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  1. Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register (BCPR): a pilot study to develop a national cerebral palsy (CP) register with surveillance of children for CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Gulam; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Islam, Johurul; Alam, Monzurul; Jung, Jenny; Novak, Iona; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl; Badawi, Nadia; Muhit, Mohammad

    2015-09-25

    The causes and pathogenesis of cerebral palsy (CP) are all poorly understood, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). There are gaps in knowledge about CP in Bangladesh, especially in the spheres of epidemiological research, intervention and service utilization. In high-income countries CP registers have made substantial contributions to our understanding of CP. In this paper, we describe a pilot study protocol to develop, implement, and evaluate a CP population register in Bangladesh (i.e., Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register - BCPR) to facilitate studies on prevalence, severity, aetiology, associated impairments and risk factors for CP. The BCPR will utilise a modified version of the Australian Cerebral Palsy Register (ACPR) on a secured web-based platform hosted by the Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Institute, Australia. A standard BCPR record form (i.e., data collection form) has been developed in consultation with local and international experts. Using this form, the BPCR will capture information about maternal health, birth history and the nature of disability in all children with CP aged CP will be identified by using the community based Key Informants Method (KIM). Data from the completed BPCR record together with details of assessment by a research physician will be entered into an online data repository. Once implemented, BCPR will be, to the best of our knowledge, the first formalised CP register from a LMIC. Establishment of the BCPR will enable estimates of prevalence; facilitate clinical surveillance and promote research to improve the care of individuals with CP in Bangladesh.

  2. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child): Evidence of Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Huang, Chien-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) is the first health condition-specific questionnaire designed for measuring QOL in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, its construct validity has not yet been confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Hence, this study assessed the construct validity of the caregiver…

  3. Description and Psychometric Properties of the CP QOL-Teen: A Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elise; Mackinnon, Andrew; Davern, Melanie; Boyd, Roslyn; Bohanna, India; Waters, Elizabeth; Graham, H. Kerr; Reid, Susan; Reddihough, Dinah

    2013-01-01

    To assess the measurement properties of a new QOL instrument, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Teen (CP QOL-Teen), in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 13-18 years, examining domain structure, reliability, validity and adolescent-caregiver concordance. Based on age, 695 eligible families were invited to participate by mail.…

  4. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  5. Comparing Levels of Mastery Motivation in Children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Typically Developing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Mahyar; Vameghi, Roshanak; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Saeedi, Ahmad; Gharib, Masoud

    2018-02-01

    The present study aimed to compare motivation in school-age children with CP and typically developing children. 229 parents of children with cerebral palsy and 212 parents of typically developing children participated in the present cross sectional study and completed demographic and DMQ18 forms. The rest of information was measured by an occupational therapist. Average age was equal to 127.12±24.56 months for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 128.08±15.90 for typically developing children. Independent t-test used to compare two groups; and Pearson correlation coefficient by SPSS software applied to study correlation with other factors. There were differences between DMQ subscales of CP and typically developing groups in terms of all subscales ( P Manual ability classification system (r=-0.782, P<0.001) and cognitive impairment (r=-0.161, P<0.05). Children with CP had lower mastery motivation than typically developing children. Rehabilitation efforts should take to enhance motivation, so that children felt empowered to do tasks or practices.

  6. Incidence of epilepsy among patients with cerebral palsy (CP in Yayasan Pemeliharaan Anak Cacat (YPAC – Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertin Sianturi

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic condition due to cerebral function disorders. Epilepsy occurs as a common complication of many neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP that can cause further brain damage if especially they are accompanied with prolonged seizure. The incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP varies, 25-35%. The high incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP suggests that these disorders has common or related origins. We carried out a retrospective study to determine the incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP registered July 1988 to June 1998 in YPAC Medan and to determine whether the incidence of epilepsy was different according to type of CP. Data was compiled from medical records, including name, sex, parity, mothers age, prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal history, and EEG resuts. Data were analysed using statistical computer program and its significance was evaluated by chi square test at p < 0.05. There were 67 cases with CP, 53 cases spastic CP, 13 cases mixed CP and one case dyskinetic CP. Of the 67 cases CP, 47.8% were male, 52.2% female with the mean age of 50.3 (SD 36.9 months. There were 25 (37.3% patients CP associated with epilepsy, 72% general seizures, 20% partial seizures, and 8% infantile spasm. The incidence of epilepsy was significantly different among patients with CP associated with the type of CP and gestational age, p < 0.05. We concluded that the incidence of epilepsy among patient with CP in YPAC Medan was 37.3% and showed significant difference in CP according to type and gestational age. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 158-63 Keywords: epilepsy, cerebral palsy, obstetric history, gestational age

  7. ERECTOR SPINAE AND SCOLIOSIS IN A POPULATION WITH CEREBRAL PALSY: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSAMA J. ALÍ-MORELL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To verify the relation of muscular response to the vestibular stimulation of the erector spinae, specifically longissimus thoracis and iliocostalis lumborum, with the origin of scoliosis in a population of individuals with level V cerebral palsy of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 12 individuals aged between four and 14 years. The muscular activity of the longissimus thoracis and iliocostalis lumborum was recorded by electromyography in the presence of anteroposterior and lateral imbalances, comparing it with that obtained in sitting position without imbalances. Scoliosis was assessed by radiological study following Cobb method. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between correct responses of both muscles to anteroposterior imbalances and absence of right thoracolumbar scoliosis (p=0.005; p=0.028, left thoracic scoliosis (p=0.005; p=0.046 and right lumbar scoliosis (p=0.005; p=0.046. Conclusions: The symmetry of muscular responses to anteroposterior imbalances, both of longissimus thoracis and iliocostalis lumborum, seems to be one of the factors that prevent the development of spine deviations in this population. Level of evidence: IV. Type of Study: Case series

  8. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  9. Cohort profile: cerebral palsy in the Norwegian and Danish birth cohorts (MOBAND-CP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Forthun, Ingeborg; Petersen, Tanja Gram; Moster, Dag; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn; Wilcox, Allen J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. Participants MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts—the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort. MOBAND-CP includes maternal interview/questionnaire data collected during pregnancy and follow-up, plus linked information from national health registries. Findings to date Initial harmonisation of data from the 2 cohorts has created 140 variables for children and their mothers. In the MOBAND-CP cohort, 438 children with CP have been identified through record linkage with validated national registries, providing by far the largest such sample with prospectively collected detailed pregnancy data. Several studies investigating various hypotheses regarding CP aetiology are currently on-going. Future plans Additional data can be harmonised as necessary to meet requirements of new projects. Biological specimens collected during pregnancy and at delivery are potentially available for assay, as are results from assays conducted on these specimens for other projects. The study size allows consideration of CP subtypes, which is rare in aetiological studies of CP. In addition, MOBAND-CP provides a platform within the context of a merged birth cohort of exceptional size that could, after appropriate permissions have been sought, be used for cohort and case-cohort studies of other relatively rare health conditions of infants and children. PMID:27591025

  10. Gross motor function, functional skills and caregiver assistance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with and without cerebral visual impairment (CVI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Steenbergen, B.; Schans, C.P. van der

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the level of gross motor function and functional skills in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and cerebral visual impairment (CVI) as well as caregiver assistance are lower in comparison with the corresponding group of children experiencing CP without CVI. Method: Data

  11. Gross motor function, functional skills and caregiver assistance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with and without cerebral visual impairment (CVI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, Masoud; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Steenbergen, B.; van der Schans, Cees

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To determine whether the level of gross motor function and functional skills in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and cerebral visual impairment (CVI) as well as caregiver assistance are lower in comparison with the corresponding group of children experiencing CP without CVI. Method:

  12. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  13. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program is a combined follow-up program and national clinical quality database that aims to monitor and improve the quality of health care for children with cerebral palsy (CP). STUDY POPULATION: The database includes children with CP aged 0...... indicators in three of five regions in Denmark comprising 432 children with CP, corresponding to a coverage of 82% of the expected population. CONCLUSION: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program is currently under development as a national clinical quality database in Denmark. The database holds...

  14. Responsiveness of the ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire measuring global activity performance in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Julie; Arnould, Carlyne; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Houx, Laëtitia; Pons-Becmeur, Christelle; Renders, Anne; Brochard, Sylvain; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2018-06-04

    To investigate the responsiveness of the ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire after two evidence-based interventions for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seventy-five children with CP either participated in an intensive motor-skill learning intervention (hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy including lower extremities [HABIT-ILE], n=47) or received botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) injection(s) into lower extremities combined with conventional physical therapy (n=28). All children were assessed three times: at baseline (T 0 ; before HABIT-ILE/the day of BoNT-A injection), at T 1 (last day of HABIT-ILE/6wks after BoNT-A injection), and at follow-up (T 2 ; 3-4mo after the beginning of intervention). Parents completed ACTIVLIM-CP and three other activity questionnaires. Responsiveness was analysed using group (based on intervention), subgroup (based on gross motor function level), and individual approaches. For the HABIT-ILE group, significant improvements in ACTIVLIM-CP were observed for the T 0 -T 1 period (pCP demonstrated high responsiveness after HABIT-ILE, showing that this scale may be used to investigate global activity performance in clinical trials focusing on improving daily life activities. Good responsiveness of ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaire during intensive motor-skill learning intervention. Higher responsiveness for children in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels III and IV versus I and II after intensive intervention. ACTIVLIM-CP is useful to identify children improving their performance after botulinum neurotoxin-A injection. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  15. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  16. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP.......This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs...

  17. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  18. Epilepsy and cerebral palsy: characteristics and trends in children born in 1976-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellier, Elodie; Uldall, Peter; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy.......Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy....

  19. Attentional and executive impairments in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottcher, Louise; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function.......Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function....

  20. Maternal Infections during Pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Streja, Elani

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common motor disability in childhood. We examined the association between maternal infections during pregnancy and the risk of congenital CP in the child. METHODS: Liveborn singletons in Denmark between 1997 and 2003 were identified from the Danish National...... the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Of the 440 564 singletons with follow-up data, 840 were diagnosed with congenital CP. Maternal genito-urinary tract infections (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3...

  1. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  2. Pain in young people aged 13 to 17 years with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Dickinson, Heather O; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP).......To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP)....

  3. Computed tomographic (CT) scans in cerebral palsy (CP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Patel, P.J.; Mahdi, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    The CT findings in 120 cerebral palsied children are analysed. The 72.5% positive findings are correlated with the clinical types, as well as the aetiological basis for the cerebral palsy. The spastic type, 83.3% of the total number of children, had the highest positive findings. The yield was increased in children with seizures (91.3%) and those in the postnatal group (90%), as well as those with birth trauma and neonatal asphyxia (94%). The findings were those of atrophy in 30.8%, hydrocephalus, in 10%, infarct in 11.6%, porencephaly in 8.3% and others. The atropic changes and their patterns are explained. Treatable lesions, such as tumour, hydrocephalus, subdural haematoma, porencephaly and hygroma were identified in 22.5% of cases. It is concluded that CT scan is definitely efficacious in the management of cerebral palsied children. (orig.)

  4. Children's perceptions of their cerebral palsy and their impact on life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Mackey, Anna H; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Stott, N Susan

    2012-01-01

    To assess an individual child's cognitive and emotional perceptions of their cerebral palsy (CP) and how these are associated with their reported life satisfaction and their functional walking ability. Convenience sample of 48 children with cerebral palsy, GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System) I-IV, mean age of 12.2 ± 2.5 years was recruited from tertiary level out-patient clinics. All children completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire-Cerebral Palsy version (BIPQ-CP), Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS) and 1- and 6-min walk tests. Children with CP reported levels of global life satisfaction (mean score 31.4/42) equivalent to previous studies of typically developing children. Higher total SLSS scores were associated with lower concern about CP (rho = -0.61, p life satisfaction. Life satisfaction in this group of children was strongly associated with a child's perceptions of their CP but was not associated with functional walking ability. Although the cross-sectional nature of the study precludes assumptions of causality, understanding children's cognitive and emotional beliefs about their cerebral palsy would seem to be an important adjunct to clinical management.

  5. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17...... prevention of CP is possible if the numbers of preterm births and multiple pregnancies can be reduced. FUNDING: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Programme is supported by the foundation "Ludvig og Sara Elsass Fond". TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2008-58-0034....

  6. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  7. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  8. Social integration of adults with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Hansen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Social integration and independence is the ultimate goal of habilitation and social support for patients with cerebral palsy (CP). Having a partner and having children provide support for social integration of adults with or without a disability. We studied 416 participants with CP born between...

  9. The efficacy of GMFM-88 and GMFM-66 to detect changes in gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP): a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Madawi; Long, Toby; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Bavishi, Siddhi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review published research on the use of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88) and (GMFM-66) as outcome measures to determine if these tools detect changes in gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP) undergoing interventions. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Medline and PubMed to identify studies published from January 2000 through January 2011 that reported the accuracy of GMFM-88 and GMFM-66 to measure changes over time in children with CP undergoing interventions. The keywords used for the search were "GMFM" and "CP". Two of the authors (M.A. and S.B.) reviewed the titles and abstracts found in the databases. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. Of 62 papers initially identified, 21 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These articles consist of three longitudinal studies, six randomized controlled trials, four repeated measure design, six pre-post test design, a case series and one non-randomized prospective study. The included studies were generally of moderate to high methodological quality. The studies included children from a wide age range of 10 months to 16 years. According to the National Health and Medical Research Council, the study designs were level II, III-2, III-3 and IV. The review suggests that the GMFM-88 and GMFM-66 are useful as outcome measures to detect changes in gross motor function in children with CP undergoing interventions. Implications for Rehabilitation Accurate measurement of change in gross motor skill acquisition is important to determine effectiveness of intervention programs in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88 and GMFM-66) are common tools used by rehabilitation specialists to measure gross motor function in children with CP. The GMFM appears to be an effective outcome tool for measuring change in gross motor function according to

  10. What constitutes cerebral palsy in the twenty-first century?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Determining inclusion/exclusion criteria for cerebral palsy (CP) surveillance is challenging. The aims of this paper were to (1) define inclusion/exclusion criteria that have been adopted uniformly by surveillance programmes and identify where consensus is still elusive, and (2) provide...... (SCPE; 1976-1998). An expert panel used a consensus building technique, which utilized the SCPE 'decision tree' and the original 'What constitutes cerebral palsy?' paper as frameworks. RESULTS: CP surveillance programmes agree on key clinical criteria pertaining to the type, severity, and origin...

  11. Congenital cerebral palsy and prenatal exposure to self-reported maternal infections, fever, or smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Miller, Jessica; Bech, Bodil H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the association between maternal self-reported infections, fever, and smoking in the prenatal period and the subsequent risk for congenital cerebral palsy (CP). STUDY DESIGN: We included the 81,066 mothers of singletons born between 1996...... and midgestation. We identified 139 CP cases including 121 cases of spastic CP (sCP) as confirmed by the Danish National Cerebral Palsy Register. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Self-reported vaginal...

  12. Cerebral palsy characterization by estimating ocular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jully; Atehortúa, Angélica; Moncayo, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a large group of motion and posture disorders caused during the fetal or infant brain development. Sensorial impairment is commonly found in children with CP, i.e., between 40-75 percent presents some form of vision problems or disabilities. An automatic characterization of the cerebral palsy is herein presented by estimating the ocular motion during a gaze pursuing task. Specifically, After automatically detecting the eye location, an optical flow algorithm tracks the eye motion following a pre-established visual assignment. Subsequently, the optical flow trajectories are characterized in the velocity-acceleration phase plane. Differences are quantified in a small set of patients between four to ten years.

  13. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  14. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON THE ASSESSMENT OF FUNCTIONAL MOTOR DISABILITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadugodapitiya .S .I

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most common conditions in childhood causing severe physical disability. Spastic paresis is the most common form of CP. According to the topographic classification, CP is divided into spastic hemiplegia, diplegia and quadriplegia. Distribution of functional motor disability is varied in each type of CP. Aims: To describe functional motor disability in children with cerebral palsy using standard scales. Method: This cross-sectional descriptive study included 93 children with cerebral palsy (CP. Functional motor disability of each type of spastic CP was assessed using standard scales. Results: The dominant sub-type of cerebral palsy in the present study was spastic diplegia. Most affected muscle with spasticity was gastrocnemius-soleus group of muscles. Active range of motion of foot eversion and dorsiflexion were the most affected movements in all the types of CP. In the overall sample, only 35% were able to walk independently. Majority of subjects with quadriplegia were in levels III and IV of Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale representing severe disability. There was a significant relationship observed between the muscle tone and range of motion of their corresponding joints as well as between the muscle tone of gastrocnemius-soleus group of muscles and the ankle components of Observational Gait Analysis. Conclusions: Results of the present study confirms the clinical impression of disability levels in each type of CP and showed that the assessment of functional motor disability in children with different types of spastic CP is useful in planning and evaluation of treatment options.

  15. Pain symptoms in patients with severe cerebral palsy: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the presence of pain in patients diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy (CP) according to the degree of motor function impairment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students of the Association of Parents and Friends of Exceptional Children (APAE) diagnosed with cerebral palsy and ...

  16. Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

  17. Predictors for early diagnosis of cerebral palsy from national registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granild-Jensen, Jakob Bie; Rackauskaite, Gija; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2015-01-01

    AIM: As early intervention is important in cerebral palsy (CP), an early diagnosis is desirable. The aim of this study was to establish the median diagnostic age of CP and to identify predictors of an early diagnosis in a population-based cohort. METHOD: Using the Danish National Cerebral Palsy...... of motor disability, cerebral ultrasonography results, epilepsy, gestational age, and degree of cognitive impairment. RESULTS: We found the overall median corrected diagnostic age of CP to be 11 months. Early diagnosis was associated with the type of CP, presence of epilepsy, a high degree of motor...... disability, and abnormalities in the cerebral ultrasonography. The gestational age was not associated with the diagnostic age. INTERPRETATION: The median diagnostic age implies that half of the Danish children with CP will be able to enter an early intervention program before 1 year of age. A late diagnosis...

  18. Acoustic Predictors of Pediatric Dysarthria in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kristen M.; Hustad, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to identify acoustic characteristics of connected speech that differentiate children with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) from typically developing children and to identify acoustic measures that best detect dysarthria in children with CP. Method: Twenty 5-year-old children with dysarthria…

  19. Quality of Arithmetic Education for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; Withagen, Floortje

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the quality of arithmetic education for children with cerebral palsy. The use of individual educational plans, amount of arithmetic instruction time, arithmetic instructional grouping, and type of arithmetic teaching method were explored in three groups: children with cerebral palsy (CP) in…

  20. Upper limb therapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP – The Pirate Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlak Marta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children with cerebral palsy (CP in the form of spastic hemiplegia experience numerous difficulties concerning an affected upper limb such as reaching for objects, gripping or manipulating them. These limitations affect their everyday activity. Conducting an effective and simultaneously an interesting therapy aimed at meeting the child’s individual needs and improving upper limb function is a challenge for a physiotherapist. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of upper limb therapy carried out within the project titled “The Pirate Group” based on Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT and Bimanual Training (BIT conducted in a specially arranged environment. Material and methods: The research included 16 children with CP in the form of spastic hemiplegia. Mean age of the study participants was 4.23 years. The children underwent a two-week Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT combined with Bimanual Training (BIT. In order to evaluate the effects of the therapy, each child underwent the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA prior to the therapy and after its completion. Results: Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p<0.05 between the results of AHA prior to and after the therapy (t(14=9.12, p<0.0001. An improvement in the affected upper limb function was noted in all the children participating in the research. Conclusions: The project titled “The Pirate Group”, based on CIMT and BIT is an effective therapeutic intervention which improves spontaneous activity of the affected upper limb in children with hemiplegia.

  1. Parental social consequences of having a child with cerebral palsy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan I; Flachs, Esben M; Madsen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the social situation of parents who have a child with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: This was a population-based longitudinal study with linkage to public registries. Parents of children with CP (n=3671) identified in the Danish CP Registry were compared with 17 983 parents of child......AIM: To analyse the social situation of parents who have a child with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: This was a population-based longitudinal study with linkage to public registries. Parents of children with CP (n=3671) identified in the Danish CP Registry were compared with 17 983 parents...... of children without CP. Employment, income, cohabitation status, and presence of additional children were factors analysed during a follow-up period of 28 years. We followed parents from before their child was born and up to the age of 43 years of the child. RESULTS: Mothers of children with CP under the age...... parents in the labour market and living together with their child. Special attention needs to be paid to the financial situation of families with children with CP under 10 years of age....

  2. Development of daily activities in school-age children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, D.W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J.W.; van Schie, P.E.M.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Jongmans, M.J.; Lindeman, E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the course of capabilities in self-care, mobility, and social function in school-age children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to investigate associations with CP-, child-, and family-characteristics. A clinic-based sample of children with CP (n= 116; 76 males,

  3. Robot-Assisted Task-Specific Training in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Hermano I.; Ladenheim, Barbara; Hippolyte, Christopher; Monterroso, Linda; Mast, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to examine the feasibility of applying therapeutic robotics to children and adults with severe to moderate impairment due to cerebral palsy (CP). Pilot results demonstrated significant gains for both groups. These results suggest that robot-mediated therapy may be an effective tool to ameliorate the debilitating effects of CP and…

  4. Physical fitness in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, O.W.

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a non-progressive condition; however, certain negative side effects such as a low muscle strength and cardio respiratory endurance can develop at later stages and can get progressively worse depending on the specifics of a person's condition. Children and adolescents with CP

  5. Aerobic capacity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO(2peak) (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level

  6. Neuro-Ophthalmological Disorders in Cerebral Palsy: Ophthalmological, Oculomotor, and Visual Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina G.; La Piana, Roberta; Bertone, Chiara; Misefari, Walter; Galli, Jessica; Balottin, Umberto; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is a disorder caused by damage to the retrogeniculate visual pathways. Cerebral palsy (CP) and CVI share a common origin: 60 to 70% of children with CP also have CVI. We set out to describe visual dysfunction in children with CP. A further aim was to establish whether different types of CP are associated with…

  7. Spina Bifida Cystica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    andrew

    2012-01-20

    Jan 20, 2012 ... disability of the infant. The prevalence of Spina Bifida varies across time, region, race and ... Family history of Spina Bifida was present in 7.8%. Nearly all patients (98%) had myelomeningocele with a most ... Birth ranking was ascertained by history provided by the mother, miscarriages before 28 weeks.

  8. Symptom Recognition and Diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder of childhood. Parents recognized the symptoms of CP at mean age of 13 months. However there was a mean delay of going to a doctor by 23 months and the mean age of diagnosis was 5.5 years. Less than half of the CP children were diagnosed by a pediatrician and were receiving treatment methods…

  9. Asphyxia-related risk factors and their timing in spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene F.; Schendel, Diana; Grove, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of asphyxia-related conditions (reducing blood flow or blood oxygen levels in the fetus) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) considering different gestational age groups and the timing of risk. Design Population-based case-control study. Setting Danish Cerebral...... Palsy Register in eastern Denmark and Danish Medical Birth Register. Population or Sample 271 singletons with spastic CP and 217 singleton controls, frequency matched by gestational age group, born 1982-1990 in eastern Denmark. Methods Data were abstracted from medical records, and a priori asphyxia...

  10. Muscle growth is reduced in 15-month-old children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    AimLack of muscle growth relative to bone growth may be responsible for development of contractures in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Here, we used ultrasonography to compare growth of the medial gastrocnemius muscle in children with and without CP.MethodTwenty-six children with spastic CP (15...

  11. Rehabilitation Interventions for Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbaskhanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of movement problems that do not worsen over time. They cause physical disability mainly in areas of body movement. It is caused by damage to the motor control centers of developing brain. Management of a child with CP to optimize functional abilities, typically includes the input of many disciplines, including occupational therapy (OT, physical therapy (PT and orthotic treatment. The main aim of this review was to compare the effects of most common rehabilitation intervention on CP. Evidence Acquisition: This systematic review was conducted on published papers that studied rehabilitation interventions approaches for children with CP. A literature search was performed using PubMed, SCOPUS and Google Scholar on papers published from January 1990 to October 2014. Results: From 125 articles related to rehabilitation interventions for children with Cerebral palsy, 36 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The efficacy of rehabilitation interventions for children with CP is still inconclusive. Functional ability and social participation should be the main outcome measures in evaluating rehabilitation efficacy.

  12. Maternal Prepregnancy BMI and Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forthun, Ingeborg; Wilcox, Allen J; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in offspring. METHODS: The study population consisted of 188 788 children in the Mothers and Babies in Norway and Denmark CP study, using data from 2 population-based, prospective birth...

  13. Aerobic Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO[subscript 2peak] (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level II and 336 typically developing…

  14. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  15. Daily activities of school-age children with cerebral palsy : development and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    In care and research, there is increasing interest in the daily lives of children with cerebral palsy (CP). So far, we know that CP can have a limiting impact on daily activities such as locomotion and self-care. What we, however, don’t know is how children with CP develop over time in terms of

  16. Prenatal stress and cerebral palsy: a nationwide cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to prenatal stress may affect neurodevelopment of the fetus, but whether this exposure increases the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) later in life is unknown. We aimed to examine the association between maternal bereavement during the prenatal time period and CP in childhood...

  17. PREDICT-CP: study protocol of implementation of comprehensive surveillance to predict outcomes for school-aged children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Roslyn N; Davies, Peter Sw; Ziviani, Jenny; Trost, Stewart; Barber, Lee; Ware, Robert; Rose, Stephen; Whittingham, Koa; Sakzewski, Leanne; Bell, Kristie; Carty, Christopher; Obst, Steven; Benfer, Katherine; Reedman, Sarah; Edwards, Priya; Kentish, Megan; Copeland, Lisa; Weir, Kelly; Davenport, Camilla; Brooks, Denise; Coulthard, Alan; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Guzzetta, Andrea; Fiori, Simona; Wynter, Meredith; Finn, Christine; Burgess, Andrea; Morris, Kym; Walsh, John; Lloyd, Owen; Whitty, Jennifer A; Scuffham, Paul A

    2017-07-12

    Cerebral palsy (CP) remains the world's most common childhood physical disability with total annual costs of care and lost well-being of $A3.87b. The PREDICT-CP (NHMRC 1077257 Partnership Project: Comprehensive surveillance to PREDICT outcomes for school age children with CP) study will investigate the influence of brain structure, body composition, dietary intake, oropharyngeal function, habitual physical activity, musculoskeletal development (hip status, bone health) and muscle performance on motor attainment, cognition, executive function, communication, participation, quality of life and related health resource use costs. The PREDICT-CP cohort provides further follow-up at 8-12 years of two overlapping preschool-age cohorts examined from 1.5 to 5 years (NHMRC 465128 motor and brain development; NHMRC 569605 growth, nutrition and physical activity). This population-based cohort study undertakes state-wide surveillance of 245 children with CP born in Queensland (birth years 2006-2009). Children will be classified for Gross Motor Function Classification System; Manual Ability Classification System, Communication Function Classification System and Eating and Drinking Ability Classification System. Outcomes include gross motor function, musculoskeletal development (hip displacement, spasticity, muscle contracture), upper limb function, communication difficulties, oropharyngeal dysphagia, dietary intake and body composition, participation, parent-reported and child-reported quality of life and medical and allied health resource use. These detailed phenotypical data will be compared with brain macrostructure and microstructure using 3 Tesla MRI (3T MRI). Relationships between brain lesion severity and outcomes will be analysed using multilevel mixed-effects models. The PREDICT-CP protocol is a prospectively registered and ethically accepted study protocol. The study combines data at 1.5-5 then 8-12 years of direct clinical assessment to enable prediction of outcomes

  18. Development of Daily Activities in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Schie, Petra; Dallmeijer, Annet; Jongmans, Marian; Lindeman, Eline

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the course of capabilities in self-care, mobility, and social function in school-age children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to investigate associations with CP-, child-, and family-characteristics. A clinic-based sample of children with CP (n = 116; 76 males, 40 females; mean age 6 y 3 mo, SD 12 mo) was…

  19. Isometric muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Rameckers, Eugene A.; Houdijk, Han; de Groot, Sonja; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between isometric leg muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to typically developing (TD) peers. Method: Participants were 62 children with CP (6-13 years), able to walk with (n=10) or without (n=52) walking aids,

  20. Prevalance of Obesity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ankita; Diwan, Shraddha; Diwan, Jasmin; Vyas, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity are epidemic among children and adolescents. There is worldwide tendency of increasing prevalence of obesity in children. Cerebral palsy (CP) is leading cause of childhood disability.studies have proposed mechanism of children with disability leading towards obesity and related health risks. So this study is aimed at determining whether such trend of obesity exists in children with CP in terms of BMI and WHR.

  1. Funding for cerebral palsy research in Australia, 2000–2015: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R; Novak, I; Badawi, N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the funding for cerebral palsy (CP) research in Australia, as compared with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Design Observational study. Setting For Australia, philanthropic funding from Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (CPARF) (2005–2015) was compared with National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC, 2000–2015) and Australian Research Council (ARC, 2004–2015) and CPARF and NHMRC funding were compared with NIH funding (USA). Participants Cerebral Palsy researchers funded by CPARF, NHMRC or NIH. Results Over 10 years, total CPARF philanthropic funding was $21.9 million, including people, infrastructure, strategic and project support. As competitive grants, CPARF funded $11.1 million, NHMRC funded $53.5 million and Australian Research Council funded $1.5 million. CPARF, NHMRC and NIH funding has increased in real terms, but only the NIH statistically significantly increased in real terms (mean annual increase US$4.9 million per year, 95% CI 3.6 to 6.2, p<0.001). The NHMRC budget allocated to CP research remained steady over time at 0.5%. A network analysis indicated the relatively small number of CP researchers in Australia is mostly connected through CPARF or NHMRC funding. Conclusions Funding for CP research from the Australian government schemes has stabilised and CP researchers rely on philanthropic funding to fill this gap. In comparison, the NIH is funding a larger number of CP researchers and their funding pattern is consistently increasing. PMID:27798026

  2. Walking drawings and walking ability in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Mackey, Anna H; Stott, N Susan; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    To investigate whether drawings of the self walking by children with cerebral palsy (CP) were associated with walking ability and illness perceptions. This was an exploratory study in 52 children with CP (M:F = 28:24), mean age 11.1 years (range 5-18), who were attending tertiary level outpatient clinics. Children were asked to draw a picture of themselves walking. Drawing size and content was used to investigate associations with clinical walk tests and children's own perceptions of their CP assessed using a CP version of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Larger drawings of the self were associated with less distance traveled, higher emotional responses to CP, and lower perceptions of pain or discomfort, independent of age. A larger self-to-overall drawing height ratio was related to walking less distance. Drawings of the self confined within buildings and the absence of other figures were also associated with reduced walking ability. Drawing size and content can reflect walking ability, as well as symptom perceptions and distress. Drawings may be useful for clinicians to use with children with cerebral palsy to aid discussion about their condition. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Spina Bifida Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Spina bifida ... the spine. Read below for the latest national statistics on spina bifida in the United States. In ...

  4. Health status of children with cerebral palsy living in Europe: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E; White-Koning, M; Marcelli, M

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this report is to describe the health status of 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP) of all severities in Europe using the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ). METHOD: A total of 818 children with CP from nine centres in defined geographical areas participated. CP type...

  5. Does Parent Report Gross Motor Function Level of Cerebral Palsy Children Impact on the Quality of Life in these Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashmdarfard, Marzieh; Amini, Malek; Badv, Reza Shervin; Ghaffarzade Namazi, Narges; Rassafiani, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of parent report gross motor function level of cerebral palsy (CP) children on the parent report quality of life of CP children. Sampling of this cross-sectional study was done in occupational therapy clinics and CP children's schools in 2016 in Zanjan, Iran. Samples size was 60 CP children aged 6-12 yr and for sampling method, a non-probability convenience was used. For assessing the quality of life of CP children the cerebral palsy quality of life (CP QOL) questionnaire and for assessing the level of gross motor function of CP children the Gross Motor Function Classification System Family Report Questionnaire (GMFCSFRQ) were used. The average age of children (22 males and 30 females) was 8.92 yr old (minimum 6 yr and maximum 12 yr). The relationship between the level of gross motor function and participation and physical health was direct and significant (r=0.65). The relationship between functioning, access to services and family health with the level of gross motor function was direct but was not significant ( P >0.05) and the relationship between pain and impact of disability and emotional well-being with the level of gross motor function was significant ( P quality of life of children with cerebral palsy. It means that the level of gross motor function cannot be used as a predictor of quality of life for children with cerebral palsy alone.

  6. Developing and Validating the Communication Function Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Paneth, Nigel; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Kent, Raymond D.; Lillie, Janet; Eulenberg, John B.; Chester, Ken, Jr.; Johnson, Brenda; Michalsen, Lauren; Evatt, Morgan; Taylor, Kara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to create and validate the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP), for use by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP.…

  7. Behaviour in Children with Cerebral Palsy with and without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Malin; Olsson, Ingrid; Hagberg, Gudrun; Beckung, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe behavioural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with and without epilepsy. The children were sampled from the Western Sweden CP register and were part of a European Union project. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire and questions on epilepsy were answered by one parent of each child. Medical…

  8. Risk factors and the occurrence of cerebral palsy in high risk infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyo Handryastuti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of cerebral palsy (CP has increased due to better survival rates of high-risk babies. Early detection and time to the occurrence of CP in the first year of life is important in order to provide early intervention. Objectives To determine the proportion of CP in high-risk babies, the time to the occurrence of CP in the first year, and assess possible associations between risk factors of CP and time to the occurrence of CP. Methods A prospective cohort study was done on 150 high-risk babies up to the age of 12 months. We obtained history of motor ability and assessed primitive reflexes and postural reactions of subjects at the ages of 4 and 6 months. The diagnosis of CP was established at 6 and 12 months of age. Results The proportion of CP was 26% at 6 months and 24% at 12 months of age. Significant risk factors associated with CP at 6 and 12 months of age were cerebral ultrasound abnormalities, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, and intracranial hemorrhage. In 88.7% of subjects with CP, CP was detected in the first 6 months. Mean age at the occurrence of CP was 9.99 months (95%CI 9.46 to 10.53. Risk factors that significantly affected the time to the occurrence of CP by survival analysis were ultrasound abnormalities and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusions Cerebral palsy can be detected as early as the first 6 months of life. Cerebral ultrasound abnormalities and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are the risk factors associated with CP.

  9. The Role of Stem Cells in the Treatment of Cerebral Palsy: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiasatdolatabadi, Anahita; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Jafarabadi, Mina; Ai, Arman; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil; Ai, Jafar

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neuromuscular disease due to injury in the infant's brain. The CP disorder causes many neurologic dysfunctions in the patient. Various treatment methods have been used for the management of CP disorder. However, there has been no absolute cure for this condition. Furthermore, some of the procedures which are currently used for relief of symptoms in CP cause discomfort or side effects in the patient. Recently, stem cell therapy has attracted a huge interest as a new therapeutic method for treatment of CP. Several investigations in animal and human with CP have demonstrated positive potential of stem cell transplantation for the treatment of CP disorder. The ultimate goal of this therapeutic method is to harness the regenerative capacity of the stem cells causing a formation of new tissues to replace the damaged tissue. During the recent years, there have been many investigations on stem cell therapy. However, there are still many unclear issues regarding this method and high effort is needed to create a technology as a perfect treatment. This review will discuss the scientific background of stem cell therapy for cerebral palsy including evidences from current clinical trials.

  10. Classification of Topographical Pattern of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: A Registry Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan M.; Carlin, John B.; Reddihough, Dinah S.

    2011-01-01

    This study used data from a population-based cerebral palsy (CP) registry and systematic review to assess the amount of heterogeneity between registries in topographical patterns when dichotomised into unilateral (USCP) and bilateral spastic CP (BSCP), and whether the terms diplegia and quadriplegia provide useful additional epidemiological…

  11. Development of the quality of reaching in infants with cerebral palsy : a kinematic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxum, Anke G; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Dijkstra, Linze-Jaap; Hamer, Elisa G; Hielkema, Tjitske; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess development of reaching and head stability in infants at very high risk (VHR-infants) of cerebral palsy (CP) who did and did not develop CP. METHOD: This explorative longitudinal study assessed the kinematics of reaching and head sway in sitting in 37 VHR-infants (18 CP) one to four

  12. Quality of life of mothers of children with cerebral palsy and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of life of mothers of children with cerebral palsy and their agematched controls. BOA Adegoke, OO Adenuga, OA Olaleye, CO Akosile. Abstract. Background Caring for a child with cerebral palsy (CP) could negatively impact the quality of life (QoL) of the mothers who are usually the primary caregivers. Studies on the ...

  13. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  14. Assessment of Postural Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Silvia Leticia; dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Woollacott, Marjorie Hines; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to review studies that assessed postural control (PC) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and describe the methods used to investigate postural control in this population. It also intended to describe the performance of children with CP in postural control. An extensive database search was performed using the keywords: postural…

  15. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and the Risk of Congenital Cerebral Palsy in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liew, Zeyan; Ritz, Beate; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are persistent pollutants and endocrine disruptors that may affect fetal brain development. We investigated whether prenatal exposure to PFASs increases the risk of congenital cerebral palsy (CP). The source population for this study includes 83,389 liveborn...... singletons and mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort during 1996-2002. We identified 156 CP cases by linking the cohort to the Danish National Cerebral Palsy Register, and we randomly selected 550 controls using a case-cohort design. We measured 16 PFASs in maternal plasma collected in early...

  16. [Oral motor dysfunction, feeding problems and nutritional status in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mei; Fu, Ping; Zhao, Jian-hui; Lan, Kun; Zhang, Hong

    2004-10-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the clinical features of oral motor dysfunction and feeding problems as well as the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-nine CP children, 39 boys and 20 girls, mean age 31 months (20 to 72 months), were recruited. Their parents were interviewed for high risk factors and feeding history. Each case was assessed for oral motor and feeding problems based on oral motor and feeding skill score; for nutritional status by measurement of weight, height; neurologically for type of cerebral palsy and for developmental age by Gesell's developmental scale. Equal number of age and sex matched controls were included for comparison of nutritional status, oral motor and feeding skill score. Among 59 patients, 51 cases had oral motor dysfunction and 55 cases had feeding problems including all athtosis, spastic tetraplegia, and 16 had spastic diplegia. The scores of both the mean oral motor function and feeding skill of CP children were significantly lower than those of the controls (P children with cerebral palsy consisted of liquid and semisolid diet. Body weight and height below the 25th percentile were found in 13 cases and 19 cases, respectively. The majority of the children with cerebral palsy had oral motor dysfunction and feeding problems which appeared in early age and disturbed the growth and nutritional status. Thorough assessment for oral motor function, feeding problems and nutritional status of CP children is indicated in order to start timely rehabilitation and nutritional interventions which can significantly improve their nutritional status and quality of life.

  17. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  18. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  19. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within...

  20. Development of non-verbal intellectual capacity in school-age children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

    Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of

  1. Typical and atypical (cerebral palsy) development of unimanual and bimanual grasp planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.; Steenbergen, B.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we tested 13 children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 24 typically developing children (7-12 years old) in a unimanual and bimanual motor planning task. We focused on two research questions: (1) How does motor planning develop in children with and without CP? and (2) Is motor

  2. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...

  3. Educational Solutions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Lynn; Omichinski, Donna Riccio; Miller, Nicole; Sandella, Danielle; Warschausky, Seth

    2010-01-01

    This paper characterizes educational strengths and needs of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and connects research findings from the University of Michigan's Adapted Cognitive Assessment Lab (ACAL) to current special educational requirements. It acknowledges the uniqueness of educating a child with significant motor and communication disabilities…

  4. Learning Among Children with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Learning Among Children with Spina Bifida Overview Parents, teachers and health care professionals have observed that children with Spina Bilda have problems with motor ...

  5. Psychiatric Disorders among Children with Cerebral Palsy at School Starting Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaas, H. M.; Hysing, M.; Elgen, I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present population study was to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP), as well as the impact of comorbid conditions. A cohort of children with CP born 2001-2003, and living in the Western Health Region of Norway were evaluated at school starting age. Parents were interviewed with the…

  6. Spina bifida and parental occupation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blatter, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were: (1) to identify parental occupations with an increased risk of spina bifida in offspring; (2) to study whether parental occupational exposure to chemicals or radiation during or shortly before pregnancy is a risk factor for the occurrence of spina bifida. In order to

  7. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Ament, A.J.H.A.; van Raak, E.P.M.; Becher, J.G.; Rotteveel, J.; Vles, J.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  8. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.; Ament, A.J.; Raak, E.P. van; Vles, J.S.; Becher, J.G.; Vermeulen, R.; Brouwer, O.F.; Maathuis, C.G.B.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C.E.; Gerritsen, J.; Geerts, M.J.; Jongerius, P.H.; Nieuwenhuizen, O.F.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Speth, L.A.; Stroink, H.; Ziel, E.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  9. The Relationship between Manual Ability and Ambulation in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Poulin, Chantal; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in 120 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (15.2, SD 2.1 years, 59.8% male). Adolescents were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). A neurologist classified CP subtype. Most…

  10. Predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Van Mô; Colver, Allan; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether childhood factors that are amenable to intervention (parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain) predicted participation in daily activities and social roles of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). We randomly selected 1174 children aged 8-12 years from eight...

  11. Neurorehabilitation with versus without resistance training after botulinum toxin treatment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Jensen, Bente Rona; Nielsen, Lone M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of physical rehabilitation with (PRT) and without (CON) progressive resistance training following treatment of spastic plantarflexors with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Fourteen children with CP performed supervised...

  12. Early vibration assisted physiotherapy in toddlers with cerebral palsy - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, C.; Herkenrath, P.; Hollmann, H.; Waltz, S.; Becker, I.; Hoebing, L.; Semler, O.; Hoyer-Kuhn, H.; Duran, I.; Hero, B.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Schoenau, E.

