of the impact of combined modality 18fluorine-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography scanning in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaneh, Paula; Hanson, Robert; Titman, Andrew; Lancaster, Gill; Plumpton, Catrin; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Yeo, Seow Tien; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Johnson, Colin; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Higginson, Antony P; Armstrong, Tom; Smith, Andrew; Scarsbrook, Andrew; McKay, Colin; Carter, Ross; Sutcliffe, Robert P; Bramhall, Simon; Kocher, Hemant M; Cunningham, David; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian; Chang, David; Khan, Saboor; Zealley, Ian; Sarker, Debashis; Al Sarireh, Bilal; Charnley, Richard; Lobo, Dileep; Nicolson, Marianne; Halloran, Christopher; Raraty, Michael; Sutton, Robert; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Evans, Jonathan; Campbell, Fiona; Deeks, Jon; Sanghera, Bal; Wong, Wai-Lup; Neoptolemos, John P

    2018-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and staging can be difficult in 10-20% of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) adds precise anatomical localisation to functional data. The use of PET/CT may add further value to the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. To determine the incremental diagnostic accuracy and impact of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up in patients with suspected pancreatic cancer. A multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and clinical value study of PET/CT in suspected pancreatic malignancy. Patients with suspected pancreatic malignancy. All patients to undergo PET/CT following standard diagnostic work-up. The primary outcome was the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Secondary outcomes were (1) changes in patients' diagnosis, staging and management as a result of PET/CT; (2) changes in the costs and effectiveness of patient management as a result of PET/CT; (3) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in chronic pancreatitis; (4) the identification of groups of patients who would benefit most from PET/CT; and (5) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in other pancreatic tumours. Between 2011 and 2013, 589 patients with suspected pancreatic cancer underwent MDCT and PET/CT, with 550 patients having complete data and in-range PET/CT. Sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were 88.5% and 70.6%, respectively, for MDCT and 92.7% and 75.8%, respectively, for PET/CT. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV max. ) for a pancreatic cancer diagnosis was 7.5. PET/CT demonstrated a significant improvement in relative sensitivity ( p  = 0.01) and specificity ( p  = 0.023) compared with MDCT. Incremental likelihood ratios demonstrated that PET/CT significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in all scenarios ( p  diagnostic benefit in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and

  20. Pathobiological implications of MUC16 expression in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Haridas

    Full Text Available MUC16 (CA125 belongs to a family of high-molecular weight O-glycosylated proteins known as mucins. While MUC16 is well known as a biomarker in ovarian cancer, its expression pattern in pancreatic cancer (PC, the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, remains unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of MUC16 during the initiation, progression and metastasis of PC for possible implication in PC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. In this study, a microarray containing tissues from healthy and PC patients was used to investigate the differential protein expression of MUC16 in PC. MUC16 mRNA levels were also measured by RT-PCR in the normal human pancreatic, pancreatitis, and PC tissues. To investigate its expression pattern during PC metastasis, tissue samples from the primary pancreatic tumor and metastases (from the same patient in the lymph nodes, liver, lung and omentum from Stage IV PC patients were analyzed. To determine its association in the initiation of PC, tissues from PC patients containing pre-neoplastic lesions of varying grades were stained for MUC16. Finally, MUC16 expression was analyzed in 18 human PC cell lines. MUC16 is not expressed in the normal pancreatic ducts and is strongly upregulated in PC and detected in pancreatitis tissue. It is first detected in the high-grade pre-neoplastic lesions preceding invasive adenocarcinoma, suggesting that its upregulation is a late event during the initiation of this disease. MUC16 expression appears to be stronger in metastatic lesions when compared to the primary tumor, suggesting a role in PC metastasis. We have also identified PC cell lines that express MUC16, which can be used in future studies to elucidate its functional role in PC. Altogether, our results reveal that MUC16 expression is significantly increased in PC and could play a potential role in the progression of this disease.

  1. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  2. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, W.D.; Stewart, E.T.; Lawson, T.L.; Maher, L.; Unger, G.F.; Geenan, J.; Loguidice, J.

    1980-01-01

    A prospective study was performed comparing the sensitivity of computed tomography, ultrasonography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease. Forty patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma, acute recurrent or chronic pancreatitis, and/or jaundice were studied. CT was the most sensitive study in evaluation of pancreatitis. ERCP was most accurate in evaluation of pancreatic malignancy. Ultrasonography was the least sensitive method in detecting pancreatic disease and dilatation of the extrahepatic biliary ducts. (orig.) [de

  3. Kallikrein-related peptidase 7 is a potential target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Ding; Liu, Wei; Zheng, Wei Hong; Li, Xiao Song; Yao, Ru Cheng; Wang, Fangyu; Liu, Sen; Tan, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers with very poor prognosis, and the five-year survival rate of the patients is less than 5% after diagnosis. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) belong to a serine protease family with 15 members that play important roles in cellular physiological behavior and diseases. The high expression level of KLK7 in pancreatic cancer tissues is considered to be a marker for the poor prognosis of this disease. In this work, we set out to investigate whether KLK7 could be a target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) were designed and constructed in lentivirus to knock down KLK7 in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, and the real time cellular analysis (RTCA) was used to evaluate cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities. Small molecules inhibiting KLK7 were discovered by computer-aided drug screening and used to inhibit PANC-1 cells. Our results confirmed that KLK7 is significantly up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissue, and knocking down or inhibiting KLK7 efficiently inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. This study suggested that KLK7 could be a potential chemotherapy target for treatment of pancreatic cancer, which would provide us a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. PMID:29560118

  4. Cachexia and pancreatic cancer: Are there treatment options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Burmeister, Marc A; Bachmann, Jeannine; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-01-01

    Cachexia is frequently described in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is associated with reduced survival and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options of this multi-factorial and complex syndrome are limited. This is due to the fact that, despite extensive preclinical and clinical research, the underlying pathological mechanisms leading to PDAC-associated cachexia are still not fully understood. Furthermore, there is still a lack of consensus on the definition of cachexia, which complicates the standardization of diagnosis and treatment as well as the analysis of the current literature. In order to provide an efficient therapy for cachexia, an early and reliable diagnosis and consistent monitoring is required, which can be challenging especially in obese patients. Although many substances have been tested in clinical and preclinical settings, so far none of them have been proven to have a long-term effect in ameliorating cancer-associated cachexia. However, recent studies have demonstrated that multidimensional therapeutic modalities are able to alleviate pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia and ultimately improve patients’ outcome. In this current review, we propose a stepwise and pragmatic approach to facilitate and standardize the treatment of cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. This strategy consists of nutritional, dietary, pharmacological, physical and psychological methods. PMID:25071331

  5. Paratesticular adenocarcinoma. Unusual presentation of metastasis of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocvirk, J.; Seruga, B.

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic paratesticular adenocarcinoma from the pancreatic cancer is very rare. To our knowledge, there are less than 20 cases published in the literature. We experienced a case of paratesticular adenocarcinoma from the primary pancreatic cancer. A 42-year-old man was presented with locoregionally advanced carcinoma of the tail of the pancreas with intraoperatively found liver metastases and with a tumour in the right hemi-scrotum. Ultrasound of the scrotum revealed a paratesticular tumour. A fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) confirmed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and it was in concordance with the diagnosis of the primary tumour. The patient started treatment with chemotherapy with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, he progressed one month later and the treatment was discontinued. Outcome in the adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is dismal. The only possible treatment option for metastatic disease is systemic therapy but the results are disappointing, as in the present case. (author)

  6. CT diagnosis of pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, W.D.; Nedden, D. zur; Lepuschuetz, H.; Zalaudek, G.; Bodner, E.; Fotter, R.; Lammer, J.; Innsbruck Univ.; Graz Univ.; Innsbruck Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The article reports on 78 CT scans of surgically diseases of the pancreas, 30 cases of chronic pancreatitis, 12 cases of haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis, and 36 cases of carcinoma of the pancreas. 12 of these cases were operable, whereas 234 were inoperable. The operable carcinomas were so small that proper diagnosis was effected in 50% only, whereas the inoperable carcinomas eluded CT identification in 17% of the cases only. The most important signs of an operable carcinoma of the pancreas are a well-defined enlargement and inhomogeneity of the parenchyma with reduced contrast, especially on bolus injection, as well as dilatation of the bile duct system. The most essential criteria for inoperability are absence of boundaries, especially towards the dorsal side, with infiltration of the retroperitoneal fatty tissue, and lack of delineation of the large vessels. According to the present state of the art, CT does not supply definite criteria for differentiating between an operable carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic fibrotic pancreatitis. Overstepping of the marginal contours is a reliably distinctive feature between carcinoma and pancreatitis, but it also points to the inoperable nature of the disease. Haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis is characterized by definite CT criteria, so that diagnosis is easy. Computerised tomography is a valuable diagnostic tool in diseases of the pancreas and can supply conclusive pointers towards the operability of a tumor. (orig.) [de

  7. Disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow from pancreatic cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Makuuchi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kinuhata, Shigeki; Morimura, Mina; Ikebe, Takashi; Tanaka, Hiromu; Shuto, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow (DCBM) arise from gastric cancer. DCBM from pancreatic cancer is very rare. We herein present a case of DCBM from pancreatic cancer. A 57-year-old man was referred to our hospital for severe lumbago. Laboratory data indicated that he suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Non-contrast abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple bone masses but no other abnormal findings. Left iliac bone marrow biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT showed diffuse abnormal uptake in the bones and tail of the pancreas. Contrast whole-body CT showed a tumor measuring approximately 28 mm in diameter with poor enhancement in the tail of the pancreas. The patient’s final diagnosis was pancreatic cancer located in the tail of the pancreas with diffuse bone metastases and DIC. His DCBM was thus believed to originate from the pancreatic cancer. He succumbed to the disease approximately 2 months after admission to our hospital. We herein describe a case of pancreatic cancer located in the tail of the pancreas with diffuse bone metastases and DIC, which, in our case, was DCBM. Therefore, in cases of DCBM with an unknown primary tumor, pancreatic cancer should be considered during differential diagnosis

  8. Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Waddell, Nicola; Pajic, Marina; Patch, Ann-Marie; Chang, David K.; Kassahn, Karin S.; Bailey, Peter; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David; Nones, Katia; Quek, Kelly; Quinn, Michael C. J.; Robertson, Alan J.; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Bruxner, Tim J. C.; Christ, Angelika N.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (...

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. ► Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. ► Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. ► Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. ► This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called “cancer stem cells”, within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the “stemness” of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  10. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. → Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. → PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. → This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated β-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered by treatment with anti

  11. Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leede, E. M.; Sibinga Mulder, B. G.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer...... registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between...

  12. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  13. Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J.; Chari, Suresh T.; Cleeter, Deborah F.; Go, Vay Liang W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Innovation leading to significant advances in research and subsequent translation to clinical practice is urgently necessary in early detection of sporadic pancreatic cancer. Addressing this need, the Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference was conducted by Kenner Family Research Fund in conjunction with the 2014 American Pancreatic Association and Japan Pancreas Society Meeting. International interdisciplinary scientific representatives engaged in strategic facilitated conversations based on distinct areas of inquiry: Case for Early Detection: Definitions, Detection, Survival, and Challenges; Biomarkers for Early Detection; Imaging; and Collaborative Studies. Ideas generated from the summit have led to the development of a Strategic Map for Innovation built upon 3 components: formation of an international collaborative effort, design of an actionable strategic plan, and implementation of operational standards, research priorities, and first-phase initiatives. Through invested and committed efforts of leading researchers and institutions, philanthropic partners, government agencies, and supportive business entities, this endeavor will change the future of the field and consequently the survival rate of those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:25938853

  14. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James F; Poruk, Katherine E; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19(th) century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20(th) century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections.

  15. Gestational diabetes as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon R

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is known to be associated with cancer of the pancreas, though there is some debate as to whether it is a cause or a consequence of the disease. We investigated the incidence of pancreatic cancer in a cohort of 37926 Israeli women followed for 28–40 years for whom information on diabetes had been collected at the time they gave birth, in 1964–1976, in Jerusalem. There were 54 cases of pancreatic cancer ascertained from the Israel Cancer Registry during follow-up. Methods We used Cox proportional hazards models to adjust for age at baseline and explore effects of other risk factors, including ethnic groups, preeclampsia, birth order and birth weight of offspring. Results We observed no cases of pancreatic cancer in the women with insulin dependent diabetes; however, there were five cases in the women with gestational diabetes. The interval between the record of diabetes in pregnancy and the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer ranged from 14–35 years. Women with a history of gestational diabetes showed a relative risk of pancreatic cancer of 7.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.8–18.0. Conclusion We conclude that gestational diabetes is strongly related to the risk of cancer of the pancreas in women in this population, and that gestational diabetes can precede cancer diagnosis by many years.

  16. Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Industry in the Development of Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Go, Vay Liang W; Chari, Suresh T; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating owing to its poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of only 9%. Currently, most individuals are diagnosed at a late stage when treatment options are limited. Early detection of pancreatic cancer provides the greatest hope for making substantial improvements in survival. The Kenner Family Research Fund in partnership with the American Pancreatic Association has sponsored a series of fora to stimulate discussion and collaboration on early detection of pancreatic cancer. At the first forum in 2014, "Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference," a strategic plan was set forth by an international group of interdisciplinary scientific representatives and subsequently The Strategic Map for Innovation was generated. The current conference report is the third forum in the series, "Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Industry in the Development of Biomarkers," which was held in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 27, 2016. This report provides an overview of examples of innovative initiatives by industry and confirms the critical need for collaboration among industry, government, research institutions, and advocacy groups in order to make pancreatic cancer more easily detectable in its earlier stages, when it is more treatable.

  17. Dual phase helical CT: diagnosis value for early pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bingqi; Zhang Ling; Zheng Keguo; Xu Dasheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study dual-phase helical CT for the evaluation of early pancreatic cacinoma. Methods: Dual-phase helical CT was performed on 21 patients with early pancreatic carcinoma. In the enhanced imaging the contrast material was intravenously injected in a dose of 1.5 ml/kg at a rate of 3 ml/s. The image acquisition of the lesion in pancreatic phase (PP) and portal venous phase (PVP) were started at 35 seconds and 65 seconds after the start of the injection respectively. The enhancement of normal pancreas and tumor during the two phases was observed and compared. All data were statistically analyzed. Results: Tumor-pancreas contrast was significantly greater in PP (45.16±113.23) HU than in PVP (23.15±12.44) HU (t=2.13, P<0.01). Conclusion: Dual-phase helical CT scan for pancreas, including the imaging of the pancreatic and portal , venous phase, can be applied as an optimal selection. It can delineate early pancreatic carcinoma clearly and provide more information for the diagnosis of the lesion. The tumor-pancreas contrast was much higher' in PP than in PVP. (authors)

  18. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  19. Curcumin AntiCancer Studies in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. Surgical resection remains the only curative therapeutic treatment for this disease, although only the minority of patients can be resected due to late diagnosis. Systemic gemcitabine-based chemotherapy plus nab-paclitaxel are used as the gold-standard therapy for patients with advanced PC; although this treatment is associated with a better overall survival compared to the old treatment, many side effects and poor results are still present. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for treatment of advanced PC. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has anticancer effects against different types of cancer, including PC, by modulating many molecular targets. Regarding PC, in vitro studies have shown potent cytotoxic effects of curcumin on different PC cell lines including MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3. In addition, in vivo studies on PC models have shown that the anti-proliferative effects of curcumin are caused by the inhibition of oxidative stress and angiogenesis and are due to the induction of apoptosis. On the basis of these results, several researchers tested the anticancer effects of curcumin in clinical trials, trying to overcome the poor bioavailability of this agent by developing new bioavailable forms of curcumin. In this article, we review the results of pre-clinical and clinical studies on the effects of curcumin in the treatment of PC.

  20. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Childhood body mass index and risk of adult pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira, Leticia; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Gamborg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    incident pancreatic cancer cases from 1968-2012. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. Results: During 8,207,015 person-years of follow-up, 1,268 pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. Childhood BMI z-scores at ages 7-13 years were......Background: Excess weight in adulthood is one of the few modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer, and height has associations as well. This leads to question whether body weight and height in childhood are associated with adult pancreatic cancer. Objective: To examine if childhood body mass...... from 7-13 years is positively and linearly associated with adult pancreatic cancer; the higher the BMI, the higher the risk. Excess childhood BMI may be indicative of processes initiated early in life that lead to this cancer. Prevention of childhood adiposity may decrease the burden of pancreatic...

  2. Ultrasound-enhanced nanotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The paper reports in vivo results of ultrasonic nanotherapy of orthotopically grown pancreatic cancer. Phase-shift paclitaxel (PTX) loaded perfluoropentane (PFP) nanoemusions combined with tumor-directed ultrasound have been used with a considerable success for tumor-targeted chemotherapy of gemcitabin (GEM)-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). The GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer proved sensitive to treatment by a micellar PTX formulation Genexol PM (GEN) andor nanodroplet PTX formulation ndGEN. Due to increased permeability of tumor blood vessels, drug-loaded nanodroplets accumulated in the tumor via passive targeting, which was confirmed by ultrasound imaging. Nanodroplets converted into microbubbles in situ under the action of tumor-directed 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound. The strongest therapeutic effect was observed for the combination therapy by PTX-loaded nanodroplets, GEM and ultrasound (ndGEN+GEM+ultrasound). This combination therapy resulted in a spectacular tumor regression and in some cases complete tumor resolution. Moreover, formation of metastases was dramatically decreased and ascitis generation was completely suppressed. However for all animal groups, local tumor recurrence was observed after the completion of the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors.

  3. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer | Benhayoune | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of ...

  4. Tumor markers in pancreatic cancer: a European Group on Tumor Markers (EGTM) status report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most difficult malignancies to diagnose and treat. The aim of this article is to review how tumor markers can aid the diagnosis and management of patients with this malignancy. The most widely used and best validated marker for pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9. Inadequate sensitivity and specificity limit the use of CA 19-9 in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. In non-jaundiced patients, however, CA 19-9 may complement other diagnostic procedures. In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, presurgical and postresection CA 19-9 levels correlate with overall survival. In advanced disease, elevated pretreatment levels of CA 19-9 are associated with adverse patient outcome and thus may be combined with other factors for risk stratification. Most, but not all, reports indicate that serial levels of CA 19-9 correlate with response to systemic therapy. Use of CA 19-9 kinetics in conjunction with imaging is therefore recommended in monitoring therapy. Although several potential serum and tissue markers for pancreatic cancer are currently undergoing evaluation, none are sufficiently validated for routine clinical use. CA 19-9 thus remains the serum pancreatic cancer marker against which new markers for this malignancy should be judged.

  5. Magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacker, H.; Rupp, N.; Reiser, M.; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1984-01-01

    New methods of examination are measured in terms of the efficiency of their predecessors. The introduction of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and computerised tomography (CT) constituted a turning point in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease. In this incipient stages as a clinical diagnostic method, the question is raised whether or not there is evidence that magnetic resonance (MR) can supplement, improve upon or replace the customary methods. It must, however, be taken into account that the technical development of MR is still in progress and that clinical experience with MR in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease, as in other areas, is still insufficient. At this point it is only possible to survey the trends. (orig.)

  6. FDA Approves Irinotecan Liposome to Treat Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer that has progressed after receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy now have a new treatment option: irinotecan liposome in combination with fluorouracil and leucovorin.

  7. Radiation induces invasiveness of pancreatic cancer via up-regulation of heparanase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, I.; Bensoussan, E.; Meirovitz, A.; Elkin, M.; Vlodavsky, I.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive neoplasms with an extremely low survival rate. Because most pancreatic carcinoma patients miss the opportunity for complete surgical resection at the time of diagnosis, radiotherapy remains a major component of treatment modalities. However, pancreatic cancer often shows resistance to radiation therapy. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced aggressiveness is emerging as one of the important mechanisms responsible for the limited benefit of radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer, but the identity of downstream effectors responsible for this effect remains poorly investigated. Here we report that IR promotes pancreatic cancer aggressiveness through up-regulation of the heparanase. Heparanase is a predominant mammalian enzyme capable of degrading heparan sulfate (HS), the main polysaccharide component of the basement membrane and other types of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cleavage of HS by heparanase leads to disassembly of ECM, enables cell invasion, releases HS-bound angiogenic and growth factors from the ECM depots, and generates bioactive HS fragments. We found that clinically relevant doses of IR augment invasive ability of pancreatic cells in vitro and in vivo via induction of heparanase. Our results indicate that the effect of IR on heparanase expression is mediated by Egr1 transcription factor. Moreover, specific inhibitor of heparanase enzymatic activity abolished IR-induced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro, while combined treatment with IR and the heparanase inhibitor, but not IR alone, attenuated ortho-topic pancreatic tumor progression in vivo. The proposed up-regulation of heparanase by IR represents a new molecular pathway through which IR may promote pancreatic tumor aggressiveness, providing explanation for the limited benefit from radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer. Our research is expected to offer a new approach to improve the efficacy of

  8. Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Suresh T.; Kelly, Kimberly; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ahlquist, David A.; Andersen, Dana K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Canto, Marcia; Cleeter, Deborah F.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Go, Vay Liang W.; Hines, O. Joe; Kenner, Barbara J.; Klimstra, David S.; Lerch, Markus M.; Levy, Michael J.; Maitra, Anirban; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Rhim, Andrew D.; Simeone, Diane M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Tanaka, Masao; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic cancer (PC) is estimated to become the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States by 2020. Early detection is the key to improving survival in PC. Addressing this urgent need, the Kenner Family Research Fund conducted the inaugural Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference in 2014 in conjunction with the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and Japan Pancreas Society. This seminal convening of international representatives from science, practice, and clinical research was designed to facilitate challenging interdisciplinary conversations to generate innovative ideas leading to the creation of a defined collaborative strategic pathway for the future of the field. An in-depth summary of current efforts in the field, analysis of gaps in specific areas of expertise, and challenges that exist in early detection is presented within distinct areas of inquiry: Case for Early Detection: Definitions, Detection, Survival, and Challenges; Biomarkers for Early Detection; Imaging; and Collaborative Studies. In addition, an overview of efforts in familial PC is presented in an addendum to this article. It is clear from the summit deliberations that only strategically designed collaboration among investigators, institutions, and funders will lead to significant progress in early detection of sporadic PC. PMID:25931254

  9. Serum Immunoglobulin G4 in Discriminating Autoimmune Pancreatitis From Pancreatic Cancer: A Diagnostic Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Cao, Qin; Jiang, Min; Sun, Ming-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Differentiation between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and pancreatic cancer (PC) is a clinical challenge. Emerging published data on the accuracy of serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) for the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC are inconsistent. The objective of our study was to perform a meta-analysis evaluating the clinical utility of serum IgG4 in the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. We performed a systematic literature search of multiple electronic databases. The methodological quality of each study was assessed according to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist. Random-effects model was used to summarize the diagnostic odds ratio and other measures of accuracy. Eleven studies comprising 523 AIP patients and 771 PC patients were included in the meta-analysis. The summary estimates for serum IgG4 in distinguishing AIP from PC were as follows: diagnostic odds ratio, 57.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.17-141.67); sensitivity, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68-0.76); specificity, 0.93 (95% CI, 0.91-0.94). The area under the curve of serum IgG4 in distinguishing AIP from PC was 0.9200. Our meta-analysis found that serum IgG4 has high specificity and relatively low sensitivity in the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. Therefore, serum IgG4 is useful in distinguishing AIP from PC.

  10. Exosomes Derived From Pancreatic Stellate Cells: MicroRNA Signature and Effects on Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikawa, Tetsuya; Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamada, Shin; Kogure, Takayuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) interact with pancreatic cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment. Cell constituents including microRNAs may be exported from cells within membranous nanovesicles termed exosomes. Exosomes might play a pivotal role in intercellular communication. This study aimed to clarify the microRNA signature of PSC-derived exosomes and their effects on pancreatic cancer cells. Exosomes were prepared from the conditioned medium of immortalized human PSCs. MicroRNAs were prepared from the exosomes and their source PSCs, and the microRNA expression profiles were compared by microarray. The effects of PSC-derived exosomes on proliferation, migration, and the mRNA expression profiles were examined in pancreatic cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cell-derived exosomes contained a variety of microRNAs including miR-21-5p. Several microRNAs such as miR-451a were enriched in exosomes compared to their source PSCs. Pancreatic stellate cell-derived exosomes stimulated the proliferation, migration and expression of mRNAs for chemokine (C - X - C motif) ligands 1 and 2 in pancreatic cancer cells. The stimulation of proliferation, migration, and chemokine gene expression by the conditioned medium of PSCs was suppressed by GW4869, an exosome inhibitor. We clarified the microRNA expression profile in PSC-derived exosomes. Pancreatic stellate cell-derived exosomes might play a role in the interactions between PSCs and pancreatic cancer cells.

  11. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  12. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-14

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care.

  13. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated

  14. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Akimasa [Department of Surgery II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-24

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated.

  15. Role of chymotrypsin C in development and progression of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zejie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chymotrypsin C (CTRC is a trypsinogen synthesized by pancreatic acinar cells and secreted by pancreatic duct cells and belongs to the family of serine chymotrypsin. The main function of CTRC is to regulate the balance between activation and degradation of trypsin and maintain the structural and functional integrity of the pancreas. CTRC gene mutations can cause abnormal activation of trypsinogen and abnormal degradation of trypsin and then lead to the development of pancreatitis. The downregulation or absence of CTRC expression may be associated with the development and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the structure and biological function of CTRC and its mechanism of action in the development and progression of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  16. Progress in cancer genetics: lessons from pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goggins, M.; Kern, S. E.; Offerhaus, J. A.; Hruban, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future advances in the molecular basis of cancer are expected to facilitate cancer diagnosis, to rationalize treatment, to facilitate screening, and to identify individuals requiring cancer prevention strategies. The literature was reviewed concerning the genetic alterations that

  17. Acute pancreatitis: The role of imaging in diagnosis and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharwani, Nishat, E-mail: nishat.bharwani@nhs.ne [Imaging Department, Barts and The London NHS Trust, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Ground Floor, King George V Wing, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom); Patel, Shilpa; Prabhudesai, Shirish; Fotheringham, Tim; Power, Niall [Imaging Department, Barts and The London NHS Trust, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Ground Floor, King George V Wing, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the more commonly encountered aetiologies in the emergency setting and its incidence is rising. Presentations range from a mild-self limiting condition which usually responds to conservative management to one with significant morbidity and mortality in its most severe forms. While clinical criteria are necessary to make the initial diagnosis, contrast-enhanced CT is the mainstay of imaging and has a vital role in assessing the extent and evolution of the disease and its associated complications. The purpose of this article is to summarise the natural course of acute severe pancreatitis, clarify confusing nomenclature, demonstrate the morphological stages in conjunction with radiological scoring systems and illustrate the complications. We will review and illustrate the increasing and significant role interventional radiology has in the management of these patients, which are often life-saving and surgery-sparing.

