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Sample records for pancreatic calcifications specific

  1. A Case of Chronic Calcific Nonalcoholic Pancreatitis

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    Aaron Kangas-Dick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical Calcific Pancreatitis (TCP is a type of chronic calcific nonalcoholic pancreatitis. Similar to nonalcoholic chronic pancreatitis, it presents in the second and third decades of life; however this type is reported mostly in the developing tropical and subtropical countries. It is associated with the formation of pancreatic calculi and a high probability of developing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Epidemiologic studies have shown that these patients have an increased risk of developing pancreatic carcinoma. The etiology of TCP remains uncertain, with the current consensus suggesting genetics as well as possible toxicity from consuming large amounts of cassava, a tuber. Definite diagnosis of TCP requires younger age of onset, history of malnutrition, and presence of diabetes mellitus along with extensive pancreatic calcification and ductal calculi. When patients meet most but not all of these conditions the term Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis (ICP is used. This is a case of a 44-year-old man who presented with most features seen in TCP, and however, was diagnosed with ICP.

  2. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in tropical calcific pancreatitis.

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    Paliwal, Sumit; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2014-12-14

    Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a form of chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis initially reported in the developing parts of the tropical world. The clinical phenotype of TCP has undergone marked changes since its first description in 1968. The disease is now seen in relatively older people with less severe symptoms. In addition, there are varying reports on the proportion of cases presenting with imaging abnormalities like calcification, ductal dilation, and glandular atrophy. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the etiopathology of TCP. The role of malnutrition and cassava toxicity in its pathogenesis is disproven and few studies have focused on the role of micronutrient deficiency and oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of TCP. Emerging evidence support an important role for genetic risk factors in TCP. Several studies have shown that, rather than mutations in trypsinogens, variants in serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1, cathepsin B, chymotrypsin C, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, and carboxypeptidase A1, predict risk of TCP. These studies also provided evidence of mutational heterogeneity between TCP and chronic pancreatitis in Western populations. The current review summarizes recent advances that have implications in the understanding of the pathophysiology and thus, heterogeneity in genotype-phenotype correlations in TCP.

  3. Model-based iterative reconstruction and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: dose-reduced CT for detecting pancreatic calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaka, Koichiro; Katsura, Masaki; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Matsuda, Izuru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods have attracted attention for reducing radiation doses in computed tomography (CT). To investigate the detectability of pancreatic calcification using dose-reduced CT reconstructed with model-based iterative construction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). This prospective study approved by Institutional Review Board included 85 patients (57 men, 28 women; mean age, 69.9 years; mean body weight, 61.2 kg). Unenhanced CT was performed three times with different radiation doses (reference-dose CT [RDCT], low-dose CT [LDCT], ultralow-dose CT [ULDCT]). From RDCT, LDCT, and ULDCT, images were reconstructed with filtered-back projection (R-FBP, used for establishing reference standard), ASIR (L-ASIR), and MBIR and ASIR (UL-MBIR and UL-ASIR), respectively. A lesion (pancreatic calcification) detection test was performed by two blinded radiologists with a five-point certainty level scale. Dose-length products of RDCT, LDCT, and ULDCT were 410, 97, and 36 mGy-cm, respectively. Nine patients had pancreatic calcification. The sensitivity for detecting pancreatic calcification with UL-MBIR was high (0.67–0.89) compared to L-ASIR or UL-ASIR (0.11–0.44), and a significant difference was seen between UL-MBIR and UL-ASIR for one reader (P = 0.014). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for UL-MBIR (0.818–0.860) was comparable to that for L-ASIR (0.696–0.844). The specificity was lower with UL-MBIR (0.79–0.92) than with L-ASIR or UL-ASIR (0.96–0.99), and a significant difference was seen for one reader (P < 0.01). In UL-MBIR, pancreatic calcification can be detected with high sensitivity, however, we should pay attention to the slightly lower specificity

  4. Model-based iterative reconstruction and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: dose-reduced CT for detecting pancreatic calcification.

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    Yasaka, Koichiro; Katsura, Masaki; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Matsuda, Izuru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods have attracted attention for reducing radiation doses in computed tomography (CT). To investigate the detectability of pancreatic calcification using dose-reduced CT reconstructed with model-based iterative construction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). This prospective study approved by Institutional Review Board included 85 patients (57 men, 28 women; mean age, 69.9 years; mean body weight, 61.2 kg). Unenhanced CT was performed three times with different radiation doses (reference-dose CT [RDCT], low-dose CT [LDCT], ultralow-dose CT [ULDCT]). From RDCT, LDCT, and ULDCT, images were reconstructed with filtered-back projection (R-FBP, used for establishing reference standard), ASIR (L-ASIR), and MBIR and ASIR (UL-MBIR and UL-ASIR), respectively. A lesion (pancreatic calcification) detection test was performed by two blinded radiologists with a five-point certainty level scale. Dose-length products of RDCT, LDCT, and ULDCT were 410, 97, and 36 mGy-cm, respectively. Nine patients had pancreatic calcification. The sensitivity for detecting pancreatic calcification with UL-MBIR was high (0.67-0.89) compared to L-ASIR or UL-ASIR (0.11-0.44), and a significant difference was seen between UL-MBIR and UL-ASIR for one reader (P = 0.014). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for UL-MBIR (0.818-0.860) was comparable to that for L-ASIR (0.696-0.844). The specificity was lower with UL-MBIR (0.79-0.92) than with L-ASIR or UL-ASIR (0.96-0.99), and a significant difference was seen for one reader (P < 0.01). In UL-MBIR, pancreatic calcification can be detected with high sensitivity, however, we should pay attention to the slightly lower specificity.

  5. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform Into Chronic Features Similar to Advanced Chronic Pancreatitis With Functional Insufficiency Following Severe Calcification.

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    Kanai, Keita; Maruyama, Masahiro; Kameko, Fumiko; Kawasaki, Kenji; Asano, Junpei; Oguchi, Takaya; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2016-09-01

    Because several studies for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) have revealed pancreatic calcification resembling that in chronic pancreatitis (CP), we sought to clarify whether AIP could transform into chronic features similar to advanced CP with severe pancreatic dysfunction. Pancreatic functions of 92 AIP patients, 47 definite CP patients, and 30 healthy controls were assessed by fecal elastase-1 concentration (FEC), fasting immunoreactive insulin (IRI), and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-R. The 92 AIP patients included 17 (18%) with severe calcification (SC) and 75 without. The FEC levels in AIP and CP patients were significantly lower than that in controls. Exocrine insufficiency defined as FEC less than 200 μg/g was 39% in AIP without SC, 56% in AIP with SC, and 74% in CP. Fasting IRI and C-peptide reactivity values in CP were significantly lower than those in AIP, with no significant differences between AIP subgroups. The prevalence of endocrine insufficiency according to fasting IRI less than 5.0 μU/mL was 26% in AIP without SC, 31% in AIP with SC, and 59% in CP, respectively. HOMA-R values were significantly higher in all AIP groups than in CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis can transform into a state of pancreatic insufficiency after calcification that is less severe than that in definite CP.

  6. Idiopathic chronic calcific pancreatitis in a child: An uncommon entity

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Simmi; Garg, Ravinder; Bansal, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory disease of pancreas can be acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is a reversible process whereas chronic pancreatitis produces irreversible changes in the architecture and function of pancreas. Although pancreatitis is less common in children than in adults it still occurs with regularity and should be considered in any child with acute or chronic abdominal pain. The main difference between chronic pancreatitis in children and adults is in the etiology. We present a case of idiopa...

  7. Clinical response to dorsal duct drainage via the minor papilla in refractory obstructing chronic calcific pancreatitis

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    Kwon, Chang-Il; Gromski, Mark A.; Sherman, Stuart; El Hajj, Ihab I.; Easler, Jeffrey J.; Watkins, James; McHenry, Lee; Lehman, Glen A.; Fogel, Evan L.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Complete stone removal from the main pancreatic duct might not be achieved in all patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis. We report our results for endoscopic dorsal pancreatic duct (DPD) bypass of obstructing stones in the ventral pancreatic duct (VPD). Patients and methods 16 patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis were treated with a DPD bypass. Clinical success was defined as significant pain relief and no hospital admissions for pain management during the ongoing treatment period. Results Among 16 patients meeting entry criteria, 10 (62.5%) had a history of unsuccessful endoscopic therapy, and 8 had failed extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Clinical success was achieved in 12 patients (75 %). Among these responders, 10 patients (83.3 %) had markedly improved or complete pain relief after the first stent placement, which persisted throughout the follow-up period; 11 patients (91.7 %) were able to discontinue their daily analgesics. Conclusions In selected patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis, the DPD bypass may be considered as a rescue endoscopic therapy, potentially obviating the need for surgery when standard endoscopic methods and ESWL fail. PMID:28201840

  8. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage treatment of calcific chronic pancreatitis.

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    Jiang, Li; Ning, Deng; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2018-04-21

    Endoscopic therapy and surgery are both conventional treatments to remove pancreatic duct stones that developed during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis. However, few studies comparing the effect and safety between surgery drainage and endoscopic drainage (plus Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy, ESWL).The aim of this study was to compare the benefits between endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct for patients with calcified chronic pancreatitis. A total of 86 patients were classified into endoscopic/ESWL (n = 40) or surgical (n = 46) treatment groups. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. Pain recurrence and hospital stays were similar between the endoscopic/ESWL treatment and surgery group. However, endoscopic/ESWL treatment yielded significantly lower medical expense and less complications compared with the surgical treatment. In selective patients, endoscopic/ESWL treatment could achieve comparable efficacy to the surgical treatment. With lower medical expense and less complications, endoscopic/ESWL treatment would be much preferred to be the initial treatment of choice for patients with calcified chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Infeasibility of endoscopic transmural drainage due to pancreatic pseudocyst wall calcifications - case report.

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    Krajewski, Andrzej; Lech, Gustaw; Makiewicz, Marcin; Kluciński, Andrzej; Wojtasik, Monika; Kozieł, Sławomir; Słodkowski, Maciej

    2017-02-28

    Postinflammatory pancreatic pseudocysts are one of the most common complications of acute pancreatitis. In most cases, pseudocysts self-absorb in the course of treatment of pancreatitis. In some patients, pancreatic pseudocysts are symptomatic and cause pain, problems with gastrointestinal transit, and other complications. In such cases, drainage or resection should be performed. Among the invasive methods, mini invasive procedures like endoscopic transmural drainage through the wall of the stomach or duodenum play an important role. For endoscopic transmural drainage, it is necessary that the cyst wall adheres to the stomach or duodenum, making a visible impression. We present a very rare case of infeasibility of endoscopic drainage of a postinflammatory pancreatic pseudocyst, impressing the stomach, due to cyst wall calcifications. A 55-year-old man after acute pancreatitis presented with a 1-year history of epigastric pain and was admitted due to a postinflammatory pseudocyst in the body and tail of pancreas. On admission, blood tests, including CA 19-9 and CEA, were normal. An ultrasound examination revealed a 100-mm pseudocyst in the tail of pancreas, which was confirmed on CT and EUS. Acoustic shadowing caused by cyst wall calcifications made the cyst unavailable to ultrasound assessment and percutaneous drainage. Gastroscopy revealed an impression on the stomach wall from the outside. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic transmural drainage. After insufflation of the stomach, a large mass protruding from the wall was observed. The stomach mucosa was punctured with a cystotome needle knife, and the pancreatic cyst wall was reached. Due to cyst wall calcifications, endoscopic drainage of the cyst was unfeasible. Profuse submucosal bleeding at the puncture site was stopped by placing clips. The patient was scheduled for open surgery, and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. The histopathological examination confirmed the initial diagnosis

  10. Tropical calcific pancreatitis and its association with CTRC and SPINK1 (p.N34S) variants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, M.H.; Szmola, R.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Sunderasan, S.; Chacko, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a relatively common form of chronic pancreatitis in parts of Asia and Africa. The SPINK1 variant p.N34S is strongly associated with TCP, but other genetic factors remain to be defined. Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) degrades trypsinogen and

  11. Species-Specific Coral Calcification Responses to the Extreme Environment of the Southern Persian Gulf

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    Emily J. Howells

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustained accretion of calcium carbonate (mostly by scleractinian corals is fundamental for maintaining the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems, but may be greatly constrained by extreme and rapidly changing environmental conditions. Corals in the southern Persian Gulf already experience extreme temperature ranges (<20 to >34°C, chronic hypersalinity (>43 psu and frequent light limitation (<100 μmol photons m−2 s−1. We compared annual rates of calcification for two of the most common coral species in the region (Platygyra daedalea and Cyphastrea microphthalma along marked gradients in environmental conditions in the southern Persian Gulf and into the Oman Sea. Overall calcification rates were 32% higher in P. daedalea colonies (x = 1.103 g cm−2 y−1, n = 46 than in C. microphthalma (x = 0.835 g cm−2 y−1, n = 37, probably reflecting inter-specific differences in energy allocation and skeletal density. There was also considerable variation in calcification rates among individual colonies from the same locations that was unrelated to depth or photosymbiont type. However, most interestingly, P. daedalea and C. microphthalma exhibited contrasting trends in mean annual calcification rates across locations. For P. daedalea, calcification rates were lowest at Delma, where the minimum temperatures were lowest and salinity was highest, and increased across the southern Persian Gulf with increases in minimum temperatures and decreases in salinity. These data suggest that calcification rates of P. daedalea are most constrained by minimum temperatures, which is consistent with the strong relationship between annual calcification rates and minimum local temperatures recorded across the Indo-Pacific. Conversely, linear extension and calcification of C. microphthalma in the southern Persian Gulf was lowest at Ras Ghanada, where there was lowest light and highest maximum temperatures. These data reveal striking taxonomic differences in

  12. Gallbladder emptying evaluation in calcific chronic pancreatitis using Tc-99m DISIDA scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Martha Regina A.; Cunha, Renata M.; Guarita, Dulce R.; Buchpieguel, Carlos A.; Mott, Carlos B.; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the gallbladder motor function in chronic pancreatitis (C) patients. Gallbladder emptying was evaluated in 11 patients, without and with addition of pancreatic extract and in ten controls. The results were compared and analyzed statistically. The ejection fraction (E F) of the gallbladder (GB) at 30, 45 and 60 minutes were calculated by using Tc-9 9 m DISIDA scintigraphy. The E F of GB at 60 minutes was significantly higher in the controls when compared to patients, although the results between patients were similar without and with addition of pancreatic extract. The results suggest that the delay in the GB emptying does not depend on the eventual alteration in the intestinal phase of the vesicular stimulation, but it probably results from a mechanic factor, which depends on the chronic pathological process located in the head of the pancreas. (author)

  13. Occult splenic rupture in a case of chronic calcific pancreatitis with a brief review of literature

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    Sharada S.

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: High clinical suspicion on the part of the treating physician and the emergency team is essential to the management of atraumatic splenic rupture. The increasing understanding of the pathophysiology and presentation of splenic complications in pancreatitis may alert the index physician to these fatal complications.

  14. Specific Radiological Imaging Findings in Patients With Hereditary Pancreatitis During a Long Follow-up of Disease.

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    van Esch, Aura A J; Drenth, Joost P H; Hermans, John J

    2017-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation of the pancreas. Radiological imaging is used to diagnose HP and to monitor complications. The aim of this study was to describe specific imaging findings in HP. We retrospectively collected data of HP patients with serial imaging and reviewed all radiological imaging studies (transabdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging). We included 15 HP patients, with a mean age of 32.5 years (range, 9-61 years) and mean disease duration of 24.1 years (range, 6-42 years). In total, 152 imaging studies were reviewed. Seventy-three percent of patients had a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD) (width 3.5-18 mm). The MPD varied in size during disease course, with temporary reduction in diameter after drainage procedures. A severe dilated MPD (>10 mm) often coincided with presence of intraductal calcifications (size, 1-12 mm). In 73% of patients, pancreatic parenchyma atrophy occurred, which did not correlate with presence of exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. In HP, the MPD diameter increases with time, mostly without dilated side branches, and is often accompanied by large intraductal calcifications. The size of the MPD is independent of disease state. Atrophy of pancreatic parenchyma is not correlated with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency.

  15. Long-term results of combined ESWL and ERCP treatment of chronic calcific pancreatitis.

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    Korpela, Taija; Udd, Marianne; Tenca, Andrea; Lindström, Outi; Halttunen, Jorma; Myrskysalo, Sanna; Mikkola, Arto; Kylänpää, Leena

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) combined with endotherapy (ET) is the standard treatment for pancreatic duct stones (PDS) in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Our aim was to report the short- and long-term results of ESWL and ET. Consecutively treated 83 patients with symptomatic PDS using ESWL and ET. Success was defined (i) technically: PDS fragmentation and clearance obtained and (ii) clinically: improvement/resolution of pain. To get information on quality of life, we conducted a phone survey whereby we contacted 64 (89%) patients. The long-term results are presented in those patients with ≥2 years follow-up. Treated PDS with median size of 10 (5-25) mm were located in the head, body, or the tail of the pancreas in 78, 4, and 1 patients, respectively. The primary results were that technical success was achieved in 69 patients (83%) and clinical success in 66 patients (80%). Fourteen patients had technical failure, but eight of them became free of pain. Thus, clinical success can be considered to have been achieved in 74 of 83 patients (89%). In patients with persistent pseudocyst (PC) at the time of ESWL (n = 19), the PC disappeared in a year in 14 patients (74%). The long-term results were obtained from 61 (73%) ESWL- and ET-treated patients. The median follow-up for them was 53 months (range: 24-124) and 57 patients (93%) became pain-free or had less pain. For patients with CP and PDS ESWL combined with ET is an effective and safe treatment giving favorable long-term results.

  16. Species-specific coral calcification responses to the extreme environment of the southern Persian Gulf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, Emily J.; Dunshea, Glenn John; McParland, Dain

    2018-01-01

    Sustained accretion of calcium carbonate (mostly by scleractinian corals) is fundamental for maintaining the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems, but may be greatly constrained by extreme and rapidly changing environmental conditions. Corals in the southern Persian Gulf already...... experience extreme temperature ranges ( 34°C), chronic hypersalinity (> 43 psu) and frequent light limitation (coral species in the region (Platygyra daedalea and Cyphastrea microphthalma) along marked...... Persian Gulf was lowest at Ras Ghanada, where there was lowest light and highest maximum temperatures. These data reveal striking taxonomic differences in the specific environmental constraints on coral calcification, which will further reinforce changes in the structure of coral assemblages with ongoing...

  17. Protective effects of estrogen against vascular calcification via estrogen receptor α-dependent growth arrest-specific gene 6 transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanao-Hamai, Michiko; Son, Bo-Kyung; Hashizume, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is one of the major complications of cardiovascular disease and is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death. Postmenopausal women have a higher prevalence of vascular calcification compared with premenopausal women, suggesting protective effects of estrogen (E2). However, the underlying mechanisms of its beneficial effects remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effects of E2 on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification, and found that growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a crucial molecule in vascular calcification, is transactivated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in response to E2. In human aortic smooth muscle cells, physiological levels of E2 inhibited inorganic phosphate (Pi)-induced calcification in a concentration-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was significantly abolished by MPP, an ERα-selective antagonist, and ERα siRNA, but not by PHTPP, an ERβ-selective antagonist, and ERβ siRNA, implicating an ERα-dependent action. Apoptosis, an essential process for Pi-induced VSMC calcification, was inhibited by E2 in a concentration-dependent manner and further, MPP abolished this inhibition. Mechanistically, E2 restored the inhibited expression of Gas6 and phospho-Akt in Pi-induced apoptosis through ERα. Furthermore, E2 significantly activated Gas6 transcription, and MPP abrogated this E2-dependent Gas6 transactivation. E2-BSA failed to activate Gas6 transcription and to inhibit Ca deposition in VSMC, suggesting beneficial actions of genomic signaling by E2/nuclear ERα. Taken together, these results indicate that E2 exerts inhibitory effects on VSMC apoptosis and calcification through ERα-mediated Gas6 transactivation. These findings indicate a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular calcification, especially in postmenopausal women. - Highlights: • E2 inhibits Pi-induced calcification in vascular smooth muscles cells. • E2 inhibits Pi

  18. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture.

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    Heather N Hutson

    Full Text Available Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD. However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased. Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

  19. Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Specificity, Issues and Hopes.

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    Rouanet, Marie; Lebrin, Marine; Gross, Fabian; Bournet, Barbara; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2017-06-08

    A recent death projection has placed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as the second cause of death by cancer in 2030. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is very poor and there is a great need for new treatments that can change this poor outcome. Developments of therapeutic innovations in combination with conventional chemotherapy are needed urgently. Among innovative treatments the gene therapy offers a promising avenue. The present review gives an overview of the general strategy of gene therapy as well as the limitations and stakes of the different experimental in vivo models, expression vectors (synthetic and viral), molecular tools (interference RNA, genome editing) and therapeutic genes (tumor suppressor genes, antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic genes, suicide genes). The latest developments in pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are described including gene-based tumor cell sensitization to chemotherapy, vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy (chimeric antigen receptor T-cells strategy). Nowadays, there is a specific development of oncolytic virus therapies including oncolytic adenoviruses, herpes virus, parvovirus or reovirus. A summary of all published and on-going phase-1 trials is given. Most of them associate gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The first results are encouraging for most of the trials but remain to be confirmed in phase 2 trials.

  20. Pancreatitis

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    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  1. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in MiceSummary

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    Mark J. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. Methods: We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cre-mediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. Results: Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3, implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. Conclusions: Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. Keywords: Npr3, Pancreatic Ducts, Primary Cilia

  2. Pancreas-specific deletion of mouse Gata4 and Gata6 causes pancreatic agenesis

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    Xuan, Shouhong; Borok, Matthew J.; Decker, Kimberly J.; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Hale, Michael A.; Macdonald, Raymond J.; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic agenesis is a human disorder caused by defects in pancreas development. To date, only a few genes have been linked to pancreatic agenesis in humans, with mutations in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1A) reported in only 5 families with described cases. Recently, mutations in GATA6 have been identified in a large percentage of human cases, and a GATA4 mutant allele has been implicated in a single case. In the mouse, Gata4 and Gata6 are expressed in several endoderm-derived tissues, including the pancreas. To analyze the functions of GATA4 and/or GATA6 during mouse pancreatic development, we generated pancreas-specific deletions of Gata4 and Gata6. Surprisingly, loss of either Gata4 or Gata6 in the pancreas resulted in only mild pancreatic defects, which resolved postnatally. However, simultaneous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 in the pancreas caused severe pancreatic agenesis due to disruption of pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation, defects in branching morphogenesis, and a subsequent failure to induce the differentiation of progenitor cells expressing carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3). These studies address the conserved and nonconserved mechanisms underlying GATA4 and GATA6 function during pancreas development and provide a new mouse model to characterize the underlying developmental defects associated with pancreatic agenesis. PMID:23006325

  3. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook

    1995-01-01

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  4. CT findings of the mucin producing pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ri, Kyoushichi; Hashimoto, Toushi; Munechika, Hirotsugu

    1992-01-01

    Mucin-producing pancreatic cancers (MPPC), which include mucinous adenocarcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma and cystadenocarcinoma, are radiographically characterized by diffuse or localized dilatation of the main pancreatic duct due to excessive mucin production. Therefore, MPPC are occasionally difficult to distinguish from chronic pancreatitis on CT unless the primary pancreatic lesion is visualized. We compared five cases of MPPC with five cases of chronic pancreatitis with marked duct dilatation to determine differences in CT images between the two diseases. There was no significant difference between the two diseases in the nature of duct dilatation (size, extent, contour) or parenchymal changes (atrophy, enlargement, calcification, cystic lesion). However, dilatation of the intramural duct was characteristically observed in MPPC but not in chronic pancreatitis. Papillary masses in the pancreatic duct, when observed, were another finding specific to MPPC. (author)

  5. Development of a Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Model to Understand Atherosclerosis and Calcification Locations: Comparison with In vivo Data in an Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar; Agu, Obiekezie; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification results in stiffening of the aorta and is associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Atherogenesis is a complex, multifactorial, and systemic process; the result of a number of factors, each operating simultaneously at several spatial and temporal scales. The ability to predict sites of atherogenesis would be of great use to clinicians in order to improve diagnostic and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a mathematical model as a tool to understand why atherosclerotic plaque and calcifications occur in specific locations. This model is then used to analyze vascular calcification and atherosclerotic areas in an aortic dissection patient using a mechanistic, multi-scale modeling approach, coupling patient-specific, fluid-structure interaction simulations with a model of endothelial mechanotransduction. A number of hemodynamic factors based on state-of-the-art literature are used as inputs to the endothelial permeability model, in order to investigate plaque and calcification distributions, which are compared with clinical imaging data. A significantly improved correlation between elevated hydraulic conductivity or volume flux and the presence of calcification and plaques was achieved by using a shear index comprising both mean and oscillatory shear components (HOLMES) and a non-Newtonian viscosity model as inputs, as compared to widely used hemodynamic indicators. The proposed approach shows promise as a predictive tool. The improvements obtained using the combined biomechanical/biochemical modeling approach highlight the benefits of mechanistic modeling as a powerful tool to understand complex phenomena and provides insight into the relative importance of key hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27445834

  6. CT findings of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Sook; Park, In Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song; Won, Jong Jin

    1988-01-01

    CT was found to be a reliable, often specific, and noninvasive method for detecting pancreatic diseases. In a study of pancreatic lesions, 37 cases having satisfactory operative and histological proofs were analyzed by CT at PMC from Jan. 1986 to Oct. 1987. The results were as following: 1. Male:female is 26:11. 2. The incidence of pancreatic disease were as follows: 1) Pancreatic cancer:21 cases (56%) a.Head:12 cases b.Body:4 cases c.Tail:1 case d.Body and tail:1 case e.Uncinate process:2 cases f.Entire pancreas: 1 case 2) Acute pancreatitis: 6 cases (16%) 3) Chronic pancreatitis:5 cases (14%) 3. The characteristic CT findings: 1) 100% of pancreatic head cancer showed focal mass or alteration of pancreatic head contour and biliary tree dilatation, and 33% (7/12) fat line obliteration. 2) All of other pancreatic cancer except head appeared as focal mass or contour alteration and fat line obliteration. 3) Total 6 cases of acute pancreatitis showed that 5 cases diffuse enlargement of pancreas, 3 fluid collection (2 cases:left anterior pararenal and posterior pararenal space and lesser sac, 1 case:only pancreas body) and 1 case abscess formation. 4) Total 5 cases of chronic pancreatitis revealed diffuse enlargement 2 cases and atrophy 1 case, pancreatic ductal dilatation 3 cases, calcification 2 cases, and biliary tree dilatation with CBD tapering appearance 1 case. 5) All cases of pseudocysts were well marginated cystic lesions that located at head in 3 cases and tail 3 cases, and 4 cases were well defined pure cystic masses but 1 case was well capsulated cyst with multiple internal septation

  7. Hepatocellular calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claus; Frifelt, J J

    1987-01-01

    Autopsy of a twenty year old girl dying from complications of renal and cardiac failure demonstrated severe hepatocellular calcification, a rare finding. The pathogenesis is thought to be a combination of dystrophic calcification caused by severe centrilobular necrosis and metastatic calcificatio...

  8. Indicative findings of pancreatic cancer in prediagnostic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Choi, Jin-Young; Hong, Hye-Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We examined 20 prediagnostic CTs from 16 patients for whom the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was delayed until full diagnostic CT was performed. Three radiologists independently reviewed the prediagnostic CTs along with 50 CTs of control subjects, including patients without pancreatic disease (n = 38) or with chronic pancreatitis without calcification visible on CT (n=12). The reviewers recorded the presence of biliary or pancreatic ductal dilation, interruption of the pancreatic duct, distal parenchymal atrophy, contour abnormality and focal hypoattenuation. Frequency, sensitivity and specificity of the significant findings were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was performed. Findings indicative of pancreatic cancer were seen on 85% (17/20) of the prediagnostic CTs. Patients with pancreatic cancer were significantly (p<0.05) more likely to show focal hypoattenuation, pancreatic duct dilation, interruption of the pancreatic duct, and distal parenchymal atrophy, with sensitivities and specificities of 75%/84%, 50%/78%, 45%/82% and 45%/96%, respectively. Focal hypoattenuation and distal parenchymal atrophy were the independent predictors of pancreatic cancer with odds ratios of 20.92 and 11.22, respectively. In conclusion, focal hypoattenuation and pancreatic duct dilation with or without interruption, especially when accompanied by distal parenchymal atrophy, were the most useful findings for avoiding delayed diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (orig.)

  9. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  10. Diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide specific antigen in serum for patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yun; Liu Xingdang; Li Ding; Dei Shouzhen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS) in serum, with the carbohydrate antigens (CA) 19-9, CA50, CA125 and CA242 in pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Serum TPS was measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CA19-9 and CA125 were measured with chemiluminescent immunoassay. CAS0 and CA242 were measured with immunoradiometric assay in 33 patients with pancreatitis, 34 patients with pathologically proven pancreatic carcinoma, and 35 patients with non-pancreatic malignancies. Statistic analysis was carried out with SPSS 9.0 software. Results: Patients with pancreatic carcinoma had relatively higher levels of TPS [(386.5 ± 315. 1) U/L] and CA19-9 [(10 820.9 ± 389.7) kU/L] when compared with patients with pancreatitis [(86. 2 ± 28.1) U/L and (61.5 ± 24.7) kU/L, respectively; F = 936. 42, P < 0. 001 ; F = 2217. 09, P < 0. 001], with a sensitivity and a specificity of 70.6% (48/68) and 57.4% (39/68), respectively, for TPS, and 82.4% (28/34) and 77.9% (53/68), respectively, for CA19-9. Diagnostic performance was further improved when TPS was assayed in combination with CA19-9, CA50, CA125 and CA242. Conclusion: Serum TPS has an incremental value in complementing CA19-9 in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. (authors)

  11. The specific localization of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in rat pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Yuta; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Tomono, Yasuko; Wang, Dengli; Izushi, Yasuhisa; Wake, Hidenori; Liu, Keyue; Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Mori, Shuji; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are produced by non-enzymatic glycation between protein and reducing sugar such as glucose. Although glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs), one of the AGEs subspecies, have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of various age-relating diseases such as diabetes mellitus or arteriosclerosis, little is known about the pathological and physiological mechanism of AGEs in vivo. In present study, we produced 4 kinds of polyclonal antibodies against AGEs subspecies and investigated the localization of AGEs-modified proteins in rat peripheral tissues, making use of these antibodies. We found that Glycer-AGEs and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs (MGO-AGEs) were present in pancreatic islets of healthy rats, distinguished clearly into the pancreatic α and β cells, respectively. Although streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats suffered from remarkable impairment of pancreatic islets, the localization and deposit levels of the Glycer- and MGO-AGEs were not altered in the remaining α and β cells. Remarkably, the MGO-AGEs in pancreatic β cells were localized into the insulin-secretory granules. These results suggest that the cell-specific localization of AGEs-modified proteins are presence generally in healthy peripheral tissues, involved in physiological intracellular roles, such as a post-translational modulator contributing to the secretory and/or maturational functions of insulin. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  13. Diabetes mellitus, pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic calcific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) was determined in 25 successive patients with both diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty patients (80%) were alcoholics and all were black. Of these, 9 (45%) had CCP. In only 3 of these 9 patients was the history compatible with the ...

  14. Diabetes mellitus, pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic calcific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) was determined in 25 successive patients with both diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty patients (80%) were alcoholics and all were black. Of these, 9. (45%) had CCP. In only 3 of these 9 patients was the history compatible with the ...

  15. Activated macrophages create lineage-specific microenvironments for pancreatic acinar- and β-cell regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscimanna, Angela; Coudriet, Gina M; Gittes, George K; Piganelli, Jon D; Esni, Farzad

    2014-11-01

    Although the cells that contribute to pancreatic regeneration have been widely studied, little is known about the mediators of this process. During tissue regeneration, infiltrating macrophages debride the site of injury and coordinate the repair response. We investigated the role of macrophages in pancreatic regeneration in mice. We used a saporin-conjugated antibody against CD11b to reduce the number of macrophages in mice following diphtheria toxin receptor-mediated cell ablation of pancreatic cells, and evaluated the effects on pancreatic regeneration. We analyzed expression patterns of infiltrating macrophages after cell-specific injury or from the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice. We developed an in vitro culture system to study the ability of macrophages to induce cell-specific regeneration. Depletion of macrophages impaired pancreatic regeneration. Macrophage polarization, as assessed by expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, interleukin 10, and CD206, depended on the type of injury. The signals provided by polarized macrophages promoted lineage-specific generation of acinar or endocrine cells. Macrophage from nonobese diabetic mice failed to provide signals necessary for β-cell generation. Macrophages produce cell type-specific signals required for pancreatic regeneration in mice. Additional study of these processes and signals might lead to new approaches for treating type 1 diabetes or pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  18. Acinar cell-specific knockout of the PTHrP gene decreases the proinflammatory and profibrotic responses in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Rastellini, Cristiana; Han, Song; Aronson, Judith F; Greeley, George H; Falzon, Miriam

    2014-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a necroinflammatory disease with acute and chronic manifestations. Accumulated damage incurred during repeated bouts of acute pancreatitis (AP) can lead to chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pancreatic parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) levels are elevated in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Here, we show elevated PTHrP levels in mouse models of pancreatitis induced by chronic cerulein administration and pancreatic duct ligation. Because acinar cells play a major role in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis, mice with acinar cell-specific targeted disruption of the Pthrp gene (PTHrP(Δacinar)) were generated to assess the role of acinar cell-secreted PTHrP in pancreatitis. These mice were generated using Cre-LoxP technology and the acinar cell-specific elastase promoter. PTHrP(Δacinar) exerted protective effects in cerulein and pancreatic duct ligation models, evident as decreased edema, histological damage, amylase secretion, pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Treating acinar cells in vitro with cerulein increased IL-6 expression and NF-κB activity; these effects were attenuated in PTHrP(Δacinar) cells, as were the cerulein- and carbachol-induced elevations in amylase secretion. The cerulein-induced upregulation of procollagen I expression was lost in PSCs from PTHrP(Δacinar) mice. PTHrP immunostaining was elevated in human CP sections. The cerulein-induced upregulation of IL-6 and ICAM-1 (human acinar cells) and procollagen I (human PSCs) was suppressed by pretreatment with the PTH1R antagonist, PTHrP (7-34). These findings establish PTHrP as a novel mediator of inflammation and fibrosis associated with CP. Acinar cell-secreted PTHrP modulates acinar cell function via its effects on proinflammatory cytokine release and functions via a paracrine pathway to activate PSCs. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  20. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  1. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  2. MUC1-specific CTLs are non-functional within a pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Madsen, C S; Tinder, T L; Jacobs, F; Parker, J; Agrawal, B; Longenecker, B M; Gendler, S J

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive, treatment refractory disease and is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. In humans, 90% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas over-express altered forms of a tumor-associated antigen, MUC1 (an epithelial mucin glycoprotein), which is a target for immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant mouse model of pancreas cancer that demonstrates peripheral and central tolerance to human MUC1 and develops spontaneous tumors of the pancreas, we have previously reported the presence of functionally active, low affinity, MUC1-specific precursor cytotoxic T cells (pCTLs). Hypothesis for this study is that MUC1-based immunization may enhance the low level MUC1-specific immunity that may lead to an effective anti-tumor response. Data demonstrate that MUC1 peptide-based immunization elicits mature MUC1-specific CTLs in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The mature CTLs secrete IFN-gamma and are cytolytic against MUC1-expressing tumor cells in vitro. However, active CTLs that infiltrate the pancreas tumor microenvironment become cytolytically anergic and are tolerized to MUC1 antigen, allowing the tumor to grow. We demonstrate that the CTL tolerance could be reversed at least in vitro with the use of anti-CD40 co-stimulation. The pancreas tumor cells secrete immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 and TGF-beta that are partly responsible for the down-regulation of CTL activity. In addition, they down-regulate their MHC class I molecules to avoid immune recognition. CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, which secrete IL-10, were also found in the tumor environment. Together these data indicate the use of several immune evasion mechanisms by tumor cells to evade CTL killing. Thus altering the tumor microenvironment to make it more conducive to CTL killing may be key in developing a successful anti-cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Specific Radiological Imaging Findings in Patients With Hereditary Pancreatitis During a Long Follow-up of Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, A.A.J. van; Drenth, J.P.H.; Hermans, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation of the pancreas. Radiological imaging is used to diagnose HP and to monitor complications. The aim of this study was to describe specific imaging findings in HP. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data

  4. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104–23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  5. Significance of coronary artery calcification detected incidentally with chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.H.; Greenberg, R.; Miller, S.W.; Shepard, J.O.; Bourgouin, P.M.; McLoud, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronary artery calcifications are well seen on CT scans because of high contrast resolution. Individual vessels were scored 0-3+ based on degree of calcification in over 40 patients who also underwent cardiac catheterization. Though relatively insensitive, the presence of dense calcifications had a specificity of roughly 60% to 70% for the presence of severe stenosis. In addition, 30 patients with calcification on CT scans and 30 age-matched controls, all of whom underwent thoracotomy, were compared with respect to prior cardiac history, estimated anesthetic risk, and postoperative cardiac complications. Patients with calcifications were more likely to have evidence of coronary disease and/or encounter postoperative cardiac complications

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  7. Reconstructing human pancreatic differentiation by mapping specific cell populations during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramond, Cyrille; Glaser, Nicolas; Berthault, Claire

    2017-01-01

    . Endocrine maturation progresses by up-regulating SUSD2 and lowering ECAD levels. Finally, in vitro differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells mimics key in vivo events. Our work paves the way to extend our understanding of the origin of mature human pancreatic......Information remains scarce on human development compared to animal models. Here, we reconstructed human fetal pancreatic differentiation using cell surface markers. We demonstrate that at 7weeks of development, the glycoprotein 2 (GP2) marks a multipotent cell population that will differentiate...... cell types and how such lineage decisions are regulated....

  8. CT manifestations of pancreatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Risheng; Zheng Ji'ai; Li Rongfen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT manifestations and diagnostic value in the pancreatic tuberculosis(PTB)with review of the literatures. Methods: All cases of PTB proved by surgery or biopsy were examined with plain and enhanced CT scans. Results: The CT findings in one case with multiple-nodular type of PTB were diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with multiple, nodular, and low-density lesions; The nodular lesions had peripheral enhancement. 7 cases of local type of PTB encroached on pancreatic head. 4 cases showed local soft tissue masses with multiple flecked calcifications in 2 cases and mild enhancement in one case; Cystic masses was found in 2 cases, with mural calcification in 1 case and multi-loculated cystic mass in 1 case, respectively; Massive pancreatic head calcification was demonstrated in one case. In these 8 cases of PTB, the lesion extended out of pancreas in 4 cases, including abdominal tuberculous lymph nodes, tuberculous peritonitis, and hepatosplenic tuberculosis. Conclusion: CT findings of PTB were various but had some characteristics. Pancreatic masses with multiple flecked calcification or mild enhancement could suggest the diagnosis. Abdominal tuberculosis accompanied with the pancreatic lesion, especially tuberculous lymph nodes, was highly suggestive of the diagnosis of PTB

  9. Secretin-stimulated MR cholangio-pancreatography in the evaluation of asymptomatic patients with non-specific pancreatic hyperenzymemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, Francescamaria, E-mail: fra.donati@katamail.co [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Boraschi, Piero; Gigoni, Roberto; Salemi, Simonetta [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bertucci, Cristina; Cecchi, Claudia; Bartolozzi, Carlo [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Rome 67, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, Fabio [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of secretin-stimulated MRCP (SS-MRCP) compared with conventional MRCP in asymptomatic patients with mild elevations of pancreatic enzymes. Materials and methods: Eighty asymptomatic patients with pancreatic hyperenzymemia underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T-device (Signa EXCITE, GE Healthcare). After the acquisition of axial T1w,T2w sequences, and conventional MRCP, SS-MRCP was performed using a single-slice coronal breath-hold, thick-slab, SSFSE T2w sequence, repeated every 30 s up to 15 min following intravenous injection of secretin (Secrelux, Sanochemia). Results: On the basis of the standards of reference, our final diagnoses were: negative findings (n = 23), pancreas divisum (n = 22), mild chronic pancreatitis (n = 14), inflammatory ampullary stenosis (n = 3), juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (n = 1), small cystic lesions (<1 cm) (n = 22; 5/22 cases associated with pancreas divisum). The image quality of SS-MRCP was significantly higher than that of conventional MRCP (p < 0.0001). Standards of reference did not differ significantly from of SS-MRCP findings (p = 0.5), while was statistically different from those of conventional MRCP (p < 0.0001). A significant difference was found between conventional MRCP and SS-MRCP findings (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: In asymptomatic patients with non-specific pancreatic hyperenzymemia SS-MRCP may represent the best non-invasive diagnostic technique, since it gives morphological and functional information.