    OBJECTIVES: to investigate feasibility, safety and efficacy of home-based side-alternating whole body vibration (sWBV) to improve motor function in toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: Randomized controlled trial including 24 toddlers with CP (mean age 19 months (SD±3.1); 13 boys).

  13. Motor Learning of a Bimanual Task in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Ching; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) have been shown to improve their motor performance with sufficient practice. However, little is known about how they learn goal-oriented tasks. In the current study, 21 children with unilateral CP (age 4-10 years old) and 21 age-matched typically developed children (TDC) practiced a simple bimanual…

  14. Factors contributing to the longitudinal development of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Siok Swan; van der Slot, Wilma M A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Becher, Jules G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We aimed to determine factors associated with the longitudinal development of social participation in a Dutch population of individuals with Cerebral Palsy (CP) aged 1–24 years. Methods and procedures For this multicentre prospective longitudinal study, 424 individuals with CP aged 1–24 years

  15. Obesity Prevention for Individuals with Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polfuss, Michele; Bandini, Linda G; Sawin, Kathleen J

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a common comorbidity in individuals with spina bifida. Carrying excess weight exacerbates the inherent health challenges associated with spina bifida, impedes the individual's ability to self-manage their condition, and creates further challenges for family members and caregivers. This manuscript provides a narrative review of key issues for understanding and prevention of obesity in persons with spina bifida within the context of the social ecological model. Specific variables related to obesity and spina bifida include individual factors (i.e., body composition and measurement issues, energy needs, eating patterns, physical activity, and sedentary activity) family factors (i.e., parenting/family, peers), community factors (i.e., culture, built environment, healthcare and healthcare providers, and school), and societal factors (i.e., policy issues). Due to the complex etiology of obesity and its increased prevalence in individuals with spina bifida, it is critical to initiate prevention efforts early with a multifactorial approach for this at-risk population. Increased research is warranted to support these efforts.

  16. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants......Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...

  17. Being in Pain: A Phenomenological Study of Young People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Kirstyn; Imms, Christine; Howie, Linsey

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the experience and impact of chronic pain on the lives of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Six participants with CP (four males, two females; age range 14-24y) who were known to experience chronic pain participated in individual in-depth interviews. Five participants had quadriplegia and used wheelchairs;…

  18. Motor Control of the Lower Extremity Musculature in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, David J.; Stuberg, Wayne; Stergiou, Nicholas; Kurz, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify the differences in torque steadiness and variability of the muscular control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen children with CP (age = 14.2 [plus or minus] 0.7 years) that had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score of I-III and 15…

  19. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  20. Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

  1. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants......Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... with epilepsy versus those without epilepsy. The severity of motor impairment among participants with CP able to walk had just a minor influence. Only half the participants with CP who had attended mainstream schooling were employed. In conclusion several childhood characteristics seemed to predict long...

  2. Development of postural adjustments during reaching in infants with CP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, M; van der Fits, IBM; Stremmelaar, EF; Touwen, BCL

    1999-01-01

    The development of postural adjustments during reaching movements was longitudinally studied in seven infants with cerebral palsy (CP) between 4 and 18 months of age. Five infants developed spastic hemiplegia, one spastic tetraplegia, and one spastic tetraplegia with athetosis. Each assessment

  3. Cognitive Correlates of Mathematical Achievement in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; de Moor, Jan M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Remarkably few studies have investigated the nature and origin of learning difficulties in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Aims: To investigate math achievement in terms of word-problem solving ability in children with CP and controls. Because of the potential importance of reading for word-problem solving, we investigated reading…

  4. Language Development and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics in Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Eun Sook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of language development in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and the other contributing factors to language development in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The study included 172 children with CP who underwent brain MRI and language…

  5. Characterization of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: Dependence of Catch Angle on Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Goldsmith, Ashlee; Gaebler, Deborah; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate spasticity under controlled velocities and torques in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using a manual spasticity evaluator. Method: The study involved 10 children with spastic CP (six males, four females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 2y 9mo, range 7-16y; one with quadriplegia, six with right hemiplegia, three with left hemiplegia; Gross…

  6. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  7. Personal and environmental factors contributing to participation in romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.H.G.; Stam, H.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Roebroeck, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study determinants of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP), focusing on personal and environmental factors. Method: A cohort study was performed with 74 young adults (46 men; 28 women) aged 20-25 years (SD 1.4) with CP (49% unilateral CP,

  8. Best seating condition in children with spastic cerebral palsy : One type does not fit all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angsupaisal, Mattana; Dijkstra, Linze-Jaap; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Burger, Karine; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effect of forward-tilting of the seat surface and foot-support in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) is debated. Aim: To assess the effect of forward-tilting of the seat surface and foot-support in children with CP on kinematic head stability and reaching. Methods: Nineteen

  9. Motor performance of individuals with cerebral palsy in a virtual game using a mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Juliana Nobre; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira; da Silva, Talita Dias; Capelini, Camila Miliani; de Menezes, Lilian Del Cielo; Massetti, Thais; Tonks, James; Watson, Suzanna; Nicolai Ré, Alessandro Hervaldo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a permanent disorder of movement, muscle tone or posture that is caused by damage to the immature and developing brain. Research has shown that Virtual Reality (VR) technology can be used in rehabilitation to support the acquisition of motor skills and the achievement of functional tasks. The aim of this study was to explore for improvements in the performance of individuals with CP with practice in the use of a virtual game on a mobile phone and to compare their performance with that of the control group. Twenty-five individuals with CP were matched for age and sex with twenty-five, typically developing individuals. Participants were asked to complete a VR maze task as fast as possible on a mobile phone. All participants performed 20 repetitions in the acquisition phase, five repetitions for retention and five more repetitions for transfer tests, in order to evaluate motor learning from the task. The CP group improved their performance in the acquisition phase and maintained the performance, which was shown by the retention test; in addition, they were able to transfer the performance acquired in an opposite maze path. The CP group had longer task-execution compared to the control group for all phases of the study. Individuals with cerebral palsy were able to learn a virtual reality game (maze task) using a mobile phone, and despite their differences from the control group, this kind of device offers new possibilities for use to improve function. Implications for rehabilitation A virtual game on a mobile phone can enable individuals with Cerebral Palsy (CP) to improve performance. This illustrates the potential for use of mobile phone games to improve function. Individuals with CP had poorer performance than individuals without CP, but they demonstrated immediate improvements from using a mobile phone device. Individuals with CP were able to transfer their skills to a similar task indicating that they were able to learn these motor skills by

  10. The effect of Sub-maximal exercise-rehabilitation program on cardio-respiratory endurance indexes and oxygen pulse in patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Izadi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical or cardio-respiratory fitness are of the best important physiological variables in children with cerebral palsy (CP, but the researches on exercise response of individuals with CP are limited. Our aim was to determine the effect of sub-maximal rehabilitation program (aerobic exercise on maximal oxygen uptake, oxygen pulse and cardio- respiratory physiological variables of children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy diplegia and compare with able-bodied children. Methods: In a controlled clinical trial study, 15 children with diplegia spastic cerebral palsy, were recruited on a voluntarily basis (experimental group and 18 subjects without neurological impairments selected as control group. In CP group, aerobic exercise program performed on the average of exercise intensity (144 beat per minute of heart rate, 3 times a week for 3 months. The time of each exercise session was 20-25 minutes. Dependent variables were measured in before (pretest and after (post test of rehabilitation program through Mac Master Protocol on Tantories cycle ergometer in CP group and compared with the control group. Results: The oxygen pulse (VO2/HR during ergometery protocol was significantly lower in CP group than normal group (P<0.05. No significant statistical difference in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max was found between groups. The rehabilitation program leads to little increase of this variable in CP group. After sub-maximal exercise in pretest and post test, the heart rate of patient group was greater than control group, and aerobic exercise leads to significant decrease in heart rate in CP patients(P<0.05. Conclusion: The patients with spastic cerebral palsy, because of high muscle tone, severe spasticity and involuntarily movements have higher energy cost and lower aerobic fitness than normal people. The rehabilitation exercise program can improve physiological function of muscle and cardio-respiratory endurance in these

  11. Effects of novel tubing gait on neuromuscular imbalance in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoon Kyum; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Jae Jin; You, Sung Joshua Hyun; Yi, Chung Hwi; Jeon, Hye Seon

    2014-01-01

    Gait impairments from a neuromuscular imbalance are crucial issues in cerebral palsy. The purpose of our study was to compare the effects of the assistive tubing gait (ATG) and assistive-resistive tubing gait (ARTG) on improving the vasti and hamstring muscle imbalance during the initial contact to mid-stance phases in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Fourteen age-matched individuals including seven normal individuals (11.7 years) and seven individuals with CP (12.9 years) were recruited. All participants underwent electromyography (EMG) measurement of the unilateral vasti and hamstring muscle activity during the three gait training conditions of no-tubing gait (NTG), ATG, and ARTG. A statistical one-way repeated-measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine differences in the vasti and hamstring activity, the vasti/hamstring ratio, and the knee joint angle across the three gait training conditions for each group. The initial vasti and hamstring muscle imbalance in CP was significantly improved by applying the ARTG compared with the ATG. The vasti/hamstring ratio during the ARTG was compatible with the ratio value obtained from the NTG of normal individuals. The knee joint angle in CP was not improved in this short-term intervention. The ARTG proportionately increased the vasti activation and reciprocally inhibited the hamstring activity, subsequently improving the neuromuscular imbalance associated with the flexed-knee gait in individuals with spastic diplegic CP.

  12. Congenital cerebral palsy, child sex and parent cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Wu, Chunsen; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP) and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular...... disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were...... used to model risk of cardiovascular outcomes for exposed parents compared to all other parents beginning at the child's 10(th) birthday. RESULTS: We identified 733,730 mothers and 666,652 fathers among whom 1,592 and 1,484, respectively, had a child with CP. The mean age for mothers at end of follow...

  13. Physical activity in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.N.; van Schie, P.E.M.; Becher, J.G.S.J.S.; Smits, D.W.; Gorter, J.W.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to describe the physical activity levels of 5- and 7-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP, n=97), to compare their physical activity levels with those of typically developing peers (TD, n=57) and the Dutch recommendation for physical activity, and to

  14. Altered sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark S; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Children diagnosed with spastic Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show perceptual and cognitive problems, which may contribute to their functional deficit. Here we investigated if altered ability to determine whether an observed movement is performed by themselves (sense of agency...

  15. Cerebral Palsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy--also known as CP--is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control the body's ability to use muscles effectively. Often the injury happens before birth, sometimes during delivery or soon after birth. The symptoms will differ from person to person and change as children and their nervous systems mature. This…

  16. Overview of Four Functional Classification Systems Commonly Used in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Paulson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common physical disability in childhood. CP comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders that can result in spasticity, dystonia, muscle contractures, weakness and coordination difficulty that ultimately affects the ability to control movements. Traditionally, CP has been classified using a combination of the motor type and the topographical distribution, as well as subjective severity level. Imprecise terms such as these tell very little about what a person is able to do functionally and can impair clear communication between providers. More recently, classification systems have been created employing a simple ordinal grading system of functional performance. These systems allow a more precise discussion between providers, as well as better subject stratification for research. The goal of this review is to describe four common functional classification systems for cerebral palsy: the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS, the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS, the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS, and the Eating and Drinking Ability Classification System (EDACS. These measures are all standardized, reliable, and complementary to one another.

  17. Functional communication in children with cerebral palsy : an interrater reliability study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Verheij; A. Hammer; A. Beelen; J. Voorman

    2015-01-01

    Poster presentatie op conferentie Background: Assessments of functional communication skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP), classified with the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), often differ between the child's school teacher and the speech language therapist (SLT).

  18. Anxiety level and self-esteem in youth with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Aneta Rita Borkowska

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the research was to compare youth with cerebral palsy (CP) and healthy individuals in terms of self-esteem and anxiety level, and to evaluate the relation between self-esteem and anxiety in both study groups. Participants and procedure The study included 30 individuals with CP and 30 healthy individuals, aged 16 to 22 years. The anxiety level was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, while self-esteem was assessed using Rosenberg’s Self-Es...

  19. Screening for psychopathology in a national cohort of 8- to 15-year-old children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskaite, Gija; Bilenberg, Niels; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is often accompanied by psychopathology and learning disability. AIMS: (1) to evaluate the prevalence of psychopathology as estimated by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) parental questionnaire in 8- to 15-year-old Danish children with CP and to analyze its association...

  20. Educational outcomes for children with cerebral palsy: a linked data cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Malcolm B; Bowen, Jennifer R; Patterson, Jillian A; Roberts, Christine L; Torvaldsen, Siranda

    2018-04-01

    To identify a cohort of children with cerebral palsy (CP) from hospital data; determine the proportion that participated in standardized educational testing and attained a score within the normal range; and describe the relationship between test results and motor symptoms. This population-based retrospective cohort study used data from New South Wales, Australia. We linked hospital data for children younger than 16 years of age admitted between 1st July 2000 and 31st March 2014 to education data from 2009 to 2014. Hospital diagnosis codes were used to identify a cohort of children with CP (n=3944) and describe their motor symptoms. Educational outcomes in the CP cohort were compared with those among children without CP. Of those with educational data (n=1770), 46% were exempt from reading assessment because of intellectual or functional disability, 7% were absent or withdrawn from testing and 47% participated in testing. About 30% of all children with educational data had test scores in the normal range. The proportion was greatest among those with hemiplegia (>40%) and lowest among those with tetraplegia (<10%). One-third of children with CP participated in standardized testing and achieved a result in the normal range. The proportions were lower in children with more severe motor symptoms. From 2009 to 2014, most Australian children with cerebral palsy (CP) attended a mainstream school. The rate of disability-related exemption from standardized educational testing was almost 50%. Thirty per cent of children with CP achieved educational scores in the normal range. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Isometric muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J; Rameckers, Eugene A; Houdijk, Han; de Groot, Sonja; Scholtes, Vanessa A; Becher, Jules G

    2017-01-01

    To determine the relationship between isometric leg muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to typically developing (TD) peers. Participants were 62 children with CP (6-13 years), able to walk with (n = 10) or without (n = 52) walking aids, and 47 TD children. Isometric muscle strength of five muscle groups of the leg was measured using hand-held dynamometry. Mobility capacity was assessed with the 1-min walk, the 10-m walk, sit-to-stand, lateral-step-up and timed-stair tests. Isometric strength of children with CP was reduced to 36-82% of TD. When adjusted for age and height, the percentage of variance in mobility capacity that was explained by isometric strength of the leg muscles was 21-24% (walking speed), 25% (sit-to-stand), 28% (lateral-step-up) and 35% (timed-stair) in children with CP. Hip abductors and knee flexors had the largest contribution to the explained variance, while knee extensors showed the weakest correlation. Weak or no associations were found between strength and mobility capacity in TD children. Isometric strength, especially hip abductor and knee flexor strength, is moderately related to mobility capacity in children with CP, but not in TD children. To what extent training of these muscle groups will lead to better mobility capacity needs further study. Implications for Rehabilitation Strength training in children with cerebral palsy (CP) may be targeted more specifically at hip abductors and knee flexors. The moderate associations imply that large improvements in mobility capacity may not be expected when strength increases.

  2. Fingertip force planning during grasp is disrupted by impaired sensorimotor integration in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, A.M.; Charles, J.; Steenbergen, B.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we examine the ability of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) to use anticipatory control of fingertip forces during grasping, and whether anticipatory control is facilitated by lifts with the contralateral hand. Eight children with CP (age 4-13) were asked to perform

  3. Risk factors for emergence and progression of scoliosis in children with severe cerebral palsy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeters, Marianne J. B.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Aim Scoliosis is a frequently occurring and serious complication of severe cerebral palsy (CP). This systematic review aims to the assess the risk factors associated with the emergence and progression of scoliosis in children with CP functioning at level IV or V of the Gross Motor Function

  4. What makes children with cerebral palsy vulnerable to malnutrition? Findings from the Bangladesh cerebral palsy register (BCPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Israt; Muhit, Mohammad; Karim, Tasneem; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Novak, Iona; Jones, Cheryl; Badawi, Nadia; Khandaker, Gulam

    2018-04-16

    To assess the nutritional status and underlying risk factors for malnutrition among children with cerebral palsy in rural Bangladesh. We used data from the Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register; a prospective population based surveillance of children with cerebral palsy aged 0-18 years in a rural subdistrict of Bangladesh (i.e., Shahjadpur). Socio-demographic, clinical and anthropometric measurements were collected using Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register record form. Z scores were calculated using World Health Organization Anthro and World Health Organization AnthroPlus software. A total of 726 children with cerebral palsy were registered into the Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register (mean age 7.6 years, standard deviation 4.5, 38.1% female) between January 2015 and December 2016. More than two-third of children were underweight (70.0%) and stunted (73.1%). Mean z score for weight for age, height for age and weight for height were -2.8 (standard deviation 1.8), -3.1 (standard deviation 2.2) and -1.2 (standard deviation 2.3) respectively. Moderate to severe undernutrition (i.e., both underweight and stunting) were significantly associated with age, monthly family income, gross motor functional classification system and neurological type of cerebral palsy. The burden of undernutrition is high among children with cerebral palsy in rural Bangladesh which is augmented by both poverty and clinical severity. Enhancing clinical nutritional services for children with cerebral palsy should be a public health priority in Bangladesh. Implications for Rehabilitation Population-based surveillance data on nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy in Bangladesh indicates substantially high burden of malnutrition among children with CP in rural Bangladesh. Children with severe form of cerebral palsy, for example, higher Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, tri/quadriplegic cerebral palsy presents the highest proportion of severe malnutrition; hence, these

  5. The Use of Computers and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices by Children and Young with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Thais Pousada; Loureiro, Javier Pereira; Gonzalez, Betania Groba; Riveiro, Laura Nieto; Sierra, Alejandro Pazos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the use of computers and assistive devices amongst children with cerebral palsy (CP) and establish the satisfaction level of both users and educational staff. The study was carried out with 30 children with cerebral palsy. A questionnaire was designed to characterize the use of new technologies and…

  6. Neuropsychological profiles of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadskleiv, Kristine; Jahnsen, Reidun; Andersen, Guro L; von Tetzchner, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    To explore factors contributing to variability in cognitive functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A geographical cohort of 70 children with CP was assessed with tests of language comprehension, visual-spatial reasoning, attention, working memory, memory, and executive functioning. Mean age was 9;9 years (range 5;1-17;7), 54.3% were girls, and 50.0% had hemiplegic, 25.7% diplegic, 12.9% quadriplegic, and 11.4% dyskinetic CP. For the participants with severe motor impairments, assessments were adapted for gaze pointing. A cognitive quotient (CQ) was computed. Mean CQ was 78.5 (range 19-123). Gross motor functioning, epilepsy, and type of brain injury explained 35.5% of the variance in CQ (F = 10.643, p = .000). Twenty-four percent had an intellectual disability, most of them were children with quadriplegic CP. Verbal comprehension and perceptual reasoning scores did only differ for the 21% with an uneven profile, of whom two-thirds had challenges with perceptual reasoning.

  7. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti W. Mohd-Zin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs. It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man.

  8. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  9. Spina Bifida. Fact Sheet = Espina Bifida. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet offers definitions of the three types of spina bifida (spina bifida occulta, meningocele, and myelomeningocele), outlines their incidence, describes characteristics of individuals with spina bifida, and reviews educational implications. The fact sheet discusses the need for many children with myelomeningocele to learn to manage…

  10. Perception-Action and Adaptation in Postural Control of Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barela, Jose A.; Focks, Grietje M. Jaspers; Hilgeholt, Toke; Barela, Ana M. F.; Carvalho, Raquel de P.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the coupling between visual information and body sway and the adaptation in this coupling of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifteen children with and 15 without CP, 6-15 years old, were required to stand upright inside of a moving room. All children first performed two trials with no movement of the room…

  11. Parental adaptation in families of young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentinck, I.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background For most parents, the birth of their child is a unique and touching moment. However, in some families a child is born with a physical disability. Among the large variety of childhood developmental disabilities, cerebral palsy (CP) is considered to be the major physical disability

  12. Functional aspects of spina bifida in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, Maria Adriana Gerdina Cornelia

    2003-01-01

    Due to advanced medical treatment, more children with spina bifida survive into adulthood. Most outcome studies in the field of spina bifida research focus on disease aspects (‘pathology’) and its relation to one of the domains in the ‘disablement process’ such as physical functioning, cognitive

  13. Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

  14. Understanding Participation of Preschool-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa Ann; Palisano, Robert J.; Orlin, Margo N.; Chang, Hui-Ju; Begnoche, Denise; An, Mihee

    2012-01-01

    Participation in home, school, and community activities is a primary outcome of early intervention services for children with disabilities and their families. The objectives of this study were to (a) describe participation of preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP); (b) determine effects of sex, age, and gross motor function on intensity…

  15. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  16. Analgesic Effects of Botulinum Toxin in Children with CP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl Michelsen, Josephine; Normann, Gitte; Wong, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Experiencing pain is the greatest contributor to a reduced quality of life in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The presence of pain is quite common (~60%) and increases with age. This leads to missed school days, less participation, and reduced ambulation. Despite these alarming consequences...... of disorders and could potentially have an analgesic effect in children with CP as well. Even though most of the studies presented here show promising results, many also have limitations in their methodology as it is unlikely to capture all dimensions of pain in this heterogeneous group using only one...... assessment tool. In this review, we present a new way of examining the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in children with CP using a variety of pain scores....

  17. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.)

  18. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  19. Brief Report: An Online Support Intervention--Perceptions of Adolescents with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miriam; Barnfather, Alison; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Ray, Lynne; Letourneau, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with cerebral palsy and spina bifida report restricted interactions with peers and gaps in social support. A pilot online support intervention offered interactions with peers. Five mentors with cerebral palsy or spina bifida and 22 adolescents with the same disabilities met weekly online for 25 group sessions over six months.…

  20. Association between isometric muscle strength and gait joint kinetics in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, A.J.; Baker, R.; Dodd, K.; Taylor, N.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between isometric muscle strength of the lower limbs and gait joint kinetics in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-five participants (11 males) with bilateral spastic CP, aged 14-22 years (mean: 18.9, sd: 2.0. yr)

  1. IMPACTS OF HIPPOTHERAPY ON CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY FROM PARENTS PERSPECTIVE: A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasia Laiou; Anna Christakou; Vaios Kaminiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hippotherapy is a physical treatment strategy with the help of horses and refers to the use of horse’s movement as a treatment tool for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Hippotherapy refers to the incorporation of equine movement by physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists. The present qualitative study investigated the impacts of hippotherapy on Greek children with Cerebral Palsy from parents’ perspective due to their better understanding of child’s specia...

  2. Digestive tract neural control and gastrointestinal disorders in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Liubiana A; Silva, Luciana R; Mendes, Fabiana A A

    2012-01-01

    To examine the neural control of digestive tract and describe the main gastrointestinal disorders in cerebral palsy (CP), with attention to the importance of early diagnosis to an efficient interdisciplinary treatment. Systematic review of literature from 1997 to 2012 from Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, and Cochrane Library databases. The study included 70 papers, such as relevant reviews, observational studies, controlled trials, and prevalence studies. Qualitative studies were excluded. The keywords used were: cerebral palsy, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, recurrent respiratory infections, and gastrostomy. The appropriate control of the digestive system depends on the healthy functioning and integrity of the neural system. Since CP patients have structural abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, they are more likely to develop eating disorders. These range from neurological immaturity to interference in the mood and capacity of caregivers. The disease has, therefore, a multifactorial etiology. The most prevalent digestive tract disorders are dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and constipation, with consequent recurrent respiratory infections and deleterious impact on nutritional status. Patients with CP can have neurological abnormalities of digestive system control; therefore, digestive problems are common. The issues raised in the present study are essential for professionals within the interdisciplinary teams that treat patients with CP, concerning the importance of comprehensive anamnesis and clinical examination, such as detailed investigation of gastrointestinal disorders. Early detection of these digestive problems may lead to more efficient rehabilitation measures in order to improve patients' quality of life.

  3. Development of social functioning and communication in school-aged (5-9 years) children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, P.E.M.; Siebes, R.C.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Schuengel, C.; Smits, D.W.; Gorter, J.W.; Becher, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine determinants of the course and level of social functioning and communication in school-aged children with cerebral palsy (CP) over a 2-year period. A clinic-based sample of 5 and 7 years old children with CP ( n=108; 72 males; mean age 6. y 3. mo, SD 12. mo;

  4. ParticiPAte CP: a protocol of a randomised waitlist controlled trial of a motivational and behaviour change therapy intervention to increase physical activity through meaningful participation in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedman, Sarah Elizabeth; Boyd, Roslyn N; Elliott, Catherine; Sakzewski, Leanne

    2017-08-07

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) participate in leisure-time physical activities (PA) less often, with less intensity and reduced diversity than their typically developing peers. Participation in leisure-time physical activities may be an important source of habitual physical activity (HPA) for children with CP, who as a group have lower levels of HPA and increased sedentary time compared with their typically developing peers. The proposed study aims to compare the efficacy of a participation focused therapy (ParticiPAte CP) to usual care in a pragmatic, randomised waitlist controlled trial. Thirty-six children with CP (18 in each group), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to III, aged between 8 and 12 years will be recruited across South East Queensland, Australia. Children will be randomised to receive either ParticiPAte CP or waitlist usual care using concealed allocation. ParticiPAte CP is an individually tailored, goal-directed intervention model of pragmatic participation-focused therapy using a toolbox of evidence-based strategies in the treatment of children with CP. This will include goal-setting; identification of barriers and facilitators to participation goals, strategy formation and planning and communication guided by principles of Self-Determination Theory using strategies of Motivational Interviewing. The intervention comprises 8 weekly sessions of 1 hour duration conducted by a physiotherapist in the child's home or community. ACTRN12615001064594. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy in Children (Under Five) in and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder of posture and movement due to brain damage/insult/lesion before birth, during delivery or in the perinatal period. It is a neurological disorder of childhood with significant medico-social implications. A retrospective hospital based cross sectional study was conducted to ...

  6. [Influence of neonatal diseases and treatments on the development of cerebral palsy in preterm infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Rong, Luo; Wang, Qiu; You, Yi; Fu, Jun-Xian; Kang, Lin-Min; Wu, Yan-Qiao

    2013-03-01

    To investigated the risk factors of cerebral palsy development in preterm infants. This study included 203 preterm infants (gestation age neonatal period, were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Multivariate logistic analysis for the risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in neonatal period found significant differences in the occurrence of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, OR = 39.87, P neonatal (OR = 2.18, P neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (OR = 1.72, P CPAP, OR = 0.21, P neonatal jaundice may increase the risk in the development of CP in preterm infant, while CPAP may decrease the risk of cerebral palsy.

  7. Functional electrical stimulation of the ankle dorsiflexors during walking in spastic cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Irene; Vles, Johannes S H; Soudant, Dan L H M; Witlox, Adhiambo M A; Staal, Heleen M; Speth, Lucianne A W M; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J M; Coenen, Marcel; Koudijs, Suzanne M; Vermeulen, R Jeroen

    2017-12-01

    To assess the effect of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of ankle dorsiflexors in children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) during walking. A systematic review was performed using the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine methodology and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six databases were searched for studies applying interventions to patients aged younger than 20 years. Outcomes were classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Seven hundred and eighty abstracts were found, 35 articles were fully screened, and 14 articles were used for analysis. Only five articles (three studies) were of level I to III evidence. At ICF participation and activity level, there is limited evidence for a decrease in self-reported frequency of toe-drag and falls. At ICF body structure and function level, there is clear evidence (I-III) that FES increased (active) ankle dorsiflexion angle, strength, and improved selective motor control, balance, and gait kinematics, but decreased walking speed. Adverse events include skin irritation, toleration, and acceptation issues. There are insufficient data supporting functional gain by FES on activity and participation level. However, evidence points towards a role for FES as an alternative to orthoses in children with spastic CP. Effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) point towards a potential role as an alternative to orthoses for patients with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Some evidence for a decrease in self-reported frequency of toe-drag and falls with the use of FES in spastic CP. Limited evidence for improvements in activity and participation in patients with spastic CP using FES. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  8. Balance improvement after physical therapy training using specially developed serious games for cerebral palsy children: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnechère, Bruno; Omelina, Lubos; Jansen, Bart; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) leads to various clinical signs mainly induced by muscle spasticity and muscle weakness. Among these ones impaired balance and posture are very common. Traditional physical therapy exercise programs are focusing on this aspect, but it is difficult to motivate patients to regularly perform these exercises, especially at home without therapist supervision. Specially developed serious games (SG) could therefore be an interesting option to motivate children to perform specific exercise for balance improvement. Ten CP children participated in this study. Patients received four sessions of SG included into conventional therapy (1 session of 30 min a week during 4 weeks). Trunk control and balance were assessed using Trunk Control Motor Scale (TCMS) before and after interventions. Children presented a significant improvement in TCMS global score after interventions [37.6 (8.7) and 39.6 (9.5) before and after interventions, respectively, p = 0.04]. SG could therefore be an interesting option to integrate in the conventional treatment of CP children. Implication for Rehabilitation Cerebral palsy (CP) leads to balance issues. Rehabilitation exercises are not performed (enough) at home. Serious games (SG) could increase patients' motivation. SG increase balance control of CP children.

  9. Are mechanically sensitive regulators involved in the function and (patho)physiology of cerebral palsy-related contractures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Suhr, Frank

    2017-01-01

    mechanosensing and metabolism cause and contribute to many diseases, i.e. muscular dystrophies/myopathies, cardiovascular diseases, COPD or diabetes mellitus type 2. A less commonly focused muscle-related disorder is clinically known as muscle contractures that derive from cerebral palsy (CP) conditions in young...... role in CP-related contractures. The aims of this review are (1) to summarize CP-related contracture mechanisms, (2) to raise novel hypotheses on the genesis of contractures with a focus on Cstms, and (3) to stimulate novel approaches to study CP-related contractures....

  10. Effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, V.A.; Becher, J.G.; Janssen-Potten, Y.J.; Dekkers, H.; Smallenbroek, L.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP).Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=

  11. Protocol for hospital based-surveillance of cerebral palsy (CP) in Hanoi using the Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance mechanism (PAEDS-Vietnam): a study towards developing hospital-based disease surveillance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Gulam; Van Bang, Nguyen; Dũng, Trịnh Quang; Giang, Nguyen Thi Huong; Chau, Cao Minh; Van Anh, Nguyen Thi; Van Thuong, Nguyen; Badawi, Nadia; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2017-11-09

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, management and outcomes of cerebral palsy (CP) in low-income and middle-income countries including Vietnam are unknown because of the lack of mechanisms for standardised collection of data. In this paper, we outline the protocol for developing a hospital-based surveillance system modelled on the Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance (PAEDS) system in Australia. Using PAEDS-Vietnam we will define the aetiology, motor function and its severity, associated impairments, and nutritional and rehabilitation status of children with CP in Hanoi, Vietnam. These essential baseline data will inform future health service planning, health professional education and training, and family support. This is a hospital-based prospective surveillance of children with CP presenting to the rehabilitation, neurology and general paediatric services at the National Children's Hospital and St Paul Hospital in Hanoi. We will use active, prospective daily case-finding for all children with CP aged CP, known risk factors for CP, and nutrition, immunisation, education and rehabilitation status. This study was approved by the Hanoi Medical University Institutional Review Board (decision no 1722) and The University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (approval no 2016/456). Establishment of PAEDS-Vietnam will enable hospital-based surveillance of CP for the first time in Vietnam. It will identify preventable causes of CP, patient needs and service gaps, and facilitate early diagnosis and intervention. Study findings will be disseminated through local and international conferences and peer-reviewed publications. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Self-worth, perceived competence, and behaviour problems in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Schuengel, C.; Voorman, J.; Stolk, J.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Vermeer, A; Becher, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the relevance of physical disabilities for self-worth and perceived competence in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to examine associations between behaviour problems and self-worth and perceived competence. Methods. The Harter scales for self-worth and perceived competence and a new scale for perceived motor competence were used in a sample of 80 children with CP. Their motor functioning was assessed with the Gross Motor Functioning Measure (GMFM) and behaviour probl...

  13. Sexuality of young adults with cerebral palsy: Experienced limitations and needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.H.G. Wiegerink (Diana); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); J. Bender (Jim); H.J. Stam (Henk); P.T. Cohen-Kettenis (Peggy)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective of this study is to describe the problems young adults with Cerebral Palsy (CP) experience in the various stages of the sexual response cycle, and the physical and emotional obstacles they experience with sexuality. In this prospective cohort study 74 young adults (46 men; 28

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding Therapy on Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Cara N.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review examined the efficacy of hippotherapy or therapeutic horseback riding (THR) on motor outcomes in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Databases were searched for clinical trials of hippotherapy or THR for children with CP. Results: Nine articles were included in this review. Although the current level of…

  15. An eye for possibilities in the development of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early...

  16. Self-worth, perceived competence, and behaviour problems in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C.; Voorman, J.; Stolk, J.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Vermeer, A; Becher, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the relevance of physical disabilities for self-worth and perceived competence in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to examine associations between behaviour problems and self-worth and perceived competence. Methods. The Harter scales for self-worth and perceived competence

  17. Frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla canton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Babajić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral palsy (CP connotes a group of non-progressive, but often variable symptoms of motor impairment of movement and posture, as well as other impairments which are a consequenceof anomalies or brain impairment in different phases of its development. CP is a pathological condition characterised in the fi rst place by motor function impairment to which other disorders such as: visual andhearing impairment, intellectual defi cit, emotional problems, behaviour disorder, speech disorder, epileptic seizure and similar can join. The aim of this study is to determine frequency of joined disabilities ofchildren with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton.Methods: The research covers a total sample of 48 examinees, chronological age from 2-19 years, in Tuzla Canton. Research instrument was a Structural Questionnaire for the parents of children and adolescentswith cerebral palsy. Research data were processed by nonparametric statistics method. Basic statistical parameters of frequency and percentages were calculated, and tabular presentation was made.Results: After classification of examinees as per frequency of joined disabilities was done, work results have shown that speech impairment occurred with 35.4 % of children, visual impairment 33.3 %, epilepsy29.3 %, whereas hearing impairment occurred with 2 % of children.Conclusion: In research of frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton, most expressed are speech and visual disorders with children, then epilepsy, whereas a small percentageof children are with hearing disorder.

  18. Cerebral Palsy: Comprehensive Review and Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Mohammed M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common pediatric disorder occurring in about 2 to 2.5 per 1000 live births. It is a chronic motor disorder resulting from a nonprogressive (static) insult to the developing brain. CP is the clinical presentation of a wide variety of cerebral cortical or sub-cortical insults occurring during the first year of life. The commonest cause of CP remains unknown in 50% of the cases; prematurity remains the commonest risk factor. Children with CP suffer multiple problems and potential disabilities such as mental retardation, epilepsy, feeding difficulties, and ophthalmologic and hearing impairments. Screening for those conditions should be part of the initial assessment. The child with CP is best cared for with an individualized treatment plan that provides a combination of interventions. This requires the provision of a number of family-centered services that make a difference in the lives of these children and their families. Management of spasticity can be challenging with a wide variety of possible therapeutic interventions. The treatment must be goal oriented, such as to assist with mobility, reduce or prevent contractures, improve positioning and hygiene, and provide comfort. Each member of the child's multidisciplinary team, including the child and both parents, should participate in the serial evaluations and treatment planning. (author)

  19. From numeracy to arithmetic: Precursors of arithmetic performance in children with cerebral palsy from 6 till 8 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, M. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are generally delayed in arithmetic compared to their peers. The development of early numeracy performance in children with CP is not yet evident, nor have the factors associated with change over time been identified. Therefore, we examined the development of

  20. Computerized Adaptive Tests Detect Change Following Orthopaedic Surgery in Youth with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahey, M J; Slavin, Mary D; Ni, Pengsheng; Vogel, Lawrence C; Kozin, Scott H; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M

    2015-09-16

    The Cerebral Palsy Computerized Adaptive Test (CP-CAT) is a parent-reported outcomes instrument for measuring lower and upper-extremity function, activity, and global health across impairment levels and a broad age range of children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study was performed to examine whether the Lower Extremity/Mobility (LE) CP-CAT detects change in mobility following orthopaedic surgery in children with CP. This multicenter, longitudinal study involved administration of the LE CP-CAT, the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) Transfer/Mobility and Sports/Physical Functioning domains, and the Timed "Up & Go" test (TUG) before and after elective orthopaedic surgery in a convenience sample of 255 children, four to twenty years of age, who had CP and a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level of I, II, or III. Standardized response means (SRMs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for all measures at six, twelve, and twenty-four months following surgery. SRM estimates for the LE CP-CAT were significantly greater than the SRM estimates for the PODCI Transfer/Mobility domain at twelve months, the PODCI Sports/Physical Functioning domain at twelve months, and the TUG at twelve and twenty-four months. When the results for the children at GMFCS levels I, II, and III were grouped together, the improvements in function detected by the LE CP-CAT at twelve and twenty-four months were found to be greater than the changes detected by the PODCI Transfer/Mobility and Sports/Physical Functioning scales. The LE CP-CAT outperformed the PODCI scales for GMFCS levels I and III at both of these follow-up intervals; none of the scales performed well for patients with GMFCS level II. The results of this study showed that the LE CP-CAT displayed superior sensitivity to change than the PODCI and TUG scales after musculoskeletal surgery in children with CP. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  1. Spina Bifida. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #12

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Spina bifida" is one of the most common birth defects in the United States, affecting some 1,500 babies each year. Spina bifida happens during the first month or so of pregnancy and means that the baby's spine did not close completely. Damage to the nerves and the spinal cord may result. Following a brief story about a child with a…

  2. Changes in Muscle Activation Following Ankle Strength Training in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: An Electromyography Feasibility Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jamie E.; Ross, Sandy A.; Foreman, Matthew H.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are likely to experience decreased participation in activities and less competence in activities of daily living. Studies of children with spastic CP have shown that strengthening programs produce positive results in strength, gait, and functional outcomes (measured by the Gross Motor Function Measure). No…

  3. Feasibility and reliability of measuring strength, sprint power, and aerobic capacity in athletes and non-athletes with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Sonja; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Evers, Marijn; Van der Luijt, Pieter; Nienhuys, Kirsten N. G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    Aim The aim of this study was to analyse the feasibility and reliability of the tests used to determine muscle strength, sprint power, and aerobic capacity in athletes and non-athletes with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Twenty individuals with spastic CP (four females, 16 males; age range 1849y;

  4. Psychometric properties of parent and child reported sleep assessment tools in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel; Whittingham, Koa; Edwards, Priya; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether any parent and child report sleep measure tools have been validated in children aged 0-18 years with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic search of five databases was performed up to June 2017. Studies were included if a sleep measure tool was used to evaluate sleep in children 0-18 years with CP based on international classifications of sleep. Sleep measures were assessed for psychometric data in children with CP. Only one paper which used the Schlaffragebogen für Kinder mit Neurologischen und Anderen Komplexen Erkrankungen (SNAKE) questionnaire met the study criteria. The four other measures frequently used in children with CP had no psychometric data available for their use in children with CP. The SNAKE questionnaire has been validated only in children with CP in Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire had the strongest psychometric properties in typically developing children, but has not yet been validated in children with CP. Current sleep measures being administered in typically developing children are also often used in children with CP, but have not been well validated in this group of children. There are no condition specific measures of sleep in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The Schlaffragebogen für Kinder mit Neurologischen und Anderen Komplexen Erkrankungen (SNAKE) questionnaire is validated for children with CP in Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. A framework to design a CP specific sleep questionnaire is provided. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Assessing True and False Belief in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy through Anticipatory Gaze Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael T.; Loganathan, Deborah; Swettenham, John

    2012-01-01

    Children with a clinical description of cerebral palsy (CP) commonly experience cognitive and sensory difficulties that co-occur with motor impairment, and for some children this can include impairments in social communication. While research has begun to examine theory of mind abilities in children with CP, relatively little is known about social…

  6. Squat test performance and execution in children with and without cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M; Harlaar, J.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; Waard, E.J.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; Houdijk, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge on lower extremity strength is imperative to informed decision making for children with cerebral palsy (CP) with mobility problems. However, a functional and clinically feasible test is not available. We aimed to determine whether the squat test is suitable for this purpose by

  7. Squat test performance and execution in children with and without cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, M. M.; Harlaar, J.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; de Waard, E.; van Bennekom, C. A. M.; Houdijk, H.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on lower extremity strength is imperative to informed decision making for children with cerebral palsy (CP) with mobility problems. However, a functional and clinically feasible test is not available. We aimed to determine whether the squat test is suitable for this purpose by

  8. Botulinum toxin effect on salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Limbeek, J. van; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Hulst, K. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A in reducing salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with severe drooling. METHODS: During a controlled clinical trial, single-dose BoNT injections into the submandibular salivary glands were compared

  9. Congenital anomalies in children with cerebral palsy: a population-based record linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rankin, Judith; Cans, Christine; Garne, Ester

    2009-01-01

    Aim Our aim was to determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have a congenital anomaly (CA) in three regions (Isère Region, French Alps; Funen County, Denmark; Northern Region, England) where population-based CP and CA registries exist, and to classify the children according...... to CA subtype. Method Data for children born between 1991 and 1999 were linked using electronic matching of cases. All potential matches were checked manually by each centre and verified as true matches. Results A total of 1104 children with CP were born during the study period (663 males, 441 females...