  18. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  19. Cancer diagnosis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, A.J.; Smith, H.S.; Sartorius, O.W.; Snow, L.; Stampfer, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Peralta Cancer Research Institute has organized the Breast Diagnostic Center (BDC) to make available to women information about the breast, and to conduct clinical research to improve methods for early diagnosis and treatment of breast disease. Women entering the center are educated about the anatomy and physiology of the breast, signs of both benign and malignant disease, and factors that influence the risk of developing cancer. The BDC program proposes to demonstrate that the combined use of various diagnostic modalities, when each modality is used at maximum potential, can detect cancers at an earlier stage. Emphasis is placed on the physical examination, using nipple aspiration cytology, contrast ductography, fine-needle aspirations, and mammography. With the financial participation of the Clorox Company, it is shown that the concept of the BDC is economically sound and fills a need in the community

  20. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  1. Emphasis on neoadjuvant therapy for “resectable” pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Chang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The treatment concept for pancreatic cancer is being transferred from “surgery first” to MDT model. The postoperative adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer can significantly improve the prognosis of patients and has become the standardized diagnostic and treatment practice; the value and significance of neoadjuvant therapy remains unclear. Limited clinical studies of “borderline resectable” pancreatic cancer have shown that neoadjuvant therapy can improve the R0 resection rate and improve the prognosis of patients, and it is recommended for clinical application. But the significance of neoadjuvant therapy in “resectable” pancreatic cancer is still controversial. There is a lack of consensus on indications, cycles, and regimens. It is necessary to carry out a series of prospective control studies to objectively evaluate the value of neoadjuvant therapy in improving the prognosis of “resectable” pancreatic cancer.

  2. Comparison of Pancreas Juice Proteins from Cancer Versus Pancreatitis Using Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Cooke, Kelly; Moyes, Kara White; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas. However, it often shares many molecular features with pancreatic cancer. Biomarkers present in pancreatic cancer frequently occur in the setting of pancreatitis. The efforts to develop diagnostic biomarkers for pancreatic cancer have thus been complicated by the false-positive involvement of pancreatitis. Methods In an attempt to develop protein biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we previously use quantitative proteomics to identify and quantify the proteins from pancreatic cancer juice. Pancreatic juice is a rich source of proteins that are shed by the pancreatic ductal cells. In this study, we used a similar approach to identify and quantify proteins from pancreatitis juice. Results In total, 72 proteins were identified and quantified in the comparison of pancreatic juice from pancreatitis patients versus pooled normal control juice. Nineteen of the juice proteins were overexpressed, and 8 were underexpressed in pancreatitis juice by at least 2-fold compared with normal pancreatic juice. Of these 27 differentially expressed proteins in pancreatitis, 9 proteins were also differentially expressed in the pancreatic juice from pancreatic cancer patient. Conclusions Identification of these differentially expressed proteins from pancreatitis juice provides useful information for future study of specific pancreatitis-associated proteins and to eliminate potential false-positive biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. PMID:17198186

  3. Hypotonic duodenography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, P.J.; Rolny, P.; Nilson, A.E.; Gamklou, R.

    1981-01-01

    Hypotonic duodenography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography were performed in 45 non-icteric patients with suggested pancreatic disease or long-standing upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The accuracy of each method in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease was compared. Hypotonic duodenography revealed pancreatitis in 48 per cent and ERP in 83 per cent of the cases. All 6 pancreatic tumours were detected at ERP and 3 at duodenography. The role of hypotonic duodenography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Nationwide prospective audit of pancreatic surgery: design, accuracy, and outcomes of the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, L. Bengt; Koerkamp, Bas G.; Zwart, Maurice J.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Bosscha, Koop; van Dam, Ronald M.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Gerhards, Michael F.; van der Harst, Erwin; de Hingh, Ignace H.; de Jong, Koert P.; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A.; Rupert, Coen G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Scheepers, Joris J.; van der Schelling, George P.; Busch, Olivier R.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Bruno, Marco J.; van Tienhoven, Geert-Jan; Norduyn, Arnold; Berry, David P.; Tingstedt, Bobby; Tseng, Jennifer F.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Auditing is an important tool to identify practice variation and 'best practices'. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit is mandatory in all 18 Dutch centers for pancreatic surgery. Methods: Performance indicators and case-mix factors were identified by a PubMed search for randomized

  5. Pancreatic cancer clinical trials and accrual in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, William A; James, Porsha M; Rahib, Lola; Talley, Anitra W; Fleshman, Julie M; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2013-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer clinical trials open in the United States and their accrual were examined to identify opportunities to accelerate progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer-specific clinical trials open in the United States in the years 2011 and 2012 were obtained from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network database. Accrual information was obtained from trial sponsors. The portfolio of pancreatic cancer clinical trials identified by type (adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine), phase, disease stage, and treatment approach is reported. More than half of trials for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma applied biologic insights to new therapeutic approaches, and 38% focused on optimization of radiation or chemotherapy delivery or regimens. In 2011, pancreatic cancer trials required total enrollment of 11,786 patients. Actual accrual to 93.2% of trials was 1,804 patients, an estimated 4.57% of the patients with pancreatic cancer alive in that year. The greatest need was for patients with resectable cancer. Trials open in 2011 enrolled an average of 15% of their total target accrual. Physician recommendations greatly influenced patients' decision to enroll or not enroll onto a clinical trial. Matching to a clinical trial within a 50-mile radius and identifying trials for recurrent/refractory disease were documented as challenges for patient accrual. Overall trial enrollment indicates that pancreatic cancer trials open in 2011 would require 6.7 years on average to complete accrual. These results suggest that harmonizing patient supply and demand for clinical trials is required to accelerate progress toward improving survival in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  7. Comparison of Plasma Tu-M2-PK and CA19-9 in Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Heegaard, Niels H H; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2009-01-01

    because of suspicion of pancreatic cancer. Of these, 51 patients had their conditions diagnosed as PDAC, whereas this diagnosis was ruled out in 52 after 12 months of follow-up. The performance of Tu-M2-PK was compared with that of CA19-9 using cutoff values 15 and 37 U/mL, respectively. RESULTS...

  8. Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Arem

    Full Text Available Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713 and controls (n = 878. The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830. Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186, LRP2 (rs4668123, CYP24A1 (rs2762932, GC (rs2282679, and CUBN (rs1810205 genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037, but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  9. CT findings of the mucin producing pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ri, Kyoushichi; Hashimoto, Toushi; Munechika, Hirotsugu

    1992-01-01

    Mucin-producing pancreatic cancers (MPPC), which include mucinous adenocarcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma and cystadenocarcinoma, are radiographically characterized by diffuse or localized dilatation of the main pancreatic duct due to excessive mucin production. Therefore, MPPC are occasionally difficult to distinguish from chronic pancreatitis on CT unless the primary pancreatic lesion is visualized. We compared five cases of MPPC with five cases of chronic pancreatitis with marked duct dilatation to determine differences in CT images between the two diseases. There was no significant difference between the two diseases in the nature of duct dilatation (size, extent, contour) or parenchymal changes (atrophy, enlargement, calcification, cystic lesion). However, dilatation of the intramural duct was characteristically observed in MPPC but not in chronic pancreatitis. Papillary masses in the pancreatic duct, when observed, were another finding specific to MPPC. (author)

  10. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  11. Factors Affecting Adjuvant Therapy in Stage III Pancreatic Cancer—Analysis of the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Krishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant therapy after curative resection is associated with survival benefit in stage III pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the factors affecting the outcome of adjuvant therapy in stage III pancreatic cancer and compared overall survival with different modalities of adjuvant treatment. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with stage III pancreatic cancer listed in the National Cancer Database (NCDB who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. Patients were stratified based on adjuvant therapy they received. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: We analyzed a cohort included 1731 patients who were recipients of adjuvant therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer within the limits of our database. Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation had the longest postdiagnosis survival time, followed by patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, and finally patients who received no adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis, advancing age and patients with Medicaid had worse survival, whereas Spanish origin and lower Charlson comorbidity score had better survival. Conclusions: Our study is the largest trial using the NCDB addressing the effects of adjuvant therapy specifically in stage III pancreatic cancer. Within the limits of our study, survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was more apparent with longer duration from date of diagnosis.

  12. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  13. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  14. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  15. Occupational exposures and risk of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santibanez, Miguel; Vioque, Jesus; Alguacil, Juan; Hera, Manuela Garcia de la; Moreno-Osset, Eduardo; Carrato, Alfredo; Porta, Miquel; Kauppinen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the relationship between occupation (and specific occupational exposures) and risk of exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC). We conducted a multicenter hospital-based case-control study in Eastern Spain. We included 161 incident cases of EPC (59.6% men, 94 with histological confirmation, of whom 80% had ductal adenocarcinoma). Cases were frequency-matched with 455 controls by sex, age and province of residence. Information was elicited using structured questionnaires. Occupations were coded according to the Spanish version of the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988. Occupational exposure to a selection of carcinogenic substances was assessed with the Finnish Job-Exposure Matrix (FINJEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, province, education, alcohol and smoking. A higher risk of EPC was associated with having worked as 'Miners, shotfirers, stone cutters and carvers', 'Machinery mechanics and fitters', 'Building trades workers' and 'Motor vehicle drivers' in men, 'Office Clerks' in women, and 'Waiters' in both sexes. Cases with ductal adenocarcinomas were more likely to have been exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.1-15.2, p-trend = 0.04). We also observed significant associations with exposure to 'synthetic polymer dust exposure' and 'ionizing radiation'. Suggestive increases in risk were observed for 'pesticides', 'diesel and gasoline engine exhaust', and 'hydrocarbon solvents'. Results support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents is associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  16. New concepts in diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This book adopts a multidisciplinary approach to examine in detail a range of interesting new concepts in the diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Its primary goals are to offer a valuable source of information for clinicians involved in the management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and to provide a modern guide to the disease for those who are interested in updating their knowledge, including fellows and senior residents. The book is divided into three parts. The first part provides an epidemiological and clinical overview of the disease, followed by an update on pathological findings, including new discoveries in the area of molecular biology. The second part, on diagnosis, offers detailed and comprehensive information on the advantages and disadvantages of different imaging techniques, including nuclear medicine and endoscopic ultrasound. Each diagnostic strategy is critically reviewed with regard to cost-effectiveness. The concluding part of the book, on therapy, gives a panoramic overview of the various therapeutic options, from surgery to chemotherapy and palliative approaches based on interventional endoscopy and radiology. (orig.)

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  18. Human pancreatic cancer xenografts recapitulate key aspects of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Judge, Sarah M; Delitto, Andrea E; Nosacka, Rachel L; Rocha, Fernanda G; DiVita, Bayli B; Gerber, Michael H; George, Thomas J; Behrns, Kevin E; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Judge, Andrew R; Trevino, Jose G

    2017-01-03

    Cancer cachexia represents a debilitating syndrome that diminishes quality of life and augments the toxicities of conventional treatments. Cancer cachexia is particularly debilitating in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Mechanisms responsible for cancer cachexia are under investigation and are largely derived from observations in syngeneic murine models of cancer which are limited in PC. We evaluate the effect of human PC cells on both muscle wasting and the systemic inflammatory milieu potentially contributing to PC-associated cachexia. Specifically, human PC xenografts were generated by implantation of pancreatic cancer cells, L3.6pl and PANC-1, either in the flank or orthotopically within the pancreas. Mice bearing orthotopic xenografts demonstrated significant muscle wasting and atrophy-associated gene expression changes compared to controls. Further, despite the absence of adaptive immunity, splenic tissue from orthotopically engrafted mice demonstrated elevations in several pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with cancer cachexia, including TNFα, IL1β, IL6 and KC (murine IL8 homologue), when compared to controls. Therefore, data presented here support further investigation into the complexity of cancer cachexia in PC to identify potential targets for this debilitating syndrome.

  19. Review Article: Diagnosis and Management of Igg4 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Salem; Diaa Hamouda; Alyssa Parian

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis that has only recently been recognized as a separate type of pancreatitis in the last two decades. The histopathological features of this distinct form of pancreatitis was first described as early as 1961 when the French Henry Sarles.

  20. MUC1 selectively targets human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Youp Park

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine whether MUC1 antibody conjugated with a fluorophore could be used to visualize pancreatic cancer. Anti-MUC1 (CT2 antibody was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Nude mouse were used to make subcutaneous and orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. Western blot and flow cytometric analysis confirmed the expression of MUC1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines including BxPC-3 and Panc-1. Immunocytochemistry with fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody demonstrated fluorescent areas on the membrane of Panc-1 cancer cells. After injecting the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies via the tail vein, subcutaneously transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumors emitted strong fluorescent signals. In the subcutaneous tumor models, the fluorescent signal from the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody was noted around the margin of the tumor and space between the cells. The conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody bound the tumor in orthotopically-transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 models enabling the tumors to be imaged. This study showed that fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies could visualize pancreatic tumors in vitro and in vivo and may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion—Preliminary Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Sarosiek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P<0.05. Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P<0.05. We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells and Their Niche: Current Therapeutic Implications and Challenges in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been identified as a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells with the ability of self-renewal and differentiation in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs and discuss the mechanisms involved in resistance to chemotherapy, the interactions with the niche, and the potential role in cancer immunoediting. We propose that immunotherapy targeting pancreatic CSCs, in combination with targeting the niche components, may provide a novel treatment strategy to eradicate pancreatic CSCs and hence improve outcomes in pancreatic cancer.

  3. Icotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Shen, Hong; Hu, Han-Guang; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2015-03-21

    A large majority of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have advanced metastatic disease with unresectable malignancies. Despite treatment advances, the survival benefit from chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted drugs is limited. Moreover, their application is limited in China because of high toxicity and cost. Recently, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor activity have shown promise for the treatment of solid cancers when used in combination with standard therapy. However, these drugs have not been evaluated extensively for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report the treatment of a 64-year-old male with metastatic pancreatic cancer using a novel regimen of icotinib with gemcitabine. Marked shrinkage of the mass was observed after two treatment cycles, and partial remission was achieved. The abdominal pain was relieved. The adverse effects were tolerable and treatment cost was acceptable. This is the first reported case for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with icotinib plus gemcitabine and demonstrates a promising therapeutic alternative.

  4. Nationwide prospective audit of pancreatic surgery: design, accuracy, and outcomes of the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijssen, L Bengt; Koerkamp, Bas G; Zwart, Maurice J; Bonsing, Bert A; Bosscha, Koop; van Dam, Ronald M; van Eijck, Casper H; Gerhards, Michael F; van der Harst, Erwin; de Hingh, Ignace H; de Jong, Koert P; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A; Rupert, Coen G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Scheepers, Joris J; van der Schelling, George P; Busch, Olivier R; Besselink, Marc G

    2017-10-01

    Auditing is an important tool to identify practice variation and 'best practices'. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit is mandatory in all 18 Dutch centers for pancreatic surgery. Performance indicators and case-mix factors were identified by a PubMed search for randomized controlled trials (RCT's) and large series in pancreatic surgery. In addition, data dictionaries of two national audits, three institutional databases, and the Dutch national cancer registry were evaluated. Morbidity, mortality, and length of stay were analyzed of all pancreatic resections registered during the first two audit years. Case ascertainment was cross-checked with the Dutch healthcare inspectorate and key-variables validated in all centers. Sixteen RCT's and three large series were found. Sixteen indicators and 20 case-mix factors were included in the audit. During 2014-2015, 1785 pancreatic resections were registered including 1345 pancreatoduodenectomies. Overall in-hospital mortality was 3.6%. Following pancreatoduodenectomy, mortality was 4.1%, Clavien-Dindo grade ≥ III morbidity was 29.9%, median (IQR) length of stay 12 (9-18) days, and readmission rate 16.0%. In total 97.2% of >40,000 variables validated were consistent with the medical charts. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit, with high quality data, reports good outcomes of pancreatic surgery on a national level. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heek, N T; Busch, O R; Van Gulik, T M; Gouma, D J

    2014-04-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile salts, impaired liver function and altered nutritional status due to obstructive jaundice have been characterized as factors for development of complications after surgery. Whereas PBD was to yield beneficial effects in the experimental setting, conflicting results have been observed in clinical studies. The meta-analysis from relative older studies as well as more importantly a recent clinical trial showed that PBD should not be performed routinely. PBD for patients with a distal biliary obstruction is leading to more serious complications compared with early surgery. Arguments for PBD have shifted from a potential therapeutic benefit towards a logistic problem such as patients suffering from cholangitis and severe jaundice at admission or patients who need extra diagnostic tests, or delay in surgery due to a referral pattern or waiting list for surgery as well as candidates for neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. If drainage is indicated in these patients it should be performed with a metal stent to reduce complications after the drainage procedure such as stent occlusion and cholangitis. Considering a change towards more neoadjuvant therapy regimes improvement of the quality of the biliary drainage concept is still important.

  6. Results of intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Jun; Noda, Masanobu

    1991-01-01

    Reported are the results and observations of the authors who, from July 1986 through December 1989, have used electron beam intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on 20 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancers, said number including 3 patients given a resection. In 14 of the 17 unresected patients, a chief symptom was pain, and 8 patients were given a celiac plexus block at the same time. The results and observations are given below. Life-threatening complications occurred in two patients, i.e., an insufficient pancreatojejunostomy, and a perforative peritonitis. In 12 of 13 evaluable patients, pain control was achieved for a mean period of 5 months, indicating that an IORT with celiac plexus block may be useful for palliation. In the resected patients, the mean survival time was 6 months, whereas in the unresected patients, the mean survival time was 7 months. The common cause of death in the unresected patients was a metastatic dissemination. Finally, in 3 of the 5 unresected patients, marked effects such as massive fibrosis were seen in the pancreatic tumor on autopsy. (author)

  7. MicroRNA-gene signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Drakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths and is characterized by early metastasis and pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Despite extensive esearch efforts, there is not any substantial progress regarding the identification of novel drugs against pancreatic cancer. Although the introduction of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine improved clinical response, the prognosis of these patients remained extremely poor with a 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. Thus, the identification of the novel molecular pathways involved in pancreatic oncogenesis and the development of new and potent therapeutic options are highly desirable. Here, we describe how microRNAs control signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated during pancreatic oncogenesis. In addition, we provide evidence that microRNAs could be potentially used as novel pancreatic cancer therapeutics through reversal of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance or regulation of essential molecular pathways. Further studies should integrate the deregulated genes and microRNAs into molecular networks in order to identify the central regulators of pancreatic oncogenesis. Targeting these central regulators could lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer patients.

  8. Pancreatic Metastasis of High-Grade Papillary Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Mimicking Primary Pancreas Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Gunay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reports of epithelial ovarian carcinomas metastatic to the pancreas are very rare. We herein present a metastasis of high grade papillary serous ovarian cancer to mid portion of pancreas. Case. A 42-year-old patient was admitted with a non-specified malignant cystic lesion in midportion of pancreas. She had a history of surgical treatment for papillary serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. A cystic lesion was revealed by an abdominal computerized tomography (CT performed in her follow up . It was considered as primary mid portion of pancreatic cancer and a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The final pathology showed high-grade papillary serous adenocarcinoma morphologically similar to the previously diagnosed ovarian cancer. Discussion. Metastatic pancreatic cancers should be considered in patients who present with a solitary pancreatic mass and had a previous non-pancreatic malignancy. Differential diagnosis of primary pancreatic neoplasm from metastatic malignancy may be very difficult. A biopsy for tissue confirmation is required to differentiate primary and secondary pancreatic tumors. Although, the value of surgical resection is poorly documented, resection may be considered in selected patients. Conclusion. Pancreatic metastasis of ovarian papillary serous adenocarcinoma has to be kept in mind when a patient with pancreatic mass has a history of ovarian malignancy.

  9. Surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction in recurrent pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Palliative surgery improves quality of life in recurrent pancreatic cancer patients and can continue patient’s palliative management. In selected patients, palliative surgery may effective management for progress of survival and quality of life.

  10. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuji; Nishihara, Tamahiro; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111 In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. (author)

  11. Is screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk groups cost-effective?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Maiken Thyregod; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sørensen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, symptoms are few and diffuse, and when the diagnosis has been made only 10-15% would benefit from resection. Surgery is the only potentially curable treatment for pancreatic cancer, and the prognosis seems to......$ per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: With a threshold value of 50,000 US$ per QALY this screening program appears to constitute a cost-effective intervention although screening of HP patients appears to be less cost-effective than FPC patients....... with Hereditary pancreatitis or with a disposition of HP and 40 first-degree relatives of patients with Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC) were screened for development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with yearly endoscopic ultrasound. The cost-effectiveness of screening in comparison with no......-screening was assessed by the incremental cost-utility ratio (ICER). RESULTS: By screening the FPC group we identified 2 patients with PDAC who were treated by total pancreatectomy. One patient is still alive, while the other died after 7 months due to cardiac surgery complications. Stratified analysis of patients...

  12. DIAGNOSIS OF MUCINOUS BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. К. Saribekyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the diagnostic results of 27 patients with mucinous breast cancer, which is a rare type of invasive ductal breast cancer accounting for less than 2% of all breast cancers. The role of radiological, histological and cytological examination in the diagnosis of mucinous breast cancer is evaluated. In cases with large tumors, it was difficult to differentiate mucinous breast cancer from fibrocystic and other benign breast lesions.

  13. Surgery for oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengchun; Poruk, Katherine E; Weiss, Matthew J

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has steadily increased over the past several decades. The majority of PDAC patients will present with distant metastases, limiting surgical management in this population. Hepatectomy and pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) has been well established for colorectal cancer patients with isolated, resectable hepatic or pulmonary metastatic disease. Recent advancements in effective systemic therapy for PDAC have led to the selection of certain patients where metastectomy may be potentially indicated. However, the indication for resection of oligometastases in PDAC is not well defined. This review will discuss the current literature on the surgical management of metastatic disease for PDAC with a specific focus on surgical resection for isolated hepatic and pulmonary metastases.

  14. Targeting Mcl-1 for Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer, we previously conducted an RNAi library screen of 8,800 genes. We identified Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, as a target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemoradiation. In the present study we investigated Mcl-1 inhibition by either genetic or pharmacological approaches as a radiosensitizing strategy in pancreatic cancer cells. Mcl-1 depletion by siRNA produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells in association with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, but only minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. We next tested the ability of the recently identified, selective, small molecule inhibitor of Mcl-1, UMI77, to radiosensitize in pancreatic cancer cells. UMI77 caused dissociation of Mcl-1 from the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells, but minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Radiosensitization by UMI77 was associated with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Importantly, UMI77 did not radiosensitize normal small intestinal cells. In contrast, ABT-737, an established inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, failed to radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells suggesting the unique importance of Mcl-1 relative to other Bcl-2 family members to radiation survival in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results validate Mcl-1 as a target for radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells and demonstrate the ability of small molecules which bind the canonical BH3 groove of Mcl-1, causing displacement of Mcl-1 from Bak, to selectively radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells.

  15. Comprehensive Evaluation of Altered Systemic Metabolism and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    09/08/15-08/31/19 0.96 cal. mo. NIH/NCI $168,300 A prospective investigation of the oral microbiome and pancreatic cancer 1.To perform a...and BWHS. 2.To evaluate racial differences in the oral microbiome using 165 AA and 165 EA controls (from the SCCS only), and to identify any racial...risk factors for pancreatic cancer (cigarette smoking, obesity, red meat and processed meat consumption, alcohol consumption, type 2 diabetes) and oral

  16. Accuracy of computed tomography in determining pancreatic cancer tumor size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazunori; Okada, Shuichi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    1994-01-01

    We compared tumor sizes determined by computed tomography (CT) with those of the resected specimens in 26 patients with pancreatic cancer in order to clarify whether or not the size of a pancreatic tumor can be accurately determined by CT. From the precontrast, postcontrast and arterial dominant phases of dynamic CT, the arterial dominant phase was found to yield the highest correlation between CT measured tumor size and that of the resected specimens (p<0.01). The correlation coefficient was, however, not high (r=0.67). CT alone may therefore be insufficient to determine tumor size in pancreatic cancer accurately. (author)

  17. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisada, Masayoshi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Tatezawa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1982-01-01

    There has been no definite examining technique for the early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases, especially small cancers of the pancreas less than 3 cm. Plain abdominal X-rays do not produce reliable roentgenological signs of acute pancreatitis, but the advent of CT has elucidated the condition to some extent. Upper gastrointestinal series are alleged to demonstrate abnormal findings in 80% of cases of pancreatic cancer or cyst. Pancreatic RI scintigraphy expresses the function and anatomy, and the sensitivity with 75 Se is 88%, similar to 87% by US and 80% by CT. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography visualizes extrapancreatic secretory function, as well as the morphology of pancreas, differentiation is not easy in many cases. The greatest indication for US was cysts. The detection rate of pancreatic cancers is similar between plain and contrast CTs, and pancreatic angiography is not specific for pancreatic cancers. (Chiba, N.)

  18. Association between allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Lowcock, Elizabeth; Hudson, Thomas J; Greenwood, Celia; Gallinger, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Less than 10% of pancreatic cancer cases survive 5 years, yet its etiology is not well understood. Studies suggest allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk. Our study collected additional information on allergies (including skin prick test results and differentiation of allergic/nonallergic asthma), and is the first to assess possible confounding by allergy medications. A population-based case-control study was designed to comprehensively assess the association between allergy and pancreatic cancer risk. Pancreas cancer cases were diagnosed during 2011 to 2012, and identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry (345 cases). Population-based controls were identified using random digit dialing and age/sex frequency matched to cases (1,285 controls). Questionnaires collected lifetime allergy history (type of allergy, age at onset, skin prick testing results), allergy medications, and established pancreas cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios and test potential confounders, including allergy medications. Hay fever was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [AOR = 0.68; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.52-0.89], and reduction was greatest for those whose skin prick test was positive for hay fever allergens. No particular patterns were observed as regards age at onset and duration of allergy. Positive dust/mold allergy skin prick test and animal allergies were associated with a statistically significant reduced pancreatic cancer risk; AOR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.78 and AOR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99, respectively. Asthma was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. These findings support the growing body of evidence that suggests certain allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk. ©2014 AACR.

  19. Family history of cancer and risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eric J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; LaCroix, Andrea; McWilliams, Robert R.; Steplowski, Emily; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Agalliu, Ilir; Allen, Naomi E.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Dorronsoro, Miren; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Kraft, Peter; Kooperberg, Charles; Lynch, Shannon M.; Sund, Malin; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Mouw, Tracy; Newton, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Thomas, Gilles; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e. ovarian, breast, and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of five types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast, and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe, and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling, or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (multivariate-adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.19–2.61). A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.12–1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.52–1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.97–1.51), or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.93–1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study. PMID:20049842

  20. Tumour-derived exosomes as a signature of pancreatic cancer - liquid biopsies as indicators of tumour progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhat, Zarin; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Sharma, Shayna; Rice, Gregory E; Joshi, Virendra; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer in the world. It is known to have a poor prognosis, mostly because early stages of the disease are generally asymptomatic. Progress in pancreatic cancer research has been slow, leaving several fundamental questions pertaining to diagnosis and treatment unanswered. Recent studies highlight the putative utility of tissue-specific vesicles (i.e. extracellular vesicles) in the diagnosis of disease onset and treatment monitoring in pancreatic cancer. Extracellular vesicles are membrane-limited structures derived from the cell membrane. They contain specific molecules including proteins, mRNA, microRNAs and non-coding RNAs that are secreted in the extracellular space. Extracellular vesicles can be classified according to their size and/or origin into microvesicles (~150-1000 nm) and exosomes (~40-120 nm). Microvesicles are released by budding from the plasmatic membrane, whereas exosomes are released via the endocytic pathway by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasmatic membrane. This endosomal origin means that exosomes contain an abundance of cell-specific biomolecules which may act as a 'fingerprint' of the cell of origin. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, particularly the potential role of EVs in these facets of disease management. In particular, we suggest that as exosomes contain cellular protein and RNA molecules in a cell type-specific manner, they may provide extensive information about the signature of the tumour and pancreatic cancer progression.