  10. Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in a Randomized Trial of a Specific Probiotic Composition in Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Renooij, Willem; de Smet, Martin B.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Timmerman, Harro M.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Cirkel, Geert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Witteman, Ben J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; van Goor, Harry; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Tan, Adriaan C.; Brink, Menno A.; van der Harst, Erwin; Wahab, Peter J.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Akkermans, Louis M.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relation between intestinal barrier dysfunction, bacterial translocation, and clinical outcome in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis and the influence of probiotics on these processes. Summary of Background data: Randomized, placebo-controlled,

  11. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi; Ito, Tetsuhide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  12. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  13. Radiological observation of determination of sex by costal cartilage calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shin Hwa; Won, Jong Jin; Rhee, Song Joo; Moon, Moo Chang; Oh, Jong Hyun; Choi, Ki Chul

    1979-01-01

    The difference of patterns of costal cartilage calcification in male and female had been first described by Fischer in 1955. Thereafter several reports were published, but specific clinical significance was not found. During the period from January, 1978 to December, 1978, we, in the Department of Radiology, Jeonbug National University, studied 2164 cases that showed the entire 12 pairs of ribs. Among these we detected 1494 cases of costal cartilage calcification and frequent sites of calcification. Patterns of costal cartilage calcification were classified into six groups- type l: central, type II: marginal, type III: junctional type, type IV: railroad, type V: diffuse, type VI: mixed. Results are as follows; 1. In a total of 2164 cases, calcification of costal cartilage was present in 1494 cases(69.0%). Of 1181 males 780 cases(66.0%) showed calcification, and of 983 females 714 cases (72.6%) showed calcification. 2. In 439 cases of males, except for 341 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows: marginal type in 265 cases (60.4%), junctional type in 134 cases (30.5%), mixed type in 21 cases (0.5%), central type in 17 cases(3.8%), and railroad type in 2 cases (0.5%). Diffuse type was not present. 3. In 492 cases of females, except of 222 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows; central type in 336 cases (68.3%), junctional type in 94 cases(19.1%), mixed type in 24 cases (4.9%), railroad type in 19 cases (3.9%), and diffuse type in 14 cases (2.8%). 4. When central calcification was observed, predictive value to female was 94.7%. When marginal calcification was observed, predictive value to male was 987.4%. 5. Males frequently showed calcification in upper costal cartilages, and females in lower costal cartilages.

  14. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features

  15. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer: the role of percutaneous biopsy and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Z.; Theis, B.; Russell, R.C.G.; House, C.; Novelli, M.; Lees, W.R

    2006-12-15

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and complications of percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses, and whether typical computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma can reliably predict this diagnosis. Materials and methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of percutaneous core biopsies of pancreatic masses and their CT features was undertaken. Data were retrieved from surgical/pathology databases; medical records and CT reports and images. Results: Three hundred and three patients underwent 372 biopsies; 56 of 87 patients had repeat biopsies. Malignancy was diagnosed in 276 patients, with ductal adenocarcinoma in 259 (85%). Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms was 90%; for repeat biopsy it was 87%. Complications occurred in 17 (4.6%) patients, in three of whom the complications were major (1%): one abscess, one duodenal perforation, one large retroperitoneal bleed. CT features typical of ductal adenocarcinoma were: hypovascular pancreatic mass with bile and/or pancreatic duct dilatation. Atypical CT features were: isodense or hypervascular mass, calcification, non-dilated ducts, cystic change, and extensive lymphadenopathy. Defining typical CT features of adenocarcinoma as true-positives, CT had a sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, and negative predictive value of 41% for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Final sensitivity of percutaneous biopsy for establishing the diagnosis was 90%. CT features typical of pancreatic adenocarcinoma had high specificity and PPV. On some occasions, especially in frail patients with co-morbidity, it might be reasonable to assume a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer if CT features are typical, and biopsy only if CT shows atypical features.

  16. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  17. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  18. Growth Pattern of Atherosclerotic Calcifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lene Lillemark; Ganz, Melanie; Dam, Erik

    2008-01-01

    of the calcifications are matched longitudinally using thin plate spline registration and area overlap calculations. The growth of the calcifications is measured by the distribution of the geometry statistics of the calcifications. The method was evaluated on 135 subjects with a total number of 611 calcifications. Our...

  19. Serum feline-specific pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity concentrations and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in cats with trauma resulting from high-rise syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Elke; Hittmair, Katharina M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M; Tichy, Alexander; Dupré, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate serum feline-specific pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) concentrations and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in cats with trauma resulting from high-rise syndrome. Prospective case series. Animals-34 client-owned cats. From cats evaluated because of high-rise syndrome between March and October 2009, a blood sample was obtained for measurement of serum fPLI concentration within 12 hours after the fall and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the first blood collection. Pancreatitis was diagnosed in cats with an fPLI concentration > 5.4 μg/L. Each cat had abdominal ultrasonography performed twice 48 hours apart, and pancreatic trauma was assessed via detection of pancreatic enlargement, hypoechoic or heteroechoic pancreatic parenchyma, hyperechoic mesentery, and peritoneal effusion. Cats were assigned 1 point for each abnormality present, and a cumulative score ≥ 3 was considered suggestive of traumatic pancreatitis. Traumatic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 9 and 8 cats on the basis of serum fPLI concentration and ultrasonographic findings, respectively. For cats with pancreatitis, fPLI concentration was significantly higher at 12 and 24 hours after the fall than at 48 and 72 hours after the fall, and serum fPLI concentration decreased as time after the fall increased. Significant agreement existed between the use of serum fPLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of traumatic pancreatitis. Cats with high-rise syndrome often had serum fPLI concentrations > 5.4 μg/L within 12 hours after the fall, and concurrent evaluation of those cats via abdominal ultrasonography twice, 48 hours apart, improved detection of traumatic pancreatitis.

  20. Pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis: Computed tomography findings – a retrospective analysis of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Amir, E-mail: amir.med87@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Ayav, Ahmet [Department of HPB Surgery, University Hospital of Nancy (France); Belle, Arthur [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Orry, Xavier [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Unité Inserm U954, Nancy (France); Laurent, Valerie [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Laboratory IADI, INSERM u947 (France)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: Chronic calcifying pancreatitis (CCP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC). Symptoms of PC are non-specific in patients with CCP, and diagnostic imaging can be difficult. Some studies have shown that diagnosis may take several months, leading to delays in treatment (Lin et al., 2015; Lennon et al., 2014) . The aim of this study was to describe the radiological signs of PC in patients with CCP. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study was conducted between January 2004 and December 2014. Patients with CCP who were being monitored for PC were included. Each patient diagnosed with PC was matched with two CCP controls who did not develop PC. Results: We studied 48 patients with CCP (30 men (62%) and 18 women (38%), mean age 69.4 years). Sixteen patients (with 18 tumor sites) who developed PC (1.52%) were compared with 32 controls who did not develop PC. A hypodense mass was observed in all of the patients with PC, predominantly in the pancreatic head (61.2%). No such masses were observed in the controls (p < 0.001). The average mass size was 36.3 mm, and the masses were observed to push aside the calcifications in all patients (p < 0.001). Calcifications were very abundant (>10) in 33.3% of the patients with PC and in 71.9% of the controls (p = 0.0076). The main pancreatic duct (MPD) was dilated in all of the patients with PC (average diameter 8.6 mm; homogeneous in 83.3%) and in only 46.9% of the controls (average 7.4 mm; homogeneous in 37.5%) (p > 0.05). Dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts and common bile duct was observed in 15 (94.4%) of the patients with PC and in none of the controls (p < 0.0001). The average alcohol consumption was 1 g/day (0–5 g/day) in the PC group and 4.6 g/day (0–20 g/day) in the control group. In addition, the average smoking history was 14.25 pack-years (0–40 PY) in the PC group and 27.70 PY (0–60 PY) in the control group. Conclusion: The presence of a pancreatic mass in a patient with CCP is

  1. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  2. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Arterial calcification: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Rachel; Henein, Michael Y

    2013-07-31

    There is a significant relationship between the presence, extent and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality in both CV and renal patients and CAC scoring can provide improved predictive ability over risk factor scoring alone. There is also a close relationship between CAC presence and atherosclerotic plaque burden, with angiography studies showing very high sensitivity but poor specificity of CAC score for predicting obstructive disease. Nevertheless, there are objections to CAC screening because of uncertainties and lack of studies showing improved outcome. Furthermore, histopathology studies indicate that heavily calcified plaque is unlikely to result in a CV event, while the vulnerable plaque tends to be uncalcified or 'mixed', suggesting that calcification may be protective. This scenario highlights a number of paradoxes, which may indicate that the association between CAC and CV events is spurious, following from the adoption of CAC as a surrogate for high plaque burden, which itself is a surrogate for the presence of vulnerable plaque. Since studies indicate that arterial calcification is a complex, organised and regulated process similar to bone formation, there is no particular reason why it should be a reliable indicator of either the plaque burden or the risk of a future CV event. We suggest that it is time to divorce arterial calcification from atherosclerosis and to view it as a distinct pathology in its own right, albeit one which frequently coexists with atherosclerosis and is related to it for reasons which are not yet fully understood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: Recommendations from PancreasFest 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Michael R.; Bellin, Melena; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Robertson, R. Paul; Andersen, Dana K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Brand, Randall; Frulloni, Luca; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Description Diabetes and glucose intolerance are common complications of chronic pancreatitis, yet clinical guidance on their detection, classification, and management is lacking. Methods A working group reviewed the medical problems, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for chronic pancreatitis-associated diabetes for a consensus meeting at PancreasFest 2012. Results Guidance Statement 1.1 Diabetes mellitus is common in chronic pancreatitis. While any patient with chronic pancreatitis should be monitored for development of diabetes, those with long-standing duration of disease, prior partial pancreatectomy, and early onset of calcific disease may be at higher risk. Those patients developing diabetes mellitus are likely to have co-existing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Guidance Statement 1.2 Diabetes occurring secondary to chronic pancreatitis should be recognized as pancreatogenic diabetes (type 3c diabetes). Guidance Statement 2.1 The initial evaluation should include fasting glucose and HbA1c. These tests should be repeated annually. Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c requires further evaluation. Guidance Statement 2.2 Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c should be further evaluated by a standard 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Guidance Statement 2.3 An absent pancreatic polypeptide response to mixed-nutrient ingestion is a specific indicator of type 3c diabetes. Guidance Statement 2.4 Assessment of pancreatic endocrine reserve, and importantly that of functional beta-cell mass, should be performed as part of the evaluation and follow-up for total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). Guidance Statement 3 Patients with pancreatic diabetes shall be treated with specifically tailored medical nutrition and pharmacologic therapies. Conclusions Physicians should evaluate and treat glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatitis. PMID:23890130

  5. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldes, K. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Lenchik, L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Jaovisidha, S. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Clopton, P. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States); Sartoris, D.J. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foldes, K.; Lenchik, L.; Jaovisidha, S.; Clopton, P.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  8. [Disk calcifications in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children.

  9. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  10. Calcific shoulder joint periarthritis. Disappearance of calcifications after laser therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussetti, P; Moroso, P; Palazzo, C

    1986-01-01

    The authors report their results in the laser therapy of 30 calcific joint periarthritis. In two out of the ten radiographed cases, at the end of therapy, the complete disappearance of calcifications has been shown and in one case a decrease in calcification volume has been demonstrated. In the follow up after 6 months, 80% of clinically checked patients had no painful relapse.

  11. CEBPA exerts a specific and biologically important proapoptotic role in pancreatic β cells through its downstream network targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Davide; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Piro, Salvatore; Parrinello, Nunziatina; Fløyel, Tina; Ragusa, Marco; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria; Størling, Joachim; Purrello, Francesco; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor CEBPA has been widely studied for its involvement in hematopoietic cell differentiation and causal role in hematological malignancies. We demonstrate here that it also performs a causal role in cytokine-induced apoptosis of pancreas β cells. Treatment of two mouse pancreatic α and β cell lines (αTC1-6 and βTC1) with proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α at doses that specifically induce apoptosis of βTC1 significantly increased the amount of mRNA and protein encoded by Cebpa and its proapoptotic targets, Arl6ip5 and Tnfrsf10b, in βTC1 but not in αTC1-6. Cebpa knockdown in βTC1 significantly decreased cytokine-induced apoptosis, together with the amount of Arl6ip5 and Tnfrsf10b. Analysis of the network comprising CEBPA, its targets, their first interactants, and proteins encoded by genes known to regulate cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β cells (genes from the apoptotic machinery and from MAPK and NFkB pathways) revealed that CEBPA, ARL6IP5, TNFRSF10B, TRAF2, and UBC are the top five central nodes. In silico analysis further suggests TRAF2 as trait d'union node between CEBPA and the NFkB pathway. Our results strongly suggest that Cebpa is a key regulator within the apoptotic network activated in pancreatic β cells during insulitis, and Arl6ip5, Tnfrsf10b, Traf2, and Ubc are key executioners of this program. PMID:24943845

  12. TUMOR-SPECIFIC EXPRESSION AND ALTERNATIVE SPLICING OF THE COL6A3 GENE IN PANCREATIC CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, Hwyda; Lazar, Melissa; Salem, Khalifa; Chipitsyna, Galina; Gong, Qiaoke; Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Yeo, Charles J.; Chu, Mon-Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a highly lethal disease in which a prominent desmoplastic reaction is a defining characteristic. Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen I and to a lesser extent, collagen III and V comprise the majority of this stromal fibrosis. Type VI collagen (COL6) forms a microfibrillar network associated with type I collagen fibrils. The expression of COL6 has been linked to inflammation and survival. Importantly, tumor-specific alternative splicing in COL6A3 has been identified in several cancers by genome exon arrays. We evaluated the expression and localization of COL6A3 in PDA and premalignant lesions and explored the presence of alternative splicing events. Methods We analyzed paired PDA-normal (n=18), IPMN (n=5), pancreatic cystadenoma (n=5), and eight PDA cell lines with RT-PCR, using unique primers that identify total COL6A3 gene and alternative splicing sites in several of its exons. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expression levels and localization of COL6A3 protein in the different lesions, and in two animal models of PDA. Results COL6A3 protein levels were significantly upregulated in 77% of the paired PDA-adjacent tissue examined. COL6A3 was mainly present in the desmoplastic stroma of PDA, with high deposition around the malignant ducts and in between the sites of stromal fatty infiltration. Analysis of the COL6A3 splice variants showed tumor-specific consistent inclusion of exons 3 and 6 in 17 of the 18 (94%) paired PDA-adjacent tissues. Inclusion of exon 4 was exclusively tumor-specific, with barely detectable expression in the adjacent tissues. IPMN and pancreatic cystadenomas showed no expression of any of the examined exons. Total COL6A3 mRNA and exon 6 were identified in six PDA cell lines, but only two cell lines (MIA PACA-2 and ASPC-1) expressed exons 3 and 4. In both the xenograft and transgenic models of PDA, COL6A3 immunoreactivity was present in the stroma

  13. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Abdominal aortic calcification in dialysis patients: results of the CORD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honkanen, Eero; Kauppila, Leena; Wikström, Björn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 have a high prevalence of vascular calcification, but the specific anatomical distribution and severity of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), in contrast to coronary calcification, is less well documented. AAC may be recorded using plain...

  15. Cell Phenotype Transitions in Cardiovascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hortells

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular calcification was originally considered a passive, degenerative process, however with the advance of cellular and molecular biology techniques it is now appreciated that ectopic calcification is an active biological process. Vascular calcification is the most common form of ectopic calcification, and aging as well as specific disease states such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and genetic mutations, exhibit this pathology. In the vessels and valves, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells contribute to the formation of extracellular calcified nodules. Research suggests that these vascular cells undergo a phenotypic switch whereby they acquire osteoblast-like characteristics, however the mechanisms driving the early aspects of these cell transitions are not fully understood. Osteoblasts are true bone-forming cells and differentiate from their pluripotent precursor, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC; vascular cells that acquire the ability to calcify share aspects of the transcriptional programs exhibited by MSCs differentiating into osteoblasts. What is unknown is whether a fully-differentiated vascular cell directly acquires the ability to calcify by the upregulation of osteogenic genes or, whether these vascular cells first de-differentiate into an MSC-like state before obtaining a “second hit” that induces them to re-differentiate down an osteogenic lineage. Addressing these questions will enable progress in preventative and regenerative medicine strategies to combat vascular calcification pathologies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the phenotypic switching of vascular endothelial, smooth muscle, and valvular cells.

  16. Evaluation of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for pancreatic glucagon in human plasma and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, V.C.; Wajchenberg, B.L.; Albuquerque, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    A glucagon radioimmunoassay employing antiserum specific for pancreatic glucagon is described. Glucagon was radioiodinated by the chloramine T technique and purified on QAE-Sephadex A 25 to a specific activity of 225 μCi/μg. The standard curve allowed measurements from 12 to 500 pg/ml with sensitivity of 17.5 pg/ml, precision of 6.3-14.9% (CV, within-assay) and 5.6-10.7% (CV, between-assay). Recovery was between 82 and 112%. Fasting plasma glucagon levels in diabetics, obese subjects, acromegalics and patients with Cushing's syndrome were greater than in normals (22.0+-91 pg/ml: mean+-SD). Very low glucagon levels after oral glucose suppression (15.2+-3.1 pg/ml) in normals and greatly increased values after arginine in insulin-dependent diabetics (271.0+-132.3 pg/ml) could be determined. (Auth.)

  17. Evaluation of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for pancreatic glucagon in human plasma and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghi, V.C.; Wajchenberg, B.L.; Albuquerque, R.H. (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1984-01-16

    A glucagon radioimmunoassay employing antiserum specific for pancreatic glucagon is described. Glucagon was radioiodinated by the chloramine T technique and purified on QAE-Sephadex A 25 to a specific activity of 225 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g. The standard curve allowed measurements from 12 to 500 pg/ml with sensitivity of 17.5 pg/ml, precision of 6.3-14.9% (CV, within-assay) and 5.6-10.7% (CV, between-assay). Recovery was between 82 and 112%. Fasting plasma glucagon levels in diabetics, obese subjects, acromegalics and patients with Cushing's syndrome were greater than in normals (22.0+-91 pg/ml: mean+-SD). Very low glucagon levels after oral glucose suppression (15.2+-3.1 pg/ml) in normals and greatly increased values after arginine in insulin-dependent diabetics (271.0+-132.3 pg/ml) could be determined.

  18. Human leukocyte and porcine pancreatic elastase: X-ray crystal structures, mechanism, substrate specificity, and mechanism-based inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, W.; Meyer, E. Jr.; Powers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The serine protease family of enzymes is one of the most widely studied group of enzymes, as evidenced by the fact that more crystal structures are available for individuals of this superfamily than for any other homologous group of enzymes. These enzymes contain a conserved triad of catalytic residues including Ser-195, His-57, and Asp-102. The active-site serine is very nucleophilic, and serine proteases are inhibited by specific serine protease reagents such as diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP), phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. Elastases are a group of proteases that possess the ability to cleave the important connective tissue protein elastin. Elastin has the unique property of elastic recoil, is widely distributed in vertebrate tissue, and is particularly abundant in the lungs, arteries, skin, and ligaments. Human neutrophil elastase and pancreatic elastase are two major serine proteases that cleave elastin. Neutrophil elastase is found in the dense granules of polymorphonuclear leukycytes and is essential for phagocytosis and defense against infection by invading microorganisms. Pancreatic elastase is stored as an inactive zymogen in the pancreas and is secreted into the intestines where it becomes activated by trypsin and then participates in digestion. Both elastases cleave substrates at peptide bonds where the P 1 residue is an amino acid residue with a small alkyl side chain

  19. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisada, Masayoshi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Tatezawa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1982-01-01

    There has been no definite examining technique for the early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases, especially small cancers of the pancreas less than 3 cm. Plain abdominal X-rays do not produce reliable roentgenological signs of acute pancreatitis, but the advent of CT has elucidated the condition to some extent. Upper gastrointestinal series are alleged to demonstrate abnormal findings in 80% of cases of pancreatic cancer or cyst. Pancreatic RI scintigraphy expresses the function and anatomy, and the sensitivity with 75 Se is 88%, similar to 87% by US and 80% by CT. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography visualizes extrapancreatic secretory function, as well as the morphology of pancreas, differentiation is not easy in many cases. The greatest indication for US was cysts. The detection rate of pancreatic cancers is similar between plain and contrast CTs, and pancreatic angiography is not specific for pancreatic cancers. (Chiba, N.)

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined gene expression analysis of whole-tissue and microdissected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma identifies genes specifically overexpressed in tumor epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Liviu; Herlea, Vlad; Dima, Simona Olimpia; Dumitrascu, Traian; Popescu, Irinel

    2008-01-01

    The precise details of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis are still insufficiently known, requiring the use of high-throughput methods. However, PDAC is especially difficult to study using microarrays due to its strong desmoplastic reaction, which involves a hyperproliferating stroma that effectively "masks" the contribution of the minoritary neoplastic epithelial cells. Thus it is not clear which of the genes that have been found differentially expressed between normal and whole tumor tissues are due to the tumor epithelia and which simply reflect the differences in cellular composition. To address this problem, laser microdissection studies have been performed, but these have to deal with much smaller tissue sample quantities and therefore have significantly higher experimental noise. In this paper we combine our own large sample whole-tissue study with a previously published smaller sample microdissection study by Grützmann et al. to identify the genes that are specifically overexpressed in PDAC tumor epithelia. The overlap of this list of genes with other microarray studies of pancreatic cancer as well as with the published literature is impressive. Moreover, we find a number of genes whose over-expression appears to be inversely correlated with patient survival: keratin 7, laminin gamma 2, stratifin, platelet phosphofructokinase, annexin A2, MAP4K4 and OACT2 (MBOAT2), which are all specifically upregulated in the neoplastic epithelia, rather than the tumor stroma. We improve on other microarray studies of PDAC by putting together the higher statistical power due to a larger number of samples with information about cell-type specific expression and patient survival.

  2. Radiological patterns of thyroid calcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jun; Sim, Do Chul; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the various patterns of calcification demonstrated in the anterior and lateral neck roentgenograms of 213 unselected patients with thyroid enlargement. The patterns of thyroid calcifications were correlated with clinical, surgical and histological findings. The results were as follows: 1. Of 213 cases of thyroid enlargement, 180 cases were benign and 168 cases were female. 2. The calcification rate was high in the chronic thyroid enlargement. 3. The incidence of calcification was 30.2% in the malignancy and 17.2% in the benign disease. There was no calcification in the Hashimoto's disease. 4. The nodular calcification was demonstrated in the both benign and malignant disease but curvilinear calcification was predominantly seen in benign disease.

  3. Computed tomography of calcification of the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Churl Min; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Soon Yong

    1981-01-01

    Calcifications of the basal ganglia are rarely found at routine autopsies and in skull radiographs. CT is superior to the plain skull radiographs in detecting intracranial attenuation differences and may be stated to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of intracranial calcifications. Of 5985 brain CT scans performed in Kyung Hee University Hospital during past 3 years, 36 cases were found to have high attenuation lesions suggesting calcifications within basal ganglia. 1. The incidence of basal ganglia calcification on CT scan was about 0.6%. 2. Of these 36 cases, 34 cases were bilateral and the remainder was unilateral. 3. The plain skull films of 23 cases showed visible calcification of basal ganglia in 3 cases (13%). 4. No specific metabolic disease was noted in the cases

  4. Fluorescent humanized anti-CEA antibody specifically labels metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Thinzar M.; Miyake, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi; DeLong, Jonathan C.; Yazaki, Paul J.; Shivley, John E.; Clary, Bryan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Specific tumor targeting can result in selective labeling of cancer in vivo for surgical navigation. In the present study, we show that the use of an anti-CEA antibody conjugated to the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, IRDye800CW, can selectively target and label pancreatic cancer and its metastases in a clinically relevant patient derived xenograft mouse model.

  5. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-01-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1. (orig.)

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  7. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  8. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  9. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  10. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  11. Diabetes mellitus in Tropical Chronic Pancreatitis Is Not Just a Secondary Type of Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, L.; Parvin, S.; Hassan, Z.; Hildebrand, P.; Keller, U.; Ali, L.; Beglinger, C.; Azad Khan, A. K.; Whitcomb, David C.; Gyr, N.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: In chronic calcific pancreatitis of the tropics, etiology and relationship to developing diabetes mellitus are unknown. Some consider these cases a straightforward secondary type of diabetes, while others suggest selective beta-cell impairment. Testing pancreatic function, we investigated whether selective beta-cell impairment triggers diabetes associated with tropical pancreatitis. METHODS: At a Bangladeshi research institute, 8 chronic tropical pancreatitis and no diabetes mellitus su...

  12. Dual-phase CT findings of groove pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaheer, Atif, E-mail: azaheer1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pancreatitis Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Haider, Maera, E-mail: mhaider3@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Kawamoto, Satomi, E-mail: skawamo1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Hruban, Ralph H., E-mail: rhruban1@jhmi.edu [Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Fishman, Elliot K., E-mail: efishma1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Groove pancreatitis is a rare focal form of chronic pancreatitis that occurs in the pancreaticoduodenal groove between the major and minor papillae, duodenum and pancreatic head. Radiologic appearance and clinical presentation can result in suspicion of malignancy rendering pancreaticoduodenectomy inevitable. This study reports dual phase CT findings in a series of 12 patients with pathology proven groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of preoperative CT findings in 12 patients with histologically proven groove pancreatitis after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Size, location, attenuation, presence of mass or cystic components in the pancreas, groove and duodenum, calcifications, duodenal stenosis and ductal changes were recorded. Clinical data, laboratory values, endoscopic ultrasonographic and histopathological findings were collected. Results: Soft tissue thickening in the groove was seen in all patients. Pancreatic head, groove and duodenum were all involved in 75% patients. A discrete lesion in the pancreatic head was seen in half of the patients, most of which appeared hypodense on both arterial and venous phases. Cystic changes in pancreatic head were seen in 75% patients. Duodenal involvement was seen in 92% patients including wall thickening and cyst formation. The main pancreatic duct was dilated in 7 patients, with an abrupt cut off in 3 and a smooth tapering stricture in 4. Five patients had evidence of chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcifications. Conclusion: Presence of mass or soft tissue thickening in the groove with cystic duodenal thickening is highly suggestive of groove pancreatitis. Recognizing common radiological features may help in diagnosis and reduce suspicion of malignancy.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  14. Pancreatic-specific autoantibodies to glycoprotein 2 mirror disease location and behaviour in younger patients with Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanos Dimitrios P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein 2 (GP2 was discovered as the major autoantigen of Crohn’s disease (CD-specific pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB. We investigated anti-GP2 IgA and IgG antibodies as novel serological parameters in CD and assessed their association with distinct disease phenotypes. Methods Anti-GP2 and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA IgA and IgG were detected by ELISA employing recombinant human GP2 and phosphopeptidomannan, respectively and PAB by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF in 271 sera, 169 with CD and 102 with ulcerative colitis (UC. As healthy controls 160 adult blood donors and 65 children were included. Results Anti-GP2 IgG and/or IgA were more prevalent in CD (51/169, 30.2% than in UC (9/102, 8.9% patients and in controls (9/225, 4% (p  Conclusions Anti-GP2 IgG and IgA, constituting novel CD specific autoantibodies, appear to be associated with distinct disease phenotypes identifying patients at a younger age, with ileocolonic location, and stricturing behaviour with perianal disease.

  15. Acute calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, I.; Mendoza, M.; Aperribay, M.; Recondo, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis results from the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in peri articular muscular attachments. It usually develops in extremities, most often in shoulders and hips. Although the incidence is much lower, it has been reported to occur in the neck region, where it involves the tendons insertion of the longs colli muscle. We present a case of acute neck pain caused by a calcareous deposition in the tendon of the longs colli muscle, producing inflammation. We describe the clinical and radiologic features (plain radiography, CT,MRI) associated with this entire. (Author) 7 refs

  16. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Singh, Vikesh K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Andersen, Dana K. [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Makary, Martin A. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zaheer, Atif [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  17. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham; Singh, Vikesh K.; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Andersen, Dana K.; Makary, Martin A.; Zaheer, Atif

    2015-01-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  18. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Singh

    Full Text Available The antiproliferative activity of two chito-specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL and Datura innoxia (DiL9 of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml(-1 (0.247 μM and 142 μg ml(-1 (14.8 μM for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  19. Cardiovascular calcification. An inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, S.E.P.; Aikawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This disease of dysregulated metabolism is no longer viewed as a passive degenerative disease, but instead as an active process triggered by pro-inflammatory cues. Furthermore, a positive feedback loop of calcification and inflammation is hypothesized to drive disease progression in arterial calcification. Both calcific aortic valve disease and atherosclerotic arterial calcification may possess similar underlying mechanisms. Early histopathological studies first highlighted the contribution of inflammation to cardiovascular calcification by demonstrating the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in 'early' lesions within the aortic valves and arteries. A series of in vitro work followed, which gave a mechanistic insight into the stimulation of smooth muscle cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation and mineralization. The emergence of novel technology, in the form of animal models and more recently molecular imaging, has enabled accelerated progression of this field, by providing strong evidence regarding the concept of this disorder as an inflammatory disease. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms behind this disorder, this review discusses the various studies that have helped form the concept of the inflammation-dependent cardiovascular calcification paradigm. (author)

  20. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Yasuda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum, but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  1. Phenotypic spectrum of probable and genetically-confirmed idiopathic basal ganglia calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Pottier, Cyril; Charbonnier, Camille; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Labauge, Pierre; Ayrignac, Xavier; Defebvre, Luc; Maltête, David; Martinaud, Olivier; Lefaucheur, Romain; Guillin, Olivier; Wallon, David; Chaumette, Boris; Rondepierre, Philippe; Derache, Nathalie; Fromager, Guillaume; Schaeffer, Stéphane; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Verny, Christophe; Jurici, Snejana; Sauvée, Mathilde; Vérin, Marc; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Rouaud, Olivier; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Rousseau, Stéphane; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification is characterized by mineral deposits in the brain, an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in most cases and genetic heterogeneity. The first causal genes, SLC20A2 and PDGFRB, have recently been reported. Diagnosing idiopathic basal ganglia calcification necessitates the exclusion of other causes, including calcification related to normal ageing, for which no normative data exist. Our objectives were to diagnose accurately and then describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification. First, calcifications were evaluated using a visual rating scale on the computerized tomography scans of 600 consecutively hospitalized unselected controls. We determined an age-specific threshold in these control computerized tomography scans as the value of the 99th percentile of the total calcification score within three age categories: 60 years. To study the phenotype of the disease, patients with basal ganglia calcification were recruited from several medical centres. Calcifications that rated below the age-specific threshold using the same scale were excluded, as were patients with differential diagnoses of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, after an extensive aetiological assessment. Sanger sequencing of SLC20A2 and PDGFRB was performed. In total, 72 patients were diagnosed with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, 25 of whom bore a mutation in either SLC20A2 (two families, four sporadic cases) or PDGFRB (one family, two sporadic cases). Five mutations were novel. Seventy-one per cent of the patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification were symptomatic (mean age of clinical onset: 39 ± 20 years; mean age at last evaluation: 55 ± 19 years). Among them, the most frequent signs were: cognitive impairment (58.8%), psychiatric symptoms (56.9%) and movement disorders (54.9%). Few clinical differences appeared between SLC20A2 and PDGFRB mutation carriers. Radiological analysis

  2. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  3. Pancreatic Endoderm-Derived From Diabetic Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generates Glucose-Responsive Insulin-Secreting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Bahareh; Shamsara, Mehdi; Amirabad, Leila Mohammadi; Massumi, Mohammad; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-10-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can potentially serve as an invaluable source for cell replacement therapy and allow the creation of patient- and disease-specific stem cells without the controversial use of embryos and avoids any immunological incompatibility. The generation of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells from pluripotent stem cells in vitro provides an unprecedented cell source for personal drug discovery and cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. A new five-step protocol was introduced in this study, effectively induced hiPSCs to differentiate into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, primitive gut-tube endoderm, posterior foregut, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine precursor. Each stage of differentiation were characterized by stage-specific markers. The produced cells exhibited many properties of functional β-cells, including expression of critical β-cells transcription factors, the potency to secrete C-peptide in response to high levels of glucose and the presence of mature endocrine secretory granules. This high efficient differentiation protocol, established in this study, yielded 79.18% insulin-secreting cells which were responsive to glucose five times higher than the basal level. These hiPSCs-derived glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells might provide a promising approach for the treatment of type I diabetes mellitus. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2616-2625, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Calcification in a pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.M.; Johnson, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive calcification in a rapidly growing malignant mixed mesothelioma of the pleura was observed on plain radiography and computed tomography of the chest in a patient with a long history of asbestos exposure and chronic renal failure

  5. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Prevalence of breast arterial calcification in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetin, M.; Cetin, R.; Tamer, N.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the age-specific prevalence of breast arterial calcifications in patients with systemic hypertension. METHODS: The mammograms and patient records of 2406 women who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography were reviewed retrospectively. Mammograms were evaluated for the presence of arterial calcification and results were coded. Hypertension was defined as use of anti-hypertensive agents and diabetes was defined as use of oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin. RESULTS: The prevalence of breast arterial calcification among hypertensives (17.6%) was lower than among diabetics (25.4%). The prevalence in the non-diabetic, non-hypertensive group was lowest (7.3%). The prevalence increased with age in all three groups. The highest prevalence was found in diabetics older than 60 years (81.8%). Breast arterial calcification was not found among women younger than 40 years. CONCLUSION: Breast arterial calcification is associated with hypertension and prevalence increases with age. Breast arterial calcification on mammograms may indicate unsuspected hypertension especially in non-diabetic patients

  7. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-02

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  8. Calcifications simulating peroneus longus tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A. de; Illum, F.; Joergensen, J.

    1984-01-01

    In two patients with sprains of the ankle joint calcification adjacent to the posterior tibial margin was evident in the lateral projection of a standard radiographic examination. Calcifying peroneus longus tendinitis was suggested. Further tangential views and computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed, however, that the calcifications in both patients were located in the tibial insertion of the posterior and inferior tibio-fibular ligament. In such cases, a correct diagnosis will avoid unnecessary treatment for a non-existent tendinitis. (orig.)

  9. CEBPA exerts a specific and biologically important proapoptotic role in pancreatic β cells through its downstream network targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbagallo, Davide; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Piro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor CEBPA has been widely studied for its involvement in hematopoietic cell differentiation and causal role in hematological malignancies. We demonstrate here that it also performs a causal role in cytokine-induced apoptosis of pancreas β cells. Treatment of two mouse pancreatic ...

  10. Can dental pulp calcification predict the risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojastepour, Leila; Bronoosh, Pegah; Khosropanah, Shahdad; Rahimi, Elham

    2013-09-01

    To report the association of pulp calcification with that of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Digital panoramic radiographs of patients referred from the angiography department were included if the patient was under 55 years old and had non-restored or minimally restored molars and canines. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of panoramic radiography in predicting CVD were calculated. Out of 122 patients who met the criteria, 68.2% of the patients with CVD had pulp chamber calcifications. Pulp calcification in panoramic radiography had a sensitivity of 68.9% to predict CVD. This study demonstrates that patients with CVD show an increased incidence of pulp calcification compared with healthy patients. The findings suggest that pulp calcification on panoramic radiography may have possibilities for use in CVD screening.

  11. Coronary artery calcification correlates with the presence and severity of valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulaouzidis, G; Nicoll, R; MacArthur, T; Jenkins, P J; Henein, M Y

    2013-10-15

    To investigate the prevalence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in symptomatic individuals with CT evidence for left heart valve calcification, aortic valve (AVC), mitral valve (MAC) or both. This is a retrospective study of 282 consecutive patients with calcification in either the aortic valve or mitral annulus. Calcium scoring of the coronary artery, aortic and mitral valve was measured using the Agatston score. AVC was more prevalent than MAC (64% vs. 2.5%, p AVC + CAC were observed in 53.5%, MAC and CAC in 2.1%, and combined AVC, MAC and CAC in 31.6%. The median CAC score was higher in individuals with combined AVC+MAC, followed by those with AVC and lowest was in the MAC group. The majority (40%) of individuals with AVC had CAC score >400, and only in 16% had CAC = 0. The same pattern was more evident in individuals with AVC + MAC, where 70% had CAC score >400 and only 6% had CAC score of 0. These results were irrespective of gender. There was no correlation between AVC and MAC but there was modest correlation between CAC score and AVC score (r = 0.28, p = 0.0001), MAC (r = 0.36, p = 0.0001) and with combined AVC + MAC (r = 0.5, p = 0.0001). AVC score of 262 had a sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 92% for the prediction of presence of CAC. The presence and extent of calcification in the aortic valve or/and mitral valves are associated with severe coronary artery calcification. © 2013.

  12. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation

  13. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  14. Diagnosis of calcification on abdominal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, C.R.; Kleine, L.J.; McMillan, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of normal and pathologic factors may induce intraabdominal calcification. In general, the most reliable indication of the cause of a calcification is its location; therefore, if the affected organ can be identified the radiographic diagnosis is often straightforward or, at least, limited to relatively few possibilities. With this principle in mind, a series of patients with abdominal calcification are described for the purpose of illustrating the appearance of calcification of various abdominal organs. In addition, etiology for the calcification in each patient is discussed. Certain extraabdominal calcifications which may be seen on abdominal radiographs are also mentioned

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  16. Genetics in arterial calcification: pieces of a puzzle and cogs in a wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutsch, Frank; Nitschke, Yvonne; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2011-08-19

    Artery calcification reflects an admixture of factors such as ectopic osteochondral differentiation with primary host pathological conditions. We review how genetic factors, as identified by human genome-wide association studies, and incomplete correlations with various mouse studies, including knockout and strain analyses, fit into "pieces of the puzzle" in intimal calcification in human atherosclerosis, and artery tunica media calcification in aging, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. We also describe in sharp contrast how ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 serve as "cogs in a wheel" of arterial calcification. Specifically, each is a minor component in the function of a much larger network of factors that exert balanced effects to promote and suppress arterial calcification. For the network to normally suppress spontaneous arterial calcification, the "cogs" ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 must be present and in working order. Monogenic ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 deficiencies each drive a molecular pathophysiology of closely related but phenotypically different diseases (generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) and arterial calcification caused by CD73 deficiency (ACDC)), in which premature onset arterial calcification is a prominent but not the sole feature.