  10. Sociometric status and the attribution of intentions in a sample of adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Anne-Pier; Tessier, Réjean; Nadeau, Line

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To examine how cerebral palsy (CP) and sociometric status at age 10 explain the development of a cognitive bias across two groups of adolescents aged 15. Method Children with CP (N = 60) and without CP (N = 57) are part of a follow-up study. Three categories of sociometric status (popular, average, rejected) were obtained by conducting a class-wide interview in the class of the target children at age 10. At 15 years old, the same children (CP and non-CP) were asked to complete the Home Interview With Child questionnaire measuring a cognitive bias (hostile attribution of intentions (AI)). Results Children with CP, especially girls, were significantly more rejected and less popular than controls at age 10. At age 15, among all participants, sociometric rejected and popular children tended to have a higher percentage of hostile AI than sociometric average children. Conclusions There were no significant results for the combined effect of CP and sociometric status on the development of hostile AI at age 15. However, knowing the risk incurred by children with CP of being socially rejected, attention should be paid in the rehabilitation process to opportunities for social participation to facilitate the development of social competence. Implications for Rehabilitation Level I or II cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition that affects not only motor abilities but also social competence in children. Sociometric status in a group tends to affect the development of the ability to interprete intentions of others during adolescence. Sociometric measures in the class of children with CP could be a useful tool in the rehabilitation process in order to better define social participation opportunities. To improve social participation attempts, rehabilitation interventions should target social initiating skills, flexibility in interpreting peers' behaviours, and ability to react effectively to negative peer treatment.

  11. Feasibility and reliability of measuring strength, sprint power, and aerobic capacity in athletes and non-athletes with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Evers, M.; Van der Luijt, P.; Nienhuys, K.N.G.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to analyse the feasibility and reliability of the tests used to determine muscle strength, sprint power, and aerobic capacity in athletes and non-athletes with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Twenty individuals with spastic CP (four females, 16 males; age range 18-49y;

  12. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  13. Transfer of motor learning from virtual to natural environments in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massetti, T; da Silva, T.D.; van der Kamp, J.; de Abreu, C.L.; Leone, C.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing accessibility of computer-assisted technology, rehabilitation programs for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) increasingly use virtual reality environments to enhance motor practice. Thus, it is important to examine whether performance improvements in the virtual environment

  14. Reliability of classification of cerebral palsy in low-birthweight children in four countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paneth, N.; Qiu, H.; Rosenbaum, P.; Saigal, S.; Bishai, S.; Jetton, J.; Ouden, L. den; Broyles, S.; Tyson, J.; Kugler, K.

    2003-01-01

    The reliability of classification of cerebral palsy (CP) in low-birthweight children was assessed by using clinical and research study records sampled from population-based cohort studies in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada, and Germany. Records of neurological examination findings and functional

  15. A neurocognitive perspective on developmental disregard in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Steenbergen, B.

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to

  16. MR findings of cerebral palsy and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To demonstrate MR findings of cerebral palsy (CP), correlation with clinical findings, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group. Brain MRI of 94 patients with cerebral palsy (CP) were reviewed. The frequency of each MR finding, statistical correlation with clinical findings including type, severity and extent of CP, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group were analyzed. Abnormal MR findings were found in 83 patients(88%), and were as follows : diffuse brain atrophy(30%); periventricular leukomalacia(PVL)(28%); infarction(11%), basal ganglia abnormality(11%); delayed myelination(10%); nonspecific tissue loss or encephalomalacia(9%); and cortical dysplasia(7%). Hemiplegia was the most common condition among patients with infarction, and was found in 80% of this group; diplegia was found in 50% of cases with diffuse brain atrophy, while paraplegia was found in 36% of those with normal MR findings (p < .05). Mild symptoms were dominant in patients with normal MR findings(82%) and in those with infarctions(90%)(p < .05). PVL was the dominant finding in the pre-term group (65%) whereas findings in the full-term group varied; in this group, 38% of MR findings suggested prenatal insults. Possible causative factors were found in 66% of the full-term and 80% of the pre-term group. Perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group(81%), whereas prenatal and postnatal factors showed relatively higher frequencies in the full-term group(30% and 24%, respectively). Diffuse brain atrophy and PVL were the most common MR findings. The extent of CP the pre-term correlated well with MR findings. PVL and perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group, whereas variable MR findings and relatively higher frequencies of pre- and postnatal factors were found in the full-term group.

  17. MR findings of cerebral palsy and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate MR findings of cerebral palsy (CP), correlation with clinical findings, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group. Brain MRI of 94 patients with cerebral palsy (CP) were reviewed. The frequency of each MR finding, statistical correlation with clinical findings including type, severity and extent of CP, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group were analyzed. Abnormal MR findings were found in 83 patients(88%), and were as follows : diffuse brain atrophy(30%); periventricular leukomalacia(PVL)(28%); infarction(11%), basal ganglia abnormality(11%); delayed myelination(10%); nonspecific tissue loss or encephalomalacia(9%); and cortical dysplasia(7%). Hemiplegia was the most common condition among patients with infarction, and was found in 80% of this group; diplegia was found in 50% of cases with diffuse brain atrophy, while paraplegia was found in 36% of those with normal MR findings (p < .05). Mild symptoms were dominant in patients with normal MR findings(82%) and in those with infarctions(90%)(p < .05). PVL was the dominant finding in the pre-term group (65%) whereas findings in the full-term group varied; in this group, 38% of MR findings suggested prenatal insults. Possible causative factors were found in 66% of the full-term and 80% of the pre-term group. Perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group(81%), whereas prenatal and postnatal factors showed relatively higher frequencies in the full-term group(30% and 24%, respectively). Diffuse brain atrophy and PVL were the most common MR findings. The extent of CP the pre-term correlated well with MR findings. PVL and perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group, whereas variable MR findings and relatively higher frequencies of pre- and postnatal factors were found in the full-term group

  18. The relationship between spasticity and gross motor capability in nonambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusic, Ana; Alimovic, Sonja

    2013-09-01

    Spasticity has been considered as a major impairment in cerebral palsy (CP), but the relationship between this impairment and motor functions is still unclear, especially in the same group of patients with CP. The aim of this investigation is to determine the relationship between spasticity and gross motor capability in nonambulatory children with spastic CP. Seventy-one children (30 boys, 41 girls) with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy and with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels IV (n=34) and V (n=37) were included in the study. The spasticity level in lower limbs was evaluated using the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the gross motor function with the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88). Spearman's correlation analysis was used to determine the nature and the strength of the relationship. The results showed a moderate correlation between spasticity and gross motor skills (ρ=0.52 for the GMFCS level; ρ=0.57 for the GMFM-88), accounting for less than 30% of the explained variance. It seems that spasticity is just one factor among many others that could interfere with gross motor skills, even in children with severe forms of spastic CP. Knowledge of the impact of spasticity on motor skills may be useful in the setting of adequate rehabilitation strategies for nonambulatory children with spastic CP.

  19. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip…

  20. A Virtual Environment to Improve the Detection of Oral-Facial Malfunction in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ruiz, María-Luisa; Máximo-Bocanegra, Nuria; Luna-Oliva, Laura

    2016-03-26

    The importance of an early rehabilitation process in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is widely recognized. On the one hand, new and useful treatment tools such as rehabilitation systems based on interactive technologies have appeared for rehabilitation of gross motor movements. On the other hand, from the therapeutic point of view, performing rehabilitation exercises with the facial muscles can improve the swallowing process, the facial expression through the management of muscles in the face, and even the speech of children with cerebral palsy. However, it is difficult to find interactive games to improve the detection and evaluation of oral-facial musculature dysfunctions in children with CP. This paper describes a framework based on strategies developed for interactive serious games that is created both for typically developed children and children with disabilities. Four interactive games are the core of a Virtual Environment called SONRIE. This paper demonstrates the benefits of SONRIE to monitor children's oral-facial difficulties. The next steps will focus on the validation of SONRIE to carry out the rehabilitation process of oral-facial musculature in children with cerebral palsy.

  1. Measuring Mobility Limitations in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Content and Construct Validity of a Mobility Questionnaire (MobQues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.; Roorda, Leo D.; Verschuren, Olaf; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the validity of a mobility questionnaire (MobQues) that was developed to measure parent-reported mobility limitations in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The parents of 439 children with CP (256 males and 183 females; age range 2-18y; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels…

  2. Sit-to-Stand Movement in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: Relationship with Knee Extensor Torque and Social Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Pavao, Silvia Leticia; Santiago, Paulo Roberto Pereira; Salvini, Tania de Fatima; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sit-to-stand (STS) movement, knee extensor torque and social participation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven spastic hemiplegic CP patients (8.0 plus or minus 2.2 years), classified by the Gross Motor Function Classification System as I and II, and 18 typical children (8.4 plus or…

  3. Spina bifida and sexuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Michael Ernst; Biering-Sørensen, Ida; Liebach, Annette

    2014-01-01

    , neurological examination, personal interview, Functional Independence Measure (FIMTM), Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) on quality of life, and questions on sexual function and related topics. Study cohort: Fifty-three participants (27 women, 26 men) with spina bifida (mean age 27.1, range 18......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate sexual function amongst adult individuals with spina bifida and to register their subjective satisfaction with their sexual life and relationships. SETTING: Department for Spinal Cord Injuries, East Denmark. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Cohort study. Medical record information......-35) years. Response rate 74%. RESULTS: Fifty-one percent of subjects regarded their sexual life as a failure or dysfunctional. However, 45% reported being satisfied with their sexual life. Participants with partners were more satisfied with their sexual life than those without partners. Faecal...

  4. Communication changes experienced by adults with cerebral palsy as they age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Leigha Jane; Clemson, Lindy; Balandin, Susan

    2016-12-01

    Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) experience multiple, functional changes as they age, including changes to communication modes and methods that enable development and maintenance of relationships, communicative participation and quality-of-life. Little is known about the nature of communication changes experienced by this group. The aim of this study was to better understand how adults with CP experience changes in their communication abilities as they age and the subsequent psychosocial impact. Twenty adults with cerebral palsy aged 40-72 years with complex communication needs (CCN) participated in a series of in-depth interviews, framing their experiences of loss and grief throughout their lives. The impact of changing communication abilities emerged as an important area of focus. Data were analysed using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Themes arising from the participants' perceptions of their communication included experiencing communication change as a loss with subsequent impact on self-concept; and how communication is integral to the process of managing losses associated with older age. Implications for speech-language pathologists working with older people with cerebral palsy and CCN include the need to understand the psychosocial impact of communication changes on social interaction, relationships and communicative participation. It is important to promote positive and meaningful communication options that maintain a coherent sense of self in addition to promoting functional communication skills and communicative participation.

  5. Incidence of epilepsy among patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertin Sianturi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic condition due to cerebral function disorders. Epilepsy occurs as a common complication of many neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP that can affect further brain damage especially if they are with prolonged seizure. The incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP varies between 25-35%. The high incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP suggests that this disorder has common or related origins. We carried out the retrospective study to determine incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP registered within July 1988 to June 1998 in YPAC Medan and to determine whether the incidence of epilepsy differed according to type of CP. Data were compiled from medical records, including name, sex, parity, mothers age, prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal history, and EEG results. Data were analyzed using statistical computer program and its significance was evaluated by chi square test at p < 0,05. There were 67 cases with CP, 53 cases spastic CP, 13 cases mixed CP and one case dyskinetic CP. Of the 67 cases CP, 47,8% male, 52,2% female and mean age 50,3 (SD 36,9 months. There were 25 (37,3% patients CP associated with epilepsy, 72% general seizures, 20% partial seizures, and 8% infantile spasms. The incidence of epilepsy was significant different among patients with CP associated with type of CP and gestasional age, p < 0,05. We concluded that incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP in YPAC Medan was 37,3% and significantly different among patients with CP according to type CP and gestasional age.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea in children with cerebral palsy and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John; Wical, Beverly; Wical, William; Schaffer, Leah; Wical, Thomas; Wendorf, Heather; Roiko, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    To examine the risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and/or epilepsy. This cross-sectional study employs the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and chart review to identify symptoms of OSA in children presenting to a multi-specialty pediatric healthcare institution. Two-hundred and fifteen patients were grouped into those with epilepsy (n=54), CP (n=18), both (n=55), and neither (comparison group, n=88). The comparison group comprised children with developmental disabilities but not children with typical development. Significantly increased PSQ scores (indicating increased risk of OSA) were found among children with CP (58%) and CP with epilepsy (67%) than among the comparison group (27%; pChildren with both CP and epilepsy had a greater number of increased PSQ scores compared with CP alone (pchildren at risk of OSA (46%) than did the medical record review for symptoms of OSA (8.2%, pChildren with CP of greater severity or comorbid epilepsy are at increased risk of OSA. This study supports the routine questionnaire-based assessment for OSA as a regular part of the care of all children with CP, especially in those with more severe CP and those with epilepsy. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  7. Dysarthria in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Cerebral Palsy: Speech Subsystem Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Hustad, Katherine C.; Kent, Ray D.; Lin, Yu Ching

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the speech characteristics of Mandarin-speaking children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children to determine (a) how children in the 2 groups may differ in their speech patterns and (b) the variables correlated with speech intelligibility for words and sentences. Method: Data from 6 children…

  8. Romantic Relationships and and Sexual Experiences of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.H.G. Wiegerink (Diana)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To describe the development of romantic relationships and sexual experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and the physical and emotional obstacles they experience with sexuality. Regarding the ICF domains we investigated whether this development is associated with

  9. A novel AP4M1 mutation in autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome and clinical expansion of AP-4 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jameel, Muhammad; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Moawia, Abubakar; Altaf Malik, Naveed; Seema Waseem, Syeda; Abdullah, Uzma; Naeem Khan, Tahir; Raininko, Raili; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability in one-third of cases. Recent findings support Mendelian inheritance in subgroups of patients with the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel genetic cause of paraplegic CP with intellectual disability in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two brothers with CP and intellectual disability. Analysis of AP...

  10. Multivariate Analysis and Machine Learning in Cerebral Palsy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), a common pediatric movement disorder, causes the most severe physical disability in children. Early diagnosis in high-risk infants is critical for early intervention and possible early recovery. In recent years, multivariate analytic and machine learning (ML) approaches have been increasingly used in CP research. This paper aims to identify such multivariate studies and provide an overview of this relatively young field. Studies reviewed in this paper have demonstrated that multivariate analytic methods are useful in identification of risk factors, detection of CP, movement assessment for CP prediction, and outcome assessment, and ML approaches have made it possible to automatically identify movement impairments in high-risk infants. In addition, outcome predictors for surgical treatments have been identified by multivariate outcome studies. To make the multivariate and ML approaches useful in clinical settings, further research with large samples is needed to verify and improve these multivariate methods in risk factor identification, CP detection, movement assessment, and outcome evaluation or prediction. As multivariate analysis, ML and data processing technologies advance in the era of Big Data of this century, it is expected that multivariate analysis and ML will play a bigger role in improving the diagnosis and treatment of CP to reduce mortality and morbidity rates, and enhance patient care for children with CP.

  11. Therapist-Designed Adaptive Riding in Children With Cerebral Palsy : Results of a Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angsupaisal, Mattana; Visser, Baudina; Alkema, Anne; Meinsma-van der Tuin, Marja; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. It is debatable whether adaptive riding (AR) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) improves postural control and gross motor development. Objective. The study aim was to explore the feasibility of an extensive assessment protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapist-designed

  12. Reliability of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 12 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Megan; Lannin, Natasha; Cusick, Anne; Novak, Iona; Boyd, Roslyn

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate reliability of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) scores for children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 2-12 years. Method: Thirty-one QUESTs from 24 children with CP were rated once by two raters and twice by one rater. Internal consistency of total scores, inter- and intra-rater reliability findings for total,…

  13. Social Attitudes toward Cerebral Palsy and Potential Uses in Medical Education Based on the Analysis of Motion Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak, Marek; Chen, Brian Po-Jung; Musielak, Bartosz; Fabiszak, Jacek; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    This study presents how motion pictures illustrate a person with cerebral palsy (CP), the social impact from the media, and the possibility of cerebral palsy education by using motion pictures. 937 motion pictures were reviewed in this study. With the criteria of nondocumentary movies, possibility of disability classification, and availability, the total number of motion pictures about CP was reduced to 34. The geographical distribution of movie number ever produced is as follows: North America 12, Europe 11, India 2, East Asia 6, and Australia 3. The CP incidences of different motor types in real world and in movies, respectively, are 78–86%, 65% (Spastic); 1.5–6%, 9% (Dyskinetic); 6.5–9%, 26% (Mixed); 3%, 0% (Ataxic); 3-4%, 0% (Hypotonic). The CP incidences of different Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels in real world and in movies, respectively, are 40–51%, 47% (Level I + II); 14–19%, 12% (Level III); 34–41%, 41% (Level IV + V). Comparisons of incidence between the real world and the movies are surprisingly matching. Motion pictures honestly reflect the general public's point of view to CP patients in our real world. With precise selection and medical professional explanations, motion pictures can play the suitable role making CP understood more clearly. PMID:26257472

  14. Longitudinal Association Between Gross Motor Capacity and Neuromusculoskeletal Function in Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Eck, Mirjam; van Meeteren, Jetty; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Twisk, Jos W.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    Objective: To examine associations over longitudinal measurements between neuromusculoskeletal function and gross motor capacity in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Rehabilitation departments of university medical centers and rehabilitations

  15. Spina Bifida Clinic Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7th Avenue S. Birmingham, AL 35233 (205) 939-5281 https://www.childrensal.org/SpinaBifidaProgram UAB Spain Rehab Adult ... Ave S Birmingham, AL 35249 Phone: (205) 934-4131 http://www.uabmedicine.org/locations/spain-rehabilitation-center Children’s ...

  16. Family adaptation to cerebral palsy in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyard, Audrey; Michelsen, Susan I; Arnaud, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    modelled with structural equations. RESULTS: 31.8% of parents living with an adolescent with CP showed clinically significant high stress requiring professional assistance. The main stressors were the level of motor impairment and behavioural disorders in adolescent. A good family functioning was the best......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Factors promoting family adaptation to child's disability are poorly studied together. The aim of the study was to describe the family adaptation to disability and to identify determinants associated with using a global theoretical model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 286 families...... of teenagers [13-17 years] with cerebral palsy (CP) from 4 European disability registers were included and visited at home. Face to face interviews were performed in order to measure parental distress, perceived impact in various dimensions of family life, family resources and stressors. Relationships were...

  17. Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Suoranta, Jutta

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) interventions on functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: A search was made in Medline, Cinahl, PEDro and the Cochrane library for the period 1990 to February 2007. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on PT...... interventions in children with diagnosed CP were included. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality and extracted the data. The outcomes measured in the trials were classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). RESULTS: Twenty-two trials...

  18. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  19. Use of sensory information during postural control in children with cerebral palsy: Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavao, S.L.; dos Santos Silva, F.P.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Impairments in sensory processing in children with cerebral palsy (CP) appear to be a cause of the postural control deficits they present and may affect function and participation in daily activities. Understanding the role of sensory processing in postural control can better inform their

  20. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Gooijer-van de Groep, K.L.; De Vlugt, E.; De Groot, J.H.; Van der Heijden-Maessen, H.C.M.; Wielheesen, D.H.M.; Van Wijlen-Hempel, R.M.S.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”).

  1. A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

  2. Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity among Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This…

  3. Arnold-Chiari-II malformation and cognitive functioning in spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinck, A.; Maassen, B.A.M.; Mullaart, R.A.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Spina bifida is a multifaceted neurological condition with complex neuropsychological sequelae. The cognitive outcome in spina bifida has frequently been attributed to the severity of the hydrocephalus. However, because of complex neuropathology, the influence of hydrocephalus alone does not

  4. Correlation of ultrasound imaging of oral swallow with ventilatory alterations in cerebral palsied and normal children: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, D J; Casas, M J; McPherson, K A

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation that synchronizes the videotaped output of ultrasound camera and the analog data from physiological measurements of swallowing and ventilation in normal and cerebral palsied (CP) children are presented. Four cerebral palsied children and three control children undertook a single sip-swallow of 5 ml of liquid and a solid mastication-swallow sequence on three occasions according to a defined protocol. The CP children exhibited much more variability and less control of the liquid bolus than did the controls. The ultrasound image clearly demonstrates the lack of control of the posterior of the tongue in many CP children. Some parts of the sequence of oral swallow and the time to achieve maximum anterior displacement of the hyoid bone appear to be slowed. The sequential events of swallowing show less variability as the sip-swallow proceeds from the oral voluntary to pharyngeal and lower involuntary phases. This study also identified a short-latency apnea that appears to accompany a saliva (protective) swallow and a long-latency apnea that accompanies semi-solid or liquid bolus (alimentary) swallows. Further investigations of normal and CP children utilizing a combined diagnostic imaging-physiological measurement approach will follow this initial study.

  5. Recent advances in the neuroimaging and neuropsychology of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, A Sophia

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of cerebral palsy (CP) and outlines how these advances could inform pediatric neuropsychological rehabilitation. Three main areas are discussed: the improved delineation of differing presentations resulting from more advanced imaging techniques with emerging links to function; a brief review of research examining neuropsychological functioning of children with CP and their quality of life and participation; and lastly, some of the evidence for efficacious interventions and the extent to which these interventions are derived from neuropsychological theory and practice. Advances and gaps in knowledge in addition to suggestions of areas for future focus in research and practice are discussed throughout the article.

  6. Early vibration assisted physiotherapy in toddlers with cerebral palsy ? a randomized controlled pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, C.; Herkenrath, P.; Hollmann, H.; Waltz, S.; Becker, I.; Hoebing, L.; Semler, O.; Hoyer-Kuhn, H.; Duran, I.; Hero, B.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Schoenau, E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate feasibility, safety and efficacy of home-based side-alternating whole body vibration (sWBV) to improve motor function in toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Randomized controlled trial including 24 toddlers with CP (mean age 19 months (SD?3.1); 13 boys). Intervention: 14 weeks sWBV with ten 9-minute sessions weekly (non-individualized). Group A started with sWBV, followed by 14 weeks without; in group B this order was reversed. Feasibility (?70% adherence) a...

  7. Congenital Cytomegalovirus among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Badawi, Nadia; Fernandez, Marian A; Kesson, Alison; McIntyre, Sarah; Leung, Kin-Chuen; Jones, Cheryl A

    2017-02-01

    To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA detected retrospectively in their newborn screening cards (NBSC), to compare the proportion of children with CMV DNA in their NBSC across spastic subtypes of CP, and to compare the sex and other characteristics of children with CP and CMV detected on their NSBC with those in whom CMV DNA was not detected. Retrospective observational study. Data were extracted from patient records on children with CP (birth years 1996-2014) from 2 Australian state CP registers and state-wide paediatric rehabilitation services with consent. NBSCs were retrospectively analyzed for CMV DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers against gB. Positive samples were validated using real time PCR for CMV UL83. Of 401 children recruited, 323 (80.5%) had an available NBSC. Of these, 31 (9.6%; 95% CI, 6.8-13.3) tested positive for CMV DNA by nested PCR for CMV gB, of whom 28 (8.7%; 95% CI, 6.1-12.2) also had CMV DNA detected by real-time PCR for CMV UL83. Detection of CMV DNA was significantly associated with epilepsy, but not with clinical or epidemiologic characteristics, including sex and pattern of spasticity. CMV viremia in the newborn period, indicating congenital CMV infection, is highly prevalent among children with CP. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms and contribution of congenital CMV to the causal pathways to CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Virtual Environment to Improve the Detection of Oral-Facial Malfunction in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Luisa Martín-Ruiz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of an early rehabilitation process in children with cerebral palsy (CP is widely recognized. On the one hand, new and useful treatment tools such as rehabilitation systems based on interactive technologies have appeared for rehabilitation of gross motor movements. On the other hand, from the therapeutic point of view, performing rehabilitation exercises with the facial muscles can improve the swallowing process, the facial expression through the management of muscles in the face, and even the speech of children with cerebral palsy. However, it is difficult to find interactive games to improve the detection and evaluation of oral-facial musculature dysfunctions in children with CP. This paper describes a framework based on strategies developed for interactive serious games that is created both for typically developed children and children with disabilities. Four interactive games are the core of a Virtual Environment called SONRIE. This paper demonstrates the benefits of SONRIE to monitor children’s oral-facial difficulties. The next steps will focus on the validation of SONRIE to carry out the rehabilitation process of oral-facial musculature in children with cerebral palsy.

  9. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and Down Syndrome: A Scoping Review

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Safiza Mohamad Nor; Nur Shahida Abdul Aziz; Cheong Siew Man; Rashidah Ambak; Mohd Azahadi Omar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Down Syndrome (DS) and Cerebral Palsy (CP) are the most common disabilities among children. Nutritional status assessment is important as these children are at risk of underweight, overweight or obesity. Therefore, the objectives of this review were to identify evidence on the prevalence of nutritional status of children with DS, CP and ASD, and to determine tools and indicators to measure the nutritional status of these children. Methods: This s...

  10. Motor planning in children with cerebral palsy: A longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Jessica Mireille; Spruijt, Steffie; Wilson, Peter H; Steenbergen, Bert

    2018-08-01

    Motor planning is important for daily functioning. Deficits in motor planning can result in slow, inefficient, and clumsy motor behavior and are linked to disruptions in performance of activities of daily living in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the evidence in CP is primarily based on cross-sectional data. Data are presented on the development of motor planning in children with CP using a longitudinal design with three measurement occasions, each separated by 1 year. Twenty-two children with CP (9 boys, 13 girls; age in years;months, M = 7;1, SD = 1;2) and 22 age-matched controls (10 boys, 12 girls, M  = 7;1, SD = 1;3) participated. Children performed a bar transport task in which some conditions ("critical angles") required participants to sacrifice initial posture comfort in order to achieve end-state comfort. Performance on critical trials was analyzed using linear growth curve modeling. In general, children with CP showed poor end-state planning for critical angles. Importantly, unlike in controls, motor planning ability did not improve across the three measurement occasions in children with CP. These longitudinal results show that motor planning issues in CP do not resolve with development over childhood. Strategies to enhance motor planning are suggested for intervention.

  11. Caracterization of adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margre, Anna L M; Reis, Maria G L; Morais, Rosane L S

    2010-01-01

    cerebral Palsy (CP) is a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture that cause functional limitation and are attributed to non-progressive disorders which occur in the fetal or infant brain. In recent years, with the increase in life expectancy of individuals with CP, several studies have described the impact of musculoskeletal disabilities and functional limitations over the life cycle. to characterize adults with CP through sociodemographic information, classifications, general health, associated conditions, physical complications and locomotion. twenty-two adults with CP recruited from local rehabilitation centers in an inner town of Brazil participated in this study. A questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, comorbities, and physical complications. A brief physical therapy evaluation was carried out, and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were applied. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. the mean age was 28.7 (SD 10.6) years, 86.4% of participants lived with parents, and 4.5% were employed. Most of the sample consisted of spastic quadriplegic subjects, corresponding to levels IV and V of the GMFCS and MACS. Different comorbidities and important physical complications such as scoliosis and muscle contractures were present. More than half of the participants were unable to walk. Most participants demonstrated important restrictions in social participation and lower educational level. Adults with CP can be affected by several physical complications and progressive limitations in gait.

  12. Improved Walking Capacity and Muscle Strength After Functional Power-Training in Young Children With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vulpen, Liesbeth F; de Groot, Sonja; Rameckers, Eugene; Becher, Jules G; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    Background. Strength training programs for children with cerebral palsy (CP) showed inconclusive evidence for improving walking, despite improvements in strength. Recent studies have suggested that strength training with high movement velocity is more effective for improving walking than traditional

  13. Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Birth Asphyxia and the Contribution of Identified Perinatal Asphyxia to Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Athina; Korzeniewski, Steven J

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy among survivors of presumed perinatal asphyxia is recognized as an important cause of cerebral palsy (CP) and neuromotor impairment. Recent studies suggest that moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy contributes to a wide range of neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments among survivors with and without CP. Nearly 1 of every 4 to 5 neonates treated with hypothermia has or develops CP. Neonatal encephalopathy is diagnosed in only approximately 10% of all cases. This article reviews the long-term cognitive outcomes of children with presumed birth asphyxia and describes what is known about its contribution to CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multivariate Analysis and Machine Learning in Cerebral Palsy Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP, a common pediatric movement disorder, causes the most severe physical disability in children. Early diagnosis in high-risk infants is critical for early intervention and possible early recovery. In recent years, multivariate analytic and machine learning (ML approaches have been increasingly used in CP research. This paper aims to identify such multivariate studies and provide an overview of this relatively young field. Studies reviewed in this paper have demonstrated that multivariate analytic methods are useful in identification of risk factors, detection of CP, movement assessment for CP prediction, and outcome assessment, and ML approaches have made it possible to automatically identify movement impairments in high-risk infants. In addition, outcome predictors for surgical treatments have been identified by multivariate outcome studies. To make the multivariate and ML approaches useful in clinical settings, further research with large samples is needed to verify and improve these multivariate methods in risk factor identification, CP detection, movement assessment, and outcome evaluation or prediction. As multivariate analysis, ML and data processing technologies advance in the era of Big Data of this century, it is expected that multivariate analysis and ML will play a bigger role in improving the diagnosis and treatment of CP to reduce mortality and morbidity rates, and enhance patient care for children with CP.

  15. Diagnostic performance of body mass index to identify excess body fat in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Ibrahim; Schulze, Josefa; Martakis, KyriakoS; Stark, Christina; Schoenau, Eckhard

    2018-03-07

    To assess the diagnostic performance of body mass index (BMI) cut-off values according to recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Obesity Federation (WOF), and the German Society for Adiposity (DAG) to identify excess body fat in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The present study was a monocentric retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data among children and adolescents with CP participating in a rehabilitation programme. Excess body fat was defined as a body fat percentage above the 85th centile assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In total, 329 children (181 males, 148 females) with CP were eligible for analysis. The mean age was 12 years 4 months (standard deviation 2y 9mo). The BMI cut-off values for 'overweight' according to the WHO, WOF, and DAG showed the following sensitivities and specificities for the prediction of excess body fat in our population: WHO: sensitivity 0.768 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.636-0.870), specificity 0.894 (95% CI 0.851-0.928); WOF: sensitivity 0.696 (95% CI 0.559-0.812), specificity 0.934 (95% CI 0.898-0.960); DAG: sensitivity 0.411 (95% CI 0.281-0.550), specificity 0.993 (95% CI 0.974-0.999). Body mass index showed high specificity, but low sensitivity in children with CP. Thus, 'normal-weight obese' children with CP were overlooked, when assessing excess body fat only using BMI. Excess body fat in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is less common than previously reported. Body mass index (BMI) had high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting excess body fat in children with CP. BMI evaluation criteria of the German Society for Adiposity could be improved in children with CP. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  16. The Influence of Age at Single-Event Multilevel Surgery on Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Flexed Knee Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehlik, Martin; Steinwender, Gerhard; Kraus, Tanja; Saraph, Vinay; Lehmann, Thomas; Linhart, Wolfgang E.; Zwick, Ernst B.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Information on the timing and long-term outcome of single-event multilevel surgery in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP) walking with flexed knee gait is limited. Based on our clinical experience, we hypothesized that older children with bilateral spastic CP would benefit more from single-event multilevel surgery than younger…

  17. Rehabilitation outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2-12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics.

  18. Parents' psychosocial adjustment in families of children with Spina Bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaes, Ignatius Petrus Renatus

    2007-01-01

    Spina bifida is the most common, congenital, neurological disorder. Children with spina bifida live with a range of impairments depending on the severity and the location of the spinal defect. Medical treatment of the disorder is very complex and can involve decision-making processes around

  19. Development of Romantic Relationships and Sexual Activity in Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy: A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.; Stam, H.J.; Gorter, J.W.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Roebroeck, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the development of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP), to investigate whether this development is associated with demographic and physical characteristics, and to compare the sexual activity of this group with an

  20. The influence of errors during practice on motor learning in young individuals with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abswoude, F. van; Santos-Vieira, B.; Kamp, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of errors during practice on motor skill learning in young individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Minimizing errors has been validated in typically developing children and children with intellectual disabilities as a method for implicit learning,

  1. The Child with Cerebral Palsy and Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the result of an injury to the developing brain during the antenatal, perinatal or postnatal period. Clinical manifestation relate to the areas affected. Patients with CP often present for elective surgical proce-dures to correct various deformities. Anaesthetic concerns of anaesthesia are intraoperative hypothermia , and slow emergence. Suxamethonium does not cause hyperkalaemia in these patients, and a rapid sequence induction may be indicated. Temperature should be monitored and an effort made to keep the patient warm. Cerebral abnormalities may lead to slow awakening; the patient should remain intubated until fully awake and airway reflexes have returned. Pulmonary infection can complicate the postoperative course. Postoperative pain management and the prevention of muscle spasms are important and drugs as baclofen and botulinum toxin are discussed. Epidural analgesia is particu-larly valuable when major orthopaedic procedures are performed.

  2. Muscle synergy analysis in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Li, Fei; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu; Wu, De; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To explore the mechanism of lower extremity dysfunction of cerebral palsy (CP) children through muscle synergy analysis. Approach. Twelve CP children were involved in this study, ten adults (AD) and eight typically developed (TD) children were recruited as a control group. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were collected bilaterally from eight lower limb muscles of the subjects during forward walking at a comfortable speed. A nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm was used to extract muscle synergies. In view of muscle synergy differences in number, structure and symmetry, a model named synergy comprehensive assessment (SCA) was proposed to quantify the abnormality of muscle synergies. Main results. There existed larger variations between the muscle synergies of the CP group and the AD group in contrast with the TD group. Fewer mature synergies were recruited in the CP group, and many abnormal synergies specific to the CP group appeared. Specifically, CP children were found to recruit muscle synergies with a larger difference in structure and symmetry between two legs of one subject and different subjects. The proposed SCA scale demonstrated its great potential to quantitatively assess the lower-limb motor dysfunction of CP children. SCA scores of the CP group (57.00 ± 16.78) were found to be significantly less (p < 0.01) than that of the control group (AD group: 95.74 ± 2.04; TD group: 84.19 ± 11.76). Significance. The innovative quantitative results of this study can help us to better understand muscle synergy abnormality in CP children, which is related to their motor dysfunction and even the physiological change in their nervous system.

  3. Effectiveness of a Nintendo Wii balance board exercise programme on standing balance of children with cerebral palsy: A randomised clinical trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Valeska Gatica-Rojas; Ricardo Cartes-Velásquez; Eduardo Guzmán-Muñoz; Guillermo Méndez-Rebolledo; Alex Soto-Poblete; Ana Carolina Pacheco-Espinoza; Carlos Amigo-Mendoza; M. Eliana Albornoz-Verdugo; Edith Elgueta-Cancino

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) typically receive limited physical therapy services. However, the Nintendo Wii system offers a simple and affordable mode of virtual reality therapy. There are no clinical trials assessing the Nintendo Wii balance board for improving standing balance in CP. Methods: This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the effectiveness of an 18-session/six-week protocol using Wii therapy (W-t) compared with conventional therapy (C-t) in Chilean CP pati...

  4. Feasibility and test-retest reliability of measuring lower-limb strength in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vulpen, L. F.; de Groot, Sonja; Becher, J. G.; De Wolf, G. S.; Dallmeijer, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantifying leg muscle strength in young children with cerebral palsy (CP) is essential for identifying muscle groups for treatment and for monitoring progress. AIM: To study the feasibility, intratester reliability and the optimal test design (number of test occasions and repetitions)

  5. Feasibility and test-retest reliability of measuring lower‑limb strength in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vulpen, L. F.; de Groot, S.; Becher, J. G.; de Wolf, G. S.; Dallmeijer, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying leg muscle strength in young children with cerebral palsy (CP) is essential for identifying muscle groups for treatment and for monitoring progress. To study the feasibility, intratester reliability and the optimal test design (number of test occasions and repetitions) of measuring

  6. Neglect-like characteristics of developmental disregard in children with cerebral palsy revealed by event related potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, I.M.; Steenbergen, B.; Baas, C.M.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Jongsma, M.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show diminished awareness of the remaining capacity of their affected upper limb. This phenomenon is known as Developmental Disregard (DD). DD has been explained by operant conditioning. Alternatively, DD can be described as a

  7. Milestone achievement in emerging adulthood in spina bifida: a longitudinal investigation of parental expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, Christina E; Zebracki, Kathy; Bechtel, Colleen F; Papadakis, Jaclyn Lennon; Bruno, Elizabeth Franks; Holmbeck, Grayson N

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess changes over time in parents' expectations of adult milestone achievement (college attendance, full-time job attainment, independent living, marriage, parenthood) for young people with spina bifida, to examine how expectancies relate to actual milestone achievement, and to compare milestone achievement in emerging adults with spina bifida with that of peers with typical development. Method Sixty-eight families of children with spina bifida (mean=8.34y, 37 male, 31 female) and 68 families of children with typical development (mean=8.49y, 37 male, 31 female) participated at Time 1. At all subsequent timepoints, parents of young people with spina bifida were asked to rate their expectations of emerging adulthood milestone achievement. At Time 7, when participants were 22 to 23 years old, milestone achievement was assessed. Results Parents of young people with spina bifida lowered their expectations over time for most milestones; parents of children with higher cognitive ability reported decreases of lower magnitude. Parent expectancies were optimistic and unrelated to actual milestone achievement. Emerging adults with spina bifida were less likely than individuals with typical development to achieve all milestones. Interpretation Optimistic parental expectations may be adaptive for children with spina bifida and their families, although it is important for families to set realistic goals. Healthcare providers serve a key role in helping families of young people with spina bifida prepare for emerging adulthood. PMID:27651215

  8. Development of user-friendly and interactive data collection system for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharjo, I; Burns, T G; Venugopalan, J; Wang, M D

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a permanent motor disorder that appears in early age and it requires multiple tests to assess the physical and mental capabilities of the patients. Current medical record data collection systems, e.g., EPIC, employed for CP are very general, difficult to navigate, and prone to errors. The data cannot easily be extracted which limits data analysis on this rich source of information. To overcome these limitations, we designed and prototyped a database with a graphical user interface geared towards clinical research specifically in CP. The platform with MySQL and Java framework is reliable, secure, and can be easily integrated with other programming languages for data analysis such as MATLAB. This database with GUI design is a promising tool for data collection and can be applied in many different fields aside from CP to infer useful information out of the vast amount of data being collected.

  9. Reduction of pain sensitivity after somatosensory therapy in adults with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada eRiquelme

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP. Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=17 or the control group (n=20. The intervention group received a somatosensory therapy including 4 types of exercises (touch, proprioception, vibration, and stereognosis. All participants were asked to continue their standardized motor therapy during the study period. Several somatosensory (pain and touch thresholds, stereognosis, propioception, texture recognition and motor parameters (fine motor skills were assessed before, immediately after and three months after the therapy (follow-up. Results. Participants of the intervention group showed a significant reduction on pain sensitivity after treatment and at follow-up after three months, whereas participants in the control group displayed increasing pain sensitivity over time. No improvements were found on touch sensitivity, proprioception, texture recognition or fine motor skills. Conclusions. Data suggest the possibility that somatosensory therapy was effective in eliciting changes in central somatosensory processing. This hypothesis may have implications for future neuromodulatory treatment of pain complaints in children and adults with cerebral palsy.

  10. Twenty weeks of computer-training improves sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark Schram; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2012-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances...

  11. A Perceptual Motor Intervention Improves Play Behavior in Children with Moderate to Severe Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryalls, Brigette O.; Harbourne, Regina; Kelly-Vance, Lisa; Wickstrom, Jordan; Stergiou, Nick; Kyvelidou, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    For children with moderate or severe cerebral palsy (CP), a foundational early goal is independent sitting. Sitting offers additional opportunities for object exploration, play and social engagement. The achievement of sitting coincides with important milestones in other developmental areas, such as social engagement with others, understanding of…

  12. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  13. Swedish Massage and Abnormal Reflexes of Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Alizad

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Massage therapy is one of the most widely used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for children. This study was conducted to determine the effect of wedish massage on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP. Methods: This study was a single blind clinical trial conducted on forty children with spastic CP who were recruited from clinics of the University of Social Welfare & Rehabilitation Sciences. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The routine occupational therapy (OT techniques were performed during a 3 month-period in both groups. The intervention group also received Swedish massage for 30 minutes before every OT session. Primary, spinal, brain stem, midbrain, cortical and automatic reflexes were evaluated at the beginning of the study and 3 months later. The data analysis was done by parametric and nonparametric tests. Results: Finally, thirteen subjects in the intervention group and 14 subjects in the control group were remained and studied. The average ages in the intervention and control groups were 49.5 and 42.1 months respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in abnormal reflexes in the intervention group in comparison to the control (P>0.05. Discussion: Adding Swedish massage to traditional OT techniques had no significant effects on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Evidently more research is required in order to completely reject the effects of Swedish massage on abnormal reflexes of children with CP.

  14. From Traditional Usage to Pharmacological Evidence: A Systematic Mini-Review of Spina Gleditsiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayu Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina Gleditsiae is an important herb with various medicinal properties in traditional and folk medicinal systems of East Asian countries. In China through the centuries, it has been traditionally used as a source of drugs for anticancer, detoxication, detumescence, apocenosis, and antiparasites effects. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been reported regarding its chemical constituents and pharmacological activities. To further evidence the traditional use, phytochemicals, and pharmacological mechanisms of this herb, a systematic literature review was performed herein for Spina Gleditsiae. The review approach consisted of searching several web-based scientific databases including PubMed, Web of Science, and Elsevier using the keywords “Spina Gleditsiae”, “Zao Jiao Ci”, and “Gleditsia sinensis”. Based on the proposed criteria, 17 articles were evaluated in detail. According to the reviewed data, it is quite evident that Spina Gleditsiae contains a number of bioactive phytochemical components, which account for variety medicinal values including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, antimicrobial, antiallergic, and antivirus activities. The phytochemical and pharmacological studies reviewed herein strongly underpin a fundamental understanding of herbal Spina Gleditsiae and support its ongoing clinical uses in China. The further phytochemical evaluation, safety verification, and clinical trials are expected to progress Spina Gleditsiae-based development to finally transform the traditional TCM herb Spina Gleditsiae to the valuable authorized drug.