  1. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer; Adenocarcinomes du pancreas localement evolues: modalites therapeutiques actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Mornex, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lyon-Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    1997-12-31

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  4. Neural Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Target for Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Aeson [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Kim-Fuchs, Corina [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland); Le, Caroline P. [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Hollande, Frédéric [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Sloan, Erica K., E-mail: erica.sloan@monash.edu [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Cousins Center for PNI, UCLA Semel Institute, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Surgery, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2015-07-17

    The tumor microenvironment is known to play a pivotal role in driving cancer progression and governing response to therapy. This is of significance in pancreatic cancer where the unique pancreatic tumor microenvironment, characterized by its pronounced desmoplasia and fibrosis, drives early stages of tumor progression and dissemination, and contributes to its associated low survival rates. Several molecular factors that regulate interactions between pancreatic tumors and their surrounding stroma are beginning to be identified. Yet broader physiological factors that influence these interactions remain unclear. Here, we discuss a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies that highlight the important role chronic stress plays as a physiological regulator of neural-tumor interactions in driving the progression of pancreatic cancer. These studies propose several approaches to target stress signaling via the β-adrenergic signaling pathway in order to slow pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. They also provide evidence to support the use of β-blockers as a novel therapeutic intervention to complement current clinical strategies to improve cancer outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  5. Neural Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Target for Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Aeson; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P.; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is known to play a pivotal role in driving cancer progression and governing response to therapy. This is of significance in pancreatic cancer where the unique pancreatic tumor microenvironment, characterized by its pronounced desmoplasia and fibrosis, drives early stages of tumor progression and dissemination, and contributes to its associated low survival rates. Several molecular factors that regulate interactions between pancreatic tumors and their surrounding stroma are beginning to be identified. Yet broader physiological factors that influence these interactions remain unclear. Here, we discuss a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies that highlight the important role chronic stress plays as a physiological regulator of neural-tumor interactions in driving the progression of pancreatic cancer. These studies propose several approaches to target stress signaling via the β-adrenergic signaling pathway in order to slow pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. They also provide evidence to support the use of β-blockers as a novel therapeutic intervention to complement current clinical strategies to improve cancer outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer

  6. Early diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiglazov, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Modern data are presentd on epidemology etiopathogensis and statistics of breast cancer. Home and international clinical and histological classifications is given. Much attention is paid to the methods for early diagnosis of pretumor diseases and breast cancer: clinical roentgenomammography, thrmography and computerized tomomammography. The role of self-examination in cancer early detection has been analyzed. Special attention is paid to system of detection of minimal and unpalpable form of breast cancer, screening of these tumors. 113 refs.; 60 figs.; 6 tabs

  7. Mathematical models of differential diagnostics and prognosis in chronic pancreatitis and cancer with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kryvoruchko

    2017-02-01

    Methods. Analyzed the results of surgical treatment of 132 patients, including 68 - for cancer of the pancreatic head (in 46 - with jaundice and 64 - chronic pancreatitis (CP with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head (16 - with jaundice. The distribution of patients into groups was carried out with a maximum value of classification functions calculated by special formulas. Next studied indicators of endothelial dysfunction for differential diagnosis.  Results. It was defined the threshold of VEGF = 346 pg/ml, which shared the group of chronic pancreatitis or cancer of the pancreatic head, which was determined based on the Pareto criterion. This model sensitivity was 72.1% and specificity of 75% for the overall accuracy of 72.7%. Even more precision indicator was on the threshold of VEGF = 248 pg/ml, which compared groups of patients with cancer and software of the control group (125.9 pg/ml and the sensitivity was 86.8%, specificity 82.4%, and overall accuracy of 82.3%. At about the same accuracy had this test and the comparison group of patients with chronic pancreatitis and control: sensitivity 84.4% and specificity of 76.5% overall accuracy of 81.5% in the threshold VEGF of 155 pg/ml (p<0,05. To develop a prognosis of a pathological process, along with the use of diagnostic data used a method of classification trees. The model showed that the index VEGF is the criterion that discriminates for pancreas- pancreatic cancer-pancreas, but relative differences in the presence of jaundice in patients defined using S-nitrozothiol. The accuracy of the proposed method of prediction was 89%, the price of cross-checking - 82,6% (p<0,05. Pancreatoduodenal resection for Whipple was performed in 23 patients, for Traverso-Longmire - in 8, subtotal right sided pancreatectomy for Fortner - in 3, hepaticojejunostomy by Roux - in 8, duodenopreserving resection for Beger - in 6, her Bernese option - in 7, operation Frey - in 51. In 26 (19.7% patients, minimally invasive

  8. Acute pancreatitis: current perspectives on diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adarsh P; Mourad, Moustafa M; Bramhall, Simon R

    2018-01-01

    The last two decades have seen the emergence of significant evidence that has altered certain aspects of the management of acute pancreatitis. While most cases of acute pancreatitis are mild, the challenge remains in managing the severe cases and the complications associated with acute pancreatitis. Gallstones are still the most common cause with epidemiological trends indicating a rising incidence. The surgical management of acute gallstone pancreatitis has evolved. In this article, we revisit and review the methods in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. We present the evidence for the supportive management of the condition, and then discuss the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. Based on the evidence, our local institutional pathways, and clinical experience, we have produced an outline to guide clinicians in the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. PMID:29563826

  9. Personalized RNA Medicine for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Maud-Emmanuelle; Hao, Liangliang; Huang, Ling; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P; Pulver, Emilia; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Hidalgo, Manuel; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Slack, Frank J

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: Since drug responses vary between patients, it is crucial to develop pre-clinical or co-clinical strategies that forecast patient response. In this study, we tested whether RNA-based therapeutics were suitable for personalized medicine by using patient-derived-organoid (PDO) and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) models. Experimental Design: We performed microRNA (miRNA) profiling of PDX samples to determine the status of miRNA deregulation in individual pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. To deliver personalized RNA-based-therapy targeting oncogenic miRNAs that form part of this common PDAC miRNA over-expression signature, we packaged antimiR oligonucleotides against one of these miRNAs in tumor-penetrating nanocomplexes (TPN) targeting cell surface proteins on PDAC tumors. Results: As a validation for our pre-clinical strategy, the therapeutic potential of one of our nano-drugs, TPN-21, was first shown to decrease tumor cell growth and survival in PDO avatars for individual patients, then in their PDX avatars. Conclusions: This general approach appears suitable for co-clinical validation of personalized RNA medicine and paves the way to prospectively identify patients with eligible miRNA profiles for personalized RNA-based therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 24(7); 1734-47. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed

  11. Five misconceptions in cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, William

    2009-01-01

    Much investment has been put into facilities for early cancer diagnosis. It is difficult to know how successful this investment has been. New facilities for rapid investigation in the UK have not reduced mortality, and may cause delays in diagnosis of patients with low-risk, or atypical, symptoms. In part, the failure of new facilities to translate into mortality benefits can be explained by five misconceptions. These are described, along with suggested research and organisational remedies. The first misconception is that cancer is diagnosed in hospitals. Consequently, secondary care data have been used to drive primary care decisions. Second, GPs are thought to be poor at cancer diagnosis, yet the type of education on offer to improve this may not be what is needed. Third, symptomatic cancer diagnosis has been downgraded in importance with the introduction of screening, yet screening identifies only a small minority of cancers. Fourth, pressure is put on GPs to make referrals for those with an individual high risk of cancer — disenfranchising those with ‘low-risk but not no-risk’ symptoms. Finally, considerable nihilism exists about the value of early diagnosis, despite considerable observational evidence that earlier diagnosis of symptomatic cancer is beneficial. PMID:19520027

  12. Combining PubMed knowledge and EHR data to develop a weighted bayesian network for pancreatic cancer prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Weng, Chunhua

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method that combines PubMed knowledge and Electronic Health Records to develop a weighted Bayesian Network Inference (BNI) model for pancreatic cancer prediction. We selected 20 common risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer and used PubMed knowledge to weigh the risk factors. A keyword-based algorithm was developed to extract and classify PubMed abstracts into three categories that represented positive, negative, or neutral associations between each risk factor and pancreatic cancer. Then we designed a weighted BNI model by adding the normalized weights into a conventional BNI model. We used this model to extract the EHR values for patients with or without pancreatic cancer, which then enabled us to calculate the prior probabilities for the 20 risk factors in the BNI. The software iDiagnosis was designed to use this weighted BNI model for predicting pancreatic cancer. In an evaluation using a case-control dataset, the weighted BNI model significantly outperformed the conventional BNI and two other classifiers (k-Nearest Neighbor and Support Vector Machine). We conclude that the weighted BNI using PubMed knowledge and EHR data shows remarkable accuracy improvement over existing representative methods for pancreatic cancer prediction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  14. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  15. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Bae; Seong, Jin Sil; Song, Si Young; Park, Seung Woo; Suh, Chang Ok

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the treatment results of concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU plus Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel for unresectable pancreatic cancer. The patients, who were diagnosed by imaging modalities or by explo-laparotomy were treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, and the total dose was 45 Gy. Patients received Gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m 2 or Paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 weekly and oral 5-FU daily. The total number of cycles of chemotherapy ranged from 1 to 39 (median, 11 cycles). The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 36 months. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Fifty-four patients between Jan. 1999 to Nov. 2001 were included in this study. Forty-two patients who completed the planned treatment were included in this analysis. The patients' age ranged from 37 to 73 years (median, 60 years) and the male to female ratio was 30:12. Treatment was interrupted for 12 patients due to; disease progression for 6 (50%), poor performance status for 4 (33.3%), intercurrent disease for 1 (8.3%), and refusal for 1 (8.3%). Response evaluation was possible for 40 patients. One patient gained complete remission and 24 patients gained partial remission, hence the response rate was 59%. The survival rates were 46.7% and 17.0% at 1 year and 2 years, respectively with a median survival time of 12 months. Patients treated with Paclitaxel showed superior outcomes compared to those patients treated with Gemcitabine, in terms of both response rate and survival rate although this difference was not statistically significant. Grade III or IV hematologic toxicity was shown in 8 patients (19%), while grade III or IV non-hematologic toxicity was shown in 5 patients (12%). Concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU and Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel improves both the response rate and survival rate in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective study should be investigated in order to improve both the patient

  16. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Arslan, Alan A.; Qi, Dai; Patel, Alpa V.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wilkins, Lynn R.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Cai, Qiuyin; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard; Clipp, Sandra; Horst, Ronald L.; Irish, Lonn; Koenig, Karen; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.

    2010-01-01

    Results from epidemiologic studies examining pancreatic cancer risk and vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (the best indicator of vitamin D derived from diet and sun) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the authors conducted a pooled nested case-control study of participants from 8 cohorts within the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP) (1974–2006) to evaluate whether prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with the development of pancreatic cancer. In total, 952 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases occurred among participants (median follow-up, 6.5 years). Controls (n = 1,333) were matched to each case by cohort, age, sex, race/ethnicity, date of blood draw, and follow-up time. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate smoking-, body mass index-, and diabetes-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Clinically relevant 25(OH)D cutpoints were compared with a referent category of 50–<75 nmol/L. No significant associations were observed for participants with lower 25(OH)D status. However, a high 25(OH)D concentration (≥100 nmol/L) was associated with a statistically significant 2-fold increase in pancreatic cancer risk overall (odds ratio = 2.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.64). Given this result, recommendations to increase vitamin D concentrations in healthy persons for the prevention of cancer should be carefully considered. PMID:20562185

  17. Cyst fluid analysis in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions : A pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waaij, LA; van Dullemen, HM; Porte, RJ

    Background: Pancreatic cystic tumors commonly include serous cystadenoma (SCA), mucinous cystadenoma (MCA), and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (MCAC). A differential diagnosis with pseudocysts (PC) can be difficult. Radiologic criteria are not reliable. The objective of the study is to investigate the

  18. Physical activity, energy restriction, and the risk of pancreatic cancer: Prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Lumey, L.H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because of their influence on insulin concentrations, we hypothesized that both physical activity and energy restriction may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We examined the associations between physical activity, proxies for energy restriction, and pancreatic cancer

  19. [Surgery for pancreatic cancer: Evidence-based surgical strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Cabús, Santiago; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer surgery represents a challenge for surgeons due to its technical complexity, the potential complications that may appear, and ultimately because of its poor survival. The aim of this article is to summarize the scientific evidence regarding the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer in order to help surgeons in the decision making process in the management of these patients .Here we will review such fundamental issues as the need for a biopsy before surgery, the type of pancreatic anastomosis leading to better results, and the need for placement of drains after pancreatic surgery will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so fa...

  1. Targeting pancreatic cancer with magneto-fluorescent theranostic gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxue; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Biswal, Nrusingh C; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Bartels, Marc; Bardhan, Rizia; Stinnet, Gary; Liu, Xian-De; Ji, Baoan; Deorukhkar, Amit; Brown, Lisa V; Guha, Sushovan; Pautler, Robia G; Krishnan, Sunil; Halas, Naomi J; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    We report a magneto-fluorescent theranostic nanocomplex targeted to neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) for imaging and therapy of pancreatic cancer. Gold nanoshells resonant at 810 nm were encapsulated in silica epilayers doped with iron oxide and the near-infrared (NIR) dye indocyanine green, resulting in theranostic gold nanoshells (TGNS), which were subsequently conjugated with antibodies targeting NGAL in AsPC-1-derived xenografts in nude mice. Anti-NGAL-conjugated TGNS specifically targeted pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo providing contrast for both NIR fluorescence and T2-weighted MRI with higher tumor contrast than can be obtained using long-circulating, but nontargeted, PEGylated nanoparticles. The nanocomplexes also enabled highly specific cancer cell death via NIR photothermal therapy in vitro. TGNS with embedded NIR and magnetic resonance contrasts can be specifically targeted to pancreatic cancer cells with expression of early disease marker NGAL, and enable molecularly targeted imaging and photothermal therapy.

  2. Clinical applications of circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Francesca; Dronov, Oleksii I; Khomenko, Dmytro I; Huguet, Florence; Louvet, Christophe; Mariani, Pascale; Stern, Marc-Henri; Lantz, Olivier; Proudhon, Charlotte; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bidard, Francois-Clement

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most frequent pancreatic cancer type and is characterized by a dismal prognosis due to late diagnosis, local tumor invasion, frequent distant metastases and poor sensitivity to current therapy. In this context, circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA constitute easily accessible blood-borne tumor biomarkers that may prove their clinical interest for screening, early diagnosis and metastatic risk assessment of PDAC. Moreover these markers represent a tool to assess PDAC mutational landscape. In this review, together with key biological findings, we summarize the clinical results obtained using "liquid biopsies" at the different stages of the disease, for early and metastatic diagnosis as well as monitoring during therapy. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riviere, D.M.; Gurusamy, K.S.; Kooby, D.A.; Vollmer, C.M.; Besselink, M.G.; Davidson, B.R.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical resection is currently the only treatment with the potential for long-term survival and cure of pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is provided as distal pancreatectomy for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. It can be performed by laparoscopic or open surgery. In

  5. Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riviere, Deniece; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Kooby, David A.; Vollmer, Charles M.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; Davidson, Brian R.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is currently the only treatment with the potential for long-term survival and cure of pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is provided as distal pancreatectomy for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. It can be performed by laparoscopic or open surgery. In operations on

  6. The Genetics and Molecular Alterations of Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, R.F. de

    2015-01-01

    The prospect that pancreatic cancer will be the second most common cause of cancer death by 2030 is worrisome. Considering that the approximate 6% overall 5-year survival has not merely changed in the past decades illustrates the need to revert the bleak prognosis. Centralization of surgery

  7. Survivin as a radioresistance factor in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asanuma, Koichi; Moriai, Ryosuke; Yajima, Tomomi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Yamada, Mikako; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    We examined whether survivin acts as a constitutive and inducible radioresistance factor in pancreatic cancer cells. Using a quantitative TaqMan reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for survivin mRNA in five pancreatic cancer cell lines, we found an inverse relationship between survivin mRNA expression and radiosensitivity. PANC-1 cells, which had the highest survivin mRNA levels, were most resistant to X-irradiation; MIAPaCa-2 cells, which showed the least survivin mRNA expression, were the most sensitive to X-irradiation. Our results suggested that survivin could act as a constitutive radioresistance factor in pancreatic cancer cells. To determine whether radioresistance is enhanced by induction of survivin expression by irradiation, PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 cells were subjected to sublethal doses of X-irradiation followed by a lethal dose. Survivin mRNA expression was increased significantly in both PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 cell lines by pretreatment with a sublethal dose of X-irradiation, as was cell survival after exposure to the lethal dose. In this system, enzymatic caspase-3 activity was significantly suppressed in cells with acquired resistance. These results suggest that survivin also acts as an inducible radioresistance factor in pancreatic cancer cells. Survivin, then, appears to enhance radioresistance in pancreatic cancer cells; inhibition of survivin mRNA expression may improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Rare case of pancreatic cancer with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duk; Chun, Hoon Jai; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Keum, Bora; Kim, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Han; Nam, Seung Joo; Hyun, Jong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs very rarely in patients with pancreatic cancer. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is characterized by multifocal seeding of the leptomeninges by malignant cells that originate from a solid tumor. To the best of our knowledge, brain metastasis from pancreatic cancer is extremely rare. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is estimated to occur in 3% to 8% of cases of solid tumors. The clinical manifestation usually involves neurological symptoms, including dizziness, headache, vomiting, nausea, and hemiparesis, symptoms similar to those of meningitis or brain tumors. Diagnostic methods for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis include brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Here, we describe a case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in which the primary tumor was later determined to be pancreatic cancer. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings showed mild enhancement of the leptomeninges, and cerebrospinal fluid cytology was negative at first. However, after repeated spinal taps, atypical cells were observed on cerebrospinal fluid analysis and levels of tumor markers such as carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in cerebrospinal fluid were elevated. Abdominal computed tomography, performed to determine the presence of extracerebral tumors, revealed pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer was confirmed histopathologically on examination of an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration specimen. PMID:25624740

  9. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174586,SRX174585,SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174585,SRX174586 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Histone Pancreas Pancreatic cancer cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174586,SRX174585 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Unc.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. At cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Lillelund, Hans Christian Düring; Andersen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Challenges exist in identifying, recruiting and motivating sedentary patients with cancer to initiate physical activity towards recommended levels. We hypothesise that the onset period of adjuvant chemotherapy can be 'the open window of opportunity' to identify and motivate sedentary patients...... with breast and colon cancers, at risk for developing coronary heart disease, to initiate and sustain lifestyle changes....

  20. CT of the pancreatic body and tail in cancer of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Minoru; Muranaka, Tooru; Nishitani, Hiromu; Onitsuka, Hideo; Kawanami, Takashi; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1983-01-01

    In comparison with chronic pancreatitis (27 cases), CT images of secondary changes in the pancreatic body and tail in cancer of the pancreatic head were studied in 17 cases. In cancer cases, the pancreatic duct was dilated in a rosary or linear form, and a fairly large portion of the duct was visualized in continuation in one slice. The parenchyma was uniformly atrophic. Chronic pancreatitis demonstrated various CT images. In the localized-mass-forming type, the pancreatic body and tail showed findings similar to those of cancer in some cases, but unevenness of the pancreatic parenchyma and flexion, tortuosity and discontinuity of the pancreatic duct were observed only in chronic pancreatitis. As well as improvement in CT images, the spatial relationship between the pancreatic duct and parenchyma should be studied in more detail. (Chiba, N.)

  1. The WSB1 gene is involved in pancreatic cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrine Archange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer cells generate metastases because they can survive the stress imposed by the new environment of the host tissue. To mimic this process, pancreatic cancer cells which are not stressed in standard culture conditions are injected into nude mice. Because they develop xenografts, they should have developed adequate stress response. Characterizing that response might provide new strategies to interfere with pancreatic cancer metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, Mia-PaCa2, Capan-1, Capan-2 and BxPC3, we used Affymetrix DNA microarrays to compare the expressions of 22.000 genes in vitro and in the corresponding xenografts. We identified 228 genes overexpressed in xenografts and characterized the implication of one of them, WSB1, in the control of apoptosis and cell proliferation. WSB1 generates 3 alternatively spliced transcripts encoding distinct protein isoforms. In xenografts and in human pancreatic tumors, global expression of WSB1 mRNA is modestly increased whereas isoform 3 is strongly overexpressed and isoforms 1 and 2 are down-regulated. Treating Mia-PaCa2 cells with stress-inducing agents induced similar changes. Whereas retrovirus-forced expression of WSB1 isoforms 1 and 2 promoted cell growth and sensitized the cells to gemcitabine- and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, WSB1 isoform 3 expression reduced cell proliferation and enhanced resistance to apoptosis, showing that stress-induced modulation of WSB1 alternative splicing increases resistance to apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data on WSB1 regulation support the hypothesis that activation of stress-response mechanisms helps cancer cells establishing metastases and suggest relevance to cancer development of other genes overexpressed in xenografts.

  2. Sonographic and radiologic diagnosis of a pancreatic duct stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habscheid, W.; Kulke, H.; Heidbreder, E.

    1986-01-01

    A case is reported in which asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis of initially unknown etiology was detected as result of a routine follow-up examination of a patient with membraneproliferative glomerulonephritis. Ultrasound and endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography detected a stone in the major pancreatic duct. The stone was of such size and irregular form that endoscopic extraction was impossible. (orig.) [de

  3. Sonographic and radiologic diagnosis of a pancreatic duct stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habscheid, W.; Kulke, H.; Heidbreder, E.

    1986-09-01

    A case is reported in which asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis of initially unknown etiology was detected as result of a routine follow-up examination of a patient with membraneproliferative glomerulonephritis. Ultrasound and endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography detected a stone in the major pancreatic duct. The stone was of such size and irregular form that endoscopic extraction was impossible.

  4. Pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis: Computed tomography findings – a retrospective analysis of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Amir, E-mail: amir.med87@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Ayav, Ahmet [Department of HPB Surgery, University Hospital of Nancy (France); Belle, Arthur [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Orry, Xavier [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Unité Inserm U954, Nancy (France); Laurent, Valerie [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Laboratory IADI, INSERM u947 (France)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: Chronic calcifying pancreatitis (CCP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC). Symptoms of PC are non-specific in patients with CCP, and diagnostic imaging can be difficult. Some studies have shown that diagnosis may take several months, leading to delays in treatment (Lin et al., 2015; Lennon et al., 2014) . The aim of this study was to describe the radiological signs of PC in patients with CCP. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study was conducted between January 2004 and December 2014. Patients with CCP who were being monitored for PC were included. Each patient diagnosed with PC was matched with two CCP controls who did not develop PC. Results: We studied 48 patients with CCP (30 men (62%) and 18 women (38%), mean age 69.4 years). Sixteen patients (with 18 tumor sites) who developed PC (1.52%) were compared with 32 controls who did not develop PC. A hypodense mass was observed in all of the patients with PC, predominantly in the pancreatic head (61.2%). No such masses were observed in the controls (p < 0.001). The average mass size was 36.3 mm, and the masses were observed to push aside the calcifications in all patients (p < 0.001). Calcifications were very abundant (>10) in 33.3% of the patients with PC and in 71.9% of the controls (p = 0.0076). The main pancreatic duct (MPD) was dilated in all of the patients with PC (average diameter 8.6 mm; homogeneous in 83.3%) and in only 46.9% of the controls (average 7.4 mm; homogeneous in 37.5%) (p > 0.05). Dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts and common bile duct was observed in 15 (94.4%) of the patients with PC and in none of the controls (p < 0.0001). The average alcohol consumption was 1 g/day (0–5 g/day) in the PC group and 4.6 g/day (0–20 g/day) in the control group. In addition, the average smoking history was 14.25 pack-years (0–40 PY) in the PC group and 27.70 PY (0–60 PY) in the control group. Conclusion: The presence of a pancreatic mass in a patient with CCP is

  5. Microanalysis in cancer diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkacheva, G A [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr

    1984-11-01

    An analysis of the diagnosis accuracy of malignant gastric, rectal, liver and prostatic tumors was performed with relation to the sensitivity and specificity of radioimmunological and immunoenzyme commercial kits of reagents manufactured by different companies and used to determine the concentration of the carcinoembryonic antigen, ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein and acid phosphatase of the prostate. With an increase of the test specificity its diagnostic sensitivity decreases, i.e. the percentage of false-negative results increases. The use of highly specific monoclonal antibodies in serological tests results in a marked decrease of the accuracy of tumor diagnosis. It is necessary to strictly determine indications for the use of the serological and immunodiagnostic kits: for the identification of risk populations, early diagnosis of tumors, differential diagnosis or the monitoring of patients.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer-Derived Exosomes Cause Paraneoplastic β-cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javeed, Naureen; Sagar, Gunisha; Dutta, Shamit K; Smyrk, Thomas C; Lau, Julie S; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Truty, Mark; Petersen, Gloria M; Kaufman, Randal J; Chari, Suresh T; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer frequently causes diabetes. We recently proposed adrenomedullin as a candidate mediator of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in pancreatic cancer. How pancreatic cancer-derived adrenomedullin reaches β cells remote from the cancer to induce β-cell dysfunction is unknown. We tested a novel hypothesis that pancreatic cancer sheds adrenomedullin-containing exosomes into circulation, which are transported to β cells and impair insulin secretion. We characterized exosomes from conditioned media of pancreatic cancer cell lines (n = 5) and portal/peripheral venous blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 20). Western blot analysis showed the presence of adrenomedullin in pancreatic cancer-exosomes. We determined the effect of adrenomedullin-containing pancreatic cancer exosomes on insulin secretion from INS-1 β cells and human islets, and demonstrated the mechanism of exosome internalization into β cells. We studied the interaction between β-cell adrenomedullin receptors and adrenomedullin present in pancreatic cancer-exosomes. In addition, the effect of adrenomedullin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation in β cells was shown. Exosomes were found to be the predominant extracellular vesicles secreted by pancreatic cancer into culture media and patient plasma. Pancreatic cancer-exosomes contained adrenomedullin and CA19-9, readily entered β cells through caveolin-mediated endocytosis or macropinocytosis, and inhibited insulin secretion. Adrenomedullin in pancreatic cancer exosomes interacted with its receptor on β cells. Adrenomedullin receptor blockade abrogated the inhibitory effect of exosomes on insulin secretion. β cells exposed to adrenomedullin or pancreatic cancer exosomes showed upregulation of ER stress genes and increased reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Pancreatic cancer causes paraneoplastic β-cell dysfunction by shedding adrenomedullin(+)/CA19-9(+) exosomes into

  7. Obesity adversely affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Matsumoto, Martha E; Burch, Patrick A; Kim, George P; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R

    2010-11-01

    Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. The authors assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and used epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self-reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI [kg/m2], PFasting blood glucose and diabetes did not affect the results. Higher BMI is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  8. Repurposing Established Compounds to Target Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard W. Renz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC carries a dismal prognosis, in particular, when patients present with unresectable disease. While significant progress has been made in understanding the biology of PDAC, this knowledge has not translated into a clear clinical benefit and current chemotherapeutic strategies only offer a modest improvement in overall survival. Accordingly, novel approaches are desperately needed. One hypothesis that could—at least in part—explain the desolate response of PDAC to chemotherapy is the so-called cancer stem cell (CSC concept, which attributes specific traits, such as chemoresistance, metastatic potential and a distinct metabolism to a small cellular subpopulation of the whole tumor. At the same time, however, some of these attributes could make CSCs more permissive for novel therapeutic strategies with compounds that are already in clinical use. Most recently, several publications have tried to enlighten the field with the idea of repurposing established drugs for antineoplastic use. As such, recycling drugs could present an intriguing and fast-track method with new therapeutic paradigms in anti-cancer and anti-CSC treatments. Here, we aim to summarize important aspects and novel findings of this emerging field.