  17. A Novel Method for Determining Calcification Composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maidment, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    Breast calcifications can be divided into two broad categories. Type I are composed of calcium oxylate while type II calcifications all have some phosphorus content most typically calcium hydroxyapatite...

  18. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  19. Coffee consumption and coronary calcification - The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Hofman, Albert; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.

    Background-The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. Methods and Results-The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who participated in the

  20. Coffee consumption and coronary calcification: The Rotterdam coronary calcification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van Woudenbergh (Geertruida); R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND - The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS - The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who

  1. Coffee Consumption and Coronary Calcification: The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenbergh, van G.J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Oudkerk, M.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background¿ The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. Methods and Results¿ The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who participated in the

  2. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R.; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  3. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  4. Calcification of peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Itai, Y.; Ohtomo, K.; Nishikawa, J.; Sasaki, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Peritoneal calcification is noted in peritoneal dissemination from serious cystoadenocarcinoma of the ovary, pseudomyxoma peritonei and meconium peritonitis. This article discusses a case of peritoneal disseminated calcification from gastric carcinoma. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report in English literature of gastric cancer showing peritoneal calcification. (author). 10 refs.; 1 fig

  5. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Assef, Mauricio Saab [Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Cesário Motta Jr. #61 Cep: 01221-020, São Paulo (Brazil); Raimondo, Massimo, E-mail: raimondo.massimo@mayo.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States)

    2011-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used.

  6. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used

  7. Pancreatic involvement in Korean patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hyuck; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Bum-Jin; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Taek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pancreatic involvement in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease and to document the changes that occur in pancreatic lesions. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and CT scans of 18 VHL patients who were diagnosed between 1994 and 2007 at the Samsung Medical Center. The clinical history with a detailed family history, biochemical test results, and imaging studies of the pancreas, adrenal glands, and kidneys were reviewed. Genetic analysis was performed in 12 patients. The changes in pancreatic lesions, such as an increase in cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct, were analyzed in patients who had CT scans at least 1 year apart. Pancreatic lesions existed in 89% (16/18) of the patients. All 16 patients had multiple cystic lesions. Two patients had co-existing neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and two patients had co-existing serous cystadenomas (SCA). At least one of three features of pancreatic lesions (cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct) progressed in all nine patients who had CT scans 1 year apart. Pancreatic involvement in VHL disease was relatively common in Korean patients. The most common type of pancreatic involvement was a multiple cystic lesion. NET and SCA existed in approximately 10% of VHL patients with pancreatic involvement. Pancreatic lesions in VHL disease progressed, at least according to radiological images. (author)

  8. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  9. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  10. Cardiac and pericardial calcifications on chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, E.C., E-mail: ecferguson@hotmail.co [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Section of Thoracic Imaging, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Berkowitz, E.A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Section of Thoracic Imaging, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Many types of cardiac and pericardial calcifications identified on chest radiographs can be recognized and distinguished based on characteristic locations and appearances. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of detecting cardiac and pericardial calcifications on chest radiographs, and to illustrate and describe the various types of calcifications that may be encountered and how they may be differentiated from one another. Each type of cardiac and pericardial calcification is discussed, its location and appearance described, and its significance explained. Recognizing and understanding these calcifications is important as they are often encountered in daily practice and play an important role in patient care.

  11. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  12. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  13. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  14. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  15. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  16. Rare finding of Eustachian tube calcifications with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali Z; Hawkins, Anna; Alluri, Leela Subashini; Jadallah, Buthainah; Shahid, Kiran; Landers, Michael; Assaf, Hussein M

    2017-12-01

    Soft tissue calcification is a pathological condition in which calcium and phosphate salts are deposited in the soft tissue organic matrix. This study presents an unusual calcification noted in the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube. A 67-year-old woman presented for dental treatment, specifically for implant placement, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed. The CBCT scan was reviewed by a board-certified oral and maxillofacial radiologist and revealed incidental findings of 2 distinct calcifications in the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube. To the authors' knowledge, no previous study has reported the diagnosis of Eustachian tube calcification using CBCT. This report describes an uncommon variant of Eustachian tube calcification, which has a significant didactic value because such cases are seldom illustrated either in textbooks or in the literature. This case once again underscores the importance of having CBCT scans evaluated by a board-certified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

  17. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  18. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  19. Imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, James; Hadden, William J; Laurence, Jerome M; Lam, Vincent; Yuen, Lawrence; Janssen, Anna; Pleass, Henry

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer, primarily pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), accounts for 2.4% of cancer diagnoses and 5.8% of cancer death annually. Early diagnoses can improve 5-year survival in PDAC. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy values for MRI, CT, PET&PET/CT, EUS and transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) in the diagnosis of PDAC. A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies reporting sensitivity, specificity and/or diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PDAC with MRI, CT, PET, EUS or TAUS. Proportional meta-analysis was performed for each modality. A total of 5399 patients, 3567 with PDAC, from 52 studies were included. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 93% (95% CI=88-96), 89% (95% CI=82-94) and 90% (95% CI=86-94) for MRI; 90% (95% CI=87-93), 87% (95% CI=79-93) and 89% (95% CI=85-93) for CT; 89% (95% CI=85-93), 70% (95% CI=54-84) and 84% (95% CI=79-89) for PET; 91% (95% CI=87-94), 86% (95% CI=81-91) and 89% (95% CI=87-92) for EUS; and 88% (95% CI=86-90), 94% (95% CI=87-98) and 91% (95% C=87-93) for TAUS. This review concludes all modalities, except for PET, are equivalent within 95% confidence intervals for the diagnosis of PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thymoma calcification: Is it clinically meaningful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkaied Homam

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among anterior mediastinal lesions, thymoma is the most common. Thymomas are tumors of thymic epithelial cell origin that are distinguished by inconsistent histological and biologic behavior. Chest imaging studies typically show a round or lobulated tumor in the anterior mediastinum. Calcifications in thymomas are classically punctuate or amorphous, positioned within the lesion. Chest computed tomography (CT features suggesting higher risk thymoma consist of tumor heterogeneity, vascular involvement, lobulation, pulmonary nodules, lymphadenopathy, and pleural manifestations. Imaging findings have an imperfect ability to predict stage and prognosis for thymoma patients. Our objective is to highlight the clinical implications of thymoma calcifications on the diagnosis, clinical manifestation and prognosis. A pubmed and google search was performed using the following words: thymoma calcification, calcified thymus, mediastinal calcification, anterior mediastinal calcification, and calcified thymoma. After reviewing 370 articles, 32 eligible articles describing thymoma calcifications were found and included in this review. Although the presence of thymus calcifications was more common in patients with invasive thymomas, they were present in significant portion of non-invasive thymomas. The presence of calcifications was not a significant factor in differentiating between benign and malignant thymoma. As a result, the type, location, size or other characteristics of thymus gland calcifications were not relevant features in clinical and radiologic diagnosis of thymoma. The histopathological diagnosis is still the only possible way to confirm the neoplastic nature of thymoma. All types of thymomas should be evaluated and managed independently of the presence of calcifications.

  1. Coral calcification and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Jury, Christopher P.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, the discovery that light increased calcification in the coral plant-animal symbiosis triggered interest in explaining the phenomenon and understanding the mechanisms involved. Major findings along the way include the observation that carbon fixed by photosynthesis in the zooxanthellae is translocated to animal cells throughout the colony and that corals can therefore live as autotrophs in many situations. Recent research has focused on explaining the observed reduction in calcification rate with increasing ocean acidification (OA). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between declining ocean pH, declining aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), declining [CO32_] and coral calcification. Nearly all previous reports on OA identify Ωarag or its surrogate [CO32] as the factor driving coral calcification. However, the alternate “Proton Flux Hypothesis” stated that coral calcification is controlled by diffusion limitation of net H+ transport through the boundary layer in relation to availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The “Two Compartment Proton Flux Model” expanded this explanation and synthesized diverse observations into a universal model that explains many paradoxes of coral metabolism, morphology and plasticity of growth form in addition to observed coral skeletal growth response to OA. It is now clear that irradiance is the main driver of net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drives net calcification (Gnet), and alters pH in the bulk water surrounding the coral. Pnet controls [CO32] and thus Ωarag of the bulk water over the diel cycle. Changes in Ωarag and pH lag behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet, rather than concentration-based parameters (e.g., Ωarag, [CO3 2], pH and [DIC]:[H+] ratio) is the primary driver of Gnet. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes DIC from the bulk seawater. Photosynthesis increases the bulk seawater pH while providing the energy that drives

  2. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  3. Foraminiferal calcification and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooijer, L. D.; Toyofuku, T.; Reichart, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    Ongoing burning of fossil fuels increases atmospheric CO2, elevates marine dissolved CO2 and decreases pH and the saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate. Intuitively this should decrease the ability of CaCO3-producing organisms to build their skeletons and shells. Whereas on geological time scales weathering and carbonate deposition removes carbon from the geo-biosphere, on time scales up to thousands of years, carbonate precipitation increases pCO2 because of the associated shift in seawater carbon speciation. Hence reduced calcification provides a potentially important negative feedback on increased pCO2 levels. Here we show that foraminifera form their calcium carbonate by active proton pumping. This elevates the internal pH and acidifies the direct foraminiferal surrounding. This also creates a strong pCO2 gradient and facilitates the uptake of DIC in the form of carbon dioxide. This finding uncouples saturation state from calcification and predicts that the added carbon due to ocean acidification will promote calcification by these organisms. This unknown effect could add substantially to atmospheric pCO2 levels, and might need to be accounted for in future mitigation strategies.

  4. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  6. Non-invasive assessment of coronary calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oei, Hok-Hay S.; Hofman, Albert; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jackqueline C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Electron-beam tomography (EBT) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enable the noninvasive assessment of coronary calcification. The amount of coronary calcification, as detected by EBT, has a close relation with the amount of coronary atherosclerosis, which is the substrate for the occurrence of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. Calcification of the coronary arteries can be seen as a cumulative measure of life-time exposure to cardiovascular risk factors. Several studies have shown that the amount of coronary calcification is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Therefore, coronary calcification is a promising method for non-invasive detection of asymptomatic subjects at high risk of developing coronary heart disease. Whether measurement of coronary calcification also increases the predictive power of coronary events based on cardiovascular risk factors is topic of current research

  7. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias

    2004-01-01

    Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... contributing to late diagnosis of this deadly disease. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive characterization of the "pancreatic juice proteome" in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pancreatic juice was first fractionated by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequently analyzed by liquid...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  8. A next-generation dual-recombinase system for time and host specific targeting of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtler, Christina; Zukowska, Magdalena; Eser, Stefan; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Paul, Mariel C.; Eser, Philipp; Klein, Sabine; Lowy, Andrew M.; Banerjee, Ruby; Yang, Fangtang; Lee, Chang-Lung; Moding, Everett J.; Kirsch, David G.; Scheideler, Angelika; Alessi, Dario R.; Varela, Ignacio; Bradley, Allan; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika E.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Rad, Roland; Schmid, Roland M.; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have dramatically improved our understanding of tumor evolution and therapeutic resistance. However, sequential genetic manipulation of gene expression and targeting of the host is almost impossible using conventional Cre-loxP–based models. We have developed an inducible dual-recombinase system by combining flippase-FRT (Flp-FRT) and Cre-loxP recombination technologies to improve GEMMs of pancreatic cancer. This enables investigation of multistep carcinogenesis, genetic manipulation of tumor subpopulations (such as cancer stem cells), selective targeting of the tumor microenvironment and genetic validation of therapeutic targets in autochthonous tumors on a genome-wide scale. As a proof of concept, we performed tumor cell–autonomous and nonautonomous targeting, recapitulated hallmarks of human multistep carcinogenesis, validated genetic therapy by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase inactivation as well as cancer cell depletion and show that mast cells in the tumor microenvironment, which had been thought to be key oncogenic players, are dispensable for tumor formation. PMID:25326799

  9. A next-generation dual-recombinase system for time- and host-specific targeting of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhuber, Nina; Seidler, Barbara; Schuck, Kathleen; Veltkamp, Christian; Schachtler, Christina; Zukowska, Magdalena; Eser, Stefan; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Paul, Mariel C; Eser, Philipp; Klein, Sabine; Lowy, Andrew M; Banerjee, Ruby; Yang, Fangtang; Lee, Chang-Lung; Moding, Everett J; Kirsch, David G; Scheideler, Angelika; Alessi, Dario R; Varela, Ignacio; Bradley, Allan; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika E; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Rad, Roland; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have dramatically improved our understanding of tumor evolution and therapeutic resistance. However, sequential genetic manipulation of gene expression and targeting of the host is almost impossible using conventional Cre-loxP-based models. We have developed an inducible dual-recombinase system by combining flippase-FRT (Flp-FRT) and Cre-loxP recombination technologies to improve GEMMs of pancreatic cancer. This enables investigation of multistep carcinogenesis, genetic manipulation of tumor subpopulations (such as cancer stem cells), selective targeting of the tumor microenvironment and genetic validation of therapeutic targets in autochthonous tumors on a genome-wide scale. As a proof of concept, we performed tumor cell-autonomous and nonautonomous targeting, recapitulated hallmarks of human multistep carcinogenesis, validated genetic therapy by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase inactivation as well as cancer cell depletion and show that mast cells in the tumor microenvironment, which had been thought to be key oncogenic players, are dispensable for tumor formation.

  10. Reliability of digital panoramic radiography in the diagnosis of carotid artery calcifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Lacerda Brasileiro Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study evaluated the reliability of digital panoramic radiography in the diagnosis of carotid artery calcifications. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients under high-risk for development of carotid artery calcifications who had digital panoramic radiography were referred to undergo ultrasonography. Thus, 70 arteries were assessed by both methods. The main parameters utilized to evaluate the panoramic radiography reliability in the diagnosis of carotid artery calcifications were accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of this method as compared with ultrasonography. Additionally, the McNemar's test was utilized to verify whether there was a statistically significant difference between digital panoramic radiography and ultrasonography. Results Ultrasonography demonstrated carotid artery calcifications in 17 (48.57% patients. Such individuals presented with a total of 29 (41.43% carotid arteries affected by calcification. Radiography was accurate in 71.43% (n = 50 of cases evaluated. The degree of sensitivity of this method was 37.93%, specificity of 95.12% and positive predictive value of 84.61%. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001 was observed between the methods evaluated in their capacity to diagnose carotid artery calcifications. Conclusion Digital panoramic radiography should not be indicated as a method of choice in the investigation of carotid artery calcifications.

  11. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, Bernhard [University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  12. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Jost, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  13. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with 99m Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  15. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  16. Resolution effects on the morphology of calcifications in digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallergi, Maria; He, Li; Gavrielides, Marios; Heine, John; Clarke, Laurence P [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Box 17, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    1999-12-31

    The development of computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) techniques and direct digital mammography systems have generated significant interest in the issue of the effect of image resolution on the detection and classification (benign vs malignant) of mammographic abnormalities. CAD in particular seems to heavily depend on image resolution, either due to the inherent algorithm design and optimization, which is almost always dependent, or due to the differences in image content at the various resolutions. This twofold dependence makes it even more difficult to answer the question of what is the minimum resolution required for successful detection and/or classification of a specific mammographic abnormality, such as calcifications. One may begin by evaluating the losses in the mammograms as the films are digitized with different pixel sizes and depths. In this paper we attempted to measure these losses for the case of calcifications at four different spatial resolutions through a simulation model and a classification scheme that is based only on morphological features. The results showed that a 60 {mu}m pixel size and 12 bits per pixel should at least be used if the morphology and distribution of the calcifications are essential components in the CAD algorithm design. These conclusions were tested with the use of a wavelet-based algorithm for the segmentation of simulated mammographic calcifications at various resolutions. The evaluation of the segmentation through shape analysis and classification supported the initial conclusion. (authors) 14 refs., 1 tabs.

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland with calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Haeng Eun; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital complaining of facial palsy and palpable mass on the right parotid gland area. Clinical examination showed non-specific findings of the intraoral region, but showed asymmetrical facial appearance. Panoramic view showed a large amorphous calcified mass on the posterior to the mandibular ramus and thin cortical plate of the posterior ramus. Sialogram showed constriction of the main duct and no further filling of striated, intercalated ducts and parenchymal areas. CT scans demonstrated an irregular, infiltrating mass with slight enhancement in the right parotid gland. The mass showed necrotic areas and calcifications. Bone scan showed marked accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP on the right posterior maxilla. Microscopic findings demonstrated the minimal morphologic alterations and rare mitotic figures within tumor cells, and diagnosed as adenocarcinoma (NOS, Grade II). This report could be aid in the diagnosis of calcified lesions of the salivary gland.

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland with calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Haeng Eun; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2002-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital complaining of facial palsy and palpable mass on the right parotid gland area. Clinical examination showed non-specific findings of the intraoral region, but showed asymmetrical facial appearance. Panoramic view showed a large amorphous calcified mass on the posterior to the mandibular ramus and thin cortical plate of the posterior ramus. Sialogram showed constriction of the main duct and no further filling of striated, intercalated ducts and parenchymal areas. CT scans demonstrated an irregular, infiltrating mass with slight enhancement in the right parotid gland. The mass showed necrotic areas and calcifications. Bone scan showed marked accumulation of 99m Tc-MDP on the right posterior maxilla. Microscopic findings demonstrated the minimal morphologic alterations and rare mitotic figures within tumor cells, and diagnosed as adenocarcinoma (NOS, Grade II). This report could be aid in the diagnosis of calcified lesions of the salivary gland.

  19. CT classification of chronic pancreatitis and the significance for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xueling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT characteristics of chronic pancreatitis and a classification based on the CT manifestations was established. Methods: In total 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 43 males and 16 females, with an average age of 40 years old were enrolled in the study. History of acute pancreatitis was positive in 36 patients. Non contrast enhanced and contrast enhanced CT scans were performed. The sizes of lesions, contour of pancreas, as well as the number, density and margin of lesions were investigated on the CT images. Results: Atrophy of the entire pancreas was revealed in 27 patients (46%), complicated with different degree of calcification. Solitary cyst with amorphous wall calcification was demonstrated in 13 patients (22%); multiple intra-pancreatic and peri-pancreatic pseudo-cysts were shown in 7 patients (12%); dilated pancreatic duct was seen in 7 patients (12%); and regional well demarcated bulging of pancreas was presented in 5 patients (8%). Conclusion: The CT findings of chronic pancreatitis in our study could be classified into 5 types: atrophy type, solitary cystic type, multicystic type, pure pancreatic duct dilatation type and mass type. The classification had certain significance for the differential diagnosis and the etiological analysis of chronic pancreatitis. (authors)

  20. Comparison of Pancreas Juice Proteins from Cancer Versus Pancreatitis Using Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Cooke, Kelly; Moyes, Kara White; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas. However, it often shares many molecular features with pancreatic cancer. Biomarkers present in pancreatic cancer frequently occur in the setting of pancreatitis. The efforts to develop diagnostic biomarkers for pancreatic cancer have thus been complicated by the false-positive involvement of pancreatitis. Methods In an attempt to develop protein biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we previously use quantitative proteomics to identify and quantify the proteins from pancreatic cancer juice. Pancreatic juice is a rich source of proteins that are shed by the pancreatic ductal cells. In this study, we used a similar approach to identify and quantify proteins from pancreatitis juice. Results In total, 72 proteins were identified and quantified in the comparison of pancreatic juice from pancreatitis patients versus pooled normal control juice. Nineteen of the juice proteins were overexpressed, and 8 were underexpressed in pancreatitis juice by at least 2-fold compared with normal pancreatic juice. Of these 27 differentially expressed proteins in pancreatitis, 9 proteins were also differentially expressed in the pancreatic juice from pancreatic cancer patient. Conclusions Identification of these differentially expressed proteins from pancreatitis juice provides useful information for future study of specific pancreatitis-associated proteins and to eliminate potential false-positive biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. PMID:17198186

  1. Size-dependent response of foraminiferal calcification to seawater carbonate chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henehan, Michael J.; Evans, David; Shankle, Madison; Burke, Janet E.; Foster, Gavin L.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Chalk, Thomas B.; Stewart, Joseph A.; Alt, Claudia H. S.; Durrant, Joseph; Hull, Pincelli M.

    2017-07-01

    The response of the marine carbon cycle to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations will be determined, in part, by the relative response of calcifying and non-calcifying organisms to global change. Planktonic foraminifera are responsible for a quarter or more of global carbonate production, therefore understanding the sensitivity of calcification in these organisms to environmental change is critical. Despite this, there remains little consensus as to whether, or to what extent, chemical and physical factors affect foraminiferal calcification. To address this, we directly test the effect of multiple controls on calcification in culture experiments and core-top measurements of Globigerinoides ruber. We find that two factors, body size and the carbonate system, strongly influence calcification intensity in life, but that exposure to corrosive bottom waters can overprint this signal post mortem. Using a simple model for the addition of calcite through ontogeny, we show that variable body size between and within datasets could complicate studies that examine environmental controls on foraminiferal shell weight. In addition, we suggest that size could ultimately play a role in determining whether calcification will increase or decrease with acidification. Our models highlight that knowledge of the specific morphological and physiological mechanisms driving ontogenetic change in calcification in different species will be critical in predicting the response of foraminiferal calcification to future change in atmospheric pCO2.

  2. Detection of coronary artery calcification by ultrafast CT and correlation with angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaoxiong; Dai Ruping; Lu Bin

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between coronary calcification and significant coronary stenosis ninety patients including 81 men and 9 women were studied asithage ranging from 27∼72 years (mean, 58 years). All patients had both ultrafast CT (UFCT) examination and coronary angiography within one month. Single slice mode with ECG gating and thickness of 3 mm were used in UFCT scan. Selected coronary angiography was performed by the Judkins technique. Among 160 vessels in which coronary calcifications were identified, 74% had significant coronary stenosis (>50% stenosis), and 77% of 154 vessels with significant coronary stenosis had calcification demonstrable by UFCT. In the younger age group the sensitivity of calcification for evaluating stenosis of coronary artery was lower and the specificity was generally higher than those in the elderly group. UFCT is a promising procedure for detecting coronary arterial disease, since this examination has high sensitivity and specificity, easy to conduct, noninvasive, and widely applicable for screening a large population

  3. THE MAMMOGRAPHIC CALCIFICATIONS IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Ruiying; Liu Jingxian; Gaowen

    1998-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to exam the relativeship between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer. Methods: All of the 184 patients with breast diseases underwent mammography before either an open biopsy or a mastectomy. The presence,morphology, and distribution of calcifications visualized on mammograms for breast cancer were compared with the controls who remained cancer free. Statistical comparisons were made by using the x2 test. Results:Of the 184 patients with breast diaeases, 93 malignant and 91 benign lesions were histologically confirmed.Calcifications were visualized on mammograms in 60(64%) of 93 breast cancers and 26 (28%) of 91 non breast cancers. The estimated odds ratio (OR) of breast cancer was 4.5 in women with calcifications seen on mammograms, compared with those having none (P<0.01). Of the 60 breast carcinomas having mammographic calcifications, 28 (47%) were infiltrating ductal carcinomas.There were only 8 (24%) cases with infiltrating ductal cancers in the group of without calcifications seen on the mammograms (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our finding suggests that mammographic calcification appears to be a risk factor for breast cancer. The granular and linear cast type calcification provide clues to the presence of breast cancer, especially when the carcinomas without associated masses were seen on mammograms.

  4. Vascular Adventitia Calcification and Its Underlying Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available Previous research on vascular calcification has mainly focused on the vascular intima and media. However, we show here that vascular calcification may also occur in the adventitia. The purpose of this work is to help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. The calcified lesions were examined by Von Kossa staining in ApoE-/- mice which were fed high fat diets (HFD for 48 weeks and human subjects aged 60 years and older that had died of coronary heart disease, heart failure or acute renal failure. Explant cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMCswere obtained from rat adventitia and media, respectively. After calcification induction, cells were collected for Alizarin Red S staining. Calcified lesions were observed in the aorta adventitia and coronary artery adventitia of ApoE-/-mice, as well as in the aorta adventitia of human subjects examined. Explant culture of fibroblasts, the primary cell type comprising the adventitia, was successfully induced for calcification after incubation with TGF-β1 (20 ng/ml + mineralization media for 4 days, and the phenotype conversion vascular adventitia fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was identified. Culture of SMCs, which comprise only a small percentage of all cells in the adventitia, in calcifying medium for 14 days resulted in significant calcification.Vascular calcification can occur in the adventitia. Adventitia calcification may arise from the fibroblasts which were transformed into myofibroblasts or smooth muscle cells.

  5. Calcifications of the bladder in schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechmar, M. von; Vogel, H.

    1989-01-01

    In schistosomiasis calcification of the urinary bladder are characteristic signs that allow a corresponding diagnosis in endemic regions. Problems concerning differential diagnosis occur only in very rare cases. The calcifications of the bladder can be easily detected by native diagnostics. A late complication in an affected bladder is often a bladder carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  6. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  7. Detection of Asymptomatic Renal Calcifications in Astronauts Using a Novel Ultrasound Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) specifically looking for asymptomatic renal calcifications that may be renal stones is typically not done in the terrestrial setting. Standard abdominal US without a renal focus may discover incidental, mineralized renal material (MRM); however punctate solid areas of MRM is less than 3 mm are usually considered subclinical. Detecting these early calcifications before they become symptomatic renal stones is critical to prevent adverse medical and mission outcomes during spaceflight.

  8. Can Dental Pulp Calcification Predict the Risk of Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Khojastepour, Leila; Bronoosh, Pegah; Khosropanah, Shahdad; Rahimi, Elham

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report the association of pulp calcification with that of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of patients referred from the angiography department were included if the patient was under 55 years old and had non-restored or minimally restored molars and canines. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. The sensitivity, specif...

  9. Histology-directed and imaging mass spectrometry: an emerging technology in ectopic calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Taverna, Domenico; Boraldi, Federica; De Santis, Giorgio; Caprioli, Richard M; Quaglino, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential of an optimized histology directed protein identification combined with imaging mass spectrometry technology to reveal and identify molecules associated to ectopic calcification in human tissue. As a proof of concept, mineralized and non-mineralized areas were compared within the same dermal tissue obtained from a patient affected by Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a genetic disorder characterized by calcification only at specific sites of...

  10. Methods for monitoring corals and crustose coralline algae to quantify in-situ calcification rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jennifer M.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don

    2013-01-01

    The potential effect of global climate change on calcifying marine organisms, such as scleractinian (reef-building) corals, is becoming increasingly evident. Understanding the process of coral calcification and establishing baseline calcification rates are necessary to detect future changes in growth resulting from climate change or other stressors. Here we describe the methods used to establish a network of calcification-monitoring stations along the outer Florida Keys Reef Tract in 2009. In addition to detailing the initial setup and periodic monitoring of calcification stations, we discuss the utility and success of our design and offer suggestions for future deployments. Stations were designed such that whole coral colonies were securely attached to fixed apparati (n = 10 at each site) on the seafloor but also could be easily removed and reattached as needed for periodic weighing. Corals were weighed every 6 months, using the buoyant weight technique, to determine calcification rates in situ. Sites were visited in May and November to obtain winter and summer rates, respectively, and identify seasonal patterns in calcification. Calcification rates of the crustose coralline algal community also were measured by affixing commercially available plastic tiles, deployed vertically, at each station. Colonization by invertebrates and fleshy algae on the tiles was low, indicating relative specificity for the crustose coralline algal community. We also describe a new, nonlethal technique for sampling the corals, used following the completion of the monitoring period, in which two slabs were obtained from the center of each colony. Sampled corals were reattached to the seafloor, and most corals had completely recovered within 6 months. The station design and sampling methods described herein provide an effective approach to assessing coral and crustose coralline algal calcification rates across time and space, offering the ability to quantify the potential effects of

  11. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M Kyla; Holden, Rachel M

    2012-03-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor that is expressed in vascular tissue. Although animal and in vitro data support this role of vitamin K, overall data from human studies are inconsistent. The majority of population-based studies have relied on vitamin K intake to measure status. Phylloquinone is the primary dietary form of vitamin K and available supplementation trials, albeit limited, suggest phylloquinone supplementation is relevant to CAC. Yet observational studies have found higher dietary menaquinone, but not phylloquinone, to be associated with less calcification. Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in certain patient populations, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is plausible vitamin K may contribute to reducing vascular calcification in patients at higher risk. Subclinical vitamin K deficiency has been reported in CKD patients, but studies linking vitamin K status to calcification outcomes in CKD are needed to clarify whether or not improving vitamin K status is associated with improved vascular health in CKD. This review summarizes the available evidence of vitamin K and vascular calcification in population-based studies and clinic-based studies, with a specific focus on CKD patients.

  12. Mesenteric ossification in CT indicates sclerosing peritonitis in chronic bacterial infection and pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Kirchner, E.M.; Kickuth, R.; Stein, A.

    2004-01-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis already has been described as a serious complication of the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. But different other affections of the pertioneum such as chronic bacterial peritonitis and pancreatitis may result in sclerosing peritonitis, too. The symptom is characterised by thickened small bowel walls and periotoneal membranes as well as peritoneal calcifications which can be shown in computed tomography. We demonstrate two cases of peritoneal ossifications due to peritonitis and pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  13. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  14. Pancreatic stone and treatment using ERCP and ESWL procedures: a case study and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, James M; Ding, Steven L

    2012-09-07

    Pancreatic duct stones are found in 22 to 60% of patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The stones can lead to obstruction of the outflow of pancreatic secretions causing increased intraductal pressure. The pancreas is relatively noncompliant. Therefore the rise in intraductal pressure can induce tissue hypertension and ischemia. This can be a major factor causing pain in patients with CP. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that symptoms may improve following pancreatic duct drainage. A 62-year-old woman presented with persistent epigastric pain. Investigations revealed calcifications within the main pancreatic duct and head of the gland. Treatment with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) achieved a good outcome. Standard endoscopic removal of the stones proved impossible so treatment with ESWL was undertaken. Following fragmentation, the calculi and fragments passed spontaneously or were removed endoscopically. If pancreatic stones cannot be removed endoscopically, ESWL should be considered prior to surgery.

  15. Physiologic and pathologic calcifications and ossifications in the face and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keberle, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Diagnostische Radiologie, Hannover (Germany); Robinson, S. [DiagnoseZentrumUrania, Wien (Austria)

    2007-08-15

    The aim was to give a systematic presentation of physiologic and pathologic calcifications and ossifications in the face and neck with a special emphasis on clinical relevance. In a sometimes subacute setting one should recognize specific calcifications which often lead to important diagnoses such as fungal sinusitis or sclerosing labyrinthitis. In a more chronic situation intraocular calcifications in small children are pathognomonic for retinoblastoma. Juxtatumoral sclerosis of the laryngeal cartilage in laryngopharyngeal carcinoma is usually caused by tumor infiltration of the cartilage resulting in a higher tumor stage and, this way, has a major impact on the therapeutical strategy. Calcified lymph nodes are mainly unspecific but can be the result of tuberculosis or metastases of thyroid cancer. Cross-sectional imaging methods, most of all computed tomography, are ideally suited to reveal head and neck calcifications and ossifications, especially those which are clinically relevant. (orig.)

  16. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  17. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancur, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    It is presented a case of a man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, whose marked dilatation of the ducts reasoned the issue. The severe untreatable pain was the surgery indication, which was practiced without complications either during or after the surgery. By the way, a shallow revision of the literature is made, by mentioning classification, physiopatholoy, clinical square, medical, surgical and endoscopic treatment

  19. Validation of a Radiography-Based Quantification Designed to Longitudinally Monitor Soft Tissue Calcification in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie N; Hawley, Gregory D; Smith, Emily N; Mignemi, Nicholas A; Ihejirika, Rivka C; Yuasa, Masato; Cates, Justin M M; Liu, Xulei; Schoenecker, Jonathan G

    2016-01-01

    between a 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% difference in STiCSS score 7 days following burn/CTX induced muscle injury were determined. Precision analysis demonstrated substantial to good agreement for both post-image processing (κ = 0.73 to 0.90) and scoring (κ = 0.88 to 0.93), with low inter- and intra-observer variability. Additionally, there was a strong correlation in quantification of soft tissue calcification between the ordinal system and by mineral volume quantification by μCT (Spearman r = 0.83 to 0.89). The ordinal scoring system reliably quantified soft tissue calcification in a burn/CTX-induced soft tissue calcification model compared to non-injured controls (Mann-Whitney rank test: P = 0.0002, ***). Sample size calculations revealed that 6 mice per group would be required to detect a 50% difference in STiCSS score with a power of 0.8. Finally, the STiCSS was demonstrated to reliably quantify soft tissue calcification [dystrophic calcification and heterotopic ossification] by radiographic analysis, independent of the histopathological state of the mineralization. Radiographic analysis can discriminate muscle injury-induced soft tissue calcification from adjacent bone and follow its clinical course over time without requiring the sacrifice of the animal. While the STiCSS cannot identify the specific type of soft tissue calcification present, it is still a useful and valid method by which to quantify the degree of soft tissue calcification. This methodology allows for longitudinal measurements of soft tissue calcification in a single animal, which is relatively less expensive, less time-consuming, and exposes the animal to less radiation than in vivo μCT. Therefore, this high-throughput, longitudinal analytic method for quantifying soft tissue calcification is a viable alternative for the study of soft tissue calcification.

  20. Calcifications in the breast in Filaria loa infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, R. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    A 40-year-old patient underwent mammography for evaluation of a mass. Atypical calcifications were observed in the opposite breast. Two types of calcification were observed: One type was spiral-shaped and the other type rod-shaped. These calcifications were caused by Filaria loa. Parasitic calcifications in the breast are uncommon. (orig.).

  1. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study the endocrine function of pancreas in acute pancreatitis. To define the role of endocrine pancreatic function in the etiology and pathogenesis of the acute pancreatitis. To assess the prospects of the use of pancreatic hormones in the treatment and predicting the outcomes of acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods of the research Survey of publications in specialized periodical medical journals, PubMed sources developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Search in PubMed was carried out in the following databases: MEDLINE, Pre MEDLINE. Results of the research. In a significant proportion of patients who recovered from acute pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine functional impairments were found. This finding was not detected only in patients after severe acute pancreatitis. Routine evaluation of pancreatic function after acute pancreatitis should be considered. The comparative analysis of the synthetic analogues (somatostatin, calcitonin, leu-enkefalin-dalargin influence on the glucose metabolism of rats in acute pancreatitis of was made. Physiological reaction of beta-cells is preserved in infusion of somatostatin. However, infusion of calcitonin results in the distortion of counterregulatory action of insulin and glucagon. It was detected that pancreatic renin-angiotensin system is markedly activated in the experimental rat models of chronic hypoxia and acute pancreatitis. The activation of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system by

  2. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, E.J.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  3. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2011-01-01

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  4. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2011-09-15

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  5. MRI of the basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masayuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Kimura, Hirohiko

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging was performed for 11 patients (9 in Down's syndrome and 2 in idiopathic intracerebral calcification) who showed calcifications in bilateral basal ganglia on CT. High signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found only in one patient with idiopathic intracerebral calcification on T1-weighted image. The calcified areas of all patients in Down's syndrome did not show high signal intensity on T1-weighted image. The exact reasons why MRI exhibits the different signal intensities in calcified tissue on T1-weighted image are unknown. Further clinical investigations will be needed. (author)

  6. Tracheobronchial calcification in adult health study subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Tatsuro; Mihara, Futoshi; Kudo, Sho; Russell, W.J.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Vaeth, M.; Hosoda, Yutaka.

    1988-04-01

    Tracheobronchial calcification is reportedly more frequent in women than in men. Ten cases of extensive tracehobronchial calcification were identified on chest radiographs of 1,152 consecutively examined Adult Health Study subjects, for a prevalence of 0.87 %. An additional 51 subjects having this coded diagnosis were identified among 11,758 members of this fixed population sample. Sixty of the 61 subjects were women. The manifestations and extent of this type of calcification and its correlations with clinical and histopathologic features, which have not been previously reported, are described here. (author)

  7. Isolated splenic calcifications in two patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleixandre, A.; Cugat, A.; Ruiz, A.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Tardaguila, F.

    2002-01-01

    Calcification of the walls of the veins of the portal hypertension (PHT) (1-0), is uncommon. Calcification of the intra splenic vessels is exceptional. We report two cases of isolated calcification of intra splenic vessels, without calcification of the splenoportal venous axis, in patients with liver cirrhosis and PHT. The calcification was not clear. Computed tomography identified the calcification as linear tubular, branched structures located in the wall of intra splenic vessels. magnetic resonance imaging disclosed signs of cirrhosis and PHT but did not show the splenic classifications because of technical limitations. The cause of these calcifications was sustained PHT due to chronic liver disease. (Author) 15 refs

  8. Smoking as a risk factor for complications in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luaces-Regueira, María; Iglesias-García, Julio; Lindkvist, Björn; Castiñeira-Alvariño, Margarita; Nieto-García, Laura; Lariño-Noia, José; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the association between smoking and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, less is known about the role of smoking in the development of CP-related complications. Our aim was to investigate the impact of smoking and alcohol consumption on age of onset and complications at CP diagnosis. A cross-sectional case-case study was performed within a prospectively collected cohort of patients with CP. Alcohol consumption and smoking habits were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Morphologic severity was defined based on endoscopic ultrasound criteria for CP and classified as mild (3-4 criteria), moderate (5-6 criteria), and severe (≥7 criteria or calcifications). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed using the C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CP-related complications were calculated using a case-case design. A total of 241 patients were included. Smoking was associated with PEI (OR [95% CI], 2.4 [1.17-5.16]), calcifications (OR [95% CI], 2.33 [1.10-4.95]), and severe morphologic changes (OR [95% CI], 3.41 [1.31-8.85]) but not with pseudocysts or diabetes. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption was associated with age of onset. Tobacco, but not alcohol, is associated with PEI, calcifications, and severe morphologic (≥7 criteria or calcifications) CP at diagnosis. Smoking cessation should be encouraged in patients with CP.

  9. Allele-specific expression in the germline of patients with familial pancreatic cancer: An unbiased approach to cancer gene discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Aik Choon; Fan, Jian-Bing; Karikari, Collins; Bibikova, Marina; Garcia, Eliza Wickham; Zhou, Lixin; Barker, David; Serre, David; Feldmann, Georg; Hruban, Ralph H.; Klein, Alison P.; Goggins, Michael; Couch, Fergus J.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2007-01-01

    Physiologic allele-specific expression (ASE) in germline tissues occurs during random X-chromosome inactivation1 and in genomic imprinting,2 wherein the two alleles of a gene in a heterozygous individual are not expressed equally. Recent studies have confirmed the existence of ASE in apparently non-imprinted autosomal genes;3–14 however, the extent of ASE in the human genome is unknown. We explored ASE in lymphoblastoid cell lines of 145 individuals using an oligonucleotide array based assay....

  10. [Update on chronic pancreatitis: review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czul, Frank; Coronel, Emmanuel; Donet, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by irreversible fibrosis of the gland with eventual failure of exocrine and endocrine functions and hallmark features of abdominal pain, malabsorption, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus and pancreatic calcifications. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals), genetic factors and a few patients with hereditary or autoimmune disease. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the epidemiology, etiology, physiopatology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatments of the disease.