  15. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  16. Determinants of participation in leisure activities in children and youth with cerebral palsy: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Majnemer, Annette; Law, Mary; Lach, Lucyna

    2008-05-01

    Children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP) experience difficulties in their ability to move, problem solve, socialize, and communicate, associated with limitations in activities in all environments. They are at risk for lower participation in social and leisure activities critical in fostering friendships, developing interests, and promoting well-being. Little is known about involvement in leisure activities and their determinants. This systematic review aims to describe participation in leisure activities by children with CP and identify personal and environmental factors that influence participation. The following databases were reviewed--CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane, Web of Science, OT-seeker, and REHABDATA--using the keywords participation, cerebral palsy, leisure, and recreation. The literature to date suggests that children with physical disabilities are less involved in leisure activities than their peers; activities are more passive, home based, and lack variety. Several factors influence participation in leisure activities, including age, gender, activity limitations, family preferences and coping, motivation, and environmental resources and supports.

  17. New Clinical and Research Trends in Lower Extremity Management for Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L.; Alter, Katharine E.; Chambers, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent physical disability in childhood and includes a group of disorders with varying manifestations and levels of capability in individuals given this diagnosis. This chapter will focus on current and future intervention strategies for improving mobility and participation over the lifespan for ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). The provision and integration of physical therapy, medical and orthopedic surgery management focused primarily on the lower extremities will be discussed here. Some of the newer trends are: more intense and task-related exercise strategies, greater precision in tone identification and management, and a shift towards musculoskeletal surgery that focuses more on promoting dynamic bony alignment and less on releasing or lengthening tendons. Advances in basic and clinical science and technology development are changing existing paradigms and offering renewed hope for improved functioning for children with CP who are currently facing a lifelong disability with unique challenges at each stage in life. PMID:19643348

  18. Visual-perceptual impairment in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ego, Anne; Lidzba, Karen; Brovedani, Paola; Belmonti, Vittorio; Gonzalez-Monge, Sibylle; Boudia, Baya; Ritz, Annie; Cans, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Visual perception is one of the cognitive functions often impaired in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess the frequency of visual-perceptual impairment (VPI) and its relationship with patient characteristics. Eligible studies were relevant papers assessing visual perception with five common standardized assessment instruments in children with CP published from January 1990 to August 2011. Of the 84 studies selected, 15 were retained. In children with CP, the proportion of VPI ranged from 40% to 50% and the mean visual perception quotient from 70 to 90. None of the studies reported a significant influence of CP subtype, IQ level, side of motor impairment, neuro-ophthalmological outcomes, or seizures. The severity of neuroradiological lesions seemed associated with VPI. The influence of prematurity was controversial, but a lower gestational age was more often associated with lower visual motor skills than with decreased visual-perceptual abilities. The impairment of visual perception in children with CP should be considered a core disorder within the CP syndrome. Further research, including a more systematic approach to neuropsychological testing, is needed to explore the specific impact of CP subgroups and of neuroradiological features on visual-perceptual development. © 2015 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Mobile applications in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Mariblanca, M; Cano de la Cuerda, R

    2017-12-21

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental disorders. Technological development has enabled a transformation of the healthcare sector, which can offer more individualised, participatory, and preventive services. Within this context of new technology applied to the healthcare sector, mobile applications, or apps, constitute a very promising tool for the management of children with CP. The purpose of this article is to perform a systematic review of the information published about various mobile applications either directly related to CP or with potential to be useful in the context of the disease, and to describe, analyse, and classify these applications. A literature search was carried out to gather articles published in English or Spanish between 2011 and 2017 which presented, analysed, or validated applications either specifically designed or potentially useful for CP. Furthermore, a search for mobile applications was conducted in the main mobile application markets. A total of 63 applications were found in biomedical databases and mobile application markets, of which 40 were potentially useful for CP and 23 were specifically designed for the condition (11 for information, 3 for evaluation, and 9 for treatment). There are numerous mobile applications either specifically designed for or with potential to be useful in the field of CP. However, despite the existing scientific evidence, the low methodological quality of scientific articles makes it impossible to generalise the use of these tools. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiplicity and early gestational age contribute to an increased risk of cerebral palsy from assisted conception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Grove, Jakob; Schendel, Diana

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper assesses the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in children born after assisted conception compared with children born after natural conception (NC). METHODS: This population based follow-up study included all 588,967 children born in Denmark from 1995 to 2003. Assisted conception...

  1. Ankle torque steadiness is related to muscle activation variability and coactivation in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rose, Martin Høyer; Sløk, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the significance of muscle activation variability and coactivation for the ability to perform steady submaximal ankle torque (torque steadiness) in healthy children and those with cerebral palsy (CP), and (2) assess ankle function during isometric...

  2. Longitudinal Relationship Among Physical Fitness, Walking-Related Physical Activity, and Fatigue in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balemans, A.C.J.; van Wely, L.; Becher, J.G.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A vicious circle of decreased physical fitness, early fatigue, and low physical activity levels (PAL) is thought to affect children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the relationship of changes in physical fitness to changes in PAL and fatigue is unclear. Objective. The objective of

  3. Children with cerebral palsy in Ghana: malnutrition, feeding challenges, and caregiver quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Sarah; Adams, Mel; O'banion, David; Baltussen, Marjolein; Asante, Sandra; Kerac, Marko; Gladstone, Melissa; Zuurmond, Maria

    2018-05-07

    To assess feeding difficulties and nutritional status among children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Ghana, and whether severity of feeding difficulties and malnutrition are independently associated with caregiver quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional survey included 76 children with CP (18mo-12y) from four regions of Ghana. Severity of CP was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System and anthropometric measures were taken. Caregivers rated their QoL (using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Family Impact Module) and difficulties with eight aspects of child feeding. Logistic regression analysis explored factors (socio-economic characteristics, severity of CP, and feeding difficulties) associated with being underweight. Linear regression was undertaken to assess the relationship between caregiver QoL and child malnutrition and feeding difficulties. Poor nutritional status was common: 65% of children aged under 5 years were categorized as underweight, 54% as stunted, and 58% as wasted. Reported difficulties with child's feeding were common and were associated with the child being underweight (odds ratio 10.7, 95% confidence interval 2.3-49.6) and poorer caregiver QoL (pnutritional status was evident. Among rural, low resource populations in Ghana, there is a need for appropriate, accessible caregiver training and support around feeding practices of children with CP, to improve child nutritional status and caregiver well-being. What this paper adds Malnutrition is very common among children with cerebral palsy in this rural population in Ghana. Feeding difficulties in this population were strongly associated with being underweight. Feeding difficulties were associated with poorer caregiver quality of life (QoL). Child nutritional status was not associated with caregiver QoL. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Trajectories of autonomy development across the adolescent transition in children with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah; Holmbeck, Grayson N; DeLucia, Christian; Jandasek, Barbara; Zebracki, Kathy

    2009-02-01

    The current study investigated individual growth in autonomy development across the adolescent transition, comparing the trajectories of children with and without spina bifida. Individual growth curve modeling procedures were utilized to describe the developmental course of autonomy across four waves of data collection, from ages 9 to 15, and to test whether illness status [spina bifida vs. matched comparison group (N = 68 for both groups at Time 1)] would significantly predict individual variability in autonomy development. Potential moderators [child gender, SES, and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) score] of the association between illness status and autonomy development were also examined. Children with spina bifida demonstrated distinct developmental trajectories, though the nature of the group differences varied by type of autonomy development (emotional vs. behavioral), context (i.e. school vs. family), and reporter. Significant interactions with PPVT score and child gender were found. Overall, children with spina bifida show considerable developmental resiliency, but may lag behind their peers in specific areas of autonomy. Boys with spina bifida, and children with spina bifida who have lower than average levels of verbal intelligence, appear to be at greater risk for exhibiting delays in autonomy development.

  5. Sentence stress in children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschmann, Anja; Lowit, Anja

    2018-03-08

    This study aimed to advance our understanding of how children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (CP) realise sentence stress acoustically, and how well listeners could identify the position of the stressed word within these utterances. Seven children with CP and eight typically developing children participated in the experiment. Stress on target words in two sentence positions was elicited through a picture-based question-answer paradigm. Acoustic parameters of stress [duration, intensity and fundamental frequency (F0)] were measured and compared between stressed and unstressed target words. For the perception experiment, ten listeners were asked to determine the position of the stressed word in the children's productions. Acoustic measures showed that at group level the typically developing children used all three acoustic parameters to mark sentence stress, whereas the children with CP showed changes in duration only. Individual performance variations were evident in both groups. Perceptually, listeners were significantly better at identifying the stressed words in the utterances produced by the typically developing children than those of the children with CP. The results suggest that children with CP can manipulate temporal speech properties to mark stress. This ability to modulate acoustic-prosodic features could be harnessed in intervention to enhance children's functional communication.

  6. People With Cerebral Palsy: Effects of and Perspectives for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayston, Margaret J.

    2001-01-01

    The movement disorder of cerebral palsy (CP) is expressed in a variety of ways and to varying degrees in each individual. The condition has become more complex over the last 20 years with the increasing survival of children born at less than 28 to 30 weeks gestationai age. Impairments present in children with CP as a direct result of the brain injury or occurring indirectly to compensate for underlying problems include abnormal muscle tone; weakness and lack of fitness; limited variety of muscle synergies; contracture and altered biomechanics, the net result being limited functional ability. Other contributors to the motor disorder include sensory, cognitive and perceptual impairments. In recent years understanding of the motor problem has increased, but less is known about effects of therapy. Evidence suggests that therapy can improve functional possibilities for children with cerebral palsy but is inconclusive as to which approach might be most beneficial. The therapist requires an understanding of the interaction of all systems, cognitive/perceptual, motor, musculoskeletal, sensory and behavioral, in the context of the development and plasticity of the CNS. It is necessary to understand the limitations of the damaged immature nervous system, but important to optimize the child's functional possibilities. PMID:11530888

  7. The Role of Exercise – Rehabilitation on Energy Cost and Metabolic Efficiency in Dipelegic Spastic Cerebral Palsy Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Izadi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the resting energy expenditure and metabolic efficiency before and after of aerobic exercise in spastic cerebral palsy children (mean age of 11 years and also to compare with those of normal children. Materials & Methods : Fifteen dipelegia spastic cerebral palsy children (experimental group participated in exercise–rehabilitation program by voluntarily and the peers eighteen able body children(control group were selected randomly. The experimental group(cp performed rehabilitation program for 3 months,3 session in week with work intensity(%HRR=462.5equal to144bpm of heart rate. The values were measured on tantory cycle ergometer according to Macmaster protocol.Results: Rest and exercise heart rate and exercise intensity(%HRR in patients decreased after rehabilitation program(P<0.05. The resting energy expenditure was similar in cp and normal groups. The rate of oxygen cost of patients decreased in post test(P<0.05 that showed increasing in metabolic efficiency.Conclusion: cerebral palsy children have greater exercise energy cost and lower cardiovascular fitness than normal children and exercise–rehabilitation leads to enhance of metabolic efficiency in this patients that is remarkable from clinical perception.

  8. Postural Muscle Dyscoordination in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda C. van der Heide

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives an overview of the knowledge currently available on muscular dyscoordination underlying postural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Such information is a prerequisite for developing successful therapeutic interventions in children with CP. Until now, three children with CP functioning at GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V have been documented. The children totally or partially lacked direction specificity in their postural adjustments and could not sit independently for more than 3 seconds. Some children functioning at GMFCS level IV have intact direction-specific adjustments, whereas others have problems in generating consistently direction-specific adjustments. Children at GMFCS levels I to III have an intact basic level of control but have difficulties in fine-tuning the degree of postural muscle contraction to the task-specific conditions, a dysfunction more prominently present in children with bilateral spastic CP than in children with spastic hemiplegia. The problems in the adaptation of the degree of muscle contraction might be the reason that children with CP, more often than typically developing children, show an excess of antagonistic coactivation during difficult balancing tasks and a preference for cranial-caudal recruitment during reaching. This might imply that both stereotypies might be regarded as functional strategies to compensate for the dysfunctional capacity to modulate subtly postural activity.

  9. Recurrent musculoskeletal pain in paediatric cerebral palsy : Relations to mental health, health-related quality of life and participation

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of movement and posture resulting from disturbances in the immature brain. Accompanying impairments including secondary musculoskeletal problems and mental health problems are common, and impairment is life-long. Thus, from a health care perspective, CP is an excellent model disease for asking what frames of reference should guide our understanding and evidence gathering about patient well-being, and what instruments should we use to assess thes...

  10. Parents’ experiences of participation in physical activities for children with cerebral palsy – protecting and pushing towards independence

    OpenAIRE

    Lauruschkus, Katarina; Nordmark, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To explore how parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) experience their child’s participation in physical activities and to identify facilitators and barriers for being physically active and reducing sedentary behaviour. Methods: Twenty-five parents of sixteen children, aged 8–11 years old with CP, with varying gross motor, cognitive and communicative functions and with different cultural backgrounds, participated in focus group or individual interviews. Content analysis was use...

  11. The spectrum of urological disease in patients with spina bifida.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: [corrected] Urological complications are the major cause of ill health during childhood and adult life of patients with spina bifida but the significance of urinary tract disease on the individual and the healthcare services is underemphasised. AIM: To assess the effects of spina bifida on the individual and the healthcare services. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed to assess the frequency and significance of urological conditions requiring hospital attendance in patients with spina bifida currently attending a specialised multidisciplinary clinic over a period of six months. RESULTS: Urinary sepsis accounted for the majority of admissions (62%), while 38 of 62 patients required 60 surgical procedures. Targeting the primary urological abnormality (the dysfunctional and usually poorly compliant bladder) allows implementation of effective treatments, including regular intermittent bladder catherisation (52%) in order to preserve upper renal tract function. Associated postural abnormalities complicated both conservative and interventional therapies. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the surgical commitment for units caring for patients with spina bifida, the important considerations for the future healthcare services, and the range and severity of urological diseases encountered by these patients.

  12. Comparison of the quality of life in cerebral palsy children with physical therapy more and less than 10 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Anggreany

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of severe physical disability in childhood. These limitations may cause lower level experience or quality of life (QoL. Physical therapy (PT plays a central role in managing CP. Objective To compare QoL in CP children with PT more and less than 10 months and to compare gross motoric level before and after PT. Methods A cross sectional study was performed from June 2012 to March 2013 in Medan. Eligible population were four to twelve year old CP children who received PT. Subjects were divided into 2 group, group I was CP children with PT more than 10 months, group II was CP children with PT less than 10 months. Parents were asked to fill CP QOL questionnaires. To evaluate motor impairment level we used gross motor function classification system (GMFCS that classified the motoric impairment into 5 levels. Data was analyzed by using independent T-test and MannWhitney U test with 95% confidence interval. Results There were 60 CP children divided into 2 groups of 30 children. The mean duration of PT in group I was 35.7 (SD 19.37 months and group II was 4.2 (SD 3.13 months. Gross motoric level in both group increased from GMFCS IV to GMFCS II in group I (P=0.0001 and from GMFCS IV to GMFCS III (P=0.002 in group II. The mean total CP QoL scores in group I and II were 79.63 (SD 5.73 and 47.71 (SD 6.85, respectively (P=0.0001. Conclusions Cerebral palsy children who received more than 10 months PT have higher QoL than children with less than 10 months PT. There was significant gross motor improvement after PT in both groups.

  13. Oral Health Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Parental Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Alaki, Sumer M; Nouri, Sumaya M

    To assess the parents' perception of the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and compare it with normally developing children. 63 children with CP were recruited from 8 disability centers, and 99 healthy controls were recruited from 5 elementary schools. The ages of the children in both groups were from 6-12 years. The Franciscan Hospital for Children Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (FHC-OHRQOL) was used to measure the OHRQOL and an oral examination was conducted in the schools/centers of the children to assess the teeth, gingival health, and oral hygiene. The FHC-OHRQOL showed a significant difference in 3 out of 4 sections indicating lower OHRQOL in the CP group. The examination showed no significant difference in the dental and gingival health and in the level of oral hygiene. The OHRQOL of children with CP is significantly lower than that of normally developing children although the oral health status of children with CP is not significantly different from that of normally developing children.

  14. Early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijna eHadders-Algra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP. CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions, but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuro-imaging techniques and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuro-imaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high risk infants without CP. In these infants early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is

  15. Impact of malnutrition on gastrointestinal disorders and gross motor abilities in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanozzi, Angelo; Capano, Guglielmo; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Alfonso; Scuccimarra, Goffredo; Del Giudice, Ennio; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Militerni, Roberto; Staiano, Annamaria

    2007-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often demonstrate abnormal feeding behaviours, leading to reduced food consumption and malnutrition. Moreover, most of them present with gastrointestinal disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or chronic constipation (CC), and poor motor function rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to assess the possible relationship between malnutrition and gastrointestinal problems and to evaluate the role of nutrition on their gross motor abilities in a population of children with CP and mental retardation. Twenty-one consecutive children (10 boys; mean age: 5.8+/-4.7 years; range: 1-14 years) with CP and severe mental retardation. Nutritional assessment included the measurement of body mass index (BMI=W/H2), fat body mass (FBM) and fat free mass (FFM). Children with symptoms suggesting GERD underwent prolonged 24h intraesophageal pH monitoring and/or upper GI endoscopy with biopsies before and after a 6 months of pharmaceutical (omeprazole) and nutritional (20% increment of daily caloric intake) treatments. The motor function was evaluated by "The Gross Motor Function Measure" (GMFM) before and after the 6 months on nutritional rehabilitation. BMI for age was or=25 degrees percentile, five of nine (55.5%) patients had persistent GERD when they were taken off the medication. Malnutrition and gastrointestinal disorders are very common in children with cerebral palsy. Improved nutritional status, particularly fat free mass gain, appears to have an impact on motor function in children with CP.

  16. Stress in parents of children with cerebral palsy : what sources of stress are we talking about?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, M.; Volman, M. J. M.; Gorter, J. W.; Vermeer, A.

    Background Parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) often experience high levels of stress. Little is known however on the different sources of stress parents experience. The purpose of the present study was to explore the relation between aspects of parental distress in the parenting role and

  17. Stress in parents of children with cerebral palsy : what sources of stress are we talking about?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, M.; Volman, M. J. M.; Gorter, J. W.; Vermeer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) often experience high levels of stress. Little is known however on the different sources of stress parents experience. The purpose of the present study was to explore the relation between aspects of parental distress in the parenting role and

  18. Spina Bifida: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 12 = La Espina Bifida: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.

    This fact sheet on spina bifida is offered in both English and Spanish. It provides definitions of the three types of spina bifida (spina bifida occulta, meningocele, and myelomeningocele). Incidence figures are given as are typical characteristics of children with spina bifida. Educational implications are briefly noted, including the need to…

  19. Deficit in implicit motor sequence learning among children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofer-Levi, Moran; Silberg, Tamar; Brezner, Amichai; Vakil, Eli

    2013-11-01

    Skill learning (SL) is learning as a result of repeated exposure and practice, which encompasses independent explicit (response to instructions) and implicit (response to hidden regularities) processes. Little is known about the effects of developmental disorders, such as Cerebral Palsy (CP), on the ability to acquire new skills. We compared performance of CP and typically developing (TD) children and adolescents in completing the serial reaction time (SRT) task, which is a motor sequence learning task, and examined the impact of various factors on this performance as indicative of the ability to acquire motor skills. While both groups improved in performance, participants with CP were significantly slower than TD controls and did not learn the implicit sequence. Our results indicate that SL in children and adolescents with CP is qualitatively and quantitatively different than that of their peers. Understanding the unique aspects of SL in children and adolescents with CP might help plan appropriate and efficient interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Story Retelling and Language Ability in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy and Speech Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Dahlgren Sandberg, Annika; Miniscalco, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on retelling ability and cognition is limited in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and speech impairment. Aims: To explore the impact of expressive and receptive language, narrative discourse dimensions (Narrative Assessment Profile measures), auditory and visual memory, theory of mind (ToM) and non-verbal cognition on the…

  1. Self-concept of adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannotti, Mary E; Minter, Christin L; Chambers, Henry G; Smith, Peter A; Tylkowski, Chester

    2011-01-01

    To describe the self-concept of adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Cross-sectional design included the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, version 2 (TSCS:2), Functional Independence Measure (FIM™), Beck Depression Index II (BDI®-II), Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF), Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) levels and demographic questions. One hundred and two people with CP (52 females, mean age=26) participated. Thirty-eight participants had unreliable answers as indicated by validity scales and were excluded from the analysis. Ten participants had high self-concept; 41 had average self-concept and 13 had low total self-concept. Self-concept had a fair and inverse association with the BDI-II (Pearson's r= -0.3, pSelf-concept was not associated with GMFCS level or FIM score. Family and Personal sub-domain scores were lowest sub-domain scores for people with low self-concept (pself-concept; and self-concept was not associated with severity of CP, but with lack of depression and life satisfaction. Results suggest the need for family centred care into adulthood. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  2. Low bone mineral density in ambulatory persons with cerebral palsy? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mus-Peters, Cindy T R; Huisstede, Bionka M A; Noten, Suzie; Hitters, Minou W M G C; van der Slot, Wilma M A; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J G

    2018-05-22

    Non-ambulatory persons with cerebral palsy are prone to low bone mineral density. In ambulatory persons with cerebral palsy, bone mineral density deficits are expected to be small or absent, but a consensus conclusion is lacking. In this systematic review bone mineral density in ambulatory persons with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification Scales I-III) was studied. Medline, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. According to international guidelines, low bone mineral density was defined as Z-score ≤ -2.0. In addition, we focused on Z-score ≤ -1.0 because this may indicate a tendency towards low bone mineral density. We included 16 studies, comprising 465 patients aged 1-65 years. Moderate and conflicting evidence for low bone mineral density (Z-score ≤ -2.0) was found for several body parts (total proximal femur, total body, distal femur, lumbar spine) in children with Gross Motor Function Classification Scales II and III. We found no evidence for low bone mineral density in children with Gross Motor Function Classification Scale I or adults, although there was a tendency towards low bone mineral density (Z-score ≤ -1.0) for several body parts. Although more high-quality research is needed, results indicate that deficits in bone mineral density are not restricted to non-ambulatory people with cerebral palsy. Implications for Rehabilitation Although more high-quality research is needed, including adults and fracture risk assessment, the current study indicates that deficits in bone mineral density are not restricted to non-ambulatory people with CP. Health care professionals should be aware that optimal nutrition, supplements on indication, and an active lifestyle, preferably with weight-bearing activities, are important in ambulatory people with CP, also from a bone quality point-of-view. If indicated, medication and fall prevention training should be prescribed.

  3. Reliability of isometric lower-extremity muscle strength measurements in children with cerebral palsy: implications for measurement design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, Lydia; Brehm, Merel A.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Jansen, Laura; Woudenberg-Vos, Hester; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2013-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) typically show muscle weakness of the lower extremities, which can be measured with the use of handheld dynamometry (HHD). The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine test-retest reliability and measurement error of isometric lower-extremity strength

  4. Spina Bifida Care In Kenya Through A Network Of Mobile Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Children with spina bifida require ongoing multidisciplinary care in order to prevent complications and improve quality of life. Bethany Crippled Children's Centre of Kenya and BethanyKids at Kijabe Hospital have been providing such care for spina bifida patients through a network of mobile clinics throughout ...

  5. Methods and Metrics for the Improvement of the Interactionand the Rehabilitation of Cerebral Palsy through Inertial Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most limiting disabilities in childhood, with 2.2 cases per 1000 1-year survivors. It is a disorder of movement and posture due to a defect or lesion of the immature brain during the pregnancy or the birth. These motor limitations appear frequently in combination with sensory and cognitive alterations generally result in great di culties for some people with CP to manipulate ob jects, communicate and interact with their environment, as well as ...

  6. Congenital cerebral palsy, child sex and parent cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elani Streja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to model risk of cardiovascular outcomes for exposed parents compared to all other parents beginning at the child's 10(th birthday. RESULTS: We identified 733,730 mothers and 666,652 fathers among whom 1,592 and 1,484, respectively, had a child with CP. The mean age for mothers at end of follow up was 50 ± 8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child's sex, child's residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.16-2.00, attributable mostly to an increased incidence of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. After additional adjustment for preterm birth, the association was markedly attenuated for cardiovascular disease (1.34, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.76, became nonsignificant for hypertension, but remained significant for cerebrovascular disease (HR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.45- 5.12. There was no increased risk of cardiovascular events in mothers of female CP children, or fathers of CP children of any sex. CONCLUSIONS: Women that have a male child with CP are at increased risk for premature cardiovascular disease. Part of this association may be related to risk factors for preterm births.

  7. Test Your Knowledge of Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specialize in spina bifida, to high health care costs from frequent surgeries and hospitalizations. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) projects improve the quality of life and encourage full participation at every ...

  8. Methods and metrics for the improvement of the interaction and the rehabilitation of cerebral palsy through inertial technology

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Garasa, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most limiting disabilities in childhood, with 2.2 cases per 1000 1-year survivors. It is a disorder of movement and posture due to a defect or lesion of the immature brain during the pregnancy or the birth. These motor limitations appear frequently in combination with sensory and cognitive alterations generally result in great difficulties for some people with CP to manipulate objects, communicate and interact with their environment, as well as...

  9. External Mechanical Work and Pendular Energy Transduction of Overground and Treadmill Walking in Adolescents with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Zollinger, Marie; Degache, Francis; Currat, Gabriel; Pochon, Ludmila; Peyrot, Nicolas; Newman, Christopher J.; Malatesta, Davide

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare th...

  10. Development and face validity of a cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaire for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, Masoud; Waninge, Aly; Rameckers, E.A.A.; van der Steen, J; Krijnen, W.P.; van der Schans, C.P.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop two cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaires (CVI-MQ's) for children with cerebral palsy (CP): one for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II and III and one for children with GMFCS levels IV and V;

  11. Development and face validity of a cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaire for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, M.; Waninge, A.; Rameckers, E. A. A.; van der Steen, J.; Krijnen, W. P.; van der Schans, C. P.; Steenbergen, B.

    Aim The objectives of this study were (i) to develop two cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaires (CVI-MQ's) for children with cerebral palsy (CP): one for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II and III and one for children with GMFCS levels IV and V;

  12. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  13. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF OPEN VERSUS CLOSED KINETIC CHAIN EXERCISES TO IMPROVE GAIT IN SPASTIC DIPLEGIC CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trishna Saikia Baruah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral Palsy (CP describes a non- progressive but not unchanging disorder of movement and posture due to an insult to or anomaly of the developing brain. People with spastic diplegia typically walk slowly and have difficulties in performing activities such as walking running or jumping. Children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy are relied more on cadence to increase speed. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of open and closed kinetic chain (OKC and CKC exercises in improving gait in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Methods: 30 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy of both genders with age 4-12 years was taken. Cadence and distance covered in 1Minute Walk Test was calculated before and after the test. The intervention for group A was CKC exercises and group B was OKC exercises for 3 days a week for 6 weeks and each session lasted for 30-45 minutes was given for both the groups. Results: Paired t-test was performed to find effectiveness of CKC and OKC improving gait in spastic diplegic CP to see the difference of means of 1minute walk, t = 10.789 which is significant (p = 0.000 and for cadence, t = 3.37 which is highly significant (p = 0.00 implying that cadence and distance covered in1minute walk was more with CKC exercises. Conclusion: Based on the result it is concluded that CKC exercises are effective in improving gait than OKC exercises in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and internet sites that offer free and for purchase personal health records, go the The American Health ... team is a high-risk pregnancy specialist with experience managing a Spina Bifida pregnancy. Babies with myelomeningocele, ...

  15. The effect of an android-based application on the knowledge of the caregivers of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Safari, Ameneh; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Dalvand, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mobile health and e-learning may have a significant impact on training patients, physicians, students and caregivers. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of using an educational mobile application on the knowledge of the caregivers of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: We used a previously developed mobile application. The knowledge of 17 caregivers of children with CP (including parents) about the daily care of their children was evaluated through a self-assessment and a test with multiple-choice and true-false questions. Next, the application, which included several educational modules for the daily care of the children with CP, was given to the caregivers to use continually for two months. After this period, the knowledge of the caregivers was evaluated by the same tools. Data analysis was performed by SPSS-16, using paired-sample t-test or Wilcoxon test. Results: The effect of the use of this educational application on the knowledge of caregivers in all childcare domains, except for eating, was reported to be significant (papplication increased the knowledge of caregivers in all domains except playing (papplications can improve the knowledge of caregivers about the daily care of children with cerebral palsy.

  16. Relations between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M.; Houdijk, Han; Doorenbosch, Caroline A. M.; Kiezebrink, Francisca E. M.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Harlaar, Jaap; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relation between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and peers with typical development. In this case-control study, knee extensor muscle endurance was estimated from

  17. Relations between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M; Houdijk, Han; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Kiezebrink, Francisca E.M.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Harlaar, Jaap; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relation between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and peers with typical development. Method: In this case–control study, knee extensor muscle endurance was

  18. Orthopedic surgery in cerebral palsy: Instructional course lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic surgery (OS plays an important role in the management of cerebral palsy (CP. The objectives of OS are to optimize functions and prevent deformity. Newer developments in OS for CP include emphasis on hip surveillance, minimally invasive procedures, use of external fixators instead of plates and screws, better understanding of lever arm dysfunctions (that can only be corrected by bony OS, orthopedic selective spasticity-control surgery, and single-event multilevel lever arm restoration and anti spasticity surgery, which have led to significant improvements in gross motor function and ambulation, especially in spastic quadriplegia, athetosis, and dystonia. The results of OS can be dramatic and life altering for the person with CP and their caregivers if it is performed meticulously by a specialized surgical team, at the appropriate age, for the correct indications, employing sound biomechanical principles and is followed by physician-led, protocol based, intensive, multidisciplinary, institutional rehabilitation, and long term followup. However, OS can be a double-edged sword, and if performed less than optimally, and without the supporting multidisciplinary medical and rehabilitation team, expertise and infrastructure, it often leads to significant functional worsening of the person with CP, including irretrievable loss of previous ambulatory capacity. OS must be integrated into the long term management of the person with CP and should be anticipated and planned at the optimal time and not viewed as a “last resort” intervention or failure of rehabilitation. This instructional course lecture reviews the relevant contemporary principles and techniques of OS in CP.

  19. Cerebral Palsy in Children as a Risk Factor for Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenc, Lidia; Przysada, Grzegorz; Trzeciak, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine some malnutrition risk factors among children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children with CP often require the assistance of physical therapy centers. Experience suggests that, apart from physical disabilities, this group often suffers from malnutrition. Data were gathered in the hospital among 128 children aged 3-18 years who were suffering from CP. The children were admitted from 2011 to 2013 to the Center for Neurological Physical Therapy for children in the Regional Hospital No. 2. St. Queen Jadwiga in Rzeszow (RORE). Statistical analyses were conducted for data on gender, age, type of CP, motor function level according to Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS), body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin levels in blood. The risk of anemia differs based on gender--the risk is 6 times greater among boys than among girls (p = 0.0398). Risk of malnutrition is 3.5 times higher in children with tetraplegia than in children with diplegia or hemiplegia (p = 0.0043). Higher GMFCS scores are connected to greater proportions of malnourished children (for BMI z-score children with CP, malnourishment risk factors are male gender for anemia and tetraplegia and high GMFCS values. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Oral Health Status among Children with Cerebral Palsy in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hashmi, Haifa; Kowash, Mawlood; Hassan, Amar; Al Halabi, Manal

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the oral health status of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Materials and Methods: Eighty-four CP and 125 healthy children were recruited from special needs centers and private/public schools in Dubai. A dental examination for decayed-missing-filled teeth in primary dentition (dmft)/Decayed-Missing-Filled teeth in permanent dentition (DMFT) indices, simplified oral hygiene index, calculus index (CI), and oral debris index was conducted. In addition, assessments of occlusal, dentofacial, soft tissue anomalies and erosion were conducted. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS for Windows, version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: DMFT/dmft scores were comparable in both groups. CI was significantly higher among children with CP. CP patients had a significantly higher proportion of anterior open bite, anterior spacing, Class II molar Angle malocclusion, trauma, high-arched palate, tongue thrust, lymphadenopathy, angular cheilitis, macroglossia, drooling, and erosion as compared to controls. Conclusions: The study highlighted peculiar characteristics and needs for the CP patients in Dubai, UAE. PMID:29285470

  1. Bell's Palsy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Treatment Leer en Español: Tratamiento de la parálisis ...

  2. Failure of normal development of central drive to ankle dorsiflexors relates to gait deficits in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon F; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Neurophysiological markers of the central control of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are used to assess developmental response to therapy. Here we measure the central common drive to a leg muscle in children with CP. We recorded EMGs from the Tibialis Anterior (TA) muscle of 40 children...... children tended to strengthen with age, although compared to the control subjects it was slightly weaker. For CP subjects' of all ages the most affected TA muscle common drive was markedly reduced compared both to their least affected muscle and to controls. These differences between the least and most...

  3. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Leer en Español: Síntomas de la parálisis ...

  4. Clinical and neuroimaging profile of congenital brain malformations in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, W.; Okurowska-Zawada, B.; Sobaniec, W.; Goscik, M.; Olenski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the incidence of congenital brain malformations in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) in a hospital based study. Material and Methods: The present study included 74 boys and 56 girls with spastic tetraplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia CP. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI findings were analyzed in children with CP. Results: Significant abnormalities relevant to the CP were evident on MRI in 124 (95.3%) subjects. Periventicular leukomalacia (PVL) was detected more frequently in children with spastic diplegia than in patients with tetraplegia or hemiplegia. Cerebral atrophy was found more often in the tetraplegic group compared to the diplegic patients. Porencephalic cysts were detected more often in children with spastic hemiplegia. Congenital brain anomalies were evident in 15 (10.7%) children with spastic CP. Brain malformations included: schizencephaly (5), agenesis corpus callosum (4), polymicrogyria (2), holoprosencephaly (2) and lissencephaly (2). Intractable epilepsy and mental retardation were observed more often in children with brain anomalies. Twelve patients with congenital brain malformations were born at term and three born at preterm. Conclusions: Neuroimaging results in children with CP may help determine the etiology and make better prognosis of CP. (authors)

  5. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84±17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78±10.36), mild defect ( 2 test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients

  6. Pregnancy outcome and complications in women with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, M; Grover, S; Dunne, K; Bryan, D

    2000-09-01

    To describe the antenatal complications, mode of delivery and outcome of pregnancy in women with spina bifida. Case series of women known to have attended the spina bifida clinic at the Royal Children's Hospital. Medical records, postal questionnaire and telephone interview were utilized to collect data on the effect of pregnancy on the health of women and the effect of spina bifida on pregnancy outcome. Of 207 women born between 1945 and 1975, 23 reported having a pregnancy, and 17 who had completed pregnancies agreed to participate. The 17 women had a total of 29 pregnancies, with 23 pregnancies progressing to births. Fourteen of 17 women had antenatal admissions, with wheelchair-dependent women requiring more-frequent and longer admissions. Recurrent urinary infections in pregnancy occurred in women with a prior history of urinary infections; stomal problems occurred but were not serious; mobility was reduced for two women during pregnancy, with full recovery afterwards; and preexisting pressure sores worsened during pregnancy. Vaginal deliveries occurred in one in five pregnancies of women who were wheelchair dependent and in ten of eighteen pregnancies in independently mobile women, including seven of eight pregnancies of independently mobile women without ileal conduits. Cesarean sections were accompanied by postoperative complications in 10 women. Women with spina bifida who become pregnant generally have a positive outcome, with relatively low complication rates.

  7. Changes in Trunk and Head Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Hippotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Tim L.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Hippotherapy (HPOT) is a therapy that uses horse movement. This pilot investigation objectively evaluated the efficacy of HPOT in improving head/trunk stability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The participants were six children with spastic diplegia and six children without disability. Head and trunk stability was challenged by using a…

  8. ASPECTS OF MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Žgur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Child’s motor development is not an isolated process but it rather involves numerous other developmental aspects, such as cognitive and conative. The research is focused on defining the developmental principles of motor abilities and skills in children with prominent motor deficits who were diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP. The research compares the motor maturity between two groups of children with CP; the younger group (up to 10 years of age and the older group (10 – 16 years of age. The research included 78 primary school children with different forms of CP (diplegia, hemiplegia, mixed forms, aged between 6 and 16. The discriminant analysis used in the research showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between age and motor maturity in children with CP. The structural matrix confirmed the different hierarchical representation of the motor components (strength, coordination, precision and graphomotor skills for the selected motor model, in relation to children’s age. The function of explosive strength showed significant differences between younger and older children as regards their motor maturity. We can conclude that there is a significant developmental difference between the groups of younger and older children with CP, in relation to their motor maturity (different hierarchical representation, with the most obvious difference in motor ability of explosive strength.

  9. Assessment and Management of the Communication Difficulties of Children with Cerebral Palsy: A UK Survey of SLT Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rose Mary; Pennington, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Communication difficulties are common in cerebral palsy (CP) and are frequently associated with motor, intellectual and sensory impairments. Speech and language therapy research comprises single-case experimental design and small group studies, limiting evidence-based intervention and possibly exacerbating variation in practice. Aims:…

  10. Mini-mental state exam for children (MMC) in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Ricardo; Andrade, Peterson Marco Oliveira; Fontes, Patrícia Lemos Bueno; Ferreira, Fernanda Oliveira; Salvador, Larissa de Souza; Carvalho, Maria Raquel Santos; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is frequent in cerebral palsy (CP) and there is a lack of multiprofessional screening instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of the Mini-Mental State Examination for Children (MMC), an adapted version of the Mini-Mental State Examination, in screening for cognitive impairments in children with CP. We assessed 397 Brazilian children, 310 with typical development and 87 with CP (hemiplegic and quadriplegic forms), aged 5-16 years. Association between the MMC and general intelligence was assessed by the Colored Progressive Matrices instrument. Psychometric indexes for the MMC were adequate. ROC analyses revealed effective diagnostic accuracy in all ages assessed. Cut-off values are reported. Major difficulties on the MMC were observed in children with CP, particularly individuals with the quadriplegic form. Moreover, the MMC showed moderate correlation with the intelligence test, and was reliable in discriminating, among clinical cases, those with poorer cognitive abilities. The MMC could be useful as a multiprofessional screening instrument for cognitive impairment in children with hemiplegic CP. Results of the MMC in quadriplegic CP children should be interpreted with caution. Diagnosis should be confirmed by further psychological testing.

  11. Health care expenditures of children and adults with spina bifida in a privately insured U.S. population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lijing; Grosse, Scott D; Armour, Brian S; Waitzman, Norman J

    2007-07-01

    We provide new estimates of medical care utilization and expenditures over the lifespan for persons living with spina bifida in the United States. Updated estimates are essential for calculations of lifetime costs and for economic evaluations of prevention and management strategies for spina bifida. We analyzed data from the 2001-2003 MarketScan database on paid medical and prescription drug claims of persons covered by employer-sponsored health insurance in the United States. Medical care utilization and expenditures during 2003 were analyzed for persons with a diagnosis of spina bifida recorded during 2001-2003 who had 12 months of coverage in a fee-for-service health plan. To calculate expenditures during infancy, a separate analysis was performed for those born during 2002 with claims and expenditures data during the first 12 months of life. We compared medical expenditures for persons with and without spina bifida by age groups. Average incremental medical expenditures comparing patients with spina bifida and those without were $41,460 per year at age 0, $14,070 at ages 1-17, $13,339 at ages 18-44, and $10,134 at ages 45-64. Children ages 1-17 years with spina bifida had average medical expenditures 13 times greater than children without spina bifida. Adults with spina bifida had average medical expenditures three to six times greater than adults without spina bifida in this privately insured population. Although per capita medical care utilization and expenditures are highest among children, adults constitute an important and growing share of the population living with spina bifida. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Ankle torque steadiness is related to muscle activation variability and co-activation in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rose, Martin; Sløk, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the significance of muscle activation variability and coactivation for the ability to perform steady submaximal ankle torque (torque steadiness) in healthy children and those with cerebral palsy (CP), and (2) assess ankle function during isometric...... contractions in those children. Fourteen children with CP who walked with equinus foot deformity and 14 healthy (control) children performed maximal and steady submaximal ankle dorsi- and plantarflexions. Dorsiflexion torque steadiness was related to agonist and antagonist muscle activation variability as well...

  13. The validity and reliability of modelled neural and tissue properties of the ankle muscles in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, L.H.; van der Krogt, M.M.; de Gooijer-van Groep, K.; van Eesbeek, S.; de Groot, J.; Buizer, A.I.; Meskers, C.; Becher, J.G.; de Vlugt, E.; Harlaar, J.

    2015-01-01

    Spastic cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint resistance, caused by a mix of increased tissue stiffness, as well as involuntary reflex and background muscle activity. These properties can be quantified using a neuromechanical model of the musculoskeletal complex and instrumented

  14. Differences between the events preceding spina bifida and anencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W H

    1981-02-01

    It is usually held that there is a time continuum in the formation of monoxygotic (MZ) twins which is indexed by their placentation, running from dichorionic to monochorionic diamniotic to monochorionic monoamniotic and conjoined pairs. There is good evidence that this continuum is characterised by a continuum of predisposition to anencephaly, slightly raised in dichorionic pairs but very high in some sorts of conjoined pairs. Although MZ twins, especially monoamniotic and conjoined pairs, are peculiarly liable to anencephaly, they are not particularly susceptible to spina bifida. Among twin pairs concordant for anencephaly or spina bifida, there are strikingly few concordant in the sense of one twin having anencephaly and the other spina bifida, in contrast with the numbers of pairs concordant for the same malformation. The prevalence of anencephaly in double monsters varies with the type of monster, being high in diprosopus. These findings may be explained by the timing of embryonic events.