  9. CT classification of chronic pancreatitis and the significance for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xueling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT characteristics of chronic pancreatitis and a classification based on the CT manifestations was established. Methods: In total 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 43 males and 16 females, with an average age of 40 years old were enrolled in the study. History of acute pancreatitis was positive in 36 patients. Non contrast enhanced and contrast enhanced CT scans were performed. The sizes of lesions, contour of pancreas, as well as the number, density and margin of lesions were investigated on the CT images. Results: Atrophy of the entire pancreas was revealed in 27 patients (46%), complicated with different degree of calcification. Solitary cyst with amorphous wall calcification was demonstrated in 13 patients (22%); multiple intra-pancreatic and peri-pancreatic pseudo-cysts were shown in 7 patients (12%); dilated pancreatic duct was seen in 7 patients (12%); and regional well demarcated bulging of pancreas was presented in 5 patients (8%). Conclusion: The CT findings of chronic pancreatitis in our study could be classified into 5 types: atrophy type, solitary cystic type, multicystic type, pure pancreatic duct dilatation type and mass type. The classification had certain significance for the differential diagnosis and the etiological analysis of chronic pancreatitis. (authors)

  10. The Role of Apoptosis in the Pathology of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samm, Nicole; Werner, Kristin; Rückert, Felix; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with high resistance to most common therapies and therefore has a poor prognosis, which is partly due to a lack of reaction to apoptotic stimuli. Signal transduction of such stimuli includes a death receptor-mediated extrinsic pathway as well as an intrinsic pathway linked to the mitochondria. Defects in apoptotic pathways and the deregulation of apoptotic proteins, such as Survivin, Bcl-2, Bcl-x L and Mcl-1, play decisive roles in the development of pancreatic cancer. Investigation of the molecular mechanism allowing tumors to resist apoptotic cell death would lead to an improved understanding of the physiology and the development of new molecular strategies in pancreatic cancer

  11. The Role of Apoptosis in the Pathology of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Detlev Saeger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a disease with high resistance to most common therapies and therefore has a poor prognosis, which is partly due to a lack of reaction to apoptotic stimuli. Signal transduction of such stimuli includes a death receptor-mediated extrinsic pathway as well as an intrinsic pathway linked to the mitochondria. Defects in apoptotic pathways and the deregulation of apoptotic proteins, such as Survivin, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, play decisive roles in the development of pancreatic cancer. Investigation of the molecular mechanism allowing tumors to resist apoptotic cell death would lead to an improved understanding of the physiology and the development of new molecular strategies in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, and pancreatic cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Yue-Tong; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To investigate the associations of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and atrophic gastritis (AG) with pancreatic cancer risk. Methods: A literature search in PubMed was performed up to July 2017. Only prospective cohort and nested case–control studies enrolling cancer-free participants were eligible. Incident pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained during the follow-up. The risks of pancreatic cancer were compared between persons infected and noninfected with Hp, or between those with and without AG status at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios were combined. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed, and publication bias was estimated. Results: Three cohort studies and 6 nested case–control studies, including 65,155 observations, were analyzed. The meta-analyses did not confirm the association between pancreatic cancer risk and Hp infection (OR = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81–1.47) or AG status (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.80–1.72). However, particular subpopulations potentially had increased risks of pancreatic cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-negative strains of Hp might be a causative factor of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.05–1.62), but a sensitivity analysis by leave-one-out method did not fully warrant it (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.93–1.56). In 1 nested case–control study, AG at stomach corpus in Hp-negative subpopulation might have increased risk of pancreatic cancer, but with a poor test power = 0.56. Publication biases were nonsignificant in the present meta-analysis. Conclusion: Based on current prospective epidemiologic studies, the linkage of pancreatic cancer to Hp infection or AG status was not warranted on the whole. Nevertheless, prospective studies only focusing on those specific subpopulations are further required to obtain better power. PMID:28816977

  14. Multifunctional inulin tethered silver-graphene quantum dots nanotheranostic module for pancreatic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam Joshi, Preeti; Agawane, Sachin; Athalye, Meghana C; Jadhav, Vrushali; Sarkar, Dhiman; Prakash, Rajiv

    2017-09-01

    Cancer nanotechnology is an emerging area of cancer diagnosis and therapy. Although considerable progress has been made for targeted drug delivery systems to deliver anticancer agents to particular site of interest, new nanomaterials are frequently being developed and explored for better drug delivery efficiency. In the present work, we have explored a novel nanoformulation based on silver-graphene quantum dots (Ag-GQDs) nanocomposite for its successful implementation for pancreatic cancer specific drug delivery in wistar rats. Carboxymethyl inulin (CMI); a modified variant of natural polysaccharide inulin is tethered with the nanocomposite via carbodiimide coupling to enhance the biocompatibility of nanoformulation. Experiments are performed to investigate the cytotoxicity reduction of silver nanoparticles after inulin tethering as well as anticancer efficacy of the system using 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) as model drug. SEM, TEM, FT-IR, UV-vis, photoluminescence and anti proliferative assays (MTT) are performed for characterisation of the nanocomposite. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is conjugated as targeting moiety for CD-44 (cancer stem cell marker) to fabricate a complete targeted drug delivery vehicle specific for pancreatic cancer. In the present work two prime objectives were achieved; mitigation the toxicity of silver nanoparticles by inulin coating and it's in vivo application for pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimizing the multimodal approach to pancreatic cyst fluid diagnosis: developing a volume-based triage protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Siaw Ming; Herba, Karl; Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi; de Boer, W Bastiaan; Amanuel, Benhur; Grieu-Iacopetta, Fabienne; Lim, Ee Mun; Segarajasingam, Dev; Yusoff, Ian; Choo, Chris; Frost, Felicity

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a triage algorithm to optimize diagnostic yield from cytology, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) testing on different components of a single pancreatic cyst fluid specimen. The authors also sought to determine whether cell block supernatant was suitable for CEA and KRAS testing. Fifty-four pancreatic cysts were triaged according to a volume-dependent protocol to generate fluid (neat and supernatant) and cell block specimens for cytology, comparative CEA, and KRAS testing. Follow-up histology, diagnostic cytology, or a combined clinicopathologic interpretation was recorded as the final diagnosis. There were 26 mucinous cystic lesions and 28 nonmucinous cystic lesions with volumes ranging from 0.3 mL to 55 mL. Testing different components of the specimens (cell block, neat, and/or supernatant) enabled all laboratory investigations to be performed on 50 of 54 cyst fluids (92.6%). Interpretive concordance was observed in 17 of 17 cases (100%) and in 35 of 40 cases (87.5%) that had multiple components tested for CEA and KRAS mutations, respectively. An elevated CEA level (>192 ng/mL) was the most sensitive test for the detection of a mucinous cystic lesion (62.5%) versus KRAS mutation (56%) and "positive" cytology (61.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 2 of 25 mucinous cystic lesions (8%) in which cytology and CEA levels were not contributory. A volume-based protocol using different components of the specimen was able to optimize diagnostic yield in pancreatic cyst fluids. KRAS mutation testing increased diagnostic yield when combined with cytology and CEA analysis. The current results demonstrated that supernatant is comparable to neat fluid and cell block material for CEA and KRAS testing. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  16. Pancreatic cancer seeding of percutaneous needle tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old African-American female presents with biliary ductal dilatation due to an obstructive pancreatic head mass. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram performed and biliary drainage catheter placement for decompression of the biliary system. The patient had a Whipple procedure performed several months later. On follow up CT imaging, there was interval development and enlargement of a subcutaneous lesion by the right oblique muscles. Biopsy of this lesion revealed pancreatic adenocarcinoma from percutaneous seeding of the transhepatic needle tract.

  17. Aberrant expression of mucin core proteins and o-linked glycans associated with progression of pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remmers, Neeley; Anderson, Judy M; Linde, Erin M

    2013-01-01

    Mucin expression is a common feature of most adenocarcinomas and features prominently in current attempts to improve diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer and other adenocarcinomas. We investigated the expression of a number of mucin core proteins and associated O-linked glycans expressed i...

  18. Regular use of aspirin and pancreatic cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Martin C

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been consistently associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma, and there is some evidence for a protective effect for other types of cancer. As experimental studies reveal a possible role for NSAIDs is reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer, epidemiological studies examining similar associations in human populations become more important. Methods In this hospital-based case-control study, 194 patients with pancreatic cancer were compared to 582 age and sex-matched patients with non-neoplastic conditions to examine the association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer. All participants received medical services at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY and completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire that included information on demographics, lifestyle factors and medical history as well as frequency and duration of aspirin use. Patients using at least one tablet per week for at least six months were classified as regular aspirin users. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Pancreatic cancer risk in aspirin users was not changed relative to non-users (adjusted OR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.72–1.39. No significant change in risk was found in relation to greater frequency or prolonged duration of use, in the total sample or in either gender. Conclusions These data suggest that regular aspirin use may not be associated with lower risk of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Proposed cut-off value of CA19-9 for detecting pancreatic cancer in patients with diabetes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mariko; Nagai, Yoshio; Tenjin, Ayumi; Tanaka, Yasushi

    2018-04-11

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy. CA19-9 is a well-known marker for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but the serum CA19-9 level is reported to be elevated in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. This study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and cut-off value of serum CA19-9 for detection of pancreatic cancer in patients with diabetes. A case-control study of 236 patients was performed. The case group was selected from diabetic patients with pancreatic cancer, while one control was selected for each case from among diabetic patients without pancreatic cancer during the same period. The case group (n = 118) and the control group (n = 118) were matched for age, sex, and pancreatic cancer risk factors. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the serum CA19-9 level that predicted pancreatic cancer. Then the sensitivity and specificity of CA19-9 were calculated for the threshold value. There were no significant differences of age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol intake, and HbA1c between the case and control groups. According to ROC analysis, a serum CA19-9 level of 75 U/mL had the maximum sensitivity and specificity for separating diabetic patients with or without pancreatic cancer. Using this cut-off value, the sensitivity and specificity of CA19-9 for pancreatic cancer was 69.5% and 98.2%, respectively, while the area under the ROC curve was 0.875 [95%CI: 0.826-0.924]. We propose that a serum CA19-9 level of 75 U/mL should be used as the cut-off value when screening patients with diabetes for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Nucleomedical diagnosis of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    1982-06-01

    /sup 67/Ga citrate is most often used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. As judged from reported cases, the accuracy rate was 90%, with a false negative rate being about 5%. Lung ventilation and blood flow scintigraphy are valuable in assessing the degree of damage to lung function and the therapeutic effect rather than in finding lung cancer. In aerosol scintigraphy, sup(99m)Tc labelled aerosols with different particle size depending on the purpose of diagnosis are used; the large particles deposit at the center of the trachea and small size aerosols on the periphery. Aerosol-inhaled scintigraphy is highly valuable for the diagnosis of hilus lung cancer. sup(99m)Tc methylene diphosphate is used in bone scintigraphy to detect bone metastasis. But it sometimes gives false positive results such as in the case of senile bone changes. Another valuable method of diagnosis is emission CT by which various substances having affinity for the tumor can be detected by labelling them with a proton emitting nuclear species such as 11 C, /sup 13/N, /sup 15/O and /sup 18/F. Some cases of lung cancer, and the radionuclide methods used in the diagnosis are shown.

  2. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in pancreatic cancer: an unsolved problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takashi; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ito, Kengo; Tadokoro, Masanori; Ota, Toyohiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Isomura, Takayuki; Ito, Shigeki; Nishino, Masanari; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the significance and problems of 2-[fluorine-18]-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in diagnosing pancreatic cancer and mass-forming pancreatitis (MFP). PET, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed in 15 patients with pancreatic cancer and nine patients with MFP. The areas of the PET scan were determined according to the markers drawn on the patients at CT or MR imaging. Regions of interests (ROIs) were placed by reference to the CT or MR images corresponding to the PET images. Tissue metabolism was evaluated by the differential absorption ratio (DAR) at 50 min after intravenous injection of FDG [DAR = tissue tracer concentration/(injected dose/body weight). The DAR value differed significantly in pancreatic cancer (mean±SD, 4.64±1.94) and MFP (mean±SD, 2.84±2.22) (P<0.05). In one false-negative case (mucinous adenocarcinoma), the tumour contained a small number of malignant cells. In one false-positive case, lymphocytes accumulated densely in the mass in the pancreatic head. Further studies are necessary to investigate the histopathological characteristics (especially the cellularity) and other factors affecting the FDG DAR on PET images. (orig.)

  3. Breast Cancer - Early Diagnosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-28

    This podcast answers a listener's question about how to tell if she has breast cancer.  Created: 4/28/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/28/2011.

  4. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  5. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  6. Intraoperative radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Almazan Ortega, Raquel; Guedea, Ferrran

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been considered for treatment of pancreas cancer since local recurrence rates are very high. This study assesses the efficacy and safety of IORT in pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic review of scientific literature from January 1995 to February 2007, including Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and HTA (Health Technology Assessment). By applying a series of inclusion criteria, two independent reviewers selected those studies in which a minimum of 30 patients received IORT and which furnished survival results based on a minimum 3-month follow-up. Results: Fourteen papers were included, one was an IORT assessment report, 5 were cohort studies, and the remaining 8 were case series studies, 2 of which belonged to the same series. In general, these studies showed that IORT could slightly increase survival among patients with pancreatic cancer in localized stages. However, the results were not conclusively in favor of IORT in the case of pancreatic cancer in locally advanced and metastatic stages. There were no published studies that assessed quality of life. Conclusions: There is no clear evidence to indicate that IORT is more effective than other therapies in treating pancreatic cancer in locally advanced and metastatic stages

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-11-14

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so far. In contrast to the management of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, the endocrinopathy in type 3c is very complex. The course of the disease is complicated by additional present comorbidities such as maldigestion and concomitant qualitative malnutrition. General awareness that patients with known and/or clinically overt chronic pancreatitis will develop type 3c diabetes mellitus (up to 90% of all cases) is rather good. However, in a patient first presenting with diabetes mellitus, chronic pancreatitis as a potential causative condition is seldom considered. Thus many patients are misdiagnosed. The failure to correctly diagnose type 3 diabetes mellitus leads to a failure to implement an appropriate medical therapy. In patients with type 3c diabetes mellitus treating exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, preventing or treating a lack of fat-soluble vitamins (especially vitamin D) and restoring impaired fat hydrolysis and incretin secretion are key-features of medical therapy.

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A.; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G.; Chung, Charles C.; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J.; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J. Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H.; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J.; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T.; Lee, I.-Min; Lemarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L.; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Oberg, Ann L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V.; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P.; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; van den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Chen, Fei; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  12. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  13. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-03

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  14. [Relationship between the expression of beta-cat, cyclin D1 and c-myc and the occurance and biological behavior of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-jun; Ji, Xiang-rui

    2003-06-01

    To study the relationship between the abnormal expression of beta-catenin (beta-cat) and the high expressions of cyclin D1 and c-myc and the occurance, proliferation, infiltration, metastasis and prognosis of pancreatic cancer, and to provide rational basis for the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Immunohistochemical PicTure trade mark was used to examine the expressions of beta-cat, cyclin D1 and c-myc in 47 cases of the cancerous tissue of pancreas, 12 cases of the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and 10 cases of normal tissue of pancreas, respectively. Pancreatic cancer proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was also tested as the index of the extent of proliferation of the pancreatic cancer. beta-cat was expressed normally in the 10 cases of the normal pancreatic tissue, while cyclin D1 and c-myc were negative. The expression rates of beta-cat, cyclin D1 and c-myc in the tissues of the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and the pancreatic cancer had no significant difference [6/12 and 68.1% (32/47), 6/12 and 74.5% (35/47), 5/12 and 70.2% (33/47) respectively;P values were all more than 0.05]. The abnormal expression rate of beta-cat was significantly correlated to the metastasis of the pancreatic cancer and the one-year survival rate (both P 0.05). The expression rate of cyclin D1 was correlated with the proliferation of the pancreatic cancer and the extent of differentiation (both P 0.05). The expression rate of c-myc was not correlated with the size, the extent of proliferation, infiltration, metastasis, or one-year survival rate (both P > 0.05), but closely with the proliferation activity of the cancerous tissue of pancreas (P < 0.05). The abnormal expression of beta-cat and the high expressions of cyclin D1 and c-myc had a parallel relationship with the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic cancer (both P < 0.05, gamma = 1.000, 0.845, 0.437, 0.452). The abnormal expression of beta-cat activates cyclin D1 and c-myc, and results in the

  15. Pancreatic cancer: Incidence, clinical profile, and frequency of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hana T. Al-Majed

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... Diabetes has been postulated to be both a risk factor and a consequence of pancreatic cancer, ... (A.A.. El-Basmi),. Shihab@yahoo.com. (S.H. Al-Mohannadi) ..... A recent meta-analysis reported that obese people may have a ...

  16. Comprehensive Evaluation of Altered Systemic Metabolism and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing...individuals provide extensive data on metabolic phenotypes, such as obesity and diabetes, and banked plasma samples for interrogation . The potential...banked plasma samples for interrogation . The potential impact of understanding the mechanisms underlying early pancreatic cancer growth is

  17. Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy for Pain Control in Irresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavassoli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Severepain is a major problem in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy (TS on pain control in these patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods:Between years 2000 to 2011, 20 patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent TS due to severe pain. They were studied in terms of age, sex, location of pancreas tumor, history of previous surgery, response to treatments for pain control (assessed with VAS scoring system and complications of surgery. Results:M/F = 14/6 with a mean age of 63 years. The most common tumour site was at the pancreas head (in 8 patients. The most cause of unresectability was local expansion to critical adjacent elements (in 10 patients. Surgery was performed successfully in all patients. Post-operative complication included only pleural effusion on the left side which was cured by proper treatment. There were no post-op mortalities.  15 patients had acceptable levels of pain at the end of a six month follow-up period. ConclusionTS provides good pain control, little side effects and minimal invasiveness, the technique is recommended for pain control in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  18. Bryostatin I inhibits growth and proliferation of pancreatic cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bryostatin I on proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells as well as tumor growth in mice tumor xenograft model. Methods: Activation of NF-κB was evaluated by preparing nuclear material extract using nuclear extract kit (Carlsbad, CA, USA) followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ...

  19. Electroacupuncture treatment for pancreatic cancer pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Tang-Yi; Kuai, Le; Zhu, Ji; Wu, Cai-Jun; Liu, Lu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often accompanied by severe abdominal or back pain. It's the first study to evaluate the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on pancreatic cancer pain. A randomized controlled trial compared electroacupuncture with control acupuncture using the placebo needle. Sixty patients with pancreatic cancer pain were randomly assigned to the electroacupuncture group (n = 30) and the placebo control group (n = 30). Patients were treated on Jiaji (Ex-B2) points T8-T12 bilaterally for 30 min once a day for 3 days. Pain intensity was assessed with numerical rated scales (NRS) before the treatment (Baseline), after 3 treatments, and 2 days follow-up. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After 3 treatment, pain intensity on NRS decreased compared with Baseline (-1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.46 to -1.87) in the electroacupuncture group; there was little change (-0.13, 95% CI 0.08 to -0.35) in control group; the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P electroacupuncture group compared with the control group (P Electroacupuncture was an effective treatment for relieving pancreatic cancer pain. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Rizzato, C.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R.; Pacetti, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Cleary, S.P.; Capurso, G.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Werner, J.; Gazouli, M.; Butterbach, K.; Ivanauskas, A.; Giese, N.; Petersen, G. M.; Fogar, P.; Wang, Z.; Bassi, C.; Ryska, M.; Theodoropoulos, G.E.; Kooperberg, Ch.; Li, D.; Greenhalf, W.; Pasquali, C.; Hackert, T.; Fuchs, Ch.S.; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, B.; Sperti, C.; Funel, N.; Dieffenbach, A.K.; Wareham, N.J.; Buring, J.; Holcátová, I.; Costello, E.; Zambon, C.F.; Kupcinskas, J.; Risch, H.A.; Kraft, P.; Bracci, P.M.; Pezzilli, R.; Olson, S.H.; Sesso, H. D.; Hartge, P.; Strobel, O.; Malecka-Panas, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Arslan, A. A.; Pedrazzoli, S.; Souček, P.; Gioffreda, D.; Key, T.J.; Talar-Wojnarowska, R.; Scarpa, A.; Mambrini, A.; Jacobs, E.J.; Jamroziak, K.; Klein, A.; Tavano, F.; Bambi, F.; Landi, S.; Austin, M. A.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Brenner, H.; Chanock, S. J.; Fave, G.D.; Piepoli, A.; Cantore, M.; Zheng, W.; Wolpin, B.M.; Amundadottir, L. T.; Canzian, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 9 (2015), s. 2175-2183 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1734 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : pancreatic cancer * polymorphisms * telomerase * susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.531, year: 2015

  1. Knowledge discovery for pancreatic cancer using inductive logic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yushan; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Maeshiro, Kensei; Ching, Wai-Ki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Furuta, Koh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease and predicting the status of the patients becomes an important and urgent issue. The authors explore the applicability of inductive logic programming (ILP) method in the disease and show that the accumulated clinical laboratory data can be used to predict disease characteristics, and this will contribute to the selection of therapeutic modalities of pancreatic cancer. The availability of a large amount of clinical laboratory data provides clues to aid in the knowledge discovery of diseases. In predicting the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer, using the ILP model, three rules are developed that are consistent with descriptions in the literature. The rules that are identified are useful to detect the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer and therefore contributed significantly to the decision of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the proposed method is compared with the other typical classification techniques and the results further confirm the superiority and merit of the proposed method.

  2. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  4. Dual-energy perfusion-CT in recurrent pancreatic cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, F.; Skornitzke, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Stiller, W.; Klauss, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Hackert, T. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Surgery; Grenacher, L. [Diagnostik Muenchen (Germany). Diagnostic Imaging Center

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of dual energy (DE) perfusion-CT for the differentiation between postoperative soft-tissue formation and tumor recurrence in patients after potentially curative pancreatic cancer resection. 24 patients with postoperative soft-tissue formation in the conventional regular follow-up CT acquisition after pancreatic cancer resection with curative intent were included prospectively. They were examined with a 64-row dual-source CT using a dynamic sequence of 34 DE acquisitions every 1.5 s (80 ml of iodinated contrast material, 370 mg/ml, flow rate 5 ml/s). Weighted average (linearly blended M0.5) 120 kVp-equivalent dual-energy perfusion image data sets were evaluated with a body-perfusion CT tool for estimating blood flow, permeability, and blood volume. Diagnosis was confirmed by histological study (n=4) and by regular follow-up. Final diagnosis was local recurrence of pancreatic cancer in 15 patients and unspecific postoperative tissue formation in 9 patients. The blood-flow values for recurrence tissue trended to be lower compared to postoperative tissue formation with 16.6 ml/100 ml/min and 24.7 ml/100 ml/min, respectively for weighted average 120 kVp-equivalent image data, which was not significant (n.s.) (p=0.06, significance level 0.05). Permeability- and blood-volume values were only slightly lower in recurrence tissue (n.s.). DE perfusion-CT is feasible in patients after pancreatic cancer resection and a promising functional imaging technique. As only a trend for lower perfusion values in local recurrence compared to unspecific postoperative alterations was found, the perfusion differences are not yet sufficient to differentiate between malignancy and unspecific postoperative alterations for this new technique. Further studies and technical improvements are needed to generate reliable data for this clinically highly relevant differentiation.

  5. Pancreatic cancer survivors' preferences, barriers, and facilitators related to physical activity and diet interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Anna E; Delk, Ashley; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Christein, John D; Contreras, Carlo; Posey, James A; Vickers, Selwyn; Oster, Robert; Rogers, Laura Q

    2016-12-01

    To conduct a telephone survey establishing pancreatic cancer survivors' level of interest in, preferences for, and perceived barriers and facilitators to participating in exercise and diet intervention programming. These data will inform the development of such interventions for newly-diagnosed patients. Seventy-one survivors treated for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma from October 2011 to August 2014 were identified through an institutional cancer registry and contacted via telephone. A telephone survey was conducted to query survivors' level of interest in, preferences for, and perceived barriers and facilitators to participating in an exercise and dietary intervention program shortly after disease diagnosis. Acceptability of a technology-based visual communication (e.g., Skype™, FaceTime®) intervention was also assessed. Fifty participants completed the survey (response rate 71.8 %). Over two-thirds of participants reported interest in exercise and diet intervention programming. Over half reported comfort with a technology-delivered visual communication intervention. Barriers to participation included older age and physical, personal, and emotional problems. The most common facilitator was program awareness. Outcomes for future research important to participants were supportive care and quality of life. Most pancreatic cancer patients are interested in exercise and diet interventions shortly after diagnosis; however, some barriers to program participation exist. Future research and intervention planning for pancreatic cancer survivors should focus on developing messaging and strategies that provide support for survivorship outcomes, increase survivor awareness, address lack of familiarity with technology, reduce fears about potential barriers, and help survivors overcome these barriers. In so doing, survivorship needs can be better met and quality of life improved in this understudied population.

  6. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J.; Abbas Rizvi, Syed M.; Qu, Chang F.; Smith, Ross C.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy for the control of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models is reviewed. Results are given for in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and clusters and micro-metastatic cancer lesions in vivo. Two complementary targeting vectors are examined. These are the C595 monoclonal antibody that targets the MUC1 antigen and the PAI2 ligand that targets the uPA receptor. The expression of the tumor-associated antigen MUC-1 and the uPA receptor on three pancreatic cancer cell lines is reported for cell clusters, human mouse xenografts and lymph node metastases, as well as for human pancreatic cancer tissues, using immuno-histochemistry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The targeting vectors C595 and PAI2 were labeled with the alpha emitting radioisotope 213 Bi using the chelators cDTPA and CHX-A″ to form the alpha-conjugates (AC). Cell clusters were incubated with the AC and examined at 48 hours. Apoptosis was documented using the TUNEL assay. In vivo, the anti-proliferative effect for tumors was tested at two days post-subcutaneous cell inoculation. Mice were injected with different concentrations of AC by local or systemic administration. Changes in tumor progression were assessed by tumor size. MUC-1 and uPA are strongly expressed on CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and moderate expression was found CAPAN-1 cell clusters and tumor xenografts. The ACs can target pancreatic cells and regress cell clusters (∼100 μm diameter), causing apoptosis in some 70–90 % of cells. At two days post-cell inoculation in mice, a single local injection of 74 MBq/kg of AC causes complete inhibition of tumor growth. Systemic injections of 111, 222 and 333 MBq/kg of alpha-conjugate caused significant tumor growth delay in a dose dependent manner after 16 weeks, compared with the non-specific control at 333 MBq/kg. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTS and TUNEL assays. The C595 and PAI2-alpha conjugates are indicated for the treatment of micro

  7. Rewiring carbohydrate catabolism differentially affects survival of pancreatic cancer cell lines with diverse metabolic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataranni, Tiziana; Agriesti, Francesca; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Scrima, Rosella; Pazienza, Valerio; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that targeting cellular metabolism represents a promising effective approach to treat pancreatic cancer, overcome chemoresistance and ameliorate patient's prognosis and survival. In this study, following whole-genome expression analysis, we selected two pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1 and BXPC-3, hallmarked by distinct metabolic profiles with specific concern to carbohydrate metabolism. Functional comparative analysis showed that BXPC-3 displayed a marked deficit of the mitochondrial respiratory and oxidative phosphorylation activity and a higher production of reactive oxygen species and a reduced NAD+/NADH ratio, indicating their bioenergetic reliance on glycolysis and a different redox homeostasis as compared to PANC-1. Both cell lines were challenged to rewire their metabolism by substituting glucose with galactose as carbon source, a condition inhibiting the glycolytic flux and fostering full oxidation of the sugar carbons. The obtained data strikingly show that the mitochondrial respiration-impaired-BXPC-3 cell line was unable to sustain the metabolic adaptation required by glucose deprivation/substitution, thereby resulting in a G2\\M cell cycle shift, unbalance of the redox homeostasis, apoptosis induction. Conversely, the mitochondrial respiration-competent-PANC-1 cell line did not show clear evidence of cell sufferance. Our findings provide a strong rationale to candidate metabolism as a promising target for cancer therapy. Defining the metabolic features at time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis and likely of other tumors, appears to be crucial to predict the responsiveness to therapeutic approaches or coadjuvant interventions affecting metabolism. PMID:28476035

  8. The effects of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on body composition of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Henrique A; Baracos, Vickie E; Hong, David S; Abbruzzese, James; Bruera, Eduardo; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-12

    Curcumin is a natural product that is often explored by patients with cancer. Weight loss due to fat and muscle depletion is a hallmark of pancreatic cancer and is associated with worse outcomes. Studies of curcumin's effects on muscularity show conflicting results in animal models. Retrospective matched 1:2 case-control study to evaluate the effects of curcumin on body composition (determined by computerized tomography) of 66 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (22 treated,44 controls). Average age (SEM) was 63(1.8) years, 30/66(45%) women, median number of prior therapies was 2, median (IQR) time from advanced pancreatic cancer diagnosis to baseline image was 7(2-13.5) months (p>0.2, all variables). All patients lost weight (3.3% and 1.3%, treated vs. control, p=0.13). Treated patients lost more muscle (median [IQR] percent change -4.8[-9.1,-0.1] vs. -0.05%[-4.2, 2.6] in controls,pcancer treated with curcumin showed significantly greater loss of subcutaneous fat and muscle than matched untreated controls.