  11. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Patient Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the most common symptom of pancreatitis. The ...

  12. Incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weble, Tanja Cruusberg; Bjerregaard, Jon Kroll; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor the evolution of the incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark over 70 years. We also compared registrations of pancreatic cancer in a nationwide population-based database, the Danish Cancer Registry, and a clinical database, the Danish Pancreatic...... Cancer Database, in 2012-2013. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Registrations of pancreatic cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry over 1943-2012 were used to calculate age-specific incidence rates per 100 000 person years by sex and age in 5-year period, weighted by the Segi World Standard Population for age...... standardization. We used absolute numbers from the Cancer Registry and the Pancreatic Cancer Database, including distribution of topography of cancers registered in 2012-2013, to compare registration in the two data sources. RESULTS: The incidence rates of pancreatic cancer among Danish men increased until 1968...

  13. Breast skin calcifications: Mammographic recognition and confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, J.E.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Gayler, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors found microcalcifications in the skin of the breast to occur in 8% of patients undergoing mammography, a prevalence much higher than what has been previously reported. Usually in incidental finding, breast skin calcifications are readily recognized when they are multiple, bilateral, coarse, or polygonal with a central radiolucency; when they are located in a peripheral portion of the breast on at least one view, or when they are serendipitously imaged within the skin. One hundred patients with breast skin calcifications were studied. In 15 patients in whom clustered dermal calcifications simulated parenchymal microcalcifications, template-guided tangential views permitted precise skin localization. Three of those patients had been referred for needle localization before biopsy and four after failed biopsy for clustered microcalcifications. Dermal calcifications can pose a vexing problem in the management of microcalcifications of the breast. A high index of suspicion is warrented in order to forestall unnecessary or unsuccessful biopsies

  14. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  15. Evaluation of pineal calcification in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Kazuo; Odagiri, Kunio; Fujiwara, Takuya; Tanohata, Kazunori; Matsui, Kengo; Okano, Shigeki.

    1987-01-01

    The study cases were 804 patients who had received either CT or plain radiographs for some reasons. Their ages ranged from newborn to 15 years old. Twenty four patients had the pineal calcification, in which one patient had the pineal region tumor and 4 patients had precocious puberty. The incidence of the pineal calcification was observed on CT as 0.2, 5.8, and 14 % in their age of 0 to 5, 6 to 10, and 11 to 15 years old, respectively. On the other hand, this finding was detected only in 0, 1.1, and 1.2 % on plain radiographs. In conclusion, pineal calcification on CT may suggest the pathological state in children. Although it is observed in a minority of normal children, such a calcification could be looked upon as not only pineal region tumor but precocious puberty and other intracranial disorders with suspicion. (author)

  16. Topical thrombin-related corneal calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Irkeç, Murat; Alaçal, Sibel; Söylemezoğlu, Figen

    2006-09-01

    To report a highly unusual case of corneal calcification after brief intraoperative use of topical thrombin. A 44-year-old man underwent sclerouvectomy for ciliochoroidal leiomyoma, during which 35 UNIH/mL lyophilized bovine thrombin mixed with 9 mL of diluent containing 1500 mmol/mL calcium chloride was used. From the first postoperative day, corneal and anterior lenticular capsule calcifications developed, and corneal involvement slightly enlarged thereafter. A year later, 2 corneal punch biopsies confirmed calcification mainly in the Bowman layer. Topical treatment with 1.5% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid significantly restored corneal clarity. Six months later, a standard extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens placement improved visual acuity to 20/60. This case suggests that topical thrombin drops with elevated calcium concentrations may cause acute corneal calcification in Bowman layer and on the anterior lens capsule.

  17. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Karandish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  18. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%-3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  19. Can Dental Pulp Calcification Predict the Risk of Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Khojastepour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the association of pulp calcification with that of cardiovascular disease (CVD using digital panoramic dental radiographs.Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of patients referred from the angiography department were included if the patient was under 55 years old and had non-restored or minimally restored molars and canines. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of panoramic radiography in predicting CVD were calculated.Results: Out of 122 patients who met the criteria, 68.2% of the patients with CVD had pulp chamber calcifications. Pulp calcification in panoramic radiography had a sensitivity of 68.9% to predict CVD.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with CVD show an increased incidence of pulp calcification compared with healthy patients. The findings suggest that pulp calcification on panoramic radiography may have possibilities for use in CVD screening.

  20. Calcific myonecrosis: keys to early recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holobinko, Newt J.; Scerpella, Patrick R.; Hojnowski, Leonard; Damron, Timothy A.

    2003-01-01

    Calcific myonecrosis is a rare, late sequela of trauma occurring almost exclusively in the lower extremity which may be confused with an aggressive primary neoplasm. The platelike mineralization pattern seen on radiographs is characteristic but not widely recognized by clinicians. Three cases of calcific myonecrosis are reported, unique in that two presented for care following infection and that one had extended to involve the muscle compartments of the foot, a previously unreported site. (orig.)

  1. Tumor-like calcifications with scleroderma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, E.; Kulenkampff, H.A.; Kortenhaus, H.

    1987-01-01

    In patients with progressive scleroderma, interstitial calcifications are present to a varying extent. They are mostly located in the soft tissues of the fingers, resembling points, commas or dashes. They may also appear as 'calcinosis universalis' and reach a considerable size. Thus they mimic proliferative tumors. Scintigraphy, proving the existence of further calcifications can be helpful. We report the case of a female patient who presented with such a 'pseudotumor' of unusual size, site and extent in the lumbar region. (orig.) [de

  2. Study of calcification formation and disease diagnostics utilising advanced vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, Marleen Maartje

    The accurate and safe diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant societal issue, with annual disease incidence of 48,000 women and around 370 men in the UK. Early diagnosis of the disease allows more conservative treatments and better patient outcomes. Microcalcifications in breast tissue are an important indicator for breast cancers, and often the only sign of their presence. Several studies have suggested that the type of calcification formed may act as a marker for malignancy and its presence may be of biological significance. In this work, breast calcifications are studied with FTIR, synchrotron FTIR, ATR FTIR, and Raman mapping to explore their disease specific composition. From a comparison between vibrational spectroscopy and routine staining procedures it becomes clear that calcium builds up prior to calcification formation. Raman and FTIR indicate the same size for calcifications and are in agreement with routine staining techniques. From the synchrotron FTIR measurements it can be proven that amide is present in the centre of the calcifications and the intensity of the bands depends on the pathology. Special attention is paid to the type of carbonate substitution in the calcifications relating to different pathology grades. In contrast to mammography, Raman spectroscopy has the capability to distinguish calcifications based on their chemical composition. The ultimate goal is to turn the acquired knowledge from the mapping studies into a clinical tool based on deep Raman spectroscopy. Deep Raman techniques have a considerable potential to reduce large numbers of normal biopsies, reduce the time delay between screening and diagnosis and therefore diminish patient anxiety. In order to achieve this, a deep Raman system is designed and after evaluation of its performance tested on buried calcification standards in porcine soft tissue and human mammary tissue. It is shown that, when the calcification is probed through tissue, the strong 960 cm-1 phosphate band

  3. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  4. Proatherogenic pathways leading to vascular calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzini, Michael J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and atherosclerosis is the major common underlying disease. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves local vascular injury, inflammation and oxidative stress as well as vascular calcification. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as a degenerative process leading to mineral deposition in the vascular wall characteristic for late stages of atherosclerosis. However, recent studies identified vascular calcification in early stages of atherosclerosis and its occurrence has been linked to clinical events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its degree correlates with local vascular inflammation and with the overall impact and the progression of atherosclerosis. Over the last decade, diverse and highly regulated molecular signaling cascades controlling vascular calcification have been described. Local and circulating molecules such as osteopontin, osteoprogerin, leptin and matrix Gla protein were identified as critical regulators of vascular calcification. We here review the current knowledge on molecular pathways of vascular calcification and their relevance for the progression of cardiovascular disease

  5. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  6. A Possible Role for Vitamin C in Coral Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, J. J.; Roberson, L.; Vazquez, N.

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of coral reefs to tropical, marine ecosystems, the biological components of the calcification process are poorly understood. Because calcification must involve the delivery of organic and inorganic components across cell membranes, we postulate that it has similar features to epithelial and neuronal transport mechanisms in vertebrates. Accordingly, we are interested in identifying the specific membrane transporters underlying skeleton formation. As a model, we are using larvae from the ubiquitous Caribbean species Porites astreoides, a rapidly growing stony coral that is resistant to anthropogenic stressors. Using Illumina RNAseq, we assembled a larval transcriptome and compared gene expression between swimming larvae and recently settled ones that had just commenced the process of calcification. As expected, we identified many ion transporter, pump and channel transcripts that were upregulated in settled larvae. It was surprising, however, to find that the most upregulated transcript appeared to encode a Na-dependent Vitamin C transporter (SLC23A). In vertebrates, SLC23A transporters play a vital role in bone morphogenesis where Vitamin C is an essential cofactor for enzymes that condition collagen precursors for assembly into mature molecules. In corals, collagen has been identified as a component of the skeleton's extracellular matrix. Using in situ hybridization, we showed that the P. astreoides SLC23A messages were expressed in regions adjacent to rapid skeleton formation, on the aboral surface and septa of settled larvae. To confirm that the coral clone is indeed a Vitamin C transporter, we expressed it in Xenopus oocytes and studied its activity using voltage-clamp. Preliminary data demonstrate that it induces a current that is activated by Na and Vitamin C. This approach will help us better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying calcification and how they might respond to environmental change.

  7. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  8. The association between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in a population-based registry cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyante, Sarah J; Lee, Sheila S; Benefield, Thad S; Hoots, Tiffany N; Henderson, Louise M

    2017-01-01

    Mammographic calcifications can be a marker of malignancy, but their association with prognosis is less well established. In the current study, the authors examined the relationship between calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in the population-based Carolina Mammography Registry. The current study included 8472 invasive breast cancers diagnosed in the Carolina Mammography Registry between 1996 and 2011 for which information regarding calcifications occurring within 2 years of diagnosis was reported. Calcification-specific Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments were reported prospectively by a radiologist. Tumor characteristic data were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and/or pathology reports. Multivariable-adjusted associations between the presence of calcifications in the breast affected by cancer and tumor characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Statistical tests were 2-sided. The presence of calcifications was found to be positively associated with tumors that were high grade (vs low grade: odds ratio [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.10-1.88) or had an in situ component (vs without: OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.81-2.55). Calcifications were found to be inversely associated with hormone receptor-negative status (vs positive status: OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.93), size >35 mm (vs ≤8 mm: OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.37-0.61), and lobular tumors (vs ductal: OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.69). The association between the presence of calcifications and an in situ component was limited to BI-RADS category 4 and 5 calcifications and was absent for BI-RADS category 2 or 3 calcifications (P for heterogeneity Cancer 2017;123:219-227. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  10. The epidemiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes of hospital admission in the United States. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Pancreatic cancer is associated with a high mortality rate and is one of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect the black population more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter the progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  12. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Wilson, Jeremy S; Smith, Ross C

    2017-08-21

    In 2015, the Australasian Pancreatic Club (APC) published the Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (http://pancreas.org.au/2016/01/pancreatic-exocrine-insufficiency-guidelines). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when normal digestion cannot be sustained due to insufficient pancreatic digestive enzyme activity. This may be related to a breakdown, at any point, in the pancreatic digestive chain: pancreatic stimulation; synthesis, release or transportation of pancreatic enzymes; or synchronisation of secretions to mix with ingested food. Main recommendations: The guidelines provide advice on diagnosis and management of PEI, noting the following: A high prevalence of PEI is seen in certain diseases and conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and pancreatic surgery. The main symptoms of PEI are steatorrhoea or diarrhoea, abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss. These symptoms are non-specific and often go undetected and untreated. PEI diagnosis is predominantly based on clinical findings and the presence of underlying disease. The likelihood of PEI in suspected patients has been categorised into three groups: definite, possible and unlikely. If left untreated, PEI may lead to complications related to fat malabsorption and malnutrition, and have an impact on quality of life. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains the mainstay of PEI treatment with the recommended adult initial enzyme dose being 25 000-40 000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 75 000-80 000 units of lipase per meal. Adjunct acid-suppressing therapy may be useful when patients still experience symptoms of PEI on high dose PERT. Nutritional management by an experienced dietitian is essential. Changes in management as a result of these guidelines: These are the first guidelines to classify PEI as being definite, possible or unlikely, and provide a diagnostic algorithm to

  13. Considerations for the grade IIIb pancreatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Ishii, Takayuki; Ootawa, Satoru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Eisuke; Nishiya, Kei; Yokoyama, Kouya; Shimizu, Kimio; Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic duct disruption accompanied by pancreatic trauma is very severe. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) is considered the main diagnostic modality. However, it is invasive and can be associated with significant complications. We diagnosed pancreatic trauma based on only Computed tomography (CT) scan data. We operated based on specific signs of pancreatic injuries on CT scans, such as edema or hematoma of the pancreatic parenchyma, fractures or lacerations of the pancreas, active hemorrhage and, in all cases, there were main pancreatic duct injuries. Certain drainage of the pancreatic juice is necessary for pancreatic duct disruption. The operation method was selected according to the location of the damage. If it is at all possible pancreas preserving surgery should be performed. It is necessary to select the operation according to the patient's age and general condition, the cause of the injury, the range of the injury, and the experience of the surgeon. When the main duct injury was not certain, ERP during the operation was very useful. We report on a method of endoscopically treating a pseudocyst, which has adhered to the stomach, secondary to pancreatic main duct disruption. Transgastric placement of a stent into the pseudocyst is possible in restricted cases. (author)

  14. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy.

  15. Clinical and radiologic analysis of the pancreatic pseudocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yul; Chung, Bong Jin; Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Sam Kyoon

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is encapsulated collections of exudate, blood, and secretions that result from pancreatic necrosis or rupture of ducts and acini, and frequently result in various life threating complications. The barium study of the upper G.I. tract is the most valuable method in diagnosis of the pancreatic pseudocyst. Total 30 cases of surgically proved pancreatic pseudocyst were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. 56.6% was male, and peak incidence was in the 5th decade. 2. Etiologic factors were blunt abdominal trauma (30%) pancreatitis (23%), and unknown (47%). 3. The most important radiologic findings was stomach displacement(100%), and the others were colon displacement (69%), mass seen in simple abdomen (67%), left kidney displacement (46%), duodental deformity (40%), elevation of diaphragm (37%), pleural effusion (27%), and pancreatic calcification (7%). 4. The most frequent site of the pseudocyst in U.G.I. series was between the greater curvature of the antrum of the stomach and transverse colon (40%). The other sites were near the incisura angularis of the lesser curvature (12%), greater curvature of the antrum (12%), and greater curvature of the body of stomach (4%). 5. The location of the pseudocyst was mainly in the body and tail of the pancreas (90%), only 3 cases (10%) was in the head.

  16. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, María José; Saez, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sabat, Miriam; López-Ben, Santiago; de Llorens, Rafael; Aleixandre, Rosa Núria; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies. CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls. The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC) of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients. Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  17. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Ferri

    Full Text Available There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in combination could help to discriminate between these two pathologies.CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, C-reactive protein, albumin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3 were measured using routine clinical analyzers in a cohort of 47 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 20 chronic pancreatitis and 15 healthy controls.The combination of CA 19-9, IGF-1 and albumin resulted in a combined area under the curve (AUC of 0.959 with 93.6% sensitivity and 95% specificity, much higher than CA 19-9 alone. An algorithm was defined to classify the patients as chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer with the above specificity and sensitivity. In an independent validation group of 20 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13 chronic pancreatitis patients, the combination of the four molecules classified correctly all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 12 out of 13 chronic pancreatitis patients.Although this panel of markers should be validated in larger cohorts, the high sensitivity and specificity values and the convenience to measure these parameters in clinical laboratories shows great promise for improving pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosis.

  18. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo

    1993-01-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author)

  19. CT brain demonstration of basal ganglion calcification in adult HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brain barrier has been postulated. Calcification of the basal ganglia in encephalopathic HIV/AIDS children has been relatively well documented. Only two adult HIV cases with basal ganglion calcification (BGC) have been reported in the literature.

  20. Idiopathic Pulmonary Calcification and Ossification in an Elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histology of tissue from autopsy showed intraparenchymal pulmonary calcification and ossification with marrow elements. Idiopathic pulmonary calcification and ossification is rare. At autopsy, she was also found to have had bilateral subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), a diagnosis missed during clinical evaluation.

  1. Double Trouble Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, I.E.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Within the project ‘Double Trouble: Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean’, I tried to illuminate mechanisms determining element incorporation in foraminifera with different calcification strategies. In particular, I aimed to assess the interplay between ocean acidification and

  2. Double Trouble : Foraminiferal calcification in a changing ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, I.E.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Within the project ‘Double Trouble: Foraminiferal Calcification in a Changing Ocean’, I tried to illuminate mechanisms determining element incorporation in foraminifera with different calcification strategies. In particular, I aimed to assess the interplay between ocean acidification and

  3. Genetic associations with valvular calcification and aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y; Owens, David S

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease.......Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease....

  4. Role of pancreatic fat in the outcomes of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chathur; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    The role of obesity in relation to various disease processes is being increasingly studied, with reports over the last several years increasingly mentioning its association with worse outcomes in acute disease. Obesity has also gained recognition as a risk factor for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).The mortality in SAP may be as high as 30% and is usually attributable to multi system organ failure (MSOF) earlier in the disease, and complications of necrotizing pancreatitis later [9-11]. To date there is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis (AP) and the management is largely expectant and supportive. Obesity in general has also been associated with poor outcomes in sepsis and other pathological states including trauma and burns. With the role of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as propagators in SAP having recently come to light and with the recognition of acute lipotoxicity, there is now an opportunity to explore different strategies to reduce the mortality and morbidity in SAP and potentially other disease states associated with such a pathophysiology. In this review we will discuss the role of fat and implications of the consequent acute lipotoxicity on the outcomes of acute pancreatitis in lean and obese states and during acute on chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bilateral basal ganglia calcifications visualised on CT scan.

    OpenAIRE

    Brannan, T S; Burger, A A; Chaudhary, M Y

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-eight cases of basal ganglia calcification imaged on computed axial tomography were reviewed. Most cases were felt to represent senescent calcification. The possibility of a vascular aetiology in this group is discussed. A less common group of patients was identified with calcification secondary to abnormalities in calcium metabolism or radiation therapy. Three cases of basal ganglia calcifications were detected in juvenile epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsants. These ca...

  6. Site-specific epsilon-NH2 monoacylation of pancreatic phospholipase A2. 2. Transformation of soluble phospholipase A2 into a highly penetrating "membrane-bound" form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Wiele, F C; Atsma, W; Roelofsen, B; van Linde, M; Van Binsbergen, J; Radvanyi, F; Raykova, D; Slotboom, A J; De Haas, G H

    1988-03-08

    Long-chain lecithins present in bilayer structures like vesicles or membranes are only very poor substrates for pancreatic phospholipases A2. This is probably due to the fact that pancreatic phospholipases A2 cannot penetrate into the densely packed bilayer structures. To improve the weak penetrating properties of pancreatic phospholipases A2, we prepared and characterized a number of pancreatic phospholipase A2 mutants that have various long acyl chains linked covalently to Lys116 in porcine and to Lys10 in bovine phospholipase A2 [Van der Wiele, F.C., Atsma, W., Dijkman, R., Schreurs, A.M.M., Slotboom, A.J., & De Haas, G.H. (1988) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. When monomolecular surface layers of L- and D-didecanoyllecithin were used, it was found that the introduction of caprinic, lauric, palmitic, and oleic acid at Lys116 in the porcine enzyme increases its penetrating power from 13 to about 17, 20, 32, and 22 dyn/cm, respectively, before long lag periods were obtained. Incorporation of a palmitoyl moiety at Lys10 in the bovine enzyme shifted the penetrating power from 11 to about 25 dyn/cm. Only the best penetrating mutant, viz., porcine phospholipase A2 having a palmitoyl moiety at Lys116, was able to cause complete leakage of 6-carboxyfluorescein entrapped in small unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin under nonhydrolytic conditions. Similarly, only this latter palmitoylphospholipase A2 completely hydrolyzed all lecithin in the outer monolayer of the human erythrocyte at a rate much faster than Naja naja phospholipase A2, the most powerful penetrating snake venom enzyme presently known.

  7. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  8. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  9. Suspicious breast calcifications undergoing stereotactic biopsy in women ages 70 and over: Breast cancer incidence by BI-RADS descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Lars J; Johnson, David Y; Johnson, Karen S; Baker, Jay A; Soo, Mary Scott; Hwang, E Shelley; Ghate, Sujata V

    2017-06-01

    To determine the malignancy rate overall and for specific BI-RADS descriptors in women ≥70 years who undergo stereotactic biopsy for calcifications. We retrospectively reviewed 14,577 consecutive mammogram reports in 6839 women ≥70 years to collect 231 stereotactic biopsies of calcifications in 215 women. Cases with missing images or histopathology and calcifications associated with masses, distortion, or asymmetries were excluded. Three breast radiologists determined BI-RADS descriptors by majority. Histology, hormone receptor status, and lymph node status were correlated with BI-RADS descriptors. There were 131 (57 %) benign, 22 (10 %) atypia/lobular carcinomas in situ, 55 (24 %) ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 23 (10 %) invasive diagnoses. Twenty-seven (51 %) DCIS cases were high-grade. Five (22 %) invasive cases were high-grade, two (9 %) were triple-negative, and three (12 %) were node-positive. Malignancy was found in 49 % (50/103) of fine pleomorphic, 50 % (14/28) of fine linear, 25 % (10/40) of amorphous, 20 % (3/15) of round, 3 % (1/36) of coarse heterogeneous, and 0 % (0/9) of dystrophic calcifications. Among women ≥70 years that underwent stereotactic biopsy for calcifications only, we observed a high rate of malignancy. Additionally, coarse heterogeneous calcifications may warrant a probable benign designation. • Cancer rates of biopsied calcifications in women ≥70 years are high • Radiologists should not dismiss suspicious calcifications in older women • Coarse heterogeneous calcifications may warrant a probable benign designation.

  10. Chronic pancreatitis: from guidelines to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The paucity of specific standardized criteria leads to uncertainties in clinical practice regarding the management of chronic pancreatitis (CP.Objectives This paper reports some of the systematic guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of CP recently elaborated by an Italian multicenter study group. We review recommendations on clinical and nutritional aspects of the disease, assessment of pancreatic function, treatment of exocrine pancreatic failure and secondary diabetes, treatment of pain, and prevention of painful relapses. The review also looks at the role of endoscopy in the management of pancreatic pain, pancreatic stones, duct narrowing and dilation, and complications; the appropriate use of various imaging techniques, including endoscopic ultrasound; and the indications for and techniques used in surgical management of CP.

  11. Vascular and valvular calcifications in chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Bruzzone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular and valvular calcifications are a frequent complication in dialyzed patients and are connected to an increased morbi-mortality. Many radiological methods (TAC multiple slices and with electrons emission have been used to investigate the presence of vascular calcifications in this population, but only few works have been focused on simple radiology. Objectives: The objectives of this work are to evaluate vascular calcifications by means of Kauppila index in hemodialysis prevalent patients, identify linked risk factors and determine their association with heart valves calcification. Methods: 95 stable patients under hemodialysis were surveyed during a period of 6 months longer. Abdominal Rx simple profile were performed on all patients to evaluate calcification of abdominal aorta by Kauppila index and twodimensional echocardiogram to detect valvular calcifications. Data were collected about sex, age, diabetes, Hypertension, tabaquism, dislipemia and bone-mineral metabolism. Results: 64.5% of the patients showed vascular calcifications. Average Kauppila index was 6.25. Age and time on dialysis correlated with vascular calcifications. In 31.6 % of individuals valvular calcifications were found, which presented significant association with diabetes and Kauppila Index. Conclusions: Vascular and valvular calcifications were frequent in the surveyed population. Kauppila index correlated with age, time on dialysis and valvular calcifications. Heart valves calcification was associated with diabetes.

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Implication of molecular vascular smooth muscle cell heterogeneity among arterial beds in arterial calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Espitia

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a strong and independent predictive factor for cardiovascular complications and mortality. Our previous work identified important discrepancies in plaque composition and calcification types between carotid and femoral arteries. The objective of this study is to further characterize and understand the heterogeneity in vascular calcification among vascular beds, and to identify molecular mechanisms underlying this process. We established ECLAGEN biocollection that encompasses human atherosclerotic lesions and healthy arteries from different locations (abdominal, thoracic aorta, carotid, femoral, and infrapopliteal arteries for histological, cell isolation, and transcriptomic analysis. Our results show that lesion composition differs between these locations. Femoral arteries are the most calcified arteries overall. They develop denser calcifications (sheet-like, nodule, and are highly susceptible to osteoid metaplasia. These discrepancies may derive from intrinsic differences between SMCs originating from these locations, as microarray analysis showed specific transcriptomic profiles between primary SMCs isolated from each arterial bed. These molecular differences translated into functional disparities. SMC from femoral arteries showed the highest propensity to mineralize due to an increase in basal TGFβ signaling. Our results suggest that biological heterogeneity of resident vascular cells between arterial beds, reflected by our transcriptomic analysis, is critical in understanding plaque biology and calcification, and may have strong implications in vascular therapeutic approaches.

  14. Coralline algae elevate pH at the site of calcification under ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Christopher E; Comeau, Steeve; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2017-10-01

    Coralline algae provide important ecosystem services but are susceptible to the impacts of ocean acidification. However, the mechanisms are uncertain, and the magnitude is species specific. Here, we assess whether species-specific responses to ocean acidification of coralline algae are related to differences in pH at the site of calcification within the calcifying fluid/medium (pH cf ) using δ 11 B as a proxy. Declines in δ 11 B for all three species are consistent with shifts in δ 11 B expected if B(OH) 4 - was incorporated during precipitation. In particular, the δ 11 B ratio in Amphiroa anceps was too low to allow for reasonable pH cf values if B(OH) 3 rather than B(OH) 4 - was directly incorporated from the calcifying fluid. This points towards δ 11 B being a reliable proxy for pH cf for coralline algal calcite and that if B(OH) 3 is present in detectable proportions, it can be attributed to secondary postincorporation transformation of B(OH) 4 - . We thus show that pH cf is elevated during calcification and that the extent is species specific. The net calcification of two species of coralline algae (Sporolithon durum, and Amphiroa anceps) declined under elevated CO 2 , as did their pH cf . Neogoniolithon sp. had the highest pH cf , and most constant calcification rates, with the decrease in pH cf being ¼ that of seawater pH in the treatments, demonstrating a control of coralline algae on carbonate chemistry at their site of calcification. The discovery that coralline algae upregulate pH cf under ocean acidification is physiologically important and should be included in future models involving calcification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  16. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beduschi, Murilo Gamba; Mello, André Luiz Parizi; VON-Mühlen, Bruno; Franzon, Orli

    2016-03-01

    About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis.

  17. Clinicoradiologic evaluation of styloid process calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagga, Mun Bhawni; Kumar, C. Anand; Yeluri, Garima

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence, morphology, and calcification pattern of the elongated styloid process in the Mathura population and its relation to gender, age, and mandibular movements. The study analyzed digital panoramic radiographs of 2,706 adults. The elongated styloid process was classified with the radiographic appearance based on the morphology and calcification pattern. The limits of mandibular protrusion were evaluated for each subject. The data were analyzed by using a Student's t-test and chi-squared test with significance set at p=0.05. Bilateral elongation having an 'elongated' type styloid process with a 'partially mineralized' pattern was the most frequent type of styloid process. No correlation was found between styloid process type and calcification pattern on the one hand and gender on the other, although elongated styloid was more prevalent in older and male populations (p 0.05). Dentists should recognize the existence of morphological variation in elongated styloid process or Eagle syndrome apparent on panoramic radiographs. We found higher prevalence of elongated styloid process in the population of the Mathura region when compared with other Indian populations. The calcification of the styloid process was more common in the older age group with no correlation to gender, mandibular movement and site. 'Type I' with a 'partially calcified' styloid process was observed more frequently in the population studied.

  18. Penile gangrene due to calcific uremic arteriopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... 2Department of Medicine, Nephrology Unit, 3Department of Medicine, Infectious Disease Unit, King Fahad. Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Correspondence to: Dr. .... Russell R, Brookshire MA, Zekonis M, Moe SM. Distal calcific uremic arteriolopathy in a hemodialysis patient responds to ...

  19. Differential diagnosis of disseminated periventricular calcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, P.; Piepgras, U.

    1986-01-01

    Juvenile disseminated periventricular calcifications may occur in tuberous sclerosis, toxoplasmosis, cytomegaly, and in tuberculous meningitis. Cysticercosis, by contrast, does not result in corresponding intracerebral foci until an older age. Differential diagnosis is no problem if clinical findings are typical (tuberous sclerosis) or if serological verification is positive. However, any unclear clinical diagnosis can often be secured by CT. (orig.) [de

  20. Coronary artery calcification in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ino, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Akimoto, K.; Park, I.; Nishimoto, K.; Yabuta, K.; Tanaka, A.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the angiographic features of coronary lesions in Kawasaki disease with coronary artery calcification, cinefluoroscopy and cineangiography were retrospectively reviewed in 116 patients who had undergone coronary angiography between 1982 and 1989. Angiographic abnormalities of coronary arteries were demonstrated in 55 of 116 patients. In 5 (9.1%) of the 55 patients, 9 with calcification were identified by cinefluoroscopy and chest X-ray. Eight of the 9 calcified lesions showed a circular or ring-shape configuration. Coronary angiography revealed a total occlusion of the right coronary artery with collateral circulation from the distal left coronary artery in 2 patients and a severe stenosis of the right coronary artery in 2 patients, in whom anticoagulant therapy had not been continued during the follow-up periods. The remaining patient in whom anticoagulant therapy had been continued had bilateral aneurysms but no significant stenosis. These results indicate that a ring-shape calcification on chest X-ray in 2 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease may suggest an involvement by coronary artery stenosis even when anticoagulant drugs had been given. Therefore, coronary angiography should be performed to evaluate the stenotic lesions if this type of calcification is found by routine radiographic examination. (orig.)

  1. Sclerosing peritonitis with gross calcification: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheung Sook; Kim, Young Jae; Min, Seon Jeong; Cho, Seong Whi; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis is an uncommon complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and can lead to small bowel dysfunction involving abdominal pain, progressive loss of ultrafiltration, and small intestinal obstruction. Peritoneal thickening, in which calcification can develop, often starts as al small plaque which gradually becomes larger. We report a case of CAPD-related calcifying peritonitis.

  2. Differential diagnosis of disseminated periventricular calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, P.; Piepgras, U.

    1986-08-01

    Juvenile disseminated periventricular calcifications may occur in tuberous sclerosis, toxoplasmosis, cytomegaly, and in tuberculous meningitis. Cysticercosis, by contrast, does not result in corresponding intracerebral foci until an older age. Differential diagnosis is no problem if clinical findings are typical (tuberous sclerosis) or if serological verification is positive. However, any unclear clinical diagnosis can often be secured by CT.

  3. Association of mitral annulus calcification, aortic valve calcification with carotid intima media thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scuteri Angelo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitral annular calcification (MAC and aortic annular calcification (AVC may represent a manifestation of generalized atherosclerosis in the elederly. Alterations in vascular structure, as indexed by the intima media thickness (IMT, are also recognized as independent predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Aim To examine the relationship between the degree of calcification at mitral and/or aortic valve annulus and large artery structure (thickness. Methods We evaluated 102 consecutive patients who underwent transthoracic echocardiography and carotid artery echoDoppler for various indications; variables measured were: systemic blood pressure (BP, pulse pressure (PP=SBP-DBP, body mass index (BMI, fasting glucose, total, HDL, LDL chlolesterol, triglycerides, cIMT. The patients were divided according to a grading of valvular/annular lesions independent scores based on acoustic densitometry: 1 = annular/valvular sclerosis/calcification absence; 2 = annular/valvular sclerosis; 3 = annular calcification; 4 = annular-valvular calcification; 5 = valvular calcification with no recognition of the leaflets. Results Patient score was the highest observed for either valvular/annulus. Mean cIMT increased linearly with increasing valvular calcification score, ranging from 3.9 ± 0.48 mm in controls to 12.9 ± 1.8 mm in those subjects scored 5 (p 0.0001. Conclusion MAC and AVC score can identify subgroups of patients with different cIMT values which indicate different incidence and prevalence of systemic artery diseases. This data may confirm MAC-AVC as a useful important diagnostic parameter of systemic atherosclerotic disease.

  4. A case report of IPA with chronic mass calcification in a neutropenic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheesh Raveendran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis is a serious pathologic condition caused by Aspergillus organisms and is frequently seen in immunocompromised patients. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA which is rare, has been identified as one of the histological subtypes of aspergillosis. It is one of the rare chronic infectious diseases of respiratory system in China, and presents high morbidity, high drug resistance and specific imaging characteristics. This paper focused on a rare case report of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with chronic mass calcification. CT imaging was discussed by contrast with clinical manifestations, aiming to survey the invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and the mass calcification and to improve the clinical differential diagnosis.

  5. Targeting pancreatic expressed PAX genes for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Petra I; López-Noriega, Livia; Gauthier, Benoit R

    2017-01-01

    Four members of the PAX family, PAX2, PAX4, PAX6 and PAX8 are known to be expressed in the pancreas. Accumulated evidences indicate that several pancreatic expressed PAX genes play a significant role in pancreatic development/functionality and alterations in these genes are involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic diseases. Areas covered: In this review, we summarize the ongoing research related to pancreatic PAX genes in diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. We dissect the current knowledge at different levels; from mechanistic studies in cell lines performed to understand the molecular processes controlled by pancreatic PAX genes, to in vivo studies using rodent models that over-express or lack specific PAX genes. Finally, we describe human studies associating variants on pancreatic-expressed PAX genes with pancreatic diseases. Expert opinion: Based on the current literature, we propose that future interventions to treat pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and diabetes mellitus could be developed via the modulation of PAX4 and/or PAX6 regulated pathways.

  6. Study of the position of calcification in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Toru; Matsuura, Koumei; Shin, Kunichika; Ooe, Kenjiro

    2011-01-01

    The commonly occurring position of calcification in the calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is said to be the supraspinatus tendon. In the anatomical field, it has been newly discovered that the infraspinatus tendon crosses over the supraspinatus tendon to the superior facet of the greater tuberosity. In this study, we thus attempted to determine the occurring position of calcification on MRI quantitatively. We measured the angle between the bicipital groove and center of calcification, and found it to be 49.5±16.5 degrees. On the other hand, it has been reported that the boundary line between the superior and middle facets is 45.4 degrees externally rotated from the bicipital groove. The protrusion formed at the greater tuberosity at this position imposes mechanical stress on the rotator cuff tendon. As we confirmed that these two angles are very close in this study, it suggests that calcification occurs at the boundary line of the superior and middle facets. Our findings also indicate that calcification often occurs at the infraspinatus tendon. (author)

  7. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  8. Calcification in large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamochi, Kazuya; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Ochiai, Atsushi; Yoshida, Junji; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Nagai, Kanji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the prevalence of intratumoral calcification in large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and to review computed tomography (CT) and histological findings. From August 1992 through March 2000, 35 out of 1183 surgically resected lung cancer patients were histologically diagnosed as having LCNEC at our institute. We reviewed the pain radiographs and CT scans of these 35 LCNEC patients. In LCNEC cases with intratumoral calcification, we examined the size, number, distribution and pattern of intratumoral calcifications visible on the CT scans and the histological features. Three cases (9%) exhibited calcification. The calcifications were recognized by CT scans alone. The CT scans showed punctate or eccentric intratumoral calcifications, which are considered to be a malignant feature, in all three cases. In two cases, the calcifications were histologically confirmed to be located within the necrotic areas of a tumor nest. We found three LCNEC cases with intratumoral calcification. The prevalence of LCNEC calcification was similar to that in previous reports on lung cancer. The mechanism of the intratumoral calcification in our LCNEC cases is speculated to be dystrophic calcification. (author)

  9. COL4A1 mutations associated with a characteristic pattern of intracranial calcification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livingston, J.; Doherty, D.; Orcesi, S.; Tonduti, D.; Piechiecchio, A.; La Piana, R.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Majumdar, A.; Tomkins, S.; Rice, G.; Kneen, R.; van der Knaap, M.; Crow, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial calcification (ICC) is a relatively common radiological finding in children undergoing investigation for neurological disorders. Many causes are recognised, and ICC is often regarded as a non-specific sign.From an ongoing study of ICC, we identified 5 patients with characteristic

  10. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff as a cause of drooping shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, N.; Banderali, A. [Department of Radiology, San Carlo Hospital, Piazzale Gianasso, 16158 Genoa (Italy); Neumaier, C.E. [Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Dahmane, M.; Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genoa, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2003-02-01

    We describe a case of inferior glenohumeral subluxation or drooping shoulder secondary to acute calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. The various etiologies of drooping shoulder and the specific causes determining glenohumeral widening in our report are discussed. The importance in recognizing this uncommon complication of a common abnormal finding and correction by aspiration is stressed. (orig.)

  11. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff as a cause of drooping shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prato, N.; Banderali, A.; Neumaier, C.E.; Dahmane, M.; Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a case of inferior glenohumeral subluxation or drooping shoulder secondary to acute calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. The various etiologies of drooping shoulder and the specific causes determining glenohumeral widening in our report are discussed. The importance in recognizing this uncommon complication of a common abnormal finding and correction by aspiration is stressed. (orig.)

  12. Medial arterial calcification in diabetes and its relationship to neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hofbauer, L C

    2009-01-01

    Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification......, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are inherently protective. The association between distal symmetrical neuropathy and calcification of the arterial wall highlights the fact that neuropathy may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.......Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification...

  13. Update on endoscopic pancreatic function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tyler Stevens; Mansour A Parsi

    2011-01-01

    Hormone-stimulated pancreatic function tests (PFTs) are considered the gold standard for measuring pancreatic exocrine function. PFTs involve the administration of intravenous secretin or cholecystokinin, followed by collection and analysis of pancreatic secretions. Because exocrine function may decline in the earliest phase of pancreatic fibrosis, PFTs are considered accurate for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Unfortunately, these potentially valuable tests are infrequently performed except at specialized centers, because they are time consuming and complicated. To overcome these limitations, endoscopic PFT methods have been developed which include aspiration of pancreatic secretions through the suction channel of the endoscope. The secretin endoscopic pancreatic function test (ePFT) involves collection of duodenal aspirates at 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after secretin stimulation. A bicarbonate concentration greater than 80 mmol/L in any of the samples is considered a normal result. The secretin ePFT has demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity compared with various reference standards, including the "Dreiling tube" secretin PFT, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical histology. Furthermore, a standard autoanalyzer can be used for bicarbonate analysis, which allows the secretin ePFT to be performed at any hospital. The secretin ePFT may complement imaging tests like endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis.This paper will review the literature validating the use of ePFT in the diagnosis of exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis. Newer developments will also be discussed, including the feasibility of combined EUS/ePFT, the use of cholecystokinin alone or in combination with secretin, and the discovery of new protein and lipid pancreatic juice biomarkers which may complement traditionalfluid analysis.