  15. The link between impaired theory of mind and executive function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Kai; Wu, Jianxian; Hong, Yongfeng; Zhao, Jingpu; Feng, Xiaojun; Xu, Mei; Wang, Min; Ndasauka, Yamikani; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between theory of mind (ToM) deficits and executive function (EF) impairments in children with cerebral palsy (CP), 42 CP with children and 42 typically developing (TD) children, acting as controls, were assessed on the tasks of ToM (false belief and faux pas) and EF (inhibition, updating and shifting). Results showed that CP children had deficits both in ToM and EF tasks. The correlation analyses showed that two EF components (inhibition and updating) were strongly related to false belief and faux pas in both two groups. We also found correlation between shifting and false belief and faux pas. However, this correlation was only found in TD children and not in children with CP. These findings suggest that children with CP lag behind TD children in both ToM and EF. Further, the results reveal, interestingly, that ToM deficits in CP children might be related to their inhibition and updating impairments, but not to shifting impairments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors Associated with Enhanced Gross Motor Progress in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Register-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størvold, Gunfrid V; Jahnsen, Reidun B; Evensen, Kari Anne I; Romild, Ulla K; Bratberg, Grete H

    2018-05-01

    To examine associations between interventions and child characteristics; and enhanced gross motor progress in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Prospective cohort study based on 2048 assessments of 442 children (256 boys, 186 girls) aged 2-12 years registered in the Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program and the Cerebral Palsy Register of Norway. Gross motor progress estimates were based on repeated measures of reference percentiles for the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) in a linear mixed model. Mean follow-up time: 2.9 years. Intensive training was the only intervention factor associated with enhanced gross motor progress (mean 3.3 percentiles, 95% CI: 1.0, 5.5 per period of ≥3 sessions per week and/or participation in an intensive program). Gross motor function was on average 24.2 percentiles (95% CI: 15.2, 33.2) lower in children with intellectual disability compared with others. Except for eating problems (-10.5 percentiles 95% CI: -18.5, -2.4) and ankle contractures by age (-1.9 percentiles 95% CI: -3.6, -0.2) no other factors examined were associated with long-term gross motor progress. Intensive training was associated with enhanced gross motor progress over an average of 2.9 years in children with CP. Intellectual disability was a strong negative prognostic factor. Preventing ankle contractures appears important for gross motor progress.

  17. [Physical exercise for people with cerebral palsy: effects, recommendations and barriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2014-05-01

    The management goal of cerebral palsy (CP) is improving functionality, locomotion and independence. Treatment programs commonly encompass adapted physical activity (APA). This review summarizes the knowledge regarding the effects and recommendations for APA in persons with CP. In addition, barriers to APA in this population are reviewed. The available literature on benefits of APA to persons with CP has focused mainly on youth. The components of the APA programs generally consist of strength, aerobic and flexibility training. There is no empirical evidence that strength-training increases spasticity in people with CP. Furthermore, strength-training may increase strength and the ability to perform daily activities. Aerobic-training is especially important as persons with CP typically have low cardiorespiratory fitness and high prevalence of cardiac disease. However, limited published evidence exists on aerobic-training effects in this population. Nonetheless, the evidence suggests that aerobic-training in persons with CP can improve physiological outcomes, yet the influence of these changes on participation has not been investigated sufficiently. Stretching exercise is a common treatment for spasticity. Surprisingly, there is inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of stretching exercise for persons with CP. Despite the importance attributed to APA for people with CP, low levels of physical activity have been reported in this population. However, when caregivers perceive greater benefits of exercise, individuals with CP are more likely to be active. In contrast, barriers to APA include costs of APA programs, limited means of transportation to APA facilities, lack of information regarding APA facilities and limited appropriate exercising equipment in the APA facilities.

  18. Self-worth, perceived competence, and behaviour problems in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuengel, Carlo; Voorman, Jeanine; Stolk, Joop; Dallmeijer, Annet; Vermeer, Adri; Becher, Jules

    2006-10-30

    To examine the relevance of physical disabilities for self-worth and perceived competence in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to examine associations between behaviour problems and self-worth and perceived competence. The Harter scales for self-worth and perceived competence and a new scale for perceived motor competence were used in a sample of 80 children with CP. Their motor functioning was assessed with the Gross Motor Functioning Measure (GMFM) and behaviour problems with the Child Behaviour Check List administered to parents. Self-worth and perceived competence for children with CP were comparable to the Dutch norm sample, except for perceived athletic competence. Within the CP sample, the GMFM showed a domain-specific effect on perceived motor competence. In the multivariate analysis, internalizing problems were associated negatively with all perceived competence scales and self-worth, whereas aggression was positively associated with perceived motor competence, physical appearance, and self-worth. Children with CP appear resilient against challenges posed to their self-worth caused by their disabilities. The relevance of the physical disability appears to be domain-specific. For internalizing problems and aggression, different theoretical models are needed to account for their associations with self-worth and perceived competence.

  19. Botulinum toxin type A chemodenervation treatment in spastic forms of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most serious outcomes of the perinatal lesion of central nervous system and the most common reason for neurological disability in children. Being the key cause of pathological dynamic stereotypes that frequently result in pathological posture and contractures, spasticity is critically important for CP. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in complex treatment 2-6 years old CP patients allows significantly to improve motor abilities, help to change the surgical procedure, delay or even avoid some types of surgery. For elder children the use of BTA allows to improve local motor impairment. The treatment of spasticity in CP with BTA is safe (evidence level A and highly effective (evidence level A. It leads to the positive change of pathological dynamic stereotype, significantly improves gait, decreases muscle tone with Ashworth and Tardeu scales and rises the gross motor function score. Our own experience of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment as a part of complex therapy in 68 patients with spastic forms of CP demonstrates the significant improvement of motor function, most noticeable in younger patients(early pre-school age with GMFS I-III.

  20. Teacher literacy expectations for kindergarten children with cerebral palsy in special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Teacher expectations are important for the literacy development of children. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent teacher expectations for future literacy success at the end of elementary school differed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as compared with peers without disabilities in kindergarten. In addition, we investigated to what extent teacher literacy expectations of children with CP were related to additional impairments such as speech, intellectual and physical impairments, and to the current level of emergent literacy skills. Forty-nine teachers of children with CP and 71 teachers of non-disabled children responded to the questionnaire. The results showed that teacher expectations for future reading and writing success of children with CP were lower (all P values are <0.001) but also of a different nature, as eight teachers had no idea what to expect for the future reading development, and 12 teachers did not know what to expect for the future writing development of the child with CP. Multiple regression analysis showed that teacher reading expectations could best be predicted by both intelligence and emergent literacy skills (P<0.001), whereas teacher writing skills could best be predicted by intelligence (P<0.001).

  1. Anti-Transglutaminase 6 Antibodies in Children and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Stenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We have previously reported a high prevalence of gluten-related serological markers (GRSM in children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP. The majority had no enteropathy to suggest coeliac disease (CD. Antibodies against transglutaminase 6 (anti-TG6 represent a new marker associated with gluten-related neurological dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of anti-TG6 antibodies in this group of individuals with an early neurological injury resulting in CP. Materials and Methods. Sera from 96 patients with CP and 36 controls were analysed for IgA/IgG class anti-TG6 by ELISA. Results. Anti-TG6 antibodies were found in 12/96 (13% of patients with CP compared to 2/36 (6% in controls. The tetraplegic subgroup of CP had a significantly higher prevalence of anti-TG6 antibodies 6/17 (35% compared to the other subgroups and controls. There was no correlation of anti-TG6 autoantibodies with seropositivity to food proteins including gliadin. Conclusions. An early brain insult and associated inflammation may predispose to future development of TG6 autoimmunity.

  2. Muscle synergies and complexity of neuromuscular control during gait in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Rozumalski, Adam; Schwartz, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have impaired movement due to a brain injury near birth. Understanding how neuromuscular control is altered in CP can provide insight into pathological movement. We sought to determine if individuals with CP demonstrate reduced complexity of neuromuscular control during gait compared with unimpaired individuals and if changes in control are related to functional ability. Muscle synergies during gait were retrospectively analyzed for 633 individuals (age range 3.9-70y): 549 with CP (hemiplegia, n=122; diplegia, n=266; triplegia, n=73; quadriplegia, n=88) and 84 unimpaired individuals. Synergies were calculated using non-negative matrix factorization from surface electromyography collected during previous clinical gait analyses. Synergy complexity during gait was compared with diagnosis subtype, functional ability, and clinical examination measures. Fewer synergies were required to describe muscle activity during gait in individuals with CP compared with unimpaired individuals. Changes in synergies were related to functional impairment and clinical examination measures including selective motor control, strength, and spasticity. Individuals with CP use a simplified control strategy during gait compared with unimpaired individuals. These results were similar to synergies during walking among adult stroke survivors, suggesting similar neuromuscular control strategies between these clinical populations. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  4. Spasticity and Its Contribution to Hypertonia in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Bar-On

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is considered an important neural contributor to muscle hypertonia in children with cerebral palsy (CP. It is most often treated with antispasticity medication, such as Botulinum Toxin-A. However, treatment response is highly variable. Part of this variability may be due to the inability of clinical tests to differentiate between the neural (e.g., spasticity and nonneural (e.g., soft tissue properties contributions to hypertonia, leading to the terms “spasticity” and “hypertonia” often being used interchangeably. Recent advancements in instrumented spasticity assessments offer objective measurement methods for distinction and quantification of hypertonia components. These methods can be applied in clinical settings and their results used to fine-tune and improve treatment. We reviewed current advancements and new insights with respect to quantifying spasticity and its contribution to muscle hypertonia in children with CP. First, we revisit what is known about spasticity in children with CP, including the various definitions and its pathophysiology. Second, we summarize the state of the art on instrumented spasticity assessment in CP and review the parameters developed to quantify the neural and nonneural components of hypertonia. Lastly, the impact these quantitative parameters have on clinical decision-making is considered and recommendations for future clinical and research investigations are discussed.

  5. The association of cerebral palsy and death with small-for-gestational-age birthweight in preterm neonates by individualized and population-based percentiles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grobman, William A

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether an individualized growth standard (IS) improves the identification of preterm small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonates at risk of developing moderate\\/severe cerebral palsy (CP) or death.

  6. Rating scales for dystonia in cerebral palsy: reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Monbaliu, Elegast; Ortibus, Els; Roelens, F; Desloovere, Kaat; Declerck, Jan; Prinzie, Peter; De Cock, Paul; Feys, Hilde

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females; mean age 13 y 3 mo, SD 5 y 2 mo, range 5-22 y). One patient each was classified at levels I-IV in the Gross Motor Function Classification System a...

  7. Cerebral Palsy for the Pediatric Eye Care Team Part III: Diagnosis and Management of Associated Visual and Sensory Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Kyle A; Pendarvis, Lauren; Jackson, Jorie; Batra, Noopur Nikki Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term used to describe a spectrum of deficits of muscle tone and posture resulting from damage to the developing nervous system. Though considered a motor disorder, CP can be associated with disorders of the sensory visual pathway. This paper, the final in a series of three articles, will present frequency, diagnosis, and management of the visual and binocular vision deficits associated with CP. Topics for discussion will include the prevalence and etiology of decreased acuity, the effect of CP on sensory and motor fusion, and the response to treatment for these sensory deficits. A retrospective chart review of all cases of cerebral palsy referred to the St. Louis Children's Hospital Eye Center was done. Detailed data on the sensory and motor deficits documented in these children was collected. Also recorded was the management strategy and response to treatment. Of the 131 cases reviewed (mean age 5.2 years at presentation), 46% had decreased vision in at least one eye due to amblyopia (24%), optic nerve abnormality (16%), cortical visual impairment (14%), or a combination. Forty-nine (37%) had significant refractive error. Sixty-four percent of those with significant refractive error responded to spectacle correction. Forty-three percent of those with amblyopia responded to conventional therapies. Of the nonstrabismic patients, 89% demonstrated sensory fusion, 90% had stereopsis, and 91% had motor fusion. No patient lacking fusion or stereopsis prior to strabismus surgery gained these abilities with realignment of the eyes. While children with CP are capable of age-appropriate acuity and binocular vision, they are at increased risk for sensory visual deficits. These deficits are not the direct result of CP itself, but either share a common underlying cause, or occur as sequelae to the strabismus that is prevalent in CP. Most importantly, some sensory deficits may respond to standard treatment methods.

  8. Use of paracetamol, ibuprofen or aspirin in pregnancy and risk of cerebral palsy in the child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tanja Gram; Liew, Zeyan; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2018-01-01

    Background: It has been debated whether mild analgesics, mainly paracetamol, adversely affect aspects of neurodevelopment. We examined whether mother's use of paracetamol, aspirin or ibuprofen in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in the child. Method: We included...... registers. We estimated the average causal effect of analgesics on risk of CP using marginal structural models with stabilized inverse probability weights. Results: Paracetamol use was reported in 49% of all pregnancies, aspirin in 3% and ibuprofen in 4%. Prenatal exposure to paracetamol ever in pregnancy......% CI: 1.0-2.5). Children ever prenatally exposed to aspirin in pregnancy had an elevated risk of bilateral spastic CP (aOR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.3) compared with unexposed. Conclusion: We observed an increased risk of spastic CP in children prenatally exposed to paracetamol and aspirin. Although we...

  9. The cranial MRI in severe cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Itoh, Masahiro; Fueki, Noboru; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Kurata, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Morimatsu, Yoshio; Yagishita, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic resonance examination was performed in 38 patients with severe cerebral palsy (CP; 15 males and 23 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move anywhere) and mental retardation (I.Q. or D.Q. below 30). Neuroimaging findings were compared with the CP type, etiology, and grade of understanding of language. Cranial magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) in CP were divided into five types. In type 1, nine predominantly showed cyst-liked ventricles and periventricular hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted imaging (PVH) and only scarred basal ganglia and thalamus were visible. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was rigospastic tetraplegia (RST). In type 2, eleven predominantly showed PVH and hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted (HT2) in basal ganglia and thalamus. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was RST or rigospastic diplegia. In type 3, five showed PVH and three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was spastic diplegia. In type 4, four predominantly showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia. The clinical type was athetotic CP (ATH). In type 5, nine predominantly showed HT2 in globus pallidus. Four had cortical atrophy and two had hippocampal atrophy. All suffered from neonatal jaundice and the clinical type was ATH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and spastic CP had MRI in PVH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and ATH showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Almost patients who suffered from neonatal jaundice and ATH showed HT2 in globus pallidus. With athetotic CP, cases with atrophy of the cerebral cortex and/or hippocampus were lower grade of understanding of language than no atrophy of both. The results of studies of MRI are in agreement with neuropathological findings. (author)

  10. Challenges experienced by mothers caring for children with cerebral palsy in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Singogo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mothers caring for children with disability experience a number of challenges. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the challenges that mothers who cared for children with cerebral palsy (CP living in Zambia experienced. Methods: During a qualitative study the experiences of 16 conveniently sampled mothers of children with CP, from the Ndola district in Zambia, were explored by means of interviews. The responses were thematically analysed. All the necessary ethical considerations were upheld. Results: Mothers experienced social isolation and marital problems, as well as negative attitudes from family, friends, community members and health care professionals. The physical environment created access challenges because of a lack of sidewalks, ramps, functioning lifts and small indoor spaces. Conclusion: Mothers of children with CP feel socially isolated owing to a lack of support from family, community members, and health care providers. This social isolation was exacerbated by attitudes of others towards the mothers; it was felt that mothers were responsible for their children’s condition. Mothers also experienced marital problems as a result of having a child with CP.

  11. A preliminary study into the economic burden of cerebral palsy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Yingyao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jun; Guo, Yan; Hailey, David

    2008-08-01

    To measure the economic burden of cerebral palsy (CP) in China is to provide information on CP's societal impacts to policy-makers. The economic burden of CP includes direct healthcare costs, direct non-healthcare costs, developmental costs and indirect costs such as productivity loss. The incidence approach is employed to estimate the lifetime economic burden of a new CP birth and that of all new cases in China in 2003. Caregivers of 319 CP patients were interviewed in specialty hospitals in five cities in 2004. Average expenditure and utilization rates for different services by age groups from this sample were obtained to estimate the economic burden of CP. Chinese CP patients' life expectancy and survival rate were simulated with reference to Australian data with Human Development Index adjustment. From the societal perspective, the average lifetime economic burden of a new CP case in China was US$ 67,044 in 2003, and the life-span total economic loss due to all new CP cases in 2003 amounted to US$ 2-4 billion. Indirect (productivity) costs are responsible for 93% of total economic loss, and direct healthcare and developmental costs make up 3% each. There are several factors which contribute to the extraordinarily high economic burden of CP, including productivity loss, reduced life expectancy, dependency, progressive deterioration of motor physical function, and recurrent use of rehabilitation services. The economic burden of CP in China is substantial for the family of a CP patient, as well as to society. Public provision and financing of necessary preventive and rehabilitative services is urgently needed to mitigate this heavy burden for patients and their families.

  12. Early detection of cerebral palsy in high-risk infants: diagnostic value of primitive and developmental reflexes as well as ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyo Handryastuti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of cerebral palsy (CP has increased due to better survival of high-risk babies. A simple assessment method is needed for the early detection of CP, which can be performed by general practitioners and pediatricians in daily practice. Objectives To assess motor delay, primitive and developmental reflexes, and cerebral ultrasound abnormalities as simple methods for early detection of CP in high-risk infants. We also aimed to evaluate the ease and consistency of the methods for use in daily practice, as well as determine risk factors associated with CP. Methods A prospective cohort study was done on 150 high-risk babies starting from the age of 4 months up to 12 months. We obtained subjects’ histories of motor ability and assessed primitive reflexes and postural reactions at the ages of 4, 6, 9 and 10 months. The diagnosis of CP was established at 6 and 12 months of age. We also determined Kappa test for inter-rater reliability between pediatric residents and pediatric neurologist. Results In 88.7% of subjects, CP was detected in the first 6 months. At 4 months, positive palmar reflex, head lag, and fisting were predictive of CP at 6 months of age. Motor delay, positive palmar grasp reflex, head lag, fisting, and absent protective extension reflex at 6 months were predictive of CP at 12 months. At 9 to 10 months, motor delays, absent protective extension reflex, and negative parachute reaction were predictive of CP at 12 months. Cerebral ultrasound abnormalities were predictive of CP at 6 and 12 months of age. Kappa test result was 0.9, indicating the ease and consistency of these methods for daily medical practice. Conclusion Cerebral palsy can be detected as early as the first 6 months of life. Assessment for motor delays, physical examination for asssessing primitive and developmental reflexes, and cerebral ultrasound can be used for this purpose.

  13. The revised FLACC score: Reliability and validation for pain assessment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Rahbek, Ole; Nikolajsen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBackground and aims Pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is difficult to assess and is therefore not sufficiently recognized and treated. Children with severe cognitive impairments have an increased risk of neglected postoperative, procedural and chronic pain resulting in decreased...... quality of life. The r-FLACC (revised Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability) pain score is an internationally acclaimed tool for assessing pain in children with CP because of its ease to use and its use of core pain behaviours. In addition the r-FLACC pain score may be superior to other pain...... of the r-FLACC pain score for use in Danish children with CP. Methods Twenty-seven children aged 3–15 years old with CP were included after orthopaedic surgery. Two methods for assessment of postoperative pain were used. Pain intensity was assessed by r-FLACC, with a 2 min standardized video recording...

  14. Mastery motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Lach, Lucy; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and factors associated with motivation level. The Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire (DMQ) measures motivation in mastering challenging tasks and expressive elements. It was completed by 153 parents and 112 adolescents with CP. Adolescents (GMFCS in n=146 - I:50, II:43, III:13, IV:15, V:25) were assessed using the Leiter IQ and Gross Motor Function Measure. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Motivation scores were highest for mastery pleasure and social persistence with adults and lowest for gross motor and object-oriented persistence. Socio-demographic factors were not strongly correlated with DMQ. Higher gross motor ability (r=0.24-0.52) and fewer activity limitations (r=0.30-0.64, pProsocial behaviors correlated with high motivation (r=0.39-0.53, pmotivation scores were higher than parents' scores. Adolescents with CP express high mastery pleasure, not related to abilities. High motivation was associated with fewer activity limitations and prosocial behaviors and aspects of family environment. Findings elucidate those at-risk for low motivation, which can influence treatment adherence and participation in challenging but meaningful activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) transplantations for cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huajiang; Li, Gang; Shang, Chongzhi; Yin, Huijuan; Luo, Yuechen; Meng, Huipeng; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Yali; Lin, Ling; Zhao, Mingliang

    2018-01-01

    This study reports a case of a 4-year-old boy patient with abnormalities of muscle tone, movement and motor skills, as well as unstable gait leading to frequent falls. The results of the electroencephalogram (EEG) indicate moderately abnormal EEG, accompanied by irregular seizures. Based on these clinical characteristics, the patient was diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) in our hospital. In this study, the patient was treated with umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) transplantation therapy. This patient received UC-MSC transplantation 3 times (5.3*107) in total. After three successive cell transplantations, the patient recovered well and showed obvious improvements in EEG and limb strength, motor function, and language expression. However, the improvement in intelligence quotient (IQ) was less obvious. These results indicate that UC-MSC transplantation is a promising treatment for cerebral palsy. PMID:29636880

  16. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Related Factors in Turkey: A Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Gorgulu, Gulderen

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to determine whether there was any difference, with respect to depression, between mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and mothers of healthy children. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether some additional factors had an impact on the depression of the mothers. The study included 49…

  17. Does an exercise programme integrating the Nintendo Wii-Fit Balance Board improve balance in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, T.; Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is a common childhood movement disorder with balance impairment a common complaint. Active video games such as the Nintendo Wii-Fit have been found to be a valuable therapeutic tool, enjoyed by a variety of populations including children with CP, but a synthesis of the research investigating its specific use for balance in children with CP has yet to be conducted.\\ud \\ud Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of a Nintendo Wii-Fit Balance board programme in impr...

  18. Goal Oriented Activity Towards Life Skill Training: Preliminary Indications of a Task-intensive Approach to Manage Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumen Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To devise a viable programme of intervention for older people with Cerebral Palsy (CP. Methods: Using focus group interviews, a ‘top down’ model of intervention was devised among older children and adolescents with CP. Ten participants volunteered and a custom tailored approach was employed, in keeping with the participants’ goals. Results: The outcomes are described qualitatively. Conclusions: There are preliminary indications that the programme is versatile and feasible. Further trials must be conducted before conclusive comments can be made.

  19. Stress and social support in caregivers of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyne Kalyane Câmara de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to describe the levels of stress and perceived social support for caregivers of children with cerebral palsy (CP, as well as investigate the relationship between stress, social support, and variables related to caregivers, the environment and children, namely: the number of children, education level of caregivers, family income, behavior, and the child’s motor level. This study comprised 50 children with CP between 3 and 7.5 years old, their 50 caregivers, and 25 rehabilitation professionals who care for children in health institutions from the countryside of São Paulo state, Brazil. The following measuring instruments were used: the Gross Motor Function Classification System for Cerebral Palsy, the Lipp’s Inventory of Stress Symptoms in Adults, the Social Support Questionnaire, and a form identifying the participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by the following tests: Chi-square, Fisher exact, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Odds Ratio. The results showed stress among the participating caregivers (66%, with predominance of the resistance phase (93.9% and psychological symptoms (69.7%, low perceived social support for caregivers, concomitant with an adequate satisfaction with the support received, as well as significant relationships of stress versus social support (p = 0.017 and education level versus social support (p = 0.037. The data allow analysis of the relationship between the variables investigated and about the impact of having a child with CP in the family regarding the physical, emotional and psychological well-being of caregivers, besides providing subsidies to think of strategies at different levels of care for families of children with disabilities.

  20. JUMP LANDING CHARACTERISTICS IN ELITE SOCCER PLAYERS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cámara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to analyse the parameters that characterize the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, and to determine the relationship among these parameters in elite soccer players with cerebral palsy (CP. Thirteen male members of the Spanish national soccer team for people with CP (mean age: 27.1 ± 4.7 years volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three counter movement jumps. The characteristics of the first peak of the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, which corresponds to the forefoot contact with the ground, were similar to the results obtained in previous studies. However, a higher magnitude of rearfoot contact with the ground (F2 was observed in participants with CP than in participants without CP. Furthermore, a significant correlation between F2 magnitude and the elapsed time until its production (T2 was not observed (r = -0.474 for p = 0.102. This result implies that a landing technique based on a delay in the production of F2 might not be effective to reduce its magnitude, contrary to what has been observed in participants without CP. The absence of a significant correlation between these two parameters in the present study, and the high magnitude of F2, suggest that elite soccer players with CP should use footwear with proper cushioning characteristics.

  1. Risk of cerebral palsy among the offspring of immigrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel G Ray

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP has a multifactorial etiology, and placental vascular disease may be one major risk factor. The risk of placental vascular disease may be lower among some immigrant groups. We studied the association between immigrant status and the risk of CP.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all singleton and twin livebirths in Ontario between 2002-2008, and who survived ≥28 days after birth. Each child was assessed for CP up to age 4 years, based on either a single inpatient or ≥2 outpatient pediatric diagnoses of CP. Relative to non-immigrants (n = 566,668, the risk of CP was assessed for all immigrants (n = 177,390, and further evaluated by World region of origin. Cox proportional hazard ratios (aHR were adjusted for maternal age, income, diabetes mellitus, obesity, tobacco use, Caesarean delivery, year of delivery, physician visits, twin pregnancy, preterm delivery, as well as small- and large-for-gestational age birthweight.There were 1346 cases of CP, with a lower rate among immigrants (1.45 per 1000 than non-immigrants (1.92 per 1000 (aHR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67 to 0.88. Mothers from East Asia and the Pacific (aHR 0.54, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.77 and the Caribbean (aHR 0.58, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93 were at a significantly lower risk of having a child with CP. Whether further adjusting for preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, placental abruption or placental infraction, or upon using a competing risk analysis that further accounted for stillbirth and neonatal death, these results did not change.Immigration and ethnicity appear to attenuate the risk of CP, and this effect is not fully explained by known risk factors.

  2. Anxiety level and self-esteem in youth with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Rita Borkowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of the research was to compare youth with cerebral palsy (CP and healthy individuals in terms of self-esteem and anxiety level, and to evaluate the relation between self-esteem and anxiety in both study groups. Participants and procedure The study included 30 individuals with CP and 30 healthy individuals, aged 16 to 22 years. The anxiety level was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, while self-esteem was assessed using Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SES and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI. Results No significant differences between youth with CP and healthy teenagers were observed in terms of anxiety level as a state or trait, global self-esteem and all the indicators of self-efficacy: family, friends, college, personal and the overall indicator of the sense of self-efficacy. State anxiety correlates with nearly all indicators of self-esteem in youth with CP, except for the sense of self-esteem in the family, although the control group also lacked that correlation. As far as trait anxiety is concerned, the values of correlations are higher and the relation seems to be more likely in the group with CP. Conclusions Youth with CP function like their healthy peers in terms of the anxiety level and self-esteem. The correlation between state anxiety and the dimensions of self-esteem in youth with CP suggests that their self-esteem is lower and more dependent on situational factors, especially anxiety-related ones, and the low level of trait anxiety suggested high self-esteem of an individual.

  3. Does early communication mediate the relationship between motor ability and social function in children with cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscombe, Belinda; Boyd, Roslyn N; Coleman, Andrea; Fahey, Michael; Rawicki, Barry; Whittingham, Koa

    2016-01-01

    Children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental conditions such as cerebral palsy (CP) are at risk of experiencing restrictions in social activities negatively impacting their subsequent social functioning. Research has identified motor and communication ability as being unique determinants of social function capabilities in children with CP, to date, no research has investigated whether communication is a mediator of the relationship between motor ability and social functioning. To investigate whether early communication ability at 24 months corrected age (ca.) mediates the relationship between early motor ability at 24 months ca. and later social development at 60 months ca. in a cohort of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP). A cohort of 71 children (43 male) diagnosed with CP (GMFCS I=24, 33.8%, II=9, 12.7%, III=12, 16.9%, IV=10, 14.1%, V=16, 22.5%) were assessed at 24 and 60 months ca. Assessments included the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Communication and Symbolic Behaviour Scales-Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP) Infant-Toddler Checklist and the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). A mediation model was examined using bootstrapping. Early communication skills mediated the relationship between early motor abilities and later social functioning, b=0.24 (95% CI=0.08-0.43 and the mediation model was significant, F (2, 68)=32.77, pcommunication ability partially mediates the relationship between early motor ability and later social function in children with CP. This demonstrates the important role of early communication in ongoing social development. Early identification of communication delay and enriched language exposure is crucial in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro shoot multiplication of Ziziphus spina-christi by shoot tip culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... Key words: Clonal propagation, cidir, shoot tip culture, Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf. INTRODUCTION. Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf., locally known as cidir, is a multipurpose tree species belonging to the botanical family Rhamnaceae. It is an important cultivated tree and one of the few truly native tree ...

  5. Psychological impact of cerebral palsy on families: The African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajide A Olawale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological stress associated with cerebral palsy (CP is known to be one of the most depressing conditions of families. In the traditional African society, some peculiar factors may contribute to the stress. Aims: The aims of this study were to identify and describe, from the African perspective, the psychological impact of CP on families and determine the strategies adopted by families in coping with it. Settings and Design: The study was a cross-sectional descriptive survey conducted in the Physiotherapy Department of a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: Participants were 52 parents of children with CP. They completed a questionnaire designed to determine the degree of psychological stress on the families and strategies adopted to cope with the stress. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to show responses in graphical formats. Results: Respondents agreed that having adequate knowledge of CP would help them cope well with the demands of taking care of children with CP. 38.5% of respondents said that people in the society accused them of some wrongdoing that has made their children to have CP. Personal problems experienced include loss of job, lack of concentration at work, loss of family joy, and derangement of financial affairs of the family. 26 (50% of them resort to religious/spiritual intervention as an alternative or complementary mode of treatment for their children while 28% resort to dependence on the extended family system for support. Conclusion: Families caring for children with CP generally have a positive attitude towards their children. However, there is need to educate the public on the causes of CP and treatment options available to families.

  6. Feasibility of trialling cord blood stem cell treatments for cerebral palsy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Kylie E; Elwood, Ngaire; Kirkland, Mark; Clark, Pamela; Novak, Iona; Reddihough, Dinah

    2014-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood may have therapeutic benefit in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but further studies are required. On first appearance it seems that Australia is well placed for such a trial because we have excellence in CP research backed by extensive CP registers, and both public and private cord blood banks. We aimed to examine the possibilities of conducting a trial of autologous umbilical cord blood cells (UCBCs) as a treatment for children with CP in Australia. Data linkages between CP registers and cord blood banks were used to estimate potential participant numbers for a trial of autologous UCBCs for children with CP. As of early 2013, one Victorian child with CP had cord blood stored in the public bank, and between 1 and 3 children had their cord blood stored at Cell Care Australia (private cord blood bank). In New South Wales, we counted two children on the CP register who had their stored cord blood available in early 2013. We estimate that there are between 10 and 24 children with CP of any type who have autologous cord blood available across Australia. In nations with small populations like Australia, combined with Australia's relatively low per capita cord blood storage to date, it is not currently feasible to conduct trials of autologous UCBCs for children with CP. Other options must be explored, such as allogeneic UCBCs or prospective trials for neonates at risk of CP. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. The Case for Musical Instrument Training in Cerebral Palsy for Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Turova, Varvara; Blumenstein, Tobias; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Recent imaging studies in cerebral palsy (CP) have described several brain structural changes, functional alterations, and neuroplastic processes that take place after brain injury during early development. These changes affect motor pathways as well as sensorimotor networks. Several of these changes correlate with behavioral measures of motor and sensory disability. It is now widely acknowledged that management of sensory deficits is relevant for rehabilitation in CP. Playing a musical instrument demands the coordination of hand movements with integrated auditory, visual, and tactile feedback, in a process that recruits multiple brain regions. These multiple demands during instrument playing, together with the entertaining character of music, have led to the development and investigation of music-supported therapies, especially for rehabilitation with motor disorders resulting from brain damage. We review scientific evidence that supports the use of musical instrument playing for rehabilitation in CP. We propose that active musical instrument playing may be an efficient means for triggering neuroplastic processes necessary for the development of sensorimotor skills in patients with early brain damage. We encourage experimental research on neuroplasticity and on its impact on the physical and personal development of individuals with CP.

  8. The Case for Musical Instrument Training in Cerebral Palsy for Neurorehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alves-Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent imaging studies in cerebral palsy (CP have described several brain structural changes, functional alterations, and neuroplastic processes that take place after brain injury during early development. These changes affect motor pathways as well as sensorimotor networks. Several of these changes correlate with behavioral measures of motor and sensory disability. It is now widely acknowledged that management of sensory deficits is relevant for rehabilitation in CP. Playing a musical instrument demands the coordination of hand movements with integrated auditory, visual, and tactile feedback, in a process that recruits multiple brain regions. These multiple demands during instrument playing, together with the entertaining character of music, have led to the development and investigation of music-supported therapies, especially for rehabilitation with motor disorders resulting from brain damage. We review scientific evidence that supports the use of musical instrument playing for rehabilitation in CP. We propose that active musical instrument playing may be an efficient means for triggering neuroplastic processes necessary for the development of sensorimotor skills in patients with early brain damage. We encourage experimental research on neuroplasticity and on its impact on the physical and personal development of individuals with CP.

  9. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Sets for cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder, and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiariti, Verónica; Mahdi, Soheil; Bölte, Sven

    2018-05-30

    Capturing functional information is crucial in childhood disability. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets promote assessments of functional abilities and disabilities in clinical practice regarding circumscribed diagnoses. However, the specificity of ICF Core Sets for childhood-onset disabilities has been doubted. This study aimed to identify content commonalities and differences among the ICF Core Sets for cerebral palsy (CP), and the newly developed Core Sets for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The categories within each Core Set were aggregated at the ICF component and chapter levels. Content comparison was conducted using descriptive analyses. The activities and participation component of the ICF was the most covered across all Core Sets. Main differences included representation of ICF components and coverage of ICF chapters within each component. CP included all ICF components, while ADHD and ASD predominantly focused on activities and participation. Environmental factors were highly represented in the ADHD Core Sets (40.5%) compared to the ASD (28%) and CP (27%) Core Sets. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Sets for CP, ASD, and ADHD capture both common but also unique functional information, showing the importance of creating condition-specific, ICF-based tools to build functional profiles of individuals with childhood-onset disabilities. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) include unique functional information. The ICF-based tools for CP, ASD, and ADHD differ in terms of representation and coverage of ICF components and ICF chapters. Representation of environmental factors uniquely influences functioning and disability across ICF Core Sets for CP, ASD and ADHD.

  10. The efficacy of functional gait training in children and young adults with cerebral palsy : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, Adam T C; Buizer, Annemieke I; Meyns, Pieter; Oude Lansink, Irene L B; Steenbrink, Frans; van der Krogt, Marjolein M

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of functional gait training on walking ability in children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: The review was conducted using standardized methodology, searching four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL,

  11. Perineal Sensation Predictive of Spina Bifida Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic examination, including perineal sensation, was conducted in a prospective cohort study of 117 consecutive patients with open spina bifida at St George's, University of London, and Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

  12. Subluxation and dislocation of the hip in children with spina bifida (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Baindurashvili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subluxation or dislocation of the hip joint develops in 30-50% children with spina bifida during the first 2-3 years of life. These problems results from force disbalance between muscle group and other structural changes of the hip and pelvis components of the joint. The goal of treatment subluxation and dislocation of the hip joint in children with spina bifida is to make comfortable daily functions, eliminate the pain, provide the mobility and social independent. Management of subluxation and dislocation in children with spina bifida had changed in the last years because of the analysis long-term results. Indications for surgical treatment were determined more clearly, what made the results of treatment better.

  13. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Opportunities Grants Process, Policies & Strategies Peer Review Small Business Programs Training & Career ... Video: Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Share ...

  14. Predictors of parent-reported quality of life of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Marion; Eisemann, Nora; Arnaud, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Parent-reporting is needed to examine Quality of Life (QoL) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) across all severities. This study examines whether QoL changes between childhood and adolescence, and what predicts adolescent QoL. METHOD: SPARCLE is a European cohort study of children with CP...... domain). Associations were assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Between childhood and adolescence, average QoL reduced in six domains (1.3-3.8 points, pChildhood...... QoL was a strong predictor of all domains of adolescent QoL. Severe impairments of motor function, IQ or communication predicted higher adolescent QoL on some domains; except that severe motor impairment predicted lower adolescent QoL on the Autonomy domain. More psychological problems and higher...

  15. Evaluation of cervical posture improvement of children with cerebral palsy after physical therapy based on head movements and serious games

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, Miguel A.; Raya, Rafael; Muzzioli, Luca; Morelli, Daniela; Otero, Abraham; Iosa, Marco; Cincotti, Febo; Rocón, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Background This paper presents the preliminary results of a novel rehabilitation therapy for cervical and trunk control of children with cerebral palsy (CP) based on serious videogames and physical exercise. Materials The therapy is based on the use of the ENLAZA Interface, a head mouse based on inertial technology that will be used to control a set of serious videogames with movements of the head. Methods Ten users with CP participated in the study. Whereas the control group (n?=?5) followed...

  16. Treatment of Cerebral Palsy with Stem Cells: A Report of 17 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Chahine, Nassim H; Wehbe, Tarek W; Hilal, Ramzi A; Zoghbi, Victoria V; Melki, Alia E; Habib, Emil B Bou

    2016-05-30

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a disabling condition that affects a child's life and his/her family irreversibly. It is usually a non-progressive condition but improvement over time is rarely seen. The condition can be due to prenatal hypoxia, metabolic, genetic, infectious, traumatic or other causes. It is therefore a heterogeneous group that results in functional motor disability associated with different degrees of cognitive abnormalities. There are no treatments that can cure or even improve CP and the best available approach aims at functional, social and nutritional supportive care and counseling. In this paper, we report 17 sequential patients with CP treated with intrathecal administration of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMC). All patients had an uneventful post-injection course with 73% of the evaluable patients treated having a good response using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). The average improvement was 1.3 levels on the GMFCS with cognitive improvements as well.

  17. The Prevalence and Distribution of Spina Bifida in a Single Major Referral Center in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adibah Sahmat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study is to review the medical history of patients with spina bifida, encompassing both aperta and occulta types born between the years 2003 until 2016, spanning a 13-year time period. We assessed each patient and maternal parent information, details of the defects, and conditions associated with the primary defect. We also include information on patients’ ambulation and education level (where available.MethodsData from the Department of Patient Information University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC, Malaysia was captured from spina bifida patients (ICD10: Q05 spina bifida. Data involved patients referred to UMMC between 2003 and 2016 and/or born in UMMC within that particular time frame. We filtered and extracted the information according to the data of clinical examination, medical review, and social history provided in the medical records.ResultsA total of 86 patient records with spina bifida were analyzed. Spina bifida prevalence rate in this study ranged from 1.87 to 8.9 per 1,000 live births depending on weightage. We note that ethnicity was a factor whereby the highest numbers of spina bifida were from Malays (n = 36, 41.86%, followed by equal numbers of Chinese and Indians (n = 24, 27.91%. The highest number of diagnoses reported was myelomeningocele type-spina bifida (n = 39, 45.35%. The most common site of the spina bifida lesion was located at the lumbar region irrespective of aperta or occulta types (n = 23, 26.74%. Data on other associated phenotypes of spina bifida such as hydrocephalus and encephalocele was also captured at 37.21% (n = 32 and 1.16% (n = 1, respectively. In terms of mobility, 32.84% (n = 22/67 of patients between the ages 4 and 16 years old were found to be mobile. As many as 36.07% of patients ranging from 5 to 16 years of age (n = 22/61 received formal education ranging from preschool to secondary school.ConclusionThe prevalence of spina bifida in

  18. The Prevalence and Distribution of Spina Bifida in a Single Major Referral Center in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmat, Adibah; Gunasekaran, Renuka; Mohd-Zin, Siti W; Balachandran, Lohis; Thong, Meow-Keong; Engkasan, Julia P; Ganesan, Dharmendra; Omar, Zaliha; Azizi, Abu Bakar; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the medical history of patients with spina bifida, encompassing both aperta and occulta types born between the years 2003 until 2016, spanning a 13-year time period. We assessed each patient and maternal parent information, details of the defects, and conditions associated with the primary defect. We also include information on patients' ambulation and education level (where available). Data from the Department of Patient Information University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia was captured from spina bifida patients (ICD10: Q05 spina bifida). Data involved patients referred to UMMC between 2003 and 2016 and/or born in UMMC within that particular time frame. We filtered and extracted the information according to the data of clinical examination, medical review, and social history provided in the medical records. A total of 86 patient records with spina bifida were analyzed. Spina bifida prevalence rate in this study ranged from 1.87 to 8.9 per 1,000 live births depending on weightage. We note that ethnicity was a factor whereby the highest numbers of spina bifida were from Malays ( n  = 36, 41.86%), followed by equal numbers of Chinese and Indians ( n  = 24, 27.91%). The highest number of diagnoses reported was myelomeningocele type-spina bifida ( n  = 39, 45.35%). The most common site of the spina bifida lesion was located at the lumbar region irrespective of aperta or occulta types ( n  = 23, 26.74%). Data on other associated phenotypes of spina bifida such as hydrocephalus and encephalocele was also captured at 37.21% ( n  = 32) and 1.16% ( n  = 1), respectively. In terms of mobility, 32.84% ( n  = 22/67) of patients between the ages 4 and 16 years old were found to be mobile. As many as 36.07% of patients ranging from 5 to 16 years of age ( n  = 22/61) received formal education ranging from preschool to secondary school. The prevalence of spina bifida in UMMC is as according to

  19. Health-enhancing physical activity in children with cerebral palsy: more of the same is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Darrah, Johanna; Novak, Iona; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Wiart, Lesley

    2014-02-01

    Physical activity is important for young people's health. The emphasis over the last 2 decades has been on moderate to vigorous exercise when designing activity and exercise programs for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Emerging evidence suggests that sedentary behavior is distinctly different from a lack of moderate to vigorous physical activity and has independent and different physiological mechanisms. The concept of concurrently increasing moderate to vigorous physical activity and replacing sedentary behavior with light physical activity may be beneficial for children and adolescents with CP. This article is a summary of the evidence for what works and what does not work for improving the physical activity of children and adolescents with CP. It also discusses what is known about sedentary behavior of children and adolescents with CP and what research directions are needed to build foundational knowledge in this area with this population.

  20. Urological care for children with spina bifida : Individual, tailored and without antibiotic prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, S.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    In our SPIN UTI study, we have focused on the urological problems, urinary tract infections and Quality of Life in spina bifida children. For eighteen months, we have analyzed the diagnosing, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections in 176 children with spina bifida from Utrecht and

  1. Assessing the Effect of Game System for Rehabilitation on Rehabilitation of Autism and Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Qunxia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presented a system to encourage children and adolescents with autism and cerebral palsy (CP to improve their abilities of self-care, mobility and sociality. A study was conducted with 51 children with autism and 36 children with CP using the Game System for Rehabilitation with Kinect at intervals of one month. The scope of this study was aimed to evaluate the effects of Game System for Rehabilitation in terms of self-care, mobility and social function of children and adolescents with autism and CP. Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI was used to determine the functional abilities of self-care, mobility and sociability. Data obtained allowed us to conclude that the positive effects of the Game System for Rehabilitation on the functional abilities of self-care, mobility and social function with disabilities were significant. The Game System for Rehabilitation applied for children and adolescents with autism and CP was effective for the targeted population. And it gives a new light for children with autism and CP to continue their rehabilitation successfully.

  2. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  3. Parents and Physiotherapists Recognition of Non-Verbal Communication of Pain in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Pades Jiménez, Antonia; Montoya, Pedro

    2017-08-29

    Pain assessment is difficult in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). This is of particular relevance in children with communication difficulties, when non-verbal pain behaviors could be essential for appropriate pain recognition. Parents are considered good proxies in the recognition of pain in their children; however, health professionals also need a good understanding of their patients' pain experience. This study aims at analyzing the agreement between parents' and physiotherapists' assessments of verbal and non-verbal pain behaviors in individuals with CP. A written survey about pain characteristics and non-verbal pain expression of 96 persons with CP (45 classified as communicative, and 51 as non-communicative individuals) was performed. Parents and physiotherapists displayed a high agreement in their estimations of the presence of chronic pain, healthcare seeking, pain intensity and pain interference, as well as in non-verbal pain behaviors. Physiotherapists and parents can recognize pain behaviors in individuals with CP regardless of communication disabilities.

  4. Relationships of muscle strength and bone mineral density in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-L; Lin, K-C; Wu, C-Y; Ke, J-Y; Wang, C-J; Chen, C-Y

    2012-02-01

    This work explores the relationships of muscle strength and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). The knee extensor strength, but not motor function, was related to aBMD. Thus, muscle strength, especially antigravity muscle strength, was more associated with aBMD in these children than motor function. Muscle strength is related to bone density in normal children. However, no studies have examined these relationships in ambulatory children with CP. This work explores the relationships of muscle strength and aBMD in ambulatory children with CP. Forty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP, aged 5-15 years, were classified into two groups based on Gross Motor Function Classification System levels: I (n = 28) and II (n = 20). Another 31 normal development (ND) children were recruited as the comparison group for the aBMD. Children with CP underwent assessments of growth, lumbar and distal femur aBMD, Gross Motor Function Measure-66 (GMFM-66), and muscle strength of knee extensor and flexor by isokinetic dynamometer. The distal femur aBMD, but not lumbar aBMD, was lower in children with CP than in ND children (p antigravity muscle strength, were more associated with the bone density of ambulatory children with CP than motor function. The data may allow clinicians for early identifying the ambulatory CP children of potential low bone density.

  5. Parental attitudes and personality traits, self-efficacy, stress, and coping strategies among mothers of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Jankowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Development of children with cerebral palsy (CP depends on the quality of parental care. The aim of the research was to compare parenting attitudes in mothers of children with CP to mothers of typically developing children, and to study the relationship between parenting attitudes and personality traits, stress, coping strategies and self-efficacy in mothers of children with CP. Participants and procedure Twenty-seven mothers of children with cerebral palsy (MCCP (mean age 35.50 years, SD = 4.83 and twenty-eight mothers (mean age 35.60 years, SD = 4.27 of typically developing children (MTDC participated in this study. Each parent had a child between the ages of two and seven years. A battery of tests was administered to both groups, which included the Parenting Attitudes Scale (SPR, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES, and the COPE Inventory. Also, maternal stress and the amount of social support received were assessed. Results Although acceptance was the most common parental attitude among all participants, mothers of children with CP presented with a stronger tendency towards overprotective and demanding attitudes. MCCP obtained higher scores in neuroticism and lower in openness compared to MTDC. Furthermore, MCCP declared a higher level of distress than MTDC. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups of mothers regarding self-efficacy, the level of social support or the most often used coping strategies. Neuroticism was found to be the best predictor of overprotective and demanding parental attitudes. Conclusions The study emphasises the importance of parenting programmes for mothers with children with CP to promote the development of autonomy among children with developmental difficulties.

  6. Thermograpic study of upper extremities in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, R.; Kawelke, S.; Mitternacht, J.; Turova, V.; Blumenstein, T.; Alves-Pinto, A.

    2015-03-01

    Trophic disorders like reduced skin blood circulation are well-known epiphenomenon of cerebral palsy (CP). They can influence quality of life and can lead to skin damages and, as a consequence, to decubitus. Therefore, it is important to analyse temperature regulation in patients with CP. Thermal imaging camera FLIR BCAM SD was used to study the dependency of skin blood circulation in upper extremities of patients with CP on hand dominance, hand force and hand volume. The hand force was evaluated using a conventional dynamometer. The hand volume was measured with a volumeter. A cold stress test for hands was applied in 22 patients with CP and 6 healthy subjects. The warming up process after the test was recorded with the thermal camera. It was confirmed that the hands of patients warm up slower comparing to healthy persons. The patients' working hands warm up faster than non-working ones. A slight correlation was established between the hand grip force of the working hands and their warm up time. No correlation was found between the warming up time and the volume of the hand. The results confirm our assumption that there is a connection of peripheral blood circulation to upper limb motor functions.

  7. [Peptidergic nootropic therapy in cerebral palsy associated with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholin, A A; Zavadenko, N N; Il Ina, E S; Kolpakchi, L M; Fedonyuk, I D; Bembeeva, R C; Esipova, E S

    To assess the efficacy and safety of сortexin in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy (CP) combined with epilepsy. Eighty-four patients (55 boys and 29 girls), aged from 1 to 11 years, with CP combined with epilepsy received cortexin together with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Cortexin was administered in doses of 5-10 mg depending on the patient's age and body weight intramuscularly during hospitalization. Cortexin as add-on to AEDs reduced for more than two times the number of seizures, along with improvement of motor function, in 31 (36.9%) patients. The improvement of motor function, but without a significant decrease in epileptic seizures, was achieved in 15 (17.8%) of the patients. Reduction of epileptic seizures frequency (>2 times), but without a significant effect on motor function, was observed in 14 cases (16.7%). Twenty-three patients (27.4%) did not respond the therapy. The aggravation of epileptic seizures during cortexin therapy was observed in only 1 girl with West syndrome (1.2%), and this was significantly lower than the probability of seizures aggravation on AED. Polypeptide nootropic medication cortexin demonstrated efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapy in children with CP combined with epilepsy.

  8. Translation of near infrared brain imaging to assess children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, George; Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Asanani, Nayan; Behbehani, Khosrow; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disorder of central origin in childhood and affects at least 2 children per 1000 live births every year. Neuroimaging techniques are needed to study neuroplastic rearrangements in the human brain in vivo as a result of CP. Unfortunately, accurate imaging from currently available techniques often requires the patients' complete body confinement, steadiness and minimal noise for a long period of time, which limits the success rate to less than 50% for normal children and worse for CP-affected ones. In this work we show that functional near infrared (fNIR) imaging is robust to motion artifacts and has excellent potential as a sensitive diagnostic tool for this motor disorder. We have analyzed data from pediatric normal and CP patients performing finger-tapping and handwaving motor cortex activation tasks. From these analyses we have identified both spatial and temporal metrics of NIR-based motor cortex activation patterns that can clearly distinguish between normal and CP patients. We also present data from additional patients where signal processing methods are applied to filter out concurrently recorded hemodynamic signals due to breathing and cardiac pulsation. It is shown that filtering can substantially improve the quality of activation data, thus enabling more accurate comparison of activation patterns between normal and CP-affected children.

  9. Cognitive Abilities of Pre- and Primary School Children with Spina Bifida in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannink, Femke; Fontaine, Johnny R. J.; Idro, Richard; van Hove, Geert

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive abilities of pre/primary school children without and with spina bifida in Uganda. Qualitative semi structured interviews and quantitative functioning scales measurements were combined and conducted with 133 parents, 133 children with spina bifida, and 35 siblings. ANCOVA was used to test for differences in…

  10. Gait in children with cerebral palsy : observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  11. Splint: The efficacy of orthotic management in rest to prevent equinus in children with cerebral palsy, a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.C.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Huijing, P.A.; Brunstrom-Hernandez, J.E; van Kampen, P.J.; Jaspers, R.T.; Becher, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Range of motion deficits of the lower extremity occur in about the half of the children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Over time, these impairments can cause joint deformities and deviations in the children's gait pattern, leading to limitations in moblity. Preventing a loss of range

  12. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Hospitalization for urinary tract infections and the quality of preventive health care received by people with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Ouyang, Lijing; Thibadeau, Judy; Grosse, Scott D; Campbell, Vincent A; Joseph, David

    2009-07-01

    The preventive health care needs of people with disabilities often go unmet, resulting in medical complications that may require hospitalization. Such complications could be due, in part, to difficulty accessing care or the quality of ambulatory care services received. To use hospitalizations for urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a marker of the potential quality of ambulatory care services received by people affected by spina bifida. MarketScan inpatient and outpatient medical claims data for 2000 through 2003 were used to identify hospitalizations for UTI, which is an ambulatory care sensitive condition, for people affected by spina bifida and to calculate inpatient discharge rates, average lengths of stay, and average medical care expenditures for such hospitalizations. People affected by spina bifida averaged 0.5 hospitalizations per year, and there were 22.8 inpatient admissions with UTI per 1000 persons with spina bifida during the period 2000-2003, in comparison to an average of 0.44 admission with UTI per 1000 persons for those without spina bifida. If the number of UTI hospitalizations among people affected by spina bifida were reduced by 50%, expenditures could be reduced by $4.4 million per 1000 patients. Consensus on the evaluation and management of bacteriuria could enhance clinical care and reduce the disparity in UTI discharge rates among people affected by spina bifida compared to those without spina bifida. National evidence-based guidelines are needed.

  14. Cebocephaly, alobar holoprosencephaly, spina bifida, and sirenomelia in a stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C P; Shih, S L; Liu, F F; Jan, S W

    1997-01-01

    Cebocephaly and sirenomelia are uncommon birth defects. Their association is extremely rare; however, the presence of spina bifida with both conditions is not unexpected. We report on a female still-birth with cebocephaly, alobar holoprosencephaly, cleft palate, lumbar spina bifida, sirenomelia, a single umbilical artery, and a 46,XX karyotype, but without maternal diabetes mellitus. Our case adds to the examples of overlapping cephalic and caudal defects, possibly related to vulnerability of the midline developmental field or axial mesodermal dysplasia spectrum. Images PMID:9132501

  15. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  16. Clinical characteristics and functional status of children with different subtypes of dyskinetic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dianrong; Wang, Qiang; Hou, Mei; Li, Yutang; Yu, Rong; Zhao, Jianhui; Wang, Ke

    2018-05-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) is the second major subtype of CP. Dyskinetic CP can be classified into different subtypes, but the exact clinical characteristics of these subtypes have been poorly studied. To investigate the clinical characteristics and functional classification of dyskinetic CP from the perspective of neurologic subtypes in a hospital-based follow-up study.This was an observational study of consecutive children with dyskinetic CP treated at The Affiliated Women & Children Hospital of Qingdao University (China) from October 2005 to February 2015. The children were stratified according to their neurologic subtype and assessed with the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Communication Function Classification System (CFCS). MRI scanning was conducted at 1 year of age for most children.Twenty-six participants (28.0%) had dystonic CP, 26 (28.0%) had choreoathetotic CP, and 41 (44.1%) had mixed CP. Auditory impairment and basal ganglion lesions occurred more frequently in the dystonia group (n = 8, 31%; and n = 16, 67%), while seizures, microcephaly, white matter lesions, and mixed lesions were more frequent in the mixed type (n = 14, 34%; n = 10, 24%; n = 15, 41%; n = 12, 32%). Functional classification levels were distributed unequally among the 3 subgroups (P  .05).Different subtypes of dyskinetic CP have specific comorbidities, radiological characteristics, and functional attributes according to their etiological factors and brain lesions. Children with dystonic CP have more limited functional status than children with choreoathetotic CP.

  17. Bone mineral density and insulin-like growth factor-1 in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazif, H; Shatla, R; Elsayed, R; Tawfik, E; Osman, N; Korra, S; Ibrahim, A

    2017-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have significant decrease linear growth rate and low bone mineral density (BMD). This study is to evaluate BMD in children with CP and its relation to the levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This cross-sectional study was carried out on 58 children suffering from spastic CP with the age range 4-12 years compared to 19 controls. All assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to measure BMD, serum level of IGF-1, and serum vitamin D. The patients were classified according to their GMFCS. Fractures were reported in seven (12.1%) of cases. Our study demonstrated that, IGF-1 level and BMD decrease in correlation with the severity of CP. IGF-1correlates positively with serum vitamin D, BMI, and BMD. CP children with severe GMFCS level or who use anticonvulsive drugs are at a high risk for low BMD and low levels of IGF-1. Both BMD and IGF-1 were significantly in low children with spastic CP; IGF-1 negatively correlates with the severity of osteopenia in children with spastic. Children with CP who are not independently ambulant or with severe GMFCS level or who use anticonvulsive drugs are at a high risk for developing low BMD.

  18. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff S. Klein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy (CP is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out, and resting current-threshold (I/V slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett-Barrett conductance (GBB, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury.

  19. Evaluating the outcome of an individual functional therapy program focused on children with cerebral palsy and cerebral visual impairment: A multiple case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Waninge, A.; Krijnen, W.P.; Schans, C.P. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: To date, there is no evidence-based functional therapy programme available for children with both cerebral palsy (CP) and cerebral visual impairment (CVI). This study evaluates an individually targeted functional therapy programme adapted for these children experiencing difficulties with

  20. Assessment of upper limb capacity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: construct validity of a Rasch-reduced Modified House Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Lindeboom, Robert; de Wolf, Sander; Steenbergen, Bert; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Aarts, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test and improve the unidimensionality and item hierarchy of the Modified House Classification (MHC) for the assessment of upper limb capacity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) using Rasch analysis. The construct validity of the Rasch-reduced item set was

  1. Measuring the effect of treatment on gait quality in children with cerebral palsy – a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Holsgaard; Skov Sørensen, Rasmus; Jensen, Carsten

    and subsequently, as a follow-up. Thus, the effect of treatment on gait quality in children with CP may be quantified. Purpose of study: In a retrospective study we investigated the effect of treatment on gait quality (measured by GDI) in children with CP. Materials and Methods: Data from children (...Background: Gait Deviation Index (GDI) describes the overall gait quality and summarizes it into a single score based upon three- dimensional gait analysis (3DGA). In the Region of Southern Denmark, children with cerebral palsy (CP) are referred to 3DGA if surgical intervention is considered......) diagnosed with CP and referred to 3DGA (either as a diagnostic instrument or for the purpose of follow- up) was extracted from a local database for the year 2012. The GDI score was calculated for each child and limb and used for further analysis. Results: 29 children with follow-up analysis were referred...

  2. The Effect of Lower Body Stabilization and Different Writing Tools on Writing Biomechanics in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lien, Yueh-Ju; Yu, Yu-Chun; Ju, Yan-Ying; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wu, David Bin-Chia

    2013-01-01

    A high percentage of children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty keeping up with the handwriting demands at school. Previous studies have addressed the effects of proper sitting and writing tool on writing performance, but less on body biomechanics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of lower body stabilization and pencil…

  3. Congenital non-central nervous system malformations in cerebral palsy: a distinct subset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Lauren; Dagenais, Lynn; Shevell, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article was to identify and contrast the subset of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and non-central nervous system (CNS) congenital malformations with children with CP but no coexisting non-CNS congenital malformations. A population-based regional comprehensive CP registry was used to identify children with CP who had non-CNS congenital malformations (n = 34; 19 males, 15 females; 22 classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I-III, 12 as GMFCS level IV or V). Their clinical features were then compared with other children with CP without non-CNS congenital malformations (n = 207; 115 males, 92 females; 138 classified as GMFCS levels I-III, 69 as GMFCS level IV or V). Children with CP and non-CNS congenital malformations did not differ from those without in terms of neurological subtype distribution or functional severity, as measured by the GMFCS. Also, there was no association with previous maternal infections (i.e. toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 2 [TORCH]), maternal fever, use of illicit substances, asphyxia, neonatal encephalopathy, intraventricular haemorrhage, or septicaemia. The incidence of comorbidities such as convulsions, communication difficulties, gavage feeding, cortical blindness, and auditory impairment was not higher in this subgroup. The incidence of congenital non-CNS malformations among children with CP is appreciable. Children with these non-CNS malformations do not appear to differ from other children with CP regarding neurological subtype, functional severity, and comorbidities, or maternal or obstetrical factors. Thus, the specific presence of a non-CNS congenital malformation does not appear to assist the practitioner in the management or understanding of a child's CP. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Characteristics of children with cerebral palsy in the ORACLE children study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Neil; Pike, Katie; Bower, Eva; Brocklehurst, Peter; Jones, David; Kenyon, Sara; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Taylor, David; Salt, Alison

    2012-07-01

    We have identified an excess of children with cerebral palsy (CP) born to women who received antibiotic treatment for spontaneous preterm labour (SPL). This nested study investigated the profile of impairment among children with CP in the ORACLE Children Study (OCS), and contrasted outcomes with those in 4Child, a population CP registry. The study group comprised 167 children aged from 7 to 10 years (100 males, 67 females) with CP from the OCS, who were subdivided into a preterm rupture of membranes (PROM) group (87 children) and an SPL group (80 children). The OCS sought follow-up information regarding the health and behaviour of surviving children at 7 years of age in the UK using a parent-report postal questionnaire. Families provided further information to define wider aspects of function and were offered a physiotherapy assessment. The prevalence of CP was higher among children in the OCS than among those in 4Child (standardized morbidity ratios: SPL group, 3.12 [95% confidence interval {CI} 2.47-3.87); PROM group: 1.56 (CI 1.24-1.92)]. The proportion of children with CP born after 32 weeks of gestation was higher in in the SPL group (73%) than in the PROM group (30%); the prevalence of CP was higher in the SPL group than in the PROM group or 4Child. Children with CP in the OCS tended to have similar distributions of neuroimpairment as children in 4Child, but motor impairment and associated vision and hearing problems were found to be less severe. The pattern of CP in both the PROM and the SPL groups was similar, but functional outcomes were milder, compared with children with CP in the general population. However, in these groups the risk of CP was increased independently of gestational age. This is consistent with findings that ongoing inflammatory damage can cause CP. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  5. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  6. De novo and rare inherited copy-number variations in the hemiplegic form of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Fehlings, Darcy L; Mawjee, Karizma; Switzer, Lauren; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Walker, Susan; Merico, Daniele; Casallo, Guillermo; Uddin, Mohammed; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Higginbotham, Edward J; Campbell, Craig; deVeber, Gabrielle; Frid, Pam; Gorter, Jan Willem; Hunt, Carolyn; Kawamura, Anne; Kim, Marie; McCormick, Anna; Mesterman, Ronit; Samdup, Dawa; Marshall, Christian R; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Wintle, Richard F; Scherer, Stephen W

    2018-02-01

    PurposeHemiplegia is a subtype of cerebral palsy (CP) in which one side of the body is affected. Our earlier study of unselected children with CP demonstrated de novo and clinically relevant rare inherited genomic copy-number variations (CNVs) in 9.6% of participants. Here, we examined the prevalence and types of CNVs specifically in hemiplegic CP.MethodsWe genotyped 97 unrelated probands with hemiplegic CP and their parents. We compared their CNVs to those of 10,851 population controls, in order to identify rare CNVs (<0.1% frequency) that might be relevant to CP. We also sequenced exomes of "CNV-positive" trios.ResultsWe detected de novo CNVs and/or sex chromosome abnormalities in 7/97 (7.2%) of probands, impacting important developmental genes such as GRIK2, LAMA1, DMD, PTPRM, and DIP2C. In 18/97 individuals (18.6%), rare inherited CNVs were found, affecting loci associated with known genomic disorders (17p12, 22q11.21) or involving genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders.ConclusionWe found an increased rate of de novo CNVs in the hemiplegic CP subtype (7.2%) compared to controls (1%). This result is similar to that for an unselected CP group. Combined with rare inherited CNVs, the genomic data impacts the understanding of the potential etiology of hemiplegic CP in 23/97 (23.7%) of participants.

  7. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gooijer-van de Groep, Karin L; de Vlugt, Erwin; de Groot, Jurriaan H; van der Heijden-Maessen, Hélène C M; Wielheesen, Dennis H M; van Wijlen-Hempel, Rietje M S; Arendzen, J Hans; Meskers, Carel G M

    2013-07-23

    Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: "spasticity" vs. "contracture"). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p therapy.

  8. Energy expenditure in children with cerebral palsy and moderate / severe malnutrition during nutritional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Andrea A; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Ibarra-Gutierrez, Ana I; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the total energy expenditure (TEE) and resting energy expenditure (REE) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and moderate or severe malnutrition during nutritional recovery. In an intervention study, thirteen subjects with CP (10 females and 3 males with a mean age of 9y11m ± 2y3m), level V of the Gross Motor Function Classification System and moderate or severe malnutrition were included. Eight were fed by nasogastric tube and five by gastrostomy. They were compared with 57 healthy participants (31 females and 26 males with mean age of 8y7m ± 10m). Anthropometric measurements, body composition and energy expenditure by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and indirect calorimetry (IC) were performed in both groups. TEE and REE were higher in healthy children than in children with CP in kcal/d and kcal/cm/d but were lower in kcal/kg/d (p children with CP produced a significant increase in energy expenditure. TEE and REE, in children with CP, are lower than in healthy children. Estimating the REE in children with CP and malnutrition is better performed in kcal/kg/d than in kcal/cm/d. Fat-free mass (FFM) is a good predictor of the REE in healthy children and children with CP. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Immature spinal locomotor output in children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Cappellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP, but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analysed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2-12 years and 33 typically developing (TD children (1-12 years. TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children. Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behaviour.

  10. Participation in everyday activities and quality of life in pre-teenage children living with cerebral palsy in South West Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Manus, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children but its impact on quality of life is not well understood. This study examined participation in everyday activities among children without CP and children with mild, moderate and severe impairment due to CP. We then examined ten domains of quality of life in children with CP and investigated whether participation in everyday activities was associated with improved quality of life independent of gender, age and level of impairment. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of children aged 8-12 years based on two questionnaires, frequency of participation (FPQ) and KIDSCREEN, completed by parents of 98 children on the South of Ireland Cerebral Palsy Register (response rate = 82%) and parents of 448 children attending two Cork city schools (response rate = 69%) who completed one questionnaire (FPQ). Multiple linear regression was used: firstly to estimate the effect of severity of CP on participation in everyday activities independent of age and gender and secondly we estimated the effect of participation on quality of life independent of age gender and level of impairment. RESULTS: Participation in 11 of the 14 everyday activities examined varied across the children without CP and the children with varying severity of CP. In general, increased impairment decreased participation. Independent of age and gender, there was a highly significant decrease in overall participation with a fall of -6.0 (95% CI = -6.9 to -5.2) with each increasing level of impairment. The children with CP generally had high quality of life. Increased impairment was associated with diminished quality of life in just two domains - Physical well-being and Social support and peers. Overall participation in everyday activities was significantly associated with quality of life in 3 of the 10 domains (Physical well-being, Social support and peers & Moods and emotions) in analysis adjusted for gender age and

  11. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Yvette L.; Buizer, Annemieke I.; van den Noort, Josien C.; Becher, Jules G.; Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A

  12. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Y.L.; Buizer, A.I.; van den Noort, J.C.; Becher, J.G.; Harlaar, J.; Brehm, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off

  13. The Effects of a Music and Movement Program on Gait, Balance and Psychological Parametres of Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efraimidou, Vasiliki; Sidiropoulou, Maria; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Proios, Miltiadis; Tsimaras, Vasileios; Orologas, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of a music and movement intervention program on gait, balance and psychological parameters of 10 male athletes in throwing events (ball and disc) with Cerebral Palsy (CP) (spastic hemiplegia), all coming from a sport club in Thessaloniki. Participants were divided randomly by methodical…

  14. Perceived quality of physiotherapy services among informal caregivers of children with cerebral palsy in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olubukola A; Hamzat, Talhatu K; Oloso, Modinat O

    2015-01-01

    Effective physiotherapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) requires that expectations of their caregivers be incorporated into treatment plans and strategies. This study explored the perceived Quality of Physiotherapy (QoP) for children with CP in Ibadan, Nigeria This cross-sectional survey explored the perceived QoP using the SERVQUAL instrument among informal caregivers of children with CP from two different healthcare facilities. Data was analysed using Mann Whiney U and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests at p ≤ 0.05. Fifty-three informal caregivers (50 females, 3 males) of children with CP (32 males, 21 females) were surveyed. Fourth-fifths (81.13%) of the caregivers perceived the QoP service for their children as poor. The highest negative and positive ranks were in the tangible and responsiveness dimensions of the SERVQUAL respectively. The study demonstrated that caregivers of children with CP perceived the quality of physiotherapy provided for their children as poor. This poor perception is related more to the tangible dimension of care. Strategies to improve care environment for children with CP and their informal caregivers should be implemented to engender satisfaction with care.

  15. An upper limb robot model of children limb for cerebral palsy neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yagna; Johnson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Robot therapy has emerged in the last few decades as a tool to help patients with neurological injuries relearn motor tasks and improve their quality of life. The main goal of this study was to develop a simple model of the human arm for children affected with cerebral palsy (CP). The Simulink based model presented here shows a comparison for children with and without disabilities (ages 6-15) with normal and reduced range of motion in the upper limb. The model incorporates kinematic and dynamic considerations required for activities of daily living. The simulation was conducted using Matlab/Simulink and will eventually be integrated with a robotic counterpart to develop a physical robot that will provide assistance in activities of daily life (ADLs) to children with CP while also aiming to improve motor recovery.

  16. Age and Electromyographic Frequency Alterations during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, Richard T.; Pierce, Samuel R.; Tucker, Carole A.; Barbe, Mary F.; Prosser, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of surface electromyography (sEMG) recorded during ambulation has provided valuable insight into motor development and changes with age in the pediatric population. However, no studies have reported sEMG differences with age in the children with cerebral palsy (CP). In this study, data from 50 children were divided retrospectively into four groups, representing either an older (above the age of 7 years) or younger (below the age of 7 years) age group with either typical development (T...

  17. Use of the Gait Deviation Index for the Assessment of Gastrocnemius Fascia Lengthening in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vimercati, Sara Laura; Albertini, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Gait analysis (GA) is widely used for clinical evaluations and it is recognized as a central element in the quantitative evaluation of gait, in the planning of treatments and in the pre vs. post intervention evaluations in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Otherwise, GA produces a large volume of data and there is the clinical need to provide…

  18. Effects of a Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program on Impairment and Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Therese E.; Watson, Kyle E.; Ross, Sandy A.; Gates, Philip E.; Gaughan, John P.; Lauer, Richard T.; Tucker, Carole A.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effects of a supported speed treadmill training exercise program (SSTTEP) with exercise on spasticity, strength, motor control, gait spatiotemporal parameters, gross motor skills, and physical function. Method: Twenty-six children (14 males, 12 females; mean age 9y 6mo, SD 2y 2mo) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP; diplegia, n =…

  19. The feasibility of evaluating the effect of using Wii Fit balance games to train postural control in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Almuwais, Afrah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the usability and potential effect of Wii Fit games as postural control intervention and Wii Balance Board [WBB] as postural control assessment tool in clinical rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy [CP]. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the intra- and inter-session reliability of the WBB in measuring Centre of Pressure [COP] path length of children with and without CP. 12 children {mean age 8.75 ± 1.7}, and 12 aged matched children w...

  20. Quality of life and mental health among parents of children with cerebral palsy: the influence of self-efficacy and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamón, Noemí; Nieto, Ruben; Pousada, Modesta; Redolar, Diego; Muñoz, Elena; Hernández, Eulàlia; Boixadós, Mercè; Gómez-Zúñiga, Benigna

    2013-06-01

    To explore the quality of life and mental health of caregivers of children with cerebral palsy and to examine the impact of self-efficacy and coping strategies on these outcomes. Few studies analyse the impact of caring for a child with cerebral palsy on the caregivers' quality of life besides mental health. Also, less attention has been paid to the influence of caregiver's personal resources like self-efficacy or coping strategies on how they adjust to the child's illness and the care situation. Cross-section correlational design. Sixty two parents of children with cerebral palsy completed measures to assess the quality of life (i.e. physical, environmental and social relationships), mental health (i.e. general mental health, depression and anxiety), self-efficacy and coping strategies. Parents of children with cerebral palsy had, in general terms, low levels of quality of life and mental health. Self-efficacy was related to most of the outcomes, whereas any of the coping strategies assessed was significantly related to the outcomes. Quality of life and mental health can be affected in caregivers of children with CP. Personal resources like self-efficacy also need attention as they can help in the understanding of the differences in these outcomes and the design of effective interventions. RELEVANCE OF CLINICAL PRACTICE: Self-efficacy should be a key element in interventions addressed to parents of children with CP to elicit a process of empowerment that can improve the well-being of the family as a whole. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Genetic variation in biotransformation enzymes, air pollution exposures, and risk of spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Amy M; Yang, Wei; Schultz, Kathleen; Lurmann, Fred; Hammond, S Katharine; Shaw, Gary M

    2018-05-01

    Spina bifida is a birth defect characterized by incomplete closure of the embryonic neural tube. Genetic factors as well as environmental factors have been observed to influence risks for spina bifida. Few studies have investigated possible gene-environment interactions that could contribute to spina bifida risk. The aim of this study is to examine the interaction between gene variants in biotransformation enzyme pathways and ambient air pollution exposures and risk of spina bifida. We evaluated the role of air pollution exposure during pregnancy and gene variants of biotransformation enzymes from bloodspots and buccal cells in a California population-based case-control (86 cases of spina bifida and 208 non-malformed controls) study. We considered race/ethnicity and folic acid vitamin use as potential effect modifiers and adjusted for those factors and smoking. We observed gene-environment interactions between each of the five pollutants and several gene variants: NO (ABCC2), NO 2 (ABCC2, SLC01B1), PM 10 (ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, NAT2, SLC01B1, SLC01B3), PM 2.5 (CYP1A1 and CYP1A2). These analyses show positive interactions between air pollution exposure during early pregnancy and gene variants associated with metabolizing enzymes. These exploratory results suggest that some individuals based on their genetic background may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of pollution. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Diffusion tensor MRI and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... diffusivity values at S1-S3 were significantly lower in patients. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study showed for the first time sacral plexus asymmetry and disorganization in 10 patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography...

  3. Marginal maternal vitamin B12 status increases the risk of offspring with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, P.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Peer, P.G.M.; Gooskens, R.H.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate B vitamins and homocysteine as risk factor for offspring with spina bifida. STUDY DESIGN: Blood samples from 45 mothers and their children with spina bifida and from 83 control mothers and their children were obtained to determine the levels of

  4. Kinect Xbox 360 as a therapeutic modality for children with cerebral palsy in a school environment: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Oliva, Laura; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Cano-de la Cuerda, Roberto; Piédrola, Rosa Martínez; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel M; Sánchez-Camarero, Carlos; Martínez Culebras, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Limited evidence is available about the effectiveness of virtual reality using low cost commercial consoles for children with developmental delay. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the usefulness of a videogame system based on non-immersive virtual reality technology (Xbox 360 KinectTM) to support conventional rehabilitation treatment of children with cerebral palsy. Secondarily, to objectify changes in psychomotor status of children with cerebral palsy after receiving rehabilitation treatment in addition with this last generation game console. 11 children with cerebral palsy were included the study. A baseline, a post-treatment and a follow-up assessment were performed related to motor and the process skills, balance, gait speed, running and jumping and fine and manual finger dexterity. All the participants completed 8 weeks of videogame treatment, added to their conventional physiotherapy treatment, with Xbox 360 Kinect™ (Microsoft) game console. The Friedman test showed significant differences among the three assessments for each variable: GMFM (p = 0.001), AMPS motor (p = 0.001), AMPS process (p = 0.010), PRT (p = 0.005) and 10 MW (p = 0.029). Wilcoxon test showed significant statistically differences pre and post-treatment, in all the values. Similarly, results revealed significant differences between basal and follow-up assessment. There were not statistical differences between post-treatment and follow-up evaluation, indicating a long-term maintenance of the improvements achieved after treatment. Low cost video games based on motion capture are potential tools in the rehabilitation context in children with CP. Our Kinect Xbox 360 protocol has showed improvements in balance and ADL in CP participants in a school environment, but further studies are need to validate the potential benefits of these video game systems as a supplement for rehabilitation of children with CP.

  5. Reliability of the modified paediatric evaluation of disability inventory, Dutch version (PEDI-NL) for children with cerebral palsy and cerebral visual impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, Masoud; Waninge, Aly; Rameckers, E.A.A.; de Blécourt, A.C.E.; Krijnen, Wim; Steenbergen, B.; van der Schans, Cees

    Purpose The aims of this study were to adapt the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, Dutch version (PEDI-NL) for children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) and cerebral palsy (CP) and determine test–retest and inter-respondent reliability. Method The Delphi method was used to gain

  6. Reliability of the modified Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, Dutch version (PEDI-NL) for children with cerebral palsy and cerebral visual impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, M.; Waninge, A.; Rameckers, E. A. A.; de Blecourt, A. C. E.; Krijnen, W. P.; Steenbergen, B.; van der Schans, C. P.

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to adapt the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, Dutch version (PEDI-NL) for children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) and cerebral palsy (CP) and determine test-retest and inter-respondent reliability. Method: The Delphi method was used to gain

  7. Malignant Neuroleptic Syndrome following Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery of Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Meen Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but potentially lethal outcome caused by sudden discontinuation or dose reduction of dopaminergic agents. We report an extremely rare case of NMS after deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery in a cerebral palsy (CP patient without the withdrawal of dopaminergic agents. A 19-year-old girl with CP was admitted for DBS due to medically refractory dystonia and rigidity. Dopaminergic agents were not stopped preoperatively. DBS was performed uneventfully under monitored anesthesia. Dopaminergic medication was continued during the postoperative period. She manifested spasticity and muscle rigidity, and was high fever resistant to anti-pyretic drugs at 2 h postoperative. At postoperative 20 h, she suffered cardiac arrest and expired, despite vigorous cardiopulmonary resuscitation. NMS should be considered for hyperthermia and severe spasticity in CP patients after DBS surgery, irrespective of continued dopaminergic medication.

  8. Team collaboration in Dutch paediatric rehabilitation. Cooperation between parents, rehabilitation professionals and special education professionals in the care for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Bianca Gertruda Johanna

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the collaborative processes in Dutch paediatric teams engaged in the care for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The three main stakeholder groups in these teams are the parents and the professionals in child rehabilitation and special education. Although the need for close

  9. Reproductive Health Care for Women with Spina Bifida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie B. Jackson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with spina bifida have unique health care concerns and as the life expectancy of this population increases, they are transitioning from adolescence to womanhood and entering their reproductive years with little information about what to expect. Likewise, their health care providers do not have the benefit of evidence-based research that comprehensively addresses the issues these women may face related to reproduction or aging. Few studies have focused on the effects that spina bifida may have on these women's reproductive systems, nor has attention been paid to the effects that possible reproductive endocrine changes may have on their disability. Needless to say, concerns about sexuality, sexual function, and pregnancy are just as important to these women as they are to their able-bodied counterparts.

  10. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Bell's Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Bell's Palsy What's in this ... Print en español Parálisis de Bell What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy is a temporary weakness or paralysis ...

  11. Transcriptional abnormalities of hamstring muscle contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas R; Chambers, Henry G; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits.Biopsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks.The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies.

  12. Transcriptional abnormalities of hamstring muscle contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Smith

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits.Biopsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10 and typically developing patients (n = 10 undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40 generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398. Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks.The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies.

  13. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Lorenzo; Frascarelli, Flaminia; Morasso, Pietro; Di Rosa, Giuseppe; Petrarca, Maurizio; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo

    2011-05-21

    It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be related not only to disturbance in

  14. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Rosa Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA, during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF, and a wash-out phase (WO in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected

  15. The Influence of Hip Abductor Weakness on Frontal Plane Motion of the Trunk and Pelvis in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwurst, Britta K.; Wolf, Sebastian I.; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Gantz, Simone; Braatz, Frank; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Trendelenburg walking pattern is a common finding in various disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), where it is seen in children and adults. Clinically, this deviation is viewed as a consequence of hip abductor weakness resulting in pelvic obliquity. Trunk lean to the ipsilateral side is a common compensatory mechanism to counteract pelvic…

  16. Importance of peers and dating in the development of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.H.G.; Roebroeck, M.E.; van der Slot, W.M.A.; Stam, H.J.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the peer group activities, romantic relationships, and sexual activity and their interrelations of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A cross-sectional study was performed in 87 participants (51 males, 36 females; mean age 20y 4mo, SD 1y 3mo

  17. Parenting style impacts on quality of life in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Adi; Shalev, Ruth S; Biran, Gali; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2007-07-01

    To assess the impact of parenting style and disease severity on quality of life (QOL) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirty-nine children with CP, their siblings, and their parents participated in the study. Probands and siblings, ages 6 to 18 years, completed questionnaires on parenting style (accepting, rejecting, controlling, and autonomy allowing) using the Children's Report of Parental Behavior Inventory. Parents completed generic (Child Health Questionnaire [CHQ]) and disease-specific (Pediatric Outcomes Data Collecting Instrument [PODCI]) QOL questionnaires for both children. A physician determined disease severity with the Gross Motor Function Classification System. In children with CP, parenting style positively correlated with the CHQ scores: physical summary and psychosocial summary (r = 0.40, P = .01) and family activities scale (r = 0.34, P = .03). Autonomy allowing parenting style impacted on psychosocial aspects of QOL, as reflected by CHQ scores, more than the degree of disability. In other domains of QOL, the effect of parenting style was greater than IQ, anxiety, and socioeconomic status. Parenting style is a significant factor in QOL in CP and the only known factor to impact on the psychosocial domains of the CHQ, exceeding the effect of disease severity. Because QOL is an important treatment goal in children with CP, early family interventions, particularly those focusing on parenting style, should be considered.

  18. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  19. Parental satisfaction with inpatient care of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Maria; Harvey, Adrienne; O'Neill, Jenny; Reddihough, Dinah

    2015-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have complex health-care needs. This study examines levels of parental satisfaction with inpatient care for children with CP at a tertiary care hospital to identify areas for improvement. Parents/guardians of children with CP and parents/guardians of children without a disability admitted to hospital completed a custom-designed questionnaire assessing six areas of the hospital admission: (i) the admission process; (ii) the child's personal care; (iii) the child's medical care; (iv) overall care of the child; (v) the parent's experience in hospital; and (vi) keeping up to date in hospital. Differences between the two groups were analysed using Student's t-tests. Parents of children with CP were significantly less satisfied with the inpatient care as compared with parents of children without a disability in four of the six categories: 'my child's personal care' (P = 0.0033), 'my child's medical care' (P = 0.0350), 'overall care' (P = 0.0081) and 'my experience in the hospital' (P = 0.0209). When the overall questionnaire was compared between the two groups, parents of children with CP were less satisfied with care than parents of children without a disability (P = 0.0036). Parents of children with CP are less satisfied with the inpatient care of their child compared with parents of children without a disability. This information should be instrumental in informing change to ensure that parent satisfaction levels improve to a level consistent with other children admitted to a tertiary care setting. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. The longest faun tail forming dreadlocks with underlying spina bifida occulta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Balvinder Kaur; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Mittal, Jyotisterna

    2013-04-15

    Spina bifida is a developmental anomaly characterized by defective closure of the bony encasement of the spinal cord through which the spinal cord and meninges may or may not protrude. We report a rare case of a very long faun tail, which was in the form of a 20 inch long tail originating from the lumbosacral area in a rhomboidal pattern, measuring 10 x 8 inches. The case is being reported for its rare presentation of a 20 inch long faun tail with underlying spina bifida occulta.

  1. MRI in spastic cerebral palsy - correlations with motor development and mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulal, W.; Sobaniec, W.; Kubas, B.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) has improved our understanding of the pathophysiology and early diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP). The aim of this study was to evaluate types of lesions on MR in children with CP in correlations with motor development, cognitive impairment and risk factors. Twenty-two children aged 4-17 years (boys 12, girls 10) with CP diplegia - 16 and tetraplegia - 6 were studied. Routine MR images were performed in all children. Results: All patients had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) in MR findings. In addition three different degrees of MRI lesion patterns were defined: a mild pattern (nucleus lentiformis and thalamus) moderate (nucleus lentiformis, thalamus and pericentral region)and a severe pattern (nucleus lentiformis , thalamus, pericentral region and hippocampus). Significant correlations of the MR findings with the motor development and mental retardation were found. No significant relationships between the MR findings and the etiological factors (prematurity, low birthweight, Apgar score, sepsis, seizures, pre-eclamsia , and gestational age) were noted. MR imaging is useful in the evaluation structural abnormalities in the brains in the children with spastic diplegia and tetraplegia. (author)

  2. Gingivitis and salivary osmolality in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Ferreira, Maria Cristina Duarte; Guaré, Renata Oliveira; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Rodrigues, Jonas Almeida; Duarte, Danilo Antonio

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the influence of salivary osmolality on the occurrence of gingivitis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A total of 82 children with spastic CP were included in this cross-sectional study. Oral motor performance and gingival conditions were evaluated. Unstimulated saliva was collected using cotton swabs, and salivary osmolality was measured using a freezing point depression osmometer. Spearman's coefficient, receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Strong correlation (r > 0.7) was determined among salivary osmolality, salivary flow rate, visible plaque, dental calculus, and the occurrence of gingivitis. The area under the ROC to predict the influence of salivary osmolality on the occurrence of gingivitis was 0.88 (95% CI 0.81-0.96; P gingivitis was 22.5%, whereas for the group presenting osmolality >84.5 mOsm/kgH 2 O, the proportion of children with gingivitis was 77.5%. Salivary osmolality above 84.5 increased the likelihood of gingivitis fivefold, whereas each additional 0.1 mL of salivary flow reduced the likelihood of gingivitis by 97%. Gingivitis occurs more frequently in children with CP showing increased values of salivary osmolality. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Social adjustment of children with cerebral palsy in mainstream classes: peer perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Line; Tessier, Réjean

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the social experience of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in mainstream classes in Canada and compare it with that of their classmates without disability. The CP group included 25 females and 35 males (mean age 10 y 5 mo [SD 0.95], range 10 y 4 mo-10 y 10 mo) diagnosed as having hemiplegia (n=44) or diplegia (n=16) and classified as Level I on the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Fifty-seven comparison children, born at term and without any motor and/or sensory impairment, were recruited from the classes of the children with CP during a school visit (mean age 10 y 3 mo, [SD 1.0], range 10 y-10 y 6 mo). They were matched to children with CP for sex, age, parents' education level, and family income. Social adjustment measures (social status, reciprocated friendships, social isolation, aggression, sociability/leadership, and verbal and/or physical victimization) were obtained by conducting a class-wide sociometric interview (n=943) in the classes of the children with CP. Findings showed that children with CP (specifically females with CP and irrespective of their type of disability) had fewer reciprocated friendships, exhibited fewer sociable/leadership behaviours, and were more isolated and victimized by their peers than their classmates without a disability. This seems to suggest that females and males with CP are perceived differently from their peers in a mainstreaming context. The discussion addresses the issue of age- and sex-related differences and provides avenues of intervention relating to personal and environmental factors that could facilitate or interfere with the social experience of children with CP in a mainstream environment.

  4. Labor market productivity costs for caregivers of children with spina bifida: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, John M; Grosse, Scott D; Goodman, Allen C; Li, Kemeng

    2009-01-01

    Caregiver productivity costs are an important component of the overall cost of care for individuals with birth defects and developmental disabilities, yet few studies provide estimates for use in economic evaluations. This study estimates labor market productivity costs for caregivers of children and adolescents with spina bifida. Case families were recruited from a state birth defects registry in Arkansas. Primary caregivers of children with spina bifida (N = 98) reported their employment status in the past year and demographic characteristics. Controls were abstracted from the Current Population Survey covering the state of Arkansas for the same time period (N = 416). Estimates from regression analyses of labor market outcomes were used to calculate differences in hours worked per week and lifetime costs. Caregivers of children with spina bifida worked an annual average of 7.5 to 11.3 hours less per week depending on the disability severity. Differences in work hours by caregivers of children with spina bifida translated into lifetime costs of $133,755 in 2002 dollars using a 3% discount rate and an age- and sex-adjusted earnings profile. Including caregivers' labor market productivity costs in prevention effectiveness estimates raises the net cost savings per averted case of spina bifida by 48% over the medical care costs alone. Information on labor market productivity costs for caregivers can be used to better inform economic evaluations of prevention and treatment strategies for spina bifida. Cost-effectiveness calculations that omit caregiver productivity costs substantially overstate the net costs of the intervention and underestimate societal value.

  5. The prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Hidehiko

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy for predicting spontaneous motor recovery in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We reviewed the records of 366 neonates with brachial plexus palsy. The clinical and follow-up data of patients with and without phrenic nerve palsy were compared. Of 366 newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, 21 (6%) had concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Sixteen of these neonates had upper-type palsy and 5 had total-type palsy. Poor spontaneous motor recovery was observed in 13 neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (62%) and in 129 without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (39%). Among neonates born via vertex delivery, poor motor recovery was observed in 7 of 9 (78%) neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy and 115 of 296 (39%) without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in neonates with brachial plexus palsy has prognostic value in predicting poor spontaneous motor recovery of the brachial plexus, particularly after vertex delivery. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Toru; Saito, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Toshirou

    1991-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author)

  7. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... is no longer being updated. Video: Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Wednesday, March 9, ... Institutes of Health and four research institutions. The fetal surgical procedure also increases the chances that a ...

  8. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... Scientific Director (OSD) Affinity Groups & Labs (AG&L) Scientists Emeriti National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) ... of Spina Bifida Wednesday, March 9, 2011 Recently, scientists in an NIH study reported that a surgical ...

  9. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... OLPP) Office of Science Policy, Reporting, and Program Analysis (OSPRA) Division of Extramural Research (DER) Extramural Scientific ... Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print NICHD Archive Note: Information on ...

  10. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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  11. Measuring Mobility Limitations in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Interrater and Intrarater Reliability of a Mobility Questionnaire (MobQues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Roorda, Leo D.; Becher, Jules G.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a mobility questionnaire (MobQues) that was developed to measure the mobility limitations of children with cerebral palsy (CP) as rated by their parents. A clinical version of the questionnaire, consisting of 47 items (MobQues47), is available, as well as a research version with 28…

  12. Treatment of pressure sores in spina bifida patients with calcium alginate and foam dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, E; Paolucci, V; Triarico, S; Maestrini, C; Murolo, D; Focarelli, B; Rendeli, C

    2013-06-01

    Prospective study on local treatment of pressure sores using calcium alginate and foam dressings in spina bifida patients. Investigate if this sequential approach is valid and safe for selected patients with neurological impairments. Using European Pressure Ulcer Grading System, after clinical evaluation of local sore, selected patients of Spina Bifida Center of Rome were treated with sequential calcium alginate and foam dressings for 12 weeks. Pressure ulcere surfaces were measured monthly by ulcer tracing. The endpoints were the mean absolute areas surface reduction during every month and number of patients achieving a 50% or more during study. 14 patients (7 males aged 12-24 years) with spina bifida and pressure sores were treated. Mean and standard deviation of mean surface area reduction were 12.5 ± 7.5 cm 2 at start of the study versus 3.7 ± 5.2 cm 2 after 12 weeks, p pressure sores in selected patients with spina bifida. In fact, they protect the wound and create an environment favorable to healing.

  13. Intellectual disability in cerebral palsy: a population-based retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan M; Meehan, Elaine M; Arnup, Sarah J; Reddihough, Dinah S

    2018-04-18

    A population-based observational study design was used to describe the epidemiology of intellectual disability in cerebral palsy (CP) in terms of clinical and neuroimaging associations, and to report the impact of intellectual disability on utilization of health services and length of survival. Population CP registry data were used to retrospectively assess the frequency of intellectual disability and strength of associations between intellectual disability and mobility, epilepsy, vision, hearing, communication, and neuroimaging patterns (n=1141). Data linkage was undertaken to assess usage of hospital inpatient and emergency department services. Survival analysis was performed in a 30-year birth cohort (n=3248). Intellectual disability, present in 45% of the cohort, was associated with non-ambulation (47% vs 8%), later walking (mean 2y 7mo vs 1y 9mo), hypotonic (8% vs 1%) or dyskinetic (9% vs 5%) CP, a quadriplegic pattern of motor impairment (42% vs 5%), epilepsy (52% vs 12%), more emergency and multi-day hospital admissions, and reduced 35-year survival (96% vs 71%). Grey matter injuries (13% vs 6%), malformations (18% vs 6%), and miscellaneous neuroimaging patterns (12% vs 4%) were more common in people with intellectual disability. Intellectual disability adds substantially to the overall medical complexity in CP and may increase health and mortality disparities. Cerebral maldevelopments and grey matter injuries are associated with higher intellectual disability rates. Health care is more 'crisis-driven' and 'reactive' in children with co-occurring intellectual disability. Length of survival is reduced in individuals with CP and co-occurring intellectual disability. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Association between anticonvulsant drugs and teeth-grinding in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A O L; Dos Santos, M T B R; Mendes, F M; Ciamponi, A L

    2014-09-01

    The relation between teeth-grinding and the use of drugs acting on the central nervous system of cerebral palsy (CP) patients has not yet been described. The aim of this research was to evaluate the presence or absence of teeth-grinding (sleep and/or awake periods) in normal and in CP children and adolescents, as well as the association of teeth-grinding and use of anticonvulsant drugs. The sample consisted of 207 children and adolescents, divided into three groups: G1, individuals with CP who did not take anticonvulsant drugs; G2, individuals with CP administered medications on a regular basis; and CG, normal individuals. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of teeth-grinding with some variables. No significant statistical differences were observed regarding the presence or absence of teeth-grinding when G1 and G2 were compared. However, compared with the CG, a statistically significant difference was determined, with the CG showing fewer children presenting teeth-grinding (P grinding. CP children and adolescents show a greater and significant presence of grinding of the teeth compared with normal individuals. Subjects taking barbiturate drugs showed greater presence of teeth-grinding, than those who were taking medications from the other groups of anticonvulsant drugs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... This page is no longer being updated. Video: Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Wednesday, ... the NICHD, describes the study’s findings. Read the Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS) Interview text alternative . The ...

  16. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... Follow follow us on Facebook follow us on Twitter follow us on Pinterest follow us on YouTube ... Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print NICHD Archive Note: Information on ...

  17. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, pDysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Classification of topographical pattern of spasticity in cerebral palsy: a registry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan M; Carlin, John B; Reddihough, Dinah S

    2011-01-01

    This study used data from a population-based cerebral palsy (CP) registry and systematic review to assess the amount of heterogeneity between registries in topographical patterns when dichotomised into unilateral (USCP) and bilateral spastic CP (BSCP), and whether the terms diplegia and quadriplegia provide useful additional epidemiological information. From the Victorian CP Register, 2956 individuals (1658 males, 1298 females), born 1970-2003, with spastic CP were identified. The proportions with each topographical pattern were analysed overall and by gestational age. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess temporal trends. For the review, data were systematically collected on topographical patterns from 27 registries. Estimates of heterogeneity were obtained, overall and by region, reporting period and definition of quadriplegia. Among individuals born <32 weeks, 48% had diplegia, whereas the proportion for children born ≥ 32 weeks was 24% (p < 0.001). Evidence was weak for a temporal trend in the relative proportions of USCP and BSCP (p = 0.038), but much clearer for an increase in the proportion of spastic diplegia relative to quadriplegia (p < 0.001). The review revealed wide variations across studies in the proportion of diplegia (range 34-90%) and BSCP (range 51-86%). These findings argue against a topographical classification based solely on laterality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of accessibility of services on Quality of Life of school children with Cerebral Palsy in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibule L.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of accessibility of services and health related factors on Quality of Life (QoL of school children with Cerebral Palsy (CP in Latvia. 80 children 47 boys and 33 girls with CP and their parents from all regions of Latvia took part in the study. Mean age of participants was 11,7 (SD± 3,5 years. 50 children without diagnosed chronic diseases formed the control group. Validated evaluation tools were used in the study (KIDSCREEN-52, GMFCS- E&R. The results show lower QoL in children with CP in comparison with their healthy peers and European children. QoL is influenced by the level of gross motor functions, lack of coordination of services, lack of rehabilitation infrastructure and presence of environmental barriers in Latvia.

  20. "You gotta try it all": Parents' Experiences with Robotic Gait Training for their Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Briony; Feltracco, Deanna; Struyf, Jillian; Strauss, Emily; Dang, Saniya; Phelan, Shanon; Wright, F Virginia; Gibson, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Innovative robotic technologies hold strong promise for improving walking abilities of children with cerebral palsy (CP), but may create expectations for parents pursuing the "newest thing" in treatment. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore parents' values about walking in relation to their experiences with robotic gait training for their children. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of five ambulatory children with CP participating in a randomized trial investigating robotic gait training effectiveness. Parents valued walking, especially "correct" walking, as a key component of their children's present and future well-being. They continually sought the "next best thing" in therapy and viewed the robotic gait trainer as a potentially revolutionary technology despite mixed experiences. The results can help inform rehabilitation therapists' knowledge of parents' values and perspectives, and guide effective collaborations toward meeting the therapeutic needs of children with CP.

  1. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

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    Full Text Available ... Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida Wednesday, March 9, 2011 Recently, scientists in an NIH study reported ... Owner Office of Communications Last Reviewed Date 3/9/2011 Contact Us Publications Sitemap Español facebook twitter ...

  2. Developmental Profiles of Preschool Children With Spastic Diplegic and Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Chen Lee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is a disorder of movement and posture control with multiple impairments. The clinical manifestations of CP vary among children. The aim of this study was to compare the developmental profiles of preschool children with either of two types of CP: spastic diplegic (SD CP and spastic quadriplegic (SQ CP. Relationships between the children's various developmental functions were also investigated. We recruited 137 children with spastic CP, aged 1-5 years (mean age = 3.7 ± 2.1 years, and we classified them into two groups: SD (n = 59 and SQ (n = 78. The comparison group comprised 18 children with typical development. Developmental functions were assessed in all the children, using the Chinese Child Development Inventory with the updated norms. This scale addressed eight functional domains: gross motor ability, fine motor ability, expressive language ability, concept comprehension ability, situation comprehension ability, self-help ability, personal-social skills, and general development. A development quotient (DQ was determined for each domain as a percentage of the developmental age divided by the chronological age. The developmental profiles of the CP subtypes were found to differ. Children with SQ were found to have lower DQs than those with SD (p < 0.01. There was also a difference in the distribution of DQs between the SD and SQ groups, although the lowest DQ in both groups was for the gross motor domain. An uneven delay in the development of gross motor function was found in both groups of children with CP. Motor functions, including gross motor and fine motor functions, were significantly related to self-help ability. Complex and significant correlations among developmental functions were also identified in children with CP. The findings in the present study may allow clinicians to anticipate the developmental profile of children with CP on the basis of whether they have the SD or SQ subtype. This, in turn, is likely to

  3. Community Knowledge, Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices towards Children with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannink, Femke; Stroeken, Koenraad; Idro, Richard; van Hove, Geert

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the findings of a qualitative study on knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and practices towards children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus in four regions of Uganda. Focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews were held with parents of children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus, policy-makers, and service…

  4. Systematic review of the efficacy of parenting interventions for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, K; Wee, D; Boyd, R

    2011-07-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate the efficacy of parenting interventions (i.e. behavioural family intervention and parent training) with parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) on child behavioural outcomes and parenting style/skill outcomes. The following databases were searched: Medline (1950-April 2010), PubMed (1951-April 2010), PsycINFO (1840-April 2010), CINAHL (1982-April 2010) and Web of Science (1900-April 2010). No randomized clinical trials of parenting interventions with parents of children with CP were identified. Three studies were identified that involved the examination of a targeted parenting intervention via a pre-post design. Interventions utilized included the implementation of parenting interventions in conjunction with behavioural intervention and oral motor exercises for children with CP and feeding difficulties, the Hanen It Takes Two to Talk programme and a Functional Communication Training programme for parents. All studies found changes in relevant child behavioural outcomes. The studies reviewed suggest that parenting interventions may be an effective intervention for parents of children with CP. However, the current research is limited to pre-post designs of targeted parenting interventions (e.g. parenting interventions focused upon communication). A randomized controlled trial of parenting interventions for families of children with CP is urgently needed to address this paucity in the literature and provide families of children with CP with an evidence-based intervention to address child behavioural and emotional problems as well as parenting challenges. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Correlation of quantitative sensorimotor tractography with clinical grade of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Agarwal, Shruti; Rathore, Ram K.S.; Shah, Vipul; Goyel, Puneet; Paliwal, Vimal K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether tract-specific diffusion tensor imaging measures in somatosensory and motor pathways correlate with clinical grades as defined using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) in cerebral palsy (CP) children. Quantitative diffusion tensor tractography was performed on 39 patients with spastic quadriparesis (mean age = 8 years) and 14 age/sex-matched controls. All patients were graded on the basis of GMFCS scale into grade II (n = 12), grade IV (n = 22), and grade V (n = 5) CP and quantitative analysis reconstruction of somatosensory and motor tracts performed. Significant inverse correlation between clinical grade and fractional anisotropy (FA) was observed in both right and left motor and sensory tracts. A significant direct correlation of mean diffusivity values from both motor and sensory tracts was also observed with clinical grades. Successive decrease in FA values was observed in all tracts except for left motor tracts moving from age/sex-matched controls to grade V through grades II and IV. We conclude that white matter tracts from both the somatosensory and the motor cortex play an important role in the pathophysiology of motor disability in patients with CP. (orig.)

  6. Correlation of quantitative sensorimotor tractography with clinical grade of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow (India); Agarwal, Shruti; Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Kanpur (India); Shah, Vipul [Bhargava Nursing Home, Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery unit, Lucknow (India); Goyel, Puneet [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Anesthesiology, Lucknow (India); Paliwal, Vimal K. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology, Lucknow (India)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether tract-specific diffusion tensor imaging measures in somatosensory and motor pathways correlate with clinical grades as defined using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) in cerebral palsy (CP) children. Quantitative diffusion tensor tractography was performed on 39 patients with spastic quadriparesis (mean age = 8 years) and 14 age/sex-matched controls. All patients were graded on the basis of GMFCS scale into grade II (n = 12), grade IV (n = 22), and grade V (n = 5) CP and quantitative analysis reconstruction of somatosensory and motor tracts performed. Significant inverse correlation between clinical grade and fractional anisotropy (FA) was observed in both right and left motor and sensory tracts. A significant direct correlation of mean diffusivity values from both motor and sensory tracts was also observed with clinical grades. Successive decrease in FA values was observed in all tracts except for left motor tracts moving from age/sex-matched controls to grade V through grades II and IV. We conclude that white matter tracts from both the somatosensory and the motor cortex play an important role in the pathophysiology of motor disability in patients with CP. (orig.)

  7. The functional muscle-bone unit in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, I; Schütz, F; Hamacher, S; Semler, O; Stark, C; Schulze, J; Rittweger, J; Schoenau, E

    2017-07-01

    Our results suggest that the prevalence of bone health deficits in children with CP was overestimated, when using only age- and height-adjusted bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). When applying the functional muscle-bone unit diagnostic algorithm (FMBU-A), the prevalence of positive results decreased significantly. We recommend applying the FMBU-A when assessing bone health in children with CP. The prevalence of bone health deficits in children with cerebral palsy (CP) might be overestimated because age- and height-adjusted reference percentiles for bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) do not consider reduced muscle activity. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of positive DXA-based indicators for bone health deficits in children with CP to the prevalence of positive findings after applying a functional muscle-bone unit diagnostic algorithm (FMBU-A) considering reduced muscle activity. The present study was a monocentric retrospective analysis of 297 whole body DXA scans of children with CP. The prevalence of positive results of age- and height-adjusted BMC and aBMD defined as BMC and aBMD below the P3 percentile and of the FMBU-A was calculated. In children with CP, the prevalence of positive results of age-adjusted BMC were 33.3% and of aBMD 50.8%. Height-adjusted results for BMC and aBMD were positive in 16.8 and 36.0% of cases. The prevalence of positive results applying the FMBU-A regarding BMC and aBMD were significantly (p BMC and aBMD (8.8 and 14.8%). Our results suggest that the prevalence of bone health deficits in children with CP was overestimated, when using age- and height-adjusted BMC and aBMD. When applying the FMBU-A, the prevalence decreased significantly. We recommend applying the FMBU-A when assessing bone health in children with CP.

  8. The function of parents and their children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nancy; Caplin, Deidre A; Christian, Becky J; Luther, Brenda L; Holobkov, Richard; Young, Paul C

    2011-02-01

    To determine associations between the function of parents and that of their children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the influence of the levels of the child's impairment, parenting stress, parent self-efficacy, and family functioning. Descriptive correlational cross-sectional survey. Academic tertiary care children's hospital and pediatric specialty orthopedic hospital in the intermountain West. A total of 51 parents or guardians who provide the majority of daily care in their homes for their children with CP between the ages of 5 and 18 years. Survey of a convenience sample of parents of children with CP. (1) Short-form 36 Health Survey v2.0 to measure parent mental and physical health; (2) Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory v4.0 to measure the physical, social, school, emotional and psychosocial function, and total quality of life of their children with CP; (3) Gross Motor Function Classification System to assess severity of the child's CP; (4) Parenting Stress Index; (5) Family Environment Scale, relationship dimension; and (6) Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index. Positive correlations were found between parent physical health and the physical function of their children with CP (r = 0.32) and between parent mental health and the emotional function (r = 0.46), psychosocial function (r = 0.40), and total health-related quality of life (r = 0.38) of their children. When adjusting for severity of CP, we found that parenting stress and parenting self-efficacy attenuated these relationships to varying degrees. A clear positive correlation was found between the function of parents and the function of their children with CP. Although a cross-sectional study does not demonstrate the direction of the relationship, it seems reasonable to conclude that clinicians who are attempting to directly maximize child function should also consider the potential value of interventions that support and improve parent function, particularly mental health. Copyright © 2011 American

  9. Emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy in special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time dedicated to storybook reading and independent picture-book reading was comparable, the children with CP received fewer opportunities to work with educational software and more time was dedicated to rhyming games and singing. For the children with CP, the level of speech, intellectual, and physical impairments were all related to the amount of time in emergent literacy instruction. Additionally, the amount of time reading precursors is trained and the number of specific reading precursors that is trained is all related to skills of emergent literacy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tertiary paediatric emergency department use in children and young people with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Elaine; Reid, Susan M; Williams, Katrina; Freed, Gary L; Babl, Franz E; Sewell, Jillian R; Rawicki, Barry; Reddihough, Dinah S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of tertiary paediatric emergency department (ED) use in children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP). A retrospective analysis of ED data routinely collected at the two tertiary paediatric hospitals in Victoria, Australia, cross-matched with the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register. Data pertaining to the ED presentations of 2183 registered individuals born 1993-2008 were obtained. Between 2008 and 2012, 37% (n = 814) of the CP cohort had 3631 tertiary paediatric ED presentations. Overall, 40% (n = 332) of presenters were residing in inner metropolitan Melbourne; 44% (n = 356) in outer Melbourne; and 13% (n = 108) in regional Victoria. Presenters were more likely than non-presenters to be younger, non-ambulant and have epilepsy. In total, 71% of presentations were triaged as Australasian Triage Scale 1-3 (urgent), and 44% resulted in a hospital admission. Disorders of the respiratory, neurological and gastrointestinal systems, and medical device problems were responsible for 72% of presentations. Many of the tertiary paediatric ED presentations in this group were appropriate based on the high admission rate and the large proportion triaged as urgent. However, there is evidence that some families are bypassing local services and travelling long distances to attend the tertiary paediatric ED, even for less urgent complaints that do not require hospital admission. Alternative pathways of care delivery, and strategies to promote the management of common problems experienced by children and young people with CP in non-paediatric EDs or primary care settings, may go some way towards reducing unnecessary tertiary paediatric ED use in this group. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Are mechanically sensitive regulators involved in the function and (patho)physiology of cerebral palsy-related contractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Jessica; Suhr, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is mechanosensitive, as it is able to sense mechanical impacts and to translate these into biochemical signals making the tissue adapt. Among its mechanosensitive nature, skeletal muscle tissue is the largest metabolic organ of the human body. Disturbances in skeletal muscle mechanosensing and metabolism cause and contribute to many diseases, i.e. muscular dystrophies/myopathies, cardiovascular diseases, COPD or diabetes mellitus type 2. A less commonly focused muscle-related disorder is clinically known as muscle contractures that derive from cerebral palsy (CP) conditions in young and adults. Muscle contractures are characterized by gradually increasing passive muscle stiffness resulting in complete fixation of joints. Different mechanisms have been identified in CP-related contractures, i.e. altered calcium handling, altered metabolism or altered titin regulation. The muscle-related extracellular matrix (ECM), specifically collagens, plays a role in CP-related contractures. Herein, we focus on mechanically sensitive complexes, known as costameres (Cstms), and discuss their potential role in CP-related contractures. We extend our discussion to the ECM due to the limited knowledge of its role in CP-related contractures. The aims of this review are (1) to summarize CP-related contracture mechanisms, (2) to raise novel hypotheses on the genesis of contractures with a focus on Cstms, and (3) to stimulate novel approaches to study CP-related contractures.

  12. Course of employment in adults with cerebral palsy over a 14-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Joyce L; Hilberink, Sander R; Veenis, Thessa; van der Slot, Wilma M A; Roebroeck, Marij E

    2017-07-01

    To explore the course of employment in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) over 14 years, and to identify subgroups at risk for unemployment. Sixty-five adults with CP (33 males, 32 females; baseline age 25y 8mo, standard deviation [SD] 3y 2mo; intellectual impairment 25%; bilateral CP 65%) participated in a prospective cohort study. Self-reports of employment and work hours per week in 1996, 2000, and 2010 were documented. The course of employment (including sheltered work) and work hours per week were analysed, using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Overall, employment rate was stable over time (38-45%, p=0.413), but lower than in the general population (75-86%, pEmployment rates were specifically low in adults with intellectual impairment, bilateral CP, and in adults with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels IV and V. Work hours per week declined (35.0 [SD 7.9] to 31.2 [SD 10.3], p=0.033), especially among females (32.3 [SD 6.4] to 23.4 [SD 7.4], pEmployment was low compared with the general population, but remained stable in the long term; however, work hours per week decreased. Adults with intellectual impairment, bilateral CP, and GMFCS levels IV and V are subgroups at risk for unemployment. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  13. Maternal diagnosis of obesity and risk of cerebral palsy in the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisham Janik, Mary D; Newman, Thomas B; Cheng, Yvonne W; Xing, Guibo; Gilbert, William M; Wu, Yvonne W

    2013-11-01

    To examine the association between maternal hospital diagnoses of obesity and risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in the child. For all California hospital births from 1991-2001, we linked infant and maternal hospitalization discharge abstracts to California Department of Developmental Services records of children receiving services for CP. We identified maternal hospital discharge diagnoses of obesity (International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition 646.1, 278.00, or 278.01) and morbid obesity (International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition 278.01), and performed logistic regression to explore the relationship between maternal obesity diagnoses and CP. Among 6.2 million births, 67 200 (1.1%) mothers were diagnosed with obesity, and 7878 (0.1%) with morbid obesity; 8798 (0.14%) children had CP. A maternal diagnosis of obesity (relative risk [RR] 1.30, 95% CI 1.09-1.55) or morbid obesity (RR 2.70, 95% CI 1.89-3.86) was associated with increased risk of CP. In multivariable analysis adjusting for maternal race, age, education, prenatal care, insurance status, and infant sex, both obesity (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.52) and morbid obesity (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.79-3.66) remained independently associated with CP. On stratified analyses, the association of obesity (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.25-2.35) or morbid obesity (RR 3.79, 95% CI 2.35-6.10) with CP was only significant among women who were hospitalized prior to the birth admission. Adjusting for potential comorbidities and complications of obesity did not eliminate this association. Maternal obesity may confer an increased risk of CP in some cases. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors of children with cerebral palsy referred from health-care centers in north and east of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of nonprogressive motor impairment syndromes with potentially different risk factors and causal pathways which is caused by damage in the very young brain. The etiology of CP is mostly unknown and the prevalence has not decreased in comparison to past decades, although many advances have occurred in obstetric and neonatal care. In fact, it seems that the prevalence might have even increased in term infants. The aim of this study was the evaluation of cerebral palsy risk factors in Iran to compare them with other countries."n"nMethods: In this case-control study, all one to six years old children who were referred to a rehabilitation center from Shahid Beheshti child-health-care centers during the years 2007-2008, with documented cerebral palsy for evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors were enrolled in the study, with matched controls. "n"nResults: 112 in the case and 113 in the control group were studied. The main factors associated with CP, were: preterm delivery, neonatal and postnatal seizures, Apgar score of zero to three at twentieth minute after birth, low birth weight, and multiple gestations. The majority of infants with CP were

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  16. Bell's Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. It usually affects just one side of the ... become inflamed. You are most likely to get Bell's palsy if you are pregnant, diabetic or sick with ...

  17. Benefits and Enjoyment of a Swimming Intervention for Youth With Cerebral Palsy: An RCT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, Marlies; Verheul, Martine; Daly, Daniel; Sanders, Ross

    2016-01-01

    To investigate enjoyment and specific benefits of a swimming intervention for youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Fourteen youth with CP (aged 7 to 17 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to III) were randomly assigned to control and swimming groups. Walking ability, swimming skills, fatigue, and pain were assessed at baseline, after a 10-week swimming intervention (2/week, 40-50 minutes) or control period, after a 5-week follow-up and, for the intervention group, after a 20-week follow-up period. The level of enjoyment of each swim-session was assessed. Levels of enjoyment were high. Walking and swimming skills improved significantly more in the swimming than in the control group (P = .043; P = .002, respectively), whereas fatigue and pain did not increase. After 20 weeks, gains in walking and swimming skills were retained (P = .017; P = .016, respectively). We recommend a swimming program for youth with CP to complement a physical therapy program.

  18. Contribution of sensory feedback to plantar flexor muscle activation during push-off in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Rasmus F; Jensen, Peter; Kirk, Henrik; Bouyer, Laurent J; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens B

    2017-12-01

    Exaggerated sensory activity has been assumed to contribute to functional impairment following lesion of the central motor pathway. However, recent studies have suggested that sensory contribution to muscle activity during gait is reduced in stroke patients and children with cerebral palsy (CP). We investigated whether this also occurs in CP adults and whether daily treadmill training is accompanied by alterations in sensory contribution to muscle activity. Seventeen adults with CP and 12 uninjured individuals participated. The participants walked on a treadmill while a robotized ankle-foot orthosis applied unload perturbations at the ankle, thereby removing sensory feedback naturally activated during push-off. Reduction of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle caused by unloads was compared and related to kinematics and ankle joint stiffness measurements. Similar measures were obtained after 6 wk of gait training. We found that sensory contribution to soleus EMG activation was reduced in CP adults compared with uninjured adults. The lowest contribution of sensory feedback was found in participants with lowest maximal gait speed. This was related to increased ankle plantar flexor stiffness. Six weeks of gait training did not alter the contribution of sensory feedback. We conclude that exaggerated sensory activity is unlikely to contribute to impaired gait in CP adults, because sensory contribution to muscle activity during gait was reduced compared with in uninjured individuals. Increased passive stiffness around the ankle joint is likely to diminish sensory feedback during gait so that a larger part of plantar flexor muscle activity must be generated by descending motor commands. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Findings suggest that adults with cerebral palsy have less contribution of sensory feedback to ongoing soleus muscle activation during push-off than uninjured individuals. Increased passive stiffness around the ankle joint is likely to diminish sensory

  19. Effect of Adding Swedish Massage to Occupational Therapy on Muscle Tone of Spastic Cerebral Palsied Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Sajedi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive disorder in body posture and movement, due to different etiologies. Different medical and rehabilitation interventions include massage have been used in these children. This study has been done to determine the effect of adding massage to occupational therapy on muscle tone of children with spastic cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods: This study was a double blind clinical trial. The children were recruited from clinics of University of Welfare & Rehabilitation Sciences. The individuals were divided to intervention and control groups. The routine rehabilitation techniques were done in 3 months in both groups. The intervention group received massage for 30 minutes before rehabilitation. Muscle tonicity was evaluated at the beginning of the study and 3 months later by Ashworth test. The data analysis was done by parametric (t test, paired t test and nonparametric (Mann Whitney, Wilcoxon tests. Results: Thirteen subjects of case (intervention group and 14 subjects of control group were studied. The average age in case group and control group was 49.5, and 42.1 months respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in Tonicity of upper and lower limbs, trunk and neck between intervention group and control group (P>0/05. Conclusion: In general based on the results of this study, adding massage to occupational therapy had no effect on tonicity of spastic cerebral palsied children. Regarding to some effects of massage mentioned in different articles on physical abilities of children with C.P. as well as executive limitations in this research, it is not possible to reject the effects of homeopathy on physical abilities of children with C.P.

  20. Life satisfaction of young adults with spina bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, H. A.; Post, M. W. M.; Verhoef, M.; Jennekens-Schinkel, A.; Gooskens, R. H. J. M.; Prevo, A. J. H.

    This study concerns life satisfaction and its determinants in Dutch young adults with spina bifida (SB). Data on life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire [LiSat-9]) were related to hydrocephalus, lesion level, disabilities, and demographic variables. In total, 179 young adults with SB

  1. Identification of a Core Set of Exercise Tests for Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Delphi Survey of Researchers and Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Keefer, Daniel; Wright, Virginia; Butler, Jane; Ada, Louise; Maher, Carol; Reid, Siobhan; Wright, Marilyn; Dalziel, Blythe; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Unnithan, Viswanath; Maltais, Desiree B.; van den Berg-Emons, Rita; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Evidence-based recommendations regarding which exercise tests to use in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) are lacking. This makes it very difficult for therapists and researchers to choose the appropriate exercise-related outcome measures for this group. This study aimed to identify a core set of exercise tests for children…

  2. Home-based tele-assisted robotic rehabilitation of joint impairments in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Ren, Yupeng; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A portable rehabilitation robot incorporating intelligent stretching, robot-guided voluntary movement training with motivating games and tele-rehabilitation was developed to provide convenient and cost-effective rehabilitation to children with cerebral palsy (CP) and extend rehabilitation care beyond hospital. Clinicians interact with the patients remotely for periodic evaluations and updated guidance. The tele-assisted stretching and active movement training was done over 6-week 18 sessions on the impaired ankle of 23 children with CP in their home setting. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated using biomechanical measures and clinical outcome measures. After the tele-assisted home robotic rehabilitation intervention, there were significant increases in the ankle passive and active range of motion, muscle strength, a decrease in spasticity, and increases in balance and selective control assessment of lower-extremity.

  3. Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyne eArnould

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP, making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA. The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein aesthesiometer, stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test, proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints, grip strength (Jamar dynamometer, gross manual dexterity (Box and Block Test, and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test. MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, gross manual dexterity in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas grip strength was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with gross manual dexterity. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions.

  4. Developing Programmes to Promote Participation in Sport among Adolescents with Disabilities: Perceptions Expressed by a Group of South African Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Swartz, Leslie; Conchar, Lauren; Derman, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with disabilities in developing countries frequently have limited access to sporting opportunities and comparatively little is known of their lived experiences and preferences. We set out to understand what a group of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) living in South Africa perceive to be important components of programmes developed…

  5. Motor learning curve and long-term effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink-van Nistelrooij, Y.A. van; Aarts, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal

  6. Effectiveness of vitamin K2 on osteoporosis in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yuichi; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Tomohiro; Hiroyama, Yoshifumi; Fukami, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kensuke; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2017-11-01

    Osteoporosis can lead to spontaneous fractures in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) is a useful marker for vitamin K insufficiency in osteoporosis. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin K2 on bone mineral density (BMD) in adults with CP and vitamin K insufficiency. Sixteen adults, median age of 56years, with CP and osteoporosis in whom the serum ucOC concentration exceeded 4.5ng/mL were included. All patients received 45mg of vitamin K2 per day. BMD was measured and presented as a percentage of the young adult mean (%YAM). Serum levels of ucOC and BMD were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12months. Serum levels of ucOC decreased from 7.8ng/mL (range, 4.9-32) at baseline to 3.9ng/mL (range, 1.9-6.8) after 6months (P=0.001). BMD increased from 59%YAM (range, 45-67) at baseline to 68%YAM (range, 50-79) after 12months (P=0.003). Vitamin K2 had a positive effect on BMD in osteoporotic adults with CP and high serum concentrations of ucOC, and might be useful as a first line treatment for osteoporotic adults with CP and vitamin K insufficiency. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Gait training reduces ankle joint stiffness and facilitates heel strike in children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Increased stiffness of the ankle joint muscles may contribute to these problems. Does four weeks of daily home based treadmill training with incline reduce ankle joint stiffness and facilitate heel strike in children with CP? Seventeen children with CP (4-14 years) were recruited. Muscle stiffness and gait ability were measured twice before and twice after training with an interval of one month. Passive and reflex-mediated stiffness were measured by a dynamometer which applied stretches below and above reflex threshold. Gait kinematics were recorded by 3-D video-analysis during treadmill walking. Foot pressure was measured by force-sensitive foot soles during treadmill and over-ground walking. Children with increased passive stiffness showed a significant reduction in stiffness following training (P = 0.01). Toe lift in the swing phase (P = 0.014) and heel impact (P = 0.003) increased significantly following the training during both treadmill and over-ground walking. Daily intensive gait training may influence the elastic properties of ankle joint muscles and facilitate toe lift and heel strike in children with CP. Intensive gait training may be beneficial in preventing contractures and maintain gait ability in children with CP.

  8. Depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with cerebral palsy: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H; Erkin, G; Nalbant, L

    2013-12-01

    Studies investigating depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with CP and related factors are limited, and controversial findings are reported in these studies. The study was aimed to determine depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to define factors related to depression and anxiety levels. A descriptive study. Outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation clinic of an education and research hospital. The study was composed of two groups: group 1, 116 mothers of children with CP and group 2, 114 mothers of healthy children. Mothers of children with spastic-type CP were included into group 1. Functional levels in children with CP were investigated with The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Depression levels of mothers in both groups were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and anxiety levels with Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). BDI and BAI scores were statistically and significantly higher in group 1, compared to group 2. Among mothers in group 1, a positive correlation was determined between GMFCS score, and depression and anxiety levels. However, no correlation was detected between depression and anxiety levels, and body involvement of CP, education status, age and economic level among patients. In logistic regression analysis, the most significant risk factors of depressive symptoms were detected to be GMFCS score and speech defects. Our findings indicate that depression and anxiety levels of mothers with CP children are higher than those with healthy children and associated with speech defects and functional disability levels in children with CP. Healthcare professionals should take into account that depression and anxiety levels may be higher in mothers of children with CP. For an effective rehabilitation program related to children with CP, depression and anxiety levels in mothers of such children should be taken into account, and mothers should closely be followed and if

  9. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell's palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face. Although typically self-limited, the facial paresis/paralysis that occurs in Bell's palsy may cause significant temporary oral incompetence and an inability to close the eyelid, leading to potential eye injury. Additional long-term poor outcomes do occur and can be devastating to the patient. Treatments are generally designed to improve facial function and facilitate recovery. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy, and some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, numerous diagnostic tests available are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for Bell's palsy, to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with Bell's palsy, and to decrease harmful variations in the evaluation and management of Bell's palsy. This guideline addresses these needs by encouraging

  10. Working memory and fine motor skills predict early numeracy performance of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooijen, Maaike; Verhoeven, Ludo; Steenbergen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Early numeracy is an important precursor for arithmetic performance, academic proficiency, and work success. Besides their apparent motor difficulties, children with cerebral palsy (CP) often show additional cognitive disturbances. In this study, we examine whether working memory, non-verbal intelligence, linguistic skills, counting and fine motor skills are positively related to the early numeracy performance of 6-year-old children with CP. A total of 56 children (M = 6.0, SD = 0.61, 37 boys) from Dutch special education schools participated in this cross-sectional study. Of the total group, 81% of the children have the spastic type of CP (33% unilateral and 66% bilateral), 9% have been diagnosed as having diskinetic CP, 8% have been diagnosed as having spastic and diskinetic CP and 2% have been diagnosed as having a combination of diskinetic and atactic CP. The children completed standardized tests assessing early numeracy performance, working memory, non-verbal intelligence, sentence understanding and fine motor skills. In addition, an experimental task was administered to examine their basic counting performance. Structural equation modeling showed that working memory and fine motor skills were significantly related to the early numeracy performance of the children (β = .79 and p working memory and early numeracy (β = .57, p working memory for early numeracy performance in children with CP and they warrant further research into the efficacy of intervention programs aimed at working memory training.

  11. Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and the use of mobility devices by children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria C. R. Cury

    Full Text Available Functional mobility of children with cerebral palsy (CP is influenced by personal and environmental factors, serving as barriers and/or facilitators and impacting on children's strategies and functional outcome. OBJECTIVES: To describe typical mobility methods used by children with CP at home, school and community and to compare them across family's socioeconomic levels (SES. METHODS: The Functional Mobility Scale was used to assess mobility of 113 children with CP of high and low SES at home, school, and community. RESULTS: Differences in mobility methods of participants classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II, III and IV were found between home and community. For levels III and IV, differences were also found between home and school. At home, participants from higher SES used wheelchairs more frequently while those from lower SES used floor mobility (crawling. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and use of mobility devices by children with CP.

  12. Effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy: a focused review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Suoranta, Jutta; Malmivaara, Antti

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a criteria-based appraisal of systematic reviews on the effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Computerized bibliographic databases were searched without language restriction up to August 2007. Reviews on trials...... physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions. Conclusions in the other reviews should be interpreted cautiously, although, because of the poor quality of the primary studies, most reviews drew no conclusions on the effectiveness of the reviewed interventions. Reviews on complex interventions...

  13. A Virtual Environment to Improve the Detection of Oral-Facial Malfunction in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    María-Luisa Martín-Ruiz; Nuria Máximo-Bocanegra; Laura Luna-Oliva

    2016-01-01

    The importance of an early rehabilitation process in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is widely recognized. On the one hand, new and useful treatment tools such as rehabilitation systems based on interactive technologies have appeared for rehabilitation of gross motor movements. On the other hand, from the therapeutic point of view, performing rehabilitation exercises with the facial muscles can improve the swallowing process, the facial expression through the management of muscles in the fa...

  14. The adverse influence of spina bifida occulta on the medical treatment outcome of primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Cakiroglu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous reports have suggested that the incidence of spina bifida occulta (SBO in patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE is higher than the general population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of spina bifida occulta on the medical treatment outcome of PMNE. Material and Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, a total of 223 children (151 boys and 72 girls, aged 6-16 years; mean age: 10.1 ± 3.04 years with PMNE were reviewed retrospectively. All of the children underwent physical examination, urine analysis, urinary tract ultrasonography and kidney ureter bladder (KUB scout film. All patients were initially treated with a timed voiding program and were given desmopressin acetate when necessary. Results: Spina bifida occulta was detected in 75 children (33.6%. Spina bifida occulta affected L4 in 2 children, L5 in 6 children, L4-L5 in 3 children, S1 in 52 children, S2 in 7 children and S1-S2 in 2 children. Treatment was successful in 79% of the children without SBO, and in only 48% of the children with SBO. Medical treatment success rates differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusion: The presence of spina bifida occulta significantly affects the response to medical treatment in patients with PMNE. Thus, verifying spina bifida occulta status in PMNE can facilitate prognostic predictions about the response to medical treatment.

  15. Intensive gait training in toddlers with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Herskind

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduced muscle growth may be involved in the development of contractures in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Here, we report data from a pilot study of intensive gait training in CP toddlers. Methods: Five children with CP aged 8-30 months performed activity-based gait training for one hour/day, five days/week for three consecutive months. Included children were diagnosed with spastic CP, had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS score of I–II, and were not epileptic. All children wore pedometers during training. Before and after the training period, kinematic and qualitative gait analysis, clinical and objective evaluation of spasticity, Gross Motor Function Measure-66 (GMFM-66, and ultrasound of the affected medial gastrocnemius (MG muscle were performed. Two children were also tested before and after three months of receiving only standard care (SC. Results: On average 1410 steps/session were logged during 63 days of training. More steps were achieved at home than at a central facility. During training, MG muscle volume increased significantly, while it decreased for SC children. Gait improved qualitatively in all children, and GMFM-66 score improved in four of the five children. Similar improvements were seen among the SC children. Two children had pathologically increased muscle stiffness prior to training, which was reduced during training. Reflex stiffness was unchanged in all five children. Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that intensive gait training may increase muscle volume, improve walking skills and reduce passive muscle stiffness in toddlers with CP.

  16. Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Quality of Life of Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sedaghati-Barog

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The findings demonstrated that parents of children with cerebral palsy experience elevated levels of distress, depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress symptom and subjective symptom of stress and low quality of life. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of this condition.Many studies have shown that Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT is an intervention that has shown efficacy in improving quality of life. In this study, the effect of Mindfulness –Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT on increasing quality of life in mothers of children with cerebral palsy has been examined.Method: Three mothers of CP children with low scores on quality of life in WHOQOL-BREF inventory participated in this single- case study.Results: Findings revealed that the MBCT program elevated quality of life of the participants. The improvement quotient for quality of life of each participant was good.Conclusion: The results have implication for efficacy of mindfulness for improvement of psychosocial life of families of children with cerebral palsy.

  17. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... diffusivity values at S1-S3 were significantly lower in patients. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study showed for the first time sacral plexus asymmetry and disorganization in 10 patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography...

  18. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP. As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measurement, spasticity (MAS – Modified Ashworth Scale, heart rate (HR and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. Results. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p<0.05. The level of spasticity was considerably decreased after therapy; the mean value before treatment was 3.21 according to MAS, and after treatment it was 1.95 (p<0.001. After treatment there was a statistically significant improvement of cardiorespiratory indurance, i.e., there was a significant decrease in the mean value of HR and a significant increase of VO2max (p<0.001. Conclusion. Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  19. Fundamental movement skills testing in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M; Sit, Cindy H P; Abernethy, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    To examine the inter-rater reliability and comparative validity of product-oriented and process-oriented measures of fundamental movement skills among children with cerebral palsy (CP). In total, 30 children with CP aged 6 to 14 years (Mean = 9.83, SD = 2.5) and classified in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III performed tasks of catching, throwing, kicking, horizontal jumping and running. Process-oriented assessment was undertaken using a number of components of the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2), while product-oriented assessment included measures of time taken, distance covered and number of successful task completions. Cohen's kappa, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and tests to compare correlated correlation coefficients were performed. Very good inter-rater reliability was found. Process-oriented measures for running and jumping had significant associations with GMFCS, as did seven product-oriented measures for catching, throwing, kicking, running and jumping. Product-oriented measures of catching, kicking and running had stronger associations with GMFCS than the corresponding process-oriented measures. Findings support the validity of process-oriented measures for running and jumping and of product-oriented measures of catching, throwing, kicking, running and jumping. However, product-oriented measures for catching, kicking and running appear to have stronger associations with functional abilities of children with CP, and are thus recommended for use in rehabilitation processes.

  20. Cerebral palsy in adult patients: constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To determine if the original protocol of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT, is adequate to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb (AUL in patients with Cerebral Palsy (CP in adulthood. Method The study included 10 patients diagnosed with CP hemiparesis had attended the adult protocol CIMT, from January/August 2009/2014. Results Average age 24.6 (SD 9.44; MAL average pretreatment How Often (HO = 0.72 and How Well (HW = 0.68 and post-treatment HO = 3.77 and HW = 3.60 (p ≤ 0.001 and pretreatment WMFT average = 21.03 and post-treatment average = 18.91 (p = 0.350. Conclusion The constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse learn of the AUL in adult patients with CP.

  1. Three-dimensional reconstructions for asymptomatic and cerebral palsy children's lower limbs using a biplanar X-ray system: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assi, Ayman, E-mail: ayman.assi@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Paris (France); Laboratory of Biomechanics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Saint-Joseph, Beirut (Lebanon); Gait and Motion Analysis Lab, SESOBEL, Beirut (Lebanon); Chaibi, Yasmina, E-mail: yasmina.chaibi@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Paris (France); Presedo, Ana, E-mail: a.presedo@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Paris (France); Hôpital Robert Debré, Paris (France); Dubousset, Jean, E-mail: jean.dubousset@wanadoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Paris (France); Ghanem, Ismat, E-mail: ghanem.i@dm.net.lb [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Saint-Joseph, Beirut (Lebanon); Gait and Motion Analysis Lab, SESOBEL, Beirut (Lebanon); Hôpital Hôtel Dieu de France, Beirut (Lebanon); Skalli, Wafa, E-mail: wafa.skalli@ensam.eu [Laboratoire de Biomécanique, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Paris (France)

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of 3D subject-specific skeletal reconstructions of lower limb in children using stereoradiography, and to assess uncertainty of clinical and anatomical parameters for children with cerebral palsy and for healthy children. The stereoradiography technique, using the EOS{sup ®} system (Eos-imaging{sup ®}), is based on the acquisition of two simultaneous digital anteroposterior and lateral X-rays, from head to feet in standing position and at low radiation dose. This technique allows subject-specific skeletal 3D reconstructions. Five children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 5 typically developing children (TD) were included in the study. Two operators performed the lower limb reconstructions twice. Tridimensional reconstructions were feasible for children over the age of 5 years. The study of reproducibility of anatomical parameters defining skeletal alignment showed uncertainties under 3° for the neck shaft angle, the femoral mechanical angle, and for the femoral and tibial torsions. The maximum degree of uncertainty was obtained for the femoral tibial rotation (4° for healthy children and 3.5° for children with CP)

  2. Three-dimensional reconstructions for asymptomatic and cerebral palsy children's lower limbs using a biplanar X-ray system: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assi, Ayman; Chaibi, Yasmina; Presedo, Ana; Dubousset, Jean; Ghanem, Ismat; Skalli, Wafa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of 3D subject-specific skeletal reconstructions of lower limb in children using stereoradiography, and to assess uncertainty of clinical and anatomical parameters for children with cerebral palsy and for healthy children. The stereoradiography technique, using the EOS ® system (Eos-imaging ® ), is based on the acquisition of two simultaneous digital anteroposterior and lateral X-rays, from head to feet in standing position and at low radiation dose. This technique allows subject-specific skeletal 3D reconstructions. Five children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 5 typically developing children (TD) were included in the study. Two operators performed the lower limb reconstructions twice. Tridimensional reconstructions were feasible for children over the age of 5 years. The study of reproducibility of anatomical parameters defining skeletal alignment showed uncertainties under 3° for the neck shaft angle, the femoral mechanical angle, and for the femoral and tibial torsions. The maximum degree of uncertainty was obtained for the femoral tibial rotation (4° for healthy children and 3.5° for children with CP)

  3. To What Extent Is Mean EMG Frequency during Gait a Reflection of Functional Muscle Strength in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gestel, L.; Wambacq, H.; Aertbelien, E.; Meyns, P.; Bruyninckx, H.; Bar-On, L.; Molenaers, G.; De Cock, P.; Desloovere, K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current paper was to analyze the potential of the mean EMG frequency, recorded during 3D gait analysis (3DGA), for the evaluation of functional muscle strength in children with cerebral palsy (CP). As walking velocity is known to also influence EMG frequency, it was investigated to which extent the mean EMG frequency is a reflection…

  4. Effects of a Static Bicycling Programme on the Functional Ability of Young People with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Non-Ambulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Heather; Pountney, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exercise on the motor function of 11 young people (10 females, one male; age range 11-15y; mean age 12y 7mo [SD 1y 4mo]) with cerebral palsy (CP) who were non-ambulant (Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels IV or V), using an adapted static bicycle. Three participants had dyskinetic quadriplegia,…

  5. Measuring Steady-State Oxygen Uptake during the 6-Min Walk Test in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Feasibility and Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Desiree B.; Robitaille, Nancy-Michelle; Dumas, Francine; Boucher, Normand; Richards, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of measuring steady-state oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2]) during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) who walk without support and whether there is construct validity for net 6MWT V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2] as a measure of their walking ability.…

  6. Effect of Knee Orthoses on Hamstring Contracture in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Multiple Single-Subject Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laessker-Alkema, Kristina; Eek, Meta Nyström

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect of knee orthoses on extensibility of the hamstrings in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The short-term effects of knee orthoses on passive range of motion (ROM), spasticity, and gross motor function of the hamstrings. Ten children with spastic CP, aged 5 to 14 years, at Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to V, were followed. The orthoses were worn for a minimum of 30 minutes day, 5 days per week, during the intervention period of 8 weeks. Visual analysis using the Two Standard Deviation Band Method supported improvements in passive ROM for all 20 hamstring muscles and in 12 of 14 knee extension measurements. Analyses with the Wilcoxon signed rank test confirm the individual results and support a significant increase in hamstring muscles (P = .005) and knee extension (right: P =.028; left: P =.018) compared with baseline. In children with spastic CP, 8 weeks of treatment with knee orthoses can improve extensibility of the hamstrings.

  7. Effect of hippotherapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Chang, Hyun Jung; Yi, Sook-Hee; Lee, Ji Young; Shin, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hippotherapy has a clinically significant effect on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Randomized controlled trial. Outpatient therapy center. Ninety-two children with CP, aged 4-10 years, presenting variable function (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I-IV). Hippotherapy (30 minutes twice weekly for 8 consecutive weeks). Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM)-88, GMFM-66, and Pediatric Balance Scale. Pre- and post-treatment measures were completed by 91 children (45 in the intervention group and 46 in the control group). Differences in improvement on all three measures significantly differed between groups after the 8-week study period. Dimensions of GMFM-88 improved significantly after hippotherapy varied by GMFCS level: dimension E in level I, dimensions D and E in level II, dimensions C and D in level III, and dimensions B and C in level IV. Hippotherapy positively affects gross motor function and balance in children with CP of various functional levels.

  8. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  9. Department of Clinical Investigation, Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 2007 (Madigan Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-30

    the Elderly Perry JT #206038 T L Venous Distensibility Index as a Predictor of Radiocephalic Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation Perry JT...specific aims: (1) to increase our understanding of the frequency and severity of pain problems in youth with spina bifida (SB), muscular dystrophy...Subgroups of youth with spina bifida (30), cerebral palsy (57), and muscular disorders (20) in the study from other sites have been identified and

  10. Availability, spatial accessibility, utilisation and the role of telehealth for multi-disciplinary paediatric cerebral palsy services in Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirippulige, Sisira; Reyno, John; Armfield, Nigel R; Bambling, Matthew; Lloyd, Owen; McNevin, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the methods of current delivery of health care services to cerebral palsy (CP) patients in Queensland, Australia. The study also examines the current use of telehealth by clinicians and their perceptions about telehealth use. Patient records during July 2013-July 2014 were accessed from the Queensland Paediatric Rehabilitation Service (QPRS) to collect information relating to the service delivery for CP patients. Analysis was carried out to examine the patient locations and travel distances using ArcMap geoprocessing software. In addition, 13 face-to-face semi structured interviews were conducted with clinicians from the QPRS and the Cerebral Palsy Health Service (CPHS) to understand the perceptions of clinicians relating to the current level of health care delivery. We also examined the clinicians' current use of telehealth and their opinions about this method. Records of 329 paediatric CP patients were accessed and reviewed. The majority of patients (96%, n = 307) who attended the clinics at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH), Brisbane, were from remote, rural or regional areas of Queensland. Only 4% of patients (n = 13) were from major cities. During 12 months, patients had attended nine outreach programmes that were conducted by the QPRS and CPHS. The study found that non-local patients were required to travel an average distance of 836 km to access QPRS and CPHS services in Brisbane. The average distance for receiving a consultation at an outreach clinic was 173 km. Clinicians perceived that access to health care services to CP patients in Queensland is inadequate. Nearly all clinicians interviewed had some experience in using telehealth. They had high satisfaction levels with the method. Traditional methods of delivering services to CP patients do not meet their needs. Clinicians have found telehealth is a feasible and satisfactory delivery method. However, the use of telehealth is still limited. © The

  11. The health and quality of life outcomes among youth and young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy L; Rochon, Trista G; McCormick, Anna; Law, Mary; Wedge, John H; Fehlings, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    Young NL, Rochon TG, McCormick A, Law M, Wedge JH, Fehlings D. The health and quality of life outcomes among youth and young adults with cerebral palsy. To describe the health and quality of life (QoL) of youth and young adults who have cerebral palsy (CP), and to assess the impact of 3 key factors (severity, age, and sex) on these outcomes. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were identified from 6 children's treatment centers in Ontario. The sample of participants (N=199) included youth (n=129; age, 13-17y) and adults (n=70; age, 23-33y) with a broad range of severity: 35% mild, 19% moderate, and 47% severe. Not applicable. Health Utilities Index (HUI(3)), Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL), and Self-Rated Health (SRH). SRH was reported to be excellent or very good by 57% of youth and 46% of adults. Mean HUI(3) scores were .30 for youth and .31 for adults. Mean AQoL scores were .28 for youth and adults. Severity of CP in childhood predicted 55% of the variance in HUI(3) scores and 45% of the variance in AQoL scores. Age and sex were not significant predictors of health or QoL. The observed health and QoL scores were much lower than those previously reported in the literature. This is likely a result of the inclusion of those with severe CP. The scores for youth were similar to those for adults and suggest that health and QoL outcomes were relatively stable across the transition to adulthood. Youth and adults with CP have limited health status and will require health care support throughout their lives to help them optimize their well being. Longitudinal follow-up studies are essential to understand better the patterns of health in this population over time. Copyright (c) 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The clinical effect of hippotherapy on gross motor function of children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Litlle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of physical disability affecting gross motor function (GMF in early childhood. Hippotherapy is a treatment approach aimed at improving GMF in children with CP. Several systematic reviews have been published showing an improvement in Dimension E of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM after hippotherapy. However, these reviews failed to evaluate the clinical effect of hippotherapy in improving GMF in children with CP. Objective: To critically appraise the evidence of hippotherapy to ascertain whether it is a clinically meaningful approach for children with CP. Methodology: Five computerised bibliographic databases were searched. Predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were set. The PEDro scale was used to assess the quality of the studies. A revised JBI Data extraction tool was used to extract data from the selected articles. Revman© Review Manager Software was used to create forest plots for comparisons of results. Results: All studies used the GMFM as an outcome measure for gross motor function. The added benefit of hippotherapy is a minimum 1% and a maximum 7% increase on the GMFM scores. However, all 95% confidence intervals (CI around all the mean differences were insignificant. Conclusion: The clinical effect of hippotherapy on the GMF of children with CP is small. Larger studies are required to provide evidence of the effect of hippotherapy within this population.

  13. Exergaming with a pediatric exoskeleton: Facilitating rehabilitation and research in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C; Lerner, Zachary F; Gravunder, Andrew J; Damiano, Diane L

    2017-07-01

    Effective rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy (CP) requires intensive task-specific exercise but many in this population lack the motor capabilities to complete the desired training tasks. Providing robotic assistance is a potential solution yet the effects of this assistance are unclear. We combined a novel exoskeleton and exercise video game (exergame) to create a new rehabilitation paradigm for children with CP. We incorporated high density electroencephalography (EEG) to assess cortical activity. Movement to targets in the game was controlled by knee extension while standing. The distance between targets was the same with and without the exoskeleton to isolate the effect of robotic assistance. Our results show that children with CP maintain or increase knee extensor muscle activity during knee extension in the presence of synergistic robotic assistance. Our EEG findings also demonstrate that participants remained engaged in the exercise with robotic assistance. Interestingly we observed a developmental trajectory of sensorimotor mu rhythm in children with CP similar, though delayed, to those reported in typically developing children. While not the goal here, the exoskeleton significantly increased knee extension in 3/6 participants during use. Future work will focus on utilizing the exoskeleton to enhance volitional knee extension capability and in combination with EMG and EEG to study sensorimotor cortex response to progressive exercise in children with CP.

  14. Transfer of motor learning from virtual to natural environments in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira; Massetti, Thais; da Silva, Talita Dias; van der Kamp, John; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Leone, Claudio; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2014-10-01

    With the growing accessibility of computer-assisted technology, rehabilitation programs for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) increasingly use virtual reality environments to enhance motor practice. Thus, it is important to examine whether performance improvements in the virtual environment generalize to the natural environment. To examine this issue, we had 64 individuals, 32 of which were individuals with CP and 32 typically developing individuals, practice two coincidence-timing tasks. In the more tangible button-press task, the individuals were required to 'intercept' a falling virtual object at the moment it reached the interception point by pressing a key. In the more abstract, less tangible task, they were instructed to 'intercept' the virtual object by making a hand movement in a virtual environment. The results showed that individuals with CP timed less accurate than typically developing individuals, especially for the more abstract task in the virtual environment. The individuals with CP did-as did their typically developing peers-improve coincidence timing with practice on both tasks. Importantly, however, these improvements were specific to the practice environment; there was no transfer of learning. It is concluded that the implementation of virtual environments for motor rehabilitation in individuals with CP should not be taken for granted but needs to be considered carefully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A study of the clinical profile and outcome of spina bifida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilus Nikita Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are a group of congenital anomalies characterized by defects in dorsal midline structures, including neural tissue, dura, muscle, bone and/or skin. The clinical presentations and the follow-up of these patients requires attention to various end organs besides the nervous system. To evaluate the clinical profile and surgical outcome of children with spina bifida. Out of a total of 74 patients treated at our institute for spina bifida between June 2013 to august 2015, 74 cases of spina bifida were analyzed retrospectively and prospectively. The clinical profile, radiological findings and urodynamic studies were recorded. Craniospinal MRI was done in patients to screen for Arnold Chiari malformations and monitoring of hydrocephalus was done as a management protocol at our institute for these children. All these patients except two underwent surgery for correction and closure of the spinal defect. Associated anomalies were treated accordingly. They were clinically assessed over a mean follow up period of 1.3years, ranging from 2months to 2½ years. 73% of the patients presented in the neonatal age group. Of which, 72% presented with a visible sac over the back.72% of the cases were Myelomeningocoeles. 79% of the defects were in the lumbosacral region.30% presented with sensorimotor loss or bladder bowel incontinence. Sensorimotor improvement was seen in 12.5% after repairing the defect with the help of physiotherapy and braces. 30% of the patients were diagnosed to have hydrocephalus, of which 33% required a CSF diversion procedure. The postoperative course of spina bifida repair was found to be uneventful in 90% of the patients

  16. Are There Disorders or Conditions Associated with Spina Bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... additional physical and psychological conditions, including digestive, vision, sexual, social, and emotional problems; obesity; and depression. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Spina bifida: Health issues and treatments. Retrieved March 30, 2012, from http://www.cdc. ...

  17. Developing and validating the Communication Function Classification System for individuals with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIDECKER, MARY JO COOLEY; PANETH, NIGEL; ROSENBAUM, PETER L; KENT, RAYMOND D; LILLIE, JANET; EULENBERG, JOHN B; CHESTER, KEN; JOHNSON, BRENDA; MICHALSEN, LAUREN; EVATT, MORGAN; TAYLOR, KARA

    2011-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to create and validate a Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) that can be used by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test–retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP. Method An 11-member development team created comprehensive descriptions of the CFCS levels, and four nominal groups comprising 27 participants critiqued these levels. Within a Delphi survey, 112 participants commented on the clarity and usefulness of the CFCS. Interrater reliability was completed by 61 professionals and 68 parents/relatives who classified 69 children with CP aged 2 to 18 years. Test–retest reliability was completed by 48 professionals who allowed at least 2 weeks between classifications. The participants who assessed the CFCS were all relevant stakeholders: adults with CP, parents of children with CP, educators, occupational therapists, physical therapists, physicians, and speech–language pathologists. Results The interrater reliability of the CFCS was 0.66 between two professionals and 0.49 between a parent and a professional. Professional interrater reliability improved to 0.77 for classification of children older than 4 years. The test–retest reliability was 0.82. Interpretation The CFCS demonstrates content validity and shows very good test–retest reliability, good professional interrater reliability, and moderate parent–professional interrater reliability. Combining the CFCS with the Gross Motor Function Classification System and the Manual Ability Classification System contributes to a functional performance view of daily life for individuals with CP, in accordance with the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. PMID:21707596

  18. Crouch severity is a poor predictor of elevated oxygen consumption in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Shuman, Benjamin R; Schwartz, Michael H

    2017-07-26

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) expend more energy to walk compared to typically-developing peers. One of the most prevalent gait patterns among children with CP, crouch gait, is often singled out as especially exhausting. The dynamics of crouch gait increase external flexion moments and the demand on extensor muscles. This elevated demand is thought to dramatically increase energy expenditure. However, the impact of crouch severity on energy expenditure has not been investigated among children with CP. We evaluated oxygen consumption and gait kinematics for 573 children with bilateral CP. The average net nondimensional oxygen consumption during gait of the children with CP (0.18±0.06) was 2.9 times that of speed-matched typically-developing peers. Crouch severity was only modestly related to oxygen consumption, with measures of knee flexion angle during gait explaining only 5-20% of the variability in oxygen consumption. While knee moment and muscle activity were moderately to strongly correlated with crouch severity (r 2 =0.13-0.73), these variables were only weakly correlated with oxygen consumption (r 2 =0.02-0.04). Thus, although the dynamics of crouch gait increased muscle demand, these effects did not directly result in elevated energy expenditure. In clinical gait analysis, assumptions about an individual's energy expenditure should not be based upon kinematics or kinetics alone. Identifying patient-specific factors that contribute to increased energy expenditure may provide new pathways to improve gait for children with CP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatigue, quality of life and walking ability in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Sofia; Nasic, Salmir; Riad, Jacques

    2018-03-01

    Few studies on fatigue, quality of life and walking ability in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are available. It is unclear whether these variables are associated. The aim was to study the influence of CP on fatigue, quality of life, and gait of adult patients. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 24 women and 26 men, mean age 32.1 (range 21.7-67.2), 23 with unilateral and 27 with bilateral CP. The Gait Profile Score was calculated; Fatigue Severity and EQ Visual Analogue scales were used. Fatigue severity was higher than in controls, mean 3.8 (SD 1.8) vs 3.0 (p = 0.012). Fatigue in the unilateral group was 3.3 (SD 1.8) and in the bilateral 4.2 (SD 1.7), (p = 0.07). EQ Visual Analogue scale in the unilateral group was mean 79.5 (21.9) and in the bilateral 64.0 (20.8), p = 0.007. The group with bilateral CP tended toward crouch gait, decreased balance and low walking speed. Muscle work was shifted from the ankle to hip muscles. Fatigue correlated with the Gait Profile Score, CC = 0.31 (p = 0.038), and with knee flexion deviation, CC = 0.31 (p = 0.037). Crouch gait, increased knee flexion in stance, contributes to increased deviation in the lower extremity associated with high fatigue and low quality of life in adults with CP, effects more pronounced in those with bilateral CP. Compensation mechanisms in gait were noted. Rational follow-up programs for CP, ideally identifying risk factors early, should be established to prevent development of fatigue and deterioration of gait in adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  1. The Reliability of the Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control (SATCo) in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lisbeth; Erhardsen, Katrine Thingholm; Bencke, Jesper

    2018-01-01

     months and 16 years of age (22 males, mean age 8y 10mo [SD 3y 5mo], Gross Motor Function Classification System level I [n = 13], II [n = 4], III [n = 4], IV [n = 3], and V [n = 7]) were included. Children were tested twice by two raters and tests were video recorded. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test, ICC [2......Aims: To assess the live-versus-video, intrarater interday and interrater interday reliability of the test Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control (SATCo), which seeks to estimate the degree of sitting trunk control in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Thirty-one children with CP between 9...... testing method could potentially improve the reliability and the value of the test in research and in clinical practice....

  2. Passive muscle properties are altered in children with cerebral palsy before the age of 3 years and are difficult to distinguish clinically from spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Clinical determination of spasticity is confounded by the difficulty in distinguishing reflex from passive contributions to muscle stiffness. There is, therefore, a risk that children with cerebral palsy (CP) receive antispasticity treatment unnecessarily. To investigate this, we aimed...... to determine the contribution of reflex mechanisms to changes in the passive elastic properties of muscles and tendons in children with CP. METHOD: Biomechanical and electrophysiological measures were used to determine the relative contribution of reflex and passive mechanisms to ankle muscle stiffness in 35...... tetraplegia. According to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, 31 children were classified in level I, two in level II, and two in level III. RESULTS: Only seven children with spastic CP showed reflex stiffness outside the range of the control children. In contrast, 20 children with spastic CP...

  3. MR imaging of the spine in children with spina bifida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.R.; Glasier, C.M.; Angtuaco, E.J.C.; McConnell, J.R.; Chadduck, W.M.; Binet, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty infants and children with spina bifida were examined as outpatients with spinal MR imaging. Studies were performed using a 0.6-T imager and a surface coil. These examinations were performed in patients previously operated on who had progressive neurologic symptoms and in newly diagnosed patients to exclude lipomyeloschisis, low-lying cord, diastematomyelia, or syringomyelia. Predominantly T1-weighted sequences were obtained in at least two orthogonal planes with a 5-mm section thickness. Eighteen patients had a low-lying spinal cord. Six patients had syringomyelia, usually lumbar. Five patients had intraspinal lipomas, and three had diastematomyelia. MR imaging was diagnostic in 17 instances. Patient motion or severe kyphoscoliosis comprised three examinations. MR imaging is the screening examination of choice in children with spina bifida

  4. Stress and Coping: A Comparison of Self-Report Measures of Functioning in Families of Young Children with Cerebral Palsy or No Medical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britner, Preston A.; Morog, Maria C.; Pianta, Robert C.; Marvin, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed data from 87 mothers of children ages 15 to 44 months with cerebral palsy (CP) or no diagnosis, who completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Parenting Stress Index, Support Functions Scale, and Inventory of Social Support. Principal components analysis of the 15 subscales from the 5 measures revealed few cross-measure loadings. Mothers…

  5. The effect of combined treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Yatsenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a close link between the activity of the brain and cerebral blood supply. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS modulates the activity of the cerebral cortex and thus affects the cerebral blood flow. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of combined treatment with tDCS on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy (CP. Materials and Methods. 60 patients with various forms of cerebral palsy were examined and received the course of treatment. The comparison group was formed from 30 children who received the course of basic medical and rehabilitation procedures. The main group included 30 children who, in addition to the same therapy, received a course of tDCS. A transcranial Doppler ultrasound examination of head blood vessels was used for the study of cerebral hemodynamics in children with cerebral palsy before and after combined treatment with tDCS. Results. tDCS reduced asymmetry coefficient of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA by 12.3 %, whereas in the comparison group only by 2.5 %; in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA – 9.5 %, while in the comparison group – 0.8 %. tDCS significantly reduced the high mean blood flow velocity per cycle (MFV in the basilar artery (BA, MCA and ACA (21.7 %, 18.3 % and 7.8 %, respectively; in the comparison group no statistically significant positive dynamics was observed. tDCS significantly increased the low MVF in the BA, MCA and ACA (29.7 %, 21.2 % and 9.7 % respectively; a statistically significant increase of MVF by 9.9 % was only in the CMA in the comparison group of patients. Conclusions. Our data indicate that the use of tDCS in the combined treatment of CP patients improves cerebral hemodynamics in 87 % of patients, in contrast to 52 % in the comparison group. The addition of transcranial direct current stimulation method to the complex treatment of patients with cerebral palsy improves the effectiveness of treatment and may also

  6. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Oropharyngeal dysphagia and gross motor skills in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) and its subtypes (oral phase, pharyngeal phase, saliva control), and their relationship to gross motor functional skills in preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was hypothesized that OPD would be present across all gross motor severity levels, and children with more severe gross motor function would have increased prevalence and severity of OPD. Children with a confirmed diagnosis of CP, 18 to 36 months corrected age, born in Queensland between 2006 and 2009, participated. Children with neurodegenerative conditions were excluded. This was a cross-sectional population-based study. Children were assessed by using 2 direct OPD measures (Schedule for Oral Motor Assessment; Dysphagia Disorders Survey), and observations of signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment and impaired saliva control. Gross motor skills were described by using the Gross Motor Function Measure, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Manual Ability Classification System, and motor type/ distribution. OPD was prevalent in 85% of children with CP, and there was a stepwise relationship between OPD and GMFCS level. There was a significant increase in odds of having OPD, or a subtype, for children who were nonambulant (GMFCS V) compared with those who were ambulant (GMFCS I) (odds ratio = 17.9, P = .036). OPD was present across all levels of gross motor severity using direct assessments. This highlights the need for proactive screening of all young children with CP, even those with mild impairments, to improve growth and nutritional outcomes and respiratory health.

  8. Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy combined with Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: how are improvements in arm-hand use established?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, P.B.M.; Jongerius, P.H.; Geerdink-van Nistelrooij, Y.A. van; Limbeek, J. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial indicated that modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy followed by Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) is an effective intervention to improve spontaneous use of the affected upper limb in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The present study

  9. CP violation with an unbroken CP transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratz, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Trautner, Andreas [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics und Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn,Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-21

    A CP conserving SU(3) gauge theory is spontaneously broken to T{sub 7} by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a 15-plet. Even though the SU(3)-CP transformation is not broken by the VEV, the theory exhibits physical CP violation in the broken phase. This is because the SU(3)-CP transformation corresponds to the unique order-two outer automorphism of T{sub 7}, which is not a physical CP transformation for the T{sub 7} states, and there is no other possible CP transformation. We explicitly demonstrate that CP is violated by calculating a CP odd decay asymmetry in the broken phase. This scenario provides us with a natural protection for topological vacuum terms, ensuring that θ G{sub μν}G̃{sup μν} is absent even though CP is violated for the physical states of the model.

  10. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of masticatory muscles spasticity in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Gouw-Soares, Sheila Cynthia; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Baeder, Fernando Martins

    2016-02-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder frequently present in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). This study aimed to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the spasticity of the masseter and anterior temporal muscle fibers in children with CP over three weeks of intermittent laser exposures. The bite force (BF) of the masticatory muscles and the amplitude of mouth opening were evaluated before and after laser irradiation in 30 children with CP. Both sides of the masseter and temporalis muscles were irradiated with low-intensity diode laser pulses of 808-nm wavelength six times over three consecutive weeks. During the subsequent three weeks of postlaser exposures, although no laser treatment was applied, the evaluation parameters were measured and recorded. A significant improvement in the amplitude of mouth opening and a decrease in the BF were observed in the weeks following LLLT (Peffective short-term therapeutic tool. This method increased the amplitude of mouth opening and decreased the muscle tonus of children with spastic CP over a time course of three weeks of intermittent laser applications.

  11. Maternal myo-inositol, glucose, and zinc status is associated with the risk of offspring with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, P.; Peer, P.G.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Franke, B.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the maternal and children's myo-inositol, glucose, and zinc status in association with spina bifida risk. STUDY DESIGN: Sixty-three mothers and 70 children with spina bifida and 102 control mothers and 85 control children were investigated. The

  12. Characteristics of children with hip displacement in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip dislocation in children with cerebral palsy (CP is a common and severe problem. The dislocation can be avoided, by screening and preventive treatment of children with hips at risk. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of children with CP who develop hip displacement, in order to optimise a hip surveillance programme. Methods In a total population of children with CP a standardised clinical and radiological follow-up of the hips was carried out as a part of a hip prevention programme. The present study is based on 212 children followed until 9–16 years of age. Results Of the 212 children, 38 (18% developed displacement with Migration Percentage (MP >40% and further 19 (9% MP between 33 and 39%. Mean age at first registration of hip displacement was 4 years, but some hips showed MP > 40% already at two years of age. The passive range of hip motion at the time of first registration of hip displacement did not differ significantly from the findings in hips without displacement. The risk of hip displacement varied according to CP-subtype, from 0% in children with pure ataxia to 79% in children with spastic tetraplegia. The risk of displacement (MP > 40% was directly related to the level of gross motor function, classified according to the gross motor function classification system, GMFCS, from 0% in children in GMFCS level I to 64% in GMFCS level V. Conclusion Hip displacement in CP often occurs already at 2–3 years of age. Range of motion is a poor indicator of hips at risk. Thus early identification and early radiographic examination of children at risk is of great importance. The risk of hip displacement varies according to both CP-subtype and GMFCS. It is sometimes not possible to determine subtype before 4 years of age, and at present several definitions and classification systems are used. GMFCS is valid and reliable from 2 years of age, and it is internationally accepted. We recommend a hip

  13. Patient-reported mobility function and engagement in young adults with cerebral palsy: a cross-sectional sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, N; Church, C; Miller, F

    2018-04-01

    To describe self-reported life satisfaction and motor function of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). A total of 57 young adults with spastic CP classified as levels I (seven), II (25), III (16), IV (nine) by the Gross Motor Function Classification System, followed from childhood by our CP clinic, returned at a mean age of 27 years two months (SD 3 years 4 months). Self-reported life satisfaction and mobility status were measured by the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) and a project questionnaire. Surgical history and childhood mobility were confirmed from medical records. The Functional Mobility Scale demonstrated limited but stable mobility function from childhood to adulthood. The PROMIS and PODCI revealed limited motor function compared with a non-disabled normative reference (p mobility function using the FMS correlated highly (r = 0.8; p mobility is limited and community independence is not fully achieved in young adults with CP, these participants maintained childhood levels of mobility function into young adulthood, were satisfied with social roles and had minimal reports of pain.

  14. A Variant of the Autophagy-Related 5 Gene Is Associated with Child Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is a major cause of childhood disability in developed and developing countries, but the pathogenic mechanisms of CP development remain largely unknown. Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular self-digestion of damaged organelles and dysfunctional macromolecules. Growing evidence suggests that autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5-dependent autophagy is involved in neural development, neuronal differentiation, and neurological degenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze ATG5 protein expression and gene polymorphisms in Chinese patients with CP and to evaluate the importance of ATG5 in the development of CP. Five polymorphisms from different regions of the ATG5 gene (rs510432, rs3804338, rs573775, rs2299863, and rs6568431 were analyzed in 715 CP patients and 658 controls using MassARRAY. Of these, 58 patients and 56 controls were selected for measurement of plasma ATG5 level using ELISA. The relevance of disease-associated SNPs was evaluated using the SHEsis program. We identified a significant association between rs6568431 and CP (OR = 1.388, 95% CI = 1.173~1.643, Pallele = 0.0005, Pgenotype = 0.0015. Subgroup analysis showed a highly significant association of rs6568431 with spastic CP (n = 468, OR = 1.511, 95% CI = 1.251~1.824, Pallele = 8.50e−005, Pgenotype = 1.57e−004 and spastic quadriplegia (OR = 1.927, 95% CI = 1.533~2.421, Pallele = 7.35e−008, Pgenotype = 3.24e−009. Furthermore, mean plasma ATG5 levels were lower in CP patients than in controls, and individuals carrying the AA genotype of rs6568431 that was positively associated with CP had lower plasma ATG5 levels (P < 0.05. This study demonstrated an association of an ATG5 gene variant and low level of ATG5 protein with CP, and stronger associations with severe clinical manifestations were identified. Our results provide novel evidence for a role of ATG5 in CP and shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this neurodevelopmental disorder.

  15. Effects of Maternal Handling Training at Home, on Development of Fine Motor Skills in the Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Sahar; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Dalvand, Hamid; Ahmadi Kahjoogh, Mina; Daemi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in children. These children require long-term therapy for achieving better motor function. It seems that treatment and training at home is necessary. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of handling training of mothers at home on fine motor skill development of children…

  16. Spina Bifida: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 12 = La Espina Bifida: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet offers definitions of the three types of spina bifida, outlines their incidence, describes characteristics of individuals with spina bifida, and reviews educational implications. The fact sheet emphasizes that school programs should be flexible to accommodate these students' special needs and frequent absences, that children with…

  17. Evaluation of Functional Electrical Stimulation to Assist Cycling in Four Adolescents with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Tokay Harrington

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP often have difficulty participating in exercise at intensities necessary to improve cardiovascular fitness. Functional electrical stimulation- (FES- assisted cycling is proposed as a form of exercise for adolescents with CP. The aims of this paper were to adapt methods and assess the feasibility of applying FES cycling technology in adolescents with CP, determine methods of performing cycling tests in adolescents with CP, and evaluate the immediate effects of FES assistance on cycling performance. Materials/Methods. Four participants (12–14 years old; GMFCS levels III-IV participated in a case-based pilot study of FES-assisted cycling in which bilateral quadriceps muscles were activated using surface electrodes. Cycling cadence, power output, and heart rate were collected. Results. FES-assisted cycling was well tolerated (n=4 and cases are presented demonstrating increased cadence (2–43 rpm, power output (19–70%, and heart rates (4-5% and decreased variability (8–13% in cycling performance when FES was applied, compared to volitional cycling without FES assistance. Some participants (n=2 required the use of an auxiliary hub motor for assistance. Conclusions. FES-assisted cycling is feasible for individuals with CP and may lead to immediate improvements in cycling performance. Future work will examine the potential for long-term fitness gains using this intervention.

  18. Spina bifida: A multidisciplinary perspective on a many-faceted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open spina bifida or myelomeningocele (SBM) is the most common birth defect involving the central nervous system, second only in incidence to congenital cardiac disease. Although recognised since antiquity, with anthropological relics depicting affected individuals and suggestive descriptions in the writings of ...

  19. Home screening for bacteriuria in children with spina bifida and clean intermittent catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zegers Bas SHJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant bacteriuria (SBU and urinary tract infections (UTIs are common in patients with spina bifida and neuropathic detrusor sphincter dysfunction. Laboratory agar plated culture is the gold standard to establish SBU. It has the disadvantage of diagnostic and subsequent therapeutic delay. Leukocyte esterase tests (LETs and dip slides proved to be useful in the general populations to exclude SBU and UTI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of LET and dip slide in children with spina bifida without symptoms of UTI. The reliability in children with asymptomatic SBU was not studied before. Methods In one hundred and twelve children with spina bifida on clean intermittent catheterization LETs and dip slides were compared with laboratory cultures. Both tests and agar plated cultures were performed on catheterized urine samples. The hypothesis was that the home tests are as accurate as laboratory cultures. Results A SBU was found in 45 (40% of the 112 laboratory cultures. A negative LET excluded SBU (negative predictive value 96%, while a positive LET had a positive predictive value of 72%. The false positive rate was 28%. Dip slide determination of bacterial growth had no added value, other than serving as transport medium. Conclusions In spina bifida children, leukocyte esterase testing can be used to exclude significant bacteriuria at home, while dip slide tests have no added value to diagnose or exclude significant bacteriuria.

  20. Construction and validation of the fatigue impact and severity self-assessment for youth and young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Laura K; Bartlett, Doreen J

    2017-07-01

    The Fatigue Impact and Severity Self-Assessment (FISSA) was created to assess the impact, severity, and self-management of fatigue for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 14-31 years. Items were generated from a review of measures and interviews with individuals with CP. Focus groups with health-care professionals were used for item reduction. A mailed survey was conducted (n=163/367) to assess the factor structure, known-groups validity, and test-retest reliability. The final measure contained 31 items in two factors and discriminated between individuals expected to have different levels of fatigue. Individuals with more functional abilities reported less fatigue (p fatigue (p fatigue to enhance collaborative goal setting and intervention planning.