  9. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  10. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Arslan, Alan A.; Qi, Dai; Patel, Alpa V.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wilkins, Lynn R.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Results from epidemiologic studies examining pancreatic cancer risk and vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (the best indicator of vitamin D derived from diet and sun) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the authors conducted a pooled nested case-control study of participants from 8 cohorts within the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP) (1974?2006) to evaluate whether prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were associated w...

  11. Dietary mutagen exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghui; Day, Rena Sue; Bondy, Melissa L; Sinha, Rashmi; Nguyen, Nga T; Evans, Douglas B; Abbruzzese, James L; Hassan, Manal M

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the association between dietary exposure to food mutagens and risk of pancreatic cancer, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center during June 2002 to May 2006. A total of 626 cases and 530 noncancer controls were frequency matched for race, sex and age (+/-5 years). Dietary exposure information was collected via personal interview using a meat preparation questionnaire. A significantly greater portion of the cases than controls showed a preference to well-done pork, bacon, grilled chicken, and pan-fried chicken, but not to hamburger and steak. Cases had a higher daily intake of food mutagens and mutagenicity activity (revertants per gram of daily meat intake) than controls did. The daily intakes of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), as well as the mutagenic activity, were significant predictors for pancreatic cancer (P = 0.008, 0.031, and 0.029, respectively) with adjustment of other confounders. A significant trend of elevated cancer risk with increasing DiMeIQx intake was observed in quintile analysis (P(trend) = 0.024). A higher intake of dietary mutagens (those in the two top quintiles) was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer among those without a family history of cancer but not among those with a family history of cancer. A possible synergistic effect of dietary mutagen exposure and smoking was observed among individuals with the highest level of exposure (top 10%) to PhIP and BaP, P(interaction) = 0.09 and 0.099, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that dietary mutagen exposure alone and in interaction with other factors contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Dietary Mutagen Exposure and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui; Sue Day, Rena; Bondy, Melissa L.; Sinha, Rashmi; Nguyen, Nga T.; Evans, Douglas B.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Hassan, Manal M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the association between dietary exposure to food mutagens and risk of pancreatic cancer, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center during June 2002 to May 2006. Atotal of 626 cases and 530 noncancer controls were frequency matched for race, sex and age (±5 years). Dietary exposure information was collected via personal interview using a meat preparation questionnaire. A significantly greater portion of the cases tha...

  13. Safety and Efficacy of AAV Retrograde Pancreatic Ductal Gene Delivery in Normal and Pancreatic Cancer Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Kayla A; Kwon, Jason J; Alioufi, Arafat; Factora, Tricia; Temm, Constance J; Jacobsen, Max; Sandusky, George E; Shontz, Kim; Chicoine, Louis G; Clark, K Reed; Mendell, Joshua T; Korc, Murray; Kota, Janaiah

    2018-03-16

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery shows promise to transduce the pancreas, but safety/efficacy in a neoplastic context is not well established. To identify an ideal AAV serotype, route, and vector dose and assess safety, we have investigated the use of three AAV serotypes (6, 8, and 9) expressing GFP in a self-complementary (sc) AAV vector under an EF1α promoter (scAAV.GFP) following systemic or retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery. Systemic delivery of scAAV9.GFP transduced the pancreas with high efficiency, but gene expression did not exceed >45% with the highest dose, 5 × 10 12 viral genomes (vg). Intraductal delivery of 1 × 10 11 vg scAAV6.GFP transduced acini, ductal cells, and islet cells with >50%, ∼48%, and >80% efficiency, respectively, and >80% pancreatic transduction was achieved with 5 × 10 11 vg. In a Kras G12D -driven pancreatic cancer mouse model, intraductal delivery of scAAV6.GFP targeted acini, epithelial, and stromal cells and exhibited persistent gene expression 5 months post-delivery. In normal mice, intraductal delivery induced a transient increase in serum amylase/lipase that resolved within a day of infusion with no sustained pancreatic inflammation or fibrosis. Similarly, in PDAC mice, intraductal delivery did not increase pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progression/fibrosis. Our study demonstrates that scAAV6 targets the pancreas/neoplasm efficiently and safely via retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of AAV Retrograde Pancreatic Ductal Gene Delivery in Normal and Pancreatic Cancer Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Quirin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-mediated gene delivery shows promise to transduce the pancreas, but safety/efficacy in a neoplastic context is not well established. To identify an ideal AAV serotype, route, and vector dose and assess safety, we have investigated the use of three AAV serotypes (6, 8, and 9 expressing GFP in a self-complementary (sc AAV vector under an EF1α promoter (scAAV.GFP following systemic or retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery. Systemic delivery of scAAV9.GFP transduced the pancreas with high efficiency, but gene expression did not exceed >45% with the highest dose, 5 × 1012 viral genomes (vg. Intraductal delivery of 1 × 1011 vg scAAV6.GFP transduced acini, ductal cells, and islet cells with >50%, ∼48%, and >80% efficiency, respectively, and >80% pancreatic transduction was achieved with 5 × 1011 vg. In a KrasG12D-driven pancreatic cancer mouse model, intraductal delivery of scAAV6.GFP targeted acini, epithelial, and stromal cells and exhibited persistent gene expression 5 months post-delivery. In normal mice, intraductal delivery induced a transient increase in serum amylase/lipase that resolved within a day of infusion with no sustained pancreatic inflammation or fibrosis. Similarly, in PDAC mice, intraductal delivery did not increase pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progression/fibrosis. Our study demonstrates that scAAV6 targets the pancreas/neoplasm efficiently and safely via retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [de

  16. Comparing human pancreatic cell secretomes by in vitro aptamer selection identifies cyclophilin B as a candidate pancreatic cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Partha; Rialon-Guevara, Kristy L; Veras, Emanuela; Sullenger, Bruce A; White, Rebekah R

    2012-05-01

    Most cases of pancreatic cancer are not diagnosed until they are no longer curable with surgery. Therefore, it is critical to develop a sensitive, preferably noninvasive, method for detecting the disease at an earlier stage. In order to identify biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we devised an in vitro positive/negative selection strategy to identify RNA ligands (aptamers) that could detect structural differences between the secretomes of pancreatic cancer and non-cancerous cells. Using this molecular recognition approach, we identified an aptamer (M9-5) that differentially bound conditioned media from cancerous and non-cancerous human pancreatic cell lines. This aptamer further discriminated between the sera of pancreatic cancer patients and healthy volunteers with high sensitivity and specificity. We utilized biochemical purification methods and mass-spectrometric analysis to identify the M9-5 target as cyclophilin B (CypB). This molecular recognition-based strategy simultaneously identified CypB as a serum biomarker and generated a new reagent to recognize it in body fluids. Moreover, this approach should be generalizable to other diseases and complementary to traditional approaches that focus on differences in expression level between samples. Finally, we suggest that the aptamer we identified has the potential to serve as a tool for the early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer: Unleash its potential through novel combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Songchuan; Contratto, Merly; Miller, George; Leichman, Lawrence; Wu, Jennifer

    2017-06-10

    Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality in both men and women in the United States, with poor response to current standard of care, short progression-free and overall survival. Immunotherapies that target cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed cell death protein-1, and programmed death-ligand 1 checkpoints have shown remarkable activities in several cancers such as melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and non-small cell lung cancer due to high numbers of somatic mutations, combined with cytotoxic T-cell responses. However, single checkpoint blockade was ineffective in pancreatic cancer, highlighting the challenges including the poor antigenicity, a dense desmoplastic stroma, and a largely immunosuppressive microenvironment. In this review, we will summarize available clinical results and ongoing efforts of combining immune checkpoint therapies with other treatment modalities such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and targeted therapy. These combination therapies hold promise in unleashing the potential of immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer to achieve better and more durable clinical responses by enhancing cytotoxic T-cell responses.

  18. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer: utility and experience from the clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dragovich, Tomislav; Kundranda,Madappa

    2016-01-01

    Madappa N Kundranda, Tomislav Dragovich Division of Hematology and Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest epithelial cancers, primarily due to late diagnosis, early metastasis and the lack of effective treatments. With recent advances in systemic therapies, the median survival for metastatic disease has essentially doubled to approximately 1 year, and a significant number of patients are receiving m...

  19. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  20. Suicide in cancer patients within the first year of diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Myung Hee; Park, Subin; Lee, Hochang Benjamin; Ramsey, Christine M; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon Ok; Kim, Jeong Eun; Yoon, Shinkyo; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-05-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is associated with an increased suicide risk, and this risk is the highest within the first year of diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine risk factors of suicide occurring within the first year of cancer diagnosis (early suicide). The sampling pool consisted of 164,497 patients with cancer admitted to a general hospital in Seoul, South Korea, from 1996 to 2009. We conducted a 1:2 matched case-control study by matching 373 patients who died from suicide (cases) with 746 patients who did not die from suicide (controls) on age, sex, anatomic site, and at the time of cancer diagnosis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Suicide within the first year after a cancer diagnosis occurred in 149 patients (40.0% of 373 total suicides). The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for early suicide was 1.65 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40-1.94] and was significantly higher for biliary-pancreatic (SMR = 3.07; 95% CI = 2.02-4.46), lung (SMR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.19-3.30), and stomach (SMR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.16-2.42) cancers than for other cancers. Early and late suicide was significantly different in anatomic site (p = 0.01) and stage (p suicide compared with late suicide (53.4 versus 18.7%; p suicide risk. Cancers with an advanced stage at diagnosis were associated with an increased risk of suicide within 1 year of diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandre, Maria José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Prados, Jose; Aránega, Antonia; Delgado, Juan R.; Irigoyen, Antonio; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Ortuño, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients' outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease. PMID:26346854

  2. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients’ outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease.

  3. The efficacy of an ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy with an 18G cutting needle for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Hwa; Park, Won Kyu; Chang, Jay Chun; Kim, Jae Woon; Cho, Jae Ho; Jang, Han Won; Lee, Jae Kyo; Choi, Joon Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy with an 18G cutting needle in patients suspected of having a pancreatic disease by analyzing the diagnostic performance and complication rate. The study population comprised 35 consecutive patients who underwent an ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy using a high-speed biopsy gun accompanied with an 18G cutting-type needle between May of 2001 and October of 2005. The diagnostic performance (i.e., the acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy) and complications associated with core needle biopsies were evaluated for its efficacy and safety. Thirty-six sessions of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies were performed in 35 consecutive patients. All patients, except two (serous cystadenoma and autoimmune pancreatitis) were diagnosed with various subtypes of pancreatic cancer. The acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 97% (35/36) and 94% (34/36), respectively. A complication occurred only in one patient (3%), which further proved to be a delayed complication (i.e., needle tract implantation). According to our findings, the ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is a viable and safe method for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Moreover, it enables the diagnosis of the pancreatic cancer subtype

  4. Nutritional status and nutritional support before and after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Vasiliki Th; Papalois, Apostolos E; Triantafillidis, John K

    2012-12-01

    Cachexia, malnutrition, significant weight loss, and reduction in food intake due to anorexia represent the most important pathophysiological consequences of pancreatic cancer. Pathophysiological consequences result also from pancreatectomy, the type and severity of which differ significantly and depend on the type of the operation performed. Nutritional intervention, either parenteral or enteral, needs to be seen as a method of support in pancreatic cancer patients aiming at the maintenance of the nutritional and functional status and the prevention or attenuation of cachexia. Oral nutrition could reduce complications while restoring quality of life. Enteral nutrition in the post-operative period could also reduce infective complications. The evidence for immune-enhanced feed in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer is supported by the available clinical data. Nutritional support during the post-operative period on a cyclical basis is preferred because it is associated with low incidence of gastric stasis. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition is indicated only to those patients who are unable to be fed orally or enterally. Thus nutritional deficiency is a relatively widesoread and constant finding suggesting that we must optimise the nutritional status both before and after surgery.

  5. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors

  6. Diagnosis and classification of pancreatic and duodenal injuries in emergency radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Wirth, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian; Körner, Markus

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal injuries after blunt abdominal trauma are rare; however, delays in diagnosis and treatment can significantly increase morbidity and mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) has a major role in early diagnosis of pancreatic and duodenal injuries. Detecting the often subtle signs of injury with whole-body CT can be difficult because this technique usually does not include a dedicated protocol for scanning the pancreas. Specific injury patterns in the pancreas and duodenum often have variable expression at early posttraumatic multidetector CT: They may be hardly visible, or there may be considerable exudate, hematomas, organ ruptures, or active bleeding. An accurate multidetector CT technique allows optimized detection of subtle abnormalities. In duodenal injuries, differentiation between a contusion of the duodenal wall or mural hematoma and a duodenal perforation is vital. In pancreatic injuries, determination of involvement of the pancreatic duct is essential. The latter conditions require immediate surgical intervention. Use of organ injury scales and a surgical classification adapted for multidetector CT enables classification of organ injuries for trauma scoring, treatment planning, and outcome control. In addition, multidetector CT reliably demonstrates potential complications of duodenal and pancreatic injuries, such as posttraumatic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, fistulas, exudates, and abscesses. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  7. Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography: value for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Burbelko, M.; Schenck zu Schweinsberg, T.; Funke, C.; Wecker, C.; Walthers, E.M.; Rominger, M.

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) is the morphologic gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables the visualization of not only the pancreatic duct but also the surrounding parenchyma using T2- and T1-weighted sequences before and after the application of a contrast agent. Moreover, it allows the depiction of ductal segments distal to a stenosis or occlusion. However, conventional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) was not able to achieve accuracy similar to that of ERCP. Despite many technological innovations, such as fast breath-hold acquisitions or respiratory-gated 3D sequences, this drawback could not be overcome. In recent years, secretin-enhanced MRCP has been used for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. A recent study showed that secretin not only improves the visibility of the pancreatic duct and its side branches but it also enhances the diagnostic accuracy of MRCP. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were improved by the application of secretin. Moreover, the agreement between independent observers increased after the use of secretin. In addition, quantitative post-processing tools have been developed that enable the measurement of the exocrine pancreatic output non-invasively using secretin-enhanced MRCP. These tools facilitate applications, such as functional follow-up after pancreaticogastrostomy and pancreaticogastric anastomoses, evaluation of the functional status of the graft after pancreas transplantation and follow-up of pancreatic drainage procedures and duct disruption. (orig.)

  8. Pancreatic cancer stimulates pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and TIMP-1 production through the MAP kinase pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Seiya; Yokota, Tokuyasu; Ujiki, Michael; Ding Xianzhong; Pelham, Carolyn; Adrian, Thomas E.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H.; Denham, Woody

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by an intense desmoplastic reaction that surrounds the tumor. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are thought to be responsible for production of this extracellular matrix. When activated, PSCs have a myofibroblast phenotype and produce not only components of the extracellular matrix including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin, but also matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Since PSCs are found in the stroma surrounding human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we postulate that pancreatic cancer could impact PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 production. Rat PSCs were isolated and cultured. Isolated PSCs were exposed to PANC-1 conditioned medium (CM) and proliferation, activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, and TIMP-1 gene induction were determined. Exposure to PANC-1 CM increased PSC DNA synthesis, cell number, and TIMP-1 mRNA (real-time PCR) as well as activating the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation (U0126) prevented the increases in growth and TIMP-1 expression. PANC-1 CM stimulates PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 through the MAP kinase (ERK 1/2) pathway

  9. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  10. Comparison of Scintigraphic and Radiological Results in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deininger, H. K.; Sielaff, H. J. [Strahlenklinik der Staedt. Krankenanstalten Heilbronn, Heilbronn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1969-05-15

    The results obtained by pancreas scanning and standard radiological diagnostic methods are compared. The roentgenographic examinations of the stomach, intestine, colon, biliary tract and kidneys were performed by standard X-ray methods and by abdominal tomography with pneumoretroperitoneum. Special methods of a radiological pancreatic diagnosis, e.g. selective angiography and intra-operative pancreatography, are intentionally not considered. So far 192 pancreas scans have been carried out after administration of {sup 75}Se-1 -selenomethionine. The patients were prepared either with a special diet or a fasting period. The quality of the pancreas scans depended on the functional state of the pancreatic tissue and a comparison with phantom studies allowed an approximate estimation of the extent of the parenchymatous lesions. Of the 87 cases with proven pancreatic diseases the results were compared with the scintigraphical and radiological findings. This comparative research illustrates the superiority of pancreas scanning over the conventional rontgenographic methods in the exclusion or detection of pancreatic diseases. (author)

  11. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherrer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Unanimity does not exist about the utility and organisation of screening procedures for early diagnosis of lung cancer. We describe a low cost structue of screening, requiring only a minimum of compliance from the elderly smoker and ex-smoker. At 4 months interval, radiographs, sputum cytologies and eventual fiberbronchoscopies are realized in all that elderly smokers and ex-smokers which begin to present one of the first early lung cancer signs or symptoms (loss of weight, hemoptoe, thoracic pain and others). (orig.) [de

  12. Complex role for the immune system in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristin S; Francis, Amanda A; Murray, Nicole R

    2014-08-28

    The immune system plays a complex role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Inflammation can promote the formation of premalignant lesions and accelerate pancreatic cancer development. Conversely, pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive environment, which is thought to promote tumor progression and invasion. Here we review the current literature describing the role of the immune response in the progressive development of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of immune cells at the tumor site, and our current understanding of the function of the immune cell types at the tumor. Recent clinical and preclinical data are reviewed, detailing the involvement of the immune response in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, including the role of specific cytokines and implications for disease outcome. Acute pancreatitis is characterized by a predominantly innate immune response, while chronic pancreatitis elicits an immune response that involves both innate and adaptive immune cells, and often results in profound systemic immune-suppression. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked immune dysfunction driven by immunosuppressive cell types, tumor-promoting immune cells, and defective or absent inflammatory cells. Recent studies reveal that immune cells interact with cancer stem cells and tumor stromal cells, and these interactions have an impact on development and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Finally, current PDAC therapies are reviewed and the potential for harnessing the actions of the immune response to assist in targeting pancreatic cancer using immunotherapy is discussed.

  13. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-01-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials

  14. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F.P. (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC); Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  15. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  16. Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark...... hydrolysates obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis on cancer cell proliferation. Skin and belly flap muscle from trout were hydrolysed with the unspecific proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, or UE1 (all from Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark) to a hydrolysis degree of 1-15%. The hydrolysates were tested for biological...... activities affecting cell proliferation and ability to modulate caspase activity in pancreatic cancer cells COLO357 and BxPC-3 in vitro. A number of the hydrolysates showed caspase promoting activity; in particular products containing muscle tissue, i.e. belly flap, were able to stimulate caspase activity...

  17. Imaging pancreatic cancer using bioconjugated InP quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Ding, Hong; Roy, Indrajit; Law, Wing-Cheung; Bergey, Earl J; Maitra, Anirban; Prasad, Paras N

    2009-03-24

    In this paper, we report the successful use of non-cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) as highly efficient and nontoxic optical probes for imaging live pancreatic cancer cells. Indium phosphide (core)-zinc sulfide (shell), or InP/ZnS, QDs with high quality and bright luminescence were prepared by a hot colloidal synthesis method in nonaqueous media. The surfaces of these QDs were then functionalized with mercaptosuccinic acid to make them highly dispersible in aqueous media. Further bioconjugation with pancreatic cancer specific monoclonal antibodies, such as anticlaudin 4 and antiprostate stem cell antigen (anti-PSCA), to the functionalized InP/ZnS QDs, allowed specific in vitro targeting of pancreatic cancer cell lines (both immortalized and low passage ones). The receptor-mediated delivery of the bioconjugates was further confirmed by the observation of poor in vitro targeting in nonpancreatic cancer based cell lines which are negative for the claudin-4-receptor. These observations suggest the immense potential of InP/ZnS QDs as non-cadmium-based safe and efficient optical imaging nanoprobes in diagnostic imaging, particularly for early detection of cancer.

  18. Current options for palliative treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwelski, K; Meyer, F

    2001-01-01

    Palliative treatment is often the only remaining option in the management of pancreatic carcinoma, but its efficacy is poor due to low tumor sensitivity and inadequate treatment protocols. There are several options of palliative treatment with antitumor or supportive intention. Classical end points of palliative treatment are survival, tumor response, and quality of life. A decade ago, palliative chemotherapy consisted mainly of 5-fluorouracil as the standard agent in combination with either other agents and/or radiotherapy. Only the new antineoplastic drug gemcitabine, which was introduced simultaneously with the definition of novel end points of chemotherapy such as clinical benefit, allowed to achieve some progress. However, while gemcitabine monotherapy appeared to be superior to 5-fluorouracil and improved important parameters of quality of life, it could not provide a significant improvement of survival. A novel concept, therefore, is to improve this beneficial cytostatic response in pancreatic carcinoma using a gemcitabine-based protocol by combining it with antineoplastic drugs such as taxanes or platin analogs. This strategy may have the potential to improve the outcome in palliative chemotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma patients with advanced tumor growth or metastases. Best supportive care in pancreatic cancer consists of the treatment of symptoms, such as pain, jaundice, duodenal obstruction, weight loss, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and tumor-associated depression. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Dynamic MR imaging of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaki, Shiro; Kohno, Yoshihiro; Gohbara, Hideo

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic MRI was performed on 21 patients with pancreatic duct cell carcinoma. Turbo-FLASH or FLASH3D was performed immediately following rapid bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine, and these FLASH images and conventional spin echo images were evaluated about detectability of the lesion. All images were classified into three groups of detectability of the lesion ; good, fair, and poor. On T 1 weighted image, 23% of cases were 'good' and 48% were evaluated as 'fair'. On the other hand, on dynamic MRI, 62% of cases were 'good' and 33% of cases were evaluated as 'fair'. Both T 2 weighted image and enhanced T 1 weighted image were not useful for depiction of the lesion. Direct comparison between T 1 weighted image and dynamic MRI was also done. In 55% of cases, dynamic MRI was superior to T 1 weighted image and in 40% of cases, dynamic MRI was equal to T 1 weighted image. Thus, dynamic MRI was superior to conventional spin echo images for detection of duct cell carcinoma. In 17 patients of duct cell carcinoma who underwent FLASH3D, contrast/noise ratio (CNR) was calculated before and after injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The absolute value of CNR became significantly larger by injection of contrast material. In nine resectable pancreatic carcinomas, two cases of INF α and two cases of medullary type were well depicted. It was concluded that dynamic MRI was useful for evaluation of pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  20. Prognostic significance of new onset ascites in patients with pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzardo German

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for development of malignant ascites and its prognostic significance in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods A prospective database was queried to identify patients with pancreatic cancer who develop ascites. Stage at presentation, size, and location of primary tumor, treatment received and length of survival after onset of ascites were determined. Results A total of 15 patients were identified. Of which 4 patients (1 stage II, 3 stage III underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and manifested with ascites 2, 3, 24 and 47 months after surgery (tumor size 2.9 ± 1.32 cm. All but one of the remaining 11 patients (tumor size 4.4 ± 3.38 cm presented with metastatic disease, and all developed malignant ascites 9 months after diagnosis, dying 2 months later. Resected patients lived longer before the onset of ascites, but not after. Conclusion Once diagnosed, ascites in pancreatic cancer patients heralds imminent death. Limited survival should be considered when determining the aggressiveness of further intervention.

  1. PTK6 promotes cancer migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer cells dependent on ERK signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Ono

    Full Text Available Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 (PTK6 is a non-receptor type tyrosine kinase that may be involved in some cancers. However, the biological role and expression status of PTK6 in pancreatic cancer is unknown. Therefore in this study, we evaluated the functional role of PTK6 on pancreatic cancer invasion. Five pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed PTK6 at varying levels. PTK6 expression was also observed in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PTK6 suppression by siRNA significantly reduced both cellular migration and invasion (0.59/0.49 fold for BxPC3, 0.61/0.62 for Panc1, 0.42/0.39 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05 for each. In contrast, forced overexpression of PTK6 by transfection of a PTK6 expression vector in Panc1 and MIAPaCa2 cells increased cellular migration and invasion (1.57/1.67 fold for Panc1, 1.44/1.57 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05. Silencing PTK6 reduced ERK1/2 activation, but not AKT or STAT3 activation, while PTK6 overexpression increased ERK1/2 activation. U0126, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2, completely abolished the effect of PTK6 overexpression on cellular migration and invasion. These results suggest that PTK6 regulates cellular migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer via ERK signaling. PTK6 may be a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Critical analysis of the potential for the therapeutic targeting of the Sp1 transcription factor in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutooru I

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Indira Jutooru,1 Gayathri Chadalapaka,1 Stephen Safe1,21Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 2Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries and, in 2013, it is estimated that in excess of 45,220 new cases were diagnosed in the United States. PDAC is a highly aggressive disease that invariably evades early diagnosis. The mean survival time for patients with metastatic disease is only 3–6 months, and only 20%–30% of pancreatic cancer patients are alive after 12 months. Because pancreatic cancers are frequently detected at an advanced stage, treatments have provided very limited improvements in tumor regression and overall survival times after diagnosis. 5-Fluorouracil alone or in combination with other drugs has been extensively used for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer, and gemcitabine has partially replaced 5-fluorouracil as a treatment for pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine provides increased clinical benefits in terms of response rate; however, future studies need to focus on developing treatment modalities that will improve the survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients. Specificity protein 1 (Sp1 is overexpressed in PDAC patients, and high expression is associated with poor prognosis, lymph node metastasis, and low survival. Knockdown studies have shown that Sp1 plays an important role in cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, survival, and metastasis. Sp1 expression is low in normal tissue when compared to tumor tissue, which makes Sp1 a potential target for development of new mechanism-based drugs for treatment of pancreatic cancer. Several drugs such as tolfenamic acid, betulinic acid, and methyl-2-cyano3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11-dien-28-oate are shown to downregulate Sp1 expression through various pathways

  3. Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Nicola; Pajic, Marina; Patch, Ann-Marie; Chang, David K; Kassahn, Karin S; Bailey, Peter; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David; Nones, Katia; Quek, Kelly; Quinn, Michael C J; Robertson, Alan J; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z H; Bruxner, Tim J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Wilson, Peter J; Markham, Emma; Cloonan, Nicole; Anderson, Matthew J; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen H; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Poudel, Barsha; Song, Sarah; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Lee, Hong C; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphris, Jeremy; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Chin, Venessa; Steinmann, Angela M; Mawson, Amanda; Humphrey, Emily S; Colvin, Emily K; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Pettitt, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Niclou, Simone P; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Grützmann, Robert; Aust, Daniela; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Falconi, Massimo; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Gill, Anthony J; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Pearson, John V; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2015-02-26

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.