  14. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  15. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Neal X., E-mail: xuechen@iupui.edu [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Moe, Sharon M. [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  16. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9{+-}6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42{+-}1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33{+-}0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0{+-}1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal

  17. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9±6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42±1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33±0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0±1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal enlargement and

  18. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Tran; G. van 't Hof; G. Kazemier (Geert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.J. Pek (Chulja); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); H. van Dekken (Herman); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Methods: Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and

  19. Calcification of intervertebral discs in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, D.

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen children with intervertebral disc calcifications of the cervical, thoracal and lumbar spine have been diagnosed since 1970. Most of them were observed over a period of several years. Ten children fell ill with acute pains, but only 2 of them sufferred from a trauma. In 3 cases the features were discovered accidentally combined with malformations of vertebral bodies and congenital diseases. Our results suggest a primary structural inferiority of the calcified discs. The calcifications arise partially from a birth trauma, partially from an unknown etiology. They can last for a long time without symptoms. An acute event effects the pains due to shifting or herniation of calcified disc-fragments. Secondary findings such as decrease of the height of cervical vertebral bodies or destructions of the endplates of thoracal and lumbar vertebral bodies disappear retarded and often incompletely and demand a control for a long time. (orig.)

  20. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  1. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    role of dendritic cells in pancreatitis. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which initiate innate and adaptive immune... Lymphoid -tissue-specific homing of bone- marrow-derived dendritic cells . Blood. 113:6638–6647. http://dx.doi .org/10.1182/blood-2009-02-204321 Dapito...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0313 TITLE: Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. George Miller

  2. Clinicoradiologic evaluation of styloid process calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagga, Mun Bhawni [Dept. of Oral Medicine Diagnosis and Radiology, M.N. D.A.V. Dental College and Hospital, Solan (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, C. Anand; Yeluri, Garima [Dept. of Oral Medicine Diagnosis and Radiology, KD Dental College and Hospital, Mathura (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence, morphology, and calcification pattern of the elongated styloid process in the Mathura population and its relation to gender, age, and mandibular movements. The study analyzed digital panoramic radiographs of 2,706 adults. The elongated styloid process was classified with the radiographic appearance based on the morphology and calcification pattern. The limits of mandibular protrusion were evaluated for each subject. The data were analyzed by using a Student's t-test and chi-squared test with significance set at p=0.05. Bilateral elongation having an 'elongated' type styloid process with a 'partially mineralized' pattern was the most frequent type of styloid process. No correlation was found between styloid process type and calcification pattern on the one hand and gender on the other, although elongated styloid was more prevalent in older and male populations (p<0.05). Further styloid process elongation showed no effect on mandibular protrusive movement (p>0.05). Dentists should recognize the existence of morphological variation in elongated styloid process or Eagle syndrome apparent on panoramic radiographs. We found higher prevalence of elongated styloid process in the population of the Mathura region when compared with other Indian populations. The calcification of the styloid process was more common in the older age group with no correlation to gender, mandibular movement and site. 'Type I' with a 'partially calcified' styloid process was observed more frequently in the population studied.

  3. Aortic stenosis and vascular calcifications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J; Chen, Marcus Y; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A; Gahl, William A; Sachdev, Vandana

    2012-02-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports. We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Risk factors for pancreatic stone formation in autoimmune pancreatitis over a long-term course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has the potential to progress to a chronic state that forms pancreatic stones. The aim of this study was to clarify the risk factors underlying pancreatic stone formation in AIP. Sixty-nine patients with AIP who had been followed for at least 3 years were enrolled for evaluation of clinical and laboratory factors as well as computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography findings. During the course of this study, increased or de novo stone formation was seen in 28 patients, who were defined as the stone-forming group. No stones were observed in 32 patients, who were defined as the non-stone-forming group. Nine patients who had stones at diagnosis but showed no change during the course of this study were excluded from our cohort. Univariate analysis revealed no significant differences in clinical or laboratory factors associated with AIP-specific inflammation between the two groups. However, pancreatic head swelling (P = 0.006) and narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts in the pancreatic head region (P = 0.010) were significantly more frequent in the stone-forming group. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified Wirsung and Santorini duct narrowing at diagnosis as a significant independent risk factor for pancreatic stone formation (OR 4.4, P = 0.019). A primary risk factor for pancreatic stone formation in AIP was narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts, which most presumably led to pancreatic juice stasis and stone development.

  5. Endocrine pancreatic function changes after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Xu, Yaping; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and the associated risk factors after acute pancreatitis (AP). Fifty-nine patients were subjected to tests of pancreatic function after an attack of pancreatitis. The mean time after the event was 3.5 years. Pancreatic endocrine function was evaluated by fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide. Homeostasis model assessment was used to evaluate insulin resistance and islet β-cell function. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by fecal elastase 1. Factors that could influence endocrine function were also investigated. Nineteen patients (32%) were found to have elevated FBG, whereas 5 (8%) had abnormal glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The levels of FBG, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide were higher in patients than in controls (P endocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic exocrine functional impairment was found at the same time. Endocrine functional impairment with insulin resistance was found in patients after AP. Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms increased the likelihood of developing functional impairment after AP.

  6. SEC23B is required for pancreatic acinar cell function in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vogel, Nancy; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Sans, M. Dolors; Zhu, Guojing; Everett, Lesley; Nelson, Bradley; Durairaj, Haritha; McKnight, Brooke; Zhang, Bin; Ernst, Stephen A.; Ginsburg, David; Williams, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Mice with germline absence of SEC23B die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration. We generated mice with tamoxifen-inducible, pancreatic acinar cell–specific Sec23b deletion. Inactivation of Sec23b exclusively in the pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice results in decreased overall pancreatic weights from pancreatic cell loss (decreased pancreatic DNA, RNA, and total protein content), as well as degeneration of exocrine cells, decreased zymogen granules, and alterations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ranging from vesicular ER to markedly expanded cisternae with accumulation of moderate-density content or intracisternal granules. Acinar Sec23b deletion results in induction of ER stress and increased apoptosis in the pancreas, potentially explaining the loss of pancreatic cells and decreased pancreatic weight. These findings demonstrate that SEC23B is required for normal function of pancreatic acinar cells in adult mice. PMID:28539403

  7. Pediatric chronic pancreatitis is associated with genetic risk factors and substantial disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Bellin, Melena; Husain, Sohail Z; Ahuja, Monika; Barth, Bradley; Davis, Heather; Durie, Peter R; Fishman, Douglas S; Freedman, Steven D; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Giefer, Matthew J; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Kumar, Soma; Morinville, Veronique D; Lowe, Mark E; Nuehring, Neil E; Ooi, Chee Y; Pohl, John F; Troendle, David; Werlin, Steven L; Wilschanski, Michael; Yen, Elizabeth; Uc, Aliye

    2015-04-01

    To determine the clinical presentation, diagnostic variables, risk factors, and disease burden in children with chronic pancreatitis. We performed a cross-sectional study of data from the International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a Cure, a registry of children with acute recurrent pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Between-group differences were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Among 170 subjects in the registry, 76 (45%) had chronic pancreatitis; 57% were female, 80% were white; median age at diagnosis was 9.9 years. Pancreatitis-predisposing genetic mutations were identified in 51 (67%) and obstructive risk factors in 25 (33%). Toxic/metabolic and autoimmune factors were uncommon. Imaging demonstrated ductal abnormalities and pancreatic atrophy more commonly than calcifications. Fifty-nine (77%) reported abdominal pain within the past year; pain was reported as constant and receiving narcotics in 28%. Children with chronic pancreatitis reported a median of 3 emergency department visits and 2 hospitalizations in the last year. Forty-seven subjects (70%) missed 1 day of school in the past month as the result of chronic pancreatitis; 26 (34%) missed 3 or more days. Children reporting constant pain were more likely to miss school (P = .002), visit the emergency department (P = .01), and experience hospitalizations (P = .03) compared with children with episodic pain. Thirty-three children (43%) underwent therapeutic endoscopic retrograde pancreatography; one or more pancreatic surgeries were performed in 30 (39%). Chronic pancreatitis occurs at a young age with distinct clinical features. Genetic and obstructive risk factors are common, and disease burden is substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Index Finger in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walocko, Frances M; Sando, Ian C; Haase, Steven C; Kozlow, Jeffrey H

    2017-09-01

    Calcific tendinitis is characterized by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within tendons and is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in adults. Its clinical manifestations may be acute, chronic, or asymptomatic. Acute calcific tendinitis is self-resolving condition that is rarely reported in the pediatric population and may be overlooked for more common processes, leading to unnecessary treatment. A chart reivew was performed of a single case of acute calcific tendonitis of the index finger in a child. We describe a case of calcific tendinitis of the index finger in a 9-year-old boy who was referred to us for a second opinion after surgical exploration of an acutely inflamed digit was recommended based on his initial presentation. The calcifications and symptoms resolved over time without operative management. Although rare in children, acute calcific tendinitis can present similar to an infection. However, appropriate managment is non-operative as the symptoms and radiographic findings resolve over time.

  9. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr’s disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly present...

  10. MR imaging of intracranial calcification; experimental and clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Hoon; Kim, Byung Jin; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Yang, Sung Yeul [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    This study was performed to evaluate MR signal intensity (SI) of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detection of various intracranial calcifications. The MR findings and ROI value of experimental model of calcium carbonate suspension according to each concentration (20, 35, 50%) and diameter (1-10 mm) and hydroxyapatite suspension according to each concentration (10, 20, 30, 40, 50%) were analyzed. A specimen of calcification in craniopharyngioma was analyzed for its composition by XRD (X-ray diffractometer) and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) methods. MRI of 34 patients with intracranial calcifications were retrospectively analyzed for signal intensity of the calcification and its capability to detect calcifications according to size, location, and contrast with adjacent lesion. The calcium carbonate phantom with larger diameter and low concentration showed lower signal intensity on T2 than T1WI. Hydroxyapatite phantom showed high signal intensity in 10-30% concentration and low signal intensity in 40-50% concentration on T1 weighted image. The 5 cases of 34 intracranial calcifications showed high signal intensity on T1 weighted image. The capability of MRI in the detection of intracranial calcifications decreased in the circumstances such as small size (< 2.5 mm) and intraventricular location. Although the size of calcification was small, the detection was easy in the good contrast with adjacent lesion. However, the detection of the small sized calcification was easy if the contrast with adjacent lesion was good. Intracranial calcification shows generally low signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted image with the exception of occasional high SI on T1WI. Detection of intracranial calcification in MRI is affected by its composition, size, location, and contrast with adjacent lesion.

  11. An unusual case of neonatal peritoneal calcifications associated with hydrometrocolpos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, M.X.; Methratta, S. [College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-10-01

    Neonatal peritoneal calcifications usually suggest a diagnosis of meconium peritonitis, but in this case, a premature baby girl, peritoneal calcifications were caused by hydrometrocolpos secondary to imperforate hymen, a rare association. The patient presented with respiratory distress and ascites and demonstrated abdominal calcifications on plain film. Other radiographic work-up revealed hydrometrocolpos without evidence of gastrointestinal tract obstruction. The patient was diagnosed and treated for imperforate hymen; she was recovered fully. (orig.)

  12. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Salameh, Jihad R; Jeyapalan, Manjula; Sweeney, John F; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy for operative drainage of symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy between June 1997 and July 2001 was performed. Data regarding etiology of pancreatitis, size of pseudocyst, operative time, complications, and pseudocyst recurrence were collected and reported as median values with ranges. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy was attempted in 6 patients. Pseudocyst etiology included gallstone pancreatitis (3), alcohol-induced pancreatitis (2), and post-ERCP pancreatitis (1). The cystogastrostomy was successfully performed laparoscopically in 5 of 6 patients. However, the procedure was converted to open after creation of the cystgastrostomy in 1 of these patients. There were no complications in the cases completed laparoscopically and no deaths in the entire group. No pseudocyst recurrences were observed with a median followup of 44 months (range 4-59 months). Laparoscopic pancreatic cystgastrostomy is a feasible surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts with a resultant low pseudocyst recurrence rate, length of stay, and low morbidity and mortality.

  13. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  14. Predictors of Post-Operative Pain Relief in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis Undergoing the Frey or Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Patel, Yuval A; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Zaheer, Atif; Afghani, Elham; Yadav, Dhiraj; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Andersen, Dana K; Singh, Vikesh K

    2016-04-01

    Post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is variable. Our objective was to determine clinical imaging or histopathologic predictor(s) of post-operative pain relief in CP patients undergoing the Whipple or Frey procedure. All patients who underwent a Whipple (n = 30) or Frey procedure (n = 30) for painful CP between January 2003 and September 2013 were evaluated. A toxic etiology was defined as a history of alcohol use and/or smoking. The pre-operative abdominal CT was evaluated for calcification(s) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) dilation (≥5 mm). The post-operative histopathology was evaluated for severe fibrosis. Clinical imaging and histopathologic features were evaluated as predictors of post-operative pain relief using univariable and multivariable regression analysis. A total of 60 patients (age 51.6 years, 53% males) were included in our study, of whom 42 (70%) reported post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1.1 years. There were 37 (62%) patients with toxic etiology, 36 (60%) each with calcification(s) and MPD dilation. A toxic etiology, calcifications, and severe fibrosis were associated with post-operative pain relief on univariable analysis (all p Whipple or Frey procedure.

  15. Mitochondrial function and malfunction in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Gerasimenko, Julia V

    2012-07-01

    As a primary energy producer, mitochondria play a fundamental role in pancreatic exocrine physiology and pathology. The most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis is either gallstones or heavy alcohol consumption. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can result in the development of chronic pancreatitis and increase the lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer 100-fold. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality with only about 3-4 % of patients surviving beyond 5 years. It has been shown that acute pancreatitis involves Ca²⁺ overload and overproduction of reactive oxygen species in pancreatic acinar cells. Both factors significantly affect mitochondria and lead to cell death. The pathogenesis of inflammation in acute and chronic pancreatitis is tightly linked to the induction of necrosis and apoptosis. There is currently no specific therapy for pancreatitis, but recent findings of an endogenous protective mechanism against Ca²⁺ overload--and particularly the potential to boost this protection--bring hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Alloxan-induced diabetes exacerbates coronary atherosclerosis and calcification in Ossabaw miniature swine with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Jill K; Kole, Ayeeshik; Stivers, Benjamin; Progar, Victor; Pareddy, Anisha; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael

    2018-03-09

    There is a preponderance of evidence implicating diabetes with increased coronary artery disease (CAD) and calcification (CAC) in human patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the effect of diabetes on CAD severity in animal models remains controversial. We investigated whether diabetes exacerbates CAD/CAC and intracellular free calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ) dysregulation in the clinically relevant Ossabaw miniature swine model of MetS. Sixteen swine, eight with alloxan-induced diabetes, were fed a hypercaloric, atherogenic diet for 6 months. Alloxan-induced pancreatic beta cell damage was examined by immunohistochemical staining of insulin. The metabolic profile was confirmed by body weight, complete blood panel, intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), and meal tolerance test. CAD severity was assessed with intravascular ultrasound and histology. [Ca 2+ ] i handling in coronary smooth muscle (CSM) cells was assessed with fura-2 ratiometric imaging. Fasting and post-prandial blood glucose, total cholesterol, and serum triglycerides were elevated in MetS-diabetic swine. This group also exhibited hypoinsulinemia during IVGTT and less pancreatic beta cell mass when compared to lean and MetS-nondiabetic swine. IVUS analysis revealed that MetS-diabetic swine had greater percent wall coverage, percent plaque burden, and calcium index when compared to lean and MetS-nondiabetic swine. Fura-2 imaging of CSM [Ca 2+ ] i revealed that MetS-nondiabetic swine exhibited increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ store release and Ca 2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels compared to lean swine. MetS-diabetic swine exhibited impaired Ca 2+ efflux. Diabetes exacerbates coronary atherosclerosis and calcification in Ossabaw miniature swine with MetS, accompanied by progression of [Ca 2+ ] i dysregulation in advanced CAD/CAC. These results recapitulate increased CAD in humans with diabetes and establish Ossabaw miniature swine as an animal model for future Met

  17. Chronic parotitis with multiple calcifications: Clinical and sialendoscopic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel; Kiringoda, Ruwan; Ryan, William R; Eisele, David W; Chang, Jolie L

    2017-07-01

    To characterize clinical, imaging, and sialendoscopy findings in patients with chronic parotitis and multiple parotid calcifications. Retrospective review. Clinical history, radiographic images and reports, lab tests, and operative reports were reviewed for adult patients with chronic parotitis and multiple parotid calcifications who underwent parotid sialendoscopy. Thirteen of 133 (10%) patients undergoing parotid sialendoscopy for chronic sialadenitis had more than one calcification in the region of the parotid gland. Seven patients (54%) were diagnosed with immune-mediated disease from autoimmune parotitis (positive Sjögren's antibodies or antinuclear antibodies) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The six patients (46%) who did not have an immune-mediated disorder had most calcifications located anterior or along the masseter muscle. Eight of 13 patients (61%) had at least one calculus found in the parotid duct on sialendoscopy. Four patients (38%) had multiple punctate calcifications within the parotid gland, all of whom had either autoimmune parotitis or HIV. None of the proximal or punctate parotid calcifications posterior to the masseter were visualized on sialendoscopy. Chronic parotitis in conjunction with multiple parotid calcifications is uncommon and was identified in 10% of our cohort. We contrast two classifications of parotid calcifications: 1) intraductal stones that cause recurrent duct obstruction and are often located within the main parotid duct along or anterior to the masseter and 2) punctate intraparenchymal parotid gland calcifications that are not visualized on sialendoscopy and may represent underlying inflammatory disease. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1565-1570, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. The roentgenographic study of placental calcifications in Korean pregnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Che

    1980-01-01

    Calcifications in the placenta have been considered as a sign of the maturity because it is found frequently in variable degrees in full-term placentas. The placentas studied were those from deliveries at Chung-Ang University Hospital during the period of January 1978 to June 1980 and were excluded if their deliveries were by Caesarean section. Roentgenographic studies of placenta were performed postnatally in 135 cases delivered from normal pregnant. The results were as follows: 1. The incidence of calcification in the placenta was 53.3%. 2. The tendency of placenta calcification was increased as progress of maturity but not indicated as postmaturity. 3. Calcifications were less correlated with increasing gravidity or maternal age. 4. Calcifications occurred more frequently with increasing birth weight. 5. Calcifications in placentas were more frequently in the neonates with 10 scores of Apgar and normal level of maternal hemoglobin. 6. No significant correlation between incidence of calcification and maternal toxemia was observed. In the pregnant with an episode of previous abortion or S. P. R. M., incidence of calcification was apparently increased but statistically not significant. On the whole, placental calcifications are not harmful and identified as normal or proper aging process

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  20. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginesta, Mireia M; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71-80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

  1. Revision of anastomotic stenosis after pancreatic head resection for chronic pancreatitis: is it futile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Katherine A; Fontenot, Bennett B; Harvey, Norman R; Adams, David B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Because survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for cancer is limited, it is difficult to assess longterm pancreaticojejunal anastomotic patency. However, in patients with benign disease, pancreaticojejunal anastomotic stenosis may become problematic. What happens when pancreaticojejunal anastomosis revision is undertaken? Methods: Patients undergoing pancreatic anastomotic revision after pancreatic head resection for benign disease between 1997 and 2007 at the Medical University of South Carolina were identified. A retrospective chart review and analysis were undertaken with the approval of the Institutional Review Board for the Evaluation of Human Subjects. Longterm follow-up was obtained by patient survey at a clinic visit or by telephone. Results: During the study period, 237 patients underwent pancreatic head resection. Of these, 27 patients (17 women; median age 42 years) underwent revision of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. Six patients (22%) had a pancreatic leak or abscess at the time of the index pancreatic head resection. The indication for revision of anastomosis was intractable pain. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which indicated anastomotic stricture in 18 patients (63%). Nine other patients underwent exploration based on clinical suspicion caused by recurrent pancreatitis and stenosis was confirmed at the time of surgery. Six patients (22%) had perioperative complications after revision. The median length of stay was 12 days. There were no perioperative deaths; however, late mortality occurred in four patients (15%). Six of 23 survivors (26%) at the time of follow-up (median 56 months) reported longterm pain relief. Conclusions: Stricture of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis after pancreatic head resection presents with recurrent pancreatitis and pancreatic pain. MRCP has good specificity in the diagnosis of anastomotic obstruction, but lacks sensitivity. Pancreaticojejunal revision

  2. Environmental control on Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore calcification in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amario, Barbara; Grelaud, Michael; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea, a "natural laboratory" characterized by strong environmental gradients, is likely to undergo serious alterations due to climate change and ocean acidification. These processes are expected to affect also phytoplankton distribution. Coccolithophores are the only phytoplankton calcifying group and laboratory studies on E. huxleyi, the most abundant and widely distributed species of coccolithophores worldwide, yield strain-specific results. Culture experiments must be integrated with observations in the natural environment to understand existing interactions between drivers, and to verify population structures in different areas. Two transects spanning the south-western and south-eastern basins have been investigated, combining data from April 2011 (Meteor cruise M84/3) and May 2013 (MedSeA cruise). E. huxleyi coccolith morphometry was analyzed to determine average mass and length. These results were then compared with morphological observations performed on the largely dominant E. huxleyi Type A through scanning electron microscope (SEM). We distinguished four main calcification morphologies within E. huxleyi Type A: low-calcified (A1), medium-calcified (A2), high-calcified with closed central area (A3a), and open central area (A3b). E. huxleyi coccolith mass was strongly and positively correlated with the relative abundance of a particular morphology. Moreover, the calcification morphologies were preferentially distributed in the Mediterranean according to specific combinations of environmental variables, which included the carbonate chemistry system. The distribution of E. huxleyi Type A calcification morphologies in the Mediterranean is likely to be influenced by climate changes. Coccolithophore calcification degree is connected to the carbon cycle through photosynthesis / calcification ratio and sedimentation (particulate inorganic and organic carbon reaching the seafloor). This study aims to provide a basis for future investigations on the

  3. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  4. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study...

  5. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  6. CT of blunt pancreatic trauma-A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur; Wan, John Mun Chin

    2008-01-01

    Blunt trauma to pancreas is uncommon and clinical features are often non-specific and unreliable leading to possible delays in diagnosis and therefore increased morbidity. CT has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of abdominal solid-organ injury in the blunt trauma patient. The introduction of multidetector-row CT allows for high resolution scans and multiplanar reformations that improve diagnosis. Detection of pancreatic injuries on CT requires knowledge of the subtle changes produced by pancreatic injury. The CT appearance of pancreatic injury ranges from a normal initial appearance of the pancreas to active pancreatic bleeding. Knowledge of CT signs of pancreatic trauma and a high index of suspicion is required in diagnosing pancreatic injury

  7. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  8. Medical image of the week: subcutaneous calcification in dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natt B

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year old woman was referred to our Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD clinic for evaluation of dyspnea. A high-resolution CT scan of the chest showed perivascular reticular and ground glass opacities with air trapping, consistent with non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (Figure 1. She was diagnosed with connective tissue associated ILD. On review of previous images extensive subcutaneous calcifications were seen (Figure 2. Calcinosis is an uncommon manifestation of dermatomyositis in adults (1. It is usually seen around areas of frequent trauma like the hands and elbows. In her case, a pelvic inflammatory disease may have been a trigger for this calcinosis. Calcinosis is a difficult complication to treat with some success seen with diltiazem, aluminum hydroxide, and even alendronate in children. Surgical excision may be required in some cases.

  9. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, J. Edward

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  10. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tueysuez, Beyhan [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Gazioglu, Nurperi [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Uenguer, Savas [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Aji, Dolly Yafet [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Seval [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Universitatsklinikum Berlin, Charite Virchow-Klinik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  11. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tueysuez, Beyhan; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Uenguer, Savas; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Tuerkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  12. Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomberg, W.; Schuster, A.

    2014-01-01

    Calcifications of the costal cartilages occur, as a rule, not until the age of 30 years. The knowledge of the clinical significance of early and extensive calcifications is still incomplete. Materials and Methods. A search was made to find patients below the age of 30 years who showed distinct calcifications of their lower costal cartilages by viewing 360 random samples of intravenous pyelograms and abdominal plain films. The histories, and clinical and laboratory findings of these patients were analyzed. Results. Nineteen patients fulfilled the criteria of premature calcifications of costal cartilages (CCCs). The patients had in common that they were frequently referred to a hospital and were treated by several medical disciplines. Nevertheless many complaints of the patients remained unsolved. Premature CCCs were often associated with rare endocrine disorders, inborn errors of metabolism, and abnormal hematologic findings. Among the metabolic disorders there were 2 proven porphyrias and 7 patients with a suspected porphyria but with inconclusive laboratory findings. Conclusion. Premature CCCs are unlikely to be a normal variant in skeletal radiology. The findings in this small group of patients call for more intensive studies, especially in regard to the putative role of a porphyria

  13. The Relation between Calcium Supplement Consumption and Calcific Shoulder Tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rouhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcific tendonitis is a common cause of non-traumatic shoulder pain. Previous studies have suggested a relation between minerals and endocrine and calcium deposition. Thus, hypercalcemia is probably related to calcific tendonitis. This study aims at evaluating the relation found between calcium supplement consumption and calcific shoulder tendonitis. Methods: This analytical-descriptive study was conducted on 250 patients with shoulder pain referring to clinics and emergency department of Shohada Orthopedics Hospital during one year for considering calcific shoulder tendonitis and calcium supplement consumption. Patients with calcific tendonitis were treated and their functional ability was evaluated using DASH questionnaire, pain severity and range of motion (ROM before and after treatment and their correlation with calcium supplement consumption. Results: Calcific tendonitis and calcium consumption were generally seen in 30 (12% and 73 (29.2% cases, respectively. Calcium consumption frequency in patients with calcific tendonitis was significantly higher than the patients who did not consume calcium supplements (76.7% vs. 22.7%. Patients with calcific tendonitis who did not consume calcium supplements suffered from significantly longer periods of shoulder pain. All patients having consumed calcium supplement were female. The group who consumed calcium supplement had significantly severe pain and higher DASH score before and after treatment, while there was no significant difference in number of impaired ROM before and after treatment. Also, there was a negative correlation between calcium supplement consumption, pain severity and DASH score before and after treatment. Conclusion: Calcium supplement consumption is related to calcific tendonitis and is also accompanied with more pain and lower functional ability in patients with calcific tendonitis.    Keywords: Calcific tendonitis; Shoulder; Calcium supplement; Pain

  14. Vitamin K: from coagulation to calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakkari, Ilari

    Vitamin K is not only essential for the synthesis of coagulation factors in the liver, but it also strengthens the bones and prevents calcification of the arteries. These effects are mediated through the same mechanism, i.e. carboxylation of Gla target proteins. The discovery of novel Gla proteins that are not associated with blood coagulation or calcium metabolism indicates that vitamin K has additional effects in the pancreas and the central nervous system, for example. As dietary supplements, vitamin K1 of plant origin and vitamins K2 of bacterial origin may exert different effects.

  15. Pulmonary metastatic calcification: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozi, Lilian Christine Franchiotti [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The present report describes the case of a 48-year-old female patient suffering from chronic renal failure on dialysis for 13 years. She presented with hemoptysis, fever, productive cough and dyspnoea. Chest radiography showed predominance of ill-defined opacities in the middle and lower lung fields, bilaterally. Chest computed tomography showed ground glass opacities associated with poorly defined centrilobular nodules with ground-glass attenuation. The patient was submitted to bronchoalveolar lavage that was negative for mycobacteria and fungi. On the basis of such findings, open lung biopsy was performed, which revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. (author)

  16. Physical water treatment against calcification and rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to Germany, where the installation of small-sized, decentralised plants is still prefered, water supply companies in countries such as Denmark have already for some time successfully been using physical water treatment systems. Although the health and environmental benefits of this non-chemical method of water treatment are undisputed and its proper application is also economically beneficial, there is still a widerspread lack of information as to where such plants can be used. Consequently, older methods are often resorted to combatting calcification and rust. (orig.) [de

  17. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, Ruediger S.; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F.; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  19. Necrotising pancreatitis presenting as a painful mass in the groin and sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K E

    2013-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is typically associated with classical clinical and radiological features. The sensitivity of CT to diagnose acute pancreatitis depends on the severity of the attack and ranges from 77% to 92% with a specificity approaching 100%. Despite the fact this is a common disease, there are myriad clinical presentations of acute pancreatitis. We report herein an especially rare presentation where severe acute necrotising pancreatitis presented with a tender inguinoscrotal swelling with a normal pancreas on CT imaging.

  20. Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii distal to the glenohumeral joint: plain film radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A B

    1989-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful condition related to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals; it favors large joints. The shoulder, specifically the tendons of the rotator cuff and the insertion of the long head of the biceps on the superior glenoid rim, is a well-recognized location for this abnormality. The purpose of this article is to describe a second site of calcific tendinitis of the biceps, distal to the joint and corresponding to the junction of the tendon and muscle. Radiographs in 119 cases of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, obtained between 1980 and 1988, were reviewed. Twenty had calcific tendinitis in the region of the tendon of the long head of the biceps (nine at the glenoid insertion and 11 adjacent to the humeral shaft). All 11 patients with calcific tendinitis at the more distal site had a small, homogeneous deposit adjacent to the proximal humeral shaft. The densities in these 11 cases followed the normal course of the tendon of the long head of the biceps and were therefore medial to the proximal humeral shaft on the internal rotation view, lateral to the proximal humeral shaft on the external rotation view, and anterior to the proximal humeral shaft on the axillary projection. The major differential diagnosis of calcific tendinitis of the tendon of the long head of the biceps is loose bodies trapped in the biceps tendon sheath. Although the position of the soft-tissue densities in these two entities is similar, loose bodies have an appearance of bone, and their source (degenerative arthritis or recurrent dislocations) is usually apparent. A site of calcific tendinitis distal to the glenohumeral joint that is detectable on plain films is reviewed. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the anatomy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. The clinical charts of the 11 patients also are summarized, with emphasis on the association between the roentgen finding and bicipital tendinitis and impingement syndrome.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  2. Activity of neutrophil elastase reflects the progression of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders M; Nord, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Neutrophil elastase (NE) concentration is associated with progression of acute pancreatitis (AP), but measuring total NE concentration includes biologically inactive NE. This study aims to investigate the relationship between NE activity and the aetiology and severity of AP...... was associated with predicted severity of AP and AP-associated respiratory failure. Specific NE inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis....

  3. From laboratory manipulations to Earth system models: scaling calcification impacts of ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Young

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The observed variation in the calcification responses of coccolithophores to changes in carbonate chemistry paints a highly incoherent picture, particularly for the most commonly cultured "species", Emiliania huxleyi. The disparity between magnitude and potentially even sign of the calcification change under simulated end-of-century ocean surface chemical changes (higher pCO2, lower pH and carbonate saturation, raises challenges to quantifying future carbon cycle impacts and feedbacks because it introduces significant uncertainty in parameterizations used for global models. Here we compile the results of coccolithophore carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments and review how ocean carbon cycle models have attempted to bridge the gap from experiments to global impacts. Although we can rule out methodological differences in how carbonate chemistry is altered as introducing an experimental bias, the absence of a consistent calcification response implies that model parameterizations based on small and differing subsets of experimental observations will lead to varying estimates for the global carbon cycle impacts of ocean acidification. We highlight two pertinent observations that might help: (1 the degree of coccolith calcification varies substantially, both between species and within species across different genotypes, and (2 the calcification response across mesocosm and shipboard incubations has so-far been found to be relatively consistent. By analogy to descriptions of plankton growth rate vs. temperature, such as the "Eppley curve", which seek to encapsulate the net community response via progressive assemblage change rather than the response of any single species, we posit that progressive future ocean acidification may drive a transition in dominance from more to less heavily calcified coccolithophores. Assemblage shift may be more important to integrated community calcification response than species-specific

  4. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Child, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma.

  5. Dracunculus medinensis (Guinea worm disease): a rare cause of calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gospos, C.

    1980-01-01

    Tangled whorly calcifications were seen in the abdominal subcutaneous tissues of a negro patient from Africa. The differential diagnosis of such calcifications - rarely observed in Europe - includes a variety of parasites. In this patient, Dracunculus medinensis (guinea worm disease) was the cause.

  6. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Bover

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD–MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc., we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions.

  7. A comparative study of the identification of rotator cuff calcifications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A deposit of calcium in the rotator cuff tendons, also known as calcifying tendinopathy, is a common condition. Calcifications are often associated with significant pain and restriction of shoulder movement. The hypothesis of this retrospective, descriptive study is that ultrasound is more sensitive to detect calcifications in the ...

  8. Acute calcific tendinitis of the finger--a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, S N

    2004-07-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the hand is rare and often misdiagnosed as infection, fracture or periarthritis. It frequently occurs in peri-menopausal women and is caused by deposits of hydroxyapatite crystals. We describe acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion in an elderly man taking oral anticoagulants. The differential diagnoses and recommended treatment are discussed.

  9. [Endomyocardial fibrosis with massive calcification of the left ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Joana; Camacho, Ana; Gago, Paula; Candeias, Rui; Santos, Walter; Marques, Nuno; Matos, Pedro; Brandão, Victor; Gomes, Veloso

    2010-03-01

    Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rare disease, endemic in tropical countries. It is characterized by fibrosis of the endocardium that can extend to myocardium. Important calcification of the endocardium is rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of endomyocardial fibrosis in a european caucasian patient, associated with massive calcification of left ventricle.

  10. Calcification within the lesion of an old cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Imamura, Toshiharu; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo

    1987-01-01

    We described a 68-year-old woman with marked calcification in the lesion of an old cerebral infarction. Calcified deposits in an old infarcted area of the left middle cerebral artery were demonstrated by CT 9 months after she had suffered a stroke, probably because of an embolism. There have been few reports of calcification associated with cerebral infarction. (author)

  11. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  12. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  13. Specifying pancreatic endocrine cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collombat, Patrick; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Serup, Palle; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2006-07-01

    Cell replacement therapy could represent an attractive alternative to insulin injections for the treatment of diabetes. However, this approach requires a thorough understanding of the molecular switches controlling the specification of the different pancreatic cell-types in vivo. These are derived from an apparently identical pool of cells originating from the early gut endoderm, which are successively specified towards the pancreatic, endocrine, and hormone-expressing cell lineages. Numerous studies have outlined the crucial roles exerted by transcription factors in promoting the cell destiny, defining the cell identity and maintaining a particular cell fate. This review focuses on the mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of the pancreas with particular emphasis on recent findings concerning the transcription factor hierarchy orchestrating endocrine cell fate allocation.

  14. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T C K; van 't Hof, G; Kazemier, G; Hop, W C; Pek, C; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Dekken, H; van Eijck, C H J

    2008-01-01

    Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were evaluated. Exocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by fecal elastase-1 test, while endocrine pancreatic function was assessed by plasma glucose level. The extent of fibrosis, duct dilation and endocrine tissue loss was examined histopathologically. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and elastase-1 level less than 100 microg/g (p pancreatic insufficiency. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and endocrine tissue loss (p pancreatic fibrosis nor endocrine tissue loss were correlated with the development of postoperative diabetes mellitus. Duct dilation alone was neither correlated with exocrine nor with endocrine function loss. The majority of patients develop severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy. The extent of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is strongly correlated with preoperative fibrosis. The loss of endocrine tissue does not correlate with postoperative diabetes mellitus. Preoperative dilation of the pancreatic duct per se does not predict exocrine or endocrine pancreatic insufficiency postoperatively. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. [Chronic pancreatitis diagnosed after the first attack of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Uvírová, Magdalena; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Klvaňa, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    2016-02-01

    One of the diseases involving a potential risk of developing chronic pancreatitis is acute pancreatitis. Of the overall number of 231 individuals followed with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 56 patients were initially treated for acute pancreatitis (24.2 %). Within an interval of 12- 24 months from the first attack of acute pancreatitis, their condition gradually progressed to reached the picture of chronic pancreatitis. The individuals included in the study abstained (from alcohol) following the first attack of acute pancreatitis and no relapse of acute pancreatitis was proven during the period of their monitoring. The etiology of acute pancreatitis identified alcohol as the predominant cause (55.3 %), biliary etiology was proven in 35.7 %. According to the revised Atlanta classification, severe pancreatitis was established in 69.6 % of the patients, the others met the criterion for intermediate form, those with the light form were not included. Significant risk factors present among the patients were smoking, obesity and 18 %, resp. 25.8 % had pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus identified. 88.1 % of the patients with acute pancreatitis were smokers. The majority of individuals with chronic pancreatitis following an attack of acute pancreatitis were of a productive age from 25 to 50 years. It is not only acute alcoholic pancreatitis which evolves into chronic pancreatitis, we have also identified this transition for pancreatitis of biliary etiology.