  4. Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Nicola; Pajic, Marina; Patch, Ann-Marie; Chang, David K.; Kassahn, Karin S.; Bailey, Peter; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David; Nones, Katia; Quek, Kelly; Quinn, Michael C. J.; Robertson, Alan J.; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Bruxner, Tim J. C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Wilson, Peter J; Markham, Emma; Cloonan, Nicole; Anderson, Matthew J.; Fink, J. Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen H.; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Poudel, Barsha; Song, Sarah; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J.; Lee, Hong C.; Jones, Marc D.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphris, Jeremy; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Chin, Venessa; Steinmann, Angela M.; Mawson, Amanda; Humphrey, Emily S.; Colvin, Emily K.; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Graham, Janet S.; Niclou, Simone P.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Grützmann, Robert; Aust, Daniela; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Falconi, Massimo; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Eshleman, James R.; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Pearson, John V.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded. PMID:25719666

  5. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  6. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer: utility and experience from the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundranda MN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madappa N Kundranda, Tomislav Dragovich Division of Hematology and Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest epithelial cancers, primarily due to late diagnosis, early metastasis and the lack of effective treatments. With recent advances in systemic therapies, the median survival for metastatic disease has essentially doubled to approximately 1 year, and a significant number of patients are receiving multiple lines of therapy. One such first-line therapy is the combination of gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. This standard option is now serving as a backbone to other novel combinations. In this review, we focus on the development of this combination, its clinical utility, and real-life experiences of managing patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma receiving gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, nab-paclitaxel, MPACT trial, PRODIGE 4/ACCORD 11 trial

  7. Exosomes derived from pancreatic cancer cells induce activation and profibrogenic activities in pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamada, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Nabeshima, Tatsuhide; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) interact with pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), which play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrogenesis, to develop the cancer-conditioned tumor microenvironment. Exosomes are membrane-enclosed nanovesicles, and have been increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-to-cell communications. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of PCC-derived exosomes on cell functions in PSCs. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of Panc-1 and SUIT-2 PCCs. Human primary PSCs were treated with PCC-derived exosomes. PCC-derived exosomes stimulated the proliferation, migration, activation of ERK and Akt, the mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) and fibrosis-related genes, and procollagen type I C-peptide production in PSCs. Ingenuity pathway analysis of the microarray data identified transforming growth factor β1 and tumor necrosis factor as top upstream regulators. PCCs increased the expression of miR-1246 and miR-1290, abundantly contained in PCC-derived exosomes, in PSCs. Overexpression of miR-1290 induced the expression of ACTA2 and fibrosis-related genes in PSCs. In conclusion, PCC-derived exosomes stimulate activation and profibrogenic activities in PSCs. Exosome-mediated interactions between PSCs and PCCs might play a role in the development of the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging based on compressive sensing to determine cancer margins in human pancreatic tissue ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Joseph; Thompson, Kyle J.; Siddiqui, Imran; Martinie, John; Iannitti, David A.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US. Currently, surgery is the only treatment that offers a chance of cure, however, accurately identifying tumor margins in real-time is difficult. Research has demonstrated that optical spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue. The design of a single-pixel imaging system for cancer detection is discussed. The system differentiates between healthy and diseased tissue based on differences in the optical reflectance spectra of these regions. In this study, pancreatic tissue samples from 6 patients undergoing Whipple procedures are imaged with the system (total number of tissue sample imaged was N=11). Regions of healthy and unhealthy tissue are determined based on SAM analysis of these spectral images. Hyperspectral imaging results are then compared to white light imaging and histological analysis. Cancerous regions were clearly visible in the hyperspectral images. Margins determined via spectral imaging were in good agreement with margins identified by histology, indicating that hyperspectral imaging system can differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue. After imaging the system was able to detect cancerous regions with a sensitivity of 74.50±5.89% and a specificity of 75.53±10.81%. Possible applications of this imaging system include determination of tumor margins during surgery/biopsy and assistance with cancer diagnosis and staging.

  9. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  10. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  11. Contribution of the ultrasonography for pancreatic endocrine tumors diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezozzo, D.C.P.; Cerri, G.G.; Siqueira, S.S.C.; Cauledori, I.; Alves, V.A.F.; Magalhaes, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a review of 12 cases of endocrine pancreatic tumors. All patients were submitted to preoperative sonography and five of these to intra-operative sonography as well. Correlation with pathological findings was obtained in all patients. Correct localization of the lesions was obtained in seven of 12 patients by pre- and intra-operative sonography studies. False-positive results were observed in two patients and a technically inadequate sonographic examination with false-negative results were seen in the remaining three cases. Intra-operative sonography contributed in 100% of cases in order to localize at least one of the lesions detected pathologically, thus been very usefull to surgical management. Intra-operative sonography should be used as a routine procedure in the evaluation of endocrine pancreatic tumors. (author)

  12. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias

    2004-01-01

    Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... contributing to late diagnosis of this deadly disease. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive characterization of the "pancreatic juice proteome" in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pancreatic juice was first fractionated by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequently analyzed by liquid...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  13. Retinoid Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer, Injury and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Emily K.; Susanto, Johana M.; Kench, James G.; Ong, Vivienna N.; Mawson, Amanda; Pinese, Mark; Chang, David K.; Rooman, Ilse; O'Toole, Sandra A.; Segara, Davendra; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Apte, Minoti V.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Biankin, Andrew V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation of embryonic signaling pathways quiescent in the adult pancreas is a feature of pancreatic cancer (PC). These discoveries have led to the development of novel inhibitors of pathways such as Notch and Hedgehog signaling that are currently in early phase clinical trials in the treatment of several cancer types. Retinoid signaling is also essential for pancreatic development, and retinoid therapy is used successfully in other malignancies such as leukemia, but little is known concerning retinoid signaling in PC. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the role of retinoid signaling in vitro and in vivo in normal pancreas, pancreatic injury, regeneration and cancer. Retinoid signaling is active in occasional cells in the adult pancreas but is markedly augmented throughout the parenchyma during injury and regeneration. Both chemically induced and genetically engineered mouse models of PC exhibit a lack of retinoid signaling activity compared to normal pancreas. As a consequence, we investigated Cellular Retinoid Binding Protein 1 (CRBP1), a key regulator of retinoid signaling known to play a role in breast cancer development, as a potential therapeutic target. Loss, or significant downregulation of CRBP1 was present in 70% of human PC, and was evident in the very earliest precursor lesions (PanIN-1A). However, in vitro gain and loss of function studies and CRBP1 knockout mice suggested that loss of CRBP1 expression alone was not sufficient to induce carcinogenesis or to alter PC sensitivity to retinoid based therapies. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, retinoid signalling appears to play a role in pancreatic regeneration and carcinogenesis, but unlike breast cancer, it is not mediated directly by CRBP1. PMID:22220202

  14. Retinoid signaling in pancreatic cancer, injury and regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Colvin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of embryonic signaling pathways quiescent in the adult pancreas is a feature of pancreatic cancer (PC. These discoveries have led to the development of novel inhibitors of pathways such as Notch and Hedgehog signaling that are currently in early phase clinical trials in the treatment of several cancer types. Retinoid signaling is also essential for pancreatic development, and retinoid therapy is used successfully in other malignancies such as leukemia, but little is known concerning retinoid signaling in PC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of retinoid signaling in vitro and in vivo in normal pancreas, pancreatic injury, regeneration and cancer. Retinoid signaling is active in occasional cells in the adult pancreas but is markedly augmented throughout the parenchyma during injury and regeneration. Both chemically induced and genetically engineered mouse models of PC exhibit a lack of retinoid signaling activity compared to normal pancreas. As a consequence, we investigated Cellular Retinoid Binding Protein 1 (CRBP1, a key regulator of retinoid signaling known to play a role in breast cancer development, as a potential therapeutic target. Loss, or significant downregulation of CRBP1 was present in 70% of human PC, and was evident in the very earliest precursor lesions (PanIN-1A. However, in vitro gain and loss of function studies and CRBP1 knockout mice suggested that loss of CRBP1 expression alone was not sufficient to induce carcinogenesis or to alter PC sensitivity to retinoid based therapies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, retinoid signalling appears to play a role in pancreatic regeneration and carcinogenesis, but unlike breast cancer, it is not mediated directly by CRBP1.

  15. Intervention on toll-like receptors in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Juan; Andersson, Roland

    2014-05-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a devastating disease with pronounced morbidity and a high mortality rate. Currently available treatments lack convincing cost-efficiency determinations and are in most cases not associated with relevant success rate. Experimental stimulation of the immune system in murine PDA models has revealed some promising results. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pillars of the immune system that have been linked to several forms of malignancy, including lung, breast and colon cancer. In humans, TLRs are expressed in the pancreatic cancer tissue and in several cancer cell lines, whereas they are not expressed in the normal pancreas. In the present review, we explore the current knowledge concerning the role of different TLRs associated to PDA. Even if almost all known TLRs are expressed in the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, there are only five TLRs suggested as possible therapeutic targets. Most data points at TLR2 and TLR9 as effective tumor markers and agonists could potentially be used as e.g. future adjuvant therapies. The elucidation of the role of TLR3 in PDA is only in its initial phase. The inhibition/blockage of TLR4-related pathways has shown some promising effects, but there are still many steps left before TLR4 inhibitors can be considered as possible therapeutic agents. Finally, TLR7 antagonists seem to be potential candidates for therapy. Independent of their potential in immunotherapies, all existing data indicate that TLRs are strongly involved in the pathophysiology and development of PDA.

  16. Exosomes facilitate therapeutic targeting of oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerkar, Sushrut; LeBleu, Valerie S; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Yang, Sujuan; Ruivo, Carolina F; Melo, Sonia A; Lee, J Jack; Kalluri, Raghu

    2017-06-22

    The mutant form of the GTPase KRAS is a key driver of pancreatic cancer but remains a challenging therapeutic target. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles generated by all cells, and are naturally present in the blood. Here we show that enhanced retention of exosomes, compared to liposomes, in the circulation of mice is likely due to CD47-mediated protection of exosomes from phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. Exosomes derived from normal fibroblast-like mesenchymal cells were engineered to carry short interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA specific to oncogenic Kras G12D , a common mutation in pancreatic cancer. Compared to liposomes, the engineered exosomes (known as iExosomes) target oncogenic KRAS with an enhanced efficacy that is dependent on CD47, and is facilitated by macropinocytosis. Treatment with iExosomes suppressed cancer in multiple mouse models of pancreatic cancer and significantly increased overall survival. Our results demonstrate an approach for direct and specific targeting of oncogenic KRAS in tumours using iExosomes.

  17. Multiple small pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis: angiographic diagnosis and transcatheter embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, G.; Stockx, L.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Wilms, G.; Marchal, G.; Steenbergen, W. van

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage due to multiple, small pseudoaneurysms complicating a chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and US could not clearly depict these vascular lesions. Selective arteriography of the superior mesenteric and gastroduodenal arteries clearly showed the small pseudoaneurysms and definitive treatment was performed by transcatheter embolization using coils. Eight months after successful embolization, the patient is asymptomatic without any recurrent bleeding. (orig.)

  18. Pan-European survey on the implementation of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery with emphasis on cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Thijs; Besselink, Marc G.; Shamali, Awad; Butturini, Giovanni; Busch, Olivier R.; Edwin, Bjørn; Troisi, Roberto; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Dagher, Ibrahim; Bassi, Claudio; Abu Hilal, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive (MI) pancreatic surgery appears to be gaining popularity, but its implementation throughout Europe and the opinions regarding its use in pancreatic cancer patients are unknown. A 30-question survey was sent between June and December 2014 to pancreatic surgeons of the European

  19. Recent Advances in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery of Relevance to the Practicing Pathologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, Lennart B.; Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Walma, Marieke S.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tol, Johanna A.; Molenaar, Isaac Q.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; Verheij, Joanne; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Besselink, Marc G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in pancreatic surgery have the potential to improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer. We address 3 new, trending topics in pancreatic surgery that are of relevance to the pathologist. First, increasing awareness of the prognostic impact of intraoperatively detected

  20. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hisao Wakabayashi; Yoshihiro Nishiyama; Tsuyoshi Otani; Takanori Sano; Shinichi Yachida; Keiichi Okano; Kunihiko Izuishi; Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the role of positron emission tomo- graphy using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the surgical management of patients with pancreatic cancer,including the diagnosis, staging, and selection of patients for the subsequent surgical treatment.METHODS: This study involved 53 patients with proven primary pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity of diagnosing the primary cancer was examined for FDG-PET, CT,cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice,and the serum levels of carcinoembrionic antigens (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Next, the accuracy of staging was compared between FDG-PET and CT. Finally, FDG-PET was analyzed semiquantitatively using the standard uptake value (SUV). The impact of the SUV on patient management was evaluated by examining the correlations between the SUV and the histological findings of cancer.RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET, CT, cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice, and the serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 were 92.5%, 88.7%, 46.4%, 37.7% and 69.8%, respectively. In staging, FDG-PET was superior to CT only in diagnosing distant disease (bone metastasis). For local staging, the sensitivity of CT was better than that of FDG-PET. The SUV did not correlate with the pTNM stage, grades, invasions to the vessels and nerve, or with the size of the tumor. However, there was a statistically significant difference (4.6±2.9 vs 7.8±4.5, P = 0.024) in the SUV between patients with respectable and unresectable disease. CONCLUSION: FDG-PET is thus considered to be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. However, regarding the staging of the disease, FDG-PET is not considered to be a sufficiently accurate diagnostic modality. Although the SUV does not correlate with the patho-histological prognostic factors, it may be useful in selecting patients who should undergo subsequent surgical treatment.

  1. Pancreatic cancer screening employing noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging combined with ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki-Suzuki, Seiko; Nagashima, Chieko; Machida, Minoru; Muramatsu, Yukio; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nasu, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an initial evaluation on the potential of combining noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) to screen for pancreatic cancer. An independent ethics committee approved this study. A total of 2511 patients who underwent US were enrolled. Among them, noncontrast MRI was performed in patients in whom the entire pancreas was difficult to depict or in those with US-suspected pancreatic lesions. In total, using 1.5-T MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and diffusion-weighted imaging, we acquired a variety of images. The efficacy of US and MRI in screening for pancreatic lesions, including pancreatic cancer, was evaluated. Of 2511 patients, 184 underwent MRI, and the pancreas was demonstrated in all of them. Among the 2511, five pancreatic cancers were detected by MRI combined with US (detection rate 0.20%). Of the five pancreatic cancers, three were detected by US (detection rate 0.12%) and two by MRI. Four of the five pancreatic cancers were resectable. By combining noncontrast MRI with US, pancreatic cancer can be detected with high accuracy. Other pancreatic lesions that require follow-up, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, can also be detected. Thus, pancreatic cancer screening with a combination of US and MRI is suggested. (author)

  2. Role of radiation therapy in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher; Czito, Brian

    2011-07-01

    The 5-year overall survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is approximately 5%, with potentially resectable disease representing the curable minority. Although surgical resection remains the cornerstone of treatment, local and distant failure rates are high after complete resection, and debate continues as to the appropriate adjuvant therapy. Many oncologists advocate for adjuvant chemotherapy alone, given that high rates of systemic metastases are the primary cause of patient mortality. Others, however, view locoregional failure as a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, thereby justifying the use of adjuvant chemoradiation. As in other gastrointestinal malignancies, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy offers potential advantages in resectable patients, and clinical investigation of this approach has shown promising results; however, phase III data are lacking. Further therapeutic advances and prospective trials are needed to better define the optimal role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  3. Development of the PANVAC-VF vaccine for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrulio, Christian A; Kaufman, Howard L

    2006-02-01

    PANVAC-VF is a vaccine regimen composed of a priming dose of recombinant vaccinia virus and booster doses of recombinant fowlpox virus expressing carcinoembryonic antigen, mucin-1 and a triad of costimulatory molecules (TRICOM), which include B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen-3. Vaccination is administered by subcutaneous injection followed by 4 days of local recombinant adjuvant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor at the vaccination site. The vaccine has been developed for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and has now entered a randomized Phase III clinical trial. This review will describe the background of recombinant poxvirus technology for tumor vaccine development, detail the key preclinical studies supporting the regimen, review the clinical trials supporting the current Phase III study, and highlight the key challenges and future obstacles to successful implementation of PANVAC-VF for pancreatic cancer.

  4. The role of pancreatic cancer-derived exosomes in cancer progress and their potential application as biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H; Wu, Y; Tan, X

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, with dismal prognosis due to its poor early detection rate and high metastatic rate. Thus, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms accounting for its metastasis and discovery of competent biomarkers is required. Exosomes are multivesicular body-derived small extracellular vesicles released by various cell types that serve as important message carriers during intercellular communication. They are also known to play critical roles during cancer-genesis, cancer-related immune reactions, and metastasis. They also possess promising potential as novel biomarkers for cancer early detection. Therefore, extensive studies on pancreatic cancer-derived exosomes are currently being performed because they hold the promising potential of elevating the overall survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer. In the present review, we focus on the role of exosomes in pancreatic cancer-related immune reactions, metastasis, and complications, and on their potential application as pancreatic cancer biomarkers.

  5. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: understanding the factors associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2017-04-28

    The prognosis of advanced chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poor with the mortality rate approximately two-fold higher than the general population according to a survey of the prognosis of CP. From this standpoint, the concept of early CP was propagated in Japan in 2009 to encourage the medical treatment for the earlier stages of CP. That is, picking up the patients suspicious for early CP and then providing medical treatment for them are very important not only for patients, but also for health care economics. In this review, we described some potential factors associated with the development of CP (alcohol, smoking, past history of acute pancreatitis, aging, gallstone, and gender) that are extremely important to discover patients with early-stage CP.

  6. Natural Products as Adjunctive Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer: Recent Trends and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxi Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a type of common malignant tumors with high occurrence in the world. Most patients presented in clinic had pancreatic cancer at advanced stages. Furthermore, chemotherapy or radiotherapy had very limited success in treating pancreatic cancer. Complementary and alternative medicines, such as natural products/herbal medicines, represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of using natural products/herbal medicines, such as Chinese herbal medicine, in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to treat pancreatic cancer in preclinical and clinical trials.

  7. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y.; Yan, Y.Q.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  8. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  9. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  10. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  11. Molecular analysis of precursor lesions in familial pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic

    Full Text Available With less than a 5% survival rate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC is almost uniformly lethal. In order to make a significant impact on survival of patients with this malignancy, it is necessary to diagnose the disease early, when curative surgery is still possible. Detailed knowledge of the natural history of the disease and molecular events leading to its progression is therefore critical.We have analysed the precursor lesions, PanINs, from prophylactic pancreatectomy specimens of patients from four different kindreds with high risk of familial pancreatic cancer who were treated for histologically proven PanIN-2/3. Thus, the material was procured before pancreatic cancer has developed, rather than from PanINs in a tissue field that already contains cancer. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using such unique specimens was performed. Bulk frozen sections displaying the most extensive but not microdissected PanIN-2/3 lesions were used in order to obtain the holistic view of both the precursor lesions and their microenvironment. A panel of 76 commonly dysregulated genes that underlie neoplastic progression from normal pancreas to PanINs and PDAC were identified. In addition to shared genes some differences between the PanINs of individual families as well as between the PanINs and PDACs were also seen. This was particularly pronounced in the stromal and immune responses.Our comprehensive analysis of precursor lesions without the invasive component provides the definitive molecular proof that PanIN lesions beget cancer from a molecular standpoint. We demonstrate the need for accumulation of transcriptomic changes during the progression of PanIN to PDAC, both in the epithelium and in the surrounding stroma. An identified 76-gene signature of PDAC progression presents a rich candidate pool for the development of early diagnostic and/or surveillance markers as well as potential novel preventive/therapeutic targets for both familial and sporadic

  12. Validation of full-field optical coherence tomography in distinguishing malignant and benign tissue in resected pancreatic cancer specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrinus van Manen

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. The minority of patients can undergo curative-intended surgical therapy due to progressive disease stage at time of diagnosis. Nonetheless, tumor involvement of surgical margins is seen in up to 70% of resections, being a strong negative prognostic factor. Real-time intraoperative imaging modalities may aid surgeons to obtain tumor-free resection margins. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT is a promising diagnostic tool using high-resolution white-light interference microscopy without tissue processing. Therefore, we composed an atlas of FF-OCT images of malignant and benign pancreatic tissue, and investigated the accuracy with which the pathologists could distinguish these.One hundred FF-OCT images were collected from specimens of 29 patients who underwent pancreatic resection for various indications between 2014 and 2016. One experienced gastrointestinal pathologist and one pathologist in training scored independently the FF-OCT images as malignant or benign blinded to the final pathology conclusion. Results were compared to those obtained with standard hematoxylin and eosin (H&E slides.Overall, combined test characteristics of both pathologists showed a sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 74%, positive predictive value of 69%, negative predictive value of 79% and an overall accuracy of 73%. In the subset of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, 97% of the FF-OCT images (n = 35 were interpreted as tumor by at least one pathologist. Moreover, normal pancreatic tissue was recognised in all cases by at least one pathologist. However, atrophy and fibrosis, serous cystadenoma and neuroendocrine tumors were more often wrongly scored, in 63%, 100% and 25% respectively.FF-OCT could distinguish normal pancreatic tissue from pathologic pancreatic tissue in both processed as non-processed specimens using architectural features. The accuracy in

  13. Prospective evaluation of yield of endoscopic ultrasonography in the etiological diagnosis of "idiopathic" acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra S Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP remains idiopathic in 30% of patients. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS has been shown to increase the diagnostic yield in patients with idiopathic AP (IAP. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EUS in achieving etiological diagnosis in patients with IAP. Materials and Methods: Consecutive 192 patients with IAP were evaluated prospectively with EUS over a period of 2 years. Patients who had no etiological diagnosis for AP after detailed history, clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were included in the study. Results: The mean age of patients was 34.6 ± 12 and male:female ratio was 2.1:1. Of these, 135 patients had gallbladder intact (Group A and 57 patients had undergone cholecystectomy (Group B. In Group A, EUS identified a possible cause in 79 (58.5% patients; microlithiasis (n = 48, chronic pancreatitis (CP (n = 23, common bile duct (CBD and gallbladder stone (n = 3, pancreatic divisum (n = 3, small pancreatic tumor (n = 1, and anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction (n = 1. In Group B, EUS yielded diagnosis in 28 (49.1% patients; CP (n = 22, ascariasis (n = 3, CBD stone (n = 2, and pancreatic divisum (n = 1. Overall EUS helped in achieving etiological diagnosis in 107 (55.1% of patients with IAP. The presence of intact gallbladder showed a tendency for increased diagnostic yield (P = 0.06. Conclusion: EUS is a useful modality to establish the diagnosis in IAP and this technique should be incorporated in the evaluation of IAP.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer: What the Oncologist Can Offer for Palliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm J Moore

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Because pancreatic cancer has a poor survival rate and only 20% of patients present with potentially resectable disease, a key goal of therapy is to provide palliation. The poor medical condition of many patients interferes with their ability to tolerate traditional chemotherapy. Recently, however, a nucleoside analogue, gemcitabine, has been developed. This drug is more effective than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, can be used in patients who fail to respond to 5-FU and has only modest toxicity. Combination therapies including gemcitabine and other agents are being tested. Local radiotherapy seems to provide pain relief, but gastrointestinal toxicity is significant. The effect of combined modality therapy (5-FU with radiotherapy on survival is unclear, and it does not prevent local disease progression. Some novel biological agents, including angiogenesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, antisense compounds, inhibitors of cell signalling such as epidermal growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, and inhibitors of oncogene activation, are undergoing phase II and III trials in patients with pancreatic cancer. Among the most promising are farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors, which modulate K-ras function. Such an approach is promising for the treatment of pancreatic cancer because this tumour frequently exhibits mutation of the ras gene.

  15. Recurrent acute pancreatitis: an approach to diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Saurabh; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is defined as more than two attacks of acute pancreatitis (AP) without any evidence of underlying chronic pancreatitis (CP). As the known causes of AP are generally taken care of, RAP usually occurs in the idiopathic group, which forms 20%-25% of cases of AP. The causes of idiopathic RAP (IRAP) can be mechanical, toxic-metabolic, anatomical, or miscellaneous. Microlithiasis commonly reported from the West is not a common cause of IRAP among Indian patients. Pancreas divisum (PD) is now believed as a cofactor, the main factor being associated genetic mutations. The role of Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) as a cause of IRAP remains controversial. Malignancy should be ruled out in any patient with IRAP > 50 years of age. Early CP can present initially as RAP. The work-up of patients with IRAP includes a detailed history and investigations. Primary investigations include liver function tests (LFT), serum calcium and triglyceride, abdominal ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-ehhanced computed tomography (CECT) abdomen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and possibly endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are indicated in the secondary phase if the work-up is negative after the primary investigations. EUS is advised usually 6-8 weeks after an acute episode. Treatment of patients with IRAP is aimed at the specific aetiology. In general, empirical cholecystectomy should be discouraged with the availability and widespread use of EUS. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is advised if there is strong suspicion of SOD. Minor papilla sphincterotomy should be carried out in those with PD but with limited expectations. Regular follow-up of patients with IRAP is necessary because most patients are likely to develop CP in due course.

  16. Animal models of pancreatic cancer for drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    The operative and conservative results of therapy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain appallingly poor. This underlines the demand for further research for effective anticancer drugs. The various animal models remain the essential method for the determination of efficacy of substances during preclinical phase. Unfortunately, most of these tested substances showed a good efficacy in pancreatic carcinoma in the animal model but were not confirmed during the clinical phase. The available literature in PubMed, Medline, Ovid and secondary literature was searched regarding the available animal models for drug testing against pancreatic cancer. The models were analyzed regarding their pros and cons in anticancer drug testing. The different modifications of the orthotopic model (especially in mice) seem at present to be the best model for anticancer testing in pancreatic carcinoma. The value of genetically engineered animal model (GEM) and syngeneic models is on debate. A good selection of the model concerning the questions supposed to be clarified may improve the comparability of the results of animal experiments compared to clinical trials.