  16. The role of intraductal US in the management of idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis without a definite cause on ERCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Moon, Jong Ho; Choi, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jong Chan; Han, Seung Hyo; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cheon, Young Koog; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Moon Sung

    2011-06-01

    The cause of pancreatitis is unknown in as many as 30% of cases of recurrent acute pancreatitis, even after ERCP. To investigate the role of intraductal US (IDUS) for managing idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis (IRP). Prospective study. Tertiary referral hospital. Thirty-one patients with suspicious IRP with negative findings on ERCP. IDUS during ERCP. IDUS findings showing any possible cause of pancreatitis. IDUS revealed small bile duct stones (≤3 mm) in 5 patients (16.1%) and sludge in 3 patients (9.7%). The detection rate for a bile duct stone and sludge was significantly higher in patients with a dilated CBD than a nondilated CBD on ERCP (71.4 vs 12.5%; P < .05). Recurrent pancreatitis did not develop in 7 of 8 patients with biliary stones or sludge after an endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Two patients (6.5%) demonstrated a small polypoid lesion on the distal end of the pancreatic duct. One patient underwent surgery for intra-ampullary cancer, and another one underwent EST without another attack of pancreatitis. Three patients (9.7%) showed evidence of chronic pancreatitis with small pancreatic stones and/or calcifications on IDUS. Small number of patients. IDUS results were not compared with those of conventional EUS. There was no reference standard for chronic pancreatitis as diagnosed by IDUS. IDUS identified a possible cause of idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis in 42% of patients with negative findings on ERCP. The IDUS-guided approach combined with ERCP and EST may be useful for decreasing recurring attacks of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcific bursitis mimicking a parosteal osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavin, J.D. Jr.; Vento, J.A.; Haugh, J.D.; Spencer, R.P.; Connecticut Univ., Farmington

    1986-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with no history of trauma or major medical illness, presented with a ten day history of right hip and thigh pain. The pain was described as constant, dull, and aching. It was nonradiating and was not relieved by analgesics. Physical examination revealed diffuse tenderness over the right hip and right lateral thigh region; no mass was palpable. The CBC, serum electrolytes, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase determinations were all normal. Radiographs of the right hip demonstrated amorphous soft tissue calcification adjacent to the lateral aspect of the right femur as well as periosteal reaction and apparent destruction in the adjacent bone. Because of these suspicious X-rays findings, the initial working diagnosis was parosteal osteogenic sarcoma. A bone scan was performed two hours after the intravenous administration of 15 millicuries of Tc-99m-MDP. It showed focal uptake overlying the upper femur, approximately where the X-ray had shown periosteal reaction and apparent bony destruction. In addition, the bone images also demonstrated a linear band of activity extending through the soft tissues from the greater trochanter to the lower lateral thigh. Because of the unexpected and quite extensive soft tissue uptake seen on the scan, the possibility that a benign process was involved was then considered seriously for the first time. An open biopsy was then performed. It revealed acute calcific trochanteric bursitis; there was no evidence of bone involvement. The patient was treated conservatively and symptoms gradually resolved. (orig.) [de

  18. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  19. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  20. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  1. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: jeamharoldo@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Santos, Antonio Carlos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and methods: computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41-54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab's own routine. Results: four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion: the selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image. (author)

  2. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  3. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  4. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence. Imagesp1656-a PMID:21221366

  5. Magnetic resonance hydrometry: non-invasive quantification of the exocrine pancreatic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Battmann, A.; Kirsch, M.; Klose, K.J.; Boehm, D.; Eissele, R.; Wagner, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To show the ability of magnetic resonance hydrometry (MRH) to quantify the pancreatic secretion after secretin stimulation in order to distinguish between physiological excretion and reduced output in chronic pancreatitis. Methods: MRH images were acquired in a 1.0-T-clinical scanner using a body-array coil and a heavily T 2 -weighted standard single-shot TSE sequence. Thirty-one patients (14 male/17 female) who routinely underwent ERCP for suspected choledocholithiasis (n = 22), recurring abdominal pain (n = 1), icterus (n = 6) and suspected pancreatitis (n = 2) were included. During the investigation 1 CU/kg BW secretin were administered intravenously. Secreted volume of fluid, start of secretion, achievement of a plateau of secretion and a combined score of these parameters (MRH score) were assessed and evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for these parameters. Results: 27 patients had no pancreatic pathology, and four suffered from chronic pancreatitis. Patients without pancreatic disorders produced a mean pancreatic fluid volume of 183±86 mL, whereas patients with chronic pancreatitis secreted 61±39 mL. Secretion started after a mean time of 95±94 seconds (no pancreatic impairment) and 62±13 seconds (chronic pancreatitis). The MRH score achieved a high accuracy in the detection of chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated the feasibility of measuring pancreatic output by MRH after stimulation with secretin. Moreover, a distinction between normal secretion and patients with chronic pancreatitis is possible. (orig.) [de

  6. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only

  7. Value of computed tomography as a screening examination of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Katsushi; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    The abdominal CT films of 50 patients were reviewed by ten radiologists to evaluate the role of CT examination in the screening of pancreatic cancer. The 50 patients consisted of 10 with pancreatic cancer, 8 with other pancreatic abnormalities, and 32 with normal pancreas. Ten radiologists were divided into two groups according to their experience in evaluating CT examinations, an experienced group and an unexperienced group, respectively. In the detectability of pancreatic abnormality, the experienced group showed a sensitivity of 72.2% and a specificity of 86.2%. The unexperienced group showed a sensitivity of 70.9% and a specificity of 72.0%. In the detectability of pancreatic cancer, the experienced group showed a sensitivity of 62.0% and a specificity of 83.4%. The unexperienced group showed a sensitivity of 66.0% and a specificity of 81.8%. In the localization of the pancreatic cancer, there was no difference between the two groups. Pancreatic abnormality can be detected with high accuracy, but diagnosis of the nature of pancreatic cancer is difficult. Experience in evaluating CT examinations elevates the detectability of pancreatic abnormality but does not elevate the detectability of pancreatic cancer. These results suggest the difficulty in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  8. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  9. Association of conjunctival and corneal calcification with vascular calcification among hepatitis-C-seropositive hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouSeif, Khaled; Sany, Dawlat; Elshahawy, Yasser; Seddik, Ayman; Rahman, Khedr; Gaber, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Disorders associated with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been reported including cardiovascular, metabolic, and central nervous system diseases. Since chronic HCV infections may be curable, their identification as causal contributors to cardiovascular risk could offer new perspectives in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between HCV and aortic arch calcification (AAC) and corneal and conjunctival calcification (CCC) in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients; further, we assessed the correlation of CCC with vascular calcification. A total of 100 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) in our hospital were included in this study. Patients underwent a complete ocular examination including intraocular pressure, and CCC was looked for by slit lamp and fundoscopy. CCC was graded according to modified Porter and Crombie classification system described by Tokuyama et al. Helical computerized tomographic chest examination was used to evaluate the grading of AAC. Demographic, hematological, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained. There was significant difference between seropositive (n = 51) and seronegative patients (n = 49) regarding grading of AAC and CCC (P <0.001). Significant positive correlation was found between grading of CCC, AAC, age (P <0.001), duration on HD (P <0.001), HCV-antibody positivity (P <0.001), serum calcium level (P <0.001), serum phosphorus level (P <0.001), calcium × phosphorus product (P <0.001), and i-parathormone level (P < 0.001). In addition, CCC grading positively correlated with AAC. Our results suggest that patients undergoing HD infected with the HCV have high degree of CCC, AAC, and mineral metabolism disorder. The strong correlation between CCC and AAC indicates that CCC evaluation is an easy, fast, non-invasive method, and might be used as an indirect indicator to detect vascular calcification in patients undergoing MHD.

  10. Association of conjunctival and corneal calcification with vascular calcification among hepatitis-C-seropositive hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled AbouSeif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders associated with the hepatitis C virus (HCV have been reported including cardiovascular, metabolic, and central nervous system diseases. Since chronic HCV infections may be curable, their identification as causal contributors to cardiovascular risk could offer new perspectives in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between HCV and aortic arch calcification (AAC and corneal and conjunctival calcification (CCC in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD patients; further, we assessed the correlation of CCC with vascular calcification. A total of 100 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD in our hospital were included in this study. Patients underwent a complete ocular examination including intraocular pressure, and CCC was looked for by slit lamp and fundoscopy. CCC was graded according to modified Porter and Crombie classification system described by Tokuyama et al. Helical computerized tomographic chest examination was used to evaluate the grading of AAC. Demographic, hematological, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained. There was significant difference between seropositive (n = 51 and seronegative patients (n = 49 regarding grading of AAC and CCC (P <0.001. Significant positive correlation was found between grading of CCC, AAC, age (P <0.001, duration on HD (P <0.001, HCV-antibody positivity (P <0.001, serum calcium level (P <0.001, serum phosphorus level (P <0.001, calcium × phosphorus product (P <0.001, and i-parathormone level (P < 0.001. In addition, CCC grading positively correlated with AAC. Our results suggest that patients undergoing HD infected with the HCV have high degree of CCC, AAC, and mineral metabolism disorder. The strong correlation between CCC and AAC indicates that CCC evaluation is an easy, fast, non-invasive method, and might be used as an indirect indicator to detect vascular calcification in patients undergoing MHD.

  11. History of hot flashes and aortic calcification among postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C; Kuller, Lewis H; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Matthews, Karen A

    2010-03-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are considered largely a quality-of-life issue. However, emerging research also links hot flashes to cardiovascular risk. In some investigations, this risk is particularly apparent among women using hormone therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether a longer history of reported hot flashes over the study period was associated with greater aortic and coronary artery calcification. Interactions with hormone therapy use were examined in an exploratory fashion. Participants included 302 women participating in the Healthy Women Study, a longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk during perimenopause and postmenopause, which was initiated in 1983. Hot flashes (any/none) were assessed when women were 1, 2, 5, and 8 years postmenopausal. Electron beam tomography measures of coronary artery calcification and aortic calcification were completed in 1997-2004. Associations between the number of visits with report of hot flashes, divided by the number of visits attended, and aortic or coronary artery calcification (transformed) were examined in linear regression models. Interactions by hormone therapy use were evaluated. Among women using hormone therapy, a longer history of reported hot flashes was associated with increased aortic calcification, controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (b = 2.87, SE = 1.21, P history of hot flashes and coronary artery calcification. Among postmenopausal women using hormone therapy, a longer history of reported hot flashes measured prospectively was associated with increased aortic calcification, controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Hot flashes may signal adverse cardiovascular changes among certain postmenopausal women.

  12. Skeletal maturity assessment using mandibular canine calcification stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildana Džemidžić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aims of this study were: to investigate the relationship between mandibular canine calcification stages and skeletal maturity; and to evaluate whether the mandibular canine calcification stages may be used as a reliable diagnostic tool for skeletal maturity assessment. Materials and methods. This study included 151 subjects: 81 females and 70 males, with ages ranging from 9 to 16 years (mean age: 12.29±1.86 years. The inclusion criteria for subjects were as follows: age between 9 and 16 years; good general health without any hormonal, nutritional, growth or dental development problems. Subjects who were undergoing or had previously received orthodontic treatment were not included in this study. The calcification stages of the left permanent mandibular canine were assessed according to the method of Demirjian, on panoramic radiographs. Assessment of skeletal maturity was carried out using the cervical vertebral maturation index (CVMI, as proposed by the Hassel-Farman method, on lateral cephalograms. The correlation between the calcification stages of mandibular canine and skeletal maturity was estimated separately for male and female subjects. Results. Correlation coefficients between calcification stages of mandibular canine and skeletal maturity were 0.895 for male and 0.701 for female subjects. Conclusions. A significant correlation was found between the calcification stages of the mandibular canine and skeletal maturity. The calcification stages of the mandibular canine show a satisfactory diagnostic performance only for assessment of pre-pubertal growth phase.

  13. Periodontal Disease Is an Independent Predictor of Intracardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg S. Pressman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition worldwide and is associated with incident coronary disease. Hypothesis. We hypothesized that periodontal disease would also be associated with cardiac calcification, a condition which shares many risk factors with atherosclerosis and is considered a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods. Cross-sectional study at two sites (USA and Japan involving subjects with both clinical echocardiograms and detailed dental examinations. Semiquantitative scoring systems were used to assess severity of periodontal disease and echocardiographic calcification. Results. Fifty-six of 73 subjects (77% had cardiac calcifications, and 51% had moderate to severe periodontal disease (score > 2. In unadjusted analysis, a significant relationship between periodontal score and cardiac calcification (Spearman rho = 0.4, P=0.001 was noted, with increases in mean calcification score seen across increasing levels of periodontal disease. On multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, race, glomerular filtration rate, and traditional risk factors, this association remained significant (P=0.024. There was no significant interaction by study site, race, or gender. Conclusions. In a multiracial population, we found a significant association between the degree of periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, and cardiac calcification. Further, higher periodontal scores were associated with greater degrees of calcification.

  14. Periodontal disease is an independent predictor of intracardiac calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Gregg S; Qasim, Atif; Verma, Nitin; Miyamae, Masami; Arishiro, Kumiko; Notohara, Yasuhiro; Crudu, Vitalie; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition worldwide and is associated with incident coronary disease. We hypothesized that periodontal disease would also be associated with cardiac calcification, a condition which shares many risk factors with atherosclerosis and is considered a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional study at two sites (USA and Japan) involving subjects with both clinical echocardiograms and detailed dental examinations. Semiquantitative scoring systems were used to assess severity of periodontal disease and echocardiographic calcification. Fifty-six of 73 subjects (77%) had cardiac calcifications, and 51% had moderate to severe periodontal disease (score > 2). In unadjusted analysis, a significant relationship between periodontal score and cardiac calcification (Spearman rho = 0.4, P = 0.001) was noted, with increases in mean calcification score seen across increasing levels of periodontal disease. On multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, race, glomerular filtration rate, and traditional risk factors, this association remained significant (P = 0.024). There was no significant interaction by study site, race, or gender. In a multiracial population, we found a significant association between the degree of periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, and cardiac calcification. Further, higher periodontal scores were associated with greater degrees of calcification.

  15. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  16. Animal Models of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L. Sider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, once thought to be a degenerative disease, is now recognized to be an active pathobiological process, with chronic inflammation emerging as a predominant, and possibly driving, factor. However, many details of the pathobiological mechanisms of CAVD remain to be described, and new approaches to treat CAVD need to be identified. Animal models are emerging as vital tools to this end, facilitated by the advent of new models and improved understanding of the utility of existing models. In this paper, we summarize and critically appraise current small and large animal models of CAVD, discuss the utility of animal models for priority CAVD research areas, and provide recommendations for future animal model studies of CAVD.

  17. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i resp...

  18. Intraocular Lens Calcification; a Clinicopathologic Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rezaei-Kanavi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and pathological features of a case of hydrogel intraocular lens (IOL calcification. CASE REPORT: A 48-year-old man underwent explantation of a single-piece hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens in his left eye because of decreased visual acuity and milky white opalescence of the IOL. The opacified lens was exchanged uneventfully with a hydrophobic acrylic IOL. Gross examination of the explanted IOL disclosed opacification of the optic and haptics. Full-thickness sections of the lens optic were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, von Kossa and Gram Tworts'. Microscopic examination of the sections revealed fine and diffuse basophilic granular deposits of variable size within the lens optic parallel to the lens curvature but separated from the surface by a moderately clear zone. The deposits were of high calcium content as evident by dark brown staining with von Kossa. Gram Tworts' staining disclosed no microorganisms. CONCLUSION: This report further contributes to the existing literature on hydrogel IOL calcification.

  19. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  20. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  1. Calcification in the portal venous system demonstrated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadar, H; Sommer, R

    1983-08-01

    The CT appearance of calcification in the portal venous system in a patient with chronic alcoholic cirrhosis is presented. Reported cases of radiologically detectable calcification in the portal system are rare, and most of them have been associated with longstanding portal hypertension. We presume that with CT this diagnosis will be made more frequently. In the presence of calcification in the portal venous system, portal vein thrombosis is highly probable. This information is of obvious importance to the surgeon contemplating a portal decompressive shunt procedure.

  2. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio E.

    2004-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2 * gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  3. Duodenal foreign body mimicking acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, M.D.; Wolf, A.M.; Green, R.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To determine the specificity and sensitivity of plasma and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) concentrat. Design: Retrospective analysis of clinical cases. Procedure: Dogs were classified into three groups: healthy animals, dogs with confirmed pancreatitis and dogs with nonpancreatic disease, which clinically or biochemically resembled pancreatitis. This last group was further subdivided into dogs with renal and those with nonrenal disease. The plasma and urinary TAP concentration was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Clinical cases additionally had serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration measured, as well as radiography and ultrasound of the abdomen and further diagnostic procedures. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis test) was performed using Statistix 4.0 program. Results: There was a wide range of urinary TAP concentration in healthy dogs (mean 52.30 nmol/L, standard deviation 55.25) that made interpretation of urinary TAP concentrations difficult in the other groups. There was a narrow reference range for plasma TAP (mean 2.67 nmol/L, standard deviation 0.93). Plasma and urinary TAP concentrations, as well as urinary TAP to creatinine ratio, were all increased in dogs that died with necrotising pancreatitis. Values were not increased in mild, interstitial pancreatitis. Increased plasma TAP concentrations were also present in dogs with severe renal disease. Conclusion: Plasma TAP concentration isa good prognostic indicator in naturally occurring pancreatitis in dogs. The failure of TAP to increase in mild pancreatitis, and the increase present in severe renal disease, suggests its measurement has limited application as a sole diagnostic tool for canine pancreatitis. Further investigations are required in order to explain the large variability of urinary TAP concentration and the presence of circulating TAP in healthy dogs

  4. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  5. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  6. Breast cancer - Early detection with mammography. Crushed stone-like calcifications - The most frequent malignant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabar, Laszlo; Central Hospital, Falun; Tot, Tibor; Central Hospital, Falun; Dean, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    million mammograms. Each volume features in-depth coverage of a specific mammographic feature representing various underlying benign and malignant breast diseases, lavishly illustrated with exceptional large section and subgross, 3D histological images to facilitate the learning process. In addition to the present volume, the series includes: - Casting Type Calcifications: Sign of a Subtype with Deceptive Features - The Ambiguous Powdery and Cotton Ball-like Calcifications (2009) - Spiculated Lesions and Architectural Distortion: Easy to Miss, Hard to Find (2010). (orig.)

  7. Breast cancer - Early detection with mammography. Crushed stone-like calcifications - The most frequent malignant type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabar, Laszlo [Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden). School of Medicine]|[Central Hospital, Falun (Sweden). Dept. of Mammography; Tot, Tibor [Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden). School of Medicine]|[Central Hospital, Falun (Sweden). Dept. of Pathology and Clinical Cytology; Dean, Peter B. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2008-07-01

    million mammograms. Each volume features in-depth coverage of a specific mammographic feature representing various underlying benign and malignant breast diseases, lavishly illustrated with exceptional large section and subgross, 3D histological images to facilitate the learning process. In addition to the present volume, the series includes: - Casting Type Calcifications: Sign of a Subtype with Deceptive Features - The Ambiguous Powdery and Cotton Ball-like Calcifications (2009) - Spiculated Lesions and Architectural Distortion: Easy to Miss, Hard to Find (2010). (orig.)

  8. Radiological and clinical predictors of long-term outcome in rotator cuff calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Adrichem, Raymond A; Selten, Jasmijn W; Nagels, Jochem; Reijnierse, M; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge on the epidemiology and long-term course of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is scarce. We assessed demographics, radiological characteristics, and their association with long-term outcomes in a large patient group. Baseline demographics, radiological characteristics and treatment were recorded in 342 patients. Interobserver agreement of radiological measures was analyzed. Long-term outcome was evaluated with questionnaires (WORC, DASH). The association of baseline characteristics with outcome was assessed. Mean age was 49.0 (SD = 10.0), and 59.5 % were female. The dominant arm was affected in 66.0 %, and 21.3 % had bilateral disease. Calcifications were on average 18.7 mm (SD = 10.1, ICC = 0.84 (p < 0.001)) and located 10.1 mm (SD = 11.8) medially to the acromion (ICC = 0.77 (p < 0.001)). Gärtner type I calcifications were found in 32.1 % (Kappa = 0.47 (p < 0.001)). After 14 years (SD = 7.1) of follow-up, median WORC was 72.5 (range, 3.0-100.0; WORC < 60 in 42 %) and median DASH 17.0 (range, 0.0-82.0). Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior WORC. DASH results were similar. Many subjects have persisting shoulder complaints years after diagnosis, regardless of treatment. Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior outcome. Radiological measures had moderate-to-good reliability and no prognostic value. • Most RCCT studies report on short-term outcome and/or small patients groups. • In this large, long-term observational study, RCCT appeared to not be self-limiting in many subjects. • Negative prognostic factors included female gender, more calcifications, dominant arm affected, and longer duration of symptoms. • Interobserver agreement of general radiological RCCT measures is

  9. Surgical approaches to chronic pancreatitis: indications and imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Singh, Vikesh K; Johnson, Stephen I; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Fishman, Elliot K; Zaheer, Atif

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas that can result in abdominal pain, exocrine insufficiency, and diabetes. Inadequate pain relief using medical and/or endoscopic therapies is an indication for surgery. The surgical management of CP is centered around three main operations including pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) and drainage procedures, and total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). PD is the method of choice when there is a high suspicion for malignancy. Combined drainage and resection procedures are associated with pain relief, higher quality of life, and superior short-term and long-term survival in comparison with the PD. TPIAT is a reemerging treatment that may be promising in subjects with intractable pain and impaired quality of life. Imaging examinations have an extensive role in pre-operative and post-operative evaluation of CP patients. Pre-operative advanced imaging examinations including CT and MRI can detect hallmarks of CP such as calcifications, pancreatic duct dilatation, chronic pseudocysts, focal pancreatic enlargement, and biliary ductal dilatation. Post-operative findings may include periportal hepatic edema, pneumobilia, perivascular cuffing and mild pancreatic duct dilation. Imaging can also be useful in the detection of post-operative complications including obstructions, anastomotic leaks, and vascular lesions. Imaging helps identify unique post-operative findings associated with TPIAT and may aid in predicting viability and function of the transplanted islet cells. In this review, we explore surgical indications as well as pre-operative and post-operative imaging findings associated with surgical options that are typically performed for CP patients.

  10. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients.

  11. The study of CT features in pancreatic carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongqiu; Yang Bin; Wu Jiang; Liu Zhenjuan; Wu Zhengcan; Liu Yuxiu; Zhang Xinhua; Lu Guangming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare various CT signs of pancreatic carcinoma (PC) and inflammatory pancreatic mass (IPM), and to study the diagnostic value of these signs for distinguishing two diseases. Methods: Eigty-five patients with PC and IPM were proved by surgery, fine needle aspiration or other comprehensive methods. These patients underwent non-enhanced and enhanced CT scans. CT findings were analyzed retrospectively. The occurrance rates of various CT signs in these two diseases were analyzed with Fisher test and were compared with the corresponding clinical and operational results as well. Results: Among the 85 patients, 66 patients were proved to have PC, and 19 were proved to have IPM. In PC group, 58 were corerectly diagnosed with CT, 3 (4.5%) were misdiagnosed, and 5 (7.6%) were omitted. In IPM group, 9 were correctly diagnosed with CT and 10 (52.6%) were misdiagnosed. The CT findings were as follows: (1) Pancreatic mass with liver metastases, lymph node metastases, encased celiac arteries, and cancer emboli in portal veins just occurred in PC group. (2) The occurrence rates of mass over 3 cm in diameter, clear boundary, low-density area within the mass, pseudocysts, peripancreatic infiltration, ascites, and slight and moderate pancreatic-bile duct dilation in PC group were 90.91% (60/66), 15.15% (10/66), 54.55% (36/66), 10.61% (7/66), 4.55% (3/66), 22.73% (15/66), 24.24% (16/66), 45.45% (30/66), and 27.27% (18/66) respectively, the occurrence rates in IPM group were 94.74% (18/19), 15.79% (3/19), 52.63% (10/19), 15.79% (3/19), 15.79% (3/19), 21.05% (4/19), 31.58% (6/19), 21.05% (4/19), and 5.26% (1/19) respectively. There was no statistical difference for these CT findings between two groups (P > 0.05). (3) Pancreatic head mass with atrophy of pancreatic body and tail, mass calcification, pancreatic duct-penetrating sign, pancreatic head mass with hypertrophy of pancreatic body and tail, biliary stones with inflammation, and thickening of pre-kidney fascia in PC

  12. A Waving Horn on the Big Mitral Annulus Calcification: Caseous Calcification of the Mitral Annulus with Abscess Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tan Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Caseous calcification of the mitral annulus (CCMA is a rare variant of mitral annular calcification. It comprises a combination of calcium, fatty acids, and cholesterol, and is characterized by heterogeneity in echocardiographic images, with peripheral areas of calcification surrounding a central area of echolucency, resembling a periannular mass. Here, we describe a case of CCMA combined with a mitral annulus abscess, manifesting as a waving, horn-like structure. Although the image characteristics of the posterior mitral annulus suggested CCMA, additional findings warranted further work-up and studies.

  13. Prognostic criteria in acute pancreatitis: importance of assessment of pancreatic necrosis by contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echevarria, F.; Martinez, B.; Lopez, F.; Vuelta, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    To compare the value of the clinical criteria of Ranson, the classical tomographic criteria of Balthzar and the severity of illness index according to CT in predicting the development of complications of acute pancreatitis. A retrospective study was performed in 100 patients with clinical and analytical evidence of acute pancreatitis. All patients were assessed according to Ranson score at admission and 48 hours later, and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was carried out. The tomographic images were analyzed on the basis of the classical criteria of Balthazar and the new CT severity of illness index, which includes the assessment of pancreatic necrosis, identified as the areas of the pancreas that are not enhanced by the administration of the contrast material. These three criteria were then correlated with onset of medical and surgical implications. Our findings show that, of the three criteria analyzed, the CT severity of illness index presents the greatest specificity, sensitivity and positive and negative predictive values in the prediction of complications of acute pancreatitis. We conclude that the inclusion of pancreatic necrosis in the tomographic study improves the early assessment of the prognosis of acute pancreatitis. (Author) 20 refs

  14. Delayed release pancrelipase for treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Mukkai Krishnamurty

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Devi Mukkai Krishnamurty,1 Atoosa Rabiee,2 Sanjay B Jagannath,1 Dana K Andersen2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; 1Department of Medicine; 2Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Pancreatic enzyme supplements (PES are used in chronic pancreatitis (CP for correction of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI as well as pain and malnutrition. The use of porcine pancreatic enzymes for the correction of exocrine insufficiency is governed by the pathophysiology of the disease as well as pharmacologic properties of PES. Variability in bioequivalence of PES has been noted on in vitro and in vivo testing and has been attributed to the differences in enteric coating and the degree of micro-encapsulation. As a step towards standardizing pancreatic enzyme preparations, the Food and Drug Administration now requires the manufacturers of PES to obtain approval of marketed formulations by April 2010. In patients with treatment failure, apart from evaluating drug and dietary interactions and compliance, physicians should keep in mind that patients may benefit from switching to a different formulation. The choice of PES (enteric coated versus non-enteric coated and the need for acid suppression should be individualized. There is no current standard test for evaluating adequacy of therapy in CP patients and studies have shown that optimization of therapy based on symptoms may be inadequate. Goals of therapy based on overall patient presentation and specific laboratory tests rather than mere correction of steatorrhea are needed.Keywords: pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic enzyme supplement

  15. Pancreatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus Pancreatitis y lupus eritematoso sistémico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lariño Noia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with SLE are common, specifically abdominal pain. However, the rate of pancreatic diseases is much lower and does not reach 5% according to published series in Europe and the USA. This association between SLE and pancreatic disease is basically at the expense of episodes of acute pancreatitis. An association with chronic pancreatitis is much more uncommon, and only four articles have been published showing this relationship. Three cases of SLE-associated pancreatitis are described, and disease onset, etiological factors, and clinical progression are analyzed. A review of the literature and a brief discussion about pathophysiological mechanisms and the role of corticosteroids are also included.Los síntomas gastrointestinales en los pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES son comunes, específicamente el dolor abdominal. Sin embargo la tasa de enfermedades pancreáticas es mucho menor, una tasa que no alcanza ni al 5% según las series publicadas en Europa y EE. UU. Esta asociación entre enfermedades pancreáticas y LES es fundamentalmente a expensas de episodios de pancreatitis aguda. La asociación con pancreatitis crónica es muchísimo más infrecuente, teniendo en cuenta que tan sólo cuatro artículos han sido publicados reflejando esta asociación. Describimos tres casos de asociación entre pancreatitis y LES, analizando el debut de la enfermedad, los factores etiológicos y también la evolución clínica. Hemos realizado, además, una breve discusión de la fisiopatología y del papel de corticosteroides, así como una revisión de la literatura.

  16. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  18. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  19. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Lanspa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Model organoids provide new research opportunities for ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David A; Clevers, Hans

    We recently established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. These organoids exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics and, after orthotopic transplantation, recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor progression. Pancreatic organoid technology

  1. Bilateral spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage complicating acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianta, M.; Varma, D. K.

    2007-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is an event that mandates prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent primary adrenocortical insufficiency and potential death. Presentation can be non-specific and incidentally diagnosed with imaging alone, primarily CT. We present a case of acute pancreatitis with spontaneous bilateral adrenal haemorrhage and briefly discuss imaging and treatment implications

  2. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  3. Endoscopic Management of Pancreatic Fluid Collections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Zaheer; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2017-07-15

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis in children has increased over the last few decades. The development of pancreatic fluid collection is not uncommon after severe acute pancreatitis, although its natural course in children and adolescents is poorly understood. Asymptomatic fluid collections can be safely observed without any intervention. However, the presence of clinically significant symptoms warrants the drainage of these fluid collections. Endoscopic management of pancreatic fluid collection is safe and effective in adults. The use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedure has improved the efficacy and safety of drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, which have not been well studied in pediatric populations, barring a scant volume of small case series. Excellent results of EUS-guided drainage in adult patients also need to be verified in children and adolescents. Endoprostheses used to drain pancreatic fluid collections include plastic and metal stents. Metal stents have wider lumens and become clogged less often than plastic stents. Fully covered metal stents specifically designed for pancreatic fluid collection are available, and initial studies have shown encouraging results in adult patients. The future of endoscopic management of pancreatic fluid collection in children appears promising. Prospective studies with larger sample sizes are required to establish their definitive role in the pediatric age group.

  4. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme as a Potential Marker of Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Piechota, Joanna; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    Human pancreas parenchyma contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and also possesses aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. The altered activities of ADH and ALDH in damaged pancreatic tissue in the course of pancreatitis are reflected in the human serum. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for acute (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Serum samples were collected for routine biochemical investigations from 75 patients suffering from acute pancreatitis and 70 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Fluorometric methods were used to measure the activity of class I and II ADH and ALDH activity. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by a photometric method. There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH III isoenzyme (15.06 mU/l and 14.62 mU/l vs. 11.82 mU/l; ppancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH III was about 84%, specificity was 92 %, positive and negative predictive values were 93% and 87% respectively in acute pancreatitis. Area under the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) curve for ADH III in AP and CP was 0.88 and 0.86 respectively. ADH III has a potential role as a marker of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Pancreatic islet regeneration: Therapeutic potential, unknowns and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L. Cockburn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis in mammals is primarily maintained by the insulin-secreting β-cells contained within pancreas-resident islets of Langerhans. Gross disruption of this glucose regulation as a result of pancreatic dysfunction frequently results in diabetes, which is currently a major health concern in South Africa, as well as globally. For many years, researchers have realised that the pancreas, and specifically the islets of Langerhans, have a regenerative capacity, as islet mass has frequently been shown to increase following induced pancreatic injury. Given that gross β-cell loss contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, endogenous pancreatic islet regeneration has been investigated extensively as a potential β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. From the extensive research conducted on pancreatic regeneration, opposing findings and opinions have arisen as to how, and more recently even if, pancreatic regeneration occurs following induced injury. In this review, we outline and discuss the three primary mechanisms by which pancreatic regeneration is proposed to occur: neogenesis, β-cell replication and transdifferentiation. We further explain some of the advanced techniques used in pancreatic regeneration research, and conclude that despite the technologically advanced research tools available to researchers today, the mechanisms governing pancreatic regeneration may remain elusive until more powerful techniques are developed to allow for real-time, live-cell assessment of morphology and gene expression within the pancreas.

  6. Hypermutation in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Humphris, Jeremy L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J.; Johns, Amber L.; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K.; Miller, David K.; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S.; Quinn, Michael C.J.; Bruxner, Timothy J.C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechan...

  7. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Arvieux, C; Trilling, B; Sage, P Y; Mougin, N; Perou, S; Lavagne, P; Létoublon, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic trauma (PT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; the therapeutic options remain debated. Retrospective study of PT treated in the University Hospital of Grenoble over a 22-year span. The decision for initial laparotomy depended on hemodynamic status as well as on associated lesions. Main pancreatic duct lesions were always searched for. PT lesions were graded according to the AAST classification. Of a total of 46 PT, 34 were grades II or I. Hemodynamic instability led to immediate laparotomy in 18 patients, for whom treatment was always drainage of the pancreatic bed; morbidity was 30%. Eight patients had grade III injuries, six of whom underwent immediate operation: three underwent splenopancreatectomy without any major complications while the other three who had simple drainage required re-operation for peritonitis, with one death related to pancreatic complications. Four patients had grades IV or V PT: two pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, with no major complication, while one patient underwent duodenal reconstruction with pancreatic drainage, complicated by pancreatic and duodenal fistula requiring a hospital stay of two months. The post-trauma course was complicated for all patients with main pancreatic duct involvement. Our outcomes were similar to those found in the literature. In patients with distal PT and main pancreatic duct involvement, simple drainage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. For proximal PT, the therapeutic options of drainage versus pancreatoduodenectomy must be weighed; pancreatoduodenectomy may be unavoidable when the duodenum is injured as well. Two-stage (resection first, reconstruction later) could be an effective alternative in the emergency setting when there are other associated traumatic lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Pancreatic and duodenal injuries: keep it simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Matthew J F X; Brohi, Karim; Bautz, Peter C

    2005-07-01

    The management of pancreatic and duodenal trauma has moved away from complex reconstructive procedures to simpler methods in keeping with the trend towards organ-specific, damage control surgery. A retrospective case note review was undertaken over a 30-month period to evaluate a simplified protocol for the management of these injuries. Of 100 consecutive patients there were 51 with pancreatic injury, 30 with a duodenal injury and 19 with combined pancreaticoduodenal trauma. Overall mortality was 18.0%, with a late mortality (after 24 h) of 9.9%. This is comparable to previous studies. Morbidity from abscesses, fistulas and anastomotic breakdown was acceptably low. The concept of staged laparotomy can be successfully applied to wounds of the pancreas and duodenum. Debridement of devitalized tissue and drainage can be employed for most cases of pancreatic trauma. Most duodenal injuries can be managed with debridement and primary repair. Temporary exclusion and reoperation should be employed for unstable patients.

  9. Novel and Experimental Therapies in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Soumya; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The currently available treatment of CP is aimed at controlling symptoms and managing complications. Unfortunately, no specific treatment is available to halt the progression of the disease process because the pathophysiological perturbations in CP are not well understood. In this review, we discuss various therapeutic targets and investigational agents acting on these targets. Among these, therapies modulating immune cells and those acting on pancreatic stellate cells appear promising and may translate into clinical benefit in near future. However, these experimental therapies are mostly in animal models and they do not recapitulate all aspects of human disease. Still they may be beneficial in developing effective therapeutic modalities to curb inflammation in chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Clinical significance of intramammary arterial calcifications in diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Zorica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that intramammary arterial calcifications diagnosed by mammography as a part of generalized diabetic macroangiopathy may be an indirect sign of diabetes mellitus. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intramammary arterial calcifications, the patient’s age when the calcifications occur, as well as to observe the influence of diabetic polineuropathy, type, and the duration of diabetes on the onset of calcifications, in comparison with nondiabetic women. Methods. Mammographic findings of 113 diabetic female patients (21 with type 1 diabetes and 92 with type 2, as well as of 208 nondiabetic women (the control group were analyzed in the prospective study. The data about the type of diabetes, its duration, and polineuropathy were obtained using the questionnaire. Statistical differences were determined by Mann-Whitney test. Results. Intramammary arterial calcifications were identified in 33.3% of the women with type 1 diabetes, in 40.2% with type 2, and in 8.2% of the women from the control group, respectively. The differences comparing the women with type 1, as well as type 2 diabetes and the controls were statistically significant (p=0.0001. Women with intramammary arterial calcifications and type 1 diabetes were younger comparing to the control group (median age 52 years, comparing to 67 years of age, p=0.001, while there was no statistically significant difference in age between the women with calcifications and type 2 diabetes (61 years of age in relation to the control group (p=0.176. The incidence of polineuropathy in diabetic women was higher in the group with intramammary arterial calcifications (52.3% in comparison to the group without calcifications (26.1%, (p=0.005. The association between intramammary arterial calcifications and the duration of diabetes was not found. Conclusion. The obtained results supported the theory that intramammary arterial calcifications, detected by

  11. Prevalence of carotid and pulp calcifications: a correlation using digital panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Stephen J.; Scheetz, James P.; Khan, Zafrulla; Farman, Allan G.; Horsley, Scott H.; Beckstrom, Brice

    2009-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of pulp calcification with that of carotid calcification using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Digital panoramic radiographs of patients at a dental oncology clinic were included if (1) the carotid artery bifurcation region was visible bilaterally and (2) the patient had non-restored or minimally restored molars and/or canines. An endodontist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist independently evaluated the same images for calcifications in the carotid bifurcation region. Odds-ratio and Pearson χ 2 were used for data analysis. Presence of pulpal calcification was also evaluated as a screening test for the presence of carotid calcification. A total of 247 panoramic radiographs were evaluated. 32% (n=80) had pulpal calcifications and 25% (n=61) had carotid calcifications with 12% (n=29) having both carotid and pulp calcifications. A significantly higher prevalence of both pulp and carotid calcification was found in subjects older than age 60 years compared to younger age groups. Accuracy of pulpal calcification in screening for carotid calcification was 66.4%. Both pulp and carotid calcifications were more prevalent in older individuals. The presence of pulp calcification was not a strong predictor for the presence of carotid calcification. (orig.)

  12. Prevalence of carotid and pulp calcifications: a correlation using digital panoramic radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Stephen J. [School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Department of Periodontics, Endodontics and Dental Hygiene, Louisville, KY (United States); Scheetz, James P.; Khan, Zafrulla [University of Louisville, Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Prosthodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Louisville, KY (United States); Farman, Allan G. [School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Department of Periodontics, Endodontics and Dental Hygiene, Louisville, KY (United States); Horsley, Scott H.; Beckstrom, Brice

    2009-03-15

    To compare the prevalence of pulp calcification with that of carotid calcification using digital panoramic dental radiographs. Digital panoramic radiographs of patients at a dental oncology clinic were included if (1) the carotid artery bifurcation region was visible bilaterally and (2) the patient had non-restored or minimally restored molars and/or canines. An endodontist evaluated the images for pulpal calcifications in the selected teeth. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist independently evaluated the same images for calcifications in the carotid bifurcation region. Odds-ratio and Pearson {chi}{sup 2} were used for data analysis. Presence of pulpal calcification was also evaluated as a screening test for the presence of carotid calcification. A total of 247 panoramic radiographs were evaluated. 32% (n=80) had pulpal calcifications and 25% (n=61) had carotid calcifications with 12% (n=29) having both carotid and pulp calcifications. A significantly higher prevalence of both pulp and carotid calcification was found in subjects older than age 60 years compared to younger age groups. Accuracy of pulpal calcification in screening for carotid calcification was 66.4%. Both pulp and carotid calcifications were more prevalent in older individuals. The presence of pulp calcification was not a strong predictor for the presence of carotid calcification. (orig.)

  13. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Calcification Rates of Crustose Coralline Algae Derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) Deployed across Marianas Archipelago in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Calcification accretion units, or CAUs, are used to assess the current effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on calcification and accretion rates of...

  14. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Calcification Rates of Crustose Coralline Algae Derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) Deployed across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Calcification accretion units, or CAUs, are used to assess the current effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on calcification and accretion rates of...

  15. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Calcification Rates of Crustose Coralline Algae Derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) Deployed across American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Calcification accretion units, or CAUs, are used to assess the current effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on calcification and accretion rates of...

  16. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Calcification Rates of Crustose Coralline Algae Derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) Deployed across the Hawaiian Archipelago in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Calcification accretion units, or CAUs, are used to assess the current effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on calcification and accretion rates of...

  17. Calcific periarthritis of the elbow presenting as acute tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, F; Jawad, A S M

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with sudden acute lateral epicondylitis. There was no history of preceding trauma or repetitive use of the arm. Because of the acute onset and signs of acute inflammation, an X-ray was arranged. The X-ray showed a hyperdense calcified elongated globule distal to the lateral epicondyle. A diagnosis of calcific periarthritis (calcium apatite) of the elbow was made. Calcific periarthritis has rarely been reported as a cause of acute elbow pain.

  18. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. A Review of the Effect of Diet on Cardiovascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Nicoll

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day and phylloquinone (500 μg/day proved protective, as did a serum 25(OHD concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification.

  20. Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef; Enzelsberger, Barbara; Bastowansky, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 65 Final Diagnosis: Mitochondrial disorder Symptoms: Headache ? tetanic seizure Medication: Diazepam Clinical Procedure: Admission Specialty: Neurology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Case Report: We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a...