  17. Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez, María José; Buckland, Genevieve; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Amiano, Pilar; Wark, Petra A.; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, José Ramón; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Peeters, Petra H.; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Boeing, Heiner; Iqbal, Khalid; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sonestedt, Emily; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina EN; Travis, Ruth C.; Skeie, Guri; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Freisling, Heinz; Huybrechts, Inge; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay Tee; Cross, Amanda J.; Ward, Heather A.; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Background:The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European

  18. Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez, María José; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Wark, Petra A.; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Travis, Ruth C.; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Krogh, Vittorio; Martorana, Caterina; Masala, Giovanna; Amiano, Pilar; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, José Ramón; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Angell Åsli, Lene; Skeie, Guri; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Peeters, Petra H.; Romieu, Isabelle; Scalbert, Augustin; Overvad, Kim; Clemens, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Peppa, Eleni; Vidalis, Pavlos; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutroun-Rualt, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cross, Amanda J.; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the

  19. Diagnosis of gastric cancers by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jianbing; Gong Jianping; Huan Jian

    1999-01-01

    Forty two cases of gastric cancers were reviewed. The cancer had been examined by CT and was confirmed by operation and pathology. The diagnostic results of gastric cancers obtained by CT were compared with that from GI and fibro-gastroscopy examination. The results showed that the preparation of gastrointestinal tract before CT examination was important in the CT diagnosis of gastric cancer. CT in diagnosis of focus of gastric cancer and organ invasion is better than Gl and Fibro-gastroscopy and accuracy in diagnosis of gastric cancers is near to that of GI examination

  20. Metformin-mediated growth inhibition involves suppression of the IGF-I receptor signalling pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnevi, Emelie; Said, Katarzyna; Andersson, Roland; Rosendahl, Ann H

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown direct associations between type 2 diabetes and obesity, both conditions associated with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia, and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Up to 80% of pancreatic cancer patients present with either new-onset type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance at the time of diagnosis. Recent population studies indicate that the incidence of pancreatic cancer is reduced among diabetics taking metformin. In this study, the effects of exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to high glucose levels on their growth and response to metformin were investigated. The human pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 were grown in normal (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose conditions, with or without metformin. The influence by metformin on proliferation, apoptosis and the AMPK and IGF-IR signalling pathways were evaluated in vitro. Metformin significantly reduced the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells under normal glucose conditions. Hyperglycaemia however, protected against the metformin-induced growth inhibition. The anti-proliferative actions of metformin were associated with an activation of AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK Thr172 together with an inhibition of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor activation and downstream signalling mediators IRS-1 and phosphorylated Akt. Furthermore, exposure to metformin during normal glucose conditions led to increased apoptosis as measured by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In contrast, exposure to high glucose levels promoted a more robust IGF-I response and Akt activation which correlated to stimulated AMPK Ser485 phosphorylation and impaired AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation, resulting in reduced anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects by metformin. Our results indicate that metformin has direct anti-tumour activities in pancreatic cancer cells involving AMPK Thr172 activation and suppression of the insulin/IGF signalling pathways

  1. Diagnostic value of combined determination of serum CA19-9 and TGF-β contents in patients with pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical diagnostic value of combined determination of serum contents of CA19-9 and TGF-β in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods: Serum CA19-9 (with RIA) and TGF-β (with ELISA) contents were deter- mined in 30 patients with pancreatic cancer and 35 controls. Results: The serum CA19-9 and TGF-β contents in patients with pancreatic cancer were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01). The diagnostic sensitivity of CA19-9 for pancreatic cancer was 70.8%, lower than that of TGF-β (80.2%, P<0.05). The diagnostic specificity of CA19-9 and TGF-β was 90.2% and 93.4% respectively. Conclusion: Both determinations of serum CA19-9 and TGF-β contents would yield high specificity for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Sensitity of TGF-β determination was higher than that of CA19-9 determination. Combined determination of CA19-9 and TGF-β would improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with pancreatic cancer. (authors)

  2. PET与增强CT同机融合检查在胰腺恶性肿瘤鉴别诊断及临床分期中的价值%Value of (18)F-FDG PET/CECT in differential diagnosis and clinical staging of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方艺; 张建; 崔莹; 孙高峰; 冯菲; 崔斌; 邱爽; 左长京

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the values of (18)F-FDG PET integrated with contrast enhance CT(CECT) in the differential diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer.Methods Routine PET/CT was performed in 52 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected pancreatic lesions who had never undergone enhanced CT scan.After routine PET/CT exams,CECT was immediately performed (PET/CECT),and the images of the two examinations were integrated for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.Pathological and follow-up results were used as golden standard,and the sensitivity,specificity and accuracy for PET/CECT and PET/CT in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were evaluated.The early maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and delayed SUVmax were measured,and the retention index (RI) was calculated.In 24 patients with surgical operation and pathological results,the accuracy of PET/CECT and PET/CT in TNM staging of pancreatic cancer were compared.Results The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of PET/CECT in diagnosing pancreatic diseases were 100%,88.2%,96.2%,while those of PET/CT were 94.3%,70.6%,86.5%.In 35 malignant cases,the early SUVmax,delayed SUVmax and RI values were 8.4 ± 3.4,10.1 ± 4.3 and (24.1 ± 22.6) %,respectively.In 17 benign cases,the corresponding values were 4.5 ±3.9,5.0 ± 4.3 and (10.9 ± 14.9) %,respectively.There were no significant differences of the RI values between malignant and benign lesions (P =0.064).Seventeen of 24 patients underwent surgery were diagnosed to have pancreatic cancer,the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CECT and PET/CT for T staging was 82.3% and 64.7% (P =0.032) while those for N staging was 91.7% and 83.3% (P =0.980).Conclusions The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of PET/CECT for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant pancreatic diseases are higher than those of PET/CT and it can more accurately evaluate vascular and organ invasion than that of PET/CT.Therefore,PET/CECT can be

  3. A MSLN-targeted multifunctional nanoimmunoliposome for MRI and targeting therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Li Deng,1,# Xingfa Ke,4,# Zhiying He,3,# Daoqiu Yang,5 Hai Gong,6 Yingying Zhang,1 Xiaolong Jing,4 Jianzhong Yao,2 Jianming Chen11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, 3Department of Cell Biology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Pharmacy, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fujian, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Dermatology, 107th Hospital of PLA, Yantai, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital of Jinan Military Region, Jinan, People’s Republic of China#These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate less than 5% due to the lack of an early diagnosis method and effective therapy. To provide a novel early diagnostic method and targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer, a multifunctional nanoimmunoliposome with high loading of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs and doxorubicin (DOX was prepared by transient binding and reverse-phase evaporation method, and was conjugated with anti-mesothelin monoclonal antibody by post-insertion method to target anti-mesothelin-overexpressed pancreatic cancer cells. The in vitro and in vivo properties of this anti-mesothelin antibody-conjugated PEGlyated liposomal DOX and USPIOs (M-PLDU; and PEGlyated nanoimmunoliposome without antibody conjugation [PLDU] were evaluated both in human pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1 cell and in a pancreatic cancer xenograft animal model. Results showed that M-PLDUs were spherical and uniform with a diameter about ~180 nm, with a zeta potential of about −28~−30 mV, and had good efficacy encapsulating DOX and USPIOs. The in vitro study demonstrated that M-PLDUs possessed good magnetic resonance imaging (MRI capability with a transverse relaxivity (r2 of about 58.5 mM–1 • s–1. Confocal microscopy showed more

  4. Diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge classification): comparative study using secretin injection-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin-Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2008-02-28

    To investigate the usefulness of secretin injection-MRCP for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis. Sixteen patients having mild chronic pancreatitis according to the Cambridge classification and 12 control subjects with no abnormal findings on the pancreatogram were examined for the diagnostic accuracy of secretin injection-MRCP regarding abnormal branch pancreatic ducts associated with mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge Classification), using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for comparison. The sensitivity and specificity for abnormal branch pancreatic ducts determined by two reviewers were respectively 55%-63% and 75%-83% in the head, 57%-64% and 82%-83% in the body, and 44%-44% and 72%-76% in the tail of the pancreas. The sensitivity and specificity for mild chronic pancreatitis were 56%-63% and 92%-92%, respectively. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) concerning the diagnosis of an abnormal branch pancreatic duct and of mild chronic pancreatitis was good to excellent. Secretin injection-MRCP might be useful for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Solitary Skull Metastasis as the First Presentation of a Metachronous Primary Lung Cancer in a Survivor from Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Altalhy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull metastasis from lung cancer is relatively common, yet the first presentation for this malignant disease is a rare occurrence. We herein report a case of a 54-year-old female, who had a good outcome following Whipple procedure for periampullary adenocarcinoma five years before her current presentation. During a routine follow-up, she was found to have a slowly progressive painless right parietal swelling. The systemic screening workup revealed no abdominal disease, but a solitary pulmonary nodule was identified. The presence of these two lesions raised the diagnosis of metastases from a previously treated pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent complete excision of the skull lesion and subsequent lung biopsy, both of which proved on histopathological examination to be consistent with a primary lung cancer. This case emphasizes the importance of imaging and histopathological correlation in the diagnosis of solitary skull metastases and their effect on the subsequent management.

  6. Serum Metabolomic Profiles for Human Pancreatic Cancer Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Itoi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the clinical use of serum metabolomics to discriminate malignant cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC from malignant diseases, such as biliary tract cancer (BTC, intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC, and various benign pancreaticobiliary diseases. Capillary electrophoresismass spectrometry was used to analyze charged metabolites. We repeatedly analyzed serum samples (n = 41 of different storage durations to identify metabolites showing high quantitative reproducibility, and subsequently analyzed all samples (n = 140. Overall, 189 metabolites were quantified and 66 metabolites had a 20% coefficient of variation and, of these, 24 metabolites showed significant differences among control, benign, and malignant groups (p < 0.05; Steel–Dwass test. Four multiple logistic regression models (MLR were developed and one MLR model clearly discriminated all disease patients from healthy controls with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.970 (95% confidential interval (CI, 0.946–0.994, p < 0.0001. Another model to discriminate PC from BTC and IPMC yielded AUC = 0.831 (95% CI, 0.650–1.01, p = 0.0020 with higher accuracy compared with tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, pancreatic cancer-associated antigen (DUPAN2 and s-pancreas-1 antigen (SPAN1. Changes in metabolomic profiles might be used to screen for malignant cancers as well as to differentiate between PC and other malignant diseases.

  7. Endogenous glutamine decrease is associated with pancreatic cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Cecilia; Riganti, Chiara; Borgogno, Sammy Ferri; Curto, Roberta; Curcio, Claudia; Catanzaro, Valeria; Digilio, Giuseppe; Padovan, Sergio; Puccinelli, Maria Paola; Isabello, Monica; Aime, Silvio; Cappello, Paola; Novelli, Francesco

    2017-11-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is becoming the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. The mortality is very high, which emphasizes the need to identify biomarkers for early detection. As glutamine metabolism alteration is a feature of PDAC, its in vivo evaluation may provide a useful tool for biomarker identification. Our aim was to identify a handy method to evaluate blood glutamine consumption in mouse models of PDAC. We quantified the in vitro glutamine uptake by Mass Spectrometry (MS) in tumor cell supernatants and showed that it was higher in PDAC compared to non-PDAC tumor and pancreatic control human cells. The increased glutamine uptake was paralleled by higher activity of most glutamine pathway-related enzymes supporting nucleotide and ATP production. Free glutamine blood levels were evaluated in orthotopic and spontaneous mouse models of PDAC and other pancreatic-related disorders by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and/or MS. Notably we observed a reduction of blood glutamine as much as the tumor progressed from pancreatic intraepithelial lesions to invasive PDAC, but was not related to chronic pancreatitis-associated inflammation or diabetes. In parallel the increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) were observed. By contrast blood glutamine levels were stable in non-tumor bearing mice. These findings demonstrated that glutamine uptake is measurable both in vitro and in vivo . The higher in vitro avidity of PDAC cells corresponded to a lower blood glutamine level as soon as the tumor mass grew. The reduction in circulating glutamine represents a novel tool exploitable to implement other diagnostic or prognostic PDAC biomarkers.

  8. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  9. Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Specificity, Issues and Hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouanet, Marie; Lebrin, Marine; Gross, Fabian; Bournet, Barbara; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2017-06-08

    A recent death projection has placed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as the second cause of death by cancer in 2030. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is very poor and there is a great need for new treatments that can change this poor outcome. Developments of therapeutic innovations in combination with conventional chemotherapy are needed urgently. Among innovative treatments the gene therapy offers a promising avenue. The present review gives an overview of the general strategy of gene therapy as well as the limitations and stakes of the different experimental in vivo models, expression vectors (synthetic and viral), molecular tools (interference RNA, genome editing) and therapeutic genes (tumor suppressor genes, antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic genes, suicide genes). The latest developments in pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are described including gene-based tumor cell sensitization to chemotherapy, vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy (chimeric antigen receptor T-cells strategy). Nowadays, there is a specific development of oncolytic virus therapies including oncolytic adenoviruses, herpes virus, parvovirus or reovirus. A summary of all published and on-going phase-1 trials is given. Most of them associate gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The first results are encouraging for most of the trials but remain to be confirmed in phase 2 trials.

  10. A novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and overcomes gemcitabine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Sun A; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Lee, Do Young; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-30

    Pancreatic cancer is predominantly lethal, and is primarily treated using gemcitabine, with increasing resistance. Therefore, novel agents that increase tumor sensitivity to gemcitabine are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging therapeutic agents, since HDAC plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib on pancreatic cancer cells and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Three pancreatic cancer-cell lines were used to evaluate the antitumor effect of CG200745 combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib. CG200745 induced the expression of apoptotic proteins (PARP and caspase-3) and increased the levels of acetylated histone H3. CG200745 with gemcitabine/erlotinib showed significant growth inhibition and synergistic antitumor effects in vitro. In vivo, gemcitabine/erlotinib and CG200745 reduced tumor size up to 50%. CG200745 enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, and decreased the level of ATP-binding cassette-transporter genes, especially multidrug resistance protein 3 (MRP3) and MRP4. The novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, with gemcitabine/erlotinib had a synergistic anti-tumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells. CG200745 significantly improved pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine, with a prominent antitumor effect on gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, improved clinical outcome is expected in the future.

  11. Hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, R E; Lynch, H T

    2000-05-01

    Although the total number of patients in these various high-risk groups is relatively small, they nevertheless provide excellent models for studying the cause, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer. These patients would also benefit greatly from procedures capable of detecting cancer at an early stage. This knowledge would be useful for the much commoner sporadic form of pancreatic cancer, in which diagnosis is almost always late and prognosis fatal. With early diagnosis, surgical resection before the cancer's extension beyond the organ's anatomic confines could be curative. The establishment of a National Familial Pancreatic Cancer Registry is essential and would increase the availability of these invaluable families for medical research.

  12. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  14. Chinese herb derived-Rocaglamide A is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Baochun; Li, Yixiong; Tan, Fengbo; Xiao, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks No.1 in mortality rate worldwide. This study aims to identify the novel anti-pancreatic cancer drugs. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were purchased from ATCC. CPE-based screening assay was used to examine the cell viability. Patient derived tumor xenografts in SCID mice was established. The Caspase-3 and 7 activities were measured using the Caspase Glo 3/7 Assay kit. Soft agar colony formation assay was used to evaluate the colony formation. Wound healing assay ...

  15. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    George H Sakorafas; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  16. Essential role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Novel study concepts and established treatment recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobiasch, Sophie; Goerig, Nicole L.; Fietkau, Rainer; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors and the incidence has increased over the last 6 years. In the majority of cases the disease is already in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis where surgery, the only curative treatment, is no longer an option and explains the still abysmal overall survival. The role of radiation therapy as treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversially discussed although radiation oncology has emerged as a central pillar in the combined oncological treatment. The present manuscript gives an overview of advanced radiotherapeutic strategies in the context of chemotherapy and surgery according to the current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines in comparison with the German guidelines and to elucidate the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Advanced modern radiotherapeutic techniques in combination with individualized high-precision radiation concepts are new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer in a multimodal setting with tolerable side effects. Several clinical studies together with experimental approaches are in process, to deliver further evidence and ultimately allow true personalized medicine. (orig.) [de

  17. Expression and significance of Axin2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Tao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the expression of Axin2 in pancreatic cancer cells, and to observe the influence of Axin2 on the proliferation, invasion, and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1. MethodsQuantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of Axin2 in pancreatic cancer cell lines with different invasive abilities (PANC-1, Mia PaCa-2, and BxPC-3 and immortalized normal pancreatic cells (H6C7. PANC-1 cells with low expression were transfected with over-expressed Axin2 plasmid by transient transfection. MTT assay, Transwell assay, and scratch assay were used to determine the proliferation, invasion, and migration of cells transfected with over-expressed Axin2. One-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups, and SNK-q test was used for comparison between any two groups. ResultsThe relative expression levels of Axin2 in PANC-1, BxPC-3, Mia PaCa-2, and H6C7 cells were 0.13±0.01, 0.42±0.05, 0.24±0.011, and 1.00±0.00, respectively, and PANC-1 cells had the lowest expression level of Axin2, with significant differences compared with the other cells (all P<0.05. When PANC-1 cells were transfected with over-expressed Axin2 plasmid, the cells in the over-expression group had a significant increase in the expression level of Axin2 compared with those in the blank group and the negative control group (both P<0.05. Compared with those in the non-transfection group and the blank group, PANC-1 cells in the over-expression group showed significant reductions in the proliferation, invasion, and migration abilities. ConclusionThe expression of Axin2 is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and decreases with the increasing invasion ability, suggesting the role of tumor suppressor gene. High expression of Axin2 can reduce the proliferation, invasion, and migration abilities of PANC-1 cells.

  18. THE RUSSIAN CONSENSUS ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS: POINTS OF DEBATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Khat'kov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most controversial provisions of the Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis (hereinafter, the Consensus are presented. The debate has been initiated by the Russian Pancreatic Club and performed with the use of the Delphi system, based on interdisciplinary approach with participation of leading gastroenterologists, surgeons and pediatricians. This paper is the first in the series of the Consensus-related publications. Here we discuss the most controversial issues of Chapter 5 "Treatment of acute episodes" and Chapter 8 "Strategies of pain syndrome management". While discussing the conventional recommendation of a period of starvation for patients with clinical symptom of exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis, it was noted that for a long time it had been virtually the only way to provide functional rest for the pancreas. However, patients with chronic pancreatitis are frequently in malnutrition, therefore, starving may aggravate nutritional deficit that significantly affects the prognosis; therefore, early nutritional support is indicated. To alleviate functional strain of the pancreas, it is reasonable to use enteral nutrition elemental and semi-elemental formulas. The transition from formulas to conventional nutrition should be accompanied by administration of adequate pancreatin doses. The role of pancreatic enzymes, spasmolytics and proton pump inhibitors in the management of pain syndrome was also controversial.

  19. The evaluation of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zenian; Wang Xiaoyan; Peng Zhenpeng; Lin Jianqin; Zhang Ting

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the manifestations and its pathologic basis of pancreatic tubeiculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. And evaluate the diagnostic values of CT and MRI. Methods: Two cases of pancreatic tuberculosis and eleven cases of peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy were collected. All cases were conformed by pathology or clinic. Plain scan and enhanced scan with spiral CT were performed in all cases. Plain scan and enhanced scan with MRI were performed in two cases. The CT and MRI features of 13 cases were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Pancreatic tuberculosis showed that the lesion was located mainly at the head of the pancreas and displayed on CT as a low-density mass with marginal or honeycomb enhancement. Peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy was seen in 11 cases, of which ring-like enhancement was seen in seven cases, calcifications in two cases and mixed in two cases. Splenic involvement was found in five cases. Conclusion: Pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy have the main features of low-density mass With marginal or honeycomb enhancement and ting-like enhancement in petipancreatic lymphadenopathy. CT and MRI are feasible methods in diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. (authors)

  20. CA 19-9 in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, R.; Lehmann, U.; Bahlo, M.; Greten, H.; Ackeren, H. v.; Dallek, M.; Schreiber, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    CA 19-9 serum concentrations were determined in 56 controls and 66 patients with various pancreatic diseases using a commercially available radioimmunoassay. 56 controls showed mean serum concentrations of 7.3 +- 9.6 U/ml (anti x +- 2 SD) range 0-24, median 6), n = 21 patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis mean values of 16 +- 24 U/ml (anti x +- 2 SD) (range 4.9-42, median 13). The majority of the patients with exocrine pancreatic carcinoma demonstrated significantly elevated values: in 91% and 82% respectively, CA 19-9 levels were elevated above the upper limit of 95% of the controls (> 15 U/ml) and of the patients with chronic pancreatitis (> 37 U/ml) (P [de

  1. A pilot study of the experience of family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Deborah W; McGuire, Deborah B; Free, David; Cheon, Joo Young

    2014-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer presents a wide spectrum of significant symptomatology. The high symptom burden, coupled with a rapidly fatal diagnosis, limits preparation or time for adjustment for both patients and their family caregivers. From the initial diagnosis and throughout the illness experience, the physical and emotional demands of caregiving can predispose caregivers themselves to illness and a greater risk of mortality. Understanding the negative and positive aspects of caregiving for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer will inform interventions that promote positive caregiver outcomes and support caregivers in their role. To provide feasibility data for a larger, mixed methods, longitudinal study focused on the experience of family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and preliminary qualitative data to substantiate the significance of studying this caregiver population. This was a mixed methods study guided by the Stress Process Model. Eight family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer from oncology practices of a university-affiliated medical center were surveyed. The pilot results supported the ability to recruit and retain participants and informed recruitment and data collection procedures. The qualitative results provided preliminary insights into caregiver experiences during the diagnosis and treatment phases. Key findings that substantiated the significance of studying these caregivers included the caregiving context of the history of sentinel symptoms, the crisis of diagnosis, the violation of assumptions about life and health, recognition of the circle of association, and contextual factors, as well as primary and secondary stressors, coping strategies, resources, discoveries, gains and growth, associated changes/transitions, and unmet caregiver needs. Findings indicated caregivers' willingness to participate in research, highlighted the negative and positive aspects of the caregiver experience, and reinforced the

  2. Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campa, Daniele; Pastore, Manuela; Gentiluomo, Manuel; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Neoptolemos, John P.; Niesen, Willem; Vodicka, Pavel; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gazouli, Maria; Pacetti, Paola; Di Leo, Milena; Ito, Hidemi; Klüter, Harald; Soucek, Pavel; Corbo, Vincenzo; Yamao, Kenji; Hosono, Satoyo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vashist, Yogesh; Gioffreda, Domenica; Strobel, Oliver; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Dijk, Frederike; Andriulli, Angelo; Ivanauskas, Audrius; Bugert, Peter; Tavano, Francesca; Vodickova, Ludmila; Zambon, Carlo Federico; Lovecek, Martin; Landi, Stefano; Key, Timothy J.; Boggi, Ugo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Mambrini, Andrea; Bambi, Franco; Busch, Olivier; Pazienza, Valerio; Valente, Roberto; Theodoropoulos, George E.; Hackert, Thilo; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Pasquali, Claudio; Basso, Daniela; Sperti, Cosimo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Büchler, Markus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Izbicki, Jakob; Costello, Eithne; Katzke, Verena; Michalski, Christoph; Stepien, Anna; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter

  3. File list: NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  5. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Natalia; Yuan, Chen; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Cao, Yin; Babic, Ana; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Kraft, Peter; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Clish, Clary B; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2018-04-01

    Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched individuals without pancreatic cancer (controls). In the prospective cohort study, 1122 participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma over 4.2 million person-years. Use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk, even after considering several latency exposure classifications. In a pre-planned subgroup analysis, regular aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk among participants with diabetes (relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.94). In the nested case-control study, pre-diagnosis levels of salicylurate were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61; P trend 0.81; comparing participants in the highest quintile with those in the lowest quintile of plasma salicylurate). Regular aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer in participants from several large prospective cohort studies. A possible reduction in risk for pancreatic cancer among people with diabetes who regularly use aspirin should be further examined in preclinical and human studies. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  6. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Role of CT in evaluation of the extension of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki

    1990-01-01

    CT findings of 39 lesions from 37 cases of pancreas cancer were correlated with surgical and/or pathological findings. Each finding was recorded following 'General rules for surgical and pathological studies on cancer of the pancras' proposed by Japanese pancreatic society. CT employed in this study is Somatom II (Siemens) with scan time of 5 seconds and slice thickness of 8 mm. Contrast study with bolus injection of contrast medium is a basic procedure in all the cases. The results are as follows. T factor (size of the tumor) was underestimated in 9 lesions, no overestimation was observed. It is because that the contrast enhancement surrounding low density was not included in the size of the tumor. No positive results were observed in lymph node group of no.17, but many false positive in no.12. Results of diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was poor, the total accuracy was 65.5%. CT was very effective in the diagnosis of V factor, total accuracy was 95.5%. In S (serosal invasion) and RP (retroperitoneal infiltration) factors, the total accuracy was 81.0%, and 87.1% respectively, when the protrusions into and the disappearance of the surrounding fat plane were taken into account. CT is not effective in the diagnosis of CH (bile duct invasion) factor, because of undifferentiation between compression and invasion from the surrounding pancreas tumor. Results of CT were good in Du (duodenal invasion) factor. Finally, it was concluded that CT is effective in the staging diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  8. Incidence and clinical findings of benign, inflammatory disease in patients resected for presumed pancreatic head cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, T. M.; Reeders, J. W.; Bosma, A.; Moojen, T. M.; Smits, N. J.; Allema, J. H.; Rauws, E. A.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation between cancer and benign disease in the pancreatic head is difficult. The aim of this study was to examine common features in a group of patients that had undergone pancreatoduodenectomy for a benign, inflammatory lesion misdiagnosed as pancreatic head cancer.

  9. miR-146a Suppresses Invasion of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; VandenBoom, Timothy G.; Wang, Zhiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Ali, Shadan; Philip, Philip A.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2010-01-01

    The aggressive course of pancreatic cancer is believed to reflect its unusually invasive and metastatic nature, which is associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression and NF-κB activation. MicroRNAs (miRNA) have been implicated in the regulation of various pathobiological processes in cancer, including metastasis in pancreatic cancer and in other human malignancies. In this study, we report lower expression of miR-146a in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Reexpression of miR-146a inhibited the invasive capacity of pancreatic cancer cells with concomitant downregulation of EGFR and the NF-κB regulatory kinase interleukin 1 receptor–associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1). Cellular mechanism studies revealed crosstalk between EGFR, IRAK-1, IκBα, NF-κB, and MTA-2, a transcription factor that regulates metastasis. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with the natural products 3,3′-diinodolylmethane (DIM) or isoflavone, which increased miR-146a expression, caused a downregulation of EGFR, MTA-2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, resulting in an inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell invasion. Our findings reveal DIM and isoflavone as nontoxic activators of a miRNA that can block pancreatic cancer cell invasion and metastasis, offering starting points to design novel anticancer agents. PMID:20124483

  10. Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, M.; Chuang, S.C.; Dahm, C.C.; Overvad, K.; Ueland, P.M.; Midttun, O.; Vollset, S.E.; Tjonneland, A.; Halkjaer, J.; Jenab, M.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Kaaks, R.; Canzian, F.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Trichopoulou, A.; Bamia, C.; Naska, A.; Palli, D.; Pala, V.; Mattiello, A.; Tumino, R.; Sacerdote, C.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Lund, E.; Rodriguez, L.; Duell, E.J.; Perez, M.J.; Molina-Montes, E.; Castano, J.M.; Barricarte, A.; Larrañaga, N.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Ye, W.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Michaud, D.S.; Riboli, E.; Xun, W.W.; Allen, N.E.; Crowe, F.L.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Vineis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective

  11. Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: A pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Wang, M.; Li, R.; Albanes, D.; Anderson, K.E.; Bernstein, L.; Brandt, P.A. van den; English, D.R.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Fuchs, C.S.; Gapstur, S.M.; Giles, G.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Håkansson, N.; Horn-Ross, P.L.; Koushik, A.; Marshal, J.R.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Robien, K.; Rohan, T.E.; Schairer, C.; Silverman, D.T.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R.Z.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Ziegler, R.G.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy

  12. Which patients with resectable pancreatic cancer truly benefit from oncological resection: is it destiny or biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. A technically perfect surgical operation may still not provide a survival advantage for patients with technically resectable pancreatic cancer. Appropriate selection of patients for surgical resections is an imminent issue. Recent studies have provided an important clue on what serum biomarkers may be used to select out the patients who would unlikely benefit from the surgical resection.

  13. The pathobiological impact of cigarette smoke on pancreatic cancer development (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittel, Uwe A; Momi, Navneet; Seifert, Gabriel; Wiech, Thorsten; Hopt, Ulrich T; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-07-01

    Despite extensive efforts, pancreatic cancer remains incurable. Most risk factors, such as genetic disposition, metabolic diseases or chronic pancreatitis cannot be influenced. By contrast, cigarette smoking, an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer, can be controlled. Despite the epidemiological evidence of the detrimental effects of cigarette smoking with regard to pancreatic cancer development and its unique property of being influenceable, our understanding of cigarette smoke-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis is limited. Current data on cigarette smoke-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis indicate multifactorial events that are triggered by nicotine, which is the major pharmacologically active constituent of tobacco smoke. In addition to nicotine, a vast number of carcinogens have the potential to reach the pancreatic gland, where they are metabolized, in some instances to even more toxic compounds. These metabolic events are not restricted to pancreatic ductal cells. Several studies show that acinar cells are also greatly affected. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer progenitor cells do not only derive from the ductal epithelial lineage, but also from acinar cells. This sheds new light on cigarette smoke-induced acinar cell damage. On this background, our objective is to outline a multifactorial model of tobacco smoke-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  14. Mortality, Cancer, and Comorbidities Associated With Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aimed to assess the risk of death, cancer, and comorbidities among patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study, collecting data from Danish registries from 1995 through 2010. We evaluated...... cases (10.2%) and controls (3.3%). Cancer (particularly pancreatic cancer) was a frequent cause of death among cases; the HR was 6.9 (95% CI, 7.5-11.8). Alcoholic CP did not produce a higher risk for cancer or death than nonalcoholic CP. Cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4), chronic...... pulmonary disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.8-2.1), ulcer disease (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 3.3-3.9), diabetes (HR, 5.2; 95% CI, 5.0-5.6), and chronic renal disease (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-1.9) occurred more frequently among patients with CP, but myocardial infarction did not (HR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.8-1.0). CONCLUSIONS: Based...

  15. Synergistic activity of troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leblond Lorraine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine nucleoside analog, is the current standard chemotherapy used as first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer of the pancreas, and extends life survival by 5.7 months. Advanced pancreatic cancer thus remains a highly unmet medical need and new therapeutic agents are required for this patient population. Troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ is the first unnatural L-nucleoside analog to show potent preclinical antitumor activity and is currently under clinical investigation. Troxacitabine was recently evaluated as a first-line therapy in 54 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and gave comparable overall results to those reported with gemcitabine in recently published randomized trials. Methods The human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, AsPC-1, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1, were exposed to troxacitabine or gemcitabine alone or in combination, for 72 h, and the effects on cell growth were determined by electronic particle counting. Synergistic efficacy was determined by the isobologram and combination-index methods of Chou and Talalay. Mechanistic studies addressed incorporation of troxacitabine into DNA and intracellular levels of troxacitabine and gemcitabine metabolites. For in vivo studies, we evaluated the effect of both drugs, alone and in combination, on the growth of established human pancreatic (AsPC-1 tumors implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Statistical analysis was calculated by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett as a post-test and the two-tailed unpaired t test using GraphPad prism software. Results Synergy, evaluated using the CalcuSyn Software, was observed in all four cell-lines at multiple drug concentrations resulting in combination indices under 0.7 at Fa of 0.5 (50% reduction of cell growth. The effects of drug exposures on troxacitabine and gemcitabine nucleotide pools were analyzed, and although gemcitabine reduced phosphorylation of

  16. Synergistic activity of troxacitabine (Troxatyl™) and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damaraju, Vijaya L; Bouffard, David Y; Wong, Clarence KW; Clarke, Marilyn L; Mackey, John R; Leblond, Lorraine; Cass, Carol E; Grey, Mike; Gourdeau, Henriette

    2007-01-01

    Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine nucleoside analog, is the current standard chemotherapy used as first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer of the pancreas, and extends life survival by 5.7 months. Advanced pancreatic cancer thus remains a highly unmet medical need and new therapeutic agents are required for this patient population. Troxacitabine (Troxatyl™) is the first unnatural L-nucleoside analog to show potent preclinical antitumor activity and is currently under clinical investigation. Troxacitabine was recently evaluated as a first-line therapy in 54 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and gave comparable overall results to those reported with gemcitabine in recently published randomized trials. The human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, AsPC-1, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1, were exposed to troxacitabine or gemcitabine alone or in combination, for 72 h, and the effects on cell growth were determined by electronic particle counting. Synergistic efficacy was determined by the isobologram and combination-index methods of Chou and Talalay. Mechanistic studies addressed incorporation of troxacitabine into DNA and intracellular levels of troxacitabine and gemcitabine metabolites. For in vivo studies, we evaluated the effect of both drugs, alone and in combination, on the growth of established human pancreatic (AsPC-1) tumors implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Statistical analysis was calculated by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett as a post-test and the two-tailed unpaired t test using GraphPad prism software. Synergy, evaluated using the CalcuSyn Software, was observed in all four cell-lines at multiple drug concentrations resulting in combination indices under 0.7 at Fa of 0.5 (50% reduction of cell growth). The effects of drug exposures on troxacitabine and gemcitabine nucleotide pools were analyzed, and although gemcitabine reduced phosphorylation of troxacitabine when cells were exposed at equal drug

  17. Targeting Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Lopez-Valdez, Rebecca; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. Increasing incidence and mortality indicates that there is still much lacking in detection and management of the disease. This is partly due to a lack of specific symptoms during early stages of the disease. Several growth factor receptors have been associated with pancreatic cancer. Here, we have investigated if an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be effective and efficient against pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. For that, we evaluated the effects of IGF-1R inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNAs) on tumor growth and metastasis in HPAC and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We found that silencing IGF-1R inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by blocking key signaling pathways such AKT/PI3K, MAPK, JAK/STAT and EMT. Silencing IGF-1R resulted in an anti-proliferative effect in PANC-1 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cell lines. Matrigel invasion, transwell migration and wound healing assays also revealed a role for IGF-1R in metastatic properties of pancreatic cancer. These results were further confirmed using Western blotting analysis of key intermediates involved in proliferation, epithelial mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion. In addition, soft agar assays showed that silencing IGF-1R also blocks the colony forming capabilities of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Western blots, as well as, flow cytometric analysis revealed the induction of apoptosis in IGF-1R silenced cells. Interestingly, silencing IGF-1R also suppressed the expression of insulin receptor β. All these effects together significantly control pancreatic cancer cell growth and metastasis. To conclude, our results demonstrate the significance of IGF-1R in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24809702

  18. MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Wang J and Sen S 2011 MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to biomarkers of disease. ... growth factor type I receptor; INSR, insulin receptor; IPA, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis; IPMN, ..... Prostate cancer signalling.

  19. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löhr, J. Matthias; Dominguez-Munoz, Enrique; Rosendahl, Jonas; Besselink, Marc; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Haas, Stephan; Akisik, Fatih; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Keller, Jutta; Boermeester, Marja; Werner, Jens; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Fockens, Paul; Drewes, Asbjorn; Ceyhan, Gürlap; Lindkvist, Björn; Drenth, Joost; Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip; de Madaria, Enrique; Witt, Heiko; Schneider, Alexander; Manfredi, Riccardo; Brøndum, Frøkjer J.; Rudolf, Sasa; Bollen, Thomas; Bruno, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background:There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  20. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohr, J.M.; Dominguez-Munoz, E.; Rosendahl, J.; Besselink, M.; Mayerle, J.; Lerch, M.M.; Haas, S.; Akisik, F.; Kartalis, N.; Iglesias-Garcia, J.; Keller, J.; Boermeester, M.; Werner, J.; Dumonceau, J.M.; Fockens, P.; Drewes, A.; Ceyhan, G.; Lindkvist, B.; Drenth, J.P.; Ewald, N.; Hardt, P.; Madaria, E. de; Witt, H.; Schneider, A.; Manfredi, R.; Brondum, F.J.; Rudolf, S.; Bollen, T.; Bruno, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on 'Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  1. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations: Advancing Collaboration and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Fleshman, Julie M; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    2015-11-01

    A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15-16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally.

  2. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  4. Pancreatic arterial calcium stimulation in the diagnosis and localisation of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia of infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigot, V.; Brunelle, F. [Department of Radiology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Lonlay, P. de; Nassogne, M.-C.; Delagne, V.; Saudubray, J.-M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Laborde, K. [Dept. of Biology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Fournet, J.-C. [Dept. of Pathology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Nihoul-Fekete, C. [Department of Surgery, Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France)

    2001-09-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia of infancy (PHHI) is often resistant to medical therapy. Surgery is therefore necessary. It is due to focal adenomatous islet-cell hyperplasia treatable by partial pancreatectomy, or diffuse beta-cell hyperfunction, which requires near-total pancreatectomy. Pancreatic venous sampling (PVS) is the reference technique for the preoperative diagnosis and localization of focal forms of PHHI in the pancreas. However, hypoglycaemia is necessary to analyse the results and PVS is technically challenging. Pancreatic arterial calcium stimulation (PACS) is technically easier and does not require hypoglycaemia. To study the accuracy in the diagnosis and localization of PHHI. Materials and methods: PACS was performed in 12 patients and correlated with histology. The accuracy of PACS is poor in diffuse lesions since only two of six cases were correctly identified by this test. Five of six focal lesions were correctly recognized and located. PACS is less accurate than PVS in PHHI. Currently, it should be performed only when PVS fails. (orig.)

  5. Pancreatic arterial calcium stimulation in the diagnosis and localisation of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia of infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigot, V.; Brunelle, F.; Lonlay, P. de; Nassogne, M.-C.; Delagne, V.; Saudubray, J.-M.; Laborde, K.; Fournet, J.-C.; Nihoul-Fekete, C.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia of infancy (PHHI) is often resistant to medical therapy. Surgery is therefore necessary. It is due to focal adenomatous islet-cell hyperplasia treatable by partial pancreatectomy, or diffuse beta-cell hyperfunction, which requires near-total pancreatectomy. Pancreatic venous sampling (PVS) is the reference technique for the preoperative diagnosis and localization of focal forms of PHHI in the pancreas. However, hypoglycaemia is necessary to analyse the results and PVS is technically challenging. Pancreatic arterial calcium stimulation (PACS) is technically easier and does not require hypoglycaemia. To study the accuracy in the diagnosis and localization of PHHI. Materials and methods: PACS was performed in 12 patients and correlated with histology. The accuracy of PACS is poor in diffuse lesions since only two of six cases were correctly identified by this test. Five of six focal lesions were correctly recognized and located. PACS is less accurate than PVS in PHHI. Currently, it should be performed only when PVS fails. (orig.)

  6. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  7. The Replication Stress Response in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    both causes cell death. We hypothesize that novel RSR genes maintain genome integrity and that deregulation of RSR genes and their cancer barrier...Microscopy, Jena, Germany ) microscope with Axiovision Rei 4.8 software (Zeiss, Jena. Germany ) using the x 63 oil objective. Foci quantitation was

  8. Opium Use and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moossavi, Shirin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Islami, Farhad; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Mirminachi, Babak; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Semnani, Shahryar; Shakeri, Ramin; Etemadi, Arash; Merat, Shahin; Khoshnia, Masoud; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Abnet, Christian C.; Boffetta, Paolo; Kamangar, Farin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Background We examined the association between opium consumption and pancreatic cancer incidence in a large-scale prospective cohort of the general population in Northeast of Iran. Methods A total of 50,045 adults were systematically followed-up (median of 7.4 years) and incident cases of pancreatic cancer were identified. Self-reported data on opium consumption was collected at baseline. Cumulative use (-year) was defined as number of nokhods (a local unit, approximately 0.2 g) of opium consumed per day multiplied by number of years consuming. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between opium consumption and pancreatic cancer were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results Overall, 54 confirmed cases of pancreatic cancer were identified. Opium use of more than 81 nokhod-years (high cumulative use), compared to never use, was strongly associated with pancreatic cancer even after adjustments for multiple potential confounding factors [HR=3.01; 95% CI 1.25-7.26]. High cumulative consumption of opium was significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer after adjusting for cumulative dose of cigarette smoking [HR=3.56; 95% CI 1.49-8.50]. In a sensitivity analysis, we excluded participants (including 2 pancreatic cancer cases) who were recruited within the first 5 years of starting opium consumption; high cumulative use of opium was still associated with pancreatic cancer risk [HR=2.75; 95% CI 1.14-6.64]. Conclusion Our results showed a positive association between opium consumption and pancreatic cancer. Impact This is the first prospective large-scale study to show the association of opium consumption with pancreatic cancer as a risk factor. PMID:29263189

  9. [Practice guideline 'Prostate cancer: diagnosis and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijke, T.M. de; Battermann, J.J.; Moorselaar, R.J.A. van; Jong, I.J. de; Visser, A.P.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    --A national, multidisciplinary practice guideline was developed concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Because of the lack of sufficient scientific evidence at this moment no practice guideline on screening is included. --The diagnosis of prostate cancer is made by

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Arising From the Remnant Pancreas: Is It a Local Recurrence or New Primary Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Daisuke; Chikamoto, Akira; Masuda, Toshiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Imai, Katsunori; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Reber, Howard A; Baba, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Local recurrence of pancreatic cancer (PC) can occur in the pancreatic remnant. In addition, new primary PC can develop in the remnant. There are limited data available regarding this so-called remnant PC. The aim of this review was to describe the characteristics and therapeutic strategy regarding remnant PC. A literature search was performed using Medline published in English according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The incidence of remnant PC has been reported to be 3% to 5%. It is difficult to distinguish local recurrence from new primary PC. Genetic diagnosis such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog mutation may resolve this problem. For patients with remnant PC, repeated pancreatectomy can be performed. Residual total pancreatectomy is the most common procedure. Recent studies have described the safety of the operation because of recent surgical progress and perioperative care. The patients with remnant PC without distant metastasis have shown good long-term outcomes, especially those who underwent repeated pancreatectomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may contribute to longer survival. In conclusion, this review found that both local recurrence and new primary PC can develop in the pancreatic remnant. Repeated pancreatectomy for the remnant PC is a feasible procedure and can prolong patient survival.

  11. Usefulness of percutaneous elastography by acoustic radiation force impulse for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Julio Llamoza-Torres

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the accuracy of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI technique for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We present an observational, single-center study that included patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis in the period between October 2012 and September 2015 who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and were classified according to the standard and Rosemont criteria. The same group of patients was assessed by the ARFI technology using ACUSON S2000™ equipment with Virtual Touch™ Quantification software for the assessment of pancreatic stiffness by obtaining the shear wave velocity (SWV in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and nonparametric correlation methods. Diagnostic accuracy was obtained by analyzing receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Results: A total of thirty-three patients were studied (45.5% women; mean age was 58.3 ± 11.8 years. Seventeen with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and sixteen classified as normal according to standard criteria. A significant difference was detected between the means of SWV in pancreatic body of patients without (SWV: 1.27 m/s and with chronic pancreatitis (SWV 1.57 m/s, p = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve was 71.3% (95% CI 0.532-0.895 and the accuracy of ARFI for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis was 69.7% for a SWV of 1.4 m/s in the pancreatic body. The SWV means in head (r = 0.421, p < 0.05 and body (r = 0.455, p < 0.05 of the pancreas showed a significant correlation with the number of EUS criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: Quantification of pancreatic stiffness with ARFI elastography technique has proven to be useful for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually

  13. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut, E-mail: friess@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer: feasibility and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquard, Regis; Ayzac, Louis; Gilly, Francois-Noeel; Romestaing, Pascale; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Sondaz, Chrystel; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Sentenac, Irenee; Braillon, Georges; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the impact of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) combined with postoperative external beam irradiation in patients with pancreatic cancer treated with curative surgical resection. Materials and methods: From January 1986 to April 1995 25 patients (11 male and 14 female, median age 61 years) underwent a curative resection with IORT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumour was located in the head of the pancreatic gland in 22 patients, in the body in two patients and in the tail in one patient. The pathological stage was pT1 in nine patients, pT2 in nine patients, pT3 in seven patients, pN0 in 14 patients and pN1 in 11 patients. All the patients were pM0. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 22 patients, a distal pancreatectomy was performed in two patients and a total pancreatectomy was performed in one patient. The resection was considered to be complete in 20 patients. One patient had microscopic residual disease and gross residual disease was present in four patients. IORT using electrons with a median energy of 12 MeV was performed in all the patients with doses ranging from 12 to 25 Gy. Postoperative EBRT was delivered to 20 patients (median dose 44 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil was given to seven patients. Results: The overall survival was 56% at 1 year, 20% at 2 years and 10% at 5 years. Nine local failures were observed. Twelve patients developed metastases without local recurrence. Twenty patients died from tumour progression and two patients died from early post-operative complications. Three patients are still alive; two patients in complete response at 17 and 94 months and one patient with hepatic metastases at 13 months. Conclusion: IORT after complete resection combined with postoperative external beam irradiation is feasible and well tolerated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

  15. The RON receptor tyrosine kinase in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and its potential implications for future targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang Moo; Babicky, Michele L; Lowy, Andrew M

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with a mortality rate that has not changed substantially in decades. Novel therapies are therefore desperately needed. The RON receptor tyrosine kinase has been identified as an important mediator of KRAS oncogene addiction and is overexpressed in the majority of pancreatic cancers. Preclinical studies show that inhibition of RON function decreases pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion, and survival and can sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. This article reviews the current state of knowledge regarding RON biology and pancreatic cancer and discusses its potential as a therapeutic target.

  16. The variable phenotype of the p.A16V mutation of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) in pancreatitis families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grocock, Christopher J; Rebours, Vinciane; Delhaye, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis (HP); idiopathic disease; or pancreatitis in a single generation. HP was defined as 2 cases in 2 generations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Onset of painful episodes of pancreatitis, death from pancreatic cancer, diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and exocrine pancreatic failure. RESULTS: Ten families with p...... or Mann-Whitney-U tests. CONCLUSIONS: Penetrance of p.A16V is highly variable and family dependent, suggesting it contributes to a multigenic inheritance of a predisposition to pancreatitis....

  17. Diagnosis delay in Libyan female breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermiah Eramah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To study the diagnosis delay and its impact on stage of disease among women with breast cancer on Libya. Methods 200 women, aged 22 to 75 years with breast cancer diagnosed during 2008–2009 were interviewed about the period from the first symptoms to the final histological diagnosis of breast cancer. This period (diagnosis time was categorized into 3 periods: 6 months. If diagnosis time was longer than 3 months, the diagnosis was considered delayed (diagnosis delay. Consultation time was the time taken to visit the general practitioner after the first symptoms. Retrospective preclinical and clinical data were collected on a form (questionnaire during an interview with each patient and from medical records. Results The median of diagnosis time was 7.5 months. Only 30.0% of patients were diagnosed within 3 months after symptoms. 14% of patients were diagnosed within 3–6 months and 56% within a period longer than 6 months. A number of factors predicted diagnosis delay: Symptoms were not considered serious in 27% of patients. Alternative therapy (therapy not associated with cancer was applied in 13.0% of the patients. Fear and shame prevented the visit to the doctor in 10% and 4.5% of patients, respectively. Inappropriate reassurance that the lump was benign was an important reason for prolongation of the diagnosis time. Diagnosis delay was associated with initial breast symptom(s that did not include a lump (p  Diagnosis delay was associated with bigger tumour size (p Conclusions Diagnosis delay is very serious problem in Libya. Diagnosis delay was associated with complex interactions between several factors and with advanced stages. There is a need for improving breast cancer awareness and training of general practitioners to reduce breast cancer mortality by promoting early detection. The treatment guidelines should pay more attention to the early phases of breast cancer. Especially, guidelines for good practices in managing

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2018-02-08

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10 -8 ). Replication of 10 promising signals in up to 2737 patients and 4752 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium yields new genome-wide significant loci: rs13303010 at 1p36.33 (NOC2L, P = 8.36 × 10 -14 ), rs2941471 at 8q21.11 (HNF4G, P = 6.60 × 10 -10 ), rs4795218 at 17q12 (HNF1B, P = 1.32 × 10 -8 ), and rs1517037 at 18q21.32 (GRP, P = 3.28 × 10 -8 ). rs78417682 is not statistically significantly associated with pancreatic cancer in PANDoRA. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in three independent pancreatic data sets provides molecular support of NOC2L as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene.

  19. Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The SCAN pancreatic cancer workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for systemic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Singapore. The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. Five international guidelines were evaluated- those developed by the National Cancer Comprehensive Network (2014), the European Society of Medical Oncology (2012), Cancer Care Ontario (2013), the Japan Pancreas Society (2013) and the British Society of Gastroenterology, Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (2005). Recommendations on the management of resected, borderline resectable, locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were developed. These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines for systemic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Singapore.

  20. Stem cell-based approach in diabetes and pancreatic cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Zhou Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-mediated therapy is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic diseases such as Type-1 diabetes (T1D and pancreatic cancers. Although islet transplantation has been reported to be an effective diabetes therapy, its worldwide application is extremely limited due to the shortage of donor islets and immune rejection problems. Stem cell-based approach for islet neogenesis in vivo could provide a promising alternative source of islets for treating diabetes. On the other hand, targeting the cancer stem cells could be very effective for the treatment of pancreatic cancers. In this review, we focused on the present progress in the field of adult pancreatic stem cells, stem cell-mediated strategies for treating T1D, and pancreatic cancer stem cells, while discussing of the possible challenges involved in them.

  1. A missing link between RON expression and oncological outcomes in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dai Hoon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Whan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-10-01

    Alteration and activation of recepteur d'origine nantais (RON) expression is known to be associated with cancer progression and decreased survival in various types of human cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Therefore, in the present study, RON expression levels were determined in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer to evaluate the potential oncological role of RON in the clinical setting of distal pancreatic cancer. From January 2005 to December 2011, a total of 57 patients underwent radical distal pancreatectomy for left-sided pancreatic cancer. Ductal adenocarcinoma was confirmed in all patients. Among these patients, 17 patients who received preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and 7 patients without available paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were excluded from the present study. RON expression in a the pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-3 and Panc-1, as well as in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer specimens was determined by Western blot analysis. RON and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) overexpression in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry using pre-diluted anti-RON and anti-VEGF antibodies. An association was identified between the oncological outcome and RON overexpression. Increased levels of RON expression were observed in two pancreatic cancer cell lines, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3. RON overexpression was detected in specimens from 15/33 patients (45.5%) using immunohistochemistry. No significant association was identified between RON overexpression and VEGF overexpression (25.5 vs. 87.9%; P=0.667). No significant differences in disease-free survival or disease-specific survival associated with RON overexpression were identified. Although the results of previous studies have suggested that RON is a potential target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, in the present study no association between RON overexpression and any adverse oncological effect was identified.

  2. Initial Misdiagnosis of Proximal Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Is Associated with Delay in Diagnosis and Advanced Stage at Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Mone, Mary C; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P; Mulvihill, Sean J; Scaife, Courtney L

    2015-10-01

    Delay in diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is associated with decreased survival. The effect of an initial misdiagnosis on delay in diagnosis and stage of PDAC is unknown. This study is a retrospective review (2000-2010) from a University-based cancer center of new diagnoses of proximal PDAC. Of 313 patients, 98 (31.3 %) had an initial misdiagnosis. Misdiagnosed patients were younger, 62.8 ± 12.6 vs. 68.0 ± 10.1 (p < 0.001). The most common initial misdiagnoses were: gallbladder disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and peptic ulcer disease. After excluding patients with prior cholecystectomy, 14.2 % were misdiagnosed with gallbladder disease and underwent cholecystectomy before PDAC diagnosis. Misdiagnosed patients had higher rates of abdominal pain (p < 0.001), weight loss (p = 0.04), and acute pancreatitis (p < 0.001) and lower rate of jaundice (p < 0.001). Median time between symptoms to PDAC diagnosis was longer in misdiagnosed: 4.2 months vs. 1.4 (p < 0.001). Median time from contact with medical provider to axial imaging was longer in misdiagnosed (p < 0.001). Rate of stages III-IV disease at diagnosis was higher in misdiagnosed: 61.2 vs. 43.7 % (p = 0.004), with a 1.4 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.12-1.74) higher risk of stages III-IV disease at diagnosis; however, there was no difference in median overall survival in misdiagnosed patients (9.6 months in misdiagnosed vs. 10.3 months in correctly diagnosed, p = 0.69). Initial misdiagnosis of patients with proximal PDAC is associated with delay in diagnosis and higher risk of locally advanced or advanced disease at time of PDAC diagnosis.

  3. Hepatocyte Growth Factor from a Clinical Perspective: A Pancreatic Cancer Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizwani, Wasia; Allen, Amanda E.; Trevino, Jose G.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and incidence rates are rising. Both detection and treatment options for pancreatic cancer are limited, providing a less than 5% five-year survival advantage. The need for new biomarkers for early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer demands the efficient translation of bench knowledge to provide clinical benefit. One source of therapeutic resistance is the pancreatic tumor microenvironment, which is characterized by desmoplasia and hypoxia making it less conducive to current therapies. A major factor regulating desmoplasia and subsequently promoting chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer is hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the sole ligand for c-MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition), an epithelial tyrosine kinase receptor. Binding of HGF to c-MET leads to receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation resulting in the activation of multiple cellular processes that support cancer progression. Inhibiting activation of c-MET in cancer cells, in combination with other approaches for reducing desmoplasia in the tumor microenvironment, might significantly improve the success of chemotherapy. Therefore, HGF makes a potent novel target for developing therapeutic strategies in combination with existing drugs for treating pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of HGF and its promising potential as a chemotherapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

  4. Hepatocyte Growth Factor from a Clinical Perspective: A Pancreatic Cancer Challenge

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    Rizwani, Wasia [Department of Biochemistry, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Telangana 500007 (India); Allen, Amanda E.; Trevino, Jose G., E-mail: Jose.Trevino@surgery.ufl.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, Rm 6175, P.O. Box 100109, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and incidence rates are rising. Both detection and treatment options for pancreatic cancer are limited, providing a less than 5% five-year survival advantage. The need for new biomarkers for early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer demands the efficient translation of bench knowledge to provide clinical benefit. One source of therapeutic resistance is the pancreatic tumor microenvironment, which is characterized by desmoplasia and hypoxia making it less conducive to current therapies. A major factor regulating desmoplasia and subsequently promoting chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer is hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the sole ligand for c-MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition), an epithelial tyrosine kinase receptor. Binding of HGF to c-MET leads to receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation resulting in the activation of multiple cellular processes that support cancer progression. Inhibiting activation of c-MET in cancer cells, in combination with other approaches for reducing desmoplasia in the tumor microenvironment, might significantly improve the success of chemotherapy. Therefore, HGF makes a potent novel target for developing therapeutic strategies in combination with existing drugs for treating pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of HGF and its promising potential as a chemotherapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Hepatocyte Growth Factor from a Clinical Perspective: A Pancreatic Cancer Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasia Rizwani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and incidence rates are rising. Both detection and treatment options for pancreatic cancer are limited, providing a less than 5% five-year survival advantage. The need for new biomarkers for early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer demands the efficient translation of bench knowledge to provide clinical benefit. One source of therapeutic resistance is the pancreatic tumor microenvironment, which is characterized by desmoplasia and hypoxia making it less conducive to current therapies. A major factor regulating desmoplasia and subsequently promoting chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer is hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, the sole ligand for c-MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition, an epithelial tyrosine kinase receptor. Binding of HGF to c-MET leads to receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation resulting in the activation of multiple cellular processes that support cancer progression. Inhibiting activation of c-MET in cancer cells, in combination with other approaches for reducing desmoplasia in the tumor microenvironment, might significantly improve the success of chemotherapy. Therefore, HGF makes a potent novel target for developing therapeutic strategies in combination with existing drugs for treating pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of HGF and its promising potential as a chemotherapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  6. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to Janu