  1. Vitamin K2 inhibits rat vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by restoring the Gas6/Axl/Akt anti-apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Cuiting; Zheng, Haijun; Tao, Huiren; Yu, Wenjun; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Li, Aiqin; Jin, Hui; Lv, Anlin; Li, Huan

    2017-09-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease as a complication of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vitamin K2 (VK2) delays vascular calcification by an unclear mechanism. Moreover, apoptosis modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. This paper aimed to study VK2-modified VSMC calcification and survival cell signaling mediated by growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and its tyrosine kinase receptor Axl. Primary-cultured VSMCs were dose-dependently treated with VK2 in the presence of calcification medium for 8 days, or pre-treated for 1 h with/without the Axl inhibitor R428 (2 μmol/L) or the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk (20 μmol/L) followed by treatment with VK2 (10 μmol/L) or rmGas6 (200 nmol/L) in calcification medium for 8 days. Calcium deposition was determined by the o-cresolphthalein complexone assay and Alizarin Red S staining. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL and flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining. Western blotting detected the expressions of Axl, Gas6, p-Akt, Akt, and Bcl2. VK2 significantly inhibited CaCl 2 - and β-sodium glycerophosphate (β-GP)-induced VSMC calcification and apoptosis, which was dependent on restored Gas6 expression and activated downstream signaling by Axl, p-Akt, and Bcl2. Z-VAD-fmk significantly inhibited CaCl 2 - and β-GP-induced VSMC calcification and apoptosis. Augmented recombinant mouse Gas6 protein (rmGas6) expression significantly reduced VSMC calcification and apoptosis. Furthermore, the Gas6/Axl interaction was inhibited by R428, which abolished the preventive effect of VK2 on CaCl 2 - and β-GP-induced apoptosis and calcification. These results suggest that Gas6 is critical in VK2-mediated functions that attenuate CaCl 2 - and β-GP-induced VSMC calcification by blocking apoptosis.

  2. Prostate calcifications: A case series supporting the microbial biofilm theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Cai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prostate calcifications are a common finding during transrectal prostate ultrasound in both healthy subjects and patients, but their etiopathogenesis and clinical significance are not fully understood. We aimed to establish a new methodology for evaluating the role of microbial biofilms in the genesis of prostate calcifications. Materials and Methods: Ten consecutive patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy were enrolled in this study. All of the patients presented with prostate calcifications during transrectal ultrasound evaluation before surgery and underwent Meares-Stamey tests and clinical evaluation with the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and the International Prostate Symptom Score. At the time of radical prostatectomy, the prostate specimen, after removal, was analyzed with ultrasonography under sterile conditions in the operating room. Core biopsy specimens were taken from the site of prostate calcification and subjected to ultrastructural and microbiological analysis. Results: The results of the Meares-Stamey test showed only 1 of 10 patients (10% with positive cultures for Escherichia coli. Two of five patients (40% had positive cultures from prostate biopsy specimens. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus raffinosus, and Citrobacter freundii were isolated. Ultrastructural analysis of the prostate biopsy specimens showed prostate calcifications in 6 of 10 patients (60%, and a structured microbial biofilm in 1 patient who had positive cultures for E. faecalis and E. raffinosus. Conclusions: Although the findings are supported by a low number of patients, this study highlights the validity of the proposed methodology for investigating the role of bacterial biofilms in the genesis of prostate calcification.

  3. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedmer B Van de Waal

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate Thoracosphaera heimii. We observe a substantial reduction in growth rate, calcification and cyst stability of T. heimii under elevated pCO2. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses reveal CO2 sensitive regulation of many genes, particularly those being associated to inorganic carbon acquisition and calcification. Stable carbon isotope fractionation for organic carbon production increased with increasing pCO2 whereas it decreased for calcification, which suggests interdependence between both processes. We also found a strong effect of pCO2 on the stable oxygen isotopic composition of calcite, in line with earlier observations concerning another T. heimii strain. The observed changes in stable oxygen and carbon isotope composition of T. heimii cysts may provide an ideal tool for reconstructing past seawater carbonate chemistry, and ultimately past pCO2. Although the function of calcification in T. heimii remains unresolved, this trait likely plays an important role in the ecological and evolutionary success of this species. Acting on calcification as well as growth, ocean acidification may therefore impose a great threat for T. heimii.

  4. Evaluation of laryngeal cartilage calcification in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowska, K.; Serafin, Z.; Lasek, W.; Maciejewski, M.; Wieczor, W.; Wisniewski, S.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the basic methods used for laryngeal carcinoma diagnostics. Osteosclerotic and osteolytic changes of the cartilages are considered as a common radiologic symptom of laryngeal neoplasms. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the prevalence of both osteosclerotic changes and focal calcification defects, which may be suggestive of osteolysis. Calcification was assessed in the thyroid, the cricoid and the arytenoids cartilages on CT images of the neck. We have retrospectively analyzed neck CT examinations of 50 patients without any laryngeal pathology in anamnesis. The grade and symmetry of calcifications was assessed in the thyroid, the cricoid and the arytenoids cartilages. Calcification of the laryngeal cartilages was present in 83% of the patients. Osteosclerotic lesions of the thyroid cartilage were seen in 70% of the patients (asymmetric in 60% of them), of the cricoid catrilage in 50% (asymmetric in 60%), and of the arytenoid cartilages in 24% (asymmetric in 67%). Focal calcification defects were present in the thyroid cartilage in 56% of the patients (asymmetric in 67% of them), in the cricoid catrilage in 8% (asymmetric in all cases), and in the arytenoid cartilages in 20% (asymmetric in 90%). Osteosclerotic changes and focal calcification defects, which may suggest osteolysis, were found in most of the patients. Therefore, they cannot be used as crucial radiological criteria of neoplastic invasion of laryngeal cartilages. (authors)

  5. Depth profiling of calcifications in breast tissue using picosecond Kerr-gated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rebecca; Matousek, Pavel; Ronayne, Kate Louise; Parker, Anthony William; Rogers, Keith; Stone, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Breast calcifications are found in both benign and malignant lesions and their composition can indicate the disease state. Calcium oxalate (dihydrate) (COD) is associated with benign lesions, however calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP) is found mainly in proliferative lesions including carcinoma. The diagnostic practices of mammography and histopathology examine the morphology of the specimen. They can not reliably distinguish between the two types of calcification, which may indicate the presence of a cancerous lesion during mammography. We demonstrate for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectroscopy is capable of non-destructive probing of sufficient biochemical information from calcifications buried within tissue, and this information can potentially be used as a first step in identifying the type of lesion. The method uses a picosecond pulsed laser combined with fast temporal gating of Raman scattered light to enable spectra to be collected from a specific depth within scattering media by collecting signals emerging from the sample at a given time delay following the laser pulse. Spectra characteristic of both HAP and COD were obtained at depths of up to 0.96 mm, in both chicken breast and fatty tissue; and normal and cancerous human breast by utilising different time delays. This presents great potential for the use of Raman spectroscopy as an adjunct to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. Genome variations associated with viral susceptibility and calcification in Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Jessica U; John, Uwe; Valentin, Klaus; Frickenhaus, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi, a key player in the global carbon cycle is one of the best studied coccolithophores with respect to biogeochemical cycles, climatology, and host-virus interactions. Strains of E. huxleyi show phenotypic plasticity regarding growth behaviour, light-response, calcification, acidification, and virus susceptibility. This phenomenon is likely a consequence of genomic differences, or transcriptomic responses, to environmental conditions or threats such as viral infections. We used an E. huxleyi genome microarray based on the sequenced strain CCMP1516 (reference strain) to perform comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH) of 16 E. huxleyi strains of different geographic origin. We investigated the genomic diversity and plasticity and focused on the identification of genes related to virus susceptibility and coccolith production (calcification). Among the tested 31940 gene models a core genome of 14628 genes was identified by hybridization among 16 E. huxleyi strains. 224 probes were characterized as specific for the reference strain CCMP1516. Compared to the sequenced E. huxleyi strain CCMP1516 variation in gene content of up to 30 percent among strains was observed. Comparison of core and non-core transcripts sets in terms of annotated functions reveals a broad, almost equal functional coverage over all KOG-categories of both transcript sets within the whole annotated genome. Within the variable (non-core) genome we identified genes associated with virus susceptibility and calcification. Genes associated with virus susceptibility include a Bax inhibitor-1 protein, three LRR receptor-like protein kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our list of transcripts associated with coccolith production will stimulate further research, e.g. by genetic manipulation. In particular, the V-type proton ATPase 16 kDa proteolipid subunit is proposed to be a plausible target gene for further calcification studies.

  7. Dissolution Dominating Calcification Process in Polar Pteropods Close to the Point of Aragonite Undersaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednaršek, Nina; Tarling, Geraint A.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Fielding, Sophie; Feely, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Thecosome pteropods are abundant upper-ocean zooplankton that build aragonite shells. Ocean acidification results in the lowering of aragonite saturation levels in the surface layers, and several incubation studies have shown that rates of calcification in these organisms decrease as a result. This study provides a weight-specific net calcification rate function for thecosome pteropods that includes both rates of dissolution and calcification over a range of plausible future aragonite saturation states (Ωar). We measured gross dissolution in the pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica in the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean) by incubating living specimens across a range of aragonite saturation states for a maximum of 14 days. Specimens started dissolving almost immediately upon exposure to undersaturated conditions (Ωar∼0.8), losing 1.4% of shell mass per day. The observed rate of gross dissolution was different from that predicted by rate law kinetics of aragonite dissolution, in being higher at Ωar levels slightly above 1 and lower at Ωar levels of between 1 and 0.8. This indicates that shell mass is affected by even transitional levels of saturation, but there is, nevertheless, some partial means of protection for shells when in undersaturated conditions. A function for gross dissolution against Ωar derived from the present observations was compared to a function for gross calcification derived by a different study, and showed that dissolution became the dominating process even at Ωar levels close to 1, with net shell growth ceasing at an Ωar of 1.03. Gross dissolution increasingly dominated net change in shell mass as saturation levels decreased below 1. As well as influencing their viability, such dissolution of pteropod shells in the surface layers will result in slower sinking velocities and decreased carbon and carbonate fluxes to the deep ocean. PMID:25285916

  8. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  9. Etiology, pathology, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in Chinese population: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Ramdany, Sonam; Zhao, Gang; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Balde, Oumar Taibata; Barry, Ahmed Boubacar; Adji, Seid; Li, Xiang; Jin, Yan; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population. The clinical data of 142 patients with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. All patients were of Chinese nationality and hospitalized from January 2008 to December 2011. Their ages ranged from 14 to 76 years, with a mean of 43 years. Of 142 patients, there were 72 cases of obstructive chronic pancreatitis (50.70%), 19 cases of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (13.38%), 14 cases of autoimmune pancreatitis (9.86%) and 37 cases of undetermined etiology (26.06%). Pathologically, the average inflammatory mass diameter was 3.8 ± 3.3 cm, biliary obstruction occurred in 36 cases, gall stones in 70 cases, calcification in 88 cases, ductal dilatation in 61 cases, side branch dilatation in 32 cases, ductal irregularity in 10 cases, lymphocytic inflammation in 23 cases, obliterative phlebitis in 14 cases, extra pancreatic lesion in 19 cases and fibrosis in 142 cases. Location of pancreatic lesion in the region of head (n=97), neck (n=16), body (n=12), tail (n=15) and whole pancreas (n=2) influenced the choice of surgical procedures. Ninety-four patients (66.20%) received surgical treatment and 33.80% received other treatments. After operation, 80.85% of 94 patients experienced decreased pain, and 8.51% of 94 showed recovery of endocrine function but with a complication rate of 12.77%. All the operations were performed successfully. According to the pain scale of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (QLQ-C30) a decrease from 76 ± 22 to 14 ± 18 was observed. Etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population vary from others.

  10. Altered central pain processing after pancreatic surgery for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S. A.; Ahmed Ali, U.; ten Broek, R. P.; Issa, Y.; van Eijck, C. H.; Wilder-Smith, O. H.; van Goor, H.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is common in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may involve altered central pain processing. This study evaluated the relationship between pain processing and pain outcome after pancreatic duct decompression and/or pancreatic resection in patients with CP. Patients with CP

  11. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  12. Bovine pericardium coated with biopolymeric films as an alternative to prevent calcification: In vitro calcification and cytotoxicity results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Grinia M.; Rodas, Andrea C.D.; Weska, Raquel F.; Aimoli, Cassiano G.; Higa, Olga Z.; Maizato, Marina; Leiner, Adolfo A.; Pitombo, Ronaldo N.M.; Polakiewicz, Bronislaw; Beppu, Marisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine pericardium, for cardiac valve fabrication, was coated with either chitosan or silk fibroin film. In vitro calcification tests of coated and non coated bovine pericardium were performed in simulated body fluid solution in order to investigate potential alternatives to minimize calcification on implanted heart valves. Complementary, morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy - SEM; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) were performed for structural characterization of coatings and biocompatibility of chitosan. Silk fibroin films were assayed by in vitro cytotoxicity and endothelial cell growth tests. Bovine pericardium coated with silk fibroin or chitosan did not present calcification during in vitro calcification tests, indicating that these biopolymeric coatings do not induce bovine pericardium calcification. Chitosan and silk fibroin films were characterized as non cytotoxic and silk fibroin films presented high affinity to endothelial cells. The results indicate that bovine pericardium coated with silk fibroin is a potential candidate for cardiac valve fabrication, since the affinity of silk fibroin to endothelial cells can be explored to induce the tissue endothelization and therefore, increase valve durability by increasing their mechanical resistance and protecting them against calcification.

  13. Breast arterial calcifications are correlated with subsequent development of coronary artery calcifications, but their aetiology is predominantly different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Angela H.E.M. [Department of Cardiology, Isala Klinieken, Groot Wezenland 20, 8011 JW Zwolle (Netherlands)], E-mail: a.maas@diagram-zwolle.nl; Schouw, Yvonne T. van der; Atsma, Femke [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Beijerinck, David; Deurenberg, Jan J.M. [Preventicon Breast Cancer Screening Center, Stationsplein 91, 3511ED Utrecht (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P.Th.M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Y. van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To study whether calcifications in breast arteries, as seen on mammograms, predict future development of coronary artery calcifications. Methods: We studied 499 women, aged 49-70 years, participating in a breast cancer screening program and investigated whether arterial calcifications in the breast (BAC) are associated with coronary arterial calcifications (CAC) after 9 years follow-up. Mammograms were reviewed for the presence of BAC. CAC was assessed by multi slice computed tomography (MSCT). With logistic regression analysis the independent effect of various risk factors on BAC and CAC was measured. Results: BAC was present in 58 of 499 women (12%) and CAC score > 0 was present in 262 of 499 women (53%). BAC was strongly associated with CAC (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.71-6.04) and this remained significant after adjustment for age at baseline and the duration of follow-up (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.10-4.23). Most CV risk factors were associated with CAC but not with BAC. Only parity was significantly associated with both increased CAC (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.21-3.60) and increased BAC (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.23-22.43). Breastfeeding was associated with BAC (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.40-8.23) but not with CAC (OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.84-1.93). Conclusion: Breast arterial calcifications are predictive of subsequent development of calcifications in the coronary arteries.

  14. CT of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  15. Pancreatic cancer clinical trials and accrual in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, William A; James, Porsha M; Rahib, Lola; Talley, Anitra W; Fleshman, Julie M; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2013-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer clinical trials open in the United States and their accrual were examined to identify opportunities to accelerate progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer-specific clinical trials open in the United States in the years 2011 and 2012 were obtained from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network database. Accrual information was obtained from trial sponsors. The portfolio of pancreatic cancer clinical trials identified by type (adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine), phase, disease stage, and treatment approach is reported. More than half of trials for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma applied biologic insights to new therapeutic approaches, and 38% focused on optimization of radiation or chemotherapy delivery or regimens. In 2011, pancreatic cancer trials required total enrollment of 11,786 patients. Actual accrual to 93.2% of trials was 1,804 patients, an estimated 4.57% of the patients with pancreatic cancer alive in that year. The greatest need was for patients with resectable cancer. Trials open in 2011 enrolled an average of 15% of their total target accrual. Physician recommendations greatly influenced patients' decision to enroll or not enroll onto a clinical trial. Matching to a clinical trial within a 50-mile radius and identifying trials for recurrent/refractory disease were documented as challenges for patient accrual. Overall trial enrollment indicates that pancreatic cancer trials open in 2011 would require 6.7 years on average to complete accrual. These results suggest that harmonizing patient supply and demand for clinical trials is required to accelerate progress toward improving survival in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.; Willingham, Field F.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis trans...

  18. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal ...

  19. An unusual cause of intra-abdominal calcification: A lithopedion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Andrade, Daniel; Ruivo, Catarina; Portilha, M. Antónia; Brito, Jorge B.; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luís

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 77-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency department complaining of diffuse abdominal pain for five days, associated with nausea, vomiting and constipation. Physical examination disclosed a large incarcerated umbilical hernia, which was readily apparent on supine abdominal plain films. These also showed a calcified heterogeneous mass in the mid-abdominal region, which was further characterized by CT as a lithopedion (calcified ectopic pregnancy). This is one of the few cases studied on a MDCT equipment, and it clearly enhances the post-processing abilities of this imaging method which allows diagnostic high-quality MIP images. Lithopedion is a rare entity, with less than 300 cases previously described in the medical literature. However, many reported cases corresponded to cases of skeletonization or collections of fetal bone fragments discovered encysted in the pelvic region at surgery or autopsy. It is thus estimated that true lithopedion is a much rarer entity. The diagnosis may be reached by a suggestive clinical history and a palpable mass on physical examination, while the value of modern cross-sectional techniques is still virtually unknown. Ultrasonography may depict an empty uterine cavity and a calcified abdominal mass of non-specific characteristics, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are able to reach a conclusive diagnosis and may additionally define the involvement of adjacent structures. The differential diagnosis includes other calcified pathologic situations, including ovarian tumors, uterine fibroids, urinary tract neoplasms, inflammatory masses or epiploic calcifications

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kojiro; Itoh, Shigeki; Takada, Akira; Mori, Yoshine; Naganawa, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the “enhanced duct sign”, for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Yuichi, E-mail: kawai.yuichi@a.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Suzuki, Kojiro, E-mail: kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Itoh, Shigeki, E-mail: shigeito@nagoya-1st.jrc.or.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Japan Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, 3-35 Michishita-cho, Nakamura-ku, Nagoya 453-8511 (Japan); Takada, Akira, E-mail: takadaa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mori, Yoshine, E-mail: yoshine@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naganawa, Shinji, E-mail: naganawa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the 'enhanced duct sign', for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  2. Chronic asymptomatic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Almost all patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia undergo an expensive, long, difficult and often repeated diagnostic workup even if this occurrence is not associated with symptoms or with known pancreatotoxic factors. This is in relationship with the poor knowledge that, beside hyperenzymemia secondary to pancreatic diseases and systemic illnesses, various non-pathological forms of chronic hyperamylasemia can occur in clinical practice. AIM OF THE STUDY This study was addressed to assess the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic diseases (CHUPD. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data of all patients with CHUPD were retrospectively reviewed (June 1997-March 2007. Forty patients were included in the study; median follow- up was 33 months (range 3-84 months. CHUPD was secondary to: a chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia, 16 patients (40%; b macroamylasemia, 15 patients (37.5%; c salivary hyperamylasemia, 9 patients (22.5%. Gilbert’s syndrome was present in 13 patients (32.5%; 8 with macroamylasemia and hyperdyslipidemia in 8 patients (20%; 5 with chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia. Diagnostic exams (all in the normal range performed before our observation were: Ca19-9 serum level in 37/40 (92.5%, ultrasonography and computed tomography-scan in all patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 21/40 (52.5%, abdominal magnetic resonance in 14/40 (35%. Previous diagnosis in these asymptomatic subjects were: chronic pancreatitis in 26 cases (65%; recurrent pancreatitis in 10 cases (25%; the remaining 4 patients (10% were addressed without a specific diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS In clinical practice, the occurrence of an unexplained chronic hyperamylasemia very often allows to an unappropriate diagnostic workup due to the poor familiarity with CHUPD conditions.

  3. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  4. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  5. Multidisciplinaire behandeling van chronische pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempeneers, M. A.; Besselink, M. G.; Issa, Y.; van Hooft, J. E.; van Goor, H.; Bruno, M. J.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    - Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease, which leads to a severe decrease in quality of life and reduced life expectancy.- 85-90% of patients with chronic pancreatitis consult the doctor because of pain.- Pain in chronic pancreatitis has a multifactorial aetiology, with

  6. Pancreatic Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancreatic cancer can form in exocrine cells and neuroendocrine cells. The exocrine type is more common and is usually found at an advanced stage. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are less common but have a better prognosis. Start here to find information on pancreatic cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  7. Transdifferentiated rat pancreatic progenitor cells (AR42J-B13/H) respond to phenobarbital in a rat hepatocyte-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, M; Haltalli, M; Currie, R; Wright, J; Gooderham, N J

    2016-07-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) is known to produce species-specific effects in the rat and mouse, being carcinogenic in certain mouse strains, but only in rats if treated after a DNA damaging event. PB treatment in the rat and mouse also produces disparate effects on cell signalling and miRNA expression profiles. These responses are induced by short term and prolonged PB exposure, respectively, with the latter treatments being difficult to examine mechanistically in primary hepatocytes due to rapid loss of the original hepatic phenotype and limited sustainability in culture. Here we explore the rat hepatocyte-like B13/H cell line as a model for hepatic response to PB exposure in both short-term and longer duration treatments. We demonstrate that PB with Egf treatment in the B13/H cells resulted in a significant increase in Erk activation, as determined by the ratio of phospho-Erk to total Erk, compared to Egf alone. We also show that an extended treatment with PB in the B13/H cells produces a miRNA response similar to that seen in the rat in vivo, via the time-dependent induction of miR-182/96. Additionally, we confirm that B13/H cells respond to Car activators in a typical rat-specific manner. These data suggest that the B13/H cells produce temporal responses to PB that are comparable to those reported in short-term primary rat hepatocyte cultures and in the longer term are similar to those in the rat in vivo. Finally, we also show that Car-associated miR-122 expression is decreased by PB treatment in B13/H cells, a PB-induced response that is common to the rat, mouse and human. We conclude that the B13/H cell system produces a qualitative response comparable to the rat, which is different to the response in the mouse, and that this model could be a useful tool for exploring the functional consequences of PB-sensitive miRNA changes and resistance to PB-mediated tumours in the rat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex role for the immune system in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristin S; Francis, Amanda A; Murray, Nicole R

    2014-08-28

    The immune system plays a complex role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Inflammation can promote the formation of premalignant lesions and accelerate pancreatic cancer development. Conversely, pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive environment, which is thought to promote tumor progression and invasion. Here we review the current literature describing the role of the immune response in the progressive development of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of immune cells at the tumor site, and our current understanding of the function of the immune cell types at the tumor. Recent clinical and preclinical data are reviewed, detailing the involvement of the immune response in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, including the role of specific cytokines and implications for disease outcome. Acute pancreatitis is characterized by a predominantly innate immune response, while chronic pancreatitis elicits an immune response that involves both innate and adaptive immune cells, and often results in profound systemic immune-suppression. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked immune dysfunction driven by immunosuppressive cell types, tumor-promoting immune cells, and defective or absent inflammatory cells. Recent studies reveal that immune cells interact with cancer stem cells and tumor stromal cells, and these interactions have an impact on development and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Finally, current PDAC therapies are reviewed and the potential for harnessing the actions of the immune response to assist in targeting pancreatic cancer using immunotherapy is discussed.

  9. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  10. CT in pancreatic involvement of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Mallek, R.; Mostbeck, G.

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate characteristic CT features of primary pancreatic involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scans of 10 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared to 50 patients with histologically proved different neoplasms of the pancreas. Setting the correct diagnosis of NHL would be essential for planning of treatment and prognosis. CT findings of NHL were characteristic but not specific. Nevertheless, the presence of a homogeneous pancreatic mass with a diameter of 7 cm or more, infiltrating surrounding tissue accompanied by retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric lymphadenopathy strongly suggests NHL. CT-guided needle biopsy can help to establish the diagnosis of pancreatic NHL. (orig.)

  11. CT in pancreatic involvement of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Mallek, R.; Mostbeck, G. (Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-03-01

    In an attempt to evaluate characteristic CT features of primary pancreatic involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scans of 10 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared to 50 patients with histologically proved different neoplasms of the pancreas. Setting the correct diagnosis of NHL would be essential for planning of treatment and prognosis. CT findings of NHL were characteristic but not specific. Nevertheless, the presence of a homogeneous pancreatic mass with a diameter of 7 cm or more, infiltrating surrounding tissue accompanied by retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric lymphadenopathy strongly suggests NHL. CT-guided needle biopsy can help to establish the diagnosis of pancreatic NHL. (orig.).

  12. The association of breast arterial calcification and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyma Yildiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship between metabolic syndrome and breast arterial calcification detected via mammography in a cohort of postmenopausal subjects. METHODS: Among 837 patients referred to our radiology department for mammographic screening, 310 postmenopausal females (105 patients with and 205 patients without breast arterial calcification aged 40 to 73 (mean 55.9±8.4 years were included in this study. The groups were compared with respect to clinical characteristics and metabolic syndrome criteria. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the factors related to breast arterial calcification. RESULTS: Age, postmenopausal duration and the frequencies of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and metabolic syndrome were significantly higher in the subjects with breast arterial calcification than in those without (p<0.05. Multivariate analysis indicated that age (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6, p = 0.001 and metabolic syndrome (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.5−10.4, p = 0.005 were independent predictors of breast arterial calcification detected via mammography. The independent predictors among the features of metabolic syndrome were low levels of high-density lipoproteins (OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 1.0−64.0, p = 0.047 and high blood pressure (OR = 8.7, 95% CI = 1.5−49.7, p = 0.014. CONCLUSIONS: The likelihood of mammographic detection of breast arterial calcification increases with age and in the presence of hypertension or metabolic syndrome. For patients undergoing screening mammography who present with breast arterial calcification, the possibility of metabolic syndrome should be considered. These patients should be informed of their cardiovascular risk factors and counseled on appropriate lifestyle changes.

  13. Robotic transgastric cystgastrostomy and pancreatic debridement in the management of pancreatic fluid collections following acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirks, Russell C; Sola, Richard; Iannitti, David A; Martinie, John B; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections may develop after severe acute pancreatitis. Organized fluid collections such as pancreatic pseudocyst and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) that mature over time may require intervention to treat obstructive or constitutional symptoms related to the size and location of the collection as well as possible infection. Endoscopic, open surgical and minimally invasive techniques are described to treat post-inflammatory pancreatic fluid collections. Surgical intervention may be required to treat collections containing necrotic pancreatic parenchyma or in locations not immediately apposed to the stomach or duodenum. Comprising a blend of the surgical approach and the clinical benefits of minimally invasive surgery, the robot-assisted technique of pancreatic cystgastrostomy with pancreatic debridement is described.

  14. The evaluation of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zenian; Wang Xiaoyan; Peng Zhenpeng; Lin Jianqin; Zhang Ting

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the manifestations and its pathologic basis of pancreatic tubeiculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. And evaluate the diagnostic values of CT and MRI. Methods: Two cases of pancreatic tuberculosis and eleven cases of peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy were collected. All cases were conformed by pathology or clinic. Plain scan and enhanced scan with spiral CT were performed in all cases. Plain scan and enhanced scan with MRI were performed in two cases. The CT and MRI features of 13 cases were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Pancreatic tuberculosis showed that the lesion was located mainly at the head of the pancreas and displayed on CT as a low-density mass with marginal or honeycomb enhancement. Peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy was seen in 11 cases, of which ring-like enhancement was seen in seven cases, calcifications in two cases and mixed in two cases. Splenic involvement was found in five cases. Conclusion: Pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy have the main features of low-density mass With marginal or honeycomb enhancement and ting-like enhancement in petipancreatic lymphadenopathy. CT and MRI are feasible methods in diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. (authors)

  15. Management of splenic and pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Cristiano, N; Siebert, M; Barbois, S; Létoublon, C; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    injury. In this context, non-operative management (NOM) has gradually become the standard as long as the patient remains hemodynamically stable and there is no suspicion of injury to hollow viscera, with the patient being carefully monitored on a surgical service. The development of arteriography with splenic artery embolization has increased the rate of splenic salvage; this can be performed electively based on specific indications (blush on CT, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula), and may also be considered for severe splenic injury, abundant hemoperitoneum, or severe polytrauma. For pancreatic injury, in addition to CT scan, magnetic resonance pancreatography (MRCP) or even endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may be necessary to identify a ductal rupture. If the pancreatic duct is intact, laboratory and CT imaging surveillance is performed just as for splenic injury. In case of pancreatic ductal injury, ERCP stenting can be considered. However, if this is unsuccessful, the therapeutic decision can be difficult: while NOM can still be successful, complications may arise that are difficult to treat while distal pancreatectomy, although initially more agressive may avoid these complications if performed early. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Lipase or amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ola Z; Bhayana, Vipin

    2017-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rapid onset of inflammation of the pancreas causing mild to severe life threatening conditions [1, 2]. In Canada, acute pancreatitis is the 5th most expensive digestive disease in Canada with a considerable economic burden on the health care system [3]. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is usually based on the presence of abdominal pain and elevated levels of serum amylase and/or lipase. Many health care centers use either serum amylase, lipase or both to diagnose acute pancreatitis without considering which one could provide a better diagnostic accuracy. The aim of this review is to investigate whether serum lipase alone is a sufficient biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. We have examined various studies looking at the utilization, sensitivity, specificity and cost associated savings of lipase and amylase in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. When comparing different studies, serum lipase offers a higher sensitivity than serum amylase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Lipase also offers a larger diagnostic window than amylase since it is elevated for a longer time, thus allowing it to be a useful diagnostic biomarker in early and late stages of acute pancreatitis. Several recent evidence-based guidelines recommend the use of lipase over amylase. Nevertheless, both lipase and amylase alone lack the ability to determine the severity and etiology of acute pancreatitis. The co-ordering of both tests has shown little to no increase in the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Thus, unnecessary testing and laboratory expenditures can be reduced by testing lipase alone. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sodium Thiosulfate Therapy for Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Steven M.; Meade, Debra; Wang, Weiling; Hymes, Jeffrey; Lacson, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objective Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is an often fatal condition with no effective treatment. Multiple case reports and case series have described intravenous sodium thiosulfate (STS) administration in CUA, but no studies have systematically evaluated this treatment. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 172 patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis who had CUA and were treated with STS between August 2006 and June 2009 at Fresenius Medical Care North America. Of these, 85% completed STS therapy. Clinical, laboratory, and mortality data were abstracted from clinical information systems. Responses to survey questionnaires sent to treating physicians regarding patient-level outcomes were available for 53 patients. Effect on CUA lesions and mortality were summarized as CUA outcomes. Relevant laboratory measures, weight (using pairwise comparisons of values before, during, and after STS), and adverse events were summarized as safety parameters. Results Mean age of the cohort was 55 years, and 74% of patients were women. Median STS dose was 25 g, and median number of doses was 38. Among surveyed patients, CUA completely resolved in 26.4%, markedly improved in 18.9%, improved in 28.3%, and did not improve in 5.7%; in the remaining patients (20.8%), the response was unknown. One-year mortality in patients treated with STS was 35%. Adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, and weight-related changes were mild. Significant reductions in serum phosphorous (P=0.02) and parathyroid hormone (P=0.01) were noted during STS treatment in patients who completed the therapy. Conclusions Although conclusive evidence regarding its efficacy is lacking, a majority of patients who received STS demonstrated clinical improvement in this study. PMID:23520041

  18. [Prognosis of acute pancreatitis by PANC 3 score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, James Ken; Franzon, Orli; Resende-Filho, Fernando de Oliveira; Kruel, Nicolau Fernandes; Ferri, Thiago Alessandro

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of great importance in clinical practice, defined as an inflammatory process of the pancreas that may involve local tissues or affect other organs in a systemic manner, requiring, in such cases, an intensive care. To analyze the simplified stratification system of the PANC 3 score, correlating it with the Ranson score, for the prognostic definition of cases of acute pancreatitis. Was conducted a prospective, observational study in which were evaluated 65 patients who were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. PANC 3 showed sensitivity, 31.25%; specificity,100%; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 81.66% and accuracy, 83.07%. The PANC 3 criteria are applicable to define the severity and the prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and are not a substitute method, but rather a method to be associated with the Ranson criteria, mainly due to its high accuracy, positive predictive value and specificity.

  19. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  20. an extended pancreatic normal subjects and ~in pancreatItIs In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    function . . patIents. N. H. GILlNSKY, A. S. MEE, I. N. MARKS. Summary. Exocrine pancreatic response was evaluated in patients with varying degrees of pancreatic damage and in control subjects by ... hormones, the Lundh meal and an oral pancreatic function test .... is any different from that of the cells in me normal gland.

  1. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cahen, Djuna L.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Busch, Olivier R.; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Huibregtse, Kees; Bruno, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pancreatitis and a dilated pancreatic duct, ductal decompression is recommended. We conducted a randomized trial to compare endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct. METHODS: All symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis and a distal

  2. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs.

  3. Imaging in pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Matthew T; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic transplantation, performed alone or in conjunction with kidney transplantation, is an effective treatment for advanced type I diabetes mellitus and select patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Following advancements in surgical technique, postoperative management, and immunosuppression, pancreatic transplantation has significantly improved the length and quality of life for patients suffering from pancreatic dysfunction. While computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have more limited utility, ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality to evaluate the transplanted pancreas; gray-scale assesses the parenchyma and fluid collections, while Doppler interrogation assesses vascular flow and viability. Ultrasound is also useful to guide percutaneous interventions for the transplanted pancreas. With knowledge of the surgical anatomy and common complications, the abdominal radiologist plays a central role in the perioperative and postoperative evaluation of the transplanted pancreas

  4. Clinical predictors of resectability of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadi, Majid A; Alharbi, Othman; Azzam, Nahla; Altayeb, Mohannad; Javed, Moammed; Alsaif, Faisal; Hassanain, Mazen; Alsharabi, Abdulsalam; Al-Saleh, Khalid; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M

    2013-01-01

    sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 75%, positive likelihood ratio of 3.6, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.15 for resectability of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This study describes the clinical characteristics of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Saudi Arabia. None of the clinical or laboratory variables that were included in our study could independently predict resectability of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Further studies are warranted to validate these results.

  5. Reduced calcification decreases photoprotective capability in the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Gao, Kunshan

    2012-07-01

    Intracellular calcification of coccolithophores generates CO₂ and consumes additional energy for acquisition of calcium and bicarbonate ions; therefore, it may correlate with photoprotective processes by influencing the energetics. To address this hypothesis, a calcifying Emiliania huxleyi strain (CS-369) was grown semi-continuously at reduced (0.1 mM, LCa) and ambient Ca²⁺ concentrations (10 mM, HCa) for 150 d (>200 generations). The HCa-grown cells had higher photosynthetic and calcification rates and higher contents of Chl a and carotenoids compared with the naked (bearing no coccoliths) LCa-grown cells. When exposed to stressfull levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), LCa-grown cells displayed lower photochemical yield and less efficient non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). When the LCa- or HCa-grown cells were inversely shifted to their counterpart medium, LCa to HCa transfer increased photosynthetic carbon fixation (P), calcification rate (C), the C/P ratio, NPQ and pigment contents, whereas those shifted from HCa to LCa exhibited the opposite effects. Increased NPQ, carotenoids and quantum yield were clearly linked with increased or sustained calcification in E. huxleyi. The calcification must have played a role in dissipating excessive energy or as an additional drainage of electrons absorbed by the photosynthetic antennae. This phenomenon was further supported by testing two non-calcifying strains, which showed insignificant changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation and NPQ when transferred to LCa conditions.

  6. Left ventricular calcification following postpartum toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella C Pak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS is a rare but lethal clinical event that can occur during the postpartum period. Early recognition and intervention is critical to improve patient outcomes. This is a case of TSS complicated by cardiac arrest and left ventricular calcification. This is a case report of streptococcal TSS in a 29-year-old female in the postpartum period who presented with fever, abdominal distension, and a purpuric rash. Her hospital course was characterized by multiple organ failure, including respiratory distress syndrome, liver failure, renal failure, and coagulopathy. She was found to have acute compartment syndrome, which resulted in a below-the-knee amputation. She deteriorated further after experiencing cardiac arrest and the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with hemorrhagic transformation. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed evidence of dystrophic myocardial calcification in the left ventricle. She improved clinically but remained ventilator dependent upon discharge to an extended acute care facility. Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy can result in myocardial calcification. As dystrophic calcification can significantly affect cardiac function, clinicians should rule out cardiac calcification in patients who have had severe septic shock.

  7. Gene expression analysis in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Oliva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of several genes involved in tissue remodelling and bone development in patients with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. Biopsies from calcified and non-calcified areas were obtained from 10 patients (8 women and 2 men; average age: 55 years; range: 40-68 with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To evaluate the expression of selected genes, RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR were performed. A significantly increased expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG2 and its substrate, osteopontin, was detected in the calcific areas compared to the levels observed in the normal tissue from the same subject with calcific tendinopathy, whereas a modest increase was observed for catepsin K. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP4 and BMP6 in the calcific area. BMP-2, collagen V and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF did not show significant differences. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 were not detectable. A variation in expression of these genes could be characteristic of this form tendinopathy, since an increased level of these genes has not been detected in other forms of tendon lesions.

  8. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  9. Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alihan Gurkan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively.

  10. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N.

    1990-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells

  11. Multislice CT for preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Akihiko; Ishihara, Shin; Ito, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the ability of multislice (MS) CT to visualize and diagnose the progression of pancreatic cancer. With regard to local progression, good diagnosis was possible for detecting the invasion of the intrapancreatic bile duct, duodenum, portal vein, arteries and other organs, and liver metastasis. Sensitivity was high but specificity was not good for detecting the invasion of the anterior and posterior pancreatic tissue. This is thought to be because of the positive diagnosis with pancreatitis that accompanies cancer. Pancreatic plexus invasion was also thought to be a cause of the lipid elevation of the nerve plexus and decreased sensitivity accompanying pancreatitis. Identification of cancer invasion and tumor periphery changes based on concomitant pancreatitis also depends on the amount of fibrous stroma, but this will require further investigation. Factors other than the size of lymph node metastases also need to be investigated. MS-CT can provide detailed volume data in a short time and making it an essential test in diagnosing the stage of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  12. Gene expression patterns in pancreatic tumors, cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson W Lowe

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the pancreas originate from both the endocrine and exocrine elements of the organ, and represent a major cause of cancer-related death. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of gene expression for pancreatic tumors, the normal pancreas, and nonneoplastic pancreatic disease.DNA microarrays were used to assess the gene expression for surgically derived pancreatic adenocarcinomas, islet cell tumors, and mesenchymal tumors. The addition of normal pancreata, isolated islets, isolated pancreatic ducts, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines enhanced subsequent analysis by increasing the diversity in gene expression profiles obtained. Exocrine, endocrine, and mesenchymal tumors displayed unique gene expression profiles. Similarities in gene expression support the pancreatic duct as the origin of adenocarcinomas. In addition, genes highly expressed in other cancers and associated with specific signal transduction pathways were also found in pancreatic tumors.The scope of the present work was enhanced by the inclusion of publicly available datasets that encompass a wide spectrum of human tissues and enabled the identification of candidate genes that may serve diagnostic and therapeutic goals.

  13. Critical Review of Diagnostic Methods Used in Chronic Pancreatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan T Beck

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a balanced assessment of the various pancreatic function tests and imaging techniques used in the differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatic disease. Function tests that study the digestive capacity of the pancreas (fat absorption of dietary lipids, fluorescein- or radiolabelled fats, bentiromide test, etc have high specificity, but very low sensitivity. This is because 90% of pancreas has to be destroyed before steatorrhea or creatorrhea occurs. Tests that directly measure pancreatic bicarbonate and protein secretion (secretin test, etc are more accurate and may detect pancreatic dysfunction even before anatomical changes occur. Measurement of pancreatic enzymes in serum or urine, or the decreased decline of serum amino acids during their incorporation into pancreatic enzymes, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to help diagnose pancreatic disease. Sensitive and specific tumour markers are not yet available. Thus screening tests are not cost-effective - if they are negative, they do not exclude pancreatic disease; and if positive, they have to be confirmed by more specific tests. Imaging techniques are the most commonly used methods of investigation. The usefulness of abdominal survey films, barium studies, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, ultrasonography, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography is critically reviewed. Most of the radiological methods can be combined with cytology or biopsy. Histology demonstrating malignancy establishes this diagnosis, but negative biopsies do not exclude malignant tumours. Presently only ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound can diagnose cancers sufficiently early to allow for possible `curative' surgery, and only endoscopic ultrasound is capable to stage tumours for the assessment of resectability.

  14. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  15. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  16. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  17. [Pancreatic serous cystadenoma associated with pancreatic heterotopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hedfi; Dorra, Belghachem; Hela, Bouhafa; Cherif, Abdelhedi; Azza, Sridi; Karim, Sassi; Khadija, Bellil; Adnen, Chouchene

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic heterotopias (HP) are rare. They can occur at any age with a slight male predominance. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and they are often found incidentally during upper or lower GI endoscopy or during the anatomo-pathological examination of an organ which was resected for other reasons; they can be isolated or associated with a digestive pathology. We report, through observation, the association of HP with serous cystadenoma of the pancreas discovered during examinations to identify the etiology of isolated abdominal pain. The aim of this study is to analyse clinical and histological features of this rare pathology.

  18. Hybrid kappa\\lambda antibody is a new serological marker to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Mingju; Li, Wenli; Yi, Lang; Yu, Songlin; Fan, Gaowei; Lu, Tian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guojing; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Jiansheng; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-06-08

    The only generally accepted serological marker currently used for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is IgG4. Our aim was mainly to determine whether hybrid κ\\λ antibody can help to diagnose AIP and to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure the levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in human sera. Sera were obtained from 338 patients, including 61 with AIP, 74 with pancreatic cancer, 50 with acute pancreatitis, 40 with ordinary chronic pancreatitis, 15 with miscellaneous pancreatic diseases, and 98 with normal pancreas. Our study showed levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in the AIP group were significantly higher than in the non-AIP group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the diagnosis of AIP were 80.3%, 91%, 66.2% and 95.5% respectively. Furthermore, the combined measurement of serum hybrid κ\\λ antibody and IgG4 tended to increase the sensitivity although the difference was not statistically significant (90.2% vs. 78.7%, P = 0.08), compared to measurement of IgG4 alone. Our findings suggest that hybrid κ\\λ antibody could be a new serological marker to diagnose AIP and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

  19. Calcified pleural scars and pleural empyema with mural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, W.G.H.; Huebener, K.H.

    1981-06-01

    The differential diagnosis between calcified pleural scars and pleural empyemas with mural calcification was studied by computer tomography, bearing in mind the patient's history. In view of the high complication rate of pleural empyemas, such as internal or external fistulae, it is desirable to elucidate every form of pleural shadowing which is more than 20 mm thick. Criteria are offered, which permit the differentiation of the pleural changes by means of conventional radiological examinations. Valuable additional information can be obtained by computer tomography. Forty-nine patients with calcification in the pleura were found among 1.900 chest x-rays which had been examined. Out of these, seven had a pleural empyema. In one case an echinococcus cyst with mural calcification was punctured under X-ray control.

  20. Calcified pleural scars and pleural empyema with mural calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, W.G.H.; Huebener, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between calcified pleural scars and pleural empyemas with mural calcification was studied by computer tomography, bearing in mind the patient's history. In view of the high complication rate of pleural empyemas, such as internal or external fistulae, it is desirable to elucidate every form of pleural shadowing which is more than 20 mm thick. Criteria are offered, which permit the differentiation of the pleural changes by means of conventional radiological examinations. Valuable additional information can be obtained by computer tomography. Forty-nine patients with calcification in the pleura were found among 1.900 chest x-rays which had been examined. Out of these, seven had a pleural empyema. In one case an echinococcus cyst with mural calcification was punctured under X-ray control. (orig.) [de

  1. Arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis; a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai T. Gavrilă

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcific tendinitis is a common cause of shoulder pain, peaking in the fourth and fifth decades of life. The excruciate pain; especially during the night is the symptom who brings patient to the doctor. In many cases conservative treatment is the best choice. Sometimes it doesn’t work and is necessary operative treatment. It is presented a case of 60 years old women who had calcific tendinits for several years and accused pain few months with absence of improvement after conservative treatment. The patient was treated surgically with removal of calcium deposit arthroscopically. After surgery, pain relief was dramatic and movement increased rapidly. Results were very good with no complications. As a conclusion, arthroscopic evacuation of calcific deposit could be considered the best solution for patients whose symptomatology fail to improve after conservative treatment.

  2. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Potts, Aaron; Anakwenze, Oke; Singh, Anshu

    2014-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff tendons is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. It is thought to be an active, cell-mediated process, although the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. Nonsurgical management continues to be the mainstay of treatment; most patients improve with modalities such as oral anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and corticosteroid injections. Several options are available for patients who fail nonsurgical treatment, including extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ultrasound-guided needle lavage, and surgical débridement. These modalities alleviate pain by eliminating the calcific deposit, and several recent studies have demonstrated success with the use of these treatment options. Surgical management options include arthroscopic procedures to remove calcific deposits and subacromial decompression; however, the role of subacromial decompression and repair of rotator cuff defects created by removing these deposits remains controversial. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  3. Abdominal aortic calcifications predict survival in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Satu M; Asola, Markku; Hadimeri, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal...... dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice. METHODS: We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar.......9) in 17%, and high (> 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS ≥ 7 (p

  4. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced

  5. CT findings in autoimmune pancreatitis: assessment using multiphase contrast-enhanced multisection CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K., E-mail: Kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya Hirokoji Clinic, Nagoya (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Departments of Medical Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Science, Nagoya (Japan); Ogawa, H.; Ota, T.; Naganawa, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Aim: To assess the spectrum of findings using multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Materials and methods: Fifty patients (four female and 46 male, mean age 65 years) were retrospectively identified from consecutive patients with abnormal CT findings of the pancreas and negative work-up for known causes. These patients had at least one finding supporting the diagnosis of AIP: serological abnormality, histopathological abnormality, or response to steroid. Two radiologists evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images in consensus. Results: The pancreas showed diffuse enlargement (n = 16; 32%), focal enlargement (n = 18; 36%), or no enlargement (n = 16; 32%). Forty-nine (98%) patients showed abnormal contrast enhancement in the affected pancreatic parenchyma, including hypoattenuation during the pancreatic phase (n = 45; 90%) and hyperattenuation during the delayed phase (n = 39; 87%). The following findings were also seen in the pancreas: a capsule-like rim (n = 24; 48%); no visualization of the main pancreatic duct lumen (n = 48; 96%); ductal enhancement (n = 26; 52%); upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (n = 27; 54%); upstream atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma (n = 27; 54%); calcification (n = 7; 14%); and cysts (n = 5; 10%). Forty-two (84%) patients showed one or more of the following extrapancreatic findings: biliary duct or gallbladder abnormality (n = 40; 80%); peripancreatic (n = 8; 16%) or para-aortic (n = 10; 20%) soft-tissue proliferation; and renal involvement (n = 15; 30%). Conclusion: Patients with AIP presented with a variety of CT findings in the pancreas and the extrapancreatic organs. The present study highlights pancreatic ductal enhancement in a subset of patients with AIP.

  6. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... cardiac CT preoperatively. CAC, AVC and ARC were quantified using Agatston scoring. Correlations were tested by Spearman's test and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing different subgroups; bicuspid (BAV) vs tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. RESULTS: CAC was present in 92%, AVC in 100% and ARC in 82......% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p AVC. The number of calcified coronary arteries correlated with ARC (rho = 0.45, p AVC. 29/152 patients had echocardiographic evidence of BAV and 123 TAV, who were older (p

  7. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Type I Choledochal Cyst Complicated With Acute Hemorrhagic Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hua Tsai

    2017-12-01

    A 14-year-old male noted with a history of recurrent abdominal pain, fever and jaundice. Ultrasonography (US of abdomen at the Emergency Department depicted distended gall bladder with wall thickening. Apparently dilated intrahepatic ducts (IHDs and fusiform dilatation of the common bile duct (CBD, and mild dilatation of the pancreatic duct were also noted, suggesting a type I choledochal cyst( . Computed tomography (CT demonstrated calcifications in the uncinate process of the pancreas in addition to the similar findings on US. He subsequently underwent choledochal cyst excision with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. After surgical treatment, he has been doing well for 3 years.

  9. Response to Comment on "Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. Debora; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Raven, John A.; Schofield, Oscar; Poulton, Alex J.; Gibbs, Samantha; Halloran, Paul R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently reported increasing calcification rates and primary productivity in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi were obtained by equilibrating seawater with mixtures of carbon dioxide in air. The noted discrepancy with previously reported decreasing calcification is likely due to the previously

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in Dachshund: Identification of a Major Locus Affecting Intervertebral Disc Calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette Sloth; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Proschowsky, Helle Friis

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc calcification and herniation commonly affects Dachshund where the predisposition is caused by an early onset degenerative process resulting in disc calcification. A continuous spectrum of disc degeneration is seen within and among clog breeds, suggesting a multifactorial etiol...

  11. Serum Osteoprotegerin level and the extent of cardiovascular calcification in haemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Ammar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: There is strong positive relationship between osteoprotegerin and both vascular and valvular calcification in hemodialysis patients. This positive correlation may open the gate for routine estimation of this agent as a surrogate marker of cardiovascular calcification in hemodialysis patients.

  12. Magnesium prevents vascular calcification in vitro by inhibition of hydroxyapatite crystal formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braake, A.D. ter; Tinnemans, P.T.; Shanahan, C.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Baaij, J.H.F. de

    2018-01-01

    Magnesium has been shown to effectively prevent vascular calcification associated with chronic kidney disease. Magnesium has been hypothesized to prevent the upregulation of osteoblastic genes that potentially drives calcification. However, extracellular effects of magnesium on hydroxyapatite

  13. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; Maclaren, Jana K; Mason, Benjamin M; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-17

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

  14. Ghrelin attenuates vascular calcification in diabetic patients with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Ye, Fei; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Bao, Zhengyang; Sun, Zhen; Xu, Liangjie; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhongqun

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification is established to be a critical factor in diabetes mellitus, which causes cardiovascular and amputation complication of diabetic patients. OPG/RANKL/RANK axis serves as a regulatory role in vascular calcification. Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), has been reported to exhibit potent cardiovascular protective effects. However, the role of ghrelin in the regulation of diabetic vascular calcification is still elusive. Here, we reported the role of ghrelin and its relationship with OPG/RANKL/RANK system in patients with diabetic foot amputation. In vivo and in vitro investigations were performed. Sixty type 2 diabetic patients with foot amputation were enrolled in vivo investigation, and they were divided into three groups through Doppler ultrasound: mild stenosis group (n=20), moderate stenosis group (n=20), and severe stenosis/occlusion group (n=20). Morphological analysis results showed diffused calcium depositions in the anterior tibial artery of diabetic amputees. Compared with the mild and moderate stenosis group, the severe stenosis/occlusion group had more spotty calcium depositions in atherosclerotic plaques. Western blot analysis indicated the expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and ghrelin were downregulated, while the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was upregulated with the vascular stenosis aggravation. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between calcium content and ghrelin levels (r=-0.58, Pghrelin levels and sRANKL levels (r=-0.57, Pghrelin levels (r=0.63, PGhrelin blunted calcification in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ghrelin upregulated OPG expression and downregulated RANKL expression in VSMC calcification when anti-OPG antibody and RANKL were performed. Collectively, we therefore conclude serum ghrelin level may be a predictor of diabetic vascular calcification. The possible mechanism may be related with OPG

  15. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process.

  16. Research on perfusion weighted imaging and diffusion weighted imaging of pancreatic masses at 3.0 T MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiuzhong; Zeng mengsu; Rao Shengxiang; Ji Yuan

    2011-01-01

    .040, P e in pancreatic cancer was statistically higher than that in normal pancreatic tissue (P=0.002). ADC values of the pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis pseudotumor, SPTP, PET and normal pancreas were (1.57±0.26) ×10 -3 , (1.19±0.15)×10 -3 (1.05±0.35)×10 -3 , (1.62±0.41)×10 -3 and (1.82±0.25)×10 -3 mm 2 /s (F=21.681, P -3 mm 2 /s was used as a cutoff value for differential diagnosis of PDCA from MLP. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.8% , 100.0%, 100.0% and 83.3% respectively when ADC ≤ 1.25×10 -3 mm 2 /s was used as a cutoff value for differential diagnosis of SPTP from PET. Conclusion: Compared to normal pancreatic tissue, pancreatic cancer usually had a lower K trans , K ep and larger V e . ADC values from respiratory-triggered DWI were well related to histopathological features of pancreatic entities and may be helpful in the differential diagnosis. (authors)

  17. A case of Addison's disease accompanied with bilateral adrenal calcification on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Li-Chik; Fujita, Naohisa; Ohba, Yachiyo

    1985-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of general malaise and hyperpigmentation. We diagnosed her case as primary adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) by endocrinological studies. CT demonstrated dense calcification in both adrenal beds without evidence of normal glandular remnants. Calcified adrenal is not specific to tuberculosis, but some points of CT findings are useful for pathogenetic approach. Recently, there have been several reports that ACTH producing pituitary tumors develop in patients treated with conventional corticosteroid replacement. Corticosteroid should be administered by monitoring of plasma cortisol and ACTH concentrations. (author)

  18. Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder in basic calcium phosphate crystal deposition disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutellari, P.N.; Mazzilli, M.P.; Orzincolo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystal deposition can lead to periarticular collections associated with typical radiographic findings, most frequently observed in the shoulder. Moreover, these deposits may be revealed in other articular sites (i.e.,wrist, hand, foot, elbow, hip, etc.). Initially, the calcium deposits may appear poorly defined (cloudlike); sequently, they may reveal different patterns (linear, triangular or circular areas), changing in size, configuration and site. Adjacent bone may be normal, altough osteoporosis, cystic lesions and reactive sclerosis are reported. The radiographic appearance of calcifications will depend upon the exact location of the deposits in the specific tendon of the rotator cuff, the adjacent bursae and the soft tissues

  19. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  20. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... auto-transplantation is performed following total pancreatectomy—the surgical removal of the whole pancreas—in patients with severe and chronic, or long lasting, pancreatitis that cannot be managed by other treatments. This procedure is not considered experimental. Patients with ...

  1. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  2. Coccolithophore growth and calcification in a changing ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhardt, Kristen M.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. Debora; Kleypas, Joan A.

    2017-12-01

    Coccolithophores are the most abundant calcifying phytoplankton in the ocean. These tiny primary producers have an important role in the global carbon cycle, substantially contributing to global ocean calcification, ballasting organic matter to the deep sea, forming part of the marine food web base, and influencing ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange. Despite these important impacts, coccolithophores are not explicitly simulated in most marine ecosystem models and, therefore, their impacts on carbon cycling are not represented in most Earth system models. Here, we compile field and laboratory data to synthesize overarching, across-species relationships between environmental conditions and coccolithophore growth rates and relative calcification (reported as a ratio of particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon in coccolithophore biomass, PIC/POC). We apply our relationships in a generalized coccolithophore model, estimating current surface ocean coccolithophore growth rates and relative calcification, and projecting how these may change over the 21st century using output from the Community Earth System Model large ensemble. We find that average increases in sea surface temperature of ∼ 2-3 ° C lead to faster coccolithophore growth rates globally (> 10% increase) and increased calcification at high latitudes. Roughly an ubiquitous doubling of surface ocean pCO2 by the end of the century has the potential to moderately stimulate coccolithophore growth rates, but leads to reduced calcification (∼ 25% decrease). Decreasing nutrient availability (from warming-induced increases in stratification) produces increases in relative calcification, but leads to ∼ 25% slower growth rates. With all drivers combined, we observe decreases in calcification and growth in most low and mid latitude regions, with possible increases in both of these responses in most high latitude regions. Major limitations of our coccolithophore model stem from a lack of conclusive

  3. Msx2 promotes cardiovascular calcification by activating paracrine Wnt signals

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Jian-Su; Cheng, Su-Li; Pingsterhaus, Joyce M.; Charlton-Kachigian, Nichole; Loewy, Arleen P.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2005-01-01

    In diabetic LDLR–/– mice, an ectopic BMP2-Msx2 gene regulatory program is upregulated in association with vascular calcification. We verified the procalcific actions of aortic Msx2 expression in vivo. CMV-Msx2 transgenic (CMV-Msx2Tg+) mice expressed 3-fold higher levels of aortic Msx2 than nontransgenic littermates. On high-fat diets, CMV-Msx2Tg+ mice exhibited marked cardiovascular calcification involving aortic and coronary tunica media. This corresponded to regions of Msx2 immunoreactivity...

  4. Is tomography of intervertebral disc calcification useful in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginalski, J.M.; Landry, M.; Gudinchet, F.; Schnyder, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the past ten years, we have found cervical intervertebral disc calcification in three children on plain films of the cervical spine made because of cervical pain. In each case, we required further radiological investigations, antero-posterior and lateral linear tomography for two children and an axial computed tomography for one child. In each case, tomography revealed no supplementary useful information. On retrospect, we think that these examinations caused unnecessary irradiation and that they should only be carried out in the rare circumstances when disc calcification is associated with neurological symptoms. (orig.)

  5. Tumor-like calcifications with scleroderma. Thibierge-Weissenbach-Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E.; Kulenkampff, H.A.; Kortenhaus, H.

    1987-12-01

    In patients with progressive scleroderma, interstitial calcifications are present to a varying extent. They are mostly located in the soft tissues of the fingers, resembling points, commas or dashes. They may also appear as 'calcinosis universalis' and reach a considerable size. Thus they mimic proliferative tumors. Scintigraphy, proving the existence of further calcifications can be helpful. We report the case of a female patient who presented with such a 'pseudotumor' of unusual size, site and extent in the lumbar region.

  6. Idiopathic Soft Tissue Calcification in an Extremity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Dhar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a-15-days-old infant presenting with firm palpable thickening of the left leg soft tissues along with induration. Radiographs of the leg revealed generalized calcification of soft tissues. No obvious underlying cause could be identified for tissue calcification and hence termed as Idiopathic calcinois cutis. There are reports of this condition in Pediatric and Dermatology literature, but very few reports in orthopedic literature. The aim of this report is to highlight the pathogenesis, course and review of literature of this relatively uncommon condition which can easily be mistaken by Orthopedic or General Surgeons for infective bony of soft tissue infection.

  7. Is tomography of intervertebral disc calcification useful in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginalski, J M; Landry, M; Gudinchet, F; Schnyder, P [Lausanne Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology

    1992-04-01

    In the past ten years, we have found cervical intervertebral disc calcification in three children on plain films of the cervical spine made because of cervical pain. In each case, we required further radiological investigations, antero-posterior and lateral linear tomography for two children and an axial computed tomography for one child. In each case, tomography revealed no supplementary useful information. On retrospect, we think that these examinations caused unnecessary irradiation and that they should only be carried out in the rare circumstances when disc calcification is associated with neurological symptoms. (orig.).

  8. Asymptomatic ''crowned dens'' calcification in CT images for the craniovertebral junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Gen; Mori, Masataka; Fukushima, Tatsuro

    2007-01-01

    Calcification around the odontoid process suggests 'crowned dens' syndrome, when accompanied with acute occipital headache or neck pain and with inflammatory signs. We retrospectively searched for calcification around the odontoid process in routine CT images of 282 patients emcompassing the craniovertebral junction, and found 13 (4.6%) had 'crowned dens' calcifications with neither characteristic symptoms nor signs suggestive for crowned dens' syndrome. Females of older ages frequently showed asymptomatic crowned dens' calcifications. (author)

  9. Computed Tomographic Distinction of Intimal and Medial Calcification in the Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Kockelkoren, Remko; Vos, Annelotte; Van Hecke, Wim; Vink, Aryan; Bleys, Ronald L. A. W.; Verdoorn, Daphne; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Koek, Huiberdina L.; de Jong, Pim A.; De Vis, Jill B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial internal carotid artery (iICA) calcification is associated with stroke and is often seen as a proxy of atherosclerosis of the intima. However, it was recently shown that these calcifications are predominantly located in the tunica media and internal elastic lamina (medial calcification). Intimal and medial calcifications are thought to have a different pathogenesis and clinical consequences and can only be distinguished through ex vivo histological analysis. Therefore...

  10. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  11. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Reppucci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic pancreatitis is a rare form of recurrent acute pancreatitis that demonstrates distinct histologic features, including diffuse, periductal, acinar, and septal inflammatory infiltrates comprised of a pure or predominant population of eosinophils, eosinophilic phlebitis and arteritis, and localized eosinophilic infiltrates with pseudocyst formation. It is associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin E levels, an elevated eosinophil count with systemic manifestations, and eosinophilic infiltrates in other organs of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of eosinophilic pancreatitis in a 44-year-old man who was diagnosed after pancreatic resection for recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis. While the gross and histologic evaluations matched other reported cases of eosinophilic pancreatitis, our patient had only minimal peripheral eosinophilia, no reported history of symptoms related to elevated eosinophilia or immunoglobulin E, and only mild eosinophilic infiltrates in his gallbladder.

  12. Cystic form of paraduodenal pancreatitis (cystic dystrophy in heterotopic pancreas (CDHP)): a potential link with minor papilla abnormalities? A study in a large series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.; Ronot, M.; Vilgrain, V. [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Radiology Department, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Paris (France); Vullierme, M.P. [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Radiology Department, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Rebours, V.; Ruszniewski, P. [Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Paris (France); University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Gastroenterology Department, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France)

    2016-01-15

    To analyze the association between cystic dystrophy in the heterotopic pancreas (CDHP) and minor papilla abnormalities. Seventy-six patients with CDHP were retrospectively included over 14 years. Two radiologists searched for MDCT signs of CDHP (cysts and thickened intestinal wall, inflammatory changes), and minor papilla abnormalities (Santorini duct dilatation, luminal calcifications of the minor papilla). Other pancreatic abnormalities (parenchymal calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilatation) or bile duct dilatation were also analysed. CDHP was mostly located in the second part of the duodenum (71/76, 93.5 %). Median duodenal wall thickness was 20 mm (range 10-46). There were multiple cysts in 86 % (65/76, median = 3), measuring 2-60 mm. No cysts were identified in four patients (5 %). Inflammatory changes were found in 87 % (66/76). Minor papilla abnormalities were found in 37 % (28/76) and calcifications in the minor papilla without calcifications in the major papilla were only observed in three patients (4 %). Abnormalities of the pancreas and main bile duct dilatation were identified in 78 % (59/76) and 38 % (29/76). Previously described CT features were seen in most patients with CDHP. However, minor papilla abnormalities were seen in a minority of patients and, therefore, do not seem to be a predisposing factor for CDHP. (orig.)

  13. Value of 18F-FDG PET imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant pancreatic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liying; Guo Wanhua; Guan Liang; Li Peiyong

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-FDG in differentiation of benign and malignant pancreatic mass. 12 patients with pancreatic occupying lesion diagnosed by ultrasound or CT/MR including 7 pancreatic cancer and 5 pancreatitis underwent 18 F-FDG PET imaging. Visual interpretation and semiquantitative analysis by calculating the tumor/liver (T/L) ratio based on ROI were performed on attenuation corrected images. 9 positive findings were detected. Among them, 7 were confirmed to be cancer, but the other 2 were mass-forming pancreatitis. Final diagnoses of the 3 patients with negative findings were confirmed to be pancreatitis. The mean T/L ratio was 2.58 +- 0.95 in pancreatic cancer, significantly higher than that in pancreatitis (1.29 +- 0.87) (p = 0.037). With a T/L ratio cutoff value of 1.5, all 7 cancer patients were correctly categorized. However, one pancreatitis had T/L ratio higher than 1.5. 18 F-FEG PET imaging was a potential reliable method in differentiating benign or malignant pancreatic mass with high negative predictive value, but the specificity was limited. Semiquantitative analysis may improve the accuracy of the diagnosis

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: review and update of etiology, risk factors, and management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pham

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving inflammation, fibrosis, and loss of acinar and islet cells which can manifest in unrelenting abdominal pain, malnutrition, and exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. The Toxic-Metabolic, Idiopathic, Genetic, Autoimmune, Recurrent and Severe Acute Pancreatitis, Obstructive (TIGAR-O classification system categorizes known causes and factors that contribute to chronic pancreatitis. Although determining disease etiology provides a framework for focused and specific treatments, chronic pancreatitis remains a challenging condition to treat owing to the often refractory, centrally mediated pain and the lack of consensus regarding when endoscopic therapy and surgery are indicated. Further complications incurred include both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pseudocyst formation, bile duct obstruction, and pancreatic cancer. Medical treatment of chronic pancreatitis involves controlling pain, addressing malnutrition via the treatment of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and recognizing the risk of osteoporosis, and administering appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation and diabetic agents. Cornerstones in treatment include the recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and administration of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, support to cease smoking and alcohol consumption, consultation with a dietitian, and a systematic follow-up to assure optimal treatment effect.

  15. Perioperative ultrasound-guided wire marking of calcific deposits in calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigg, Andreas; Draws, Detlev; Stamm, Axel; Pfeiffer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The identification of a calcific deposit in the rotator cuff can often cause difficulties. A new technique is described to identify the calcific deposit perioperatively with a ultrasound-guided wire. The technique allows a safe direct marking of calcific deposits making the procedure faster especially in difficult cases.

  16. Calcification of the heart: A rare manifestation of chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, C.R. de

    1986-01-01

    A case is presented in which chronic renal failure led to intense visceral calcification, mainly to the lungs and heart. The discovery of cardiac calcifications on plain chest radiographs is exceedingly rare in renal patients. Puncate calcific deposits with an almost homogeneous distribution throughout the cardiac muscle were the main feature of this case. (orig.)

  17. Extract of grapefruit-seed reduces acute pancreatitis induced by ischemia/reperfusion in rats: possible implication of tissue antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Pawlik, W W; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Naskalski, J W

    2004-12-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been shown to exert antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity possibly due to the presence of naringenin, the flavonoid with cytoprotective action on the gastric mucosa. No study so far has been undertaken to determine whether this GSE is also capable of preventing acute pancreatic damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which is known to result from reduction of anti-oxidative capability of pancreatic tissue, and whether its possible preventive effect involves an antioxidative action of this biocomponent. In this study carried out on rats with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced by 30 min partial pancreatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion, the GSE or vehicle (vegetable glycerin) was applied intragastrically in gradually increasing amounts (50-500 microl) 30 min before I/R. Pretreatment with GSE decreased the extent of pancreatitis with maximal protective effect of GSE at the dose 250 microl. GSE reduced the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum lipase and poly-C specific ribonuclease activity, and attenuated the marked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. GSE administered alone increased significantly pancreatic tissue content of lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkens, and when administered before I/R, GSE reduced the pancreatitis-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that GSE exerts protective activity against I/R-induced pancreatitis probably due to the activation of antioxidative mechanisms in the pancreas and the improvement of pancreatic blood flow.

  18. Endoscopic Management of Peri-Pancreatic Fluid Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hon Chi; Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun

    2017-09-15

    In the past decade, there has been a progressive paradigm shift in the management of peri-pancreatic fluid collections after acute pancreatitis. Refinements in the definitions of fluid collections from the updated Atlanta classification have enabled better communication amongst physicians in an effort to formulate optimal treatments. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has emerged as the procedure of choice over surgical cystogastrostomy. The approach provides similar success rates with low complications and better quality of life compared with surgery. However, an endoscopic "step up" approach in the management of pancreatic walled-off necrosis has also been advocated. Both endoscopic and percutaneous drainage routes may be used depending on the anatomical location of the collections. New-generation large diameter EUS-specific stent systems have also recently been described. The device allows precise and effective drainage of the collections and permits endoscopic necrosectomy through the stents.

  19. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  20. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Wartmann, T.; Fleming, A.K.; Gocheva, V.; Linden, W.A. van der; Withana, N.P.; Verdoes, M.; Aurelio, L.; Edgington-Mitchell, D.; Lieu, T.; Parker, B.S.; Graham, B.; Reinheckel, T.; Furness, J.B.; Joyce, J.A.; Storz, P.; Halangk, W.; Bogyo, M.; Bunnett, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked

  1. Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-κB, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-α. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

  2. A sea urchin Na(+)K(+)2Cl(-) cotransporter is involved in the maintenance of calcification-relevant cytoplasmic cords in Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Wiebke C; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Findeisen, Ulrike; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Jackson, Daniel J; Himmerkus, Nina; Melzner, Frank; Bleich, Markus

    2015-09-01

    The cellular mechanisms of calcification in sea urchin larvae are still not well understood. Primary mesenchyme cells within the larval body cavity form a syncytium to secrete CaCO3 spicules from intracellular amorphous CaCO3 (ACC) stores. We studied the role of Na(+)K(+)2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) in intracellular ACC accumulation and larval spicule formation of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. First, we incubated growing larvae with three different loop diuretics (azosemide, bumetanide, and furosemide) and established concentration-response curves. All loop diuretics were able to inhibit calcification already at concentrations that specifically inhibit NKCC. Calcification was most effectively inhibited by azosemide (IC50=6.5 μM), while larval mortality and swimming ability were not negatively impacted by the treatment. The inhibition by bumetanide (IC50=26.4 μM) and furosemide (IC50=315.4 μM) resembled the pharmacological fingerprint of the mammalian NKCC1 isoform. We further examined the effect of azosemide on the maintenance of cytoplasmic cords and on the occurrence of calcification vesicles using fluorescent dyes (calcein, FM1-43). Fifty micromolars of azosemide inhibited the maintenance of cytoplasmic cords and resulted in increased calcein fluorescence within calcification vesicles. The expression of NKCC in S. droebachiensis was verified by PCR and Western blot with a specific NKCC antibody. In summary, the pharmacological profile of loop diuretics and their specific effects on calcification in sea urchin larvae suggest that they act by inhibition of NKCC via repression of cytoplasmic cord formation and maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  4. Smoking and morphology of calcific deposits affect the outcome of needle aspiration of calcific deposits (NACD) for calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudelaar, Bart W; Ooms, Edwin M; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Schepers-Bok, Relinde; Vochteloo, Anne J

    2015-11-01

    Although NACD has proven to be an effective minimal invasive treatment for calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff, little is known about the factors associated with treatment failure or the need for multiple procedures. Patients with symptomatic calcific tendinitis who were treated by NACD were evaluated in a retrospective cohort study. Demographic details, medical history, sonographic and radiographic findings were collected from patient files. Failure of NACD was defined as the persistence of symptoms after a follow-up of at least six months. NACD procedures performed within six months after a previous NACD procedure were considered repeated procedures. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with treatment failure and multiple procedures. 431 patients (277 female; mean age 51.4±9.9 years) were included. Smoking (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.7, p=0.04) was significantly associated with failure of NACD. Patients with Gärtner and Heyer (GH) type I calcific deposits were more likely to need multiple NACD procedures (AOR: 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.5, protator cuff tears were of no influence on the outcome of NACD or the number of treatments necessary. Smoking almost doubled the chance of failure of NACD and the presence of GH type I calcific deposits significantly increased the chance of multiple procedures. Partial thickness rotator cuff tears did not seem to affect the outcome of NACD. Based on the findings in this study, the importance of quitting smoking should be emphasized prior to NACD and partial thickness rotator cuff tears should not be a reason to withhold patients NACD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between coronary artery calcification detected by non-gated multi-detector CT in patients with suspected ischemic heart disease and myocardial ischemia detected by thallium exercise stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Chikako; Okajima, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Takashi; Hattori, Ryuichi; Kudo, Takashi; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether we could predict myocardial ischemia when coronary artery calcification is detected by non-gated multidetector CT in patients with suspected ischemic heart disease. Eighty-three patients suspected of having ischemic heart disease (55 men, 28 women; age range 36-83 years; mean age 68 years) underwent multidetector CT and Tl-201 single photon emission computed tomography. Prediction of myocardial ischemia by coronary arterial calcification detected on CT was evaluated by comparing the coronary artery territories that showed calcification with the area of myocardial ischemia determined by SPECT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of multidetector CT for predicting myocardial ischemia were calculated. Coronary angiography was also examined and compared with multidetector CT. Risk factors, including hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and family history, were compared for evidence of coronary artery calcification detected by multidetector CT and myocardial ischemia detected by thallium nuclear scans. For analysis by patients, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary artery calcification for myocardial ischemia detection were 65, 63, 56, and 71%, respectively. Similarly, for analysis by coronary arterial territories, those values were 56, 77, 41 and 86%, respectively. Coronary stenosis on CAG was also related to the ischemia determined by SPECT and calcification on multidetector CT. Ischemia was better influenced by risk factors than was coronary arterial calcification. For analysis by coronary arterial territories, the specificity and negative predictive value of coronary arterial calcification seen by multidetector CT are relatively high. (author)

  6. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  7. [Robot-assisted pancreatic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssle, B; Distler, M; Weitz, J; Welsch, T

    2017-06-01

    Although robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been considered critically in the past, it is nowadays an established standard technique in some centers, for distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic head resection. Compared with the laparoscopic approach, the use of robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous for acquiring the skills for pancreatic, bile duct and vascular anastomoses during pancreatic head resection and total pancreatectomy. On the other hand, the use of the robot is associated with increased costs and only highly effective and professional robotic programs in centers for pancreatic surgery will achieve top surgical and oncological quality, acceptable operation times and a reduction in duration of hospital stay. Moreover, new technologies, such as intraoperative fluorescence guidance and augmented reality will define additional indications for robot-assisted pancreatic surgery.

  8. Current knowledge on pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eIovanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the deregulation of many signalling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signalling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovanna, Juan [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France); Mallmann, Maria Cecilia [Centre d’Investigation Clinique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gonçalves, Anthony [Département d’Oncologie Médicale, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Turrini, Olivier [Département de Chirurgie Oncologique, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Dagorn, Jean-Charles, E-mail: juan.iovanna@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France)

    2012-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Intracranial calcification in Raine syndrome: radiological pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mane, K.; Al-Dayel, F.; McDonald, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report the seventh known patient with Raine syndrome, a recently recognised, lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with severe craniofacial dysmorphism and intracranial calcification in whom the CT findings are correlated with the gross and microscopic abnormalities found in the brain at autopsy. (orig.)

  12. Low calcification in corals in the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Reef-building coral communities in the Great Barrier Reef—the world's largest coral reef—may now be calcifying at only about half the rate that they did during the 1970s, even though live coral cover may not have changed over the past 40 years, a new study finds. In recent decades, coral reefs around the world, home to large numbers of fish and other marine species, have been threatened by such human activities as pollution, overfishing, global warming, and ocean acidification; the latter affects ambient water chemistry and availability of calcium ions, which are critical for coral communities to calcify, build, and maintain reefs. Comparing data from reef surveys during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s with present-day (2009) measurements of calcification rates in One Tree Island, a coral reef covering 13 square kilometers in the southern part of the Great Barrier Reef, Silverman et al. show that the total calcification rates (the rate of calcification minus the rate of dissolution) in these coral communities have decreased by 44% over the past 40 years; the decrease appears to stem from a threefold reduction in calcification rates during nighttime.

  13. Intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications: two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinetti, A.; Sessa, M.; Falzone, A.; Della Sala, S.W. [Santa Maria del Carmine Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rovereto, TN (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons may be complicated by adjacent bone erosion and subsequent migration of calcific deposits within the bone resulting in marrow inflammation. Bone marrow involvement is not readily visible using X-ray and ultrasound (US) and further testing is necessary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive technique that can detect a focal bone T1 and T2-weighted hypointensity with bone marrow edema-like signal and cortical erosion. These findings can mislead the radiologist by suggesting an infectious or neoplastic lesion, often requiring further evaluation with computed tomography (CT) and biopsy. We report two cases of patients with shoulder pain in which different radiological approaches were used with pathological confirmation in one of them. In the first case, MRI revealed significant bone involvement in the head of the humerus and cortical erosion of the greater tuberosity. A CT examination and a biopsy was necessary for a final diagnosis of inflammatory bone reaction from intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications. In the second case, similar MRI findings prompted re-evaluation of imaging to make a diagnosis of intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications, obviating the need to perform CT and biopsy. We illustrate MRI signs of this complication that we think would allow to narrow the differential diagnosis potentially avoiding biopsy and additional CT examinations. (orig.)

  14. Vitamin D in Vascular Calcification: A Double-Edged Sword?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification (VC as a manifestation of perturbed mineral balance, is associated with aging, diabetes and kidney dysfunction, as well as poorer patient outcomes. Due to the current limited understanding of the pathophysiology of vascular calcification, the development of effective preventative and therapeutic strategies remains a significant clinical challenge. Recent evidence suggests that traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and dyslipidaemia, fail to account for clinical observations of vascular calcification. Therefore, more complex underlying processes involving physiochemical changes to mineral balance, vascular remodelling and perturbed hormonal responses such as parathyroid hormone (PTH and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23 are likely to contribute to VC. In particular, VC resulting from modifications to calcium, phosphate and vitamin D homeostasis has been recently elucidated. Notably, deregulation of vitamin D metabolism, dietary calcium intake and renal mineral handling are associated with imbalances in systemic calcium and phosphate levels and endothelial cell dysfunction, which can modulate both bone and soft tissue calcification. This review addresses the current understanding of VC pathophysiology, with a focus on the pathogenic role of vitamin D that has provided new insights into the mechanisms of VC.

  15. Impact of elevated CO2 on shellfish calcification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.P.H.; Quiblier, C.M.L.; Jansen, J.M.; Gattuso, J.P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean acidification resulting from human emissions of carbon dioxide has already lowered and will further lower surface ocean pH. The consequent decrease in calcium carbonate saturation potentially threatens calcareous marine organisms. Here, we demonstrate that the calcification rates of the edible

  16. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  17. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutscheson, JD; Aikawa, M

    2016-01-01

    obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin...

  18. Intracranial Convexity Lipoma with Massive Calcification: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare entity, accounting for less than 0.5% of intracranial tumors, which usually develops in the callosal cisterns. We report a case of lipoma with an unusual location; in the high parietal convexity combined with massive calcification, and no underlying vascular malformation or congenital anomaly.

  19. Intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications: two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinetti, A.; Sessa, M.; Falzone, A.; Della Sala, S.W.

    2018-01-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons may be complicated by adjacent bone erosion and subsequent migration of calcific deposits within the bone resulting in marrow inflammation. Bone marrow involvement is not readily visible using X-ray and ultrasound (US) and further testing is necessary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive technique that can detect a focal bone T1 and T2-weighted hypointensity with bone marrow edema-like signal and cortical erosion. These findings can mislead the radiologist by suggesting an infectious or neoplastic lesion, often requiring further evaluation with computed tomography (CT) and biopsy. We report two cases of patients with shoulder pain in which different radiological approaches were used with pathological confirmation in one of them. In the first case, MRI revealed significant bone involvement in the head of the humerus and cortical erosion of the greater tuberosity. A CT examination and a biopsy was necessary for a final diagnosis of inflammatory bone reaction from intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications. In the second case, similar MRI findings prompted re-evaluation of imaging to make a diagnosis of intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications, obviating the need to perform CT and biopsy. We illustrate MRI signs of this complication that we think would allow to narrow the differential diagnosis potentially avoiding biopsy and additional CT examinations. (orig.)

  20. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate