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Sample records for paired hormone response

  1. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinus F van Batenburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs, but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  2. Hormonal predictors of women's extra-pair vs. in-pair sexual attraction in natural cycles: Implications for extended sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Nicholas M; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Gangestad, Steven W

    2016-02-01

    In naturally cycling women, Roney and Simmons (2013) examined hormonal correlates of their desire for sexual contact. Estradiol was positively associated, and progesterone negatively associated, with self-reported desire. The current study extended these findings by examining, within a sample of 33 naturally cycling women involved in romantic relationships, hormonal correlates of sexual attraction to or interests in specific targets: women's own primary partner or men other than women's primary partner. Women's sexual interests and hormone (estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone) levels were assessed at two different time points. Whereas estradiol levels were associated with relatively greater extra-pair sexual interests than in-pair sexual interests, progesterone levels were associated with relatively greater in-pair sexual interests. Both hormones specifically predicted in-pair sexual desire, estradiol negatively and progesterone positively. These findings have implications for understanding the function of women's extended sexuality - their sexual proceptivity and receptivity outside the fertile phase, especially during the luteal phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hormonal responses during early embryogenesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Lausser, Andreas; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Plant hormones have been shown to regulate key processes during embryogenesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but the mechanisms that determine the peculiar embryo pattern formation of monocots are largely unknown. Using the auxin and cytokinin response markers DR5 and TCSv2 (two-component system, cytokinin-responsive promoter version #2), as well as the auxin efflux carrier protein PIN1a (PINFORMED1a), we have studied the hormonal response during early embryogenesis (zygote towards transition stage) in the model and crop plant maize. Compared with the hormonal response in Arabidopsis, we found that detectable hormone activities inside the developing maize embryo appeared much later. Our observations indicate further an important role of auxin, PIN1a and cytokinin in endosperm formation shortly after fertilization. Apparent auxin signals within adaxial endosperm cells and cytokinin responses in the basal endosperm transfer layer as well as chalazal endosperm are characteristic for early seed development in maize. Moreover, auxin signalling in endosperm cells is likely to be involved in exogenous embryo patterning as auxin responses in the endosperm located around the embryo proper correlate with adaxial embryo differentiation and outgrowth. Overall, the comparison between Arabidopsis and maize hormone response and flux suggests intriguing mechanisms in monocots that are used to direct their embryo patterning, which is significantly different from that of eudicots.

  4. Hormonal and haematological responses of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed hormonal and haematological responses of Clarias gariepinus to ammonia toxicity. Laboratory study of haematological responses of adult C. gariepinus to sub-lethal level of ammonia (2.2 g/l) at different exposure hours (0, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 h) were carried out. Blood samples of C. gariepinus were ...

  5. Challenges to the pair bond: neural and hormonal effects of separation and reunion in a monogamous primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Hinde

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social monogamy at its most basic is a group structure in which two adults form a unit and share a territory. However, many socially monogamous pairs display attachment relationships known as pair bonds, in which there is a mutual preference for the partner and distress upon separation. The neural and hormonal basis of this response to separation from the adult pair mate is under-studied. In this project, we examined this response in male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus, a socially monogamous New World primate. Males underwent a baseline scan, a short separation (48 hours, a long separation (app. two weeks, a reunion with the female pair mate, and an encounter with a female stranger (with nine males completing all five conditions. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured via positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG co-registered with structural MRI, and region of interest analysis was carried out. In addition, plasma was collected and assayed for cortisol, oxytocin (OT, vasopressin (AVP, glucose, and insulin concentrations. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected and assayed for OT and AVP. We used generalized estimating equations to examine significant changes from baseline. Short separations were characterized by decreases in FDG uptake, in comparison to baseline, in the lateral septum (LS, ventral pallidum (VP, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, periaqueductal gray (PAG, and cerebellum, as well as increases in CSF OT, and plasma cortisol and insulin. Long separations differed from baseline in reduced FDG uptake in the central amygdala (CeA, reduced whole brain FDG uptake, increased CSF OT and increased plasma insulin. The response on encounter with a stranger female depended on whether or not the male had previously reproduced with his pair mate, suggesting that transitions to fatherhood contribute to the neurobiology underlying response to a novel female. Reunion with the partner

  6. The effect of short-term cortisol changes on growth hormone responses to the pyridostigmine-growth-hormone-releasing-hormone test in healthy adults and patients with suspected growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M; Støving, R K; Hangaard, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The interaction between cortisol and growth hormone (GH)-levels may significantly influence GH-responses to a stimulation test. In order to systematically analyse the interaction in a paired design, it is necessary to use a test, which has been proven safe and reliable...... such as the pyridostigmine-growth-hormone-releasing-hormone (PD-GHRH) test. Three groups of subjects with a different GH-secretory capacity were included. STUDY A: Eight healthy adults were tested seven times, once with placebo throughout the examination and six times with the PD-GHRH test following no glucocorticoid......-responses to a PD-GHRH test were reduced in all individuals during acute stress-appropriate cortisol levels and the percentage reduction in GH-levels was independent of the GH-secretory capacity. Clinically, we found that peak GH-responses were not significantly affected by a short break in conventional HC therapy...

  7. Exaggerated gonadotropin response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in amenorrheic runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, J; Glass, A R; Fears, W B; Ferguson, E W; Vigersky, R A

    1987-03-01

    Most studies of exercise-induced amenorrhea have compared amenorrheic athletes (usually runners) with sedentary control subjects. Such comparisons will identify hormonal changes that develop as a result of exercise training but cannot determine which of these changes play a role in causing amenorrhea. To obviate this problem, we assessed reproductive hormone status in a group of five amenorrheic runners and compared them to a group of six eumenorrheic runners matched for body fatness, training intensity, and exercise performance. Compared to the eumenorrheic runners, the amenorrheic runners had lower serum estradiol concentrations, similar basal serum luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations, and exaggerated responses of serum gonadotropins after administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (100 micrograms intravenous bolus). Serum prolactin levels, both basally and after thyrotropin-releasing hormone administration (500 micrograms intravenous bolus) or treadmill exercise, was similar in the two groups, as were serum thyroid function tests (including thyrotropin response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone). Changes in serum cortisol levels after short-term treadmill exercise were similar in both groups, and serum testosterone levels increased after exercise only in the eumenorrheic group. In neither group did such exercise change serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, or thyrotropin levels. We concluded that exercise-induced amenorrhea is not solely related to the development of increased prolactin output after exercise training. The exaggerated gonadotropin response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone seen in amenorrheic runners in comparison with matched eumenorrheic runners is consistent with a hypothalamic etiology for the menstrual dysfunction, analogous to that previously described in "stress-induced" or "psychogenic" amenorrhea.

  8. Acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses to a basketball game

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    Denis Foschini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses of professional basketball players to a basketball game. The sample was composed of eight basketball athletes, with a minimum of 4 years’ experience in basketball. A real game was simulated with a total duration of 40 minutes, divided into two halves of 20 minutes each and an interval of 10 minutes between halves. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after the game (20 ml, vacuum tube system. The variables analyzed were: testosterone and cortisol hormones, total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and the enzymes creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Statistical analysis was with descriptive statistics and the Student’s t test for paired samples to p≤0.05. The pre (13.34 nmol/L and 301.97 nmol/L and post game (17.34 nmol/L and 395.91 nmol/L levels of testosterone and cortisol were statistically different, with higher levels after the game for both hormones. The immune cell counts exhibited significant differences for total leukocytes (6393.75 nmol/L and 9158.75 nmol/L and neutrophils (3532.5 nmol/L and 6392.62 nmol/L, with levels being higher after the game. No statistical differences were observed for the enzymatic variables. Therefore, based on the markers analyzed, testosterone and cortisol exhibited pronounced increases after the game and the same behavior was observed for total leukocytes and neutrophils.

  9. Acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses to a basketball game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses of professional basketball players to a basketball game. The sample was composed of eight basketball athletes, with a minimum of 4 years’ experience in basketball. A real game was simulated with a total duration of 40 minutes, divided into two halves of 20 minutes each and an interval of 10 minutes between halves. Blood samples were collected before andimmediately after the game (20 ml, vacuum tube system. The variables analyzed were: testosterone and cortisol hormones, total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and the enzymes creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Statistical analysis was with descriptive statistics and the Student’s t test for paired samples to p≤0.05. The pre (13.34 nmol/L and 301.97 nmol/L and post game (17.34 nmol/L and 395.91 nmol/L levels of testosterone and cortisol were statistically different, with higher levels after the game for both hormones. The immune cell counts exhibited significant differences for total leukocytes (6393.75 nmol/L and 9158.75 nmol/L and neutrophils (3532.5 nmol/L and 6392.62 nmol/L, with levels being higher after the game. No statistical differences were observed for the enzymatic variables. Therefore, based on the markers analyzed, testosterone and cortisol exhibited pronounced increases after the game and the samebehavior was observed for total leukocytes and neutrophils.

  10. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...... into the complex hormonal crosstalk of classical growth stimulating plant hormones within the naturally occurring biotic and abiotic multistress environment of higher plants. The MAPK- and phytohormone-cascades which comprise a multitude of single molecules on different signalling levels, as well as interactions...

  11. Psychological and hormonal stress response patterns during a blood donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, M. D.; Veldhuizen, I. J. T.; Merz, E.-M.; de Kort, W. L. A. M.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; Sluiter, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background and ObjectivesDonating blood has been associated with increased stress responses, with scarce evidence indicating that levels of psychological and hormonal stress are higher pre-donation than post-donation. We investigated whether a blood donation induces psychological and/or hormonal

  12. Pairing of heterochromatin in response to cellular stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, H.I.; Mullenders, L.H.F.; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure of human cells to DNA-damaging agents (X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC)) induces pairing of the homologous paracentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 (9q12-13). Here, we show that UV irradiation and also heat shock treatment of human cells lead to similar effects. Since the various agents induce very different types and frequencies of damage to cellular constituents, the data suggest a general stress response as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, local UV irradiation experiments revealed that pairing of heterochromatin is an event that can be triggered without induction of DNA damage in the heterochromatic sequences. The repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group F) previously shown to fail pairing after MMC displayed elevated pairing after heat shock treatment but not after UV exposure. Taken together, the present results indicate that pairing of heterochromatin following exposure to DNA-damaging agents is initiated by a general stress response and that the sensing of stress or the maintenance of the paired status of the heterochromatin might be dependent on DNA repair

  13. Event-related brain potentials to emotional images and gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia and paired controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Julie; Mendrek, Adrianna; Germain, Martine; Hot, Pascal; Lavoie, Marc E

    2014-01-01

    Prominent disturbances in the experience, expression, and emotion recognition in patients with schizophrenia have been relatively well documented over the last few years. Furthermore, sex differences in behavior and brain activity, associated with the processing of various emotions, have been reported in the general population and in schizophrenia patients. Others proposed that sex differences should be rather attributed to testosterone, which may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Also, it had been suggested that estradiol may play a protective role in schizophrenia. Surprisingly, few studies investigating this pathology have focused on both brain substrates and gonadal steroid hormone levels, in emotional processing. In the present study, we investigated electrocortical responses related to emotional valence and arousal as well as gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia. Event-Related Potentials (ERP) were recorded during exposition to emotional pictures in 18 patients with schizophrenia and in 24 control participants paired on intelligence, manual dominance and socioeconomic status. Given their previous sensitivity to emotional and attention processes, the P200, N200 and the P300 were selected for analysis. More precisely, emotional valence generally affects early components (N200), which reflect early process of selective attention, whereas emotional arousal and valence both influences the P300 component, which is related to memory context updating, and stimulus categorization. Results showed that, in the control group, the amplitude of the N200 was significantly more lateralized over the right hemisphere, while there was no such lateralization in patients with schizophrenia. In patients with schizophrenia, significantly smaller anterior P300 amplitude was observed to the unpleasant, compared to the pleasant. That anterior P300 reduction was also correlated with negative symptoms. The N200 and P300 amplitudes were positively

  14. Event-related brain potentials to emotional images and gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia and paired controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eChampagne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prominent disturbances in the experience, expression, and emotion recognition in patients with schizophrenia have been relatively well documented over the last few years. Furthermore, sex differences in behavior and brain activity, associated with the processing of various emotions, have been reported in the general population and in schizophrenia patients. Others proposed that sex differences should be rather attributed to testosterone, which may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Also, it had been suggested that estradiol may play a protective role in schizophrenia. Surprisingly, few studies investigating this pathology have focused on both brain substrates and gonadal steroid hormone levels, in emotional processing. In the present study, we investigated electrocortical responses related to emotional valence and arousal as well as gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia. Event-Related Potentials (ERP were recorded during exposition to emotional pictures in 18 patients with schizophrenia and in 24 control participants paired on intelligence, manual dominance and socioeconomic status. Given their previous sensitivity to emotional and attention processes, the P200, N200 and the P300 were selected for analysis. More precisely, emotional valence generally affects early components (N200, which reflect early process of selective attention, whereas emotional arousal and valence both influences the P300 component, which is related to memory context updating, and stimulus categorization. Results showed that, in the control group, the amplitude of the N200 was significantly more lateralized over the right hemisphere, while there was no such lateralization in patients with schizophrenia. In patients with schizophrenia, significantly smaller anterior P300 amplitude was observed to the unpleasant, compared to the pleasant. That anterior P300 reduction was also correlated with negative symptoms.

  15. A common polymorphism of the growth hormone receptor is associated with increased responsiveness to growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Christine; Essioux, Laurent; Teinturier, Cécile; Tauber, Maïté; Goffin, Vincent; Bougnères, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Growth hormone is used to increase height in short children who are not deficient in growth hormone, but its efficacy varies largely across individuals. The genetic factors responsible for this variation are entirely unknown. In two cohorts of short children treated with growth hormone, we found that an isoform of the growth hormone receptor gene that lacks exon 3 (d3-GHR) was associated with 1.7 to 2 times more growth acceleration induced by growth hormone than the full-length isoform (P < 0.0001). In transfection experiments, the transduction of growth hormone signaling through d3-GHR homo- or heterodimers was approximately 30% higher than through full-length GHR homodimers (P < 0.0001). One-half of Europeans are hetero- or homozygous with respect to the allele encoding the d3-GHR isoform, which is dominant over the full-length isoform. These observations suggest that the polymorphism in exon 3 of GHR is important in growth hormone pharmacogenetics.

  16. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  17. Ovarian response to recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH) concentrat......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH...

  18. Hormonal contraceptive use lowers female intrasexual competition in pair-bonded women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobey, Kelly D.; Klipping, Christine; Buunk, Abraham P.

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of hormonal contraceptive use on levels of female intrasexual competition. Twenty-eight women completed a scale for intrasexual competition on three occasions: when using hormonal contraceptives and when regularly cycling at a fertile and a

  19. Response of Indian growth hormone deficient children to growth hormone therapy: association with pituitary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Vaman V; Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Ekbote, Veena H; Rustagi, Vaishakhi T; Singh, Joshita; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2015-05-01

    To ascertain the impact of pituitary size as judged by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), on response to Growth Hormone (GH) therapy in GH deficient children. Thirty nine children (9.1 ± 2.7 y, 22 boys) with non-acquired GH deficiency (21 Isolated GH deficiency and 18 Combined pituitary hormone deficiency) were consecutively recruited and followed up for one year. Clinical, radiological (bone age and MRI) and biochemical parameters were studied. Children with hypoplastic pituitary (pituitary height deficit (height for age Z-score -6.0 vs. -5.0) and retardation of skeletal maturation (bone age chronological age ratio of 0.59 vs. 0.48) at baseline as compared to children with normal pituitary heights (p growth hormone deficient children with hypoplastic pituitary respond better to therapy with GH in short term.

  20. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M

    2013-01-01

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore......, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life......, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels....

  1. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

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    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  2. Sex hormones and the immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Annechien; Heineman, Maas Jan; Faas, Marijke M.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to their effects on sexual differentiation and reproduction, sex hormones appear to influence the immune system. This results in a sexual dimorphism in the immune response in humans: for instance, females produce more vigorous cellular and more vigorous humoral immune reactions, are more

  3. Adipokinetic hormone-induced antioxidant response in Spodoptera littoralis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, Josef; Krishnan, N.; Mithöfer, A.; Vogel, H.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 2 (2012), s. 389-395 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant response * antioxidant enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2012

  4. Hormonal responses to resistance exercise during different menstrual cycle states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Aizawa, Katsuji; Imai, Tomoko; Kono, Ichiro; Mesaki, Noboru

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the effect of menstrual cycle states on ovarian and anabolic hormonal responses to acute resistance exercise in young women. Eight healthy women (eumenorrhea; EM) and eight women with menstrual disorders including oligomenorrhea and amenorrhea (OAM) participated in this study. The EM group performed acute resistance exercises during the early follicular (EF) and midluteal (ML) phases, and the OAM group performed the same exercises. All subjects performed three sets each of lat pull-downs, leg curls, bench presses, leg extensions, and squats at 75%-80% of one-repetition maximum with a 1-min rest between sets. Blood samples were obtained before exercise, immediately after, 30 min after, and 60 min after the exercise. In the EM group, resting serum levels of estradiol and progesterone in the ML phase were higher than those in the EF phase and higher than those in the OAM group. Serum estradiol and progesterone in the ML phase increased after the exercise but did not change in the EF phase or in the OAM group. In contrast, resting levels of testosterone in the OAM group were higher than those in both the ML and EF phases of the EM group. After the exercise, serum growth hormone increased in both the ML and EF phases but did not change in the OAM group. The responses of anabolic hormones to acute resistance exercise are different among the menstrual cycle states in young women. Women with menstrual disturbances with low estradiol and progesterone serum levels have an attenuated anabolic hormone response to acute resistance exercise, suggesting that menstrual disorders accompanying low ovarian hormone levels may affect exercise-induced change in anabolic hormones in women.

  5. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  6. Hormone replacement therapy improves contractile function and myonuclear organization of single muscle fibres from postmenopausal monozygotic female twin pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Renaud, Guillaume; Hedstrom, Yvette; Pöllänen, Eija; Ronkainen, Paula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Alen, Markku; Sipilä, Sarianna; Artemenko, Konstantin; Bergquist, Jonas; Kovanen, Vuokko; Larsson, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in muscle mass and strength leading to increased physical dependency in old age. Postmenopausal women experience a greater decline than men of similar age in parallel with the decrease in female sex steroid hormone production. We recruited six monozygous female twin pairs (55-59 years old) where only one twin pair was on hormone replacement therapy (HRT use = 7.8 ± 4.3 years) to investigate the association of HRT with the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei (myonuclear domain (MND) size,) together with specific force at the single fibre level. HRT use was associated with a significantly smaller (∼27%; P muscle fibres expressing the type I but not the IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform. In comparison to non-users, higher specific force was recorded in HRT users both in muscle fibres expressing type I (∼27%; P fibre-type dependent, i.e. the higher specific force in fast-twitch muscle fibres was primarily caused by higher force per cross-bridge while slow-twitch fibres relied on both a higher number and force per cross-bridge. HRT use had no effect on fibre cross-sectional area (CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V0) and relative proportion of MyHC isoforms. In conclusion, HRT appears to have significant positive effects on both regulation of muscle contraction and myonuclei organization in postmenopausal women.

  7. Hormonal contraception use alters stress responses and emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Segal, Sabrina K; Worden, Ian V; Yim, Ilona S; Cahill, Larry

    2013-02-01

    Emotionally arousing material is typically better remembered than neutral material. Since norepinephrine and cortisol interact to modulate emotional memory, sex-related influences on stress responses may be related to sex differences in emotional memory. Two groups of healthy women - one naturally cycling (NC women, n=42) and one using hormonal contraceptives (HC women, n=36) - viewed emotionally arousing and neutral images. Immediately after, they were assigned to Cold Pressor Stress (CPS) or a control procedure. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test. Saliva samples were collected and later assayed for salivary alpha-amylase (biomarker for norepinephrine) and cortisol. Compared to NC women, HC women exhibited significantly blunted stress hormone responses to the images and CPS. Recall of emotional images differed between HC and NC women depending on noradrenergic and cortisol responses. These findings may have important implications for understanding the neurobiology of emotional memory disorders, especially those that disproportionately affect women. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Interactions between plant hormones and heavy metals responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Paiva, Ana Luiza Sobral; Machado, Ronei Dorneles; Arenhart, Rafael Augusto; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals are natural non-biodegradable constituents of the Earth's crust that accumulate and persist indefinitely in the ecosystem as a result of human activities. Since the industrial revolution, the concentration of cadmium, arsenic, lead, mercury and zinc, amongst others, have increasingly contaminated soil and water resources, leading to significant yield losses in plants. These issues have become an important concern of scientific interest. Understanding the molecular and physiological responses of plants to heavy metal stress is critical in order to maximize their productivity. Recent research has extended our view of how plant hormones can regulate and integrate growth responses to various environmental cues in order to sustain life. In the present review we discuss current knowledge about the role of the plant growth hormones abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroid and ethylene in signaling pathways, defense mechanisms and alleviation of heavy metal toxicity.

  9. Interactions between plant hormones and heavy metals responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Bücker-Neto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heavy metals are natural non-biodegradable constituents of the Earth's crust that accumulate and persist indefinitely in the ecosystem as a result of human activities. Since the industrial revolution, the concentration of cadmium, arsenic, lead, mercury and zinc, amongst others, have increasingly contaminated soil and water resources, leading to significant yield losses in plants. These issues have become an important concern of scientific interest. Understanding the molecular and physiological responses of plants to heavy metal stress is critical in order to maximize their productivity. Recent research has extended our view of how plant hormones can regulate and integrate growth responses to various environmental cues in order to sustain life. In the present review we discuss current knowledge about the role of the plant growth hormones abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroid and ethylene in signaling pathways, defense mechanisms and alleviation of heavy metal toxicity.

  10. Psychological and hormonal stress response patterns during a blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerwerf, M D; Veldhuizen, I J T; Merz, E-M; de Kort, W L A M; Frings-Dresen, M H W; Sluiter, J K

    2017-11-01

    Donating blood has been associated with increased stress responses, with scarce evidence indicating that levels of psychological and hormonal stress are higher pre-donation than post-donation. We investigated whether a blood donation induces psychological and/or hormonal stress during the course of a blood donation, and whether responses differed between men and women, first-time and experienced donors and donors with high or low non-acute stress. In 363 donors, psychological (donation-stress and arousal) and hormonal (cortisol) stress were measured by questionnaire and salivary sample at seven key moments during a routine donation. Non-acute stress was assessed by a questionnaire. Repeated measurement analyses were performed, using the last measurement (leaving the donation center) as reference value. Levels of donation-stress, arousal and cortisol were significantly higher during donation than when leaving the donation center. When compared with men, women reported higher levels of donation-stress and cortisol in the first part of the visit. When compared with first-time donors, experienced donors reported lower levels of donation-stress during the first part of the visit, and higher levels of arousal but less reactivity throughout the visit. When compared to donors high on non-acute stress, donors low on non-acute stress reported lower levels of donation-stress during the first part of the visit, and showed less cortisol reactivity throughout the visit. Donating blood influences psychological and hormonal stress response patterns. The response patterns differ between women and men, first-time and experienced donors and between donors high and low on non-acute stress. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Hormonal contraception use alters stress responses and emotional memory

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Shawn E.; Segal, Sabrina K.; Worden, Ian V.; Yim, Ilona S.; Cahill, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Emotionally arousing material is typically better remembered than neutral material. Since norepinephrine and cortisol interact to modulate emotional memory, sex-related influences on stress responses may be related to sex differences in emotional memory. Two groups of healthy women – one naturally cycling (NC women, N = 42) and one using hormonal contraceptives (HC women, N = 36) – viewed emotionally arousing and neutral images. Immediately after, they were assigned to Cold Pressor Stress (CP...

  12. REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES AND CORTISOL RESPONSES TO PLYOMETRIC TRAINING IN MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Vatansever Ozen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plyometric training activities are commonly used by a wide range of athletes to increase jump performance and improve explosive power and muscular activation patterns. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric training on male reproductive hormones. Nineteen recreationally active males volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned to plyometrically trained (n=10, 21.2 ±2.3 years and control groups (n=9, 21.4± 2.1. The plyometric training group performed in a six-week plyometric training programme and the control group did not perform any plyometric training techniques. Resting serum levels of testosterone, prolactin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinising hormone (LH, and cortisol were measured in each subject at t0 (before the training, t1 (end of third week and t2 (end of training. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant (P<0.05 interaction effects for testosterone, prolactin, FSH and cortisol. Six-week plyometric training decreased serum levels of testosterone, cortisol and FSH and increased serum levels of prolactin. These results suggest the presence of alterations in anabolic and catabolic hormonal responses to resistance exercise in men.

  13. Radioiodine uptake and thyroid hormone levels on or off simultaneous carbimazole medication. A prospective paired comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.A.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Christ-Crain, M.; Mueller, B.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To allow radioiodine (RAI) treatment in patients with need for anti-thyroid drug medication and low RAI uptakes we investigated the feasibility of discontinuing carbimazole for 3 days to enhance the RAI uptake without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. Methods: We prospectively investigated RAI dynamics and thyroid hormone concentration in 12 patients with low RAI uptake ( 4 , T 3 and TSH were monitored. Results: Discontinuation of carbimazole for 3 days led to a significant increase of RAI uptake in all patients. We found an enhancement up to 4.9-fold compared to the measurement on carbimazole. The mean RAI uptake increased from 15.2±4.4% to 50.1±15.5% (p<0.001). The intrapersonal radioiodine half-life increased from 4.2±1.6 days to 5.4±0.7 days (p=0.13). Mean thyroid hormone concentration was not affected by the three day withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs and no patient suffered from an aggravation of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Conclusion: A withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days is long enough to provide sufficiently high RAI uptakes for RAI treatment in patients with low RAI uptakes and short enough to avoid the risk of exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  14. Radioiodine uptake and thyroid hormone levels on or off simultaneous carbimazole medication. A prospective paired comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.A.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, M.; Mueller, B. [Div. of Endocrinology, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-02-01

    Aim: To allow radioiodine (RAI) treatment in patients with need for anti-thyroid drug medication and low RAI uptakes we investigated the feasibility of discontinuing carbimazole for 3 days to enhance the RAI uptake without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. Methods: We prospectively investigated RAI dynamics and thyroid hormone concentration in 12 patients with low RAI uptake (<30%) under simultaneous carbimazole medication and 3 days after discontinuation. At both time points fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH were monitored. Results: Discontinuation of carbimazole for 3 days led to a significant increase of RAI uptake in all patients. We found an enhancement up to 4.9-fold compared to the measurement on carbimazole. The mean RAI uptake increased from 15.2{+-}4.4% to 50.1{+-}15.5% (p<0.001). The intrapersonal radioiodine half-life increased from 4.2{+-}1.6 days to 5.4{+-}0.7 days (p=0.13). Mean thyroid hormone concentration was not affected by the three day withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs and no patient suffered from an aggravation of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Conclusion: A withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days is long enough to provide sufficiently high RAI uptakes for RAI treatment in patients with low RAI uptakes and short enough to avoid the risk of exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  15. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout....... We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response...

  16. Hyperthyroidism and acromegaly due to a thyrotropin- and growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor. Lack of hormonal response to bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H E; Linfoot, J A; Braunstein, G D; Kovacs, K; Young, R T

    1983-05-01

    A 47-year-old woman with acromegaly and hyperthyroidism was found to have an inappropriately normal serum thyrotropin level (1.5 to 2.5 microU/ml) that responded poorly to thyrotropin-releasing hormone but showed partial responsiveness to changes in circulating thyroid hormones. Serum alpha-subunit levels were high-normal and showed a normal response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Growth hormone and thyrotropin hypersecretion persisted despite radiotherapy and bromocriptine treatment. Selective trans-sphenoidal removal of a pituitary adenoma led to normalization of both growth hormone and thyrotropin levels. Both thyrotropes and somatotropes were demonstrated in the adenoma by the immunoperoxidase technique and electron microscopy.

  17. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sala, Michael S.; Hurtado, Maria D.; Brown, Alicia R.; Bohórquez, Diego V.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.—La Sala, M. S., Hurtado, M. D., Brown, A. R., Bohórquez, D. V., Liddle, R. A., Herzog, H., Zolotukhin, S., Dotson, C. D. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY. PMID:24043261

  18. Joint Testlet Cognitive Diagnosis Modeling for Paired Local Item Dependence in Response Times and Response Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peida Zhan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In joint models for item response times (RTs and response accuracy (RA, local item dependence is composed of local RA dependence and local RT dependence. The two components are usually caused by the same common stimulus and emerge as pairs. Thus, the violation of local item independence in the joint models is called paired local item dependence. To address the issue of paired local item dependence while applying the joint cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs, this study proposed a joint testlet cognitive diagnosis modeling approach. The proposed approach is an extension of Zhan et al. (2017 and it incorporates two types of random testlet effect parameters (one for RA and the other for RTs to account for paired local item dependence. The model parameters were estimated using the full Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. The 2015 PISA computer-based mathematics data were analyzed to demonstrate the application of the proposed model. Further, a brief simulation study was conducted to demonstrate the acceptable parameter recovery and the consequence of ignoring paired local item dependence.

  19. Sex-Steroid Hormone Manipulation Reduces Brain Response to Reward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Henningsson, Susanne; Pinborg, Anja

    2016-01-01

    's vulnerability for mood disorders is linked to sex-steroid dynamics by investigating the effects of a pharmacologically induced fluctuation in ovarian sex steroids on the brain response to monetary rewards. In a double-blinded placebo controlled study, healthy women were randomized to receive either placebo...... or the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) goserelin, which causes a net decrease in sex-steroid levels. Fifty-eight women performed a gambling task while undergoing functional MRI at baseline, during the mid-follicular phase, and again following the intervention. The gambling task enabled us to map...

  20. Psychological stress during exercise: cardiorespiratory and hormonal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Heather E; Weldy, Michael L; Fabianke-Kadue, Emily C; Orndorff, G R; Kamimori, Gary H; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiorespiratory (CR) and stress hormone responses to a combined physical and mental stress. Eight participants (VO2(max) = 41.24 +/- 6.20 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed two experimental conditions, a treatment condition including a 37 min ride at 60% of VO2(max) with participants responding to a computerized mental challenge dual stress condition (DSC) and a control condition of the same duration and intensity without the mental challenge exercise alone condition (EAC). Significant interactions across time were found for CR responses, with heart rate, ventilation, and respiration rate demonstrating higher increases in the DSC. Additionally, norepinephrine was significantly greater in the DSC at the end of the combined challenge. Furthermore, cortisol area-under-the-curve (AUC) was also significantly elevated during the DSC. These results demonstrate that a mental challenge during exercise can exacerbate the stress response, including the release of hormones that have been linked to negative health consequences (cardiovascular, metabolic, autoimmune illnesses).

  1. Caffeine and blood pressure response: sex, age, and hormonal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Noha H; Whitsett, Thomas L; McKey, Barbara S; Wilson, Michael F; Vincent, Andrea S; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Lovallo, William R

    2010-06-01

    The pressor effect of caffeine has been established in young men and premenopausal women. The effect of caffeine on blood pressure (BP) remains unknown in postmenopausal women and in relation to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a randomized, 2-week cross-over design, we studied 165 healthy men and women in 6 groups: men and premenopausal women (35-49 yrs) vs. men and postmenopausal women (50-64 yrs), with postmenopausal women divided into those taking no hormone replacements (HR), estrogen alone, or estrogen and progesterone. Testing during one week of the study involved 6 days of caffeine maintenance at home (80 mg, 3x/day) followed by testing of responses to a challenge dose of caffeine (250 mg) in the laboratory. The other week involved ingesting placebos on maintenance and lab days. Resting BP responses to caffeine were measured at baseline and at 45 to 60 min following caffeine vs placebo ingestion, using automated monitors. Ingestion of caffeine resulted in a significant increase in systolic BP in all 6 groups (4 +/- .6, p < 0.01). Diastolic BP significantly increased in response to caffeine in all (3 +/- .4, p < 0.04) but the group of older men (2 +/- 1.0, p = 0.1). The observed pressor responses to caffeine did not vary by age. Caffeine resulted in an increase in BP in healthy, normotensive, young and older men and women. This finding warrants the consideration of caffeine in the lifestyle interventions recommended for BP control across the age span.

  2. The scissors phenomenon in hormonal response to execise in coronary patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitilev, S.B.; Saprygin, D.B.; Migalina, L.A.; Besshapov, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A difference between baseline and final plasma hormonal (insulin, cortisol, somatotrophic hormone, triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and thyronine (T 4 ) levels, related to the pattern of responce to physical stress, was demonstrated in 67 coronary patients with angio-graphically verified diagnosis. Post-exercise increase in these hormones was associated with their lowered baseline elevated final blood levels, as compared to those patients who showed a decrease in hormonal levels in response to exercise, with the base-lines exceeding final values

  3. Response to growth hormone therapy in adolescents with familial panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, B; Eunice, M; Ammini, A C

    2010-04-01

    Familial combined pituitary hormone deficiency is a rare endocrine disorder. We describe growth patterns of four children (3 females and 1 male) from two families with combined pituitary hormone deficiency. These children received growth hormone at ages ranging from 14.5 years to 19 years. While all the female siblings reached their target height, the male sibling was much shorter than mid parental height. The reasons for sexual dimorphism in growth patterns in these children are unclear.

  4. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denance, N.; Sanchez Vallet, A.; Goffner, D.; Molina, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA),

  5. Cascading effects of thermally-induced anemone bleaching on associated anemonefish hormonal stress response and reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Beldade, Ricardo; Blandin, Agathe; O’Donnell, Rory; Mills, Suzanne C.

    2017-01-01

    Organisms can behaviorally, physiologically, and morphologically adjust to environmental variation via integrative hormonal mechanisms, ultimately allowing animals to cope with environmental change. The stress response to environmental and social changes commonly promotes survival at the expense of reproduction. However, despite climate change impacts on population declines and diversity loss, few studies have attributed hormonal stress responses, or their regulatory effects, to climate chang...

  6. Cascading effects of thermally-induced anemone bleaching on associated anemonefish hormonal stress response and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldade, Ricardo; Blandin, Agathe; O'Donnell, Rory; Mills, Suzanne C

    2017-10-10

    Organisms can behaviorally, physiologically, and morphologically adjust to environmental variation via integrative hormonal mechanisms, ultimately allowing animals to cope with environmental change. The stress response to environmental and social changes commonly promotes survival at the expense of reproduction. However, despite climate change impacts on population declines and diversity loss, few studies have attributed hormonal stress responses, or their regulatory effects, to climate change in the wild. Here, we report hormonal and fitness responses of individual wild fish to a recent large-scale sea warming event that caused widespread bleaching on coral reefs. This 14-month monitoring study shows a strong correlation between anemone bleaching (zooxanthellae loss), anemonefish stress response, and reproductive hormones that decreased fecundity by 73%. These findings suggest that hormone stress responses play a crucial role in changes to population demography following climate change and plasticity in hormonal responsiveness may be a key mechanism enabling individual acclimation to climate change.Elevated temperatures can cause anemones to bleach, with unknown effects on their associated symbiotic fish. Here, Beldade and colleagues show that climate-induced bleaching alters anemonefish hormonal stress response, resulting in decreased reproductive hormones and severely impacted reproduction.

  7. Peer-Allocated Instant Response (PAIR): Computional allocation of peer tutors in learning communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Westera, W. (2007). Peer-Allocated Instant Response (PAIR): Computational allocation of peer tutors in learning communities. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/10/2/5.html

  8. Durable remission of leptomeningeal metastases from hormone-responsive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Mahta, Ali; Kim, Ryan Y; Akar, Serra; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer is rarely associated with leptomeningeal metastasis. An 87-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer presented with leptomeningeal metastasis. He received hormonal therapy with leuprolide. Subsequently, he achieved an impressive response, indicated by a constant fall in his PSA levels and by the stabilization of leptomeningeal disease and clinical improvement. Hormonal therapy may be effective in inducing remission in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer with leptomeningeal metastasis.

  9. Sex differences in stress responses : Focus on ovarian hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, Gert J.; Wichmann, Romy; Gerrits, Marjolein; Westenbroek, Christel; Lin, Yanhua

    2009-01-01

    Women in the reproductive age are more vulnerable to develop affective disorders than men. This difference may attribute to anatomical differences, hormonal influences and environmental factors such as stress. However, the higher prevalence in women normalizes once menopause is established,

  10. Growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol response to exercise in patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Mohammad-Nezhad, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A blunted growth hormone and prolactin response to pharmacological stress test have previously been found in depressed patients, as well as an increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. This study investigated these hormones in response to acute exercise using an incremental...... bicycle test. METHOD: A cross-sectional comparison of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in depressed (n=137) and healthy (n=44) subjects during rest and in response to an incremental bicycle test. Secondly, we tested the depressed patients again after a 4-month randomized naturalistic exercise...... controls. The effect of acute exercise stress on PRL (p=.56) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects. Apart from a decrease in GH response in the strength-training group (p=.03) the pragmatic exercise intervention did not affect resting hormonal levels, or the response to acute exercise...

  11. Growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol response to exercise in patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Mohammad-Nezhad, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A blunted growth hormone and prolactin response to pharmacological stress test have previously been found in depressed patients, as well as an increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. This study investigated these hormones in response to acute exercise using an incremental...... bicycle test. METHOD: A cross-sectional comparison of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in depressed (n=137) and healthy (n=44) subjects during rest and in response to an incremental bicycle test. Secondly, we tested the depressed patients again after a 4-month randomized naturalistic exercise...... intervention. RESULTS: Resting plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, or prolactin (PRL) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects (all p-values>.12). In response to an incremental bicycle test the GH (p=.02) and cortisol (p=.05) response in depressed was different compared to healthy...

  12. Effects of methimazole treatment on growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing hormone in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, A; Ferrari, C; Bodini, C; Buffoli, M G; Legati, F; Schettino, M; Zuccato, F; Wehrenberg, W B

    1990-12-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that thyroid hormones can enhance basal and stimulated growth hormone secretion by cultured pituitary cells. However, both in man and in the rat the effects of high thyroid hormone levels on GH secretion are unclear. The aim of our study was to test the GH response to human GHRH in hyperthyroid patients and to evaluate the effects on GH secretion of short- and long-term pharmacological decrease of circulating thyroid hormones. We examined 10 hyperthyroid patients with recent diagnosis of Graves' disease. Twelve healthy volunteers served as controls. All subjects received a bolus iv injection of GHRH(1-29)NH2, 100 micrograms. Hyperthyroid patients underwent a GHRH test one and three months after starting antithyroid therapy with methimazole, 10 mg/day po. GH levels at 15, 30, 45, 60 min and GH peak after stimulus were significantly lower in hyperthyroid patients than in normal subjects. The GH peak was also delayed in hyperthyroid patients. After one month of methimazole therapy, most of the hyperthyroid patients had thyroid hormone levels in the normal range, but they did not show significant changes in GH levels after GHRH, and the GH peak was again delayed. After three months of therapy with methimazole, the hyperthyroid patients did not show a further significant decrease in serum thyroid hormone levels. However, mean GH levels from 15 to 60 min were significantly increased compared with the control study. The GH peak after GHRH was also earlier than in the pre-treatment study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The effects of genetic polymorphism on treatment response of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; You, Hanxiao; Pan, Hui; Zhu, Huijuan; Yang, Hongbo; Gong, Fengying; Wang, Linjie; Jiang, Yu; Yan, Chengsheng

    2017-12-06

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has been widely used in clinical treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) or non GHD since 1985 and technology have achieved a great development in different long-acting formulations. Although the mathematical models for predicting the growth hormone response could help clinicians get to an individual personalized growth dose, many patients just can't reach the target height and the growth hormone responses differed.Genetic polymorphisms may play a role in the varies of individual responses in this treatment process.This article gives an overview of the genetic polymorphisms research of growth hormone in recent years, in order to give some potential suggestion and guide for the dose titration during treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Sex hormones affect acute and chronic stress responses in sexually dimorphic patterns : Consequences for depression models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Lei; Chen, Yi-Xi; Hu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Xue-Yan; He, Yang; Wu, Juan-Li; Huang, Man-Li; Mason, M.R.J.; Bao, Ai-Min

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alterations in peripheral sex hormones may play an important role in sex differences in terms of stress responses and mood disorders. It is not yet known whether and how stress-related brain systems and brain sex steroid levels fluctuate in relation to changes in peripheral sex hormone

  15. Resting hormone level response to a 16-week dynamic and static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... The aim of the study was to evaluate hormonal responses of serum cortisol, growth hormone (GH), testesterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels during dynamic and static stress exercises in 20 male volunteer student athletes.

  16. Current Hormonal Contraceptive Use Predicts Female Extra-Pair and Dyadic Sexual Behavior: Evidence Based on Czech National Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Klapilová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from 1155 Czech women (493 using oral contraception, 662 non-users, obtained from the Czech National Survey of Sexual Behavior, were used to investigate evolutionary-based hypotheses concerning the predictive value of current oral contraceptive (OC use on extra-pair and dyadic (in-pair sexual behavior of coupled women. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether current OC use was associated with lower extra-pair and higher in-pair sexual interest and behavior, because OC use suppresses cyclical shifts in mating psychology that occur in normally cycling women. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP regression and negative binomial models were used to test associations between OC use and these sexual measures, controlling for other relevant predictors (e.g., age, parity, in-pair sexual satisfaction, relationship length. The overall incidence of having had an extra-pair partner or one-night stand in the previous year was not related to current OC use (the majority of the sample had not. However, among the women who had engaged in extra-pair sexual behavior, OC users had fewer one-night stands than non-users, and tended to have fewer partners, than non-users. OC users also had more frequent dyadic intercourse than non-users, potentially indicating higher commitment to their current relationship. These results suggest that suppression of fertility through OC use may alter important aspects of female sexual behavior, with potential implications for relationship functioning and stability.

  17. Gonadal hormones and heart rate as an emotional response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Loos, Wolter Statius

    1988-01-01

    Animai experiments may give information on the physiology of hormones under stress conditions. The model for the investigation of acute emotional stress in animals that has been chosen permits the study of heart rate in freely moving laboratory rats as a sensitive psychophysiological parameter, This

  18. The effect of anesthesia type on stress hormone response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different types of anesthesia on stress hormones. Materials and Methods: The study was included 60 ASAI-II cases scheduled for major lower extremity surgery. The cases were randomized into 2 groups: The EA group was administered epidural anesthesia and the ...

  19. Hormone response to bidirectional selection on social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdam, Gro V; Page, Robert E; Fondrk, M Kim; Brent, Colin S

    2010-01-01

    Behavior is a quantitative trait determined by multiple genes. Some of these genes may have effects from early development and onward by influencing hormonal systems that are active during different life-stages leading to complex associations, or suites, of traits. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have been used extensively in experiments on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, but the relationships between their early developmental processes and adult behavioral variation are not well understood. Bidirectional selective breeding on social food-storage behavior produced two honey bee strains, each with several sublines, that differ in an associated suite of anatomical, physiological, and behavioral traits found in unselected wild type bees. Using these genotypes, we document strain-specific changes during larval, pupal, and early adult life-stages for the central insect hormones juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids. Strain differences correlate with variation in female reproductive anatomy (ovary size), which can be influenced by JH during development, and with secretion rates of ecdysteroid from the ovaries of adults. Ovary size was previously assigned to the suite of traits of honey bee food-storage behavior. Our findings support that bidirectional selection on honey bee social behavior acted on pleiotropic gene networks. These networks may bias a bee's adult phenotype by endocrine effects on early developmental processes that regulate variation in reproductive traits. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hormonal responses of the fish, Cyprinus carpio, to environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... gasoline, batteries, and paint. Environmental pollutants such as metals pose serious risks to many aquatic organisms by changing genetic, .... ties of cortisol and its role in maintaining ion homeostasis. (Sheridan, 1994). Secretion of the steroid hormone cortisol by the interrenal tissue is a characteristic ...

  1. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...... to be more heavily stressed during exercise to reach a certain heart rate or catecholamine level. The relation between other metabolic and hormonal response is discussed....

  2. A mutation in the receptor Methoprene-tolerant alters juvenile hormone response in insects and crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Toyota, Kenji; Hirakawa, Ikumi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miura, Toru; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormone is an essential regulator of major developmental and life history events in arthropods. Most of the insects use juvenile hormone III as the innate juvenile hormone ligand. By contrast, crustaceans use methyl farnesoate. Despite this difference that is tied to their deep evolutionary divergence, the process of this ligand transition is unknown. Here we show that a single amino-acid substitution in the receptor Methoprene-tolerant has an important role during evolution of the arthropod juvenile hormone pathway. Microcrustacea Daphnia pulex and D. magna share a juvenile hormone signal transduction pathway with insects, involving Methoprene-tolerant and steroid receptor coactivator proteins that form a heterodimer in response to various juvenoids. Juvenile hormone-binding pockets of the orthologous genes differ by only two amino acids, yet a single substitution within Daphnia Met enhances the receptor's responsiveness to juvenile hormone III. These results indicate that this mutation within an ancestral insect lineage contributed to the evolution of a juvenile hormone III receptor system.

  3. Endocrine factors of pair bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stárka, L

    2007-01-01

    Throughout literature--fiction and poetry, fine arts and music--falling in love and enjoying romantic love plays a central role. While several psychosocial conceptions of pair attachment consider the participation of hormones, human endocrinology has dealt with this theme only marginally. According to some authors in addictology, falling in love shows some signs of hormonal response to stressors with changes in dopamine and serotonin signalling and neurotrophin (transforming growth factor b) concentration. Endorphins, oxytocin and vasopressin may play a role during the later phases of love. However, proof of hormonal events associated with love in humans has, until recently, been lacking.

  4. Recovery responses of testosterone, growth hormone, and IGF-1 after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Nindl, Bradley C

    2017-03-01

    The complexity and redundancy of the endocrine pathways during recovery related to anabolic function in the body belie an oversimplistic approach to its study. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of resistance exercise (RE) on the recovery responses of three major anabolic hormones, testosterone, growth hormone(s), and insulin-like growth factor 1. Each hormone has a complexity related to differential pathways of action as well as interactions with binding proteins and receptor interactions. Testosterone is the primary anabolic hormone, and its concentration changes during the recovery period depending on the upregulation or downregulation of the androgen receptor. Multiple tissues beyond skeletal muscle are targeted under hormonal control and play critical roles in metabolism and physiological function. Growth hormone (GH) demonstrates differential increases in recovery with RE based on the type of GH being assayed and workout being used. IGF-1 shows variable increases in recovery with RE and is intimately linked to a host of binding proteins that are essential to its integrative actions and mediating targeting effects. The RE stress is related to recruitment of muscle tissue with the glandular release of hormones as signals to target tissues to support homeostatic mechanisms for metabolism and tissue repair during the recovery process. Anabolic hormones play a crucial role in the body's response to metabolism, repair, and adaptive capabilities especially in response to anabolic-type RE. Changes of these hormones following RE during recovery in the circulatory biocompartment of blood are reflective of the many mechanisms of action that are in play in the repair and recovery process. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Hormone action. Part I. Peptide hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaumer, L.; O'Malley, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    The major sections of this book on the hormonal action of peptide hormones cover receptor assays, identification of receptor proteins, methods for identification of internalized hormones and hormone receptors, preparation of hormonally responsive cells and cell hybrids, purification of membrane receptors and related techniques, assays of hormonal effects and related functions, and antibodies in hormone action

  6. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues de, E-mail: nandaeduca@yahoo.com.br; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana [UFU - Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis.

  7. Postprandial gut hormone responses and glucose metabolism in cholecystectomized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Hare, Kristine J; Martens, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    -rich liquid meal (2,200 kJ). Basal and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), cholecystokinin (CCK), and gastrin were measured. Furthermore, gastric emptying and duodenal and serum......Preclinical studies suggest that gallbladder emptying, via bile acid-induced activation of the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 in intestinal L cells, may play a significant role in the secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and, hence, postprandial glucose homeostasis. We...... examined the secretion of gut hormones in cholecystectomized subjects to test the hypothesis that gallbladder emptying potentiates postprandial release of GLP-1. Ten cholecystectomized subjects and 10 healthy, age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched control subjects received a standardized fat...

  8. Sex differences in immune responses: Hormonal effects, antagonistic selection, and evolutionary consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roved, Jacob; Westerdahl, Helena; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2017-02-01

    Males and females differ in both parasite load and the strength of immune responses and these effects have been verified in humans and other vertebrates. Sex hormones act as important modulators of immune responses; the male sex hormone testosterone is generally immunosuppressive while the female sex hormone estrogen tends to be immunoenhancing. Different sets of T-helper cells (Th) have important roles in adaptive immunity, e.g. Th1 cells trigger type 1 responses which are primarily cell-mediated, and Th2 cells trigger type 2 responses which are primarily humoral responses. In our review of the literature, we find that estrogen and progesterone enhance type 2 and suppress type 1 responses in females, whereas testosterone suppresses type 2 responses and shows an inconsistent pattern for type 1 responses in males. When we combine these patterns of generally immunosuppressive and immunoenhancing effects of the sex hormones, our results imply that the sex differences in immune responses should be particularly strong in immune functions associated with type 2 responses, and less pronounced with type 1 responses. In general the hormone-mediated sex differences in immune responses may lead to genetic sexual conflicts on immunity. Thus, we propose the novel hypothesis that sexually antagonistic selection may act on immune genes shared by the sexes, and that the strength of this sexually antagonistic selection should be stronger for type 2- as compared with type 1-associated immune genes. Finally, we put the consequences of sex hormone-induced effects on immune responses into behavioral and ecological contexts, considering social mating system, sexual selection, geographical distribution of hosts, and parasite abundance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incretin hormone and insulin responses to oral versus intravenous lipid administration in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Ola; Carr, Richard D; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2011-01-01

    Context: The incretin effect is responsible for the higher insulin response to oral glucose than to iv glucose at matching glucose levels. It is notknownwhetherthis effect is restricted to glucose only. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine whether insulin and incretin hormone responses ...

  10. Molecular genetics of growth hormone deficient children: correlation with auxology and response to first year of growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Vaman; Phadke, Nikhil; Khatod, Kavita; Ekbote, Veena; Gupte, Supriya Phanse; Nadar, Ruchi; Khadilkar, Anuradha

    2017-05-24

    With the paucity of available literature correlating genetic mutation and response to treatment, we aimed to study the genetic makeup of children with growth hormone (GH) deficiency in Western India and correlate the mutation with auxology and response to GH treatment at end of 1 year. Fifty-three (31 boys and 22 girls) children with severe short stature (height for age z-score imaging (MRI) brain scan was done in all. Genetic mutations were tested for in GH1, GHRH, LHX3, LHX4 and PROP1, POU1F1 and HESX1 genes. Mean age at presentation was 9.7±5.1 years. Thirty-seven children (Group A) had no genetic mutation detected. Six children (Group B) had mutations in the GH releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) gene, while eight children (Group C) had mutation in the GH1 gene. In two children, one each had a mutation in PROP1 and LHX3. There was no statistically significant difference in baseline height, weight and BMI for age z-score and height velocity for age z-score (HVZ). HVZ was significantly lower, post 1 year GH treatment in the group with homozygous GH1 deletion than in children with no genetic defect. Response to GH at the end of 1 year was poor in children with the homozygous GH1 deletion as compared to those with GHRHR mutation or without a known mutation.

  11. REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES AND CORTISOL RESPONSES TO PLYOMETRIC TRAINING IN MALES

    OpenAIRE

    Serife Vatansever Ozen

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training activities are commonly used by a wide range of athletes to increase jump performance and improve explosive power and muscular activation patterns. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric training on male reproductive hormones. Nineteen recreationally active males volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned to plyometrically trained (n=10, 21.2 ±2.3 years) and control groups (n=9, 21.4± 2.1). The plyometric training group ...

  12. Hormonal response during a fenfluramine-associated panic attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H.G. Vieira

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Secretion curves for prolactin, cortisol, TSH, and GH from a 37-year old woman with dysthymia and panic disorder with agoraphobia were determined one day prior to (day I, and during a panic attack (day II associated with an oral dose of 60 mg dl-fenfluramine, a drug known to increase anticipatory anxiety. The increased cortisol secretion observed is discussed in relation to the hormonal correlates of anxiety and the possible role of depression, dl-fenfluramine, and serotonergic receptor sensitivity

  13. Studies on Several Hormone Responses Following Intravenous Alimentation: Insulin and growth hormone responses following oral or intravenous alimentation in patient with far advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, H K; Koh, J H; Ryu, Y W; Lee, J O; Lee, C W; Kim, J Y; Lee, J K [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1975-09-15

    Glucose tolerance, insulin and growth hormone responses following glucose for amino acids administration by means of parenteral or oral load were studied in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. Hormone responses following nutrients load showed in patients with gastric cancer were compared to those of healthy subjects. Results were as follows:1) Blood sugar appearance following oral glucose administration was diminished in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. 2) The insulin responses of gastric cancer following oral glucose were also diminished as compared to that of normal subjects and were identical with parenteral route. 3) Parenteral administration of glucose or amino acids to patients with gastric cancer resulted in a increase of plasma growth hormone level. 4) Lower insulin response to amino acids was observed on parenteral administration in patient with gastric cancer as in healthy subjects. 5) Author discussed that the low insulin response after oral glucose administration showed in gastric cancer, and any additional insulin requirement arise when longer periods of parenteral amino acid administration are necessary, as in the patient with malnutrition.

  14. Studies on Several Hormone Responses Following Intravenous Alimentation: Insulin and growth hormone responses following oral or intravenous alimentation in patient with far advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, H. K.; Koh, J. H.; Ryu, Y. W.; Lee, J. O.; Lee, C. W.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    Glucose tolerance, insulin and growth hormone responses following glucose for amino acids administration by means of parenteral or oral load were studied in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. Hormone responses following nutrients load showed in patients with gastric cancer were compared to those of healthy subjects. Results were as follows:1) Blood sugar appearance following oral glucose administration was diminished in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. 2) The insulin responses of gastric cancer following oral glucose were also diminished as compared to that of normal subjects and were identical with parenteral route. 3) Parenteral administration of glucose or amino acids to patients with gastric cancer resulted in a increase of plasma growth hormone level. 4) Lower insulin response to amino acids was observed on parenteral administration in patient with gastric cancer as in healthy subjects. 5) Author discussed that the low insulin response after oral glucose administration showed in gastric cancer, and any additional insulin requirement arise when longer periods of parenteral amino acid administration are necessary, as in the patient with malnutrition.

  15. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas V. Vamvakopoulos

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h CRH gene: (1 a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2 a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system.

  16. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test ≥7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  17. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  18. STUDENTS POSITIVE RESPONSE THROUGH THINK PAIR SHARE STRATEGY ON ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iin Baroroh Ma’arif

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmonious communication has an important role in teaching and learning process, especially in encouraging the success of teaching and learning process in the classroom. This research was conducted to know the student's response to the implementation of Think Pair Share strategy in Speaking course. This strategy emphasizes how students are more active in communicating using English in the classroom. The purpose of this research is 1 how the implementation of Think Pair Share strategy in class; 2 how students respond to the Think Pair Share strategy in the classroom; The design of this study is descriptive-qualitative to answer these questions. In this study, researchers themselves are the main instrument. In collecting data, researchers used observation sheets, and field notes.

  19. Cardiovascular and hormonal responses of conscious pigs during physical restraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, C.E.; Bossone, C.A.; Hannon, J.P.; Hunt, M.M.; Rodkey, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of physical restraint on cardiovascular function and plasma hormone levels in 20 to 25 kg conscious Duroc pigs. Pigs were placed in a Pavlov sling or remained in a portable holding cage. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored and blood samples taken at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min. Placement into the sling increased heart rate from 106 ''+ or -'' 3 to 151 ''+ or -'' 13 beats/min and mean arterial pressure rose from 95 ''+ or -'' 2 to 115 ''+ or -'' 2 mm Hg. Both heart rate and blood pressure returned to basal values within 10 min. Hematocrit was increased from 26 ''+ or -'' 1 to 32 ''+ or -'' 1%. Heart rate, blood pressure and hematocrit were not changed in caged animals. Plasma norepinephrine increased from 179 ''+ or -'' 32 to 461 ''+ or -'' 52 pg/ml returning to basal values within 10 min. Epinephrine showed a similar trend rising from 69 ''+ or -'' 10 to 337 ''+ or -'' 53 pg/ml. Plasma renin activity increased after 5 min in the sling and remained increased from a basal level of 1.0 ''+ or -'' 0.2 to 2.8 ''+ or -'' 0.5 ng AI/ml/hr at four hr. Plasma cortisol (4.5 ''+ or -'' 0.6 to 8.2 ''+ or -'' 1.5 microg/dl), ACTH (45 ''+ or -'' 9 to 169 ''+ or -'' pg/ml) and aldosterone (3.5 ''+ or -'' 0.4 to 11.2 ''+ or -'' 1.1 ng/dl) rose over the four hr period. Pigs in cages showed no change in plasma hormones. Placement of an untrained pig into a sling raises heart rate, blood pressure and hematocrit and produces increases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine, ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone

  20. Estradiol potentiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone responsiveness in the anterior pituitary is mediated by an increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.; Peegel, H.; Katta, V.

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism by which 17 beta-estradiol potentiates the action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on the anterior pituitary in vitro, cultured pituitary cells from immature female rats were used as the model system. Cultures exposed to estradiol at concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L exhibited a significant augmentation of luteinizing hormone release in response to a 4-hour gonadotropin-releasing hormone (10 mumol/L) challenge at a dose of 10(-9) mol/L compared to that of control cultures. The estradiol augmentation of luteinizing hormone release was also dependent on the duration of estradiol exposure. When these cultures were incubated with tritium-labeled L-leucine, an increase in incorporation of radiolabeled amino acid into total proteins greater than that in controls was observed. A parallel stimulatory effect of estradiol on iodine 125-labeled D-Ala6 gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding was observed. Cultures incubated with estradiol at different concentrations and various lengths of time showed a significant increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding capacity and this increase was abrogated by cycloheximide. Analysis of the binding data showed that the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding activity was due to a change in the number of gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding sites rather than a change in the affinity. These results suggest that (1) estradiol treatment increases the number of pituitary receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, (2) the augmentary effect of estradiol on luteinizing hormone release at the pituitary level might be mediated, at least in part, by the increase in the number of binding sites of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and (3) new protein synthesis may be involved in estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor induction

  1. Role of Serotonin Transporter Changes in Depressive Responses to Sex-Steroid Hormone Manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe Gedsoe; Pinborg, Anja; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2015-01-01

    .6 ± 2.2) and at follow-up (16.2 ± 2.6 days after intervention start). RESULTS: Sex hormone manipulation with GnRHa significantly triggered subclinical depressive symptoms within-group (p = .003) and relative to placebo (p = .02), which were positively associated with net decreases in estradiol levels (p......BACKGROUND: An adverse response to acute and pronounced changes in sex-hormone levels during, for example, the perimenopausal or postpartum period appears to heighten risk for major depression in women. The underlying risk mechanisms remain elusive but may include transiently compromised...... serotonergic brain signaling. Here, we modeled a biphasic ovarian sex hormone fluctuation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) and evaluated if emergence of depressive symptoms was associated with change in cerebral serotonin transporter (SERT) binding following intervention. METHODS...

  2. Growth hormone response to guanfacine in boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Jeffrey M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; McKay, Kathleen E; Siever, Larry J; Sharma, Vanshdeep

    2003-01-01

    This preliminary study evaluated a method for assessing central noradrenergic function in children via the growth hormone response to a single dose of the alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine and examined whether this measure distinguishes between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) boys with and without reading disabilities (RD). Plasma growth hormone was assessed before and after the oral administration of guanfacine and placebo in boys with ADHD who were divided into subgroups based on the presence (n = 3) or absence (n = 5) of RD. Guanfacine and placebo conditions did not differ at baseline, but peak growth hormone was significantly higher following guanfacine. The increase in growth hormone following guanfacine was significantly greater in boys without RD as compared to those with RD, with no overlap between the groups. Consistent with findings using peripheral measures of noradrenergic function, these preliminary data suggest that ADHD boys with and without RD may differ in central noradrenergic function.

  3. Investigation of Responsiveness to Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ouk Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate how the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH changes according to tumor volumes. Methods. Patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly were classified as either TRH responders or nonresponders according to the results of a TRH stimulation test (TST, and their clinical characteristics were compared according to responsiveness to TRH and tumor volumes. Results. A total of 41 acromegalic patients who underwent the TST were included in this study. Between TRH responders and nonresponders, basal GH, IGF-I levels, peak GH levels, and tumor volume were not significantly different, but the between-group difference of GH levels remained near significant over the entire TST time. during the TST were significantly different according to the responsiveness to TRH. Peak GH levels and during the TST showed significantly positive correlations with tumor volume with higher levels in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. GH levels over the entire TST time also remained significantly higher in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH in GH-producing pituitary adenomas was not inversely correlated with tumor volumes.

  4. Adolescence and the ontogeny of the hormonal stress response in male and female rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Russell D; Patel, Ravenna; Pham, Laurie; So, Veronica M

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent development is marked by many changes in neuroendocrine function, resulting in both immediate and long-term influences on an individual's physiology and behavior. Stress-induced hormonal responses are one such change, with adolescent animals often showing different patterns of hormonal reactivity following a stressor compared with adults. This review will describe the unique ways in which adolescent animals respond to a variety of stressors and how these adolescent-related changes in hormonal responsiveness can be further modified by the sex and previous experience of the individual. Potential central and peripheral mechanisms that contribute to these developmental shifts in stress reactivity are also discussed. Finally, the short- and long-term programming effects of chronic stress exposure during adolescence on later adult hormonal responsiveness are also examined. Though far from a clear understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of these adolescent-related shifts in stress reactivity, continued study of developmental changes in stress-induced hormonal responses may shed light on the increased vulnerability to physical and psychological dysfunctions that often accompany a stressful adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hormonal receptors and response to treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, D.; Rakowsky, E.; Stein, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Response to several types of endocrine therapy or chemotherapy was evaluated in 60 patients with breast cancer. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were determined by radioimmunoassay. Response to endocrine therapy was significantly higher (P<0.01) among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases than among ER-negative cases. The response to chemotherapy did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this small series support the conclusion that determination of ER is valuable in planning endocrine treatment of the breast cancer patient, whereas response to chemotherapy does not correlate with ER levels. (author)

  6. Response to three years of growth hormone therapy in girls with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kyu Park

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeShort stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Improving the final adult height in these patients is a challenge both for the patients and physicians. We investigated the clinical response of patients to growth hormone treatment for height improvement over the period of three years.MethodsReview of medical records from 27 patients with Turner syndrome treated with recombinant human growth hormone for more than 3 years was done. Differences in the changes of height standard deviation scores according to karyotype were measured and factors influencing the height changes were analyzed.ResultsThe response to recombinant human growth hormone was an increase in the height of the subjects to a mean value of 1.1 standard deviation for subjects with Turner syndrome at the end of the 3-year treatment. The height increment in the first year was highest. The height standard deviation score in the third year was negatively correlated with the age at the beginning of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment. Different karyotypes in subjects did not seem to affect the height changes.ConclusionEarly growth hormone administration in subjects with Turner syndrome is helpful to improve height response to the treatment.

  7. Thyroid hormone regulation of Sirtuin 1 expression and implications to integrated responses in fasted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Aline; de Souza, Luana Lopes; Oliveira, Lorraine Soares; Faustino, Larissa Costa; Santiago, Letícia Aragão; Bloise, Flavia Fonseca; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria; Almeida, Norma Aparecida Dos Santos; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been connected to beneficial effects elicited by calorie restriction. Physiological adaptation to starvation requires higher activity of SIRT1 and also the suppression of thyroid hormone (TH) action to achieve energy conservation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that those two events are correlated and that TH may be a regulator of SIRT1 expression. Forty-eight-hour fasting mice exhibited reduced serum TH and increased SIRT1 protein content in liver and brown adipose tissue (BAT), and physiological thyroxine replacement prevented or attenuated the increment of SIRT1 in liver and BAT of fasted mice. Hypothyroid mice exhibited increased liver SIRT1 protein, while hyperthyroid ones showed decreased SIRT1 in liver and BAT. In the liver, decreased protein is accompanied by reduced SIRT1 activity and no alteration in its mRNA. Hyperthyroid and hypothyroid mice exhibited increases and decreases in food intake and body weight gain respectively. Food-restricted hyperthyroid animals (pair-fed to euthyroid group) exhibited liver and BAT SIRT1 protein levels intermediary between euthyroid and hyperthyroid mice fed ad libitum. Mice with TH resistance at the liver presented increased hepatic SIRT1 protein and activity, with no alteration in Sirt1 mRNA. These results suggest that TH decreases SIRT1 protein, directly and indirectly, via food ingestion control and, in the liver, this reduction involves TRβ. The SIRT1 reduction induced by TH has important implication to integrated metabolic responses to fasting, as the increase in SIRT1 protein requires the fasting-associated suppression of TH serum levels.

  8. Behavioural and brain responses to flavoured-meals paired with visceral stimulations in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values were studied in twelve 30-kg pigs. During four 30-min conditioning sessions per flavour, the animals received a flavoured-meal paired with intraduodenal infusions of 15% glucose (FG), lithium chloride (FL), or saline (FS). Two-choice feeding tests were performed 1 and 5 weeks later, and in between, anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three PET brain imaging with exposure to the flavours. During conditi...

  9. Pairing call-response surveys and distance sampling for a mammalian carnivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sara J. K.; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Underwood, Harold B.; Gibbs, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Density estimates accounting for differential animal detectability are difficult to acquire for wide-ranging and elusive species such as mammalian carnivores. Pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys may provide an efficient means of tracking changes in populations of coyotes (Canis latrans), a species of particular interest in the eastern United States. Blind field trials in rural New York State indicated 119-m linear error for triangulated coyote calls, and a 1.8-km distance threshold for call detectability, which was sufficient to estimate a detection function with precision using distance sampling. We conducted statewide road-based surveys with sampling locations spaced ≥6 km apart from June to August 2010. Each detected call (be it a single or group) counted as a single object, representing 1 territorial pair, because of uncertainty in the number of vocalizing animals. From 524 survey points and 75 detections, we estimated the probability of detecting a calling coyote to be 0.17 ± 0.02 SE, yielding a detection-corrected index of 0.75 pairs/10 km2 (95% CI: 0.52–1.1, 18.5% CV) for a minimum of 8,133 pairs across rural New York State. Importantly, we consider this an index rather than true estimate of abundance given the unknown probability of coyote availability for detection during our surveys. Even so, pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys provided a novel, efficient, and noninvasive means of monitoring populations of wide-ranging and elusive, albeit reliably vocal, mammalian carnivores. Our approach offers an effective new means of tracking species like coyotes, one that is readily extendable to other species and geographic extents, provided key assumptions of distance sampling are met.

  10. Response of the pigeon crop sac to mammotrophic hormones: Comparison between relaxin and prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bani, G.; Sacchi, T.B.; Bigazzi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of relaxin (RLX), a hormone that has previously been demonstrated to have mammotrophic properties, were studied in the pigeon crop sac, a well-known target organ for mammotrophic and lactogenic hormones, and compared with the effects produced by prolactin (PRL). The two hormones were injected directly over the crop at different doses and the response was evaluated after differing times of exposure. RLX causes a dose-related increase in wet and dry weights and [ 3 H]thymidine and [ 3 H]uridine uptake by the crop mucosa, as well as morphological changes indicating growth and differentiation of the epithelial cells similar to those occurring during physiological activation in incubation and hatching. At the doses assayed, the effects of RLX were nearly identical to those obtained following PRL in the short-term experiments, but differences in functional responses were found in the long-term experiment

  11. Tuning smart microgel swelling and responsive behavior through strong and weak polyelectrolyte pair assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eunice; Lloyd, Margaret M; Chopko, Caroline; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana; Hammond, Paula T

    2012-07-03

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolyte pairs on temperature and pH-sensitive cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid), poly(NIPAAm-co-MAA), microgels enabled a fine-tuning of the gel swelling and responsive behavior according to the mobility of the assembled polyelectrolyte (PE) pair and the composition of the outermost layer. Microbeads with well-defined morphology were initially prepared by synthesis in supercritical carbon dioxide. Upon LbL assembly of polyelectrolytes, interactions between the multilayers and the soft porous microgel led to differences in swelling and thermoresponsive behavior. For the weak PE pairs, namely poly(L-lysine)/poly(L-glutamic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(acrylic acid), polycation-terminated microgels were less swollen and more thermoresponsive than native microgel, whereas polyanion-terminated microgels were more swollen and not significantly responsive to temperature, in a quasi-reversible process with consecutive PE assembly. For the strong PE pair, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/poly(sodium styrene sulfonate), the differences among polycation and polyanion-terminated microgels are not sustained after the first PE bilayer due to extensive ionic cross-linking between the polyelectrolytes. The tendencies across the explored systems became less noteworthy in solutions with larger ionic strength due to overall charge shielding of the polyelectrolytes and microgel. ATR FT-IR studies correlated the swelling and responsive behavior after LbL assembly on the microgels with the extent of H-bonding and alternating charge distribution within the gel. Thus, the proposed LbL strategy may be a simple and flexible way to engineer smart microgels in terms of size, surface chemistry, overall charge and permeability.

  12. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2011-03-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as "vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins", behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Divergent hormonal responses to social competition in closely related species of haplochromine cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter D.; Verzijden, Machteld N.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    The diverse cichlid species flocks of the East African lakes provide a classical example of adaptive radiation. Territorial aggression is thought to influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity in this system. Most vertebrates mount hormonal (androgen, glucocorticoid) responses to a territorial

  14. Heterologous humoral immune response in patients treated with human growth hormone from different sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, A.I.; Llera, A.S.; Iacono, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of homologous anti-human growth hormone (anti-hGH) and heterologous anti-bovine growth hormone (anti-bGH) humoral immune responses in hypopituitary patients under hGH therapy has been reported previously. In order to study the influence of the hormone source, both responses were compared by radiobinding assays performed with [ 125 I]hGH or [ 125 I]bGH as tracers. 57 hypopituitary patients treated with extractive hGH, recombinant methionyl hGH or authentic recombinant hGH were studied. A very low incidence of heterologous antibodies was found in patients under recombinant hGH therapy, contrary to the high incidence observed in patients treated with extractive hGH preparations. In addition, immunochemical studies performed with a synthetic peptide (hGH 44-128) indicated that this peptide exhibited, in the anti-bGH/[ 125 I]bGH radioimmunoassay system, higher reactivity than the native hGH, suggesting that such fragment resembled an altered conformation of the hormone. The high heterologous response elicited only by the extractive hGH along with the behaviour of the hGH 44-128 fragment supports the fact that the extraction and purification procedures in extractive preparations may alter slightly the structure of the hGH molecule and trigger a heterologous immune response. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Heterologous humoral immune response in patients treated with human growth hormone from different sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, A.I.; Llera, A.S.; Iacono, R.F. (and others) (Inst. de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1993-07-01

    The existence of homologous anti-human growth hormone (anti-hGH) and heterologous anti-bovine growth hormone (anti-bGH) humoral immune responses in hypopituitary patients under hGH therapy has been reported previously. In order to study the influence of the hormone source, both responses were compared by radiobinding assays performed with [[sup 125]I]hGH or [[sup 125]I]bGH as tracers. 57 hypopituitary patients treated with extractive hGH, recombinant methionyl hGH or authentic recombinant hGH were studied. A very low incidence of heterologous antibodies was found in patients under recombinant hGH therapy, contrary to the high incidence observed in patients treated with extractive hGH preparations. In addition, immunochemical studies performed with a synthetic peptide (hGH 44-128) indicated that this peptide exhibited, in the anti-bGH/[[sup 125]I]bGH radioimmunoassay system, higher reactivity than the native hGH, suggesting that such fragment resembled an altered conformation of the hormone. The high heterologous response elicited only by the extractive hGH along with the behaviour of the hGH 44-128 fragment supports the fact that the extraction and purification procedures in extractive preparations may alter slightly the structure of the hGH molecule and trigger a heterologous immune response. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Sex hormones affect acute and chronic stress responses in sexually dimorphic patterns: Consequences for depression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Chen, Yi-Xi; Hu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Xue-Yan; He, Yang; Wu, Juan-Li; Huang, Man-Li; Mason, Matthew; Bao, Ai-Min

    2018-05-21

    Alterations in peripheral sex hormones may play an important role in sex differences in terms of stress responses and mood disorders. It is not yet known whether and how stress-related brain systems and brain sex steroid levels fluctuate in relation to changes in peripheral sex hormone levels, or whether the different sexes show different patterns. We aimed to investigate systematically, in male and female rats, the effect of decreased circulating sex hormone levels following gonadectomy on acute and chronic stress responses, manifested as changes in plasma and hypothalamic sex steroids and hypothalamic stress-related molecules. Experiment (Exp)-1: Rats (14 males, 14 females) were gonadectomized or sham-operated (intact); Exp-2: gonadectomized and intact rats (28 males, 28 females) were exposed to acute foot shock or no stressor; and Exp-3: gonadectomized and intact rats (32 males, 32 females) were exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) or no stressor. For all rats, plasma and hypothalamic testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), and the expression of stress-related molecules were determined, including corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasopressin, oxytocin, aromatase, and the receptors for estrogens, androgens, glucocorticoids, and mineralocorticoids. Surprisingly, no significant correlation was observed in terms of plasma sex hormones, brain sex steroids, and hypothalamic stress-related molecule mRNAs (p > 0.113) in intact or gonadectomized, male or female, rats. Male and female rats, either intact or gonadectomized and exposed to acute or chronic stress, showed different patterns of stress-related molecule changes. Diminished peripheral sex hormone levels lead to different peripheral and central patterns of change in the stress response systems in male and female rats. This has implications for the choice of models for the study of the different types of mood disorders which also show sex differences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Noradrenergic and hormonal responses to physical exercise in adolescents. Relationship to anxiety and tolerance to frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerra, G; Caccavari, R; Reali, N; Bonvicini, P; Marcato, A; Fertonani, G; Delsignore, R; Passeri, M; Brambilla, F

    1993-01-01

    Seventy physically healthy 14-year-old adolescents, 40 boys and 30 girls, were evaluated psychologically and endocrinologically. After the psychological tests (Anxiety Score Test for Adolescents, Rosenzweig, Pictures Frustration Test for Children), subjects were divided into group A, with low anxiety/sense of guilt and high self-esteem/tolerance to frustration and group B with the opposite. In both groups, we measured basal plasma levels of noradrenaline (NE), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), melatonin (MT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and their response to physical exercise (the Harvard step test). Basal levels of the hormones and of NE were not different in the two groups. After the physical stimulus, NE levels rose significantly more in B girls than in A and significantly less in B than in A boys. GH and PRL levels increased only in A girls and MT in B boys, while LH levels decreased in A boys and girls but not in B subjects.

  18. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic gl...

  19. Local and systemic hormonal responses in pepper leaves during compatible and incompatible pepper-tobamovirus interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dziurka, M.; Janeczko, A.; Juhasz, C.; Gullner, G.; Oklešťková, Jana; Novák, Ondřej; Saja, D.; Skoczowski, A.; Tobias, I.; Barna, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 109, DEC (2016), s. 355-364 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : tobacco-mosaic-virus * pathogenesis-related proteins * salicylic-acid * abscisic-acid * acquired- resistance * disease resistance * nicotiana-benthamiana * arabidopsis-thaliana * defense response * immune-responses * Brassinosteroids * Ethylene * Hormone * Pepper * Phenylalanine ammonia lyase * Progesterone * Salicylic acid * Tobamovirus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.724, year: 2016

  20. Second messenger production in avian medullary nephron segments in response to peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, D L; Reddy, V; Plaga, K

    1999-03-01

    We examined the sites of peptide hormone activation within medullary nephron segments of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) kidney by measuring rates of hormone-induced generation of cyclic nucleotide second messenger. Thin descending limbs, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts had baseline activity of adenylyl cyclase that resulted in cAMP accumulation of 207 +/- 56, 147 +/- 31, and 151 +/- 41 fmol. mm-1. 30 min-1, respectively. In all segments, this activity increased 10- to 20-fold in response to forskolin. Activity of adenylyl cyclase in the thin descending limb was stimulated approximately twofold by parathyroid hormone (PTH) but not by any of the other hormones tested [arginine vasotocin (AVT), glucagon, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), or isoproterenol, each at 10(-6) M]. Thick ascending limb was stimulated two- to threefold by both AVT and PTH; however, glucagon and isoproterenol had no effect, and ANP stimulated neither cAMP nor cGMP accumulation. Adenylyl cyclase activity in the collecting duct was stimulated fourfold by AVT but not by the other hormones; likewise, ANP did not stimulate cGMP accumulation in this segment. These data support a tubular action of AVT and PTH in the avian renal medulla.

  1. Different growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing peptide and GH-releasing hormone in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Dias, J C; Pimentel-Filho, F; Reis, A F; Lengyel, A M

    1996-04-01

    Altered GH responses to several pharmacological stimuli, including GHRH, have been found in hyperthyroidism. The mechanisms underlying these disturbances have not been fully elucidated. GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) is a synthetic hexapeptide that specifically stimulates GH release both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of action of GHRP-6 is unknown, but it probably acts by inhibiting the effects of somatostatin on GH release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GHRP-6 on GH secretion in patients with hyperthyroidism (n = 9) and in control subjects (n = 9). Each subject received GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg, iv), GHRH (100 microg, iv), and GHRP-6 plus GHRH on 3 separate days. GH peak values (mean +/- SE; micrograms per L) were significantly lower in hyperthyroid patients compared to those in control subjects after GHRH alone (9.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 27.0 +/- 5.2) and GHRP-6 plus GHRH (22.5 +/- 3.5 vs. 83.7 +/- 15.2); a lack of the normal synergistic effect of the association of both peptides was observed in thyrotoxicosis. However, a similar GH response was seen in both groups after isolated GHRP-6 injection (31.9 +/- 5.7 vs. 23.2 +/- 3.9). In summary, we have shown that hyperthyroid patients have a normal GH response to GHRP-6 together with a blunted GH responsiveness to GHRH. Our data suggest that thyroid hormones modulate GH release induced by these two peptides in a differential way.

  2. Recall and response time norms for English-Swahili word pairs and facts about Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Ashley S; Heydarian, Nazanin M

    2017-02-01

    In the vast literature exploring learning, many studies have used paired-associate stimuli, despite the fact that real-world learning involves many different types of information. One of the most popular materials used in studies of learning has been a set of Swahili-English word pairs for which Nelson and Dunlosky (Memory 2; 325-335, 1994) published recall norms two decades ago. These norms involved use of the Swahili words as cues to facilitate recall of the English translation. It is unclear whether cueing in the opposite direction (from English to Swahili) would lead to symmetric recall performance. Bilingual research has suggested that translation in these two different directions involves asymmetric links that may differentially impact recall performance, depending on which language is used as the cue (Kroll & Stewart, Journal of Memory and Language 33; 149-174,1994). Moreover, the norms for these and many other learning stimuli have typically been gathered from college students. In the present study, we report recall accuracy and response time norms for Swahili words when they are cued by their English translations. We also report norms for a companion set of fact stimuli that may be used along with the Swahili-English word pairs to assess learning on a broader scale across different stimulus materials. Data were collected using Amazon's Mechanical Turk to establish a sample that was diverse in both age and ethnicity. These different, but related, stimulus sets will be applicable to studies of learning, metacognition, and memory in diverse samples.

  3. Linear response calculation using the canonical-basis TDHFB with a schematic pairing functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Shuichiro; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A canonical-basis formulation of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (TDHFB) theory is obtained with an approximation that the pair potential is assumed to be diagonal in the time-dependent canonical basis. The canonical-basis formulation significantly reduces the computational cost. We apply the method to linear-response calculations for even-even nuclei. E1 strength distributions for proton-rich Mg isotopes are systematically calculated. The calculation suggests strong Landau damping of giant dipole resonance for drip-line nuclei.

  4. Candesartan decreases the sympatho-adrenal and hormonal response to isolation stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Armando

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A change from group housing to isolation in unfamiliar metabolic cages represents, for rodents, a significant emotional stress. We studied the effect of candesartan, a peripheral and central angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist, on the hormonal and sympathetic response to acute isolation. We pretreated rats with 1 mg/kg/day candesartan for 13 days via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps, followed by 24-hour isolation in individual metabolic cages. We measured brain, pituitary and adrenal angiotensin II (Ang II receptor binding by quantitative autoradiography and adrenal hormones and catecholamines by RIA and HPLC. Isolation increased adrenal catecholamines, aldosterone and corticosterone, AT1-receptor binding in the zona glomerulosa and AT2-receptor binding in the adrenal medulla. Candesartan pretreatment decreased adrenal catecholamines, aldosterone and corticosterone, AT1-receptor binding in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla, pituitary gland and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, and AT2-receptor binding in adrenal medulla, but increased AT2-receptor binding in zona glomerulosa. We conclude that peripheral and central AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan decreases the sympatho-adrenal and hormonal response to acute stress. Our results indicate that Ang II is an important stress hormone and suggest that blockade of the physiologically active AT 1-receptors could influence stress-related disorders.

  5. Behavioural and Hormonal Stress Responses to Social Separation in Ravens, Corvus corax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Alexandru M; Stocker, Martina; Stöwe, Mareike; Massen, Jorg J M; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Social life is profitable, but it facilitates conflicts over resources and creates interdependence between individuals. Separating highly social animals triggers intense reactions aimed at re-establishing lost connections. Less is known, however, about behavioural and physiological responses to separation in socially facultative species, where individuals temporarily form groups and may subsequently leave them. Non-breeding common ravens ( Corvus corax ) gather in large numbers at feeding and roosting sites, but otherwise spend time seemingly solitary or in small subgroups. We here studied how ravens cope with being socially isolated, and investigated the life characteristics that might explain potential individual differences. For this, we individually separated captive subadult ravens (n = 25) and housed them in physical and visual isolation from their group members across 4 d. During the separation period, we collected behavioural data and measured the amount of immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites from bird droppings to assess the ravens' physiological stress response. We found behavioural indicators of stress at the start of the separation, when ravens showed higher levels of tension than of comfort - a pattern that reversed at the end of the separation. Furthermore, we found that the upbringing of ravens affected their behaviour during separation. Hand-raised birds produced more vocalisations in the beginning of the separation, and were less active at the end, while the reverse pattern occurred with parent-raised ravens. Contrary to our predictions, we did not find differences in hormonal responses between the beginning and end of the separation period or any link between hormonal responses and behaviours. Ravens' behavioural responses to social separation stress seem to be dependent on their arousal states, although possible links with hormonal reactions remain unclear. Our results show that behavioural reactions are not always linked with hormonal

  6. Oblique Wave-Induced Responses of A VLFS Edged with A Pair of Inclined Perforated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Ji, Chun-yan; Zhai, Gang-jun; Oleg, Gaidai

    2018-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the hydroelastic responses of a mat-like, rectangular very large floating structure (VLFS) edged with a pair of horizontal/inclined perforated anti-motion plates in the context of the direct coupling method. The updated Lagrangian formulae are applied to establish the equilibrium equations of the VLFS and the total potential formula is employed for fluids in the numerical model including the viscous effect of the perforated plates through the Darcy's law. The hybrid finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) method is implemented to determine the response reduction of VLFS with attached perforated plates under various oblique incident waves. Also, the numerical solutions are validated against a series of experimental tests. The effectiveness of the attached perforated plates in reducing the deflections of the VLFS can be significantly improved by selecting the proper design parameters such as the porous parameter, submergence depth, plate width and inclination angle for the given sea conditions.

  7. The effect of eating speed at breakfast on appetite hormone responses and daily food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Meena; Crisp, Kelli; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Dart, Lyn; Bouza, Brooke; Franklin, Brian; Phillips, Melody

    2015-01-01

    The effect of eating speed at a meal on appetite gut hormone responses and future food consumption is not clear. This study examined the effect of eating speed at breakfast on postprandial gut hormone responses, subjective appetite, and daily food consumption. Twenty-five participants [68% men; age, 25.9 (8.1) years; body mass index, 25.0 (3.2) kg/m] were recruited. Each participant consumed the same breakfast at a slow (30 minutes) and fast (10 minutes) speed, on 2 separate days, in a randomized crossover design. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and 3 hours postprandially during each eating condition. Appetite was assessed over the same period using visual analog scales. Blood concentrations of orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY), were determined. Daily food intake was measured, by food recall, after the slow and fast breakfast. Mixed-model repeated-measures analysis showed no eating condition or eating condition by time interaction effect on ghrelin, GLP-1, PYY, hunger, or fullness. Significant eating speed by time interaction effect on desire to eat was found (P=0.007). Desire to eat was lower at 60 minutes (P=0.007) after breakfast began during the slow versus fast eating condition. Eating speed at breakfast did not affect daily energy and macronutrient intake. Eating speed at breakfast did not affect postprandial ghrelin, GLP-1, PYY, hunger, and fullness values or daily energy and macronutrient intake. Desire to eat was lower at 60 minutes in the slow versus fast eating condition, but this result could not be explained by the changes in meal-related hormones measured in the study.

  8. Phytohormone signaling pathway analysis method for comparing hormone responses in plant-pest interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studham Matthew E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytohormones mediate plant defense responses to pests and pathogens. In particular, the hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid have been shown to dictate and fine-tune defense responses, and identification of the phytohormone components of a particular defense response is commonly used to characterize it. Identification of phytohormone regulation is particularly important in transcriptome analyses. Currently there is no computational tool to determine the relative activity of these hormones that can be applied to transcriptome analyses in soybean. Findings We developed a pathway analysis method that provides a broad measure of the activation or suppression of individual phytohormone pathways based on changes in transcript expression of pathway-related genes. The magnitude and significance of these changes are used to determine a pathway score for a phytohormone for a given comparison in a microarray experiment. Scores for individual hormones can then be compared to determine the dominant phytohormone in a given defense response. To validate this method, it was applied to publicly available data from previous microarray experiments that studied the response of soybean plants to Asian soybean rust and soybean cyst nematode. The results of the analyses for these experiments agreed with our current understanding of the role of phytohormones in these defense responses. Conclusions This method is useful in providing a broad measure of the relative induction and suppression of soybean phytohormones during a defense response. This method could be used as part of microarray studies that include individual transcript analysis, gene set analysis, and other methods for a comprehensive defense response characterization.

  9. Metabolomics Analysis of Hormone-Responsive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Responses to Paclitaxel Identify Key Metabolic Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Delisha A; Winnike, Jason H; McRitchie, Susan L; Clark, Robert F; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-09-02

    To date, no targeted therapies are available to treat triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), while other breast cancer subtypes are responsive to current therapeutic treatment. Metabolomics was conducted to reveal differences in two hormone receptor-negative TNBC cell lines and two hormone receptor-positive Luminal A cell lines. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of paclitaxel (Taxol). TNBC cell lines had higher levels of amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars and lower levels of proliferation-related metabolites like choline compared with Luminal A cell lines. In the presence of paclitaxel, each cell line showed unique metabolic responses, with some similarities by type. For example, in the Luminal A cell lines, levels of lactate and creatine decreased while certain choline metabolites and myo-inositol increased with paclitaxel. In the TNBC cell lines levels of glutamine, glutamate, and glutathione increased, whereas lysine, proline, and valine decreased in the presence of drug. Profiling secreted inflammatory cytokines in the conditioned media demonstrated a greater response to paclitaxel in the hormone-positive Luminal cells compared with a secretion profile that suggested greater drug resistance in the TNBC cells. The most significant differences distinguishing the cell types based on pathway enrichment analyses were related to amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways, whereas several biological pathways were differentiated between the cell lines following treatment.

  10. Modulation of the Chlamydia trachomatis In vitro transcriptome response by the sex hormones estradiol and progesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symonds Ian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease in humans. Previous studies in both humans and animal models of chlamydial genital tract infection have suggested that the hormonal status of the genital tract epithelium at the time of exposure can influence the outcome of the chlamydial infection. We performed a whole genome transcriptional profiling study of C. trachomatis infection in ECC-1 cells under progesterone or estradiol treatment. Results Both hormone treatments caused a significant shift in the sub-set of genes expressed (25% of the transcriptome altered by more than 2-fold. Overall, estradiol treatment resulted in the down-regulation of 151 genes, including those associated with lipid and nucleotide metabolism. Of particular interest was the up-regulation in estradiol-supplemented cultures of six genes (omcB, trpB, cydA, cydB, pyk and yggV, which suggest a stress response similar to that reported previously in other models of chlamydial persistence. We also observed morphological changes consistent with a persistence response. By comparison, progesterone supplementation resulted in a general up-regulation of an energy utilising response. Conclusion Our data shows for the first time, that the treatment of chlamydial host cells with key reproductive hormones such as progesterone and estradiol, results in significantly altered chlamydial gene expression profiles. It is likely that these chlamydial expression patterns are survival responses, evolved by the pathogen to enable it to overcome the host's innate immune response. The induction of chlamydial persistence is probably a key component of this survival response.

  11. Sex differences, hormones, and fMRI stress response circuitry deficits in psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jill M; Lancaster, Katie; Longenecker, Julia M; Abbs, Brandon; Holsen, Laura M; Cherkerzian, Sara; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nicolas; Tsuang, Ming T; Buka, Stephen L; Seidman, Larry J; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-06-30

    Response to stress is dysregulated in psychosis (PSY). fMRI studies showed hyperactivity in hypothalamus (HYPO), hippocampus (HIPP), amygdala (AMYG), anterior cingulate (ACC), orbital and medial prefrontal (OFC; mPFC) cortices, with some studies reporting sex differences. We predicted abnormal steroid hormone levels in PSY would be associated with sex differences in hyperactivity in HYPO, AMYG, and HIPP, and hypoactivity in PFC and ACC, with more severe deficits in men. We studied 32 PSY cases (50.0% women) and 39 controls (43.6% women) using a novel visual stress challenge while collecting blood. PSY males showed BOLD hyperactivity across all hypothesized regions, including HYPO and ACC by FWE-correction. Females showed hyperactivity in HIPP and AMYG and hypoactivity in OFC and mPFC, the latter FWE-corrected. Interaction of group by sex was significant in mPFC (F = 7.00, p = 0.01), with PSY females exhibiting the lowest activity. Male hyperactivity in HYPO and ACC was significantly associated with hypercortisolemia post-stress challenge, and mPFC with low androgens. Steroid hormones and neural activity were dissociated in PSY women. Findings suggest disruptions in neural circuitry-hormone associations in response to stress are sex-dependent in psychosis, particularly in prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of ovarian hormones on the phagocytic response of ovariectomized mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjam, V K; McLeod, C; Klesius, P H; Washburn, S M; Kwapien, R; Brown, B; Fazeli, M H

    1982-01-01

    The reaction between ovarian hormones and experimental uterine infection (Streptococcus zooepidemicus) was investigated in 3 groups, each containing 6 ovariectomized mares. Group 1 served as controls ('anoestrus'), Group 2 mares were injected with oestrogen ('oestrus') and Group 3 with progesterone ('dioestrus') over a period of 5 weeks. All mares received an intrauterine inoculation of the bacteria 1 week after the start of hormonal treatment, and the results of the challenge were examined by endometrial biopsy and swabs once weekly. At the end of Week 1 no bacteria were recovered from the mares in Group 2. Group 1 mares were free of bacteria at the end of Week 2 but all Group 3 mares remained infected at least for the total period examined. Streptococcal phagocytosis was quantitated by chemiluminescence. Before the challenge-inoculation, phagocytosis was not significantly different in the 3 groups of mares. Bacterial cultures were negative for all three groups. However, within 48 h after infection, there was a significant increase (P less than 0.01) in phagocytosis in Group 2 and a significant suppression (P less than 0.05) in Group 3 mares. Patterns of streptococcal clearance from the uterus closely paralleled the changes in the magnitude of chemiluminescence response. The results suggest that ovarian hormonal status can modulate the phagocytic response in episodes of streptococcal-induced endometritus in mares.

  13. Transcript and hormone analyses reveal the involvement of ABA-signalling, hormone crosstalk and genotype-specific biological processes in cold-shock response in wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalapos, S.; Dobrev, Petre; Nagy, T.; Vítámvás, P.; Gyorgyey, J.; Kocsy, G.; Marincs, F.; Galiba, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, DEC (2016), s. 86-97 ISSN 0168-9452 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : complex phytohormone responses * abscisic-acid biosynthesis * frost-resistance * stress responses * gene-expression * chromosome 5a * triticum-monococcum * regulatory network * basal resistance * abiotic stresses * ABA-Signalling * Carbon metabolism * Freezing-tolerance * Gene ontology * Plant hormones * Short-term cold-shock * Triticum aestivum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.437, year: 2016

  14. Sex Differences in Stress Response Circuitry Activation Dependent on Female Hormonal Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jill M.; Jerram, Matthew; Abbs, Brandon; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nikos

    2010-01-01

    Understanding sex differences in stress regulation has important implications for understanding basic physiological differences in the male and female brain and their impact on vulnerability to sex differences in chronic medical disorders associated with stress response circuitry. In this fMRI study, we demonstrated that significant sex differences in brain activity in stress response circuitry were dependent on women's menstrual cycle phase. Twelve healthy Caucasian premenopausal women were compared to a group of healthy men from the same population, based on age, ethnicity, education, and right-handedness. Subjects were scanned using negative valence/high arousal versus neutral visual stimuli that we demonstrated activated stress response circuitry (amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices (OFC and mPFC), and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG). Women were scanned twice based on normal variation in menstrual cycle hormones (i.e., early follicular (EF) compared with late follicular-midcycle menstrual phases (LF/MC)). Using SPM8b, there were few significant differences in BOLD signal changes in men compared to EF women, except ventromedial (VMN) and lateral (LHA) hypothalamus, left amygdala, and ACG. In contrast, men exhibited significantly greater BOLD signal changes compared to LF/MC women on bilateral ACG and OFC, mPFC, LHA, VMN, hippocampus, and periaqueductal gray, with largest effect sizes in mPFC and OFC. Findings suggest that sex differences in stress response circuitry are hormonally regulated via the impact of subcortical brain activity on the cortical control of arousal, and demonstrate that females have been endowed with a natural hormonal capacity to regulate the stress response that differs from males. PMID:20071507

  15. Genetic architecture of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, Kate E; Rueppell, Olav; Huang, Zachary Y; Wang, Ying; Fondrk, M Kim; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V

    2015-01-01

    Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with these behavioral phenotypes, comprising the pollen hoarding syndrome (PHS) one of the best-described animal behavioral syndromes. Genotype differences in responsiveness of JH to Vg are a potential mechanistic basis for the PHS. Here, we reduced Vg expression via RNA interference in progeny from a backcross between 2 selected lines of honey bees that differ in JH responsiveness to Vg reduction and measured JH response and ovary size, which represents another key aspect of the PHS. Genetic mapping based on restriction site-associated DNA tag sequencing identified suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ovary size and JH responsiveness. We confirmed genetic effects on both traits near many QTL that had been identified previously for their effect on various PHS traits. Thus, our results support a role for endocrine control of complex traits at a genetic level. Furthermore, this first example of a genetic map of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in a social insect helps to refine the genetic understanding of complex behaviors and the physiology that may underlie behavioral control in general. © The American Genetic Association. 2015.

  16. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, P. J. de, E-mail: p.j.devisser@tudelft.nl [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Yates, S. J. C. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Neto, A.; Llombart, N. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Baryshev, A. M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Baselmans, J. J. A. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-22

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements.

  17. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, P. J. de; Yates, S. J. C.; Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.; Neto, A.; Llombart, N.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements

  18. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected ...

  19. Prolactin response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in early and advanced human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barni, S.; Lissoni, P.; Tancini, G.

    1986-01-01

    While prolactin (PRL) has been shown to stimulate the development of mammary carcinoma in several animal species, its role in human breast cancer remains to be established. To further investigate PRL secretion in human breast cancer, its basal levels and response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were evaluated in 16 patients (6 with no metastases and 10 with metastatic locations). The control group consisted of 19 healthy women. High PRL basal concentrations were seen in 2 patients only; no significant differences were found between the other patients and the normal subjects. The PRL increase induced by TRH administration was significantly higher in patients than in controls. Finally a change in the hormonal secretion was found after chemotherapy in 3 of the 5 patients in whom PRL response to TRH was evaluated either before or 10-12 days after a cycle of intravenous CMF adjuvant chemotherapy. These results demostrate the existence of an exaggerated response of PRL to TRH in patients with breast cancer, even in the presence of normal basal levels. Moreover, they would seem to suggest a possible influence of CMF on PRL response to TRH stimulation

  20. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  1. Chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on the executive function and oxidative stress response in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos K B Ferrari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: to investigate the chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on executive function and the oxidative stress response in rats. Materials and Methods: Fifty male Wistar rats (36-40 weeks old had ad libitum access to water and food and were separated into four groups: diurnal control, nocturnal control, diurnal GH-treated, and nocturnal GH-treated animals. Levels of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, and superoxide release by spleen macrophages were evaluated. For memory testing, adaptation and walking in an open field platform was used. GH-treated animals demonstrated better performance in exploratory and spatial open-field tests. Results: The latency time in both GH-treated groups was significantly lower compared with the latency time of the control groups. The diurnal GH treatment did not stimulate superoxide release but increased the CuZn-SOD enzyme levels. The nocturnal GH treatment did not influence the superoxide release and CuZn-SOD concentration. GH treatment also resulted in heart atrophy and lung hypertrophy. Conclusion: Growth hormone treatment improved the performance of executive functions at the cost of oxidative stress triggering, and this effect was dependent on the circadian period of hormone administration. However, GH treatment caused damaging effects such as lung hypertrophy and heart atrophy.

  2. Chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on the executive function and oxidative stress response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Carlos K B; França, Eduardo L; Monteiro, Luciane A; Santos, Bruno L; Pereira-Junior, Alfredo; Honorio-França, Adenilda C

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the chronopharmacological effects of growth hormone on executive function and the oxidative stress response in rats. Fifty male Wistar rats (36-40 weeks old) had ad libitum access to water and food and were separated into four groups: diurnal control, nocturnal control, diurnal GH-treated, and nocturnal GH-treated animals. Levels of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD), and superoxide release by spleen macrophages were evaluated. For memory testing, adaptation and walking in an open field platform was used. GH-treated animals demonstrated better performance in exploratory and spatial open-field tests. The latency time in both GH-treated groups was significantly lower compared with the latency time of the control groups. The diurnal GH treatment did not stimulate superoxide release but increased the CuZn-SOD enzyme levels. The nocturnal GH treatment did not influence the superoxide release and CuZn-SOD concentration. GH treatment also resulted in heart atrophy and lung hypertrophy. Growth hormone treatment improved the performance of executive functions at the cost of oxidative stress triggering, and this effect was dependent on the circadian period of hormone administration. However, GH treatment caused damaging effects such as lung hypertrophy and heart atrophy.

  3. Cyclic AMP regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone α-subunit gene is mediated by an 18-base-pair element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, B.J.; Bokar, J.A.; Virgin, J.B.; Vallen, E.A.; Milsted, A.; Nilson, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    cAMP regulates transcription of the gene encoding the α-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the choriocarcinoma cells (BeWo). To define the sequences required for regulation by cAMP, the authors inserted fragments from the 5' flanking region of the α-subunit gene into a test vector containing the simian virus 40 early promoter (devoid of its enhancer) linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Results from transient expression assays in BeWo cells indicated that a 1500-base-pair (bp) fragment conferred cAMP responsiveness on the CAT gene regardless of position or orientation of the insert relative to the viral promoter. A subfragment extending from position -169 to position -100 had the same effect on cAMP-induced expression. Furthermore, the entire stimulatory effect could be achieved with an 18-bp synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide corresponding to a direct repeat between position -146 and -111. In the absence of cAMP, the α-subunit 5' flanking sequence also enhanced transcription from the simian virus 40 early promoter. They localized this enhancer activity to the same -169/-100 fragment containing the cAMP response element. The 18-bp element alone, however, had no effect on basal expression. Thus, this short DNA sequence serves as a cAMP response element and also functions independently of other promoter-regulatory elements located in the 5' flanking sequence of the α-subunit gene

  4. Proteome and radioimmunoassay analyses of pituitary hormones and proteins in response to feed restriction of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, Björn; Albrecht, Dirk; Bruckmaier, Rupert; Viergutz, Torsten; Nürnberg, Gerd; Metges, Cornelia C

    2010-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system controls homeostasis during feed energy reduction. In order to examine which pituitary proteins and hormone variants are potentially associated with metabolic adaptation, pituitary glands from ad libitum and energy restrictively fed dairy cows were characterized using RIA and 2-DE followed by MALDI-TOF-MS. We found 64 different spots of regulatory hormones: growth hormone (44), preprolactin (16), luteinizing hormone (LH) (1), thyrotropin (1), proopiomelanocortin (1) and its cleavage product lipotropin (1), but none of these did significantly differ between feeding groups. Quantification of total pituitary LH and prolactin concentrations by RIA confirmed the results obtained by proteome analysis. Also, feed energy restriction provoked increasing non-esterified fatty acid, decreasing prolactin, but unaltered glucose, LH and growth hormone plasma concentrations. Energy restriction decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, triosephosphate isomerase, purine-rich element-binding protein A and elongation factor Tu, whereas it increased expression of proline synthetase co-transcribed homolog, peroxiredoxin III, β-tubulin and annexin A5 which is involved in the hormone secretion process. Our results indicate that in response to feed energy restriction the pituitary reservoir of all posttranslationally modified hormone forms remains constant. Changing plasma hormone concentrations are likely attributed to a regulated releasing process from the gland into the blood. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Severe short stature and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: response to growth hormone in two cases without growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Devon E; Gunn, Alistair J; Jefferies, Craig A

    2015-02-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a rare congenital disorder occurring in approximately 1/50 000 births, with marked pre- and postnatal growth failure. WHS results from the hemizygous deletion encompassing the 4p16.3 region. This report of two children with WHS shows that growth hormone treatment in selected children with WHS and severe short stature may have a substantial effect on long-term growth.

  6. A new image reconstruction method for 3-D PET based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatsu, Shoji [Department of Radiology, Kyoritu General Hospital, 4-33 Go-bancho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 456-8611 (Japan) and Department of Brain Science and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 36-3, Gengo Moriaka-cho, Obu-shi, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: b6rgw@fantasy.plala.or.jp; Ushiroya, Noboru [Department of General Education, Wakayama National College of Technology, 77 Noshima, Nada-cho, Gobo-shi, Wakayama 644-0023 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    We formerly introduced a new image reconstruction method for three-dimensional positron emission tomography, which is based upon pairs of near-missing lines of response. This method uses an elementary geometric property of lines of response, namely that two lines of response which originate from radioactive isotopes located within a sufficiently small voxel, will lie within a few millimeters of each other. The effectiveness of this method was verified by performing a simulation using GATE software and a digital Hoffman phantom.

  7. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs

  8. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R. (Hospital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Pediatric Endocrinology Unit and INSERM U30)

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs.

  9. Penile growth in response to hormone treatment in children with micropenis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra B Nerli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Micropenis is defined as a stretched penile length 2.5 standard deviations less than the mean for age without the presence of any other penile anomalies, such as hypospadias. The term refers to a specific disorder that has a known set of causative factors and defined treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hormonal therapy on the gonadal response and penile growth in children who presented with micropenis. Materials and Methods: Children (<18 years who met the criteria for micropenis were included in this study. Children more than 11 years old were treated using a standard protocol of 1,500 to 2,000 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin administrated intramuscularly, once per week, for 6 weeks. Children less than 11 years old were treated with parenteral testosterone enanthate 25 mg once a month for 3 months. Response was evaluated in terms of change in testosterone levels and size of penis. Results: Serum testosterone levels at baseline and after 8 weeks of hormonal treatment were <20 and 449.4 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.0001 in all children more than 11 years old. Stretched penile length after hormonal treatment increased from 15.54 to 37.18 mm in children less than 11 years old and from 26.42 to 64.28 mm in children more than 11 years old (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Management of isolated micropenis revolves around testosterone (direct administration or encouraging the patient′s body to make its own, and results with respect to increase in penile length are promising.

  10. Different stress modalities result in distinct steroid hormone responses by male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Andersen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Since both paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD and stress alter male reproductive function, the purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of PSD and other stressors (restraint, electrical footshock, cold and forced swimming, N = 10 per group on steroid hormones in adult Wistar male rats. Rats were submitted to chronic stress for four days. The stressors (footshock, cold and forced swimming were applied twice a day, for periods of 1 h at 9:00 and 16:00 h. Restrained animals were maintained in plastic cylinders for 22 h/day whereas PSD was continuous. Hormone determination was measured by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (testosterone, competitive immunoassay (progesterone and by radioimmunoassay (corticosterone, estradiol, estrone. The findings indicate that PSD (13.7 ng/dl, footshock (31.7 ng/dl and cold (35.2 ng/dl led to lower testosterone levels compared to the swimming (370.4 ng/dl and control (371.4 ng/dl groups. However, progesterone levels were elevated in the footshock (4.5 ng/ml and PSD (5.4 ng/ml groups compared to control (1.6 ng/ml, swimming (1.1 ng/ml, cold (2.3 ng/ml, and restrained (1.2 ng/ml animals. Estrone and estradiol levels were reduced in the PSD, footshock and restraint groups compared to the control, swimming and cold groups. A significant increase in corticosterone levels was found only in the PSD (299.8 ng/ml and footshock (169.6 ng/ml groups. These changes may be thought to be the full steroidal response to stress of significant intensity. Thus, the data suggest that different stress modalities result in distinct steroid hormone responses, with PSD and footshock being the most similar.

  11. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-08-03

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies.

  12. Seasonal variation in hormonal responses of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) to reproductive and environmental stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterschmidt, William I; Lutterschmidt, Deborah I; Mason, Robert T; Reinert, Howard K

    2009-08-01

    Data addressing adrenocortical modulation across taxonomic groups are limited, especially with regard to how female reproductive condition influences the sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. We investigated seasonal and reproductive variation in basal and stress-induced hormone profiles in a population of free-ranging timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) in north-central Pennsylvania during spring (i.e., May), summer (i.e., July), and early fall (i.e., September). Baseline corticosterone concentrations varied seasonally and were significantly lower during the summer sampling period in July. We observed a significant negative relationship between baseline corticosterone and testosterone in male snakes, while baseline corticosterone and estradiol tended to be positively correlated in females. Treatment of snakes with 1 h of capture stress significantly increased corticosterone across all seasons. However, there was a significant interaction between corticosterone responses to capture stress and season, suggesting that adrenocortical function is modulated seasonally. Because elevated corticosterone may be associated with reproduction, we asked whether hormonal stress responses vary with female reproductive condition. Although sample sizes are low, reproductive snakes had significantly higher baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations than non-reproductive or post-parturient females. Further, despite similar baseline corticosterone concentrations between non-reproductive and post-parturient rattlesnakes, post-parturient females responded to capture stress with a significantly higher increase in corticosterone. Collectively, these data suggest that the sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis varies both seasonally and with changing reproductive states.

  13. Polymeric microcapsules assembled from a cationic/zwitterionic pair of responsive block copolymer micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Timothy; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon; Armes, Steven P; York, David

    2010-05-04

    Using a layer-by-layer (LbL) approach, this work presents the preparation of hollow microcapsules with a membrane constructed entirely from a cationic/zwitterionic pair of pH-responsive block copolymer micelles. Our previous work with such systems highlighted that, in order to retain the responsive nature of the individual micelles contained within the multilayer membranes, it is important to optimize the conditions required for the selective dissolution of the sacrificial particulate templates. Consequently, here, calcium carbonate particles have been employed as colloidal templates as they can be easily dissolved in aqueous environments with the addition of chelating agents such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Furthermore, the dissolution can be carried out in solutions buffered to a desirable pH so not to adversely affect the pH sensitive micelles forming the capsule membranes. First, we have deposited alternating layers of anionic poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-block-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)] (PDMA-PDEA) and cationic poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)methacrylate-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PDEA-PMAA) copolymer micelles onto calcium carbonate colloidal templates. After deposition of five micelle bilayers, addition of dilute EDTA solution resulted in dissolution of the calcium carbonate and formation of hollow polymer capsules. The capsules were imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which shows that the micelle/micelle membrane is sufficiently robust to withstand dissolution of the supporting template. Quartz crystal microbalance studies were conducted and provide good evidence that the micelle multilayer structure is retained after EDTA treatment. In addition, a hydrophobic dye was incorporated into the micelle cores prior to adsorption. After dissolution of the particle template, the resulting hollow capsules retained a high concentration of dye, suggesting that the core

  14. Salivary Hormones Response to Preparation and Pre-competitive Training of World-class Level Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Gaël; Hanon, Christine; Gendreau, Nicolas; Bonneau, Dominique; Guével, Arnaud; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the response of salivary hormones of track and field athletes induced by preparation and pre-competitive training periods in an attempt to comment on the physiological effects consistent with the responses of each of the proteins measured. Salivary testosterone, cortisol, alpha-amylase, immunoglobulin A (IgA), chromogranin A, blood creatine kinase activity, and profile of mood state were assessed at rest in 24 world-class level athletes during preparation (3 times in 3 months) and pre-competitive (5 times in 5 weeks) training periods. Total mood disturbance and fatigue perception were reduced, while IgA (+61%) and creatine kinase activity (+43%) increased, and chromogranin A decreased (−27%) during pre-competitive compared to preparation period. A significant increase in salivary testosterone (+9 to +15%) and a decrease in testosterone/cortisol ratio were associated with a progressive reduction in training load during pre-competitive period (P athletics training. PMID:26635619

  15. Postprandial responses of incretin and pancreatic hormones in non-diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    of the insulinotropic gut-derived incretin hormones and pancreatic hormones play a critical role in the maintenance of a normal postprandial glucose tolerance. METHODS: We studied patients with ESRD and either normal (n = 10) or impaired (n = 10) glucose tolerance, and control subjects (n = 11). Plasma concentrations...... glucose responses were comparable between groups (P > 0.082). Patients with ESRD exhibited higher fasting levels of GIP and glucagon compared with controls (P corrected GLP-1 and glucagon responses were enhanced (P corrected insulin responses and insulin excursions...... increased secretion of the insulinotropic incretin hormone GLP-1. Fasting levels and baseline-corrected responses of glucagon were elevated and gastric emptying was delayed in the ESRD patients. These perturbations seem to be caused by uraemia per se and may contribute to the disturbed glucose metabolism...

  16. Plasma growth hormone response to human growth hormone releasing factor in rats administered with chlorpromazine and antiserum against somatostatin. Effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Tonegawa, Y; Ihara, T; Hattori, M; Shibasaki, T; Ling, N

    1985-10-01

    The effect of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the plasma growth hormone (GH) response to synthetic human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was determined in conscious, freely moving rats pretreated with chlorpromazine and antiserum against somatostatin. Chlorpromazine plus somatostatin antiserum pretreated rats gave consistent response to GRF which was not observed in untreated rats. Chlorpromazine alone has no effect on GH secretion induced by GRF in rat pituitary monolayer culture. In rats made hypothyroid by thyroidectomy, both basal and peak plasma GH responses to a small (0.25 microgram/kg bw) and a moderate dose of GRF (1 microgram/kg bw) were significantly reduced as compared to controls. In rats made hyperthyroid by the administration of thyroxine, basal and peak plasma GH responses to a small but not to a moderate dose of GRF were significantly reduced as compared to controls. A reduced plasma GH response to a small dose of GRF was observed 8 days after the cessation of thyroxine administration. The pituitary GH reserve was markedly reduced in hypothyroid but not in hyperthyroid rats as compared to their respective controls. These results indicate that plasma GH response to GRF is reduced both in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. The mechanism involved in the phenomenon appears to be different between the two conditions.

  17. Dependency of maximum goitrogenic response on some minimal level of thyroid hormone production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, B.E.; Poon, R.

    1981-01-01

    Thyroidal activity was studied in chicks given dietary thiouracil in conjunction with daily doses of thyroxine and with diets adequate and deficient in iodine. DL-thyroxine administered at doses up to 1.0 microgram per day for 10 to 12 days had no effect or slightly increased thyroid weight. Both the epithelial and colloid components of the thyroid gland were increased in response to thiouracil and to thiouracil in combination with low dosages of exogenous thyroxine. Radioiodine uptake was increased above the control with thiouracil and with thiouracil in conjunction with .5 and 1.0 microgram DL-thyroxine given daily. Birds receiving thiouracil, with and without exogenous thyroxine, showed a different pattern of radioiodine uptake and release than the control birds. Thiouracil-treated birds showed a rapid uptake of iodine following its administration, which was followed by a rapid decline immediately after peak accumulation, whereas in control birds thyroidal radioiodine concentration reached a plateau at the maximum concentration attained. The goitrogenic response to thiouracil was much greater when the diet was supplemented with iodine than when the diet was iodine-deficient. Thyroids under iodine deficiency contained greater percentages of epithelial tissue than with iodine-supplemented diets. Thyroid glands of chicks given thiouracil in an iodine-supplemented diet contained much more colloid than glands from iodine-deficient chicks with or without thiouracil. DL-thyroxine at a dosage of .5 microgram per day to chicks given thiouracil in an iodine-adequate diet increased, whereas higher dosages decreased thyroidal colloid. It is concluded that some minimal concentration of thyroid hormone is required for maximum goitrogenic response. It is not clear whether the response is entirely due to an effect on thyrotropin production or whether there is an effect of thyroid hormone on the thyroid gland itself

  18. Predicting Treatment Response for Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorder Using Pre-treatment Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E; Dorn, Lorah D; Kolko, David J; Susman, Elizabeth J; Noll, Jennie G; Bukstein, Oscar G

    2012-12-01

    Variations in adrenal and gonadal hormone profiles have been linked to increased rates of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD). These relationships suggest that certain hormone profiles may be related to how well children respond to psychological treatments for ODD and CD. The current study assessed whether pre-treatment profiles of adrenal and gonadal hormones predicted response to psychological treatment of ODD and CD. One hundred five children, 6 - 11 years old, participating in a randomized, clinical trial provided samples for cortisol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione. Diagnostic interviews of ODD and CD were administered up to three years post-treatment to track treatment response. Group-based trajectory modeling identified two trajectories of treatment response: 1) a High-response trajectory where children demonstrated lower rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up, and 2) a Low-response trajectory where children demonstrated higher rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up. Hierarchical logistic regression predicting treatment response demonstrated that children with higher pre-treatment concentrations of testosterone were four times more likely to be in the Low-response trajectory. No other significant relationship existed between pre-treatment hormone profiles and treatment response. These results suggest that higher concentrations of testosterone are related to how well children diagnosed with ODD or CD respond to psychological treatment over the course of three years.

  19. Hormonal and neuromuscular responses to mechanical vibration applied to upper extremity muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Di Giminiani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. METHODS: Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG, a low vibration group (LVG, or a control group (CG. A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH, testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]. RESULTS: The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003. Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011 and the HVG (P = 0.001. MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001 and the HVG (P = 0.002. In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006 muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009 and FCR (P = 0.006 muscles. CONCLUSION: Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness.

  20. Effects of lifting tempo on one repetition maximum and hormonal responses to a bench press protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Samuel A; Henry, Kelley; Nindl, Bradley C; Thompson, Brian A; Kraemer, William J; Jones, Margaret T

    2011-02-01

    This study was carried out in 2 parts: part 1 was designed to measure the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press with 2 different moderate-velocity tempos (2/0/2) vs. (2/0/4) in male lifters while part 2 compared the hormonal responses at the same tempos as described in part 1. In both parts 1 and 2, the 1RMs (lbs) were higher on the 2/0/2 tempo than on the 2/0/4 tempo. The change in plasma volume (PV) was greater after the 2/0/4 tempo (-5.7 ± 1.7% vs. 0.96 ± 1.2%, p < 0.05). All blood parameters were significantly (p < 0.05) higher post-exercise compared with baseline. With PV corrected, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (ng·mL⁻¹) was higher with the 2/0/2 tempo only (pre-exercise: 277.4 ± 21.8, post-exercise: 308.1 ± 22.9; 2/0/4 tempo pre-exercise: 277.2 ± 17.6, post-exercise: 284.8 ± 21.2). In conclusion, heavier loads can be lifted and more total work can be performed using a (2/0/2) tempo compared with a slower (2/0/4) tempo, but with the exception of IGF-1, the hormonal responses are similar. Individuals may get the same metabolic responses to training by using different tempos, but they will need to use less weight at a slower tempo.

  1. Hormonal and Neuromuscular Responses to Mechanical Vibration Applied to Upper Extremity Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Fabiani, Leila; Baldini, Giuliano; Cardelli, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Aldo; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. Methods Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG), a low vibration group (LVG), or a control group (CG). A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV) with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH), testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms) muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]). Results The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003). Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011) and the HVG (P = 0.001). MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001) and the HVG (P = 0.002). In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006) muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009) and FCR (P = 0.006) muscles. Conclusion Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness. PMID:25368995

  2. The acute hormonal response to free weight and machine weight resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Aaron A; Vingren, Jakob L; Hatfield, Disa L; Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W

    2014-04-01

    Resistance exercise can acutely increase the concentrations of circulating neuroendocrine factors, but the effect of mode on this response is not established. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of resistance exercise selection on the acute hormonal response using similar lower-body multijoint movement free weight and machine weight exercises. Ten resistance trained men (25 ± 3 years, 179 ± 7 cm, 84.2 ± 10.5 kg) completed 6 sets of 10 repetitions of squat or leg press at the same relative intensity separated by 1 week. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes (P30) after exercise, and analyzed for testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), and cortisol (C) concentrations. Exercise increased (p ≤ 0.05) T and GH at IP, but the concentrations at IP were greater for the squat (T: 31.4 ± 10.3 nmol·L(-1); GH: 9.5 ± 7.3 μg·L(-1)) than for the leg press (T: 26.9 ± 7.8 nmol·L(-1); GH: 2.8 ± 3.2 μg·L(-1)). At P15 and P30, GH was greater for the squat (P15: 12.3 ± 8.9 μg·L(-1); P30: 12.0 ± 8.9 μg·L(-1)) than for the leg press (P15: 4.8 ± 3.4 μg·L(-1); P30: 5.4 ± 4.1 μg·L(-1)). C was increased after exercise and was greater for the squat than for the leg press. Although total work (external load and body mass moved) was greater for the squat than for the leg press, rating of perceived exertion did not differ between the modes. Free weight exercises seem to induce greater hormonal responses to resistance exercise than machine weight exercises using similar lower-body multijoint movements and primary movers.

  3. Multiple bony metastases of breast cancer. Role of CA 15.3 and response to hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez C, Nayara; Ramon G, Natividad; Sanchez M, Jose Ignacio; De Santiago G, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastases are involved in a 65-75% of advanced metastatic breast cancer cases. Tumoral markers (CEA, CA 15.3) are useful in the follow-up and evaluation of response to treatment. Hormonal therapy is the optimal treatment option in low grade metastatic breast cancer due to low toxicity and general long term good response. We present a breast cancer case treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient was asymptomatic during the follow-up and multiple bone metastases were diagnosed as a result of an increased CA 15.3 marker found. Hormone therapy was the recommended initial treatment with good response and tolerance. Bone lesions remained stabilized for 7 years but after treatment suspension new bone lesions appeared. CA 15.3 marker had increased again. Reintroduction of hormonal therapy achieved again the stabilization of the lesions

  4. Pupil dilation co-varies with memory strength of individual traces in a delayed response paired-associate task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedderik van Rijn

    Full Text Available Studies on cognitive effort have shown that pupil dilation is a reliable indicator of memory load. However, it is conceivable that there are other sources of effort involved in memory that also affect pupil dilation. One of these is the ease with which an item can be retrieved from memory. Here, we present the results of an experiment in which we studied the way in which pupil dilation acts as an online marker for memory processing during the retrieval of paired associates while reducing confounds associated with motor responses. Paired associates were categorized into sets containing either 4 or 7 items. After learning the paired associates once, pupil dilation was measured during the presentation of the retrieval cue during four repetitions of each set. Memory strength was operationalized as the number of repetitions (frequency and set-size, since having more items per set results in a lower average recency. Dilation decreased with increased memory strength, supporting the hypothesis that the amplitude of the evoked pupillary response correlates positively with retrieval effort. Thus, while many studies have shown that "memory load" influences pupil dilation, our results indicate that the task-evoked pupillary response is also sensitive to the experimentally manipulated memory strength of individual items. As these effects were observed well before the response had been given, this study also suggests that pupil dilation can be used to assess an item's memory strength without requiring an overt response.

  5. The effects of age, sex, and hormones on emotional conflict-related brain response during adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cservenka, Anita; Stroup, Madison L.; Etkin, Amit; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2015-01-01

    While cognitive and emotional systems both undergo development during adolescence, few studies have explored top-down inhibitory control brain activity in the context of affective processing, critical to informing adolescent psychopathology. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain response during an Emotional Conflict (EmC) Task across 10–15-year-old youth. During the EmC Task, participants indicated the emotion of facial expressions, while disregarding emotion-congruent and incongruent words printed across the faces. We examined the relationships of age, sex, and gonadal hormones with brain activity on Incongruent vs. Congruent trials. Age was negatively associated with middle frontal gyrus activity, controlling for performance and movement confounds. Sex differences were present in occipital and parietal cortices, and were driven by activation in females, and deactivation in males to Congruent trials. Testosterone was negatively related with frontal and striatal brain response in males, and cerebellar and precuneus response in females. Estradiol was negatively related with fronto-cerebellar, cingulate, and precuneus brain activity in males, and positively related with occipital response in females. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of age, sex, and sex steroids during an emotion-cognition task in adolescents. Further research is needed to examine longitudinal development of emotion-cognition interactions and deviations in psychiatric disorders in adolescence. PMID:26175008

  6. Effects of tributyltin (TBT) on in vitro hormonal and biotransformation responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Anne S; Arukwe, Augustine

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the biocide tributyltin (TBT) and its metabolites affect the hormonal and xenobiotic biotransformation pathways in aquatic species are not well understood. In this study hepatocytes isolated from salmon were used to evaluate the mechanistical effects of TBT on fish hormonal and xenobiotic biotransformation pathways. Cells were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 5 microM TBT and samples were collected at 0, 12, 24, or 48 h following exposure. Gene expression patterns were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-mediated enzyme activities were evaluated by ethoxyresorufin, benzyloxyresorufin, and pentoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD, BROD, and PROD, respectively) activity assays. Generally, exposure of hepatocytes to 1 microM (at 48 h) and 5 microM TBT (at 12, 24, and 48 h) consistently produced reductions in all mRNA species investigated. TBT produced significant decreases of vitellogen (Vtg) expression at 48 h and modified the expression patterns of estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) and androgen receptor-beta (ARbeta) that were dependent on time and TBT concentration. In the xenobiotic biotransformation pathway, TBT produced differential expression patterns that were dependent on exposure time and concentration for all salmonid AhR2 isoforms (AhR2alpha, AhR2beta, AhR2delta, and AhR2gamma). For CYP1A1, CYP3A, AhRR, and Arnt mRNA, TBT produced exposure- and time-specific modulations. Catalytic CYP activities showed that BROD activity increased in an apparent concentration-specific manner in cells exposed to TBT for 12 h. Interestingly, EROD activity showed a TBT concentration-dependent increase at 24 h and PROD at 12 and 48 h of exposure. In general our data show that TBT differentially modulated hormonal and biotransformation responses in the salmon in vitro system. The apparent and consistent decrease of the studied responses with time in 1 and 5 microM exposed hepatocytes suggest a possible

  7. Favorable Growth Hormone Treatment Response in a Young Boy with Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstevska-Konstantinova, Marina; Stamatova, Ana; Gucev, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia, the most common cause of rhizomelic dwarfism. This is a ten year old boy who was first diagnosed prenatally. He had a mutation c1138G>A in the gene FGFR3 in a heterozygotic constellation. His IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were normal. Two stimulation tests for growth hormone were performed with values within the reference range. His psychomotor development was adequate for his age except for speech difficulty. He started with recombinant hGH (r-hGH) at the age of 3.4 years in a dose of 0.06 mg/kg. His mean Height SDS (HtSDS) was -2.2. The growth increased to 10 cm/year in the first year of therapy (HtSDS -1.1). It decreased during the second year to 4 cm (HtSDS -1.7) and again increased during the third year to 8 cm/year (HtSDS-1.3). In the next years the growth was constant (6.5, 2.3, 3.5 cm / year). He is still growing in the 3(rd) percentile of the growth curve (HtSDS - 1.2) under GH treatment. The body disproportion remained the same. The growth response on GH treatment was satisfactory in the first 4 years of treatment, and the boy still continued to grow. The young age at the start of treatment was also of importance. Our other patients with achondroplasia who started treatment older had a poor response to growth hormone.

  8. A single night light exposure acutely alters hormonal and metabolic responses in healthy participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S Albreiki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many animal studies have reported an association between melatonin suppression and the disturbance of metabolic responses; yet, few human studies have investigated bright light effects on metabolic and hormonal responses at night. This study investigated the impact of light on plasma hormones and metabolites prior to, and after, an evening meal in healthy participants. Seventeen healthy participants, 8 females (22.2 ± 2.59 years, mean ± s.d. and 9 males (22.8 ± 3.5 years were randomised to a two-way cross-over design protocol; dim light (DL (500 lux sessions, separated by at least seven days. Saliva and plasma samples were collected prior to and after a standard evening meal at specific intervals. Plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA levels were significantly higher pre-meal in DL compared to BL (P < 0.01. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly greater post-meal in the BL compared to DL session (P = 0.02, P = 0.001, respectively. Salivary melatonin levels were significantly higher in the DL compared to those in BL session (P = 0.005. BL at night was associated with significant increases in plasma glucose and insulin suggestive of glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity. Raised pre-prandial NEFA levels may be due to changes in insulin sensitivity or the presence of melatonin and/or light at night. Plasma triglyceride (TAG levels were the same in both sessions. These results may explain some of the health issues reported in shift workers; however, further studies are needed to elucidate the cause of these metabolic changes.

  9. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Aju; Davidson, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Multiple strategies for endocrine treatment of premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer have been assessed and results have been presented over the last two years. These include tamoxifen for 5-10 years (ATLAS and aTTom), tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor (AI) for 5 years for women who have become postmenopausal (MA-17); ovarian ablation (OA) by surgery (EBCTCG overview); ovarian function suppression (OFS) by LHRH agonist (LHRH agonist meta-analysis); or combinations of approaches including OFS plus tamoxifen or AI (SOFT, TEXT, ABCSG 12 and E3193). Many of these trials have taken place in the backdrop of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy which can confound interpretation because such therapy can suppress ovarian function either transiently or permanently. Nonetheless these trials suggest in aggregate that 10 years of tamoxifen are better than 5 years and that a program of extended adjuvant therapy of tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor for 5 years is effective for suitable candidates. The SOFT and E3193 trials do not show a major advantage for use of OFS + tamoxifen compared to tamoxifen alone. The joint SOFT/TEXT analysis and ABCGS12 trials both suggest that outcomes can be excellent with the use of combined endocrine therapy alone in properly selected patients but give conflicting results with regard to potential benefits for OFS + AI compared with OFS + tamoxifen. Further work will be needed to ascertain long-term outcomes, identify factors that predict who will benefit from extended adjuvant endocrine therapy, and assess role of OFS by medical or surgical means. It is clear, however, that endocrine therapy is a critical part of the adjuvant regimen for most premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer, and a subset of these women with luminal A-type tumors can be safely treated with endocrine therapy alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CLINICAL AND HORMONAL MILIEU OF 9 PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY GROWTH HORMONE INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME AND THEIR RESPONSE TO IGF-I GENERATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Razzaghy-Azar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS is a rare entity which can be due to defects in growth hormone (GH receptor that is called type 1 Laron syndrome (T1LS or post receptor defects (type 2 Laron syndrome . The aim of study was determining the clinical and hormonal milieu of the patients with primary GHIS and their response to IGF-I (insulin like growth factor-I generation test (IGT. GH, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein 1 and 3 (BP-1 and BP-3, GH binding protein (GHBP and anti-GH antibody were detected by ELISA and RIA methods. IGF-I and BP-3 were measured before and after IGT. Nine patients (8 males, 1 female (mean age ± SD, 6.4 ± 5 years with severe short stature and high GH level were studied. Height SDS was - 8.5 ± 2.6. In 7 patients GHBP was zero, IGF-I and BP-3 were low and did not increase after IGT, so they had T1LS. Two brothers did not show the hormonal milieu of GH receptor defect, and were called non Laron syndrome (NLS. Birth weight in patients with T1LS and NLS was 3.65 ± 0.2 Kg and 1.65 ± 0.2 Kg, respectively (P = 0.001. All of the patients had typical clinical feature of GH-deficiency, but nasal bridge depression and microphallus were not seen in NLS. GH treatment of NLS, normalized their growth velocity, but without catch up growth. In conclusion IGT can differentiate Laron syndrome from other types of short stature. GH and IGF-I of fetus have no role in intrauterine growth.

  11. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  12. Magnetosphere and ionosphere response to a positive-negative pulse pair of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, A.; Degeling, A. W.

    2017-12-01

    Simulations and observations had shown that single positive/negative solar wind dynamic pressure pulse would excite geomagnetic impulsive events along with ionosphere and/or magnetosphere vortices which are connected by field aligned currents(FACs). In this work, a large scale ( 9min) magnetic hole event in solar wind provided us with the opportunity to study the effects of positive-negative pulse pair (△p/p 1) on the magnetosphere and ionosphere. During the magnetic hole event, two traveling convection vortices (TCVs, anti-sunward) first in anticlockwise then in clockwise rotation were detected by geomagnetic stations located along the 10:30MLT meridian. At the same time, another pair of ionospheric vortices azimuthally seen up to 3 MLT first in clockwise then in counter-clockwise rotation were also appeared in the afternoon sector( 14MLT) and centered at 75 MLAT without obvious tailward propagation feature. The duskside vortices were also confirmed in SuperDARN radar data. We simulated the process of magnetosphere struck by a positive-negative pulse pair and it shows that a pair of reversed flow vortices in the magnetosphere equatorial plane appeared which may provide FACs for the vortices observed in ionosphere. Dawn dusk asymmetry of the vortices as well as the global geomagnetism perturbation characteristics were also discussed.

  13. Adrenal hormones and the anorectic response and adaptation of rats to amino acid imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, V A; Gietzen, D W; Sworts, V D; Beverly, J L; Rogers, Q R

    1990-12-01

    The role of adrenal function in the anorectic response and adaptation of rats to a diet with an isoleucine (Ile) imbalance was investigated. In the first of four experiments, rats were fed a mildly Ile-imbalanced diet after treatment with metyrapone, and inhibitor of glucocorticoid synthesis. In two separate experiments, rats were presented with either a mildly or severely Ile-imbalanced diet (4.93 and 9.86% imbalanced amino acid mixture, respectively) after bilateral adrenalectomy. Finally, the effects of ICS 205-930, a serotonin-3 receptor antagonist, on the intake of mildly Ile-imbalanced diet were tested in adrenalectomized animals. In each experiment a 2 X 2 factorial design was used. Neither metyrapone nor adrenalectomy altered the initial depression in the intake of an imbalanced diet. The adaptation phase in the response of adrenalectomized rats fed a mildly Ile-imbalanced diet was not different from that of controls, but adrenalectomized rats fed severely Ile-imbalanced diets were unable to adapt. Adrenalectomy did not alter the anti-anoretic activity of ICS 205-930 in this model. These results suggest that adrenal hormones are not necessary for the initial anoretic response or adaptation of rats to an Ile-imbalanced diet, nor are they implicated in the anti-anorectic effect of serotonin-3 blockade.

  14. Stimulant medication use and response to growth hormone therapy: an NCGS database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frindik, J Paul; Morales, Alba; Fowlkes, John; Kemp, Stephen; Thrailkill, Kathryn; Lippe, Barbara; Dana, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Determine (1) frequency of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment and (2) growth responses in growth hormone (GH)-treated children who are receiving ADHD medication versus GH alone. Prepubertal children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) or GH deficiency (IGHD) enrolled in Genentech's National Cooperative Growth Study. ADHD treatment was determined by documentation of psycho-stimulant medication use at enrollment. ADHD medication use increased from 0.8% (7/850) in 1985 to 5.8% (752/12,113) in 2005. First-year GH treatment response for ADHD + IGHD versus IGHD: 8.5 +/- 2.0 vs. 9.4 +/- 2.6 cm/year, but when adjusted for age, sex, and enrollment body mass index, the difference is clinically insignificant (-0.4 cm/year). First-year growth was similar in all ISS: 8.1 +/- 1.9 versus 8.6 +/- 2.1 cm/year (ADHD + ISS vs. ISS, an adjusted -0.2-cm/year difference). Increasing numbers of GH-treated children are taking ADHD medications and their growth responses during the first year of GH therapy are similar to those not taking ADHD medications. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Skeletal response of male mice to anabolic hormone therapy in the absence of the Igfals gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Oran D; Sun, Hui; Wu, Yingjie; Courtland, Hayden-William; Williams, Garry A; Cardoso, Luis; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Yakar, Shoshana

    2014-03-01

    IGF-I is a critical regulator of skeletal acquisition, which acts in endocrine and autocrine/paracrine modes. In serum, IGF-I is carried by the IGF-binding proteins in binary complexes. Further stabilization of these complexes is achieved by binding to the acid labile subunit (ALS) in a ternary complex (of IGF-I-IGF-binding protein 3/5-ALS). Ablation of the Igfals gene in humans (ALS deficiency) and mice (ALS knockout [ALSKO]) leads to markedly decreased serum IGF-I levels, growth retardation, and impaired skeletal acquisition. To investigate whether hormonal replacement therapy would improve the skeletal phenotype in cases of Igfals gene ablation, we treated male ALSKO mice with GH, IGF-I, or a combination of both. Treatments were administered to animals between 4 and 16 weeks of age or from 8 to 16 weeks of age. Although all treatment groups showed an increase (20%) in serum IGF-I levels, there was no increase in body weight, weight gain, or bone length in either age group. Despite the blunted linear growth in response to hormone therapy, ALSKO mice treated with GH showed radial bone growth, which contributed to bone strength tested by 4-point bending. We found that ALSKO mice treated with GH showed increased total cross-sectional area, cortical bone area, and cortical thickness by microtomography. Dynamic histomorphometry showed that although GH and double treatment groups resulted in trends towards increased bone formation parameters, these did not reach significance. However, bone resorption parameters were significantly increased in all treatment groups. ALSKO mice treated between 4 and 16 weeks of age showed minor differences in bone traits compared with vehicle-treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with GH and IGF-I do not work synergistically to rescue the stunted growth found in mice lacking the Igfals gene. Although GH alone appears to increase bone parameters slightly, it does not affect body weight or linear growth.

  16. Age-dependent plasticity of sex pheromone response in the moth, Agrotis ipsilon: combined effects of octopamine and juvenile hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarriault, David; Barrozo, Romina B; de Carvalho Pinto, Carlos J

    2009-01-01

    Male moths use sex pheromones to find their mating partners. In the moth, Agrotis ipsilon, the behavioral response and the neuron sensitivity within the primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL), to sex pheromone increase with age and juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis. By manipulating...

  17. Evaluation of response to hormone therapy in patients with measurable adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.; van Driel, Willemien J.; Kenter, Gemma G.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the objective response rate to hormone therapy (HT) for patients with a measurable adult granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary in a consecutive series of patients. All patients with an adult GCT who were treated with HT [steroidal progestins,

  18. GSHR, a Web-Based Platform Provides Gene Set-Level Analyses of Hormone Responses in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Ran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytohormones regulate diverse aspects of plant growth and environmental responses. Recent high-throughput technologies have promoted a more comprehensive profiling of genes regulated by different hormones. However, these omics data generally result in large gene lists that make it challenging to interpret the data and extract insights into biological significance. With the rapid accumulation of theses large-scale experiments, especially the transcriptomic data available in public databases, a means of using this information to explore the transcriptional networks is needed. Different platforms have different architectures and designs, and even similar studies using the same platform may obtain data with large variances because of the highly dynamic and flexible effects of plant hormones; this makes it difficult to make comparisons across different studies and platforms. Here, we present a web server providing gene set-level analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana hormone responses. GSHR collected 333 RNA-seq and 1,205 microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus, characterizing transcriptomic changes in Arabidopsis in response to phytohormones including abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroids, cytokinins, ethylene, gibberellins, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and strigolactones. These data were further processed and organized into 1,368 gene sets regulated by different hormones or hormone-related factors. By comparing input gene lists to these gene sets, GSHR helped to identify gene sets from the input gene list regulated by different phytohormones or related factors. Together, GSHR links prior information regarding transcriptomic changes induced by hormones and related factors to newly generated data and facilities cross-study and cross-platform comparisons; this helps facilitate the mining of biologically significant information from large-scale datasets. The GSHR is freely available at http://bioinfo.sibs.ac.cn/GSHR/.

  19. Effects of thyroid hormone on β-adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have compared the effects of β-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T 3 )-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T 3 treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T 3 treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial β-adrenergic receptor sites measured by [ 125 I]cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, β-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T 3 -treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T 3 treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the β-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T 3 treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to β-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals

  20. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Modulates Vomeronasal Neuron Response to Male Salamander Pheromone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste R. Wirsig-Wiechmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological studies have shown that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH modifies chemosensory neurons responses to odors. We have previously demonstrated that male Plethodon shermani pheromone stimulates vomeronasal neurons in the female conspecific. In the present study we used agmatine uptake as a relative measure of the effects of GnRH on this pheromone-induced neural activation of vomeronasal neurons. Whole male pheromone extract containing 3 millimolar agmatine with or without 10 micromolar GnRH was applied to the nasolabial groove of female salamanders for 45 minutes. Immunocytochemical procedures were conducted to visualize and quantify relative agmatine uptake as measured by labeling density of activated vomeronasal neurons. The relative number of labeled neurons did not differ between the two groups: pheromone alone or pheromone-GnRH. However, vomeronasal neurons exposed to pheromone-GnRH collectively demonstrated higher labeling intensity, as a percentage above background (75% as compared with neurons exposed to pheromone alone (63%, P < 0.018. Since the labeling intensity of agmatine within neurons signifies the relative activity levels of the neurons, these results suggest that GnRH increases the response of female vomeronasal neurons to male pheromone.

  1. Molecular genetics of Turner syndrome: correlation with clinical phenotype and response to growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsezou, A; Hadjiathanasiou, C; Gourgiotis, D; Galla, A; Kavazarakis, E; Pasparaki, A; Kapsetaki, M; Sismani, C; Theodoridis, C; Patsalis, P C; Moschonas, N; Kitsiou, S

    1999-12-01

    To correlate the origin of the retained X in Turner syndrome with phenotype, pre-treatment height and response to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy, systematic clinical assessment and molecular studies were carried out in 33 Greek children with Turner syndrome and their parents including 18 children with 45,X and 15 with X-mosaicism. Microsatellite markers on X chromosomes (DXS101 and DXS337) revealed that the intact X was paternal (Xp) in 15/30 and maternal (Xm) in 15/30 children, while 3/33 families were non-informative. No significant relationship was found between parental origin of the retained X and birth weight/length/gestational age, blepharoptosis, pterygium colli, webbed neck, low hairline, abnormal ears, lymphoedema, short 4th metacarpal, shield chest, widely spaced nipples, cubitus valgus, pigmented naevi, streak gonads, and cardiovascular/renal anomalies. With regard to the children's pre-treatment height, there was a significant correlation with maternal height and target height in both Xm and Xp groups. No differences were found between Xm and Xp groups and the improvement of growth velocity (GV) during the first and second year of rhGH administration, while for both groups GV significantly improved with rhGH by the end of the first and the second year. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to correlate the parental origin of Turner syndrome with the response to rhGH therapy.

  2. Age-related changes in mouse taste bud morphology, hormone expression, and taste responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu-Kyong; Cong, Wei-na; Cai, Huan; Kim, Wook; Maudsley, Stuart; Egan, Josephine M; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-04-01

    Normal aging is a complex process that affects every organ system in the body, including the taste system. Thus, we investigated the effects of the normal aging process on taste bud morphology, function, and taste responsivity in male mice at 2, 10, and 18 months of age. The 18-month-old animals demonstrated a significant reduction in taste bud size and number of taste cells per bud compared with the 2- and 10-month-old animals. The 18-month-old animals exhibited a significant reduction of protein gene product 9.5 and sonic hedgehog immunoreactivity (taste cell markers). The number of taste cells expressing the sweet taste receptor subunit, T1R3, and the sweet taste modulating hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1, were reduced in the 18-month-old mice. Concordant with taste cell alterations, the 18-month-old animals demonstrated reduced sweet taste responsivity compared with the younger animals and the other major taste modalities (salty, sour, and bitter) remained intact.

  3. Effects of thyroid hormone on. beta. -adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have compared the effects of ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/)-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T/sub 3/ treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T/sub 3/ treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites measured by (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, ..beta..-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T/sub 3/-treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T/sub 3/ treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T/sub 3/ treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals.

  4. Automatic and consistent registration framework for temporal pairs of mammograms in application to breast cancer risk assessment due to hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Carreras, I. Arganda; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-01-01

     Purpose: Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. However, whether changes in mammographic density due to HRT are associated with risk remains unclear. The aim of this study is to provide a framework for accurate interval change analysis in temporal pairs of mammograms of ...

  5. Gender influences short-term growth hormone treatment response in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sävendahl, Lars; Blankenstein, Oliver; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment.......Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment....

  6. Heat shock protein 90 chaperone complex inhibitor enhanced radiosensitivity through modification of response to hormone and degradation of androgen receptor in hormone sensitive prostate cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, N.; Harashima, K.; Akimoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    It is easily speculated that androgen or androgen deprivation affects proliferative activity or radiosensitivity, but there has been enough information how androgen or androgen deprivation influences the response to radiation. In this setting, the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on cellular growth and radiosensitivity was examined in hormone-responsive human prostate cancer cell line (LnCap). The binding of androgen receptor (AR) with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays an important role in stability of the function of receptor. It was, therefore, examined how Hsp90 chaperone complex inhibitor modified the effect of DHT on radiosensitivity in addition to the effect of DHT, especially focusing on AR and its downstream signal transduction pathways. Hydroxy-flutamide (OH-flutamide) was also used to confirm the effect of activation of AR on radiosensitivity because AR of LnCap has a point mutation, leading to activation of AR caused by the binding of OH-flutamide. Radicicol was used as a Hsp90 chaperone complex inhibitor, and incubated with cells at a concentration of 500 nM. Radicicol was incubated with cells for 9 h, and cells were irradiated 1 h after the start of incubation. DHT and OH-flutamide were incubated with cells until staining. DHT or OH-flutamide resulted in stimulation of cellular growth in contrast to inhibition of cellular growth caused by higher concentrations, so that we adopted 1 nM as a concentration of DHT and 1μM as a concentration of OH-flutamide. DHT or OH-flutamide in combination with radiation resulted in slight decrease in radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. Radicicol at a concentration of 500 nM in combination with DHT or OH-flutamide abolished decrease in radiosensitivity caused by DHT or OH-flutamide. In terms of the expression of AR, radicicol in combination with radiation and/or DHT, OH-flutamide induced degradation of AR. In consistent with degradation of AR, the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA) decreased

  7. IHH Gene Mutations Causing Short Stature With Nonspecific Skeletal Abnormalities and Response to Growth Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasques, Gabriela A; Funari, Mariana F A; Ferreira, Frederico M; Aza-Carmona, Miriam; Sentchordi-Montané, Lucia; Barraza-García, Jimena; Lerario, Antonio M; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Naslavsky, Michel S; Duarte, Yeda A O; Bertola, Debora R; Heath, Karen E; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2018-02-01

    Genetic evaluation has been recognized as an important tool to elucidate the causes of growth disorders. To investigate the cause of short stature and to determine the phenotype of patients with IHH mutations, including the response to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. We studied 17 families with autosomal-dominant short stature by using whole exome sequencing and screened IHH defects in 290 patients with growth disorders. Molecular analyses were performed to evaluate the potential impact of N-terminal IHH variants. We identified 10 pathogenic or possibly pathogenic variants in IHH, an important regulator of endochondral ossification. Molecular analyses revealed a smaller potential energy of mutated IHH molecules. The allele frequency of rare, predicted to be deleterious IHH variants found in short-stature samples (1.6%) was higher than that observed in two control cohorts (0.017% and 0.08%; P IHH variants segregate with short stature in a dominant inheritance pattern. Affected individuals typically manifest mild disproportional short stature with a frequent finding of shortening of the middle phalanx of the fifth finger. None of them have classic features of brachydactyly type A1, which was previously associated with IHH mutations. Five patients heterozygous for IHH variants had a good response to rhGH therapy. The mean change in height standard deviation score in 1 year was 0.6. Our study demonstrated the association of pathogenic variants in IHH with short stature with nonspecific skeletal abnormalities and established a frequent cause of growth disorder, with a preliminary good response to rhGH. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  8. Dose-response curve for translocation frequency with single pair of painted chromosome. A comparison with dicentric and micronuclei frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, P.; Paul, S.F.D.; Mohankumar, M.N.; Prabhu, B.K.; Gajendiran, N.; Jeevanram, R.K

    2000-07-01

    A translocation dose-response curve using a single pair of painted chromosomes was constructed. The translocation frequencies observed at different doses were compared to those obtained for dicentrics (DC) and micronuclei (MN). The translocation and DC frequency followed the Poisson distribution and MN showed over-dispersion. The translocation and DC frequencies were nearly the same for each dose point. Micronuclei showed a comparatively lower frequency. The alpha/beta ratio for translocations (0.916) and DC (0.974) were comparable, whereas the value for MN (1.526) was much higher. The equal frequencies of translocations and DC observed for a given dose indicated that genomic translocation frequency estimated using a single pair of painted chromosomes provides a reliable and easy method to measure translocation frequency. (autho000.

  9. Dose-response curve for translocation frequency with single pair of painted chromosome. A comparison with dicentric and micronuclei frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, P.; Paul, S.F.D.; Mohankumar, M.N.; Prabhu, B.K.; Gajendiran, N.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    A translocation dose-response curve using a single pair of painted chromosomes was constructed. The translocation frequencies observed at different doses were compared to those obtained for dicentrics (DC) and micronuclei (MN). The translocation and DC frequency followed the Poisson distribution and MN showed over-dispersion. The translocation and DC frequencies were nearly the same for each dose point. Micronuclei showed a comparatively lower frequency. The alpha/beta ratio for translocations (0.916) and DC (0.974) were comparable, whereas the value for MN (1.526) was much higher. The equal frequencies of translocations and DC observed for a given dose indicated that genomic translocation frequency estimated using a single pair of painted chromosomes provides a reliable and easy method to measure translocation frequency. (author)

  10. Growth hormone response to GRF 1-44 in children following cranial irradiation for central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberfield, S.E.; Kirkland, J.L.; Frantz, A.; Allen, J.C.; Levine, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) responses to (A) GRF 1-44, 1 microgram/kg i.v., (B) L-dopa and either arginine, insulin, or glucagon, and (C) exercise were evaluated in 10 children (3 girls, 7 boys; ages 10 years to 15 years, 8 months), 2-10.75 years following cranial irradiation for medulloblastoma (8 patients), pineoblastoma (1 patient), and a fourth ventricular ependymoma (1 patient). Nine of the 10 children had abnormal growth rates. All children were euthyroid at the time of the study. The mean 0-60-min peak GH response to GRF (10.06 +/- 2.6 ng/ml) in the patients was less than the mean peak GH response (29 +/- 2.3 ng/ml) in the control children (n = 7). In 6 patients (5 with poor growth rates), a decreased GH response was noted to GRF and all other tests. Of the remaining patients, all with poor growth rates, two patients demonstrated an adequate response to GRF and pharmacologic testing; one patient had a normal GH response to GRF with a low GH response to pharmacologic testing; and one patient had a low response to GRF, despite a normal response to both exercise and pharmacologic testing. The decrease in mean peak GH response to GRF in the patient population confirms that radiation to the hypothalamic-pituitary region produces abnormalities in growth hormone release. Furthermore, in these patients, discordant GH responses to GRF and pharmacologic or physiologic tests can be observed. The abnormality in growth hormone release may result from a hypothalamic dysfunction in GRF release and/or damage to GH secretory pituicytes

  11. The Complexity of Romantic Relationship: A Quantitative Study of Women's Emotional Responses to Couple Conflicts in Light of Hormones and Evolutionary Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Karlestrand, Sølvi Dørum

    2013-01-01

    Women who use hormonal contraceptives have been shown to report more intense affective responses to partner infidelity than women with a natural cycle. Also, previous research suggests that female jealousy is sensitive to hormonal changes when naturally cycling, with a peak around ovulation, while women using hormonal contraceptives are less sensitive. This research is aimed at exploring women`s perception of couple conflicts in line with predictions derived from evolutionary theory. A fa...

  12. Incretin and islet hormone responses to meals of increasing size in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalim, Wathik; Omar, Bilal; Pacini, Giovanni; Bizzotto, Roberto; Mari, Andrea; Ahrén, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Postprandial glucose homeostasis is regulated through the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) through the stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. However, how these processes dynamically adapt to demands created by caloric challenges achieved during daily life is not known. The objective of the study was to explore the adaptation of incretin and islet hormones after mixed meals of increasing size in healthy subjects. Twenty-four healthy lean subjects ingested a standard breakfast after an overnight fast followed, after 4 hours, by a lunch of a different size (511, 743, and 1034 kcal) but with identical nutrient composition together with 1.5 g paracetamol. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, intact GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and paracetamol were measured after the meals. Area under the 180-minute curve (AUC) for insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP and model-derived β-cell function and paracetamol appearance were calculated. Glucose profiles were similar after the two larger meals, whereas after the smaller meal, there was a postpeak reduction below baseline to a nadir of 3.8 ± 0.1 mmol/L after 75 minutes (P lunch meals of increasing size elicit a caloric-dependent insulin response due to increased β-cell secretion achieved by increased GIP and GLP-1 levels. The adaptation at larger meals results in identical glucose excursions, whereas after a lower caloric lunch, the insulin response is high, resulting in a postpeak suppression of glucose below baseline.

  13. Transcriptome response to hormonal manipulation of follicle-enclosed oocytes in rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captive fish often display reproductive dysfunction associated with follicle maturation. Gonadotropins and the progestogen maturation-inducing hormones (MIH) are important regulators of follicle maturation; however, their actions including regulating follicle maturation are not fully understood. The...

  14. The growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing peptide (His-DTrp-Ala-Trp-DPhe-Lys-NH2), GH-releasing hormone, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, D K; Bowers, C Y; Jaffe, C A; Ho, P J; Barkan, A L

    1993-09-01

    In patients with acromegaly, GH-producing pituitary tumors release GH in response to specific stimuli such as GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and are also responsive to a variety of nonspecific stimuli, such as TRH or GnRH, and may exhibit paradoxical responses to glucose and dopamine. In healthy humans, the synthetic peptide GH-releasing peptide (GHRP) (His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2) releases GH by a putative mechanism of action that is independent of GHRH. How these tumors respond to GHRP is not well characterized. We studied the GH responses to GHRH, GHRP, and TRH stimulation in 11 patients with active acromegaly. The peak GH responses to GHRP and GHRH were not correlated (r = 0.57; P = 0.066). In contrast, the peak GH responses to GHRP and TRH were highly correlated (r = 0.95; P < 0.001). In conclusion, in patients with acromegaly, the GH response to GHRP is qualitatively normal and does not appear to depend on GHRH.

  15. Microtubule array reorientation in response to hormones does not involve changes in microtubule nucleation modes at the periclinal cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Samantha; Kirik, Angela; Kirik, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Aligned microtubule arrays spatially organize cell division, trafficking, and determine the direction of cell expansion in plant cells. In response to changes in environmental and developmental signals, cells reorganize their microtubule arrays into new configurations. Here, we tested the role of microtubule nucleation during hormone-induced microtubule array reorientation. We have found that in the process of microtubule array reorientation the ratios between branching, parallel, and de-novo nucleations remained constant, suggesting that the microtubule reorientation mechanism does not involve changes in nucleation modes. In the ton2/fass mutant, which has reduced microtubule branching nucleation frequency and decreased nucleation activity of the γ-tubulin complexes, microtubule arrays were able to reorient. Presented data suggest that reorientation of microtubules into transverse arrays in response to hormones does not involve changes in microtubule nucleation at the periclinal cell surface PMID:25135522

  16. Growth hormone responsiveness: peak stimulated growth hormone levels and other variables in idiopathic short stature (ISS): data from the National Cooperative Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wayne V; Dana, Ken; Frane, James; Lippe, Barbara

    2008-09-01

    In children with idiopathic short stature (ISS), growth hormone (GH) response to a provocative test will be inversely related to the first year response to hGH and be a variable accounting for a degree of responsiveness. Because high levels of GH are a characteristic of GH insensitivity, such as in Laron syndrome, it is possible that a high stimulated GH is associated with a lower first year height velocity among children diagnosed as having ISS. We examined the relationship between the peak stimulated GH levels in 3 ISS groups; GH >10 -40 ng/mL and the first year growth response to rhGH therapy. We also looked at 8 other predictor variables (age, sex, height SDS, height age, body mass index (BMI), bone age, dose, and SDS deficit from target parental height. Multiple regression analysis with the first year height as the dependent variable and peak stimulated GH was the primary endpoint. The predictive value of adding each of the other variables was then assessed. Mean change in height velocity was similar among the three groups, with a maximum difference among the groups of 0.6 cm/yr. There was a small but statistically significant correlation (r=-0.12) between the stimulated GH and first year height velocity. The small correlation between first year growth response and peak GH is not clinically relevant in defining GH resistance. No cut off level by peak GH could be determined to enhance the usefulness of this measure to predict response. Baseline age was the only clinically significant predictor, R-squared, 6.4%. All other variables contributed less than an additional 2% to the R-squared.

  17. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of acupuncture on behavioral, cardiovascular and hormonal responses in restraint-stressed Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well-known entity and may be defined as a threat to the homeostasis of a being. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of acupuncture on the physiological responses induced by restraint stress. Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic technique which is used in the treatment and prevention of diseases. Its proposed mechanisms of action are based on the principle of homeostasis. Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were divided into four groups: group I (N = 12, unrestrained rats with cannulas previously implanted into their femoral arteries for blood pressure and heart rate measurements; group II (N = 12, rats that were also cannulated and were submitted to 60-min immobilization; group III (N = 12, same as group II but with acupuncture needles implanted at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 during the immobilization period; group IV (N = 14, same as group III but with needles implanted at points not related to acupuncture (non-acupoints. During the 60-min immobilization period animals were assessed for stress-related behaviors, heart rate, blood pressure and plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Group III animals showed a significant reduction (60% on average, P<0.02 in restraint-induced behaviors when compared to groups II and IV. Data from cardiovascular and hormonal assessments indicated no differences between group III and group II and IV animals, but tended to be lower (50% reduction on average in group I animals. We hypothesize that acupuncture at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 has an anxiolytic effect on restraint-induced stress that is not due to a sedative action

  19. Increased adrenocortical response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in sport horses with equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, M D; Gerber, V; Bruckmaier, R M; van der Kolk, J H; Burger, D; Ramseyer, A

    2017-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adrenocortical function would be altered in horses with equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS). Twenty-six sport horses competing at national or international levels in eventing (n=15) or endurance (n=11) were subjected to a gastroscopic examination and an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before (baseline) and after (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150min) IV ACTH injection (1μg/kg bodyweight). Within EGUS, two distinct diseases, equine squamous gastric disease (ESGD) and equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD), can be distinguished. ESGD was diagnosed in 8/11 (73%; 95% confidence intervals [95%CI], 43-92%) endurance horses and 5/15 (33%; 95% CI, 14-58%) eventing horses. EGGD was observed in 9/11 (82%; 95% CI, 53-96%) endurance horses and 9/15 (60%; 95% CI, 35-81%) eventing horses. The presence or severity of ESGD was unrelated to the presence or severity of EGGD. ACTH stimulation induced a larger increase in cortisol concentration in horses with moderate EGGD than in horses with mild EGGD. Cortisol concentration during the entire sampling period (total increase in cortisol concentration during the entire sampling period [dAUC], 31.1±6.4ng/mL) and the highest measured concentration at a single time point (maximal increase in cortisol concentration [dMAX], 10.3±2.3ng/mL) were increased (P=0.005 and P=0.038, respectively), indicating that horses with glandular gastric disease exhibited increased adrenocortical responses to ACTH stimulation. These results suggest that EGGD might be associated with an enhanced adrenocortical sensitivity. Further investigations are warranted to confirm the association between adrenocortical sensitivity and EGGD and to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three Pairs of Protease-Serpin Complexes Cooperatively Regulate the Insect Innate Immune Responses*

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Rui; Kim, Eun-Hye; Gong, Ji-Hee; Kwon, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Park, Ji-Won; Kurokawa, Kenji; Zhang, Jinghai; Gubb, David; Lee, Bok-Luel

    2009-01-01

    Serpins are known to be necessary for the regulation of several serine protease cascades. However, the mechanisms of how serpins regulate the innate immune responses of invertebrates are not well understood due to the uncertainty of the identity of the serine proteases targeted by the serpins. We recently reported the molecular activation mechanisms of three serine protease-mediated Toll and melanin synthesis cascades in a large beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Here, we purified three novel serpins ...

  1. PREDICTION OF OVARIAN RESPONSE BY ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE IN WOMEN WITH PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burri Sandhya Rani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AMH would hinder the effect of FSH and participate in the pathogenesis of PCOS. This proof has led to hypothesise that there is a subgroup of women suffering from PCOS who have the excessive levels of AMH and who are the more resistant to gonadotropins therapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the serum AMH levels in predicting ovarian response in infertile women with PCOS. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a prospective study conducted in Laxmi Narasimha Hospital, Warangal Telangana, for a period of 2 years from January 2014 to February 2016. Totally, 200 women who were admitted in infertility clinic and having induction of ovulation by gonadotropins. The patients were divided into two groups- namely, Group A, which included 100 patients who were women with PCOS having anti-Mullerian hormone 7.77 mg/dL. RESULTS Body mass index in kg/m2 of 27.3 ± 3.2 in group A, 27.8 ± 1.5 in group B and the ‘p’ value was nonsignificant, duration of infertility in minutes of 8.0 ± 1.8 in group A, 8.4 ± 2.7 in group B and the ‘p’ value was nonsignificant, number of developing follicles at insemination of 3.2 ± 1.4 in group A, 3.7 ± 1.2 in group B and the ‘p’ value was nonsignificant, mean diameter of dominant follicles at insemination of 22.3 ± 1.1 in group A, 21.0 ± 1.8 in group B and the ‘p’ value was nonsignificant. Biochemical pregnancy rates were 4411.2 in group A, 3122.5 in group B, clinical pregnancy rates were 3022.8 in group A and 2478.1 in group B, dose of HMG (IU/cycle was 658 ± 35.8 in group A and 820.9 ± 54.9 in group B. AMH sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy and diagnostic odds ratio was 62, 90, 65, 80, 71.8, 18.25, respectively when threshold concentration was 7.77 ng/mL. CONCLUSION In outcome prediction, circulating serum AMH level evaluation for anovulatory women suffering from PCOS before undergoing therapy acts as a helpful tool. It can act in predicting ovarian response in inducing

  2. Lignin biosynthesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): its response to waterlogging and association with hormonal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran-Nguyen; Son, SeungHyun; Jordan, Mark C; Levin, David B; Ayele, Belay T

    2016-01-25

    Lignin is an important structural component of plant cell wall that confers mechanical strength and tolerance against biotic and abiotic stressors; however it affects the use of biomass such as wheat straw for some industrial applications such as biofuel production. Genetic alteration of lignin quantity and quality has been considered as a viable option to overcome this problem. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying lignin formation in wheat biomass has not been studied. Combining molecular and biochemical approaches, the present study investigated the transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis in two wheat cultivars with varying lodging characteristics and also in response to waterlogging. It also examined the association of lignin level in tissues with that of plant hormones implicated in the control of lignin biosynthesis. Analysis of lignin biosynthesis in the two wheat cultivars revealed a close association of lodging resistance with internode lignin content and expression of 4-coumarate:CoA ligase1 (4CL1), p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase1 (C3H1), cinnamoyl-CoA reductase2 (CCR2), ferulate 5-hydroxylase2 (F5H2) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase2 (COMT2), which are among the genes highly expressed in wheat tissues, implying the importance of these genes in mediating lignin deposition in wheat stem. Waterlogging of wheat plants reduced internode lignin content, and this effect is accompanied by transcriptional repression of three of the genes characterized as highly expressed in wheat internode including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase6 (PAL6), CCR2 and F5H2, and decreased activity of PAL. Expression of the other genes was, however, induced by waterlogging, suggesting their role in the synthesis of other phenylpropanoid-derived molecules with roles in stress responses. Moreover, difference in internode lignin content between cultivars or change in its level due to waterlogging is associated with the level of cytokinin. Lodging resistance, tolerance against

  3. Normobaric hypoxia increases the growth hormone response to maximal resistance exercise in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filopoulos, Dean; Cormack, Stuart J; Whyte, Douglas G

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the effect of hypoxia on growth hormone (GH) release during an acute bout of high-intensity, low-volume resistance exercise. Using a single-blinded, randomised crossover design, 16 resistance-trained males completed two resistance exercise sessions in normobaric hypoxia (HYP; inspiratory oxygen fraction, (FiO 2 ) 0.12, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) 82 ± 2%) and normoxia (NOR; FiO 2 0.21, SpO 2 98 ± 0%). Each session consisted of five sets of three repetitions of 45° leg press and bench press at 85% of one repetition maximum. Heart rate, SpO 2 , and electromyographic activity (EMG) of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured throughout the protocol. Serum lactate and GH levels were determined pre-exposure, and at 5, 15, 30 and 60 min post-exercise. Differences in mean and integrated EMG between HYP and NOR treatments were unclear. However, there was an important increase in the peak levels and area under the curve of both lactate (HYP 5.8 ± 1.8 v NOR 3.9 ± 1.1 mmol.L -1 and HYP 138.7 ± 33.1 v NOR 105.8 ± 20.8 min.mmol.L -1 ) and GH (HYP 4.4 ± 3.1 v NOR 2.1 ± 2.5 ng.mL -1 and HYP 117.7 ± 86.9 v NOR 72.9 ± 85.3 min.ng.mL -1 ) in response to HYP. These results suggest that performing high-intensity resistance exercise in a hypoxic environment may provide a beneficial endocrine response without compromising the neuromuscular activation required for maximal strength development.

  4. Acute hormonal and force responses to combined strength and endurance loadings in men and women: the "order effect".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva S Taipale

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine acute responses and recovery of serum hormones and muscle force following combined strength (S and endurance (E loading sessions in which the order of exercises is reversed (ES vs. SE. METHODS: This cross-over study design included recreationally endurance trained men and women (age 21-45 years, n = 12 men n = 10 women who performed both loadings. Maximal bilateral isometric strength (MVC, isometric rate of force development (RFD and serum concentrations of testosterone (T, cortisol (C, growth hormone (GH, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, binding protein 3 (IGFBP3 and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG were measured during and after both loadings. RESULTS: Both of the present combined (ES and SE loadings led to a greater acute decrease in MVC in men than in women, while RFD was slightly affected only in men. Recovery of MVC and RFD to baseline was complete at 24 h regardless of the order of exercises. In men, neuromuscular fatigue was accompanied by increased C concentrations observed post SE. This was followed by decreased concentrations of T at 24 h and 48 h that were significantly lower than those observed following ES. GH response in men also differed significantly post loadings. In women, only a significant difference in T between ES and SE loadings was observed at post. CONCLUSION: These observed differences in hormonal responses despite similarities in neuromuscular fatigue in men indicate the presence of an order effect as the body was not fully recovered at 48 h following SE. These findings may be applicable in training prescription in order to optimize specific training adaptations.

  5. Thyroid hormones and changes in body weight and metabolic parameters in response to weight loss diets: the POUNDS LOST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Liang, L; Bray, G A; Qi, L; Hu, F B; Rood, J; Sacks, F M; Sun, Q

    2017-06-01

    The role of thyroid hormones in diet-induced weight loss and subsequent weight regain is largely unknown. To examine the associations between thyroid hormones and changes in body weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a diet-induced weight loss setting. Data analysis was conducted among 569 overweight and obese participants aged 30-70 years with normal thyroid function participating in the 2-year Prevention of Obesity Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS) LOST randomized clinical trial. Changes in body weight and RMR were assessed during the 2-year intervention. Thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (T4), total T3, total T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)), anthropometric measurements and biochemical parameters were assessed at baseline, 6 months and 24 months. Participants lost an average of 6.6 kg of body weight during the first 6 months and subsequently regained an average of 2.7 kg of body weight over the remaining period from 6 to 24 months. Baseline free T3 and total T3 were positively associated, whereas free T4 was inversely associated, with baseline body weight, body mass index and RMR. Total T4 and TSH were not associated with these parameters. Higher baseline free T3 and free T4 levels were significantly associated with a greater weight loss during the first 6 months (Ppressure, glucose, insulin, triglycerides and leptin at 6 months and 24 months (all P<0.05). In this diet-induced weight loss setting, higher baseline free T3 and free T4 predicted more weight loss, but not weight regain among overweight and obese adults with normal thyroid function. These findings reveal a novel role of thyroid hormones in body weight regulation and may help identify individuals more responsive to weight loss diets.

  6. Salivary steroid hormone response to whole-body cryotherapy in elite rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, D; Lanteri, P; Di Bernardo, C; Mauri, C; Porcelli, S; Colombini, A; Zani, V; Bonomi, F G; Melegati, G; Banfi, G; Lombardi, G

    2014-01-01

    Saliva represents a low stress, not-invasively collected matrix that allows steroid hormone monitoring in athletes by reflecting type, intensity and duration of exercise. Whole body cryotherapy (WBC) consists of short whole-body exposures to extremely cold air (-110° to -140°C) which, despite being initially used to treat inflammatory diseases, is currently acquiring increasing popularity in sports medicine. Cryostimulation practice is now widely accepted as an effective treatment to accelerate muscle recovery in rugby players. The aim of this work was to study the changes of steroid hormones in saliva of rugby players after both 2 and 14 consecutive WBC sessions, in order to investigate the effects of the treatment on their salivary steroid hormonal profile. Twenty-five professional rugby players, belonging to the Italian National Team, underwent a 7-day cryotherapy protocol consisting of 2 daily sessions. Saliva samples were taken in the morning prior to the start of the WBC, in the evening after the end of the second WBC, and in the morning of the day after the last WBC session. The samples were analyzed for cortisol, DHEA, testosterone and estradiol using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Cortisol and DHEA showed a reduction already after the 2 WBC sessions of the first day; after 14 consecutive WBC sessions cortisol, DHEA, and estradiol levels decreased, while testosterone increased as did the testosterone to cortisol ratio. These results were confirmed by the fact that the majority of subjects showed variations exceeding the critical difference (CD). In conclusion, we found that WBC acutely affects the salivary steroid hormone profile, and the results are evident already after only one twice-daily session. Most significantly, after one-week of consecutive twice-daily WBC sessions, all the hormones were modified. This is the first experimental report that links changes in the hormonal asset to WBC.

  7. Pavlovian drug-sickness pairings result in the conditioning of an antisickness response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, B T

    1983-10-01

    After a drug conditioned stimulus (CS) has been injected prior to lithium chloride as the unconditioned stimulus (US) on five occasions, the drug CS becomes able to evoke a conditioned antisickness response (CAR). This CAR is implied by the finding that the CS drug mitigates the conditioned saccharin aversion produced by lithium when it is administered in the interval between saccharin consumption and lithium injection. The following drugs were tested and are listed in approximate order of their effectiveness in producing a conditioned antisickness effect: pentobarbital, ethanol, morphine, amphetamine, and chlordiazepoxide.

  8. Responses to the change in the environment in pairs of male rats genetically selected for activity level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franková, S; Tikal, K

    1989-12-01

    Laboratory Wistar strain rats were genetically selected for high (+A) and low (-A) activity level. In thirteen pairs of adult males of the 23rd filial generation reactions to changes in the external environment were studied. The animals were housed in breeding cages four each. Two parallel studies were conducted: in pairs simultaneously placed into a novel environment (NOV), empty cages of the same dimensions as the home cage (HC), in the second, behaviour of the second pair that remained in the HC, after removal of two cage-mates, was tested. Once a minute, for a period of one hour, the type of activity was recorded and noted whether it was an element effected in contact with the partner or without any contact. The animals +A and -A differed in the frequency of various types of activity and immobility, in the ratio between behavioural manifestations shown in or without contact as well as in the response to the type of modified environment. To changes in the situation, whether removed cage-mates from the HC or placed into NOV +A animals reacted with a high wave of environment exploration which gradually habituated. -A rats equally responded with exploration but on a lower level. In +rats we recorded more frequently exploration without contact with the partner in HC and NOV in comparison with -A, more frequent grooming, less immobility in contact and with no contact. Between +A partners there was a greater number of contacts in NOV than in HC whereas in the -A group the incidence of contact did not differ between HC and NOV. ANOVA revealed the influence of factors of genetics and environment and interaction in several behavioural categories. The simple and in time economical method demonstrated the possibility of use for the detection of differences between +A and -A lines even at relatively small changes in the external stimulatory situation.

  9. Thirty days of resveratrol supplementation does not affect postprandial incretin hormone responses, but suppresses postprandial glucagon in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, F K; Konings, E; Timmers, S

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound produced by various plants (e.g. red grapes) and found in red wine, has glucose-lowering effects in humans and rodent models of obesity and/or diabetes. The mechanisms behind these effects have been suggested to include resveratrol......-induced secretion of the gut incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1. We investigated postprandial incretin hormone and glucagon responses in obese human subjects before and after 30 days of resveratrol supplementation. METHODS: Postprandial plasma responses of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1...... and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon were evaluated in 10 obese men [subjects characteristics (mean ± standard error of the mean): age 52 ± 2 years; BMI 32 ± 1 kg/m(2) , fasting plasma glucose 5.5 ± 0.1 mmol/l] who had been given a dietary supplement of resveratrol (Resvida(®) 150 mg...

  10. Expression of complement and pentraxin proteins in acute phase response elicited by tumor photodynamic therapy: the engagement of adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Soroush; Huang, Naiyan; Korbelik, Mladen

    2010-12-01

    Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) was recently shown to trigger a strong acute phase response. Using the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) model, the present study examined complement and pentraxin proteins as PDT-induced acute phase reactants. The results show a distinct pattern of changes in the expression of genes encoding these proteins in the tumor, as well as host liver and spleen, following PDT mediated by photosensitizer Photofrin™. These changes were influenced by glucocorticoid hormones, as evidenced by transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptor and the upregulation of gene encoding this receptor. The expression of gene for glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) protein, whose activity is particularly susceptible to glucocorticoid regulation, was also changed in PDT-treated tumors. A direct demonstration that tumor PDT induces glucocorticoid hormone upregulation is provided by documenting elevated levels of serum corticosterone in mice bearing PDT-treated LLC tumors. Tumor response to PDT was negatively affected by blocking glucocorticoid receptor activity, which suggests that glucocorticoid hormones have a positive impact on the therapeutic outcome with this therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Complete hormonal and metabolic response after iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment in a patient diagnosed of malignant pheochromocytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alonso, M P; Balsa Bretón, M A; Paniagua Correa, C; Castillejos Rodríguez, L; Rodríguez Pelayo, E; Mendoza Paulini, A; Ortega Valle, A; Penín González, J

    2013-01-01

    Radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine is an analogue of norepinephrine used to localize tumors that express the neurohormone transporters, specifically those derived from the neural crest having a neuroendocrine origin. It is also used to treat non-surgical metastases derived from them. A review of the literature revealed symptomatic improvements associated to a decrease in hormone levels in a significant percentage of patients after (131)I-MIBG treatment. However, complete tumor remission has been described only in very few cases and hardly ever when bone metastases exist. We present a case of a patient diagnosed of malignant pheochromocytoma who achieved complete hormonal and metabolic response after (131)I-MIBG treatment (600 mCi) in spite of the presence of bone metastases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Charge and pairing dynamics in the attractive Hubbard model: Mode coupling and the validity of linear-response theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Seibold, Götz

    2017-12-01

    Pump-probe experiments have turned out as a powerful tool in order to study the dynamics of competing orders in a large variety of materials. The corresponding analysis of the data often relies on standard linear-response theory generalized to nonequilibrium situations. Here we examine the validity of such an approach for the charge and pairing response of systems with charge-density wave and (or) superconducting (SC) order. Our investigations are based on the attractive Hubbard model which we study within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. In particular, we calculate the quench and pump-probe dynamics for SC and charge order parameters in order to analyze the frequency spectra and the coupling of the probe field to the specific excitations. Our calculations reveal that the "linear-response assumption" is justified for small to moderate nonequilibrium situations (i.e., pump pulses) in the case of a purely charge-ordered ground state. However, the pump-probe dynamics on top of a superconducting ground state is determined by phase and amplitude modes which get coupled far from the equilibrium state indicating the failure of the linear-response assumption.

  13. Rapid Weight Loss Elicits Harmful Biochemical and Hormonal Responses in Mixed Martial Arts Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coswig, Victor Silveira; Fukuda, David Hideyoshi; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare biochemical and hormonal responses between mixed martial arts (MMA) competitors with minimal prefight weight loss and those undergoing rapid weight loss (RWL). Blood samples were taken from 17 MMA athletes (Mean± SD; age: 27.4 ±5.3yr; body mass: 76.2 ± 12.4kg; height: 1.71 ± 0.05m and training experience: 39.4 ± 25 months) before and after each match, according to the official events rules. The no rapid weight loss (NWL, n = 12) group weighed in on the day of the event (~30 min prior fight) and athletes declared not having used RWL strategies, while the RWL group (n = 5) weighed in 24 hr before the event and the athletes claimed to have lost 7.4 ± 1.1kg, approximately 10% of their body mass in the week preceding the event. Results showed significant (p < .05) increases following fights, regardless of group, in lactate, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine, and cortisol for all athletes. With regard to group differences, NWL had significantly (p < .05) greater creatinine levels (Mean± SD; pre to post) (NWL= 101.6 ± 15-142.3 ± 22.9μmol/L and RWL= 68.9 ± 10.6-79.5 ± 15.9μmol/L), while RWL had higher LDH (median [interquartile range]; pre to post) (NWL= 211.5[183-236] to 231[203-258]U/L and RWL= 390[370.5-443.5] to 488[463.5-540.5]U/L) and AST (NWL= 30[22-37] to 32[22-41]U/L and 39[32.5-76.5] to 72[38.5-112.5] U/L) values (NWL versus RWL, p < .05). Post hoc analysis showed that AST significantly increased in only the RWL group, while creatinine increased in only the NWL group. The practice of rapid weight loss showed a negative impact on energy availability and increased both muscle damage markers and catabolic expression in MMA fighters.

  14. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  15. Blunted cortisol response after administration of corticotropin releasing hormone in endotoxemic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeniralam, H. S.; Endert, E.; van Lanschot, J. J.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a standard inflammatory challenge on the dynamics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, we studied the effects of low-dose endotoxin (1.0 microgram/kg) on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations in a saline-controlled study in five

  16. Inducibility of carbamoylphosphate synthetase (ammonia) in cultures of embryonic hepatocytes: ontogenesis of the responsiveness to hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Zonneveld, D.; Charles, R.

    1984-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids and cyclic AMP induce carbamoylphosphate synthetase (ammonia) (CPS) in rat hepatocytes. Using an enzyme immunoassay applied to hepatocyte cultures fixed in situ, it has been demonstrated that the capacity of hepatocytes to synthesize CPS in the presence of both hormones is

  17. Methylphenidate and the Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Renes (Judith); M.A.J. de Ridder (Maria); P.E. Breukhoven (Petra); A.J. Lem (Annemieke); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Growth hormone (GH) treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment of ADHD with

  18. Early changes in plasma glucagon and growth hormone response to oral glucose in experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F; Moghetti, P; Castello, R; Negri, C; Bonora, E; Muggeo, M

    1996-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying deterioration of glucose tolerance associated with hyperthyroidism are not completely understood. Increases in glucagon and growth hormone (GH) secretion have been previously found in hyperthyroid subjects, and could play a crucial role in this phenomenon. However, studies have not yet established the time sequence of changes in plasma glucose on the one hand and glucagon and GH on the other. To assess the early effects of thyroid hormone excess on glucose tolerance and plasma concentrations of the main glucoregulatory hormones, 12 nondiabetic euthyroid subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after triiodothyronine ([T3] 120 micrograms/d) was administered for 10 days. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and GH were determined at fasting and after the glucose load. T3 administration caused a marked increase in serum T3 (8.8 +/- 0.6 v 2.0 +/- 0.1 nmol/L), with clinical and biochemical signs of thyrotoxicosis. During the treatment, plasma glucose significantly increased both at fasting and after the glucose load (basal, 5.3 +/- 0.1 v 4.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/L, P hormone excess rapidly impairs glucose tolerance. Altered secretion of GH is an early event in thyrotoxicosis accompanying the onset of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma glucagon is appropriately suppressed by the increased plasma glucose levels. Thus, GH but not glucagon may contribute to the early hyperglycemic effect of thyrotoxicosis.

  19. Does growth hormone releasing factor desensitize the somatotroph? Interpretation of responses of growth hormone during and after 10-hour infusion of GRF 1-29 amide in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J R; Sheppard, M C; Shakespear, R A; Lynch, S S; Clayton, R N

    1986-02-01

    It is unclear whether growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) administration in vivo may desensitize the somatotroph. To investigate this possibility we have examined the effects of 10-h infusion of the equipotent 1-29 amide analogue of hpGRF on serum GH levels and on the subsequent GH response to a bolus dose of GRF (1-29). Four normal adult males received an intravenous infusion of 1-29 GRF (1 microgram/kg/h) from 0800 to 1800 h, with blood samples taken at 10 min intervals. A 100 micrograms intravenous bolus dose of GRF was given at 1800 h, and sampling continued for a further 90 min. GH levels were near or below the limit of detection (0.5 mU/l) throughout the control 10 h period. During GRF infusion there was increased GH release with pulses of irregular frequency and amplitude (up to 80 mU/l) continuing throughout the entire infusion period. There was no apparent reduction in total GH released towards the latter part of the infusion. On the control day, 100 micrograms GRF bolus increased mean (+/- SEM) GH from 0.82 +/- 0.21 mU/l to a peak of 59.0 +/- 44.8 mU/l (P less than 0.002). Following 10-GRF infusion, responses to bolus injection of GRF were reduced, but variable. In two subjects a small rise in GH levels occurred (basal 6.4 and 7.2 rising to peak values of 11.2 and 23.0 mU/l respectively). In the other two subjects, GH levels fell but in these the GRF bolus had coincided with a GH peak. The loss of GRF responsiveness after GRF infusion may be due to 'desensitization'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Elevation of plasma gonadotropin concentration in response to mammalian gonadotropin releasing hormone (GRH) treatment of the male brown trout as determined by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crim, L.W.; Cluett, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid increase of the plasma gonadotropin concentration as measured by radioimmunoassay has been demonstrated in response to GRH treatment of the sexually mature male brown trout. Peak gonadotropin values were observed within 15 minutes of GRH treatment, however, the return to baseline values was prolonged compared with the mammalian response. These data support the concept that the brain, operating via releasing hormones, plays a role in the control of pituitary hormone secretion in fish

  1. Alternate adenovirus type-pairs for a possible circumvention of host immune response to recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nász, I; Adám, E; Lengyel, A

    2001-01-01

    With the help of monoclonal antibodies the existence of at least 18 different earlier not known intertype (IT) specific epitopes were demonstrated in different numbers and combinations on the hexons of different adenovirus serotypes. The IT specific epitopes play an important role in the experimental gene therapy and in the recombinant adenovirus vaccination because of the harmful immune response of the recipient organisms directed against the many different epitopes of the adenovirus vector. For the elimination of harmful effect the authors suggest the use of multiple vectors, each prepared from different adenovirus serotypes showing the loosest antigenic relationship to each other. The vectors would be used sequentially when second or multiple administration is needed. For this purpose the authors determined and described 31 such adenovirus type-pairs, which are probably the best alternates for sequential use in experimental gene therapy.

  2. Hormone Responses to an Acute Bout of Low Intensity Blood Flow Restricted Resistance Exercise in College-Aged Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eonho Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the acute hormone response to exercise differed between low intensity blood flow restricted resistance exercise and traditional high-intensity resistance exercise in college-aged women. A total of 13 healthy women (aged 18-25 yrs, who were taking oral contraceptives, volunteered for this randomized crossover study. Subjects performed a session of low intensity blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFR (20% of 1-RM, 1 set 30 reps, 2 sets 15 reps and a session of traditional high intensity resistance exercise without blood flow restriction (HI (3 sets of 10 repetitions at 80% of 1-RM on separate days. Fasting serum cortisol and growth hormone (GH and blood lactate responses were measured in the morning pre and post exercise sessions. GH (Change: HI: 6.34 ± 1.72; BFR: 4.22 ± 1.40 ng·mL-1 and cortisol (Change: HI: 4.46 ± 1.53; BFR: 8.10 ± 2.30 ug·dL-1 significantly (p < 0.05 increased immediately post exercise for both protocols compared to baseline and there were no significant differences between the protocols for these responses. In contrast, blood lactate levels (HI: 7.35 ± 0.45; BFR: 4.02 ± 0.33 mmol·L-1 and ratings of perceived exertion were significantly (p < 0.01 higher for the HI protocol. In conclusion, acute BFR restricted resistance exercise stimulated similar increases in anabolic and catabolic hormone responses in young women.

  3. Sex-related differences in fuel utilization and hormonal response to exercise: implications for individuals with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Nicole K; Yardley, Jane E

    2018-06-01

    Sex-related differences in metabolic and neuroendocrine response to exercise in individuals without diabetes have been well established. Men and women differ in fuel selection during exercise, in which women rely to a greater extent on fat oxidation, whereas males rely mostly on carbohydrate oxidation for energy production. The difference in fuel selection appears to be mediated by sex-related differences in hormonal (including catecholamines, growth hormone, and estrogen) response to different types and intensities of exercise. In general, men exhibit an amplified counter-regulatory response to exercise, with elevated levels of catecholamines compared with women. However, women exhibit greater sensitivity to the lipolytic action of the catecholamines and deplete less of their glycogen stores than men during exercise, which suggests that women may experience a greater defense in blood glucose control after exercise than men. Conversely, little is known about sex-related differences in response to exercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A single study investigating sex-related differences in response to moderate aerobic exercise in individuals with T1D found sex-related differences in catecholamine response and fuel selection, but changes in blood glucose were not measured. To our knowledge, there are no studies investigating sex-related differences in blood glucose responses to different types and intensities of exercise in individuals with T1D. This review summarizes sex-related differences in exercise responses that could potentially impact blood glucose levels during exercise in individuals with T1D and highlights the need for further research.

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  5. [FEMALE STEROID HORMONES - MODULATORS OF IMMUNE RESPONSE TO GENITAL CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, E; Ivanov, S; Bechev, B; Angelova, M; Grueva, E; Kolev, N; Ivanova, V

    In the recent years according to WHO, genital chlamydia is the mos't common sexually transmitted infection. Chlamydia Trachomatis is an intracellular parasite which target are the tubular epithelial cells of the urethra, endocervix, endometrium, endosalpinx, conjunctiva, synovial lining of the joints, Glisson's capsule of the liver Our study, as well as some international researches, shows that in the cases of genital chlamydia there are changes in the ovarian hormones (estradiol and progesterone), their impact on the immune system and their importance for the development and the complications of the infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. The physiological level of the steroid hormones in its turn contributes for the normalization of the local immunity and reduces the possibility of recurrences.

  6. Hormonal regulation of response to oxidative stress in insects - an update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2015), s. 25788-25816 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormones (AKH) * AKH gene * anti-oxidative mechanisms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015 http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/16/10/25788

  7. A L-type lectin gene is involved in the response to hormonal treatment and water deficit in Volkamer lemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Dayse Drielly Sousa Santana; Emiliani, Giovanni; Bartolini, Paola; Podda, Alessandra; Centritto, Mauro; Luro, François; Carratore, Renata Del; Morillon, Raphaël; Gesteira, Abelmon; Maserti, Biancaelena

    2017-11-01

    Combination of biotic and abiotic stress is a major challenge for crop and fruit production. Thus, identification of genes involved in cross-response to abiotic and biotic stress is of great importance for breeding superior genotypes. Lectins are glycan-binding proteins with a functions in the developmental processes as well as in the response to biotic and abiotic stress. In this work, a lectin like gene, namely ClLectin1, was characterized in Volkamer lemon and its expression was studied in plants exposed to either water stress, hormonal elicitors (JA, SA, ABA) or wounding to understand whether this gene may have a function in the response to multiple stress combination. Results showed that ClLectin1 has 100% homology with a L-type lectin gene from C. sinensis and the in silico study of the 5'UTR region showed the presence of cis-responsive elements to SA, DRE2 and ABA. ClLectin1 was rapidly induced by hormonal treatments and wounding, at local and systemic levels, suggesting an involvement in defence signalling pathways and a possible role as fast detection biomarker of biotic stress. On the other hand, the induction of ClLectin1 by water stress pointed out a role of the gene in the response to drought. The simultaneous response of ClLectin1 expression to water stress and SA treatment could be further investigated to assess whether a moderate drought stress may be useful to improve citrus performance by stimulating the SA-dependent response to biotic stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of different hormonal combinations on follicular wave emergence and superovulatory response in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria Gonçalves; da Rosa, Rômulo Mendonça; Balaro, Mário Felipe Alvarez; Pinto, Pedro Henrique Nicolau; Dos Santos, Gustavo Bervian; Arashiro, Eduardo Kenji Nunes; da Fonseca, Jeferson Ferreira; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo; Brandão, Felipe Zandonadi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare hormonal treatments to induce and synchronize follicular wave emergence to improve the results of superovulatory (SOV) treatments in ewes. In Experiment 1 (n = 66), ewes were treated with a progesterone intravaginal implant plus a PGF 2α analogue (group G P4 ), or with the same treatment plus estradiol benzoate (G P4+EB ), a GnRH agonist (G P4+GnRH ), or both, estradiol benzoate and a GnRH agonist (G P4+EB+GnRH ) in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Follicular wave emergence was determined by ultrasound. Follicular wave did not emerge during the studied period in 10 females (one from G P4 , six from G P4+EB and three from G P4+EB+GnRH ). Follicular emergence was less synchronized (P = 0.007) when estradiol was administered (G P4+EB : 103.6 ± 22.0 h), without any interaction with GnRH treatment (G P4+EB+GnRH : 80.1 ± 21.4 h, G P4+GnRH : 52.5 ± 8.7 h, G P4 : 56.6 ± 10.4 h). Estradiol administration delayed the moment of follicular emergence (P = 0.007) and the follicular wave emergence moment in which follicular dominance was achieved (P = 0.009), without interactions between estradiol and GnRH in the moment of follicular wave emergence or dominance. In Experiment 2 (n = 22), two SOV protocols were compared: the best treatment of Experiment 1 (G P4 ) was used to synchronize follicular wave emergence, initiating the SOV treatment 2.5 days later; in the control treatment, SOV treatment started 80 h after a short-term protocol to synchronize ovulation (G control ). The number of corpora lutea (CL) and the evaluation of the collected embryos were performed six days after estrus. Blood samples were collected daily for plasma progesterone determination. Although the number of CL was similar in G control (7.1 ± 1.0) and G P4 (6.9 ± 5.1), the number of structures and viable embryos recovered were greater in G control (P synchronization of follicular wave emergence. When EB was used (alone or

  9. Altered circadian rhythms of the stress hormone and melatonin response in lupus-prone MRL/MP-fas(Ipr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, O; Dietrich, H; Oliveira dos Santos, A; Wiegers, G J; Schwarz, S; Harbutz, M; Herold, M; Wick, G

    2000-06-01

    The immune system interacts with the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis via so-called glucocorticoid increasing factors, which are produced by the immune system during immune reactions, causing an elevation of systemic glucocorticoid levels that contribute to preservation of the immune reactions specificities. Previous results from our laboratory had already shown an altered immuno-neuroendocrine dialogue via the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in autoimmune disease-prone chicken and mouse strains. In the present study, we further investigated the altered glucocorticoid response via the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in murine lupus. We established the circadian rhythms of corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, adrenocorticotropic hormone and melatonin, as well as the time response curves after injection of interleukin-1 of the first three parameters in normal SWISS and lupus-prone MRL/MP-fas(Ipr) mice. The results show that lupus-prone MRL/ MP-fas(Ipr) mice do not react appropriately to changes of the light/dark cycle, circadian melatonin rhythms seem to uncouple from the light/dark cycle, and plasma corticosterone levels are elevated during the resting phase. Diurnal changes of dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate and adrenocorticotropic hormone were normal compared to healthy controls. These data indicate that MRL/ MP-fas(Ipr) mice not only show an altered glucocorticoid response mediated via the hypothalamo pituitary adrenal axis to IL-1, but are also affected by disturbances of corticosterone and melatonin circadian rhythms. Our findings may have implications for intrathymic T cell development and the emergence of autoimmune disease.

  10. Antitumor Responses Stimulated by Dendritic Cells Are Improved by Triiodothyronine Binding to the Thyroid Hormone Receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamino, Vanina A; Mascanfroni, Iván D; Montesinos, María M; Gigena, Nicolás; Donadio, Ana C; Blidner, Ada G; Milotich, Sonia I; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Masini-Repiso, Ana M; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Pellizas, Claudia G

    2015-04-01

    Bidirectional cross-talk between the neuroendocrine and immune systems orchestrates immune responses in both physiologic and pathologic settings. In this study, we provide in vivo evidence of a critical role for the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) in controlling the maturation and antitumor functions of dendritic cells (DC). We used a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) β mutant mouse (TRβPV) to establish the relevance of the T3-TRβ system in vivo. In this model, TRβ signaling endowed DCs with the ability to stimulate antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses during tumor development. T3 binding to TRβ increased DC viability and augmented DC migration to lymph nodes. Moreover, T3 stimulated the ability of DCs to cross-present antigens and to stimulate cytotoxic T-cell responses. In a B16-OVA mouse model of melanoma, vaccination with T3-stimulated DCs inhibited tumor growth and prolonged host survival, in part by promoting the generation of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells. Overall, our results establish an adjuvant effect of T3-TRβ signaling in DCs, suggesting an immediately translatable method to empower DC vaccination approaches for cancer immunotherapy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Determination of the electron-hole pair creation energy for semiconductors from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, F; Kuschnerus, P; Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be detected by the measurement of the charge carriers produced in a detector. The improved semiconductor technology now allows detectors operating near the physical limits of the detector materials to be designed. The mean energy required for producing an electron-hole pair, W, is a material property of the semiconductor. Here, the determination of W from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes is demonstrated. Using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation, different types of semiconductor photodiodes have been examined in the UV-, VUV-, and soft X-ray spectral range. Their spectral responsivity was determined with relative uncertainties between 0.4% and 1% using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as primary detector standard. Results are presented for silicon n-on-p junction photodiodes and for GaAsP/Au Schottky diodes at room temperature. The investigations for silicon covered the complete spectral range from 3 to 1500 eV, yielding a constant value W=(3.66+-0.03) eV fo...

  12. Thyroid hormone receptor binds to a site in the rat growth hormone promoter required for induction by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.J.; Brent, G.A.; Warne, R.L.; Larsen, P.R.; Moore, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. The authors have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. They show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor

  13. GnRH Neuron Activity and Pituitary Response in Estradiol-Induced vs Proestrous Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marina A; Burger, Laura L; DeFazio, R Anthony; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    During the female reproductive cycle, estradiol exerts negative and positive feedback at both the central level to alter gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and at the pituitary to affect response to GnRH. Many studies of the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying estradiol feedback have been done on ovariectomized, estradiol-replaced (OVX+E) mice. In this model, GnRH neuron activity depends on estradiol and time of day, increasing in estradiol-treated mice in the late afternoon, coincident with a daily luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Amplitude of this surge appears lower than in proestrous mice, perhaps because other ovarian factors are not replaced. We hypothesized GnRH neuron activity is greater during the proestrous-preovulatory surge than the estradiol-induced surge. GnRH neuron activity was monitored by extracellular recordings from fluorescently tagged GnRH neurons in brain slices in the late afternoon from diestrous, proestrous, and OVX+E mice. Mean GnRH neuron firing rate was low on diestrus; firing rate was similarly increased in proestrous and OVX+E mice. Bursts of action potentials have been associated with hormone release in neuroendocrine systems. Examination of the patterning of action potentials revealed a shift toward longer burst duration in proestrous mice, whereas intervals between spikes were shorter in OVX+E mice. LH response to an early afternoon injection of GnRH was greater in proestrous than diestrous or OVX+E mice. These observations suggest the lower LH surge amplitude observed in the OVX+E model is likely not attributable to altered mean GnRH neuron activity, but because of reduced pituitary sensitivity, subtle shifts in action potential pattern, and/or excitation-secretion coupling in GnRH neurons. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  14. Sleeve gastrectomy effects on hunger, satiation, and gastrointestinal hormone and motility responses after a liquid meal test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Esther; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Suñol, Xavier; Clavé, Pere

    2015-09-01

    The relation between hunger, satiation, and integrated gastrointestinal motility and hormonal responses in morbidly obese patients after sleeve gastrectomy has not been determined. The objective was to assess the effects of sleeve gastrectomy on hunger, satiation, gastric and gallbladder motility, and gastrointestinal hormone response after a liquid meal test. Three groups were studied: morbidly obese patients (n = 16), morbidly obese patients who had had sleeve gastrectomy (n = 8), and nonobese patients (n = 16). The participants fasted for 10 h and then consumed a 200-mL liquid meal (400 kcal + 1.5 g paracetamol). Fasting and postprandial hunger, satiation, hormone concentrations, and gastric and gallbladder emptying were measured several times over 4 h. No differences were observed in hunger and satiation curves between morbidly obese and nonobese groups; however, sleeve gastrectomy patients were less hungry and more satiated than the other groups. Antrum area during fasting in morbidly obese patients was statistically significant larger than in the nonobese and sleeve gastrectomy groups. Gastric emptying was accelerated in the sleeve gastrectomy group compared with the other 2 groups (which had very similar results). Gallbladder emptying was similar in the 3 groups. Sleeve gastrectomy patients showed the lowest ghrelin concentrations and higher early postprandial cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 peaks than did the other participants. This group also showed an improved insulin resistance pattern compared with morbidly obese patients. Sleeve gastrectomy seems to be associated with profound changes in gastrointestinal physiology that contribute to reducing hunger and increasing sensations of satiation. These changes include accelerated gastric emptying, enhanced postprandial cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 concentrations, and reduced ghrelin release, which together may help patients lose weight and improve their glucose metabolism after

  15. Factors that predict a positive response on gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test for diagnosing central precocious puberty in girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwan Suh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rapid increase in the incidence of precocious puberty in Korea has clinical and social significance. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH stimulation test is required to diagnose central precocious puberty (CPP, however this test is expensive and time-consuming. This study aimed to identify factors that can predict a positive response to the GnRH stimulation test.MethodsClinical and laboratory parameters, including basal serum luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, and estradiol (E2, were measured in 540 girls with clinical signs of CPP.ResultsTwo hundred twenty-nine of 540 girls with suspected CPP had a peak serum LH level higher than 5 IU/L (the CPP group. The CPP group had advanced bone age (P<0.001, accelerated yearly growth rate (P<0.001, increased basal levels of LH (P=0.02, FSH (P<0.001, E2 (P=0.001, and insulin-like growth factor-I levels (P<0.001 compared to the non-CPP group. In contrast, body weight (P<0.001 and body mass index (P<0.001 were lower in the CPP group. Although basal LH was significantly elevated in the CPP group compared to the non-CPP group, there was considerable overlap between the 2 groups. Cutoff values of basal LH (0.22 IU/L detected CPP with 87.8% sensitivity and 20.9% specificity.ConclusionNo single parameter can predict a positive response on the GnRH stimulation test with both high sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, multiple factors should be considered in evaluation of sexual precocity when deciding the timing of the GnRH stimulation test.

  16. Calcium-independent phosphatidylinositol response in gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-stimulated pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Naor, Z; Molcho, J; Zakut, H; Yavin, E

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, gonadoliberin) on phospholipid metabolism in cultured rat pituitary cells. The cells were incubated with [32P]Pi to label endogenous phospholipids (10-60 min) and then stimulated with GnRH for up to 60 min. Cellular phospholipids were separated by two-dimensional t.l.c. and the radioactivity was determined. Phosphatidylinositol (PI), a minor constituent of cellular phospholipids (7.7%), was the major labelled phospholipi...

  17. Evaluation of the responsiveness of pituitary gland to thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) in rats in the period of 8:00 to 12:00 a.m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, V.C.; Nicolau, W.; Bojarczuk, C.; Pieroni, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The functional pituitary capacity for the secretion thyrotropin in rats, in relation to the period of time 8:00-12:00 a.m. was studied by means of the administration of synthetic TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone). The highest pituitary response to the hypothalamic hormone attains its peak between 9:50 and 10:30 a.m., a time in which the gland denotes a high and practically constant level of TSH secretion [pt

  18. Synergism by individual macronutrients explains the marked early GLP-1 and islet hormone responses to mixed meal challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlkvist, L; Vikman, J; Pacini, G; Ahrén, B

    2012-10-10

    Apart from glucose, proteins and lipids also stimulate incretin and islet hormone secretion. However, the glucoregulatory effect of macronutrients in combination is poorly understood. We therefore developed an oral mixed meal model in mice to 1) explore the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and islet hormone responses to mixed meal versus isocaloric glucose, and 2) characterize the relative contribution of individual macronutrients to these responses. Anesthetized C57BL/6J female mice were orally gavaged with 1) a mixed meal (0.285 kcal; glucose, whey protein and peanut oil; 60/20/20% kcal) versus an isocaloric glucose load (0.285 kcal), and 2) a mixed meal (0.285 kcal) versus glucose, whey protein or peanut oil administered individually in their mixed meal caloric quantity, i.e., 0.171, 0.055 and 0.055 kcal, respectively. Plasma was analyzed for glucose, insulin and intact GLP-1 before and during oral challenges. Plasma glucose was lower after mixed meal versus after isocaloric glucose ingestion. In spite of this, the peak insulin response (P=0.02), the peak intact GLP-1 levels (P=0.006) and the estimated β-cell function (P=0.005) were higher. Furthermore, the peak insulin (P=0.004) and intact GLP-1 (P=0.006) levels were higher after mixed meal ingestion than the sum of responses to individual macronutrients. Compared to glucose alone, we conclude that there is a marked early insulin response to mixed meal ingestion, which emanates from a synergistic, rather than an additive, effect of the individual macronutrients in the mixed meal and is in part likely caused by increased levels of GLP-1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Resumption of menstruation and pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea subjects undertaking estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z Q; Xu, J J; Lin, J F

    2013-11-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) refers to a functional menstrual disorder with various causes and presentations. Recovery of menstrual cyclicity is common in long-term follow-up but the affecting factors remain unknown. To explore factors affecting the menstrual resumption and to evaluate the pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in FHA. Thirty cases with FHA were recruited. All subjects were put on continuous 1 mg/day estradiol valerate orally and followed up monthly. Recovery was defined as the occurrence of at least three consecutive regular cycles. Responder referred to those who recovered within two years of therapy. Gonadotropin response to the 50 μg GnRH challenge was tested every three months. Nineteen (63.3%) subjects recovered with a mean time to recovery of 26.8 months. Time to recovery was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) before and by amenorrhea. Twentyone cases had undertaken therapy for more than two years and 10 of them recovered. BMI before and by amenorrhea were negatively correlated with the recovery. Significant increase of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and LH response to GnRH were noted after recovery. Menstrual resumption was common in FHA undertaking estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The likelihood of recovery was affected by their BMI before and by amenorrhea but not by the weight gain during therapy. Low serum LH and attenuated LH response to GnRH were the main features of pituitary deficiency in FHA. The menstrual resumption in FHA was accompanied by the recovery of serum LH and the LH response to GnRH.

  20. Effect of time of day on performance, hormonal and metabolic response during a 1000-M cycling time trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lins Fernandes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p0.05, but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p0.05. Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu.

  1. Differential gene expression in response to juvenile hormone analog treatment in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti (Isoptera, Archotermopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, Richard; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Termite societies are characterized by a highly organized division of labor among conspicuous castes, groups of individuals with various morphological specializations. Termite caste differentiation is under control of juvenile hormone (JH), but the molecular mechanism underlying the response to JH and early events triggering caste differentiation are still poorly understood. In order to profile candidate gene expression during early soldier caste differentiation of the damp-wood termite, Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we treated pseudergates (workers) with a juvenile hormone analog (JHA) to induce soldier caste differentiation. We then used Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization to create two cDNA libraries enriched for transcripts that were either up- or downregulated at 24h after treatment. Finally, we used quantitative PCR to confirm temporal expression patterns. Hexamerins represent a large proportion of the genes upregulated following JHA treatment and have an expression pattern that shows roughly an inverse correlation to intrinsic JH titers. This data is consistent with the role of a JH "sink", which was demonstrated for hexamerins in another termite, Reticulitermes flavipes. A putative nuclear protein was also upregulated a few hours after JHA treatment, which suggests a role in the early response to JH and subsequent regulation of transcriptional events associated with soldier caste differentiation. Some digestive enzymes, such as endogenous beta-endoglucanase and chymotrypsin, as well as a protein associated to digestion were identified among genes downregulated after JHA treatment. This suggests that JH may directly influence the pseudergate-specific digestive system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and Expression Profiling of the Auxin Response Factors in Capsicum annuum L. under Abiotic Stress and Hormone Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenliang Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs play important roles in regulating plant growth and development and response to environmental stress. An exhaustive analysis of the CaARF family was performed using the latest publicly available genome for pepper (Capsicum annuum L.. In total, 22 non-redundant CaARF gene family members in six classes were analyzed, including chromosome locations, gene structures, conserved motifs of proteins, phylogenetic relationships and Subcellular localization. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from pepper (Capsicum annuum L., tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa L. revealed both similarity and divergence between the four ARF families, and aided in predicting biological functions of the CaARFs. Furthermore, expression profiling of CaARFs was obtained in various organs and tissues using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. Expression analysis of these genes was also conducted with various hormones and abiotic treatments using qRT-PCR. Most CaARF genes were regulated by exogenous hormone treatments at the transcriptional level, and many CaARF genes were altered by abiotic stress. Systematic analysis of CaARF genes is imperative to elucidate the roles of CaARF family members in mediating auxin signaling in the adaptation of pepper to a challenging environment.

  3. Effect of a test meal on meal responses of satiation hormones and their association to insulin resistance in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beglinger, Svetlana; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Graf, Steffi; Zumsteg, Urs; Drewe, Jürgen; Beglinger, Christoph; Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The role of gastrointestinal (GI) hormones in the pathophysiology of obesity is unclear, although they are involved in the regulation of satiation and glucose metabolism. To (i) examine glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), amylin, ghrelin, and glucagon responses to a meal in obese adolescents and to (ii) test which GI peptides are associated with insulin resistance are presented. A total of 16 obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 97th percentile for age and gender) and 14 control (BMI between 25th and 75th percentiles) adolescents were included. Subjects were instructed to eat a test meal (490 kcal). Plasma samples were collected for hormone and glucose analysis. Obese adolescents were insulin resistant as expressed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index and had significantly increased fasting glucagon and amylin levels compared to the control group (P = 0.003 and 0.044, respectively). In response to the meal, the increase in GLP-1 levels was reduced in obese adolescents (P < 0.001). In contrast, amylin secretion was significantly increased in the obese population compared to the control group (P < 0.005). Obese adolescents have increased fasting glucagon and amylin levels and attenuated post-prandial GLP-1 concentrations compared with the control group. These factors could contribute to the metabolic syndrome. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  4. Hormonal, metabolic, and cardiorespiratory responses of young and adult athletes to a single session of high-intensity cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Florian; Härtel, Sascha; Wagner, Matthias Oliver; Strahler, Jana; Bös, Klaus; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a single high-intensity interval training (HIIT) session on salivary cortisol (SC) levels, physiological responses, and performance in trained boys and men. Twenty-three boys (11.5 ± 0.8 years) and 25 men (29.7 ± 4.6 years) performed HIIT (4 consecutive Wingate Anaerobic Tests). SC in boys and men increased after HIIT from 5.55 ± 3.3 nmol/l to 15.13 ± 9.7 nmol/l (+173%) and from 7.07 ± 4.7 nmol/l to 19.19 ± 12.7 nmol/l (+171%), respectively (p HIIT, mean heart rates in boys were higher (p HIIT in young athletes is associated with a higher activation of the hormonal stress axis than other types of exercise regimes as described in the literature. This study is the first to show a pronounced SC increase to HIIT in trained boys accompanied by elevated levels of blood lactate concentrations and heart rate suggesting a high cardio-respiratory, metabolic, and hormonal response to HIIT in 11-year-old boys.

  5. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalel Mahouachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain” subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA and cinnamic acids (CA were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  6. Hormonal and hydroxycinnamic acids profiles in banana leaves in response to various periods of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahouachi, Jalel; López-Climent, María F; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. "Grand Nain") subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  7. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  8. Counter-regulatory hormone responses to spontaneous hypoglycaemia during treatment with insulin Aspart or human soluble insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock Jacobsen, I; Vind, B F; Korsholm, Lars

    2011-01-01

    examined in a randomized, double-blinded cross-over study for two periods of 8 weeks. Sixteen patients with type 1 diabetes were subjected to three daily injections of human soluble insulin or Aspart in addition to Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin twice daily. Each intervention period was followed......-regulatory responses regarding growth hormone, glucagon and ghrelin whereas no differences were found in relation to free fatty acid, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and IGF-binding proteins 1 and 2. Treatment with insulin Aspart resulted in well-defined peaks in serum insulin concentrations...... elicited a slightly different physiological response to spontaneous hypoglycaemia compared with human insulin. Keywords hypoglycaemia counter-regulation, insulin Aspart, type 1 diabetes....

  9. Breeding status affects the hormonal and metabolic response to acute stress in a long-lived seabird, the king penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Gineste, Benoit; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Groscolas, René

    2016-09-15

    Stress responses are suggested to physiologically underlie parental decisions promoting the redirection of behaviour away from offspring care when survival is jeopardized (e.g., when facing a predator). Besides this classical view, the "brood-value hypothesis" suggests that parents' stress responses may be adaptively attenuated to increase fitness, ensuring continued breeding when the relative value of the brood is high. Here, we test the brood-value hypothesis in breeding king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), long-lived seabirds for which the energy commitment to reproduction is high. We subjected birds at different breeding stages (courtship, incubation and chick brooding) to an acute 30-min capture stress and measured their hormonal (corticosterone, CORT) and metabolic (non-esterified fatty acid, NEFA) responses to stress. We found that CORT responses were markedly attenuated in chick-brooding birds when compared to earlier stages of breeding (courtship and incubation). In addition, NEFA responses appeared to be rapidly attenuated in incubating and brooding birds, but a progressive increase in NEFA plasma levels in courting birds suggested energy mobilization to deal with the threat. Our results support the idea that stress responses may constitute an important life-history mechanism mediating parental reproductive decisions in relation to their expected fitness outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The response on glucoregulatory hormones of in vivo whole body hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, M; Gyhrs, A; Galbo, H; Pedersen, B K

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of in vivo hyperthermia on the circulating concentrations of a number of glucoregulatory hormones potentially involved in immunomodulation. Eight healthy male volunteers were immersed for 2 h in a hot water bath (water temperature 39.5 degrees C) (WI) during which period their rectal temperature rose to 39.5 degrees C. In a control study the subjects were immersed in thermoneutral water (water temperature 34.5 degrees C). Blood samples were collected before, at body temperature 38 degrees C (42.5 (30-52), median and range), minutes of hot WI, 39 degrees C (72.5 (58-97) minutes of hot WI), and 39.5 degrees C (at the end of 2 h of hot WI), as well as 1 and 2 h after cessation of 2 h of hot WI. In the control experiment blood samples were collected at identical time points. The growth hormone concentrations were elevated already at 38 degrees C to 24.2 (3.9-55.0) mU/l and peaked at 39 degrees C to 48.4 (20.8-81.5) mU/l compared to 0.3 (0.3-9.0) mU/l at baseline; at 39.5 degrees C the concentration declined to 31.6 (13.0-48.0) mU/l and further to 7.4 (0.8-17.3) mU/l 1 h after ending hot WI. The beta-endorphin levels were augmented at 39 degrees C and 39.5 degrees, to 8.0 (3.4-27.8) pmol/l and 8.1 (3.1-44.6) pmol/l, respectively, from 2.2 (0.7-5.6) pmol/l baseline. Glucagon levels raised from 23.0 (12.0-32.0) pmol/l to 32.0 (24.0-52.0) pmol/l at 39 degrees C, and to 38.5 (26.0-57.0) pmol/l at 39.0 degrees C. Insulin levels remained unchanged. Plasma glucose increased from 4.75 (4.2-7.6) mmol/l to 5.20 (4.6-5.6) mmol/l alone after 90 min of WI (temperature 39-39.5 degrees C). It is concluded that in vivo whole body WI hyperthermia increases the circulating levels of several essential glucoregulatory hormones.

  11. SERUM IGF-I AND HORMONAL RESPONSES TO INCREMENTAL EXERCISE IN ATHLETES WITH AND WITHOUT LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zebrowska

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the response of insulin-like growth factor (IGF- I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 and some hormones, i.e., testosterone (T, growth hormone (GH, cortisol (C, and insulin (I, to maximal exercise in road cyclists with and without diagnosed left ventricular hypertrophy. M-mode and two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography was performed in 30 professional male endurance athletes and a group of 14 healthy untrained subjects using a Hewlett-Packard Image Point HX ultrasound system with standard imaging transducers. Echocardiography and an incremental physical exercise test were performed during the competitive season. Venous blood samples were drawn before and immediately after the maximal cycling exercise test for determination of somatomedin and hormonal concentrations. The basal concentration of IGF-I was statistically higher (p < 0.05 in athletes with left ventricular muscle hypertrophy (LVH when compared to athletes with a normal upper limit of the left ventricular wall (LVN (p < 0.05 and to the control group (CG (p < 0.01. The IGF-I level increased significantly at maximal intensity of incremental exercise in CG (p < 0.01, LVN (p < 0.05 and LVH (p < 0.05 compared to respective values at rest. Long-term endurance training induced an increase in resting (p < 0.01 and post-exercise (p < 0.05 IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio in athletes with LVH compared to LVN. The testosterone (T level was lower in LVH at rest compared to LVN and CG groups (p < 0.05. These results indicate that resting serum IGF-I concentration were higher in trained subjects with LVH compared to athletes without LVH. Serum IGF- I/IGFBP-3 elevation at rest and after exercise might suggest that IGF-I act as a potent stimulant of left ventricular hypertrophy in chronically trained endurance athletes

  12. Effect of extended morning fasting upon ad libitum lunch intake and associated metabolic and hormonal responses in obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, E A; Richardson, J D; Tsintzas, K; Thompson, D; Betts, J A

    2016-02-01

    Breakfast omission is positively associated with obesity and increased risk of disease. However, little is known about the acute effects of extended morning fasting upon subsequent energy intake and associated metabolic/regulatory factors in obese adults. In a randomised cross-over design, 24 obese men (n=8) and women (n=16) extended their overnight fast by omitting breakfast consumption or ingesting a typical carbohydrate-rich breakfast of 2183±393 kJ (521±94 kcal), before an ad libitum pasta lunch 3 h later. Blood samples were obtained throughout the day until 3 h post lunch and analysed for hormones implicated in appetite regulation, along with metabolic outcomes and subjective appetite measures. Lunch intake was unaffected by extended morning fasting (difference=218 kJ, 95% confidence interval -54 kJ, 490 kJ; P=0.1) resulting in lower total intake in the fasting trial (difference=-1964 kJ, 95% confidence interval -1645 kJ, -2281 kJ; Pfasting (P⩽0.06). Plasma-acylated ghrelin concentrations were also lower following the ad libitum lunch in the fasting trial (Pfasting trial (P=0.05), with plasma glucose also greater 1 h after lunch (Pfasting did not result in greater appetite ratings after lunch, with some tendency for lower appetite 3 h post lunch (P=0.09). We demonstrate for the first time that, in obese adults, extended morning fasting does not cause compensatory intake during an ad libitum lunch nor does it increase appetite during the afternoon. Morning fasting reduced satiety hormone responses to a subsequent lunch meal but counterintuitively also reduced concentrations of the appetite-stimulating hormone-acylated ghrelin during the afternoon relative to lunch consumed after breakfast.

  13. Hormonal responses and tolerance to cold of female quail following parathion ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-week-old female bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus), maintained at 26 + 1?C, were provided diets containing 0,25, or 100 ppm parathion ad libitum. After 10 days, birds were exposed to mild cold (6 + 1?C) for 4,8, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in birds receiving 25 and 100 ppm parathion. Body weight, egg production, and plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations were reduced in birds receiving 100 ppm parathion compared with other groups. Cold exposure did not alter plasma corticosterone levels in the 0- and 25-ppm parathion groups, but a two- to five fold elevation of plasma corticosterone was observed in birds fed 100 ppm parathion. These findings indicate that (i) short-term ingestion of parathion can impair reproduction possibly by altering gonadotropin or steroid secretion, and (ii) tolerance to cold may be reduced following ingestion of this organophosphate.

  14. Hormonal response recovery after long-term androgen deprivation therapy in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Jacques; Celma, Ana; Placer, José; Cuadras, Mercè; Regis, Lucas; Gasanz, Carlos; Trilla, Enrique; Salvador, Carlos; Lorente, David; Morote, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hormonal recovery after cessation of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in a group of elderly prostate cancer patients. Forty patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, with a mean age of 71.5 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 69.1-73.9], were treated with ADT for a mean duration of 74.6 months (95% CI 59.7-89.5 months). Mean follow-up time after ADT cessation was 36.5 months (95% CI 30.6-42.3 months). Serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined at 6 month intervals after ADT cessation. After 18 months of follow-up, all patients had recovered normal LH levels, while 38% of patients still presented castration levels of testosterone (50 ng/dl). Neither age at start of ADT nor clinical stage reached statistical significance. Only time under ADT was correlated with testosterone recovery (p = .031). Kaplan-Meier curves were obtained. Mean time for testosterone recovery was 14.5 months (95% CI 6.5-22.6 months) in patients treated with ADT for less than 60 months compared to 29.3 months (95% CI 19.6-39.1 months) in patients treated with ADT for more than 60 months (log-rank p = .029). Age did not correlate with testosterone recovery in a group of elderly prostate cancer patients in whom ADT was stopped. Testosterone recovery after ADT cessation was significantly correlated with time under ADT treatment. Significant implications related to economic aspects of the dosage schedule may be considered.

  15. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by /sup 125/I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10/sup -10/ M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less /sup 125/I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by /sup 125/I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by /sup 125/I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF.

  16. Yearly stepwise increments of the growth hormone dose results in a better growth response after four years in girls with Turner syndrome. Dutch Working Group on Growth Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Teunenbroek, A.; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S. M.; Stijnen, T.; Jansen, M.; Otten, B. J.; Delemarre-van de Waal, H. A.; Vulsma, T.; Wit, J. M.; Rouwé, C. W.; Reeser, H. M.; Gosen, J. J.; Rongen-Westerlaken, C.; Drop, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    To optimize the growth promoting effect of growth hormone (GH), 65 previously untreated girls with Turner syndrome (TS), chronological age (CA) 2-11 yr, were randomized into 3 dosage regimen groups: A, B, and C, with a daily recombinant-human GH dose during 4 study years of 4-4-4-4, 4-6-6-6, and

  17. CARDIAC STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ABNORMALITIES IN FEMALES WITH UNTREATED HYPOPITUITARISM DUE TO SHEEHAN SYNDROME: RESPONSE TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Ramzan, Mahroosa; Allai, Mohd Sultan; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Data on cardiac abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism are limited. We investigated echocardiographic abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism and their response to treatment. Twenty-three females with treatment-naïve hypopituitarism and 30 matched healthy controls were evaluated for cardiac structure and function. Echocardiographic evaluation was done at presentation and after achieving a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Fourteen (61%) patients had mitral regurgitation, and 11 (48%) had pericardial effusion as against none among controls. Indices of left ventricular (LV) size like LV end diastolic dimension (LVEDD; 44.5 ± 3.5 mm in cases vs. 47.6 ± 3.8 mm in controls, P = .004), and LV diastolic volume (LVEDV; 91.8 ± 18.0 mL versus 106.5 ± 20.4 mL, P = .009) were significantly lower in the SS group compared with controls. LV mass (LVM) was 70.8 ± 19.2 g in cases and 108.0 ± 33.2 g in controls (P = .02). Similarly, indices of LV systolic function like stroke volume (SV; 59.1 ± 12.0 mL in cases and 74.4 ± 15.8 mL in controls; P = .000), ejection fraction (EF; 64.3 ± 6.2 % in cases against 69.9 ± 9.2 % in controls; P = .03), and fractional shortening (FS; 34.9 ± 4.7% versus 40.1 ± 4.4%, P = .000) were significantly decreased in patients compared with controls. Cardiac abnormalities normalized with restoration of a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Pericardial effusion, mitral regurgitation, and diminished LVM are common in females with untreated hypopituitarism. ACTH = adrenocorticotrophic hormone BMI = body mass index DT = deceleration time EDV = end-diastolic volume EF = ejection fraction FS = fractional shortening GH = growth hormone IGF-1 = insulin growth factor-1 ITT = insulin tolerance test IVSd = interventricular septal diameter LH = luteinizing hormone LV = left ventricular LVEDD = LV end diastolic dimension LVEDV = LV end diastolic volume LVM = LV mass MRI = magnetic resonance imaging MVP = mitral value prolapse PPH

  18. Synergistic effect of obesity and lipid ingestion in suppressing the growth hormone response to exercise in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stacy R; Hingorani, Sunita R; Rosa, Jaime S; Zaldivar, Frank P; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2012-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating exercise responses, including activation of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) axis. Obesity and fat ingestion were separately shown to reduce exercise GH responses, but their combined effect, especially important in children, has not been studied. We therefore measured the GH response to exercise [30-min intermittent cycling, ten 2-min bouts at ~80% maximal aerobic capacity (Vo(2max)), separated by 1-min rest], started 45 min after ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM) in 16 healthy [controls; body mass index percentile (BMI%ile) 51 ± 7], and 19 obese (Ob, BMI%ile 97 ± 0.4) children. Samples were drawn at baseline (premeal), and at start, peak, and 30 min postexercise. In the Ob group, a marked ~75% suppression of the GH response (ng/ml) to exercise was observed (2.4 ± 0.6 vs. 10.6 ± 2.1, P fasting conditions. Our data indicate that the reduction in the GH response to exercise, already present in obese children vs. healthy controls, is considerably amplified by ingestion of fat nutrients shortly before exercise, implying a potentially downstream negative impact on growth factor homeostasis and long-term modulation of physiological growth.

  19. Investigating the association between polymorphism of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor gene and ovarian response in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Sheikhha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of the study was to investigate the association between follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR gene polymorphism at Position 680 and the outcomes of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET in infertile women. Materials and Methods : One hundred and eight patients under 35 years of age who underwent IVF-ET procedures were included in this study. The hormonal profile and treatment of all patients were analyzed and FSHR polymorphism was examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Women from all groups were classified based on polymorphisms at Position 680, occupied either by asparagines (Asn or serine (Ser as Asn/Asn, Asn/Ser, and Ser/Ser genotype. Result : Our study showed that all patients in the Asn/Asn group were normal responders and in the Asn/Ser group 64.8% were normal responders and 21.1% and 14.1% were poor and hyper responders respectively. In the Ser/Ser group we did not have normal responders and 46.7% of these patients were poor responders and 53.3% were hyper responders. Conclusion : FSH receptor polymorphism is correlated with response to ovarian stimulation.

  20. Prolactin-sensitive neurons express estrogen receptor-α and depend on sex hormones for normal responsiveness to prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furigo, Isadora C; Kim, Ki Woo; Nagaishi, Vanessa S; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; de Alencar, Amanda; Pedroso, João A B; Metzger, Martin; Donato, Jose

    2014-05-30

    Estrogens and prolactin share important target tissues, including the gonads, brain, liver, kidneys and some types of cancer cells. Herein, we sought anatomical and functional evidence of possible crosstalk between prolactin and estrogens in the mouse brain. First, we determined the distribution of prolactin-responsive neurons that express the estrogen receptor α (ERα). A large number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5-immunoreactive neurons expressing ERα mRNA were observed in several brain areas, including the anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), medial nucleus of the amygdala and nucleus of the solitary tract. However, although the medial preoptic area, periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, retrochiasmatic area, dorsomedial subdivision of the VMH, lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus and ventral premammillary nucleus contained significant numbers of prolactin-responsive neurons, these areas showed very few pSTAT5-immunoreactive cells expressing ERα mRNA. Second, we evaluated prolactin sensitivity in ovariectomized mice and observed that sex hormones are required for a normal responsiveness to prolactin as ovariectomized mice showed a lower number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5 immunoreactive neurons in all analyzed brain nuclei compared to gonad-intact females. In addition, we performed hypothalamic gene expression analyses to determine possible post-ovariectomy changes in components of prolactin signaling. We observed no significant changes in the mRNA expression of prolactin receptor, STAT5a or STAT5b. In summary, sex hormones exert a permissive role in maintaining the brain's prolactin sensitivity, most likely through post-transcriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 and inflammatory response to a single exercise bout in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Dan; Eliakim, Alon

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity plays an important role in tissue anabolism, growth and development, but the mechanisms that link patterns of exercise with tissue anabolism are not completely understood. The effectiveness of physical training depends on the training load and on the individual ability to tolerate it, and an imbalance between the two may lead to under or over-training. Therefore, many efforts have been made to find objective parameters to quantify the balance between training load and the athlete's tolerance. One of the unique features of exercise is that it leads to a simultaneous increase of antagonistic mediators. On the one hand, exercise stimulates anabolic components of the growth hormone (GH) → IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) axis. On the other hand, exercise elevates catabolic pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). This emphasizes probably the importance of optimal adaptation to exercise in particularly during adolescence. The very fine balance between the anabolic and inflammatory/catabolic response to exercise will determine the effectiveness of exercise training and the health consequences of exercise. If the anabolic response is stronger, exercise will probably lead ultimately to increased muscle mass and improved fitness. A greater catabolic response, in particularly if persists for long duration, may lead to overtraining. Therefore, changes in the anabolic-catabolic hormonal balance and in circulating inflammatory cytokines can be used by adolescent athletes and/or their coaches to gauge the training intensity in individual and team sports. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Ozone modifies the metabolic and endocrine response to glucose: Reproduction of effects with the stress hormone corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Errol M; Pilon, Shinjini; Guénette, Josée; Williams, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C

    2018-03-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased incidence of metabolic disease (e.g. metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes); however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Air pollutants increase the release of stress hormones (human cortisol, rodent corticosterone), which could contribute to metabolic dysregulation. We assessed acute effects of ozone, and stress axis involvement, on glucose tolerance and on the metabolic (triglyceride), endocrine/energy regulation (insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, leptin, ghrelin, corticosterone), and inflammatory/endothelial (TNF, IL-6, VEGF, PAI-1) response to exogenous glucose. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed to clean air or 0.8 ppm ozone for 4 h in whole body chambers. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis involvement in ozone effects was tested through subcutaneous administration of the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (50 mg/kg body weight), corticosterone (10 mg/kg body weight), or vehicle (40% propylene glycol) prior to exposure. A glucose tolerance test (2 g/kg body weight glucose) was conducted immediately after exposure, with blood samples collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Ozone exposure impaired glucose tolerance, an effect accompanied by increased plasma triglycerides but no impairment of insulin release. Ozone diminished glucagon, GLP-1, and ghrelin responses to glucose, but did not significantly impact inflammatory/endothelial analytes. Metyrapone reduced corticosterone but increased glucose and triglycerides, complicating evaluation of the impact of glucocorticoid inhibition. However, administration of corticosterone reproduced the profile of ozone effects, supporting a role for the HPA axis. The results show that ozone-dependent changes in glucose tolerance are accompanied by altered metabolic and endocrine responses to glucose challenge that are reproduced by exogenous stress hormone. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypothalamic amenorrhea with normal body weight: ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to corticotropin-releasing hormone test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meczekalski, B; Tonetti, A; Monteleone, P; Bernardi, F; Luisi, S; Stomati, M; Luisi, M; Petraglia, F; Genazzani, A R

    2000-03-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is a functional disorder caused by disturbances in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulsatility. The mechanism by which stress alters GnRH release is not well known. Recently, the role of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurosteroids in the pathophysiology of HA has been considered. The aim of the present study was to explore further the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in HA. We included 8 patients (aged 23.16+/-1.72 years) suffering from hypothalamic stress-related amenorrhea with normal body weight and 8 age-matched healthy controls in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. We measured basal serum levels of FSH, LH, and estradiol and evaluated ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to CRH test in both HA patients and healthy women. Serum basal levels of FSH, LH, and estradiol as well as basal levels of allopregnanolone were significantly lower in HA patients than in controls (P<0.001) while basal ACTH and cortisol levels were significantly higher in amenorrheic patients with respect to controls (P<0.001). The response (area under the curve) of ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol to CRH was significantly lower in amenorrheic women compared with controls (P<0.001, P<0.05, P<0.05 respectively). In conclusion, women with HA, despite the high ACTH and cortisol levels and, therefore, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, are characterized by low allopregnanolone basal levels, deriving from an impairment of both adrenal and ovarian synthesis. The blunted ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to CRH indicate that, in hypothalamic amenorrhea, there is a reduced sensitivity and expression of CRH receptor. These results open new perspectives on the role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  4. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Timme, Terry L.; Mai, W.-Y.; Satoh, Takefumi; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR + CD8 + T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR + CD4 + T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer

  5. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein–protein and lipid–protein interactions to hormone signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant–microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD–PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD–PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD–PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD–PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD–PA in a broader context in order to guide future research. PMID:25680793

  6. Comparison of self-administration behavior and responsiveness to drug-paired cues in rats running an alley for intravenous heroin and cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Baird, Rebeccah; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2011-04-01

    Evidence suggests that responsiveness to a drug-paired cue is predicted by the reinforcing magnitude of the drug during prior self-administration. It remains unclear, however, if this principle holds true when comparisons are made across drug reinforcers. The current study was therefore devised to test the hypothesis that differences in the animals' responsiveness to a cocaine- or heroin-paired cue presented during extinction would reflect differences in the patterns of prior cocaine and heroin runway self-administration. Rats ran a straight alley for single intravenous injections of either heroin (0.1 mg/kg/inj) or cocaine (1.0 mg/kg/inj) each paired with a distinct olfactory cue. Animals experienced 15 trials with each drug reinforcer in a counterbalanced manner. Start latencies, run times, and retreat behaviors (a form of approach-avoidance conflict) provided behavioral indices of the subjects' motivation to seek the reinforcer on each trial. Responsiveness to each drug-paired cue was assessed after 7, 14, or 21 days of non-reinforced extinction trials. Other animals underwent conditioned place preference (CPP) testing to ensure that the two drug reinforcers were capable of producing drug-cue associations. While both drugs produced comparable CPPs, heroin served as a stronger incentive stimulus in the runway as evidenced by faster start and run times and fewer retreats. In contrast, cocaine- but not heroin-paired cues produced increases in drug-seeking behavior during subsequent extinction trials. The subjects' responsiveness to drug-paired cues during extinction was not predicted by differences in the motivation to seek heroin versus cocaine during prior drug self-administration.

  7. Follicular and endocrine dose responses according to anti-Müllerian hormone levels in IVF patients treated with a novel human recombinant FSH (FE 999049)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Ernesto; Nyboe Andersen, Anders; Barri, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytop......OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF...... for these hormones, and no clear dose-related increase was observed for the number of follicles in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dose-response relationships between rhFSH and follicular development and endocrine parameters are significantly different for IVF/ICSI patients with lower and higher serum AMH levels...

  8. Hormonal therapy followed by chemotherapy or the reverse sequence as first-line treatment of hormone-responsive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients: results of an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighin, Claudia; Dozin, Beatrice; Poggio, Francesca; Ceppi, Marcello; Bruzzi, Paolo; D'Alonzo, Alessia; Levaggi, Alessia; Giraudi, Sara; Lambertini, Matteo; Miglietta, Loredana; Vaglica, Marina; Fontana, Vincenzo; Iacono, Giuseppina; Pronzato, Paolo; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2017-07-04

    Introduction Although hormonal-therapy is the preferred first-line treatment for hormone-responsive, HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer, no data from clinical trials support the choice between hormonal-therapy and chemotherapy.Methods Patients were divided into two groups according to the treatment: chemotherapy or hormonal-therapy. Outcomes in terms of clinical benefit and median overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated in the two groups. To calculate the time spent in chemotherapy with respect to OS in the two groups, the proportion of patients in chemotherapy relative to those present in either group was computed at every day from the start of therapy.Results From 1999 to 2013, 119 patients received first-line hormonal-therapy (HT-first group) and 100 first-line chemotherapy (CT-first group). Patients in the CT-first group were younger and with poorer prognostic factors as compared to those in HT-first group. Clinical benefit (77 vs 81%) and median OS (50.7 vs 51.1 months) were similar in the two groups. Time spent in chemotherapy was significantly longer during the first 3 years in CT-first group (54-34%) as compared to the HT-first group (11-18%). This difference decreased after the third year and overall was 28% in the CT-first group and 18% in the HT-first group.Conclusions The sequence first-line chemotherapy followed by hormonal-therapy, as compared with the opposite sequence, is associated with a longer time of OS spent in chemotherapy. However, despite the poorer prognostic factors, patients in the CT-first group had a superimposable OS than those in the HT-first group.

  9. Appetite, food intake and gut hormone responses to intense aerobic exercise of different duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Adrian; Blannin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of acute bouts of high-intensity aerobic exercise of differing durations on subjective appetite, food intake and appetite-associated hormones in endurance-trained males. Twelve endurance-trained males (age = 21 ± 2 years; BMI = 21.0 ± 1.6 kg/m 2 ; VO 2max  = 61.6 ± 6.0 mL/kg/min) completed four trials, within a maximum 28 day period, in a counterbalanced order: resting (REST); 15 min exercise bout (15-min); 30 min exercise bout (30-min) and 45 min exercise bout (45-min). All exercise was completed on a cycle ergometer at an intensity of ~76% VO 2max Sixty minutes post exercise, participants consumed an ad libitum meal. Measures of subjective appetite and blood samples were obtained throughout the morning, with plasma analyzed for acylated ghrelin, total polypeptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) and total glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) concentrations. The following results were obtained: Neither subjective appetite nor absolute food intake differed between trials. Relative energy intake (intake - expenditure) was significantly greater after REST (2641 ± 1616 kJ) compared with both 30-min (1039 ± 1520 kJ) and 45-min (260 ± 1731 kJ), and significantly greater after 15-min (2699 ± 1239 kJ) compared with 45-min (condition main effect, P  exercise in 30-min and 45-min, respectively (condition × time interaction, P  exercise trials (condition × time interaction, P  = 0.011); the greatest, most enduring suppression, was observed in 45-min. PYY concentration was unchanged with exercise. In conclusion, high-intensity aerobic cycling lasting up to 45 min did not suppress subjective appetite or affect absolute food intake, but did reduce relative energy intake, in well-trained endurance athletes. Findings question the role of appetite hormones in regulating subjective appetite in the acute post-exercise period. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Mahonian pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Sagan, Bruce E.; Savage, Carla D.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a Mahonian pair. Consider the set, P^*, of all words having the positive integers as alphabet. Given finite subsets S,T of P^*, we say that (S,T) is a Mahonian pair if the distribution of the major index, maj, over S is the same as the distribution of the inversion number, inv, over T. So the well-known fact that maj and inv are equidistributed over the symmetric group, S_n, can be expressed by saying that (S_n,S_n) is a Mahonian pair. We investigate various Mahonia...

  11. Relationship among circulating anti-Müllerian hormone, insulin like growth factor 1, cadmium and superovulatory response in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, R L; Khalil, A A Y; Abdel-Wahab, A; Hassan, N Y; Abdel-Hamied, E; Kasimanickam, R K

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this study were 1. to determine the associations among circulating anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations of lactating Holstein cows at the time of superovulation and 2. to determine the effect of circulating AMH, IGF1 and Cd concentrations on the superovulatory response in Holstein dairy cows. Holstein cows (n = 30) were milked thrice daily and housed and fed in free stall barn as a separate group. All animals were synchronized for superovulation and flushed. Three blood samples for AMH, IGF1 and Cd analysis were collected prior to superovulation, at estrus and at the time of embryo collection. The concentrations of blood makers prior to superovulation were highly correlated to superovulatory response. Circulating concentrations of AMH, IGF1 prior to superovulation were negatively correlated to Cd concentrations (P cows were classified into quartiles (Q) of circulating AMH concentration, number of corpus luteum, and total embryos, total transferable embryos and total grade 1 embryos yield was significantly different for AMH quartiles. The superovulatory response parameters evaluated were increased with increased AMH concentrations; particularly we observed a >2-fold difference between first and fourth AMH quartiles in total transferable embryo yield and total grade 1 embryo yield. In conclusion, circulating AMH concentration was strongly associated with superovulatory response. Measuring AMH before enrolling cows in superovulation programs will likely allow practitioners to improve numbers of embryos produced and, thereby, reduce costs per embryo produced. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Marker of Bone Resorption in Acute Response to Exogenous or Endogenous Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Zikan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH changes morphology of osteoclasts within minutes after its systemic administration. The aim of our study was to test in healthy men whether both exogenous and endogenous PTH could change acutely (minutes to hours the serum cross-linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen (beta CTX, which is released during osteoclastic resorption of bone. Twelve healthy men (age range 24–34 yr were each studied during 180 min on a control period, after a single subcutaneous injection of teriparatide, and after 30 min EDTA infusion to stimulate endogenous PTH secretion. The tests were started after overnight fast, 3 h after a standard calcium load. The EDTA infusion induced a significant decrease in serum ionized calcium (by 8.5% at 33 min and a significant increase in plasma PTH (by 305% at 33 min. Both the EDTA and teriparatide resulted in a significant increase in beta CTX (p < 0.001 with maximum increases of 64% and 80%, respectively. A mild, but significant decrease in beta CTX was observed during the control test period. In conclusion, single-dose teriparatide injection as well as a stimulation of endogenous PTH in healthy men results in an acute increase of the bone resorption marker.

  13. Serum corticosterone response to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation in Florida sandhill cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludders, J W; Langenberg, J A; Czekala, N M; Erb, H N; McCormick, H

    1998-10-01

    Florida sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pratensis) were conditioned to confinement in an enclosure for 7 days, 6 hr a day. On day 8, cranes were catheterized and then confined in an enclosure. Venous blood (2 ml) was collected through the catheter and an attached IV line immediately before (-60 min) and 60 min after (0 min) confinement. Using a randomization table and a restricted cross-over experimental design, cranes were injected intravenously with either saline (control) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; cosyntropin, Cortrosyn; 0.25 mg). At 30, 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min after injection, blood samples were collected and assayed for corticosterone. The cranes receiving ACTH increased their serum corticosterone concentrations as much as fivefold above baseline concentrations. Serum corticosterone concentrations remained significantly elevated for approximately 60 min after ACTH stimulation. Physical restraint and catheterization caused an increase in serum corticosterone almost comparable to that induced by ACTH stimulation. In cranes injected with saline, serum corticosterone decreased within 1 hr after physical restraint and catheterization, and remained at lower levels throughout the remaining 5 hr of confinement.

  14. Hormonal, Biochemical and Haematological Changes in Response to Acute Hyperthermia in Rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, N.A.R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Today, hyperthermia plays a significant role in the evidence-based on treatment of cancer patients. Such promising endeavor is due to the fact that neoplastic cells are more heat sensitive than normal cells. the prospect of using hyperthermia alone to treat cancer tumours is appealing because hyperthermia is a physical treatment and so would have fewer side effects than chemotherapy or radiotherapy and, it could be used in combination with these therapeutic approaches. much more consistent evidence has been obtained experimentally, and continuing clinical interest has been encouraged by confirmation that, at relatively low temperature (37-41.5 C), heat enhances cell growth and may well enhance also the growth and proliferation of tumours, while above 45 C heat begins to damage both normal and malignant cells in both animal and human. So, the goal is to achieve a selective temperature elevation between 42-45 C at the tumour site while maintaining healthy tissue temperatures in a physiological save range.This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of acute whole body hyperthermia , (WBH) (rectal temperature 43 c) on biochemical , hormonal and haematological changes in normal healthy local strain (baladi) rabbits.The thermal late effects (recovery) at 24 hr-post whole body hyperthermia was also undertaken , in the attempt to evaluate the degree of safety , when hyperthermia is applied in the clinic for treating cancer and other diseases

  15. Hematologic, Metabolite and Hormone Responses to Weaning-Induced Stress in Foals of Different Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Sarwar Qureshi*, Fazeela Yaqoob1 and Heinrich Enbergs2

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-four foals of different breeds (Thoroughbred, Standardbred, German Warmblood, aged 5-6 months, were used in a study to evaluate the effects of weaning, sex, breed on haematological, metabolic and hormonal parameters. The values of leukocytes, neutrophils, red blood cells, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, platelets, activity of -GT and concentrations of cholesterol, cortisol and thyroxin rose on day 1 after weaning, while the percentages of eosinophils, lymphocytes and serum concentration of triglycerides decreased one day following weaning. These parameters returned to pre-weaning values on day 14 post-weaning except serum cholesterol, which fell to a significantly lower level on day 14 post-weaning than pre-weaning value. Serum alkaline phosphatase declined markedly on day 14 post-weaning. The most pronounced rise was observed for cortisol (51% and thyroxin (40% values. Females presented higher mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and cortisol concentration than males (P<0.05. German Warmblood foals presented a less-altered picture following weaning as compared with Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds. It is concluded that foals respond immediately to weaning, which may lead to suppression of the activities of bone cells i.e., osteoblasts. In addition, serum concentrations of cortisol and thyroxin influence one another in weanling foals. The Thoroughbred foals appear to be the most sensitive to weaning.

  16. Growth hormone and prolactin responses during partial and whole body warm-water immersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, J; Rovensky, J; Zimanova, T; Vigas, M

    2003-05-01

    To elucidate the role of core and skin thermoreceptors in the release of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), a sequence of two experiments using whole-body (head-out) and partial (one forearm) hot water immersions was performed. Experiment 1: Nine healthy men were exposed to head-out and partial water immersions (25 min, 38-39 degrees C). Head-out immersion increased the core temperature (38.0 +/- 0.1 vs. 36.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P immersion the core temperature was slightly elevated (36.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 36.6 +/- 0.1, P immersed one forearm once in 39 degrees C and once in 38 degrees C water. The measurements were performed in 5-min intervals. The GH concentration increased gradually from the beginning of the immersions (min 10; 39 degrees C: 1.9 +/- 1.0 vs. 0.6 +/- 0.3 ng mL(-1), P Immersion in 38 degrees C water did not induce core temperature changes. Peripheral thermoreceptors are involved in GH release when the body is exposed to elevated environmental temperature while a substantial elevation of core temperature is a precondition of PRL release.

  17. Gender and Stress Perception Based Differences in BMI, Hormonal Response and Appetite in Adult Pakistani Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Z.; Haleem, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the gender based variations in stress perception induced changes in leptin, cortisol and serotonin (5-HT) trends, appetite and Body Mass Index (BMI). Study Design: An analytical comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Neurochemistry Laboratory, University of Karachi, from January to August 2013. Methodology: Appetite, BMI and serum leptin, cortisol, and 5-HT were measured in 100 men and women of aged 30 - 60 years, working in teaching institutes of Karachi, to evaluate gender based, stress perception induced variations. The samples were identified by stratified random technique. The chemical variables were estimated through ELISA. Results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and multivariate general linear model using SPSS version 17. Results: Mean stress perception, BMI and serum leptin levels were significantly more in women (p < 0.05). Serum cortisol and 5-HT were found significantly reduced in women (p < 0.05). BMI, serum cortisol and leptin were found to be increased with increasing level of stress perception (p < 0.05). VAS for hunger and desire to eat as the measure of appetite was significantly higher in men (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Stress perception attenuates the positive effect of cortisol and negative effects of leptin and 5-HT on appetite through changes in their circulatory levels. Women perceive more stress and exhibit significantly attenuated changes in hormonal levels and appetite which may be the contributing factor towards obesity. Increased BMI in women despite decreased appetite merits more studies. (author)

  18. Morning and afternoon appetite and gut hormone responses to meal and stress challenges in obese individuals with and without binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, S; Grillot, C; Ungredda, T; Ellis, S; Mehta, N; Holst, J; Geliebter, A

    2017-12-13

    Eating late in the day is common, and stress can induce eating. Little is understood about how time of day and stress interact to affect appetite and thereby body weight. These may be particularly important influences in binge eaters, who tend to binge in the evening, and in response to stress. Obese participants with (n=16) and without (n=16) Binge Eating Disorder (BED) participated in two identical test protocols beginning either in the morning or the afternoon (AM condition/PM condition), each following an 8 h fast. For each protocol they first received a standardized liquid meal (9:00am/4:00pm), then a stress test (Socially-Evaluated Cold Pressor Test, 11:10am/6:1pm), then a multi-item ad libitum buffet meal (11:40am/6:40pm), while rating appetite and stress and having blood drawn for hormone measures. Appetite at baseline was greater in the PM than AM condition (higher hunger, lower fullness). Following the liquid meal, AUC values for hunger and ghrelin were greater, and AUC values for PYY lower, in the PM than AM condition. Only those with BED showed lower fullness AUC in the PM condition, as well as a pattern of higher initial PM and lower initial AM ghrelin. Following the stress test, cortisol and ghrelin increased in both the AM and PM conditions, but higher ghrelin AUC and lower cortisol AUC were observed in the PM condition. Again, only participants with BED showed lower fullness AUC in the PM condition. Buffet meal intake was similar across groups and conditions, but those with BED reported greater loss of control and binge resemblance than those without. Afternoon/evening may be a high-risk period for overeating, particularly when paired with stress exposure, and for those with binge eating.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 13 December 2017. doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.307.

  19. Endocrine effects of adjuvant letrozole compared with tamoxifen in hormone-responsive postmenopausal patients with early breast cancer: the HOBOE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Emanuela; Morabito, Alessandro; Di Rella, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Gravina, Adriano; Labonia, Vincenzo; Landi, Gabriella; Nuzzo, Francesco; Pacilio, Carmen; De Maio, Ermelinda; Di Maio, Massimo; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; De Feo, Gianfranco; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Botti, Gerardo; Chiodini, Paolo; Gallo, Ciro; Perrone, Francesco; de Matteis, Andrea

    2009-07-01

    PURPOSE We compared the endocrine effects of 6 and 12 months of adjuvant letrozole versus tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients with hormone-responsive early breast cancer within an ongoing phase III trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients were randomly assigned to receive tamoxifen, letrozole, or letrozole plus zoledronic acid. Serum values of estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEA-S), progesterone, and cortisol were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. For each hormone, changes from baseline at 6 and 12 months were compared between treatment groups, and differences over time for each group were analyzed. Results Hormonal data were available for 139 postmenopausal patients with a median age of 62 years, with 43 patients assigned to tamoxifen and 96 patients assigned to letrozole alone or combined with zoledronic acid. Baseline values were similar between the two groups for all hormones. Many significant changes were observed between drugs and for each drug over time. Namely, three hormones seemed significantly affected by one drug only: estradiol that decreased and progesterone that increased with letrozole and cortisol that increased with tamoxifen. Both drugs affected FSH (decreasing with tamoxifen and slightly increasing with letrozole), LH (decreasing more with tamoxifen than with letrozole), testosterone (slightly increasing with letrozole but not enough to differ from tamoxifen), and DHEA-S (increasing with both drugs but not differently between them). Zoledronic acid did not have significant impact on hormonal levels. CONCLUSION Adjuvant letrozole and tamoxifen result in significantly distinct endocrine effects. Such differences can explain the higher efficacy of letrozole as compared with tamoxifen.

  20. Sex-dependent expression of caveolin 1 in response to sex steroid hormones is closely associated with development of obesity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (CAV1 is a conserved group of structural membrane proteins that form special cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich compartments, especially in adipocytes. Recently, it has been reported that CAV1 is an important target protein in sex hormone-dependent regulation of various metabolic pathways, particularly in cancer and diabetes. To clarify distinct roles of CAV1 in sex-dependent obesity development, we investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD and sex steroid hormones on CAV1 expression in adipose tissues of male and female rats. Results of animal experiments revealed that estrogen (17-β-estradiol, E2 and androgen (dihydrotestosterone, DHT had opposite effects on body weight gain as well as on the regulation of CAV1, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in adipose tissues. Furthermore, sex hormone receptors and aromatase were differentially expressed in a sex-dependent manner in response to E2 and DHT treatments. In vivo data were confirmed using 3T3-L1 and HIB1B cell lines, where Cav1 knock down stimulated lipogenesis but suppressed sex hormone receptor signaling proteins. Most importantly, co-immunoprecipitation enabled the identification of previously unrecognized CAV1-interacting mitochondrial or lipid oxidative pathway proteins in adipose tissues. Taken together, current data showed that CAV1 may play important preventive role in the development of obesity, with more prominent effects in females, and proved to be an important target protein for the hormonal regulation of adipose tissue metabolism by manipulating sex hormone receptors and mitochondrial oxidative pathways. Therefore, we can report, for the first time, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of sex steroid hormones in the sex-dimorphic regulation of CAV1.

  1. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements for plant hormone responses based on microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi-Shinozaki Kazuko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytohormones organize plant development and environmental adaptation through cell-to-cell signal transduction, and their action involves transcriptional activation. Recent international efforts to establish and maintain public databases of Arabidopsis microarray data have enabled the utilization of this data in the analysis of various phytohormone responses, providing genome-wide identification of promoters targeted by phytohormones. Results We utilized such microarray data for prediction of cis-regulatory elements with an octamer-based approach. Our test prediction of a drought-responsive RD29A promoter with the aid of microarray data for response to drought, ABA and overexpression of DREB1A, a key regulator of cold and drought response, provided reasonable results that fit with the experimentally identified regulatory elements. With this succession, we expanded the prediction to various phytohormone responses, including those for abscisic acid, auxin, cytokinin, ethylene, brassinosteroid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid, as well as for hydrogen peroxide, drought and DREB1A overexpression. Totally 622 promoters that are activated by phytohormones were subjected to the prediction. In addition, we have assigned putative functions to 53 octamers of the Regulatory Element Group (REG that have been extracted as position-dependent cis-regulatory elements with the aid of their feature of preferential appearance in the promoter region. Conclusions Our prediction of Arabidopsis cis-regulatory elements for phytohormone responses provides guidance for experimental analysis of promoters to reveal the basis of the transcriptional network of phytohormone responses.

  2. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  3. Enzymatic and hormonal responses following a 24 h endurance run and a 10 h triathlon race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellmann, N; Sagnol, M; Bedu, M; Falgairette, G; Van Praagh, E; Gaillard, G; Jouanel, P; Coudert, J

    1988-01-01

    Muscle cell leakage and hormonal changes were compared immediately after and during the 3 days following a 24 h endurance run (R24h) in 8 subjects, and a 10 h triathlon non-competitive race (T10h) in 6 subjects. The study showed three main differences: 1) plasma enzyme increases were considerably more significant in R24h than in T10h: compared with resting levels, creatine kinase increased x 120 after R24h but only x 2 after T10h; lactic dehydrogenase x 4, as opposed to x 1.5; and transaminases only showed an increase after R24h. The plasma myoglobin increase after R24h was double that found after T10h; 2) for the same magnitude of plasma aldosterone and cortisol after R24h and T10h (3 times the resting levels), a highly significant decrease in urinary Na+ (p less than 0.001) and an increase in urinary K+ (p less than 0.01) were found only after R24h; and 3) the plasma free noradrenaline level increased significantly after R24h (x 2.6) whereas it was unchanged after T10h. In contrast, the plasma level of conjugated dopamine increased only after T10h (x 3.7, p less than 0.05). These results suggest that long-distance running causes more muscular lesions than the triathlon, and that important factors other than aldosterone are probably involved in the regulation of urinary electrolyte excretions during T10h.

  4. SNP analyses of postprandial responses in (an)orexigenic hormones and feelings of hunger reveal long-term physiological adaptations to facilitate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, M; Smeets, A J P G; Veldhorst, M A B; Nieuwenhuizen, A G; Bouwman, F G; Heidema, A G; Mariman, E C M; Westerterp-Plantenga, M S; Westerterp, K R

    2008-12-01

    The postprandial responses in (an)orexigenic hormones and feelings of hunger are characterized by large inter-individual differences. Food intake regulation was shown earlier to be partly under genetic control. This study aimed to determine whether the postprandial responses in (an)orexigenic hormones and parameters of food intake regulation are associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding for satiety hormones and their receptors. Peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide 1 and ghrelin levels, as well as feelings of hunger and satiety, were determined pre- and postprandially in 62 women and 41 men (age 31+/-14 years; body mass index 25.0+/-3.1 kg/m(2)). Dietary restraint, disinhibition and perceived hunger were determined using the three-factor eating questionnaire. SNPs were determined in the GHRL, GHSR, LEP, LEPR, PYY, NPY, NPY2R and CART genes. The postprandial response in plasma ghrelin levels was associated with SNPs in PYY (215G>C, PG and 688A>G, PGHRL (-501A>C, PA, PG and 585T>C, PA, PA and 204T>C, P<0.05). Part of the inter-individual variability in postprandial responses in (an)orexigenic hormones can be explained by genetic variation. These postprandial responses represent either long-term physiological adaptations to facilitate homeostasis or reinforce direct genetic effects.

  5. Neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 regulate Caenorhabditis elegans avoidance response to the plant stress hormone methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jintao; Xu, Zhaofa; Tan, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhuohua; Ma, Long

    2015-02-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSa) is a stress hormone released by plants under attack by pathogens or herbivores . MeSa has been shown to attract predatory insects of herbivores and repel pests. The molecules and neurons underlying animal response to MeSa are not known. Here we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong avoidance response to MeSa, which requires the activities of two closely related neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2. Molecular analyses suggest that NPR-1 expressed in the RMG inter/motor neurons is required for MeSa avoidance. An NPR-1 ligand FLP-18 is also required. Using a rescuing npr-2 promoter to drive a GFP transgene, we identified that NPR-2 is expressed in multiple sensory and interneurons. Genetic rescue experiments suggest that NPR-2 expressed in the AIZ interneurons is required for MeSa avoidance. We also provide evidence that the AWB sensory neurons might act upstream of RMGs and AIZs to detect MeSa. Our results suggest that NPR-2 has an important role in regulating animal behavior and that NPR-1 and NPR-2 act on distinct interneurons to affect C. elegans avoidance response to MeSa. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Repeated exposure to cat urine induces complex behavioral, hormonal, and c-fos mRNA responses in Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baofa; Gu, Chen; Lu, Yi; Hegab, Ibrahim M.; Yang, Shengmei; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Wanhong

    2017-08-01

    Prey species show specific adaptations that allow recognition, avoidance, and defense against predators. This study was undertaken to investigate the processing of a chronic, life-threatening stimulus to Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus). One hundred forty-four Norway rats were tested by repeated presentation of cat urine for 1 h at different days in a defensive withdrawal apparatus. Rats exposed to urine for short periods showed significantly larger defensive behavioral and medial hypothalamic c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) responses than other groups. These defensive responses habituated shortly after the presentation of cat urine. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone increased significantly when animals were repeatedly exposed to cat urine. However, the hormonal responses took longer to habituate than the behavioral and molecular responses did. We conclude that the behavioral and c-fos mRNA responses are "primed" for habituation to repeated exposures to cat urine, while the hormonal responses show "resistance." The results support our hypothesis that the strongest anti-predator responses at three levels would occur during short-term exposure to cat urine and that these responses would subsequently disappear on prolonged exposure. This study assists understanding the way in which the different levels of defensive responses are integrated and react during chronic stress.

  7. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  8. Steroid hormones and psychological responses to soccer matches: Insights from a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamer Slimani

    Full Text Available The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess the perturbations in hormonal and psychological homeostasis in response to soccer match-play. These perturbations were explored according to match outcome (i.e., win versus loss, gender, type of contest (i.e., competitive versus non-competitive fixtures and competitive level (i.e., novice versus high-level. The review was conducted according to the Population/Intervention or Exposure/Comparison/Outcome(s (PICO criteria and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines. Match outcome, type of contest and competitive levels were moderator variables in the examined steroid hormones responses to a soccer match-play. Different testosterone responses were seen between match winners (increase and losers (decrease when compared to pre-game or baseline values (p <0.05, whilst no changes could be detected for cortisol relative to match outcome in female soccer players. Males (Δ% = 6.26; ES = 0.28 demonstrated a marginally lower increase in testosterone levels when compared to females (Δ% = 49.16; ES = 1.00, though not statistically significant. Females (Δ% = 162.7; ES = 0.98 did not demonstrate elevated cortisol match response compared to males (Δ% = 34.60; ES = 1.20. Male novice soccer match-play increased cortisol levels compared to high-level soccer match-play (Q = 18.08, p<0.001. Competitive soccer matches increased cortisol levels compared to non-competitive fixtures (i.e., collegiate tournament. Additionally, competitive levels moderate the relationship between a soccer match and testosterone levels (p <0.001, regardless of gender differences. From the presented systematic review and meta-analysis it appears (1 cortisol changes are associated with cognitive anxiety in starter female soccer players, while (2 testosterone changes are associated with changes in mood state in females and social connectedness in male soccer players. This

  9. Capacity for cooperative binding of thyroid hormone (T3) receptor dimers defines wild type T3 response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, G A; Williams, G R; Harney, J W; Forman, B M; Samuels, H H; Moore, D D; Larsen, P R

    1992-04-01

    Thyroid hormone response elements (T3REs) have been identified in a variety of promoters including those directing expression of rat GH (rGH), alpha-myosin heavy chain (rMHC), and malic enzyme (rME). A detailed biochemical and genetic analysis of the rGH element has shown that it consists of three hexamers related to the consensus [(A/G)GGT(C/A)A]. We have extended this analysis to the rMHC and rME elements. Binding of highly purified thyroid hormone receptor (T3R) to T3REs was determined using the gel shift assay, and thyroid hormone (T3) induction was measured in transient tranfections. We show that the wild type version of each of the three elements binds T3R dimers cooperatively. Mutational analysis of the rMHC and rME elements identified domains important for binding T3R dimers and allowed a direct determination of the relationship between T3R binding and function. In each element two hexamers are required for dimer binding, and mutations that interfere with dimer formation significantly reduce T3 induction. Similar to the rGH element, the rMHC T3RE contains three hexameric domains arranged as a direct repeat followed by an inverted copy, although the third domain is weaker than in rGH. All three are required for full function and T3R binding. The rME T3RE is a two-hexamer direct repeat T3RE, which also binds T3R monomer and dimer. Across a series of mutant elements, there was a strong correlation between dimer binding in vitro and function in vivo for rMHC (r = 0.99, P less than 0.01) and rME (r = 0.67, P less than 0.05) T3REs. Our results demonstrate a similar pattern of T3R dimer binding to a diverse array of hexameric sequences and arrangements in three wild type T3REs. Addition of nuclear protein enhanced T3R binding but did not alter the specificity of binding to wild type or mutant elements. Binding of purified T3R to T3REs was highly correlated with function, both with and without the addition of nuclear protein. T3R dimer formation is the common

  10. Modulation of xenobiotic biotransformation system and hormonal responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) after exposure to tributyltin (TBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Anne Skjetne; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-04-01

    represent another hormonal effect of TBT not previously reported in any fish or lower vertebrate. The proposed androgenic effect is supported by the observation that TBT also induced ARbeta mRNA expression in a concentration-specific manner. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has simultaneously studied multiple responses after exposure to TBT in fish.

  11. Appetite, appetite hormone and energy intake responses to two consecutive days of aerobic exercise in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jessica A; King, James A; McFarlane, Ewan; Baker, Luke; Bradley, Chloe; Crouch, Nicole; Hill, David; Stensel, David J

    2015-09-01

    Single bouts of exercise do not cause compensatory changes in appetite, food intake or appetite regulatory hormones on the day that exercise is performed. It remains possible that such changes occur over an extended period or in response to a higher level of energy expenditure. This study sought to test this possibility by examining appetite, food intake and appetite regulatory hormones (acylated ghrelin, total peptide-YY, leptin and insulin) over two days, with acute bouts of exercise performed on each morning. Within a controlled laboratory setting, 15 healthy males completed two, 2-day long (09:00-16:00) experimental trials (exercise and control) in a randomised order. On the exercise trial participants performed 60 min of continuous moderate-high intensity treadmill running (day one: 70.1 ± 2.5% VO2peak, day two: 70.0 ± 3.2% VO2max (mean ± SD)) at the beginning of days one and two. Across each day appetite perceptions were assessed using visual analogue scales and appetite regulatory hormones were measured from venous blood samples. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes were determined from meals provided two and six hours into each day and from a snack bag provided in-between trial days. Exercise elicited a high level of energy expenditure (total = 7566 ± 635 kJ across the two days) but did not produce compensatory changes in appetite or energy intake over two days (control: 29,217 ± 4006 kJ; exercise: 28,532 ± 3899 kJ, P > 0.050). Two-way repeated measures ANOVA did not reveal any main effects for acylated ghrelin or leptin (all P > 0.050). However a significant main effect of trial (P = 0.029) for PYY indicated higher concentrations on the exercise vs. control trial. These findings suggest that across a two day period, high volume exercise does not stimulate compensatory appetite regulatory changes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Methylphenidate and the response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, Judith S; de Ridder, Maria A J; Breukhoven, Petra E; Lem, Annemieke J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment of ADHD with methylphenidate (MP) has greatly increased in recent years, therefore more children are being treated with GH and MP simultaneously. Some studies have found an association between MP treatment and growth deceleration, but data are contradictory. To explore the effects of MP treatment on growth in GH-treated short SGA children Anthropometric measurements were performed in 78 GH-treated short SGA children (mean age 10.6 yr), 39 of whom were also treated with MP (SGA-GH/MP). The SGA-GH/MP group was compared to 39 SGA-GH treated subjects. They were matched for sex, age and height at start of GH, height SDS at start of MP treatment and target height SDS. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels were yearly determined. Growth, serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels during the first three years of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures regression analysis. The SGA-GH/MP group had a lower height gain during the first 3 years than the SGA-GH subjects, only significant between 6 and 12 months of MP treatment. After 3 years of MP treatment, the height gain was 0.2 SDS (± 0.1 SD) lower in the SGA-GH/MP group (P = 0.17). Adult height was not significantly different between the SGA-GH/MP and SGA-GH group (-1.9 SDS and -1.9 SDS respectively, P = 0.46). Moreover, during the first 3 years of MP treatment IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were similar in both groups. MP has some negative effect on growth during the first years in short SGA children treated with GH, but adult height is not affected.

  13. Methylphenidate and the response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S Renes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth hormone (GH treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA. Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Treatment of ADHD with methylphenidate (MP has greatly increased in recent years, therefore more children are being treated with GH and MP simultaneously. Some studies have found an association between MP treatment and growth deceleration, but data are contradictory. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of MP treatment on growth in GH-treated short SGA children METHODS: Anthropometric measurements were performed in 78 GH-treated short SGA children (mean age 10.6 yr, 39 of whom were also treated with MP (SGA-GH/MP. The SGA-GH/MP group was compared to 39 SGA-GH treated subjects. They were matched for sex, age and height at start of GH, height SDS at start of MP treatment and target height SDS. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 levels were yearly determined. Growth, serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels during the first three years of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures regression analysis. RESULTS: The SGA-GH/MP group had a lower height gain during the first 3 years than the SGA-GH subjects, only significant between 6 and 12 months of MP treatment. After 3 years of MP treatment, the height gain was 0.2 SDS (± 0.1 SD lower in the SGA-GH/MP group (P = 0.17. Adult height was not significantly different between the SGA-GH/MP and SGA-GH group (-1.9 SDS and -1.9 SDS respectively, P = 0.46. Moreover, during the first 3 years of MP treatment IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: MP has some negative effect on growth during the first years in short SGA children treated with GH, but adult height is not affected.

  14. Stress and immunological response of heifers divergently ranked for residual feed intake following an adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A K; Lawrence, P; Earley, B; Kenny, D A; McGee, M

    2017-01-01

    When an animal is exposed to a stressor, metabolic rate, energy consumption and utilisation increase primarily through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Changes to partitioning of energy by an animal are likely to influence the efficiency with which it is utilised. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the physiological stress response to an exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge in beef heifers divergently ranked on phenotypic residual feed intake (RFI). Data were collected on 34 Simmental weaning beef heifers the progeny of a well characterized and divergently bred RFI suckler beef herd. Residual feed intake was determined on each animal during the post-weaning stage over a 91-day feed intake measurement period during which they were individually offered adlibitum grass silage and 2 kg of concentrate per head once daily. The 12 highest [0.34 kg DM/d] and 12 lowest [-0.48 kg DM/d] ranking animals on RFI were selected for use in this study. For the physiological stress challenge heifers (mean age 605 ± 13 d; mean BW 518 ± 31.4 kg) were fitted aseptically with indwelling jugular catheters to facilitate intensive blood collection. The response of the adrenal cortex to a standardised dose of ACTH (1.98 IU/kg metabolic BW 0.75 ) was examined. Serial blood samples were analysed for plasma cortisol, ACTH and haematology variables. Heifers differing in RFI did not differ ( P  = 0.59) in ACTH concentrations. Concentration of ACTH peaked ( P  response than Low RFI from 40 min to 150 min relative to ACTH administration. Cortisol response was positively associated with RFI status ( r  = 0.32; P  responsiveness of the HPA axis is likely to contribute to appreciable variation in the efficiency feed utilisation of cattle.

  15. Responses of membrane lipid peroxidation and endogenous hormones of soybean seedlings to UV-B radiation and rare earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shengrong; Yang Chunhe; Zhang Yuequn

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to provide strategies for development of rare earth and control of environmental pollution. [Method] Responses of membrane lipid peroxidation and endogenous hormones of soybean seedlings to UV-B radiation and rare earth were studied through hydroponics in laboratory. [Result] The results showed that under irradiation of UV-B(T1-0.15 W/m2 and T2-0.45 W/m2), chlorophyll and indole-3-acetic acid(IAA) contents firstly decreased during the stress phase (1-5d) and then increased during the restoration phase (6-9d) while contents of malonadialdehyde(MDA) and abscisic acid(ABA) gradually increased during the imposition of UV-B radiation (1-5d) and subsequently decreased during recovery from UV-B stress (6-9d) . With adding of La (Ⅲ) with the concentration of 20mg•L-1, the decline/rise trend of chlorophyll, IAA, MDA and ABA contents was slowed down during the stress period while the rise/decline speed was accelerated during the recovery period. [Conclusion] It suggests that the regulation of La (Ⅲ) on membrane lipid peroxidation and endogenous hormones could increase chlorophyll and IAA contents, improve the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibit membrane lipid peroxidation, decrease the accumulation amount of ABA and alleviate injury of UV-B radiation to soybean seedlings. Further, the protective potential of La (Ⅲ) was better under low UV-B radiation than under high one

  16. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Does short-term fasting lead to stressed-out parents? A study of incubation commitment and the hormonal stress responses and recoveries in snow petrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Parenteau, Charline; Pellé, Marie; Chastel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The hormonal stress response is flexible and can be modulated by individuals according to its costs and benefits. Therefore, it is predicted that parents in poor body condition should modify their hormonal stress response, and thus, redirect energy allocation processes from parental care to self-maintenance when stressors occur. To test this prediction, most studies on free-living vertebrates have only focused on the stress response while the stress recovery - how quickly hormonal levels return to baseline values - has been neglected. Moreover, most studies have only focused on corticosterone - the primary mediator of allostasis - without paying attention to prolactin despite its major role in mediating parental behaviors. Here, we examined the effect of a short-term fasting event on the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses and recoveries, and we subsequently explored their relationships with parental decision in the snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea). By comparing the hormonal profiles of fasting and non-fasting snow petrels, we showed that parents modulate their corticosterone (but not prolactin) stress response according to their energetic status. We also described for the first time the hormonal stress recoveries in wild birds and found that they did not differ between fasting and non-fasting birds. Importantly, egg neglect was negatively correlated with circulating prolactin but not corticosterone levels in this species, demonstrating therefore a complex link between body condition, parental behavior and circulating corticosterone and prolactin levels. We suggest that both corticosterone and prolactin play a major role in the way parents adjust to stressors. This multiple signaling may allow parents to fine-tune their response to stressors, and especially, to activate specific allostasis-related mechanisms in a timely manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pair-housing of male and female rats during chronic stress exposure results in gender-specific behavioral responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbroek, C.; Snijders, T.A.B.; Den Boer, J.A.; Gerrits, Marjolein; Fokkema, D.S.; ter Horst, G.J

    Social support has a positive influence on the course of a depression and social housing of rats could provide an animal model for studying the neurobiological mechanisms of social support. Male and female rats were subjected to chronic footshock stress for 3 weeks and pair-housing of rats was used

  19. Dissociated incretin hormone response to protein versus fat ingestion in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, O; Carr, RD; Holst, Jens Juul

    2011-01-01

    kcal/kg) fat (olive oil) or protein (whey protein) was ingested by non-diabetic obese male volunteers [body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m(2) ; n = 12] and plasma GIP and GLP-1 were determined. We found no difference in the early GIP or GLP-1 responses to fat versus protein. However, the total 300-min GIP...

  20. Paired motor cortex and cervical epidural electrical stimulation timed to converge in the spinal cord promotes lasting increases in motor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asht M; Pal, Ajay; Gupta, Disha; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-11-15

    Pairing motor cortex stimulation and spinal cord epidural stimulation produced large augmentation in motor cortex evoked potentials if they were timed to converge in the spinal cord. The modulation of cortical evoked potentials by spinal cord stimulation was largest when the spinal electrodes were placed over the dorsal root entry zone. Repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal cord stimulation caused lasting increases in evoked potentials from both sites, but only if the time between the stimuli was optimal. Both immediate and lasting effects of paired stimulation are likely mediated by convergence of descending motor circuits and large diameter afferents onto common interneurons in the cervical spinal cord. Convergent activity in neural circuits can generate changes at their intersection. The rules of paired electrical stimulation are best understood for protocols that stimulate input circuits and their targets. We took a different approach by targeting the interaction of descending motor pathways and large diameter afferents in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that pairing stimulation of motor cortex and cervical spinal cord would strengthen motor responses through their convergence. We placed epidural electrodes over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord in rats; motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from biceps. MEPs evoked from motor cortex were robustly augmented with spinal epidural stimulation delivered at an intensity below the threshold for provoking an MEP. Augmentation was critically dependent on the timing and position of spinal stimulation. When the spinal stimulation was timed to coincide with the descending volley from motor cortex stimulation, MEPs were more than doubled. We then tested the effect of repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal stimulation. Repetitive pairing caused strong augmentation of cortical MEPs and spinal excitability that lasted up to an hour after just 5 min of pairing. Additional physiology

  1. The role of adrenal hormones in the response of glutamine synthetase to fasting in adult and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarobba, V; Torrent, A; Leydier, I; Alles, S; Brajon, B; Mignon, M; Attaix, D; Meynial-Denis, D

    2003-12-01

    During fasting, skeletal muscle exports increased amounts of glutamine (Gln) while increasing the production of this amino acid by glutamine synthetase (GS) in order to maintain the intramuscular Gln pool. Glucocorticoid hormones are believed to be the principal mediators of GS induction during stress conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the effect of fasting on GS activity and expression in skeletal muscle during aging and consequently, (2) the role of glucocorticoids in fasting-induced GS activity. Male Wistar rats (6-, 22-month old) were fasted for 5 days and both the activity and expression of GS were measured in tibialis anterior muscle. To better demonstrate the role of glucocorticoids in the response of GS to fasting, we suppressed their action by RU38486 administration (a potent glucocorticoid antagonist) and their production by adrenalectomy in fed and fasted rats. An increase in fasting-induced GS activity was observed in skeletal muscles from both adult and aged rats. Adrenalectomy, but surprisingly not RU38486, suppressed the fasting-induced increase in GS activity and expression. The data clearly show that the GS responsiveness to fasting was not modified by aging in skeletal muscle.

  2. High Sensitivity of Aged Mice to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Anorexia Corresponds to Elevated Proinflammatory Cytokine and Satiety Hormone Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erica S; Flannery, Brenna M; Gardner, Elizabeth M; Pestka, James J

    2015-10-19

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal grains, is a public health concern because of its adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and immune systems. The objective of this study was to compare effects of DON on anorectic responses in aged (22 mos) and adult (3 mos) mice. Aged mice showed increased feed refusal with both acute i.p. (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and dietary (1, 2.5, 10 ppm) DON exposure in comparison to adult mice. In addition to greater suppression of food intake from dietary DON exposure, aged mice also exhibited greater but transient body weight suppression. When aged mice were acutely exposed to 1 mg/kg bw DON i.p., aged mice displayed elevated DON and DON3GlcA tissue levels and delayed clearance in comparison with adult mice. Acute DON exposure also elicited higher proinflammatory cytokine and satiety hormone responses in the plasma of the aged group compared with the adult group. Increased susceptibility to DON-induced anorexia in aged mice relative to adult mice suggests that advanced life stage could be a critical component in accurate human risk assessments for DON and other trichothecenes.

  3. High Sensitivity of Aged Mice to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin-Induced Anorexia Corresponds to Elevated Proinflammatory Cytokine and Satiety Hormone Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Clark

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, a trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal grains, is a public health concern because of its adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and immune systems. The objective of this study was to compare effects of DON on anorectic responses in aged (22 mos and adult (3 mos mice. Aged mice showed increased feed refusal with both acute i.p. (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg and dietary (1, 2.5, 10 ppm DON exposure in comparison to adult mice. In addition to greater suppression of food intake from dietary DON exposure, aged mice also exhibited greater but transient body weight suppression. When aged mice were acutely exposed to 1 mg/kg bw DON i.p., aged mice displayed elevated DON and DON3GlcA tissue levels and delayed clearance in comparison with adult mice. Acute DON exposure also elicited higher proinflammatory cytokine and satiety hormone responses in the plasma of the aged group compared with the adult group. Increased susceptibility to DON-induced anorexia in aged mice relative to adult mice suggests that advanced life stage could be a critical component in accurate human risk assessments for DON and other trichothecenes.

  4. Variation in the biochemical response to l-thyroxine therapy and relationship with peripheral thyroid hormone conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, John E M; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W; Hoermann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Several influences modulate biochemical responses to a weight-adjusted levothyroxine (l-T4) replacement dose. We conducted a secondary analysis of the relationship of l-T4 dose to TSH and free T3 (FT3), using a prospective observational study examining the interacting equilibria between thyroid parameters. We studied 353 patients on steady-state l-T4 replacement for autoimmune thyroiditis or after surgery for malignant or benign thyroid disease. Peripheral deiodinase activity was calculated as a measure of T4–T3 conversion efficiency. In euthyroid subjects, the median l-T4 dose was 1.3 μg/kg per day (interquartile range (IQR) 0.94,1.60). The dose was independently associated with gender, age, aetiology and deiodinase activity (all P29 nmol/s revealed an increasing FT3–FT4 dissociation; the poorest converters showed the lowest FT3 levels in spite of the highest dose and circulating FT4 (P<0.001). An l-T4-related FT3–TSH disjoint was also apparent; some patients with fully suppressed TSH failed to raise FT3 above the median level. These findings imply that thyroid hormone conversion efficiency is an important modulator of the biochemical response to l-T4; FT3 measurement may be an additional treatment target; and l-T4 dose escalation may have limited success to raise FT3 appropriately in some cases. PMID:26335522

  5. Comparative ovarian microarray analysis of juvenile hormone-responsive genes in water flea Daphnia magna: potential targets for toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Williams, Timothy D; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2017-03-01

    The freshwater zooplankton Daphnia magna has been extensively employed in chemical toxicity tests such as OECD Test Guidelines 202 and 211. Previously, it has been demonstrated that the treatment of juvenile hormones (JHs) or their analogues to female daphnids can induce male offspring production. Based on this finding, a rapid screening method for detection of chemicals with JH-activity was recently developed using adult D. magna. This screening system determines whether a chemical has JH-activity by investigating the male offspring inducibility. Although this is an efficient high-throughput short-term screening system, much remains to be discovered about JH-responsive pathways in the ovary, and whether different JH-activators act via the same mechanism. JH-responsive genes in the ovary including developing oocytes are still largely undescribed. Here, we conducted comparative microarray analyses using ovaries from Daphnia magna treated with fenoxycarb (Fx; artificial JH agonist) or methyl farnesoate (MF; a putative innate JH in daphnids) to elucidate responses to JH agonists in the ovary, including developing oocytes, at a JH-sensitive period for male sex determination. We demonstrate that induction of hemoglobin genes is a well-conserved response to JH even in the ovary, and a potential adverse effect of JH agonist is suppression of vitellogenin gene expression, that might cause reduction of offspring number. This is the first report demonstrating different transcriptomics profiles from MF and an artificial JH agonist in D. magna ovary, improving understanding the tissue-specific mode-of-action of JH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Alcohol dysregulates corticotropin-releasing-hormone (CRH promoter activity by interfering with the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena M Przybycien-Szymanska

    Full Text Available EtOH exposure in male rats increases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, a brain region responsible for coordinating stress and anxiety responses. In this study we identified the molecular mechanisms involved in mediating these effects by examining the direct effects of EtOH on CRH promoter activity in a neuronal cell line derived from the PVN (IVB. In addition, we investigated the potential interactions of EtOH and glucocorticoids on the CRH promoter by concomitantly treating cells with EtOH and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR antagonist RU486, and by sequentially deleting GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response element (GRE on the CRH promoter. Cells were transiently transfected with a firefly luciferase reporter construct containing 2.5 kb of the rat wild type (WT or mutated CRH promoter. Our results showed that EtOH treatment induced a biphasic response in CRH promoter activity. EtOH exposure for 0.5 h significantly decreased promoter activity compared to vehicle treated controls, whereas promoter activity was significantly increased after 2.0 h of EtOH exposure. Treatment with RU486, or deletion of the GR binding sites 1 and 2 within the GRE, abolished the EtOH-induced increase in the promoter activity, however did not affect EtOH-induced decrease in CRH promoter activity at an earlier time point. Overall, our data suggest that alcohol exposure directly regulates CRH promoter activity by interfering with the normal feedback mechanisms of glucocorticoids mediated by GR signaling at the GRE site of the CRH promoter.

  7. Response to the gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist leuprolide in immature female sheep androgenized in utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO E RECABARREN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS, female sheep treated prenatally with testosterone (T-females are hypergonadotropic, exhibit neuroendocrine defects, multifollicular ovarian morphology, hyperinsulinemia and cycle defects. Hypergonadotropism and multifollicular morphology may in part be due to developmentally regulated increase in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH and may culminate in increased ovarian estradiol production. In this study, we utilized a GnRH agonist, leuprolide, to determine the developmental impact of prenatal testosterone exposure on pituitary-gonadal function and to establish if prenatal exposure produces changes in the reproductive axis similar to those described for women with PCOS. Eight control and eight T-females were injected intravenously with 0.1 mg of leuprolide acetate per kilogram of body weight at 5, 10 and 20 weeks of age. Blood samples were collected by means of an indwelling jugular vein catheter at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 and 48 hours after leuprolide. Area under the curve (AUC of LH response to leuprolide increased progressively between the three ages studied (P<0.05. AUC of LH in T-females was higher than in control females of the same age at 5 and 10 weeks of age (P<0.05, but similar at 20 weeks of age. AUC of estradiol response was lower at 10 but higher at 20 weeks of age in T-females compared to controls of the same age (P<0.05. Our findings suggest that prenatal T treatment alters the pituitary and ovarian responsiveness in a manner comparable to that observed in women with PCOS.

  8. Gut hormones and gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut hormone secretion in response to nutrient ingestion appears to depend on membrane proteins expressed by the enteroendocrine cells. These include transporters (glucose and amino acid transporters), and, in this case, hormone secretion depends on metabolic and electrophysiological events elicited...... that determines hormone responses. It follows that operations that change intestinal exposure to and absorption of nutrients, such as gastric bypass operations, also change hormone secretion. This results in exaggerated increases in the secretion of particularly the distal small intestinal hormones, GLP-1, GLP-2......, oxyntomodulin, neurotensin and peptide YY (PYY). However, some proximal hormones also show changes probably reflecting that the distribution of these hormones is not restricted to the bypassed segments of the gut. Thus, cholecystokinin responses are increased, whereas gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses...

  9. Role of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in the catabolic response to injury and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Charles H; Frost, Robert A

    2002-05-01

    The erosion of lean body mass resulting from protracted critical illness remains a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Previous studies have documented the well known impairment in nitrogen balance results from both an increase in muscle protein degradation as well as a decreased rate of both myofibrillar and sacroplasmic protein synthesis. This protein imbalance may be caused by an increased presence or activity of various catabolic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 or glucocorticoids, or may be mediated via a decreased concentration or responsiveness to various anabolic hormones, such as growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to the importance of alterations in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis as a mechanism for the observed defects in muscle protein balance.

  10. Functional characterization of AGAMOUS-subfamily members from cotton during reproductive development and in response to plant hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Stéfanie Menezes; Artico, Sinara; Lima, Cássio; Nardeli, Sarah Muniz; Berbel, Ana; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo Brilhante; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Madueño, Francisco; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2017-03-01

    Expression analysis of the AG -subfamily members from G. hirsutum during flower and fruit development. Reproductive development in cotton, including the fruit and fiber formation, is a complex process; it involves the coordinated action of gene expression regulators, and it is highly influenced by plant hormones. Several studies have reported the identification and expression of the transcription factor family MADS-box members in cotton ovules and fibers; however, their roles are still elusive during the reproductive development in cotton. In this study, we evaluated the expression profiles of five MADS-box genes (GhMADS3, GhMADS4, GhMADS5, GhMADS6 and GhMADS7) belonging to the AGAMOUS-subfamily in Gossypium hirsutum. Phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses were performed using diploid (G. arboreum, G. raimondii) and tetraploid (G. barbadense, G. hirsutum) cotton genomes, as well as the AG-subfamily members from Arabidopsis thaliana, Petunia hybrida and Antirrhinum majus. qPCR analysis showed that the AG-subfamily genes had high expression during flower and fruit development in G. hirsutum. In situ hybridization analysis also substantiates the involvement of AG-subfamily members on reproductive tissues of G. hirsutum, including ovule and ovary. The effect of plant hormones on AG-subfamily genes expression was verified in cotton fruits treated with gibberellin, auxin and brassinosteroid. All the genes were significantly regulated in response to auxin, whereas only GhMADS3, GhMADS4 and GhMADS7 genes were also regulated by brassinosteroid treatment. In addition, we have investigated the GhMADS3 and GhMADS4 overexpression effects in Arabidopsis plants. Interestingly, the transgenic plants from both cotton AG-like genes in Arabidopsis significantly altered the fruit size compared to the control plants. This alteration suggests that cotton AG-like genes might act regulating fruit formation. Our results demonstrate that members of the AG-subfamily in G. hirsutum

  11. Hormonal Responses to Cholinergic Input Are Different in Humans with and without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Peripheral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate insulin and glucagon release in rodents but their importance for similar roles in humans is unclear. Bethanechol, an acetylcholine analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was used to examine the role of peripheral muscarinic signaling on glucose homeostasis in humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 10, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 11, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n = 9. Subjects received four liquid meal tolerance tests, each with a different dose of oral bethanechol (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg given 60 min before a meal containing acetaminophen. Plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, glucose, glucagon, C-peptide, and acetaminophen concentrations were measured. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs were calculated from C-peptide levels. Acetaminophen and PP concentrations were surrogate markers for gastric emptying and cholinergic input to islets. The 150 mg dose of bethanechol increased the PP response 2-fold only in the IGT group, amplified GLP-1 release in the IGT and T2DM groups, and augmented the GIP response only in the NGT group. However, bethanechol did not alter ISRs or plasma glucose, glucagon, or acetaminophen concentrations in any group. Prior studies showed infusion of xenin-25, an intestinal peptide, delays gastric emptying and reduces GLP-1 release but not ISRs when normalized to plasma glucose levels. Analysis of archived plasma samples from this study showed xenin-25 amplified postprandial PP responses ~4-fold in subjects with NGT, IGT, and T2DM. Thus, increasing postprandial cholinergic input to islets augments insulin secretion in mice but not humans.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01434901.

  12. Modifications in adrenal hormones response to ethanol by prior ethanol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaza, C; Borrell, S

    1985-03-01

    Ethanol was administered to rats by means of a liquid diet for 16 days; after an ethanol-free interval of four weeks, animals received a test (IP) dose of ethanol (2 g/kg), and the adrenocortical and adrenomedullary responses were evaluated. Chronically ethanol-exposed animals showed tolerance to the stimulatory effect of ethanol in the pituitary-adrenal axis. Likewise, previously dependent rats showed tolerance to the increase in the activity of the adrenomedullary function induced by acute administration of the drug. Our results indicate that chronic ethanol ingestion can induce persistent changes after complete alcohol abstinence.

  13. Similarity criterion analysis of dose-response curves in biological assay and radioimmunoassay of hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristakou, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    The difficulties involved in the control of biological and radioimmunological assay systems, and in the maintenance of standard, as well as, the usual heterogeneity of assayed samples require some evidence of similarity between the dose-response curves obtained with the standard and the sample. Nowadays the parallelism test is used to provide such evidence. However, some indications of non-normal errors distribution, such as the presence of out layers, render the parallelism test both conceptually implausible and statistically inefficient. In such a manner we suggest the non-parametric 'frequencial' test as a more sounding option. (author)

  14. The molecular response of bone to growth hormone during skeletal unloading: regional differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Hind limb elevation of the growing rat provides a good model for the skeletal changes that occur during space flight. In this model the bones of the forelimbs (normally loaded) are used as an internal control for the changes that occur in the unloaded bones of the hind limbs. Previous studies have shown that skeletal unloading of the hind limbs results in a transient reduction of bone formation in the tibia and femur, with no change in the humerus. This fall in bone formation is accompanied by a fall in serum osteocalcin (bone Gla protein, BGP) and bone BGP messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, but a rise in bone insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) protein and mRNA levels and resistance to the skeletal growth-promoting actions of IGF-I. To determine whether skeletal unloading also induced resistance to GH, we evaluated the response of the femur and humerus of sham and hypophysectomized rats, control and hind limb elevated, to GH (two doses), measuring mRNA levels of IGF-I, BGP, rat bone alkaline phosphatase (RAP), and alpha 1(1)-procollagen (coll). Hypophysectomy (HPX) decreased the mRNA levels of IGF-I, BGP, and coll in the femur, but was either less effective or had the opposite effect in the humerus. GH at the higher dose (500 micrograms/day) restored these mRNA levels to or above the sham control values in the femur, but generally had little or no effect on the humerus. RAP mRNA levels were increased by HPX, especially in the femur. The lower dose of GH (50 micrograms/day) inhibited this rise in RAP, whereas the higher dose raised the mRNA levels and resulted in the appearance of additional transcripts not seen in controls. As for the other mRNAs, RAP mRNA in the humerus was less affected by HPX or GH than that in the femur. Hind limb elevation led to an increase in IGF-I, coll, and RAP mRNAs and a reduction in BGP mRNA in the femur and either had no effect or potentiated the response of these mRNAs to GH. We conclude that GH stimulates a number of markers of bone

  15. Plasma growth hormone, cortisol and testosterone responses to repeated and intermittent ergometer exercise at different pedalling rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BH Opaszowski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the hormonal response to the repeated and intermittent exercises at different rates. Nine students of the physical education (age: 24.1±0.39 years; body mass: 81.2±10.17kg; height: 182.1±7.32 cm; VO2max – 4.121±0.697 l O2/min performed in the laboratory conditions series of 5 efforts on the cycle ergometer lasting for 3 min with the loading of 250 W and divided with 2 min intervals. In the first day the pedalling rate amounted to 45circ/min (W45, in the second day to 80circ/min (W80. In both cases the work performed (225 kJ, time lasting and power of efforts were the same. The growth hormone (GH, testosterone (T and cortisol (C were denoted in the capillary blood taken with the immuno-enzymatic methods from the finger tip. The anabolic – catabolic index (T/C was also determined. The blood acid – alkali balance parameters were registered using the gas analyser Ciba-Corning 248. The blood was taken: before effort, after third effort (13 min, immediately after fifth effort (23 min and 30 min after the test. Series of the repeated and intermittent exercises caused the significant (P<0.05 lowering of the capillary blood pH, respectively from: 7.392–7.409 before effort to: 7.316±0.092 (W45 and 7.287±0.068 (W80 after fifth effort. The differences between W45 and W80 were statistically insignificant. The highest concentrations of GH and T were noticed after all efforts in both series. The T concentration grew significantly, similarly in both series: W45 –5.8±1.93 and W80 –5.9±1.59 ng/ml from the restful level ≈ 4.6 ng/ml. The significant differentiation of the response on different pedalling rates was observed in case of GH. The highest GH concentration amounted to: 7.7±5.43 ng/ml after W45 and after W80 to: 16.8±6.68 ng/ml. The GH concentration changes presented lower level (P<0.05 during work performed with the smaller rate i.e.: 45circ/min. As regards cortisol (C, the significant

  16. Increased androgen response to follicle-stimulating hormone administration in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Deborah S; Coffler, Mickey S; Malcom, Pamela J; Shimasaki, Shunichi; Chang, R Jeffrey

    2008-05-01

    In women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), excess ovarian androgen production is driven by increased LH secretion. Studies conducted in animals suggest that the granulosa cell may influence LH-stimulated theca cell androgen production. The objective of this study was to determine whether FSH enhances androgen production in women with PCOS compared with that of normal women. A prospective study was conducted to compare androgen production in response to FSH in two groups of women. The study was conducted in a General Clinical Research Center in a tertiary academic medical center. Women with PCOS, 18-35 yr (n = 20), and normal ovulatory controls, 18-35 yr (n = 10), were recruited for study. Serial blood samples were obtained over a 24-h period after an iv injection of recombinant human FSH (150 IU). The main outcome measures were serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), androstenedione (A), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), testosterone (T), and inhibin B (Inh B) responses after FSH administration. Basal serum 17-OHP, A, and T levels were markedly increased in women with PCOS compared with that observed in normal women. Basal DHEA and Inh B levels were similar to those of normal controls. After FSH injection, PCOS women demonstrated enhanced production of 17-OHP, A, DHEA, and Inh B, whereas in normal women no increases were observed. T levels declined slightly in both groups. These findings provide evidence that, in PCOS women, theca cell androgen production is enhanced by FSH administration and suggest a granulosa-theca cell paracrine mechanism.

  17. Rapid response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant intramammary testosterone-anastrozole therapy: neoadjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca L; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2014-06-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the inhibitory effect of testosterone on breast tissue and breast cancer. However, testosterone is aromatized to estradiol, which exerts the opposite effect. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of testosterone, combined with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole, on a hormone receptor positive, infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the neoadjuvant setting. To determine clinical response, we obtained serial ultrasonic measurements and mammograms before and after therapy. Three combination implants-each containing 60 mg of testosterone and 4 mg of anastrozole-were placed anterior, superior, and inferior to a 2.4-cm tumor in the left breast. Three additional testosterone-anastrozole implants were again placed peritumorally 48 days later. By day 46, there was a sevenfold reduction in tumor volume, as measured on ultrasound. By week 13, we documented a 12-fold reduction in tumor volume, demonstrating a rapid logarithmic response to intramammary testosterone-anastrozole implant therapy, equating to a daily response rate of 2.78% and a tumor half-life of 23 days. Therapeutic systemic levels of testosterone were achieved without elevation of estradiol, further demonstrating the efficacy of anastrozole combined with testosterone. This novel therapy, delivered in the neoadjuvant setting, has the potential to identify early responders and to evaluate the effectiveness of therapy in vivo. This may prove to be a new approach to both local and systemic therapies for breast cancer in subgroups of patients. In addition, it can be used to reduce tumor volume, allowing for less surgical intervention and better cosmetic oncoplastic results.

  18. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  19. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Identification of Differentially Expressed Thyroid Hormone Responsive Genes from the Brain of the Mexican Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) ✧

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, P; Johnson, CK; Schoergendorfer, A; Putta, S; Bathke, AC; Stromberg, AJ; Voss, SR

    2011-01-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) presents an excellent model to investigate mechanisms of brain development that are conserved among vertebrates. In particular, metamorphic changes of the brain can be induced in free-living aquatic juveniles and adults by simply adding thyroid hormone (T4) to rearing water. Whole brains were sampled from juvenile A. mexicanum that were exposed to 0, 8, and 18 days of 50 nM T4, and these were used to isolate RNA and make normalized cDNA libraries for 454 DNA sequencing. A total of 1,875,732 high quality cDNA reads were assembled with existing ESTs to obtain 5,884 new contigs for human RefSeq protein models, and to develop a custom Affymetrix gene expression array (Amby_002) with approximately 20,000 probe sets. The Amby_002 array was used to identify 303 transcripts that differed statistically (p 1.5) as a function of days of T4 treatment. Further statistical analyses showed that Amby_002 performed concordantly in comparison to an existing, small format expression array. This study introduces a new A. mexicanum microarray resource for the community and the first lists of T4-responsive genes from the brain of a salamander amphibian. PMID:21457787

  1. Identification of differentially expressed thyroid hormone responsive genes from the brain of the Mexican Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, P; Johnson, C K; Schoergendorfer, A; Putta, S; Bathke, A C; Stromberg, A J; Voss, S R

    2012-01-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) presents an excellent model to investigate mechanisms of brain development that are conserved among vertebrates. In particular, metamorphic changes of the brain can be induced in free-living aquatic juveniles and adults by simply adding thyroid hormone (T4) to rearing water. Whole brains were sampled from juvenile A. mexicanum that were exposed to 0, 8, and 18 days of 50 nM T4, and these were used to isolate RNA and make normalized cDNA libraries for 454 DNA sequencing. A total of 1,875,732 high quality cDNA reads were assembled with existing ESTs to obtain 5884 new contigs for human RefSeq protein models, and to develop a custom Affymetrix gene expression array (Amby_002) with approximately 20,000 probe sets. The Amby_002 array was used to identify 303 transcripts that differed statistically (p1.5) as a function of days of T4 treatment. Further statistical analyses showed that Amby_002 performed concordantly in comparison to an existing, small format expression array. This study introduces a new A. mexicanum microarray resource for the community and the first lists of T4-responsive genes from the brain of a salamander amphibian. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tissue specificity of the hormonal response in sex accessory tissues is associated with nuclear matrix protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzenberg, R H; Coffey, D S

    1990-09-01

    The DNA of interphase nuclei have very specific three-dimensional organizations that are different in different cell types, and it is possible that this varying DNA organization is responsible for the tissue specificity of gene expression. The nuclear matrix organizes the three-dimensional structure of the DNA and is believed to be involved in the control of gene expression. This study compares the nuclear structural proteins between two sex accessory tissues in the same animal responding to the same androgen stimulation by the differential expression of major tissue-specific secretory proteins. We demonstrate here that the nuclear matrix is tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, and undergoes characteristic alterations in its protein composition upon androgen withdrawal. Three types of nuclear matrix proteins were observed: 1) nuclear matrix proteins that are different and tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, 2) a set of nuclear matrix proteins that either appear or disappear upon androgen withdrawal, and 3) a set of proteins that are common to both the ventral prostate and seminal vesicle and do not change with the hormonal state of the animal. Since the nuclear matrix is known to bind androgen receptors in a tissue- and steroid-specific manner, we propose that the tissue specificity of the nuclear matrix arranges the DNA in a unique conformation, which may be involved in the specific interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences, resulting in tissue-specific patterns of secretory protein expression.

  3. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis, Neuropsychological Assessment, and Growth Hormone Response in a Patient with 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Wan, Naijun; Wang, Xinli; Chang, Liang; Cheng, Dazhi

    2018-01-01

    18p deletion syndrome is a rare chromosomal disease caused by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18. By using cytogenetic and SNP array analysis, we identified a girl with 18p deletion syndrome exhibiting craniofacial anomalies, intellectual disability, and short stature. G-banding analysis of metaphase cells revealed an abnormal karyotype 46,XX,del(18)(p10). Further, SNP array detected a 15.3-Mb deletion at 18p11.21p11.32 (chr18:12842-15375878) including 61 OMIM genes. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis showed that clinical manifestations of the patient were correlated with LAMA1, TWSG1, and GNAL deletions. Her neuropsychological assessment test demonstrated delay in most cognitive functions including impaired mathematics, linguistic skills, visual motor perception, respond speed, and executive function. Meanwhile, her integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test (IVA-CPT) indicated a severe comprehensive attention deficit. At age 7 and 1/12 years, her height was 110.8 cm (-2.5 SD height for age). Growth hormone (GH) treatment was initiated. After 27 months treatment, her height was increased to 129.6 cm (-1.0 SD height for age) at 9 and 4/12 years, indicating an effective response to GH treatment. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Antigravity suit inflation: kidney function and cardiovascular and hormonal responses in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, G; Kravik, S E; Hadj-Aissa, A; Leftheriotis, G; Vincent, M; Bizollon, C A; Sem-Jacobsen, C W; Greenleaf, J E; Gharib, C

    1989-02-01

    To investigate the effects of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on kidney function while controlling certain cardiovascular and endocrine responses, seven men [35 +/- 2 (SE) yr] underwent 30 min of sitting and then 4.5 h of 70 degrees head-up tilt. An antigravity suit was applied (60 Torr legs, 30 Torr abdomen) during the last 3 h of tilt. A similar noninflation experiment was conducted where the suited subjects were tilted for 3.5 h. To provide adequate urine flow, the subjects were hydrated during the course of both experiments. Immediately after inflation, mean arterial pressure increased by 8 +/- 3 Torr and pulse rate decreased by 16 +/- 3 beats/min. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone were maximally suppressed (P less than 0.05) after 2.5 h of inflation. Plasma vasopressin decreased by 40-50% (P less than 0.05) and plasma sodium and potassium remained unchanged during both experiments. Glomerular filtration rate was not increased significantly by inflation, whereas inflation induced marked increases (P less than 0.05) in effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), urine flow, osmolar and free water clearances, and total and fractional sodium excretion. No such changes occurred during control. Thus, LBPP induces 1) a significant increase in ERPF and 2) significant changes in kidney excretory patterns similar to those observed during water immersion or the early phase of bed rest, situations that also result in central vascular volume expansion.

  5. [Exogenous luteinizing hormone for assisted reproduction techniques in poor response patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremović-Radjenović, Svetlana; Gudović, Aleksandra; Lazović, Gordana

    2010-07-01

    Two gonadotrophins, two cell theory refers to necessity of both gonadotrophin activities for theca and granulose cells steroidogenesis of dominant follicle. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of recombinant LH in women qualified as poor responders in the first assisted reproduction procedure (IVF), on fertility results, expressed as percentage of clinical pregnancies. The study included 12 women, 35 years and older who were their own controls. The next trial of IVF was with the same dose of recombinant FSH and GnRH agonist, and with the same, long protocol. Recombinant LH was added in the dose of 75 IU from the 2nd to 7th day of the cycle, and 150 IU from the 8th day of the cycle to the aspiration of oocytes. Within the two different protocols: there was no significant difference between LH concentration in 8th and 12th day of cycle; there was no significant difference between E2 concentration on day 2nd and day 8th; there was a significant difference between E2 concentrations on day 12th; endometrial thickness was not significantly different on the day of aspiration, neither was the number of follicles and embryos. In the two patients, clinical pregnancy was detected (pregnancy rate 17%), and they delivered in term. So, a statistically significant difference between the two protocols was in the rate of clinical pregnancies. The patients with low response to a long protocol in IVF procedures had significantly better results according to the clinical pregnancy rate when the recombinant LH was added to recombinant FSH in the stimulation protocol.

  6. Auxin synthesis gene tms1 driven by tuber-specific promoter alters hormonal status of transgenic potato plants and their responses to exogenous phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolachevskaya, Oksana O; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Floková, Kristyna; Getman, Irina A; Lomin, Sergey N; Alekseeva, Valeriya V; Rukavtsova, Elena B; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2017-03-01

    Ectopic auxin overproduction in transgenic potato leads to enhanced productivity accompanied with concerted and occasional changes in hormonal status, and causing altered response of transformants to exogenous auxin or cytokinin. Previously, we generated potato transformants expressing Agrobacterium-derived auxin synthesis gene tms1 driven by tuber-specific patatin gene promoter (B33-promoter). Here, we studied the endogenous hormonal status and the response to exogenous phytohormones in tms1 transformants cultured in vitro. Adding indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or kinetin to culture medium affected differently tuberization of tms1-transformed and control plants, depending also on sucrose content in the medium. Exogenous phytohormones ceased to stimulate the tuber initiation in transformants at high (5-8%) sucrose concentration, while in control plants the stimulation was observed in all experimental settings. Furthermore, exogenous auxin partly inhibited the tuber initiation, and exogenous cytokinin reduced the average tuber weight in most transformants at high sucrose content. The elevated auxin level in tubers of the transformants was accompanied with a decrease in content of cytokinin bases and their ribosides in tubers and most shoots. No concerted changes in contents of abscisic, jasmonic, salicylic acids and gibberellins in tubers were detected. The data on hormonal status indicated that the enhanced productivity of tms1 transformants was due to auxin and not mediated by other phytohormones. In addition, exogenous cytokinin was shown to upregulate the expression of genes encoding orthologs of auxin receptors. Overall, the results showed that tms1 expression and local increase in IAA level in transformants affect both the balance of endogenous cytokinins and the dynamics of tuberization in response to exogenous hormones (auxin, cytokinin), the latter reaction depending also on the carbohydrate supply. We introduce a basic model for the hormonal network

  7. An enriched rearing environment calms adult male rat sexual activity: implication for distinct serotonergic and hormonal responses to females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Urakawa

    Full Text Available Early life events induce alterations in neural function in adulthood. Although rearing in an enriched environment (EE has a great impact on behavioral development, the effects of enriched rearing on sociosexual behavior remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of rearing in an EE on male copulatory behavior and its underlying neurobiological mechanisms in Wistar-Imamichi rats. Three-week-old, recently weaned rats were continuously subjected to a standard environment (SE or an EE comprised of a large cage with several objects, such as toys, tunnels, ladders, and a running wheel. After 6 weeks, rats reared in an EE (EE rats showed decreased sexual activity compared with rats reared in a SE (SE rats. This included a lower number of ejaculations and longer latencies in three consecutive copulatory tests. In addition, EE rats showed decreased emotional responsiveness and less locomotor behavior in an open field. In a runway test, on the other hand, sexual motivation toward receptive females in EE males was comparable to that of SE males. Furthermore, following exposure to a female, increases in serotonin levels in the nucleus accumbens and the striatum were significantly suppressed in EE males, whereas dopaminergic responses were similar between the groups. Female-exposure-induced increases in the levels of plasma corticosterone and testosterone were also suppressed in EE rats compared to SE rats. These data suggest that rearing in an EE decreases male copulatory behavior, and serotonin and hormonal regulating systems may regulate the differences in sociosexual interactions that result from distinct rearing environments.

  8. A preliminary inter-centre comparison study for photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of two pairs of ionisation chambers used for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Antoaneta; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Wojnecki, Cecile; Green, Stuart; Nievaart, Sander; Ghani, Zamir; Moss, Ray

    2009-01-01

    The dual ionisation chamber technique is the recommended method for mixed field dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams. This paper presents initial data from an ongoing inter-comparison study involving two identical pairs of ionisation chambers used at the BNCT facilities of Petten, NL and of University of Birmingham, UK. The goal of this study is to evaluate the photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of both pairs of TE(TE) (Exradin T2 type) and Mg(Ar) (Exradin M2 type) ionisation chambers in similar experimental conditions. At this stage, the work has been completed for the M2 type chambers and is intended to be completed for the T2 type chambers in the near future.

  9. The anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) acts as a gatekeeper of ovarian steroidogenesis inhibiting the granulosa cell response to both FSH and LH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Sandro; D'Ippolito, Giovanni; Sena, Paola; Marsella, Tiziana; Tagliasacchi, Daniela; Maggi, Elena; Argento, Cindy; Tirelli, Alessandra; Giulini, Simone; La Marca, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anti Müllerian Hormone (AMH) has a negative and inhibitory role in many functions of human granulosa-lutein cells (hGCs) including notoriously the reduction of the aromatase CYP19A1 expression induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). No data have been provided on the possible role of AMH in modulating the response to luteinizing hormone (LH) (alone or combined with FSH) as well as its effect on other enzymes involved in steroidogenesis including aromatase P450scc. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AMH as regulator of the basal and stimulated steroids production by hGCs. Primary culture of hGCs were incubated with hormones AMH, LH, and FSH, alone or in combination. The CYP19A1 and P450scc messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, normalized by housekeeping ribosomal protein S7 (RpS7) gene, was evaluated by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Each reaction was repeated in triplicate. Negative controls using corresponding amount of vehicle control for each hormone treatment were performed. AMH did not modulate the basal mRNA expression of both aromatase genes at any of the concentrations tested. Meanwhile, the strong mRNA induction of CYP19A1 and P450scc generated by a 24-h gonadotropin treatment (alone and combined) was suppressed by 20 ng/ml AMH added to culture medium. These findings contribute in clarifying the relationship between hormones regulating the early phase of steroidogenesis confirming that AMH is playing a suppressive role on CYP19A1 expression stimulated by gonadotropin in hGCs. Furthermore, a similar inhibitory effect for AMH was observed on P450scc gene expression when activated by gonadotropin treatment.

  10. Response to ''Comment on 'Acoustic solitons in inhomogenous pair-ion plasmas''' [Phys. Plasmas 18, 054701 (2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity n p0 (0) is different from n p0 (x) and same is true for v p0 (0), v p0 (x). Taking these differences into account and considering the mathematical relation v p0 (x)= 1/n p0 (x), it can easily be shown that derivatives of these space dependent densities and velocities are linked through the relation ∂v p0 (x)/∂η=-1/n p0 2 (x)∂n p0 (x)/∂η. We show that constraint (1) of the comment can also be transformed to derivative transformation relation. This derivative transformation relation can be used in the derivation of the KdV like equation and our model is valid for inhomogenous pair ion plasma. We mathematically and physically prove that the objections in the comment are false and baseless.

  11. Acute effects of nicotine amplify accumbal neural responses during nicotine-taking behavior and nicotine-paired environmental cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Guillem

    Full Text Available Nicotine self-administration (SA is maintained by several variables, including the reinforcing properties of nicotine-paired cues and the nicotine-induced amplification of those cue properties. The nucleus accumbens (NAc is implicated in mediating the influence of these variables, though the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are not yet understood. In the present study, Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer nicotine. During SA sessions each press of a lever was followed by an intravenous infusion of nicotine (30 µg/kg paired with a combined light-tone cue. Extracellular recordings of single-neuron activity showed that 20% of neurons exhibited a phasic change in firing during the nicotine-directed operant, the light-tone cue, or both. The phasic change in firing for 98% of neurons was an increase. Sixty-two percent of NAc neurons additionally or alternatively showed a sustained decrease in average firing during the SA session relative to a presession baseline period. These session decreases in firing were significantly less prevalent in a group of neurons that were activated during either the operant or the cue than in a group of neurons that were nonresponsive during those events (referred to as task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons, respectively. Moreover, the session decrease in firing was dose-dependent for only the task-nonactivated neurons. The data of the present investigation provide supportive correlational evidence for two hypotheses: (1 excitatory neurophysiological mechanisms mediate the NAc role in cue-maintenance of nicotine SA, and (2 a differential nicotine-induced inhibition of task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons mediates the NAc role in nicotine-induced amplification of cue effects on nicotine SA.

  12. Social environment during egg laying: Changes in plasma hormones with no consequences for yolk hormones or fecundity in female Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M A Langen

    Full Text Available The social environment can have profound effects on an individual's physiology and behaviour and on the transfer of resources to the next generation, with potential consequences for fecundity and reproduction. However, few studies investigate all of these aspects at once. The present study housed female Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica in pairs or groups to examine the effects on hormone concentrations in plasma and yolk and on reproductive performance. Circulating levels of androgens (testosterone and 5-α-dihydrotestosterone and corticosterone were measured in baseline samples and after standardised challenges to assess the responsiveness of the females' endocrine axes. Effects of the social environment on female fecundity were analysed by measuring egg production, egg mass, fertilization rates, and number of hatched offspring. Counter to expectation, females housed in pairs had higher plasma androgen concentrations and slightly higher corticosterone concentrations than females housed in groups, although the latter was not statistically significant. Pair vs. group housing did not affect the females' hormonal response to standardised challenges or yolk testosterone levels. In contrast to previous studies, the females' androgen response to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge was not related to yolk testosterone levels. Non-significant trends emerged for pair-housed females to have higher egg-laying rates and higher fertility, but no differences arose in egg weight or in the number, weight or size of hatchlings. We propose that our unexpected findings are due to differences in the adult sex ratio in our social treatments. In pairs, the male may stimulate female circulating hormone levels more strongly than in groups where effects are diluted due to the presence of several females. Future studies should vary both group size and sex composition to disentangle the significance of sexual, competitive and affiliative social interactions for

  13. The chicken c-erbA alpha-product induces expression of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine receptor-deficient rat hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, A; Höppner, W; Sap, J

    1990-01-01

    To determine the capacity of the chicken c-erbA (cTR-alpha) gene product in regulating expression of known thyroid hormone-responsive genes, both the cTR-alpha and the viral v-erbA genes were expressed in FAO cells, a rat hepatoma cell line defective for functional thyroid hormone receptors. Upon...

  14. The effect of different accentuated eccentric load levels in eccentric-concentric loading contractions on acute neuromuscular, growth hormone and blood lactate responses during a hypertrophic protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Ojasto, Timo

    2007-01-01

    When accentuated load is applied during the eccentric (ECC) phase of eccentric-concentric (ECC-CON) contractions, it is defined as dynamic accentuated external resistance (DAER) exercise. This study monitored acute neuromuscular responses, growth hormone (GH) and blood lactate (La) concentrations to find out the most efficient ECC-CON loading strategy for muscle hypertrophy by employing various DAER resistances in the bench-press. Male subjects (age=32.4±4.3years, n=11) were assigned as subje...

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency and a Blunted Parathyroid Hormone Response in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcil, Sibelnur; Uysal, Pinar; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Erge, Duygu; Demirkaya, Sevcan K; Eren, Esra

    2017-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most frequently diagnosed neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood. The etiopathogenesis of ADHD has not been fully defined. Recent evidence has suggested a pathophysiological role of vitamin D deficiency in ADHD. In this study, we evaluated the serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in children with ADHD. The study group consisted of 105 children diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. A control group, matched for age and gender, was composed of 95 healthy children. Venous blood samples were collected, and 25(OH)D, PTH, Ca, P, and ALP levels were measured. The mean serum 25(OH)D, Ca, and P levels of the children with ADHD were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding PTH and ALP. Serum PTH levels were found to be normal, but vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, and hypophosphatemia were observed in children with ADHD. There was no correlation between serum PTH and Ca levels in children with ADHD, whereas, there was a negative correlation between serum PTH and Ca levels in healthy controls. There was no correlation between serum 25(OH)D and PTH levels in children with ADHD, whereas, there was a negative correlation between serum 25(OH)D and PTH levels in healthy controls. There were no significant differences in all parameters' levels among the subtypes of ADHD. The findings suggest that ADHD is associated with vitamin D deficiency, blunted PTH response, and impaired Ca homeostasis in children.

  16. Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles for delivering hormone response element-conjugated neurotrophin-3 to the brain of intracerebral hemorrhagic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chiu-Yen; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Kuo, Yung-Chih

    2013-12-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a rapidly evolutional pathology, inducing necrotic cell death followed by apoptosis, and alters gene expression levels in surrounding tissue of an injured brain. For ICH therapy by controlled gene release, the development of intravenously administrable delivery vectors to promote the penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical challenge. To enhance transfer efficiency of genetic materials under hypoxic conditions, polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) nanoparticles (NPs) were used to mediate the intracellular transport of plasmid neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) containing hormone response element (HRE) with a cytomegalovirus (cmv) promoter and to differentiate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The differentiation ability of iPSCs to neurons was justified by various immunological stains for protein fluorescence. The effect of PBCA NP/cmvNT-3-HRE complexes on treating ICH rats was studied by immunostaining, western blotting and Nissl staining. We found that the treatments with PBCA NP/cmvNT-3-HRE complexes increased the capability of differentiating iPSCs to express NT-3, TrkC and MAP-2. Moreover, PBCA NPs could protect cmvNT-3-HRE against degradation with EcoRI/PstI and DNase I in vitro and raise the delivery across the BBB in vivo. The administration of PBCA NP/cmvNT-3-HRE complexes increased the expression of NT-3, inhibited the expression of apoptosis-inducing factor, cleaved caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation, and reduced the cell death rate after ICH in vivo. PBCA NPs are demonstrated as an appropriate delivery system for carrying cmvNT-3-HRE to the brain for ICH therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploratory Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Response-Guided Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Hormone Positive Breast Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Miquel-Cases

    Full Text Available Guiding response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (guided-NACT allows for an adaptative treatment approach likely to improve breast cancer survival. In this study, our primary aim is to explore the expected cost-effectiveness of guided-NACT using as a case study the first randomized controlled trial that demonstrated effectiveness (GeparTrio trial.As effectiveness was shown in hormone-receptor positive (HR+ early breast cancers (EBC, our decision model compared the health-economic outcomes of treating a cohort of such women with guided-NACT to conventional-NACT using clinical input data from the GeparTrio trial. The expected cost-effectiveness and the uncertainty around this estimate were estimated via probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA, from a Dutch societal perspective over a 5-year time-horizon.Our exploratory CEA predicted that guided-NACT as proposed by the GeparTrio, costs additional €110, but results in 0.014 QALYs gained per patient. This scenario of guided-NACT was considered cost-effective at any willingness to pay per additional QALY. At the prevailing Dutch willingness to pay threshold (€80.000/QALY cost-effectiveness was expected with 78% certainty.This exploratory CEA indicated that guided-NACT (as proposed by the GeparTrio trial is likely cost-effective in treating HR+ EBC women. While prospective validation of the GeparTrio findings is advisable from a clinical perspective, early CEAs can be used to prioritize further research from a broader health economic perspective, by identifying which parameters contribute most to current decision uncertainty. Furthermore, their use can be extended to explore the expected cost-effectiveness of alternative guided-NACT scenarios that combine the use of promising imaging techniques together with personalized treatments.

  18. Identification and expression analysis of ERF transcription factor genes in petunia during flower senescence and in response to hormone treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juanxu; Li, Jingyu; Wang, Huinan; Fu, Zhaodi; Liu, Juan; Yu, Yixun

    2011-01-01

    Ethylene-responsive element-binding factor (ERF) genes constitute one of the largest transcription factor gene families in plants. In Arabidopsis and rice, only a few ERF genes have been characterized so far. Flower senescence is associated with increased ethylene production in many flowers. However, the characterization of ERF genes in flower senescence has not been reported. In this study, 13 ERF cDNAs were cloned from petunia. Based on the sequence characterization, these PhERFs could be classified into four of the 12 known ERF families. Their predicted amino acid sequences exhibited similarities to ERFs from other plant species. Expression analyses of PhERF mRNAs were performed in corollas and gynoecia of petunia flower. The 13 PhERF genes displayed differential expression patterns and levels during natural flower senescence. Exogenous ethylene accelerates the transcription of the various PhERF genes, and silver thiosulphate (STS) decreased the transcription of several PhERF genes in corollas and gynoecia. PhERF genes of group VII showed a strong association with the rise in ethylene production in both petals and gynoecia, and might be associated particularly with flower senescence in petunia. The effect of sugar, methyl jasmonate, and the plant hormones abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and 6-benzyladenine in regulating the different PhERF transcripts was investigated. Functional nuclear localization signal analyses of two PhERF proteins (PhERF2 and PhERF3) were carried out using fluorescence microscopy. These results supported a role for petunia PhERF genes in transcriptional regulation of petunia flower senescence processes.

  19. Effects of Acute Endurance Exercise Performed in the Morning and Evening on Inflammatory Cytokine and Metabolic Hormone Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Ki Kim

    Full Text Available To compare the effects of endurance exercise performed in the morning and evening on inflammatory cytokine responses in young men.Fourteen healthy male participants aged 24.3 ± 0.8 years (mean ± standard error performed endurance exercise in the morning (0900-1000 h on one day and then in the evening (1700-1800 h on another day with an interval of at least 1 week between each trial. In both the morning and evening trials, the participants walked for 60 minutes at approximately 60% of the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max on a treadmill. Blood samples were collected to determine hormones and inflammatory cytokines at pre-exercise, immediately post exercise, and 2 h post exercise.Plasma interleukin (IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations were significantly higher immediately after exercise in the evening trial than in the morning trial (P < 0.01, both. Serum free fatty acids concentrations were significantly higher in the evening trial than in the morning trial at 2 h after exercise (P < 0.05. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between the levels of IL-6 immediately post-exercise and free fatty acids 2 h post-exercise in the evening (r = 0.68, P < 0.01.These findings suggest that the effect of acute endurance exercise in the evening enhances the plasma IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations compared to that in the morning. In addition, IL-6 was involved in increasing free fatty acids, suggesting that the evening is more effective for exercise-induced lipolysis compared with the morning.

  20. Effects of time-of-day on oxidative stress, cardiovascular parameters, biochemical markers, and hormonal response following level-1 Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, K; Abedelmalek, S; Chtourou, H; Wong, D P; Boussetta, N; Souissi, N

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of time-of-day on oxidative stress, cardiovascular parameters, muscle damage parameters, and hormonal responses following the level-1 Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (YYIRT). A total of 11 healthy subjects performed an intermittent test (YYIRT) at two times-of-day (i.e., 07:00 h and 17:00 h), with a recovery period of ≥36 h in-between, in a randomized order. Blood samples were taken at the rest (baseline) and immediately (post-YYIRT) after the YYIRT for measuring oxidative stress, biochemical markers, and hormonal response. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way and two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni test at p creatine kinase (p  0.05) were similar for the morning and evening test. In conclusion, our findings suggest that aerobic performance presents diurnal variation with great result observed in the evening accompanied by an improvement of hormonal, metabolic, and oxidative responses. These data may help to guide athletes and coaches and contribute to public health recommendations on exercise and muscle damage particularly in the competitive periods.

  1. Role of an ER stress response element in regulating the bidirectional promoter of the mouse CRELD2 - ALG12 gene pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Yoko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we identified cysteine-rich with EGF-like domains 2 (CRELD2 as a novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-inducible gene and characterized its transcriptional regulation by ATF6 under ER stress conditions. Interestingly, the CRELD2 and asparagine-linked glycosylation 12 homolog (ALG12 genes are arranged as a bidirectional (head-to-head gene pair and are separated by less than 400 bp. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional regulation of the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes that is mediated by a common bidirectional promoter. Results This short intergenic region contains an ER stress response element (ERSE sequence and is well conserved among the human, rat and mouse genomes. Microarray analysis revealed that CRELD2 and ALG12 mRNAs were induced in Neuro2a cells by treatment with thapsigargin (Tg, an ER stress inducer, in a time-dependent manner. Other ER stress inducers, tunicamycin and brefeldin A, also increased the expression of these two mRNAs in Neuro2a cells. We then tested for the possible involvement of the ERSE motif and other regulatory sites of the intergenic region in the transcriptional regulation of the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes by using variants of the bidirectional reporter construct. With regards to the promoter activities of the CRELD2-ALG12 gene pair, the entire intergenic region hardly responded to Tg, whereas the CRELD2 promoter constructs of the proximal region containing the ERSE motif showed a marked responsiveness to Tg. The same ERSE motif of ALG12 gene in the opposite direction was less responsive to Tg. The direction and the distance of this motif from each transcriptional start site, however, has no impact on the responsiveness of either gene to Tg treatment. Additionally, we found three putative sequences in the intergenic region that antagonize the ERSE-mediated transcriptional activation. Conclusions These results show that the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes are arranged as a

  2. Clinical value of serum anti-mullerian hormone and inhibin B in prediction of ovarian response in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Rong, Nan; Huang, Xiao-Wen

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the clinical value of serum anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B (INHB) in predicting the ovarian response of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 120 PCOS patients were enrolled and divided into three groups in terms of the ovarian response: a low-response group (n=36), a normal-response group (n=44), and a high-response group (n=40). The serum AMH and INHB levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) levels were determined by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay. The correlation of the serum AMH and INHB levels with other indicators was analyzed. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was established to analyze the prediction of ovarian response by AMH and INHB. The results showed that there were significant differences in age, body mass index (BMI), FSH, total gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), LH, E2, and antral follicle counts (AFCs) between the groups (Povarian response of PCOS patients increasing (Povarian response showed that the area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of the serum AMH level was 0.817, with a cut-off value of 1.29 ng/mL. The sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 79.6%, respectively. The AUC value of serum INHB was 0.674, with a cut-off value of 38.65 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 50.7% and 74.5%, respectively. ROC curve analysis showed when the serum AMH and INHB levels were used to predict a high ovarian response, the AUC value of the serum AMH level was 0.742, with a cut-off value of 2.84 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 72.7% and 65.9%, respectively; the AUC value of the serum INHB level was 0.551 with a cut-off of 45.76 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 76.3% and 40.2%, respectively. It was suggested the serum AMH and INHB levels have high clinical value in predicting the ovarian response of PCOS

  3. Circulating basal anti-Müllerian hormone levels as predictor of ovarian response in women undergoing ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardo, Luciano G; Gelbaya, Tarek A; Wilkinson, Hannah; Roberts, Stephen A; Yates, Allen; Pemberton, Phil; Laing, Ian

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of basal anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) measurements compared with other available determinants, apart from chronologic age, in the prediction of ovarian response to gonadotrophin stimulation. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral center for reproductive medicine and an IVF unit. Women undergoing their first cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Basal levels of FSH and AMH as well as antral follicle count (AFC) were measured in 165 subjects. All patients were followed prospectively and their cycle outcomes recorded. Predictive value of FSH, AMH, and AFC for extremes of ovarian response to stimulation. Out of the 165 women, 134 were defined as normal responders, 15 as poor responders, and 16 as high responders. Subjects in the poor response group were significantly older then those in the other two groups. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels and AFC were markedly raised in the high responders and decreased in the poor responders. Compared with FSH and AFC, AMH performed better in the prediction of excessive response to ovarian stimulation-AMH area under receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC(AUC)) 0.81, FSH ROC(AUC) 0.66, AFC ROC(AUC) 0.69. For poor response, AMH (ROC(AUC) 0.88) was a significantly better predictor than FSH (ROC(AUC) 0.63) but not AFC (ROC(AUC) 0.81). AMH prediction of ovarian response was independent of age and PCOS. Anti-Müllerian hormone cutoffs of >3.75 ng/mL and stimulation with exogenous gonadotrophins. Overall, this biomarker is superior to basal FSH and AFC, and has the potential to be incorporated in to work-up protocols to predict patient's ovarian response to treatment and to individualize strategies aiming at reducing the cancellation rate and the iatrogenic complications of COH.

  4. A pair natural orbital based implementation of CCSD excitation energies within the framework of linear response theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Marius S.; Hättig, Christof

    2018-04-01

    We present a pair natural orbital (PNO)-based implementation of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) excitation energies that builds upon the previously proposed state-specific PNO approach to the excited state eigenvalue problem. We construct the excited state PNOs for each state separately in a truncated orbital specific virtual basis and use a local density-fitting approximation to achieve an at most quadratic scaling of the computational costs for the PNO construction. The earlier reported excited state PNO construction is generalized such that a smooth convergence of the results for charge transfer states is ensured for general coupled cluster methods. We investigate the accuracy of our implementation by applying it to a large and diverse test set comprising 153 singlet excitations in organic molecules. Already moderate PNO thresholds yield mean absolute errors below 0.01 eV. The performance of the implementation is investigated through the calculations on alkene chains and reveals an at most cubic cost-scaling for the CCSD iterations with the system size.

  5. Three-dimensional cut wire pair behavior and controllable bianisotropic response in vertically oriented meta-atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, D Bruce; Adomanis, Bryan M; Sinclair, Michael B; Campione, Salvatore

    2017-12-11

    This paper investigates three-dimensional cut wire pair (CWP) behavior in vertically oriented meta-atoms. We first analyze CWP metamaterial inclusions using full-wave electromagnetic simulations. The scattering behavior of the vertical CWP differs substantially from that of the planar version of the same structure. In particular, we show that the vertical CWP supports a magnetic resonance that is solely excited by the incident magnetic field. This is in stark contrast to the bianisotropic resonant excitation of in-plane CWPs. We further show that this CWP behavior can occur in other vertical metamaterial resonators, such as back-to-back linear dipoles and back-to-back split ring resonators (SRRs), due to the strong coupling between the closely spaced metallic elements in the back-to-back configuration. In the case of SRRs, the vertical CWP mode (unexplored in previous literature) can be excited with a magnetic field that is parallel to both SRR loops, and exists in addition to the familiar fundamental resonances of the individual SRRs. In order to fully describe the scattering behavior from such dense arrays of three-dimensional structures, coupling effects between the close-packed inclusions must be included. The new flexibility afforded by using vertical resonators allows us to controllably create purely electric inclusions, purely magnetic inclusions, as well as bianisotropic inclusions, and vastly increases the degrees of freedom for the design of metafilms.

  6. Release of β-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in response to machine milking of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fazio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken with the objective to obtain insight into the dynamics of the release of β-endorphin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH and cortisol in response to machine milking in dairy cows. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 healthy multiparous lactating Italian Friesian dairy cows were used in the study. Animals were at the 4th-5th month of pregnancy and were submitted to machine milking 2 times daily. Blood samples were collected in the morning: In baseline conditions, immediately before milking and after milking; and in the early afternoon: In baseline conditions, before milking and after milking, for 2 consecutive days. Endocrine variables were measured in duplicate, using a commercial radioimmunoassay for circulating β-endorphin and ACTH concentrations and a competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay for cortisol concentration. Results: Data obtained showed a similar biphasic cortisol secretion of lactating dairy cows, with a significant increase of cortisol concentration after morning machine milking, at both the 1st and the 2nd day (p<0.05, and a decrease after afternoon machine milking at the 2nd day (p<0.01. One-way RM ANOVA showed significant effects of the machine milking on the cortisol changes, at both morning (f=22.96; p<0.001 and afternoon (f=15.10; p<0.01 milking, respectively. Two-way RM ANOVA showed a significant interaction between cortisol changes at the 1st and the 2nd day (f=7.94; p<0.0002, and between the sampling times (f=6.09; p<0.001. Conversely, no significant effects of the machine milking were observed on β-endorphin and ACTH changes, but only a moderate positive correlation (r=0.94; p<0.06 after milking stimuli. Conclusions: A wide range of cortisol concentrations reported in this study showed the complex dynamic patterns of the homeostatic mechanisms involved during machine milking in dairy cows, suggesting that β-endorphin and ACTH were not the main factors that caused the

  7. Beyond the HPA-axis: The role of the gonadal steroid hormone receptors in modulating stress-related responses in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenchel, Daphna; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Vainer, Ella; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2015-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which plays a major role in the response to stress, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are closely linked with the ability to inhibit the other. Testosterone, a product of the HPG, has many beneficial effects beyond its functions as a sex hormone including anti-anxiety properties. In this study we examined the effect of stress exposure on gonadal hormones, and their efficacy in modulating anxiety-like response in an animal model of PTSD. Male rats were exposed to predator scent stress, followed by analysis of brain expression of androgen receptor (AR) receptor and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The behavioral effects of immediate treatment with testosterone, testosterone receptor antagonist (flutamide) or vehicle were evaluated using the elevated plus-maze, acoustic startle response and trauma-cue response. Levels of circulating corticosterone and testosterone were also measured after treatment. The behavioral effects of delayed testosterone treatment were explored in the same manner. We report that animals whose behavior was extremely disrupted (EBR) selectively displayed significant down-regulation of AR and ERα in the hippocampus. Immediate treatment with flutamide or delayed treatment with testosterone significantly increased prevalence rates of minimal behavioral response (MBR) and decreased prevalence of EBR with favorable behavioral results. Testosterone levels were higher in control un-exposed animals, while corticosterone was higher in control exposed animals. This study suggests that gonadal steroid hormones are involved in the neurobiological response to predator scent stress and thus warrant further study as a potential therapeutic avenue for the treatment of anxiety-related disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of emotional processing in depressive responses to sex-hormone manipulation: a pharmacological fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, S.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Pinborg, A.

    2015-01-01

    resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if sex-steroid hormone manipulation with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) influences emotional processing. Fifty-six healthy women were investigated twice: at baseline (follicular phase of menstrual cycle) and 16 +/- 3 days post intervention. At both...... sessions, fMRI-scans during exposure to faces expressing fear, anger, happiness or no emotion, depressive symptom scores and estradiol levels were acquired. The fMRI analyses focused on regions of interest for emotional processing. As expected, GnRHa initially increased and subsequently reduced estradiol...

  9. Fetal programming: excess prenatal testosterone reduces postnatal luteinizing hormone, but not follicle-stimulating hormone responsiveness, to estradiol negative feedback in the female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Hirendra N; Manikkam, Mohan; Herkimer, Carol; Dell'Orco, James; Welch, Kathleen B; Foster, Douglas L; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2005-10-01

    Exposure of female sheep fetuses to excess testosterone (T) during early to midgestation produces postnatal hypergonadotropism manifest as a selective increase in LH. This hypergonadotropism may result from reduced sensitivity to estradiol (E2) negative feedback and/or increased pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. We tested the hypothesis that excess T before birth reduces responsiveness of LH and FSH to E2 negative feedback after birth. Pregnant ewes were treated with T propionate (100 mg/kg in cotton seed oil) or vehicle twice weekly from d 30-90 gestation. Responsiveness to E2 negative feedback was assessed at 12 and 24 wk of age in the ovary-intact female offspring. Our experimental strategy was first to arrest follicular growth and reduce endogenous E2 by administering the GnRH antagonist (GnRH-A), Nal-Glu (50 microg/kg sc every 12 h for 72 h), and then provide a fixed amount of exogenous E2 via an implant. Blood samples were obtained every 20 min at 12 wk and every 10 min at 24 wk before treatment, during and after GnRH-A treatment both before and after E2 implant. GnRH-A ablated LH pulsatility, reduced FSH by approximately 25%, and E2 production diminished to near detection limit of assay at both ages in both groups. Prenatal T treatment produced a precocious and selective reduction in responsiveness of LH but not FSH to E2 negative feedback, which was manifest mainly at the level of LH/GnRH pulse frequency. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to excess T decreases postnatal responsiveness to E2 inhibitory feedback of LH/GnRH secretion to contribute to the development of hypergonadotropism.

  10. A Study of Reverse-Worded Matched Item Pairs Using the Generalized Partial Credit and Nominal Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock Cole, Ki Lynn; Turner, Ronna C.; Gitchel, W. Dent

    2018-01-01

    The generalized partial credit model (GPCM) is often used for polytomous data; however, the nominal response model (NRM) allows for the investigation of how adjacent categories may discriminate differently when items are positively or negatively worded. Ten items from three different self-reported scales were used (anxiety, depression, and…

  11. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Yates, S.J.C.; Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D.J.; Withington, S.; Neto, A.; Llombart, N.; Baryshev, A.M.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Baselmans, J.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the

  12. Regulatory Architecture of the LβT2 Gonadotrope Cell Underlying the Response to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Ruf-Zamojski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The LβT2 mouse pituitary cell line has many characteristics of a mature gonadotrope and is a widely used model system for studying the developmental processes and the response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. The global epigenetic landscape, which contributes to cell-specific gene regulatory mechanisms, and the single-cell transcriptome response variation of LβT2 cells have not been previously investigated. Here, we integrate the transcriptome and genome-wide chromatin accessibility state of LβT2 cells during GnRH stimulation. In addition, we examine cell-to-cell variability in the transcriptional response to GnRH using Gel bead-in-Emulsion Drop-seq technology. Analysis of a bulk RNA-seq data set obtained 45 min after exposure to either GnRH or vehicle identified 112 transcripts that were regulated >4-fold by GnRH (FDR < 0.05. The top regulated transcripts constitute, as determined by Bayesian massive public data integration analysis, a human pituitary-relevant coordinated gene program. Chromatin accessibility [assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq] data sets generated from GnRH-treated LβT2 cells identified more than 58,000 open chromatin regions, some containing notches consistent with bound transcription factor footprints. The study of the most prominent open regions showed that 75% were in transcriptionally active promoters or introns, supporting their involvement in active transcription. Lhb, Cga, and Egr1 showed significantly open chromatin over their promoters. While Fshb was closed over its promoter, several discrete significantly open regions were found at −40 to −90 kb, which may represent novel upstream enhancers. Chromatin accessibility determined by ATAC-seq was associated with high levels of gene expression determined by RNA-seq. We obtained high-quality single-cell Gel bead-in-Emulsion Drop-seq transcriptome data, with an average of >4,000 expressed genes

  13. One pair of hands is not like another: caudate BOLD response in dogs depends on signal source and canine temperament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Cook

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Having previously used functional MRI to map the response to a reward signal in the ventral caudate in awake unrestrained dogs, here we examined the importance of signal source to canine caudate activation. Hand signals representing either incipient reward or no reward were presented by a familiar human (each dog’s respective handler, an unfamiliar human, and via illustrated images of hands on a computer screen to 13 dogs undergoing voluntary fMRI. All dogs had received extensive training with the reward and no-reward signals from their handlers and with the computer images and had minimal exposure to the signals from strangers. All dogs showed differentially higher BOLD response in the ventral caudate to the reward versus no reward signals, and there was a robust effect at the group level. Further, differential response to the signal source had a highly significant interaction with a dog’s general aggressivity as measured by the C-BARQ canine personality assessment. Dogs with greater aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal presented by the unfamiliar human and computer, while dogs with lower aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal from their handler. This suggests that specific facets of canine temperament bear more strongly on the perceived reward value of relevant communication signals than does reinforcement history, as each of the dogs were reinforced similarly for each signal, regardless of the source (familiar human, unfamiliar human, or computer. A group-level psychophysiological interaction (PPI connectivity analysis showed increased functional coupling between the caudate and a region of cortex associated with visual discrimination and learning on reward versus no-reward trials. Our findings emphasize the sensitivity of the domestic dog to human social interaction, and may have other implications and applications

  14. Identification and expression analysis of WRKY transcription factor genes in canola (Brassica napus L. in response to fungal pathogens and hormone treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyholos Michael K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of plant WRKY transcription factor families are widely implicated in defense responses and various other physiological processes. For canola (Brassica napus L., no WRKY genes have been described in detail. Because of the economic importance of this crop, and its evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana, we sought to characterize a subset of canola WRKY genes in the context of pathogen and hormone responses. Results In this study, we identified 46 WRKY genes from canola by mining the expressed sequence tag (EST database and cloned cDNA sequences of 38 BnWRKYs. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the conserved WRKY domain amino acid sequences, which demonstrated that BnWRKYs can be divided into three major groups. We further compared BnWRKYs to the 72 WRKY genes from Arabidopsis and 91 WRKY from rice, and we identified 46 presumptive orthologs of AtWRKY genes. We examined the subcellular localization of four BnWRKY proteins using green fluorescent protein (GFP and we observed the fluorescent green signals in the nucleus only. The responses of 16 selected BnWRKY genes to two fungal pathogens, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Alternaria brassicae, were analyzed by quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR. Transcript abundance of 13 BnWRKY genes changed significantly following pathogen challenge: transcripts of 10 WRKYs increased in abundance, two WRKY transcripts decreased after infection, and one decreased at 12 h post-infection but increased later on (72 h. We also observed that transcript abundance of 13/16 BnWRKY genes was responsive to one or more hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA, and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine, BAP and the defense signaling molecules jasmonic acid (JA, salicylic acid (SA, and ethylene (ET. We compared these transcript expression patterns to those previously described for presumptive orthologs of these genes in Arabidopsis and rice, and observed both similarities and differences in

  15. Female Sex Hormones Influence the Febrile Response Induced by Lipopolysaccharide, Cytokines and Prostaglandins but not by Interleukin-1β in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, H O; Radulski, D R; Wilhelms, D B; Stojakovic, A; Brito, L M O; Engblom, D; Franco, C R C; Zampronio, A R

    2016-10-01

    There are differences in the immune response, and particularly fever, between males and females. In the present study, we investigated how the febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and different endogenous pyrogens were affected by female gonadal hormones. The febrile response to i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg/kg) was 40% lower in female rats compared to male or ovariectomised (OVX) female rats. Accordingly, oestrogen replacement in OVX animals reduced LPS-induced fever. Treatment with the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min before) reduced the febrile response induced by LPS in both OVX (88%) and sham-operated (71%) rats. In line with the enhanced fever in OVX rats, there was increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hypothalamus and elevated levels of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). In addition, OVX rats were hyper-responsive to PGE 2 injected i.c.v. By contrast to the enhanced fever in response to LPS and PGE 2 , the febrile response induced by i.c.v. injection of interleukin (IL)-1β was unaffected by ovariectomy, whereas the responses induced by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α were completely abrogated. These results suggest that the mediators involved in the febrile response in females are similar to males, although the reduction of female hormones may decrease the responsiveness of some mediators such as TNF-α and MIP-1α. Compensatory mechanisms may be activated in females after ovariectomy such as an augmented synthesis of COX-2 and PGE 2 . © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. Changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue (CRF and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load. Methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with primary lung cancer in West China Hospital, Sichuan University between June 2014 and November 2016 were selected and then divided into CRF group and control group according to their self-reported symptoms, serum was collected to determine the levels of endocrine hormones and tumor markers, and peripheral blood was collected to detect the levels of immune cells. Results: Serum ACTH and TSH levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group while Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels were significantly lower than those of control group; peripheral blood CD11b+ CD15 - CD33+ CD14+ M-MDSC, CD11b+ CD15-CD33+ CD14- G-MDSC, CD4+ CD25+ CD127lowTreg and CD19+ CD5+ CD1d+ Breg levels as well as serum CEA, Cyfra21-1, SCC-Ag, HE4, GDF- 15 and PCNA levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group, positively correlated with serum ACTH and TSH levels, and negatively correlated with Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels. Conclusion: The changes of thyroid hormone and adrenal cortical hormone levels in patients with cancer-related fatigue are closely related to the inhibited antitumor immune response and increased tumor load.

  17. Effects of 17α-ethynylestradiol on hormonal responses and xenobiotic biotransformation system of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, Anne S.; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are ubiquitous pollutants in the aquatic environment where their potential effects on non-target species like fish has only recently become subject of systematic investigations. In the present study, experiments were undertaken to examine the effects of a synthetic pharmaceutical endocrine disruptor, ethynylestradiol (EE2), given in water at 5 or 50 ng/L and sampled at days 0 (control), 3 and 7 after exposure, on hepatic phase I and II biotransformation and hormonal pathways of juvenile salmon using quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Vtg ELISA and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) catalytic activity. Our data show that EE2 produced time- and concentration-specific modulation of estrogen receptor isoforms (ERα, ERβ) and androgen receptor-β (ARβ). EE2 produced a concentration-specific induction of vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata protein (Zr-protein) at day 3 after exposure. At day 7, Vtg and Zr-protein mRNA (and plasma Vtg protein) expression were significantly decreased in the group given 5 ng EE2/L, compared to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control group. In the xenobiotic biotransformation pathway, EE2 produced a significant increase of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-α (AhRα) at day 3 in the group given 5 ng EE2/L and AhRβ was decreased at the same concentration at day 7. While CYP3A was not significantly affected by EE2 exposure, the CYP1A1, AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA showed an apparent EE2 concentration and time-dependent decrease. The expression of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UGT) and glutathione S-transferase class pi-like (GSTpi-like) mRNA were decreased after exposure to 50 ng EE2/L at both day 3 and 7 after exposure. The effect of EE2 on the CYP1A1 gene expressions paralleled effect on EROD and AhRR mRNA, suggesting a direct role of EE2 in controlling cellular detoxification machinery. Interestingly, the carrier vehicle, DMSO produced significant time

  18. Adipokinetic hormone-induced enhancement of antioxidant capacity of Pyrrhocoris apterus hemolymph in response to oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, J.; Krishnan, Natraj; Alquicer, Glenda; Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, - (2007), s. 336-342 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant activity * oxidative stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.345, year: 2007

  19. Repression of transcription mediated at a thyroid hormone response element by the v-erb-A oncogene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Muñoz, A; Schmitt, J

    1989-01-01

    Several recent observations, such as the identification of the cellular homologue of the v-erb-A oncogene as a thyroid-hormone receptor, have strongly implicated nuclear oncogenes in transcriptional control mechanisms. The v-erb-A oncogene blocks the differentiation of erythroid cells, and changes...

  20. Zymosan-induced immune challenge modifies the stress response of hypoxic air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus Bloch): Evidence for reversed patterns of cortisol and thyroid hormone interaction, differential ion transporter functions and non-specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simi, S; Peter, Valsa S; Peter, M C Subhash

    2017-09-15

    Fishes have evolved physiological mechanisms to exhibit stress response, where hormonal signals interact with an array of ion transporters and regulate homeostasis. As major ion transport regulators in fish, cortisol and thyroid hormones have been shown to interact and fine-tune the stress response. Likewise, in fishes many interactions have been identified between stress and immune components, but the physiological basis of such interaction has not yet delineated particularly in air-breathing fish. We, therefore, investigated the responses of thyroid hormones and cortisol, ion transporter functions and non-specific immune response of an obligate air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch to zymosan treatment or hypoxia stress or both, to understand how immune challenge modifies the pattern of stress response in this fish. Induction of experimental peritonitis in these fish by zymosan treatment (200ngg -1 ) for 24h produced rise in respiratory burst and lysozomal activities in head kidney phagocytes. In contrast, hypoxia stress for 30min in immune-challenged fish reversed these non-specific responses of head kidney phagocytes. The decline in plasma cortisol in zymosan-treated fish and its further suppression by hypoxia stress indicate that immune challenge suppresses the cortisol-driven stress response of this fish. Likewise, the decline in plasma T 3 and T 4 after zymosan-treatment and the rise in plasma T 4 after hypoxia stress in immune-challenged fish indicate a critical role for thyroid hormone in immune-stress response due to its differential sensitivity to both immune and stress challenges. Further, analysis of the activity pattern of ion-dependent ATPases viz. Na + /K + -ATPase, H + /K + -ATPase and Na + /NH 4 + -ATPase indicates a functional interaction of ion transport system with the immune response as evident in its differential and spatial modifications after hypoxia stress in immune-challenged fish. The immune-challenge that produced differential

  1. Severe acute malnutrition in childhood: hormonal and metabolic status at presentation, response to treatment, and predictors of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sarah; Mody, Aaloke; Hornik, Christoph; Bain, James; Muehlbauer, Michael; Kiyimba, Tonny; Kiboneka, Elizabeth; Stevens, Robert; Bartlett, John; St Peter, John V; Newgard, Christopher B; Freemark, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. To identify and target those at highest risk, there is a critical need to characterize biomarkers that predict complications prior to and during treatment. We used targeted and nontargeted metabolomic analysis to characterize changes in a broad array of hormones, cytokines, growth factors, and metabolites during treatment of severe childhood malnutrition. Children aged 6 months to 5 years were studied at presentation to Mulago Hospital and during inpatient therapy with milk-based formulas and outpatient supplementation with ready-to-use food. We assessed the relationship between baseline hormone and metabolite levels and subsequent mortality. Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in the study; a subset was followed up from inpatient treatment to the outpatient clinic. Inpatient and outpatient therapies increased weight/height z scores and induced striking changes in the levels of fatty acids, amino acids, acylcarnitines, inflammatory cytokines, and various hormones including leptin, insulin, GH, ghrelin, cortisol, IGF-I, glucagon-like peptide-1, and peptide YY. A total of 12.2% of the patients died during hospitalization; the major biochemical factor predicting mortality was a low level of leptin (P = .0002), a marker of adipose tissue reserve and a critical modulator of immune function. We have used metabolomic analysis to provide a comprehensive hormonal and metabolic profile of severely malnourished children at presentation and during nutritional rehabilitation. Our findings suggest that fatty acid metabolism plays a central role in the adaptation to acute malnutrition and that low levels of the adipose tissue hormone leptin associate with, and may predict, mortality prior to and during treatment.

  2. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gonzalez-Anton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI, glycemic load (GL, insulinemic index (InI, appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18 compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73 compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response.

  3. Seasonal response of ghrelin, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor I in the free-ranging Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Rachel L; Bonde, Robert K.; Avery, Julie P.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal changes in light, temperature, and food availability stimulate a physiological response in an animal. Seasonal adaptations are well studied in Arctic, Sub-Arctic, and hibernating mammals; however, limited studies have been conducted in sub-tropical species. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), a sub-tropical marine mammal, forages less during colder temperatures and may rely on adipose stores for maintenance energy requirements. Metabolic hormones, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, and ghrelin influence growth rate, accretion of lean and adipose tissue. They have been shown to regulate seasonal changes in body composition. The objective of this research was to investigate manatee metabolic hormones in two seasons to determine if manatees exhibit seasonality and if these hormones are associated with seasonal changes in body composition. In addition, age related differences in these metabolic hormones were assessed in multiple age classes. Concentrations of GH, IGF-I, and ghrelin were quantified in adult manatee serum using heterologous radioimmunoassays. Samples were compared between short (winter) and long (summer) photoperiods (n = 22 male, 20 female) and by age class (adult, juvenile, and calf) in long photoperiods (n = 37). Short photoperiods tended to have reduced GH (p = 0.08), greater IGF-I (p = 0.01), and greater blubber depth (p = 0.03) compared with long photoperiods. No differences were observed in ghrelin (p = 0.66). Surprisingly, no age related differences were observed in IGF-I or ghrelin concentrations (p > 0.05). However, serum concentrations of GH tended (p = 0.07) to be greater in calves and juveniles compared with adults. Increased IGF-I, greater blubber thickness, and reduced GH during short photoperiod suggest a prioritization for adipose deposition. Whereas, increased GH, reduced blubber thickness, and decreased IGF-I in long photoperiod suggest prioritization of lean tissue

  4. The effect of palm oil, lard, and puff-pastry margarine on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J; Bysted, A; Dawids, S; Hermansen, K; Hølmer, G

    1999-12-01

    Only a few studies have been published on the postprandial effects of different fatty acids in obese subjects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of three test meals containing palm oil (PO), lard (LD), or puff-pastry margarine (PPM), all normal dietary ingredients, on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women. The study was performed as a randomized, crossover design. The fats differed in the content of palmitic acid, stearic acid, and trans monounsaturated fatty acids allowing a dietary comparison of different 'solid' fatty acids. The obese women had significantly higher fasting concentrations and postprandial responses of plasma total triacylglycerol (TAG), chylomicron-TAG, and insulin compared with the normal-weight women but there was no significant difference in the postprandial responses between the three test meals. The obese women had fasting concentrations of leptin four times greater than the normal-weight women. There were no postprandial changes in the concentrations of leptin. The fasting concentrations of HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in the obese women than in the normal-weight women, whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol. These results provide evidence that obese women have exaggerated lipid and hormone responses compared with normal-weight women but the different contents of saturated and trans monounsaturated fatty acids provided by PO, LD, and PPM have no effect in either group.

  5. Stress and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Ranabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern environment one is exposed to various stressful conditions. Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin. Some of these changes are necessary for the fight or flight response to protect oneself. Some of these stressful responses can lead to endocrine disorders like Graves′ disease, gonadal dysfunction, psychosexual dwarfism and obesity. Stress can also alter the clinical status of many preexisting endocrine disorders such as precipitation of adrenal crisis and thyroid storm.

  6. Developmental processes and responses to hormonal stimuli in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) leaves are controlled by GRF and GIF gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Wen-Li; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    Tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) is an important leaf-type woody crop used for producing of non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. The GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) transcription factors cooperated with GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR (GIF) transcriptional coactivators positively regulate leaf development. In the present study, six GRF and two GIF genes were identified and characterized in the leaf transcriptome of C. sinensis, respectively. The alignment results showed that the feature structures of the predicted homologous GRF and GIF proteins of C. sinensis hold a high identity with Arabidopsis and rice. The presence of C. sinensis miR396 target sites suggested that these miR396 members are the potential post-transcriptional regulators of CsGRF genes. The expression profiles of CsGRF and CsGIF1 genes were higher in tender leaves and consistently downregulated during tea plant leaf development. Those results suggested that these genes may be actively involved in the early stage leaf tissue formation in tea plant. The divergence of CsGRF and CsGIF genes in response to different hormonal stimuli revealed the possible multiple functions of these genes in hormonal regulation. This study provided the potential molecular basis of the CsGRF and CsGIF family genes for future functional research on leaf development and hormonal stimuli in C. sinensis.

  7. Hormone Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hormones quantified from marine mammal and sea turtle tissue provide information about the status of each animal sampled, including its sex, reproductive status and...

  8. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  9. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    of the hypothalamic- pituitary -adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic- pituitary -thyroid (HPT) axes across multiple matrices. APPROACH Task 1 – Natural...performance. Hair samples will be collected from the anterior back region of seals for determination of cortisol as a measure of chronic stress...and 5 juveniles. Task 3 – TSH challenges Thyroid hormones (thyroxin, T4 and triiodothyronine, T3) are released from the thyroid gland and are

  10. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol...... satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers...

  11. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  12. The Effects of a Hypocaloric Diet on Diet-Induced Thermogenesis and Blood Hormone Response in Healthy Male Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shunsuke; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction is a common strategy for weight loss and management. Consumption of food and nutrients stimulates diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), as well as pancreatic and gastrointestinal hormone secretion that may regulate energy metabolism. Yet, little is known about the impact of hypocaloric diets on energy metabolism-related parameters. In this study, we assessed the effects of hypocaloric diets on hormonal variance in relation to DIT in healthy adults. Ten healthy male adults were enrolled in a randomized crossover study comprising three meal trials. Each subject was given a meal of 200 (extremely hypocaloric), 400 (moderately hypocaloric), or 800 kcal (normocaloric). Postprandial blood variables and energy expenditure were measured for 4 h (after the 200- and 400-kcal meals) or 6 h (after the 800-kcal meal). DIT and postprandial changes in blood pancreatic peptide and ghrelin were significantly smaller after the extremely or moderately hypocaloric diet than after the normocaloric diet but were similar between the hypocaloric diets. Postprandial blood insulin, amylin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide type-1 (GLP-1) increased in a calorie-dependent manner. Thermogenic efficiency (DIT per energy intake) was negatively correlated with the maximum blood level (Cmax) (p=0.01) and incremental area under the curve (p=0.01) of the blood GIP response. Calorie restriction thus leads to hormonal responses and lower DIT in healthy adults. Extreme calorie restriction, however, led to greater thermogenic efficiency compared with moderate calorie restriction. The postprandial GIP response may be a good predictor of postprandial thermogenic efficiency.

  13. Factors Influencing the One- and Two-Year Growth Response in Children Treated with Growth Hormone: Analysis from an Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gut Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To assess gender-, pubertal-, age-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation score (, data from 5,797 growth hormone (GH naïve pediatric patients ( at year 1 was significantly greater for males versus females (, but no other gender differences were observed. For patients with GHD, was greater in prepubertal than in pubertal patients. Younger patients for both genders ( ( for GHD, MPHD, and ISS. Overall, positive were observed in all patients, with greater growth responses in younger prepubertal children, emphasizing the importance of starting GH treatment early.

  14. The effect of palm oil, lard, and puff-pastry margarine on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne J. Dyrsborg; Bysted, Anette; Dawids, Steen

    1999-01-01

    , on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women. The study was performed as a randomized, crossover design. The fats differed in the content of palmitic acid, stearic acid, and traits monounsaturated fatty acids allowing a dietary comparison of different 'solid' fatty acids......Only a few studies have been published on the postprandial effects of different fatty acids in obese subjects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of three test meals containing palm oil (PO), lard (LD), or puff-pastry margarine (PPM), all normal dietary ingredients...... acids provided by PO, LD, and PPM have no effect in either group....

  15. Hormonal, metabolic and cardiovascular responses to hypoglycaemia in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes with and without residual B cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, S; Hilsted, J; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    Hormonal, metabolic and cardiovascular responses to insulin induced hypoglycaemia were investigated in seven Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with residual B cell function, eight Type 1 diabetic patients without B cell function and six healthy subjects. No differences were found between...... the diabetic groups regarding nadir of glucose and rate of recovery to normoglycaemia. The patients with residual B cell function had a glucagon response to hypoglycaemia which was close to that of normal subjects. In patients without B cell function, the glucagon response to hypoglycaemia was present, albeit...... significantly smaller than in the patients with preserved B cell function (0.025 ng/ml, range 0.007-0.042 versus 0.054 ng/ml, range 0.029-0.087). The group without B cell function had signs of an exaggerated rate of lipolysis and ketogenesis compared with the patients with B cell function and the normal...

  16. Growth Response and Feed Utilization of Giant Gourami (Osphronemus goramy Juvenile Feeding Different Protein Levels of the Diets Supplemented with Recombinant Growth Hormone

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    DARMAWAN SETIA BUDI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of dietary supplementation with recombinant growth hormone (rGH on the growth and dietary utility of juvenile giant gourami. The rGH was mixed with chicken egg yolk and sprayed on to artificial feed with different protein levels (34, 28, and 21%; isoenergy. Each treatment group of gourami was paired with a control group that received feed of the same protein level, but without rGH supplementation. Juvenile of giant gourami (weight 15.83 ± 0.13 g were fed diets containing rGH, to apparent satiation, 2 times a week. Fish were reared from less than 2 months old for 42 days in 100 L glass aquaria at an initial density of 10 fish per aquarium. At the end of this period, the biomass and daily growth rate (SGR of the fish were measured and the feed conversion ratio calculated and compared. Our data showed that fish fed rGH-supplemented diets experienced higher growth than fish in the control groups and showed that fish with higher protein diets experienced higher growth than the groups with less protein diets. The group with the highest biomass gain, SGR, and lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR was the group fed a 34% protein diet supplemented with rGH. Furthermore, biomass gain, SGR, and FCR in the rGH treatment group with a 28% protein diet matched the measurements of the non-rGH control group receiving a 34% protein diet (P > 0.05. We conclude that giant juvenile gourami given feed supplemented with recombinant growth hormone will experience increased growth and dietary utility compared with gourami given the same feed without supplementation.

  17. Optimal cutoff value of basal anti-mullerian hormone in iranian infertile women for prediction of ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome and poor response to stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghssa, Malek Mansour; Tarafdari, Azam Manshadi; Tehraninejad, Ensieh Shahrokh; Ezzati, Mohammad; Bagheri, Maryam; Panahi, Zahra; Mahdavi, Saeed; Abbasi, Mehrshad

    2015-09-10

    We intended to establish the threshold of Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) for detection of Ovarian Hyper-Stimulation Syndrome (OHSS) and poor response to treatment in Iranian infertile women. Pre-stimulation menstrual cycle day-3 hormonal indices including basal AMH values were measured in 105 infertile women aged 32.5 ± 4.3 years. Patients underwent long GnRH agonist Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation (COH) in a referral infertility center (Tehran, Iran). The gonadotropin dose was determined based on the age and basal serum Follicular Stimulating Hormone (FSH) level. The IVF/ICSI cycles were followed and the clinical and sonographic data were recorded. Sixteen cases developed OHSS. The prevalence of PCOS was higher in subjects with OHSS [62.5 % (38.8-86.2) vs. 17 % (9.2-24.9)]. The patients with OHSS had higher ovarian follicular count [23.7 (3.2) vs. 9.1 (0.5); p Basal AMH level and oocyte yields (but not age, BMI, and PCOS) correlated with occurrence of OHSS; and only the AMH levels were associated with poor ovarian response (oocytes yield ≤ 4). The optimal cutoff value for the prediction of OHSS was 6.95 ng/ml (area under the receiver operating characteristics curve: 0.86; CI: 0.78-0.95; sensitivity: 75 %; specificity: 84 %; odds ratio for occurrence of OHSS: 9 and p basal AMH level > 6.95 ng/ml are at high risk of developing OHSS and those with AMH level < 1.65 ng/ml are poor responders.

  18. Influence of nitrate and nitrite on thyroid hormone-responsive and stress-associated gene expression in cultured Rana catesbeiana tadpole tail fin tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eHinther

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signalling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 mg/L and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO3-N and 0.5 mg/L and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO2-N in the absence and presence of 10 nM T3. Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI, both of which are thyroid hormone responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signalling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30 (HSP30 and catalase (CAT transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T3. Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action.

  19. The Role of Cyclic AMP and Its Relationship to Parathyroid Hormone Response in an In Vitro Model of Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    factors on bone and cartilage cell equilibria and differentiation will enhance our understanding of bone metabolism in health and disease . A. Parathyroid...1984. Difference between 1-84 parathyroid hormone and the 1-34 fragment on renal tubular calcium transport in the dog . Miner. Electrolyte Metab., ]A...general dentist during a four-year tour. In June 1989, Dr. Semba entered the Postdoctoral Periodontics program at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio in conjunction with Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center.

  20. A 3-day high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet does not alter exercise-induced growth hormone response in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroto; Ishibashi, Aya; Tsuchiya, Yoshihumi; Shimura, Nobuhiro; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Ebi, Kumiko; Goto, Kazushige

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of 3 days isoenergetic high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet (HF-LC) relative to low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet (LF-HC) on the exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) response in healthy male subjects. Ten healthy young males participated in this study. Each subject consumed the HF-LC (18±1% protein, 61±2% fat, 21±1% carbohydrate, 2720 kcal per day) for 3 consecutive days after consuming the LF-HC (18±1% protein, 20±1% fat, 62±1% carbohydrate, 2755 kcal per day) for 3 consecutive days. After each dietary intervention period, the hormonal and metabolic responses to an acute exercise (30 min of continuous pedaling at 60% of V˙O2max) were compared. The intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) contents in the vastus lateralis, soleus, and tibialis anterior were evaluated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Serum GH concentrations increased significantly during the exercise after both the HF-LC and LF-HC periods (Pexercise-induced GH response was not significantly different between the two periods. Fat utilization and lipolytic responses during the exercise were enhanced significantly after the HF-LC period compared with the LF-HC period. IMCL content did not differ significantly in any portion of muscle after the dietary interventions. We could not show that short-term HF-LC consumption changed significantly exercise-induced GH response or IMCL content in healthy young males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Self-Paired Sera of Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Responsive to Gefin

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    Ying HUANG

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective All the advanced NSCLC patients that received EGFR-TKI therapy will eventually relapse after a period of efficacy. The aim of this study is to investigate the serum biomarkers as potential predictive factors for the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI targeted therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods Twenty self-paired serum samples were collected from 9 advanced NSCLC patients that evaluated as disease control (SD or PR after gefinitib therapy, at the time points of before and after gefinitib treatment but 2 weeks before being evaluated as disease progress. All samples were pre-separated by WCX microbeads, and then detected on the MALDI-TOF-MS platform of Bruker AutoflexTM. ClinProTools (Version: 2.1 was used to analyze the differentially expressed proteins. Results There were 7 protein peaks (m/z, 3242.09, 8 690.36, 2 952.64, 3 224.04, 1 450.51, 1 887.8 and 3 935.73 found statistically differentially expressed between the self-paired samples. Three proteins (3 242.09, 2 952.64 and 3 224.04 were down-regulated and four proteins (8 690.36, 1 450.51, 1 887.8 and 3 935.73 up-regulated in gefinitib treated sera. Conclusion The data here suggest that several specific protein peaks might indicate gefinitib resistance, yet the identities of these proteins and the mechanisms underlying the responsiveness to gefinitib treatment need further investigation.

  2. Effect of short-term vs. long-term elevation of dietary protein intake on responsiveness of rat thick ascending limbs to peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David L; Plaga, Kimberly

    2002-10-01

    We compared the renal responses of rats on three diet regimens. Rats received either 8% protein food (low-protein, LP) for 10 weeks following weaning, 8% protein for 9 weeks followed by 1 week on 30% protein (short-term high-protein, SHP), or 30% protein for 10 weeks (high-protein, HP). Kidneys from HP rats were enlarged by approximately 50%, or 20% when corrected for body mass. Most of this hypertrophy resulted from enlargement of the inner stripe of the outer medulla, site of the thick ascending limbs (TAL), and TAL from HP rats were larger in diameter. SHP rats had TAL diameters similar to HP rats, but changes in renal mass or height of renal zones did not reach statistical significance. The activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in TAL, measured from the accumulation of cAMP in isolated tubules, increased with dose of both arginine vasopressin (AVP) and glucagon in all rats. However, HP rats had significantly higher hormone-induced AC activity than LP or SHP rats, which were not different from each other. Our results suggest that tubule hypertrophy may precede up-regulation of hormone-sensitive AC activity during the progression of renal response to elevated dietary protein.

  3. Acute effects of movement velocity on blood lactate and growth hormone responses after eccentric bench press exercise in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Rd; Verlengia, R; Crisp, Ah; Carvalho, Tb; Crepaldi, Md; Pereira, Aa; Yamada, Ak; da Mota, Gr; Lopes, Cr

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of different velocities of eccentric muscle actions on acute blood lactate and serum growth hormone (GH) concentrations following free weight bench press exercises performed by resistance-trained men. Sixteen healthy men were divided into two groups: slow eccentric velocity (SEV; n = 8) and fast eccentric velocity (FEV; n = 8). Both groups performed four sets of eight eccentric repetitions at an intensity of 70% of their one repetition maximum eccentric (1RMecc) test, with 2-minute rest intervals between sets. The eccentric velocity was controlled to 3 seconds per range of motion for SEV and 0.5 seconds for the FEV group. There was a significant difference (P bench press exercise in the SEV group (1.7 ± 0.6 ng · mL(-1)) relative to the FEV group (0.1 ± 0.0 ng · mL(-1)). In conclusion, the velocity of eccentric muscle action influences acute responses following bench press exercises performed by resistance-trained men using a slow velocity resulting in a greater metabolic stress and hormone response.

  4. Transactivation of a cellular promoter by the NS1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice through a putative hormone-responsive element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, J M; Corbau, R; Adelmant, G; Perros, M; Laudet, V; Rommelaere, J

    1996-01-01

    The promoter of the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (c-erbA-1) is activated by the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of parvovirus minute virus of mice (prototype strain [MVMp]) in ras-transformed FREJ4 cells that are permissive for lytic MVMp replication. This stimulation may be related to the sensitivity of host cells to MVMp, as it does not take place in parental FR3T3 cells, which are resistant to the parvovirus killing effect. The analysis of a series of deletion and point mutants of the c-erbA-1 promoter led to the identification of an upstream region that is necessary for NS1-driven transactivation. This sequence harbors a putative hormone-responsive element and is sufficient to render a minimal promoter NS1 inducible in FREJ4 but not in FR3T3 cells, and it is involved in distinct interactions with proteins from the respective cell lines. The NS1-responsive element of the c-erbA-1 promoter bears no homology with sequences that were previously reported to be necessary for NS1 DNA binding and transactivation. Altogether, our data point to a novel, cell-specific mechanism of promoter activation by NS1. PMID:8642664

  5. The follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) response to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue test in healthy prepubertal girls aged 10 months to 6 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben T; Schjørring, Mia Elbek; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    and bone age were determined in all participants. Forty-eight healthy normal-weight girls aged 3.5 ± 0.2 years (range: 0.8-5.9 years) were included. Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were measured before and 30 min after the gonadorelin injection. RESULTS: The 30-min LH responses (mean ± 2 s.d.) were 5.......2 ± 4.0 and 2.9 ± 2.5 IU/L and the FSH responses were 23.3 ± 16.2 and 14.5 ± 10.3 IU/L in girls aged 0.8-3.0 years and 3.0-5.9 years respectively. This corresponds to upper cut-off limits for LH of 9.2 IU/L (3 years) and 5.3 IU/L (3-6 years). The stimulated LH/FSH ratio was 0.23 ± 0.19 (range 0.......06-0.43) and did not correlate with age. CONCLUSIONS: We found that LH increases up to 9.2 IU/L during GnRH test in healthy normal-weight girls below 3 years of age and that the stimulated LH/FSH ratio did not exceed 0.43. Our findings have important implications for appropriate diagnosis of central precocious...

  6. High-throughput sequencing of natively paired antibody chains provides evidence for original antigenic sin shaping the antibody response to influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yann-Chong; Blum, Lisa K; Kongpachith, Sarah; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Cai, Xiaoyong; Lindstrom, Tamsin M; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William H

    2014-03-01

    We developed a DNA barcoding method to enable high-throughput sequencing of the cognate heavy- and light-chain pairs of the antibodies expressed by individual B cells. We used this approach to elucidate the plasmablast antibody response to influenza vaccination. We show that >75% of the rationally selected plasmablast antibodies bind and neutralize influenza, and that antibodies from clonal families, defined by sharing both heavy-chain VJ and light-chain VJ sequence usage, do so most effectively. Vaccine-induced heavy-chain VJ regions contained on average >20 nucleotide mutations as compared to their predicted germline gene sequences, and some vaccine-induced antibodies exhibited higher binding affinities for hemagglutinins derived from prior years' seasonal influenza as compared to their affinities for the immunization strains. Our results show that influenza vaccination induces the recall of memory B cells that express antibodies that previously underwent affinity maturation against prior years' seasonal influenza, suggesting that 'original antigenic sin' shapes the antibody response to influenza vaccination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Effects of aging on thermoregulatory responses and hormonal changes in humans during the four seasons in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Sugenoya, Junichi; Inukai, Yoko; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    Physiological functions are impaired in various organs in aged people, as manifest by, e.g., renal and cardiac dysfunction and muscle atrophy. The elderly are also at increased risk of both hypothermia and hyperthermia in extreme temperatures. The majority of those over 65 years old have elevated serum osmolality. Our hypothesis is that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control in different seasons compared to the young. Eight healthy young men and six healthy older men participated in this study. The experiments were performed during spring, summer, autumn and winter in Japan, with average atmospheric temperatures of 15-20°C in spring, 25-30°C in summer, 15-23°C in autumn and 5-10°C in winter. Each subject immersed his lower legs in warm water at 40°C for 30 min. Core (tympanic) temperature and sweat rate at chest were recorded continuously. Blood was taken pre-immersion to measure the concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, serum osmolality, plasma renin activity, angiotensin II, aldosterone, leptin, thyroid stimulating hormone, fT3 and fT4. The results suggested that the elderly have suppressed osmolality control compared to the young; osmolality was especially elevated in winter compared to the summer in elderly subjects. Therefore, particularly in the elderly, balancing fluid by drinking water should be encouraged to maintain euhydration status in winter.

  8. [Dynamics of hormone secretion during chronic emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiragova, M G; Kovalev, S V; Svirskaia, R I

    1979-05-01

    Study of spontaneous secretion of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones and the direct hormonal response to stress revealed the pathogenic effect of chronic combined emotional stress upon the hormonal function of adrenal glands. The hippocampus takes part in formation of the emotional tension in response to stress stimulus and of the following hormonal secretion.

  9. Reproductive factors, menopausal hormone therapies and primary liver cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guo-Chao; Liu, Yan; Chen, Nan; Hao, Fa-Bao; Wang, Kang; Cheng, Jia-Hao; Gong, Jian-Ping; Ding, Xiong

    2016-12-01

    A striking gender disparity in the incidence and outcome of primary liver cancer (PLC) has been well recognized. Mounting evidence from basic research suggests that hormonal factors may be involved in the gender disparity of PLC. Whether hormonal exposures in human subjects are associated with PLC risk is largely unknown. Whether reproductive factors and use of menopausal hormone therapies (MHTs) in women are associated with PLC risk remains controversial. We conducted this study to clarify this issue. PubMed and EMBASE were searched to July, 2016 for studies published in English or Chinese. Observational studies (cohort, nested case-control and case-control) that provided risk estimates of reproductive factors, MHTs and PLC risk were eligible. The quality of included studies was determined based on the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale. Summary risk ratios (RRs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Dose-response analysis was conducted where possible. Fifteen peer-reviewed studies, involving 1795 PLC cases and 2 256 686 women, were included. Overall meta-analyses on parity and PLC risk did not find any significant associations; however, when restricting to studies with PLC cases ≥100, increasing parity was found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of PLC [RR for the highest versus lowest parity 0.67, 95% CI 0.52, 0.88; RR for parous versus nulliparous 0.71, 95% CI 0.53, 0.94; RR per one live birth increase 0.93, 95% CI 0.88, 0.99]. A J-shaped relationship between parity and PLC risk was identified (P non-linearity  Parity is associated with PLC risk in a J-shaped dose-response pattern. Late age at menarche and ever use of MHT are associated with a reduced risk of PLC, whereas there is no association of ever use of ET and EPT, age at first birth, or spontaneous and induced abortion with PLC risk. Compared to women with no history of oophorectomy, those with a history of oophorectomy are at an increased risk of PLC. Our findings

  10. The secretory response of parathyroid hormone to acute hypocalcemia in vivo is independent of parathyroid glandular sodium/potassium-ATPase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martuseviciene, Giedre; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Clausen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    increased in response to ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid-induced acute hypocalcemia and to the same extent in both vehicle and ouabain groups. The glands were removed, and inhibition of the ATPase was measured by (86)rubidium uptake, which was found to be significantly decreased in ouabain......-treated parathyroid glands, indicating inhibition of the ATPase. As ouabain induced systemic hyperkalemia, the effect of high potassium on hormone secretion was also examined but was found to have no effect. Thus, inhibition of the parathyroid gland sodium/potassium-ATPase activity in vivo had no effect...... on the secretory response to acute hypocalcemia. Hence, the suggested importance of this ATPase in the regulation of PTH secretion could not be confirmed in this in vivo model....

  11. Honey bee foraging induces upregulation of early growth response protein 1, hormone receptor 38 and candidate downstream genes of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A S; Shah, A; Brockmann, A

    2018-02-01

    In honey bees, continuous foraging at an artificial feeder induced a sustained upregulation of the immediate early genes early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) and hormone receptor 38 (Hr38). This gene expression response was accompanied by an upregulation of several Egr-1 candidate downstream genes: ecdysone receptor (EcR), dopamine/ecdysteroid receptor (DopEcR), dopamine decarboxylase and dopamine receptor 2. Hr38, EcR and DopEcR are components of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway, which is highly probably involved in learning and memory processes in honey bees and other insects. Time-trained foragers still showed an upregulation of Egr-1 when the feeder was presented at an earlier time of the day, suggesting that the genomic response is more dependent on the food reward than training time. However, presentation of the feeder at the training time without food was still capable of inducing a transient increase in Egr-1 expression. Thus, learnt feeder cues, or even training time, probably affect Egr-1 expression. In contrast, whole brain Egr-1 expression changes did not differ between dancing and nondancing foragers. On the basis of our results we propose that food reward induced continuous foraging ultimately elicits a genomic response involving Egr-1 and Hr38 and their downstream genes. Furthermore this genomic response is highly probably involved in foraging-related learning and memory responses. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  12. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  13. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  14. The Arabidopsis cax1 mutant exhibits impaired ion homeostasis, development, and hormonal responses and reveals interplay among vacuolar transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ning-Hui; Pittman, Jon K; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Shigaki, Toshiro; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2003-02-01

    The Arabidopsis Ca(2+)/H(+) transporter CAX1 (Cation Exchanger1) may be an important regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Here, we describe the preliminary localization of CAX1 to the tonoplast and the molecular and biochemical characterization of cax1 mutants. We show that these mutants exhibit a 50% reduction in tonoplast Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport activity, a 40% reduction in tonoplast V-type H(+)-translocating ATPase activity, a 36% increase in tonoplast Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, and increased expression of the putative vacuolar Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporters CAX3 and CAX4. Enhanced growth was displayed by the cax1 lines under Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) stress conditions. The mutants exhibited altered plant development, perturbed hormone sensitivities, and altered expression of an auxin-regulated promoter-reporter gene fusion. We propose that CAX1 regulates myriad plant processes and discuss the observed phenotypes with regard to the compensatory alterations in other transporters.

  15. The Arabidopsis cax1 Mutant Exhibits Impaired Ion Homeostasis, Development, and Hormonal Responses and Reveals Interplay among Vacuolar Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ning-Hui; Pittman, Jon K.; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Shigaki, Toshiro; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Ca2+/H+ transporter CAX1 (Cation Exchanger1) may be an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Here, we describe the preliminary localization of CAX1 to the tonoplast and the molecular and biochemical characterization of cax1 mutants. We show that these mutants exhibit a 50% reduction in tonoplast Ca2+/H+ antiport activity, a 40% reduction in tonoplast V-type H+-translocating ATPase activity, a 36% increase in tonoplast Ca2+-ATPase activity, and increased expression of the putative vacuolar Ca2+/H+ antiporters CAX3 and CAX4. Enhanced growth was displayed by the cax1 lines under Mn2+ and Mg2+ stress conditions. The mutants exhibited altered plant development, perturbed hormone sensitivities, and altered expression of an auxin-regulated promoter-reporter gene fusion. We propose that CAX1 regulates myriad plant processes and discuss the observed phenotypes with regard to the compensatory alterations in other transporters. PMID:12566577

  16. Kisspeptin Signaling Is Required for the Luteinizing Hormone Response in Anestrous Ewes following the Introduction of Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bond, Julie-Ann P.; Li, Qun; Millar, Robert P.; Clarke, Iain J.; Smith, Jeremy T.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of a novel male stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of female sheep during seasonal anestrus, leading to the resumption of follicle maturation and ovulation. How this pheromone cue activates pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) is unknown. We hypothesised that pheromones activate kisspeptin neurons, the product of which is critical for the stimulation of GnRH neurons and fertility. During the non-breeding season, female sheep were exposed to novel males and blood samples collected for analysis of plasma LH profiles. Females without exposure to males served as controls. In addition, one hour before male exposure, a kisspeptin antagonist (P-271) or vehicle was infused into the lateral ventricle and continued for the entire period of male exposure. Introduction of a male led to elevated mean LH levels, due to increased LH pulse amplitude and pulse frequency in females, when compared to females not exposed to a male. Infusion of P-271 abolished this effect of male exposure. Brains were collected after the male effect stimulus and we observed an increase in the percentage of kisspeptin neurons co-expressing Fos, by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the per-cell expression of Kiss1 mRNA was increased in the rostral and mid (but not the caudal) arcuate nucleus (ARC) after male exposure in both aCSF and P-271 treated ewes, but the per-cell content of neurokinin B mRNA was decreased. There was also a generalized increase in Fos positive cells in the rostral and mid ARC as well as the ventromedial hypothalamus of females exposed to males. We conclude that introduction of male sheep to seasonally anestrous female sheep activates kisspeptin neurons and other cells in the hypothalamus, leading to increased GnRH/LH secretion. PMID:23469121

  17. GROWTH RESPONSE OF CLOWN LOACH (Chromobotia macracanthus Bleeker 1852 JUVENILES IMMERSED IN WATER CONTAINING RECOMBINANT GROWTH HORMONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Permana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem in the culture of clown loach (Chromobotia macracanthus is the slow growth rate, which takes about six months to reach its market size (two inches total body length. Slow growth eventually cause a long production time and increase the production costs. An alternative solution can be proposed in order to enhance the growth is by using recombinant growth hormone. The aim of this study was to determine the immersion dose of recombinant Epinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone (rElGH which can generate the highest growth in clown loach. Larvae at seven day after hatching were hyperosmotic treated with NaCl 2.0% for one minute, then immersed for one hour in water containing 0.3% NaCl, 0.01% bovine serum albumin (BSA, and different doses of rElGH, namely: 0.12 (treatment A, 1.2 (B, 12 (C, and 120 mg/L (D. As control, fish were immersed in water without rElGH and NaCl (control-1, water containing 0.3% NaCl and 0.01% BSA (control-2, and 0.3% NaCl water (control-3. Each treatment was replicated three times. The results showed that clown loach juveniles in treatment B, C, and D had longer total body length (P0.05. In addition, the percentage of large size juveniles increased approximately 5% in treatment B, almost the same as in the medium size, while the small size were decrease compared to the control-1. Thus, the best immersion dose of rElGH was 1.2 mg/L water.

  18. Increased height standard deviation scores in response to growth hormone therapy to near-adult height in older children with delayed skeletal maturation: results from the ANSWER Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L; Lee, Peter A; Gut, Robert; Germak, John

    2015-01-01

    A primary goal of recombinant human growth hormone therapy (GHT) in children is attaining normal adult height. In this study, children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) (including isolated idiopathic growth hormone deficiency [IGHD] and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency [MPHD]), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and Turner syndrome (TS) were evaluated for near-adult height (NAH) and percent achieving NAH within the normal range after approximately 4 years of GHT. Data from the American Norditropin® Web-Enabled Research (ANSWER) Program were analyzed for NAH from age at treatment start (ATS) (i.e., referral age as defined by age at enrollment in the study) to last clinic visit using one of the following two criteria: 1) age ≥18 years, or 2) if male: ≥16 years and height velocity (HV) standard deviation score (HSDS) ≤ -2, and either GHD (n = 201), ISS (n = 19), or TS (n = 41). The main outcome measures included HSDS and corrected HSDS (HSDS-target HSDS) in response to GH treatment, and correlation of ATS with NAH HSDS. Mean (± SD) chronological and bone ages at baseline were 14.0 ± 2.1 years and 11.7 ± 2.0 years, respectively, and mean GHT duration was 4.0 ± 1.6 years. Mean HSDS (baseline to NAH; GHD: -2.7 to -1.0; ISS: -2.8 to -1.4; TS: -3.0 to -1.8) and mean corrected HSDS (baseline to NAH; GHD: -2.1 to -0.3; ISS: -2.1 to -0.6; TS: -1.8 to -0.6) increased across diagnostic indications. Percentages of patients reaching near-adult HSDS > -2 were GHD: 87.6%; ISS: 78.9%; TS: 65.8%. Significant negative correlations were found between ATS and NAH HSDS when analyzed by sex. Despite a relatively advanced childhood age, the majority of GH-treated patients attained mean near-adult HSDS within the normal range (HSDS > -2). Negative correlations of ATS with near-adult HSDS indicate that an earlier age at treatment start would likely have resulted in greater adult height achieved in both male and female patients.

  19. Postprandial incretin and islet hormone responses and dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 enzymatic activity in patients with maturity onset diabetes of the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østoft, Signe Harring; Bagger, Jonatan Ising; Hansen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The role of the incretin hormones in the pathophysiology of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is unclear. Design: We studied the postprandial plasma responses of glucagon, incretin hormones (glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP......)), and dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP-4) enzymatic activity in patients with glucokinase (GCK)-diabetes (MODY2), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1A)-diabetes (MODY3), and in matched healthy individuals (CTRLs). Subjects and methods: Ten patients with GCK-diabetes (age: 43±5 years; BMI: 24±2 kg/m2; FPG: 7.1±0.3 mmol....../l: HbA1c: 6.6±0.2%), 10 patients with HNF1A-diabetes (age: 31±3 years (mean ± SEM); body mass index (BMI): 24±1 kg/m2; fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 8.9±0.8 mmol/l; haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 7.0±0.3%), and 10 CTRLs (age: 40±5 years; BMI: 24±1 kg/m2; FPG: 5.1±0.1 mmol/l; HbA1c: 5.3±0.1%) were examined...

  20. The hormone response element mimic sequence of GAS5 lncRNA is sufficient to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Mark R.; Williams, Gwyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) lncRNA promotes apoptosis, and its expression is down-regulated in breast cancer. GAS5 lncRNA is a decoy of glucocorticoid/related receptors; a stem-loop sequence constitutes the GAS5 hormone response element mimic (HREM), which is essential for the regulation of breast cancer cell apoptosis. This preclinical study aimed to determine if the GAS5 HREM sequence alone promotes the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Nucleofection of hormone-sensitive and –insensitive breast cancer cell lines with a GAS5 HREM DNA oligonucleotide increased both basal and ultraviolet-C-induced apoptosis, and decreased culture viability and clonogenic growth, similar to GAS5 lncRNA. The HREM oligonucleotide demonstrated similar sequence specificity to the native HREM for its functional activity and had no effect on endogenous GAS5 lncRNA levels. Certain chemically modified HREM oligonucleotides, notably DNA and RNA phosphorothioates, retained pro-apoptotic. activity. Crucially the HREM oligonucleotide could overcome apoptosis resistance secondary to deficient endogenous GAS5 lncRNA levels. Thus, the GAS5 lncRNA HREM sequence alone is sufficient to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells, including triple-negative breast cancer cells. These findings further suggest that emerging knowledge of structure/function relationships in the field of lncRNA biology can be exploited for the development of entirely novel, oligonucleotide mimic-based, cancer therapies. PMID:26862727

  1. Effects of lactational exposure to organochlorine pesticides, PCBs and dioxins on immune response and thyroid hormone systems in Japanese male and female infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, J. [School of Health Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Tsuji, H. [Kitakyushu-Tsuyazaki Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Iida, T.; Nakagawa, R.; Matsueda, T.; Hirakawa, H. [Fukuoka Inst. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Shiraha, A.; Yanagawa, T. [Graduate School of Mathematics, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukushige, J. [Fukuoka Children' s Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Watanabe O.B.G.Y. Clinic, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Our environments including food have been polluted with some organochlorine compounds such as dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides. Japanese people have also been contaminated with these chemicals. Consequently, some pesticides such as hexachlorocyclohexans (HCHs), 1,1,1-trichloro- 2,2-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDT), dieldrin and heptachlor epoxide (HCE), and PCBs have been determined in Japanese breast milk and their mean or median concentrations on fat weight basis were about 420, 330, 3, 4 and 110 ppb, respectively. Their levels were considered more than 100 to 10,000 times higher than those of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs), so-called dioxins, in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxic equivalent (TEQ) value as a whole. Therefore, we should give due attention to possible health consequences of these organochlorine pesticides and PCBs as well as dioxins in Japanese infants. We have already reported effects of the perinatal exposure to these compounds on lymphocyte subsets and thyroid hormone statuses in the peripheral blood of Japanese infants. In this study, in order to clarify the sexual distinction in their effects on the immune response and thyroid hormone systems, we investigated the lymphocyte subsets and thyroid related chemicals in the blood of Japanese male and female infants in relation to their concentrations of the breast milk.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Receptor β (TRβ) and Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulate Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP) Expression in a Tissue-selective Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Karine; Billon, Cyrielle; Bissler, Marie; Beylot, Michel; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Samarut, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TR) and liver X (LXR) receptors are transcription factors involved in lipogenesis. Both receptors recognize the same consensus DNA-response element in vitro. It was previously shown that their signaling pathways interact in the control of cholesterol elimination in the liver. In the present study, carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP), a major transcription factor controlling the activation of glucose-induced lipogenesis in liver, is characterized as a direct target of thyroid hormones (TH) in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT), the two main lipogenic tissues in mice. Using genetic and molecular approaches, ChREBP is shown to be specifically regulated by TRβ but not by TRα in vivo, even in WAT where both TR isoforms are expressed. However, this isotype specificity is not found in vitro. This TRβ specific regulation correlates with the loss of TH-induced lipogenesis in TRβ−/− mice. Fasting/refeeding experiments show that TRβ is not required for the activation of ChREBP expression particularly marked in WAT following refeeding. However, TH can stimulate ChREBP expression in WAT even under fasting conditions, suggesting completely independent pathways. Because ChREBP has been described as an LXR target, the interaction of LXR and TRβ in ChREBP regulation was assayed both in vitro and in vivo. Each receptor recognizes a different response element on the ChREBP promoter, located only 8 bp apart. There is a cross-talk between LXR and TRβ signaling on the ChREBP promoter in liver but not in WAT where LXR does not regulate ChREBP expression. The molecular basis for this cross-talk has been determined in in vitro systems. PMID:20615868

  3. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Bioidentical Hormones January 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... take HT for symptom relief. What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  4. An enriched, cereal-based bread affects appetite ratings and glycemic, insulinemic, and gastrointestinal hormone responses in healthy adults in a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Lopez-Millan, Belen; Rico, Maria C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D

    2015-02-01

    Bread can contribute to the regulation of appetite. The objective of this study was to investigate the appetite ratings and postprandial glucose, insulin, and gastrointestinal hormone responses related to hunger and satiety after the intake of a cereal-based bread. A randomized, controlled crossover trial was conducted in 30 healthy adults (17 men and 13 women) aged 19-32 y with body mass index of 19.2-28.5. Each volunteer consumed the cereal-based bread and the control bread 2 times, with a 1-wk wash-out period, over a total of 4 sessions. The cereal-based bread contained a variety of cereal flours (wheat, oat, and spelt) and consisted of 22% dried fruits (figs, apricots, raisins, and prunes). It was also enriched with both fiber (7% from wheat cross-linked maltodextrins and pea) and protein (10-11% from wheat gluten and hydrolyzed wheat proteins). The control bread consisted of white bread with margarine and jam to control for energy density, fat, and sugar content. We measured appetite ratings using standardized visual analogue scales and glucose, insulin, and gastrointestinal hormone responses over a postprandial time of 4 h after the ingestion of each bread. Linear mixed-effects models were used to compare the areas under the curve (AUCs) for different variables. Consuming the cereal-based bread decreased prospective consumption more than consumption of the control bread (-5.3 ± 0.6 m · min and -4.4 ± 0.6 m · min, respectively; P = 0.02) and increased satiety more (6.2 ± 0.7 m · min and 5.2 ± 0.6 m · min, respectively; P = 0.04), although subsequent ad libitum energy intake 4 h later did not differ. Postprandial blood glucose, insulin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide AUCs were lower after the ingestion of the cereal-based bread, whereas the pancreatic polypeptide AUC was higher than with the control bread (P < 0.05). Consumption of the cereal-based bread contributed to appetite control by reducing hunger and

  5. First-principles study lone-pair effects of Sb (III)-S chromophore influence on SHG response in quaternary potassium containing silver antimony sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Junben [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Su, Xin; Hou, Dianwei; Lei, Binghua [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Zhihua, E-mail: zhyang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); Pan, Shilie, E-mail: slpan@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments of CAS,, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry of CAS, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2017-05-15

    First-principles studies of the geometric structures, electronic structures and optical properties of non-centrosymmetrical (NCS) KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4}, K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} and centrosymmetrical (CS) KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Ag{sub 9}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 12} have been performed by means of density functional theory. It is indicated that although they have similarity in their anionic groups and, the electronic structures, prominent features of the optical anisotropy or second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities are apparently different. The calculated birefringences are 0.0537, 0.0343, 0.1324, 0.2217 and 0.0604 which are attributed to the different anionic groups [SbS{sub 3}] and triangles [AgS{sub 3}]. Also, the calculated NLO responses are about 0.5×, 1.0× and 2.0× times than that commercial AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS, d{sub 36}=11 pm/V) for K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4}, KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}, respectively. In comparison with the absolute magnitude of second harmonic generation (SHG) coefficients, the order K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}>KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4}>K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4} is clearly established in the SHG response. Further analysis based on the real-space atom-cutting method reveals that the main sources of the SHG properties of these compounds are from the Sb-S group, especially K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} is mainly attributed to the lone pair stereochemical activity of Sb (III)-S group. - Graphical abstract: Compounds K{sub 2}AgSbS{sub 4}, KAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} and K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} exhibit second-order NLO response: 15×, 30× and 62× times than that KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, d{sub 36}=0.39 pm/V), respectively. First-principles methods reveal that the large SHG response of K{sub 2}Ag{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7} is dominated by the Sb-S chromophore with lone pairs.

  6. Effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 on counterregulatory hormone responses, cognitive functions, and insulin secretion during hyperinsulinemic, stepped hypoglycemic clamp experiments in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, Michael A; Heimesaat, Markus M; Behle, Kai

    2002-01-01

    and neuroglucopenic symptoms were assessed, and cognitive function was tested at each plateau. Insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution (two-compartment model of C-peptide kinetics). At insulin concentrations of approximately 45 mU/liter, glucose infusion rates were similar with and without GLP-1 (P......Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and analogues are being evaluated as a new therapeutic principle for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 suppresses glucagon secretion, which could lead to disturbances of hypoglycemia counterregulation. This has, however, not been tested. Nine healthy volunteers.......97). The other counterregulatory hormones and autonomic or neuroglucopenic symptom scores increased, and cognitive functions decreased with decreasing glucose concentrations, but there were no significant differences comparing experiments with GLP-1 or placebo, except for a significant reduction of GH responses...

  7. Surface characterization and free thyroid hormones response of chemically modified poly(ethylene terephthalate) blood collection tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali Dil, Ebrahim; Kim, Samuel C.; Saffar, Amir; Ajji, Abdellah; Zare, Richard N.; Sattayapiwat, Annie; Esguerra, Vanessa; Bowen, Raffick A. R.

    2018-06-01

    The surface chemistry and surface energy of chemically modified polyethylene terephthalate (PET) blood collection tubes (BCTs) were studied and the results showed a significant increase in hydrophilicity and polarity of modified PET surface. The surface modification created nanometer-sized, needle-like asperities through molecular segregation at the surface. The surface dynamics of the modified PET was examined by tracking its surface properties over a 280-day period. The results showed surface rearrangement toward a surface with lower surface energy and fewer nanometer-sized asperities. Thromboelastography (TEG) was used to evaluate and compare the thrombogenicity of the inner walls of various types of BCTs. The TEG tracings and data from various types of BCTs demonstrated differences in the reactionand coagulation times but not in clot strength. The performance of the modified tubes in free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) hormone tests was examined, and it was found that the interference of modified PET tubes was negligible compared to that of commercially available PET BCTs.

  8. Renal, metabolic, and hormonal responses to proteins of different origin in normotensive, nonproteinuric type I diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontessis, P A; Bossinakou, I; Sarika, L; Iliopoulou, E; Papantoniou, A; Trevisan, R; Roussi, D; Stipsanelli, K; Grigorakis, S; Souvatzoglou, A

    1995-09-01

    Whether the differences in renal function found in vegetarian compared with omnivorous subjects are related to quantity or quality of the protein is unknown. We have studied the renal function of nine normotensive, nonproteinuric type I diabetic patients who were fed in random order for 4 weeks either an animal protein diet (APD) (protein intake 1.1 g . kg-1 . day-1) or a vegetable protein diet VPD (protein intake 0.95 g . kg-1 . day-1). The two diets were isocaloric. In a crossover study, we measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (inulin clearance), renal plasma flow (RPF) (p-aminohippurate clearance), plasma amino acids, growth hormone, glucagon, insulin-like growth factor I-(IGF-I), and microalbuminuria. GFR and RPF were lower with the VPD than with the APD (89.9 +/- 4.1 vs. 105.6 +/- 5.1 ml . min-1 . 1.73 m-2, P protein intake in normotensive type I diabetic patients. This could be explained partly by differences in plasma concentrations of amino acids and IGF-I.

  9. Ovarian structure and hormonal status of the UChA and UChB adult rats in response to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Padovani, Carlos R; Martinez, Francisco E

    2009-01-20

    In females, chronic alcoholism has a current and dangerous incidence to fertility. This work had the goal of elucidating the alterations on the ovary of UChA and UChB adult rats (ethanol 10% (v/v) voluntary drinkers). After the treatment period, 42 female rats divided into three experimental groups (UChA, UChB and Wistar) suffered decapitation and their ovaries were removed and processed to further analysis on light and electron microscopy. The ovary was entirely sliced and stained by hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue, periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and Masson's tricromic. Thereby, the enzymatic reaction to acid and alkaline phosphatase, estral cyclicity, reproductive hormonal status and frequency in oestrous-related ovarian structures were assigned. The UChB rats showed an increase in body mass gain index and the ovaries relative weight was significantly lower comparing to the other groups. UCh rats presented the longest estral cycle durations and also persistent oestrous phasis, with uninterrupted cycles. Advanced follicular atresia was common in UCh animals, and degenerating intracellular fragments could be observed through acid phosphatase and electron microscopy techniques. There were some estral cyclicity irregularities caused by chronic ethanol intake in the UCh groups which were consequently reflected as morphologic injury in the ovary structure.

  10. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hiroko; Nakamura, Akira; Texada, Michael J; Truman, James W; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Nibu, Yutaka; Kume, Kazuhiko; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-05-01

    The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue) has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2) acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps). A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R) in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3), is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production.

  11. Influence of Nitrate and Nitrite on Thyroid Hormone Responsive and Stress-Associated Gene Expression in Cultured Rana catesbeiana Tadpole Tail Fin Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinther, Ashley; Edwards, Thea M.; Guillette, Louis J.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signaling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin) assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO3–N) and 0.5 and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO2–N) in the absence and presence of 10 nM T3. Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI), both of which are TH-responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signaling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30, and catalase (CAT) transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T3. Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action. PMID:22493607

  12. No influence of parental origin of intact X chromosome and/or Y chromosome sequences on three-year height response to growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWhether parental origin of the intact X chromosome and/or the presence of Y chromosome sequences (Yseq play a role in three-year height response to growth hormone (GH were investigated.MethodsPaternal (Xp or maternal (Xm origin of X chromosome was assessed by microsatellite marker analysis and the presence of hidden Yseq was analyzed. The first-, second-, and third-year GH response was measured as a change in height z-score (Z_Ht in Turner syndrome (TS patients with 45,Xp (n=10, 45,Xm (n=15, and 45,X/46,X,+mar(Y (Xm_Yseq (n=8.ResultsThe mean baseline Z_Ht did not differ according to Xp or Xm origin, however the mean baseline Z_Ht was higher in the Xm_Yseq group than in Xm group, after adjusting for bone age delay and midparental Z_Ht (P=0.04. There was no difference in the height response to GH between the 3 groups. The height response to GH decreased progressively each year (P<0.001, such that the third-year increase in Z_Ht was not significant. This third-year decrease in treatment response was unaffected by Xp, Xm, and Xm_Yseq groups. Increasing GH dosage from the second to third-year of treatment positively correlated with the increase in Z_Ht (P=0.017.ConclusionThere was no evidence of X-linked imprinted genes and/or Yseq affecting height response to 3 years of GH therapy. Increasing GH dosages may help attenuate the decrease in third-year GH response in TS patients with 45,X and/or 46,X/+mar(Y.

  13. The interrelationships of thyroid and growth hormones: effect of growth hormone releasing hormone in hypo- and hyperthyroid male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, A W; Shulman, D; Root, J; Diamond, F

    1986-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and the thyroid hormones interact in the hypothalamus, pituitary and peripheral tissues. Thyroid hormone exerts a permissive effect upon the anabolic and metabolic effects of GH, and increases pituitary synthesis of this protein hormone. GH depresses the secretion of thyrotropin and the thyroid hormones and increases the peripheral conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine. In the adult male rat experimental hypothyroidism produced by ingestion of propylthiouracil depresses the GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in vivo and in vitro, reflecting the lowered pituitary stores of GH in the hypothyroid state. Short term administration of large amounts of thyroxine with induction of the hyperthyroid state does not affect the in vivo GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in this animal.

  14. Sensorimotor cortex ablation induces time-dependent response of ACTH cells in adult rats: behavioral, immunohistomorphometric and hormonal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrnja, Irena; Trifunovic, Svetlana; Ajdzanovic, Vladimir; Pekovic, Sanja; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Verica

    2014-02-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious event with far reaching complications, including pituitary dysfunction. Pars distalis corticotropes (ACTH cells), that represent the active module of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, seem to be affected as well. Since pituitary failure after TBI has been associated with neurobehavioral impairments the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of TBI on recovery of motor functions, morphology and secretory activity of ACTH cells in the pituitary of adult rats. Wistar male rats, initially exposed to sensorimotor cortex ablation (SCA), were sacrificed at the 2nd, 7th, 14th and 30th days post-surgery (dps). A beam walking test was used to evaluate the recovery of motor functions. Pituitary glands and blood were collected for morphological and hormonal analyses. During the first two weeks post-injury increased recovery of locomotor function was detected, reaching almost the control value at day 30. SCA induces significant increase of pituitary weights compared to their time-matched controls. The volume of ACTH-immunopositive cells was reduced at the 7th dps, while at the 14th dps their volume was enlarged, in comparison to corresponding sham controls. Volume density of ACTH cells was increased only at 14th dps, while at day 30 this increase was insignificant. The plasma level of ACTH transiently increased after the injury. The most pronounced changes were observed at the 7th and 14th dps, and were followed by decrease toward control levels at the 30th dps. Thus, temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after traumatic brain injury appear to correlate with the recovery process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of thyroid hormone concentration on the transcriptional response underlying induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuels Amy K

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid hormones (TH induce gene expression programs that orchestrate amphibian metamorphosis. In contrast to anurans, many salamanders do not undergo metamorphosis in nature. However, they can be induced to undergo metamorphosis via exposure to thyroxine (T4. We induced metamorphosis in juvenile Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum using 5 and 50 nM T4, collected epidermal tissue from the head at four time points (Days 0, 2, 12, 28, and used microarray analysis to quantify mRNA abundances. Results Individuals reared in the higher T4 concentration initiated morphological and transcriptional changes earlier and completed metamorphosis by Day 28. In contrast, initiation of metamorphosis was delayed in the lower T4 concentration and none of the individuals completed metamorphosis by Day 28. We identified 402 genes that were statistically differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold between T4 treatments at one or more non-Day 0 sampling times. To complement this analysis, we used linear and quadratic regression to identify 542 and 709 genes that were differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold in the 5 and 50 nM T4 treatments, respectively. Conclusion We found that T4 concentration affected the timing of gene expression and the shape of temporal gene expression profiles. However, essentially all of the identified genes were similarly affected by 5 and 50 nM T4. We discuss genes and biological processes that appear to be common to salamander and anuran metamorphosis, and also highlight clear transcriptional differences. Our results show that gene expression in axolotls is diverse and precise, and that axolotls provide new insights about amphibian metamorphosis.

  16. Effect of thyroid hormone concentration on the transcriptional response underlying induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert B; Voss, Stephen R; Samuels, Amy K; Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Beachy, Christopher K

    2008-02-11

    Thyroid hormones (TH) induce gene expression programs that orchestrate amphibian metamorphosis. In contrast to anurans, many salamanders do not undergo metamorphosis in nature. However, they can be induced to undergo metamorphosis via exposure to thyroxine (T4). We induced metamorphosis in juvenile Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) using 5 and 50 nM T4, collected epidermal tissue from the head at four time points (Days 0, 2, 12, 28), and used microarray analysis to quantify mRNA abundances. Individuals reared in the higher T4 concentration initiated morphological and transcriptional changes earlier and completed metamorphosis by Day 28. In contrast, initiation of metamorphosis was delayed in the lower T4 concentration and none of the individuals completed metamorphosis by Day 28. We identified 402 genes that were statistically differentially expressed by > or = two-fold between T4 treatments at one or more non-Day 0 sampling times. To complement this analysis, we used linear and quadratic regression to identify 542 and 709 genes that were differentially expressed by > or = two-fold in the 5 and 50 nM T4 treatments, respectively. We found that T4 concentration affected the timing of gene expression and the shape of temporal gene expression profiles. However, essentially all of the identified genes were similarly affected by 5 and 50 nM T4. We discuss genes and biological processes that appear to be common to salamander and anuran metamorphosis, and also highlight clear transcriptional differences. Our results show that gene expression in axolotls is diverse and precise, and that axolotls provide new insights about amphibian metamorphosis.

  17. Distribution and responsiveness of rat anti-Muellerian hormone during ovarian development and VCD-induced ovotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark-Kappeler, Connie J.; Sen, Nivedita; Keating, Aileen F.; Sipes, I. Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-Muellerian hormone (AMH) is produced by granulosa cells in primary to small antral follicles of the adult ovary and helps maintain primordial follicles in a dormant state. The industrial chemical, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) causes specific ovotoxicity in primordial and small primary follicles of mice and rats. Previous studies suggest that this ovotoxicity involves acceleration of primordial to primary follicle recruitment via interactions with the Kit/Kit ligand signaling pathway. Because of its accepted role in inhibiting primordial follicle recruitment, the present study was designed to investigate a possible interaction between AMH and VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Protein distribution of AMH was compared in neonatal and adult F344 rat ovaries. AMH protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy in large primary and secondary follicles of the adult ovary, but in small primary follicles in neonatal rat ovaries. In cultured postnatal day (PND) 4 F344 rat ovaries, VCD exposure (30 μM, 2-8 days) decreased (P < 0.05) AMH mRNA (d4-8) and protein (d6-8). Recombinant AMH (100-400 mg/ml) in PND4 ovaries cultured 8 days ± VCD (30 μM) caused an increase (P < 0.05) in primordial, and a decrease (P < 0.05) in small primary follicles, supporting that AMH retarded primordial follicle recruitment. However, no concentration of AMH had an effect on VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Whereas, VCD caused a reduction in expression of AMH (d4-d8), it followed previously reported initial disruptions in Kit signaling induced by VCD (d2). Thus, collectively, these results do not support a mechanism whereby VCD causes ovotoxicity via generalized activation of primordial follicle recruitment, but instead provide further support for the specificity of other intracellular mechanisms involved in VCD-induced ovotoxicity.

  18. The repeated bout effect of typical lower body strength training sessions on sub-maximal running performance and hormonal response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Kenji; Schumann, Moritz; Sinclair, Wade H; Leicht, Anthony S; Deakin, Glen B; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of two typical strength training sessions performed 1 week apart (i.e. repeated bout effect) on sub-maximal running performance and hormonal. Fourteen resistance-untrained men (age 24.0 ± 3.9 years; height 1.83 ± 0.11 m; body mass 77.4 ± 14.0 kg; VOpeak 48.1 ± 6.1 M kg(-1) min(-1)) undertook two bouts of high-intensity strength training sessions (i.e. six-repetition maximum). Creatine kinase (CK), delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), counter-movement jump (CMJ) as well as concentrations of serum testosterone, cortisol and testosterone/cortisol ratio (T/C) were examined prior to and immediately post, 24 (T24) and 48 (T48) h post each strength training bout. Sub-maximal running performance was also conducted at T24 and T48 of each bout. When measures were compared between bouts at T48, the degree of elevation in CK (-58.4 ± 55.6 %) and DOMS (-31.43 ± 42.9 %) and acute reduction in CMJ measures (4.1 ± 5.4 %) were attenuated (p 0.05). Sub-maximal running performance was impaired until T24, although changes were not attenuated following the second bout. The initial bout appeared to provide protection against a number of muscle damage indicators suggesting a greater need for recovery following the initial session of typical lower body resistance exercises in resistance-untrained men although sub-maximal running should be avoided following the first two sessions.

  19. Energy Expenditure and Hormone Responses in Humans After Overeating High-Fructose Corn Syrup Versus Whole-Wheat Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mostafa; Bonfiglio, Susan; Schlögl, Mathias; Vinales, Karyne L; Piaggi, Paolo; Venti, Colleen; Walter, Mary; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the dietary source of carbohydrates, either high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or complex carbohydrates, affects energy expenditure (EE) measures, appetitive sensations, and hormones during 24 hours of overfeeding. Seventeen healthy participants with normal glucose regulation had 24-hour EE measures and fasting blood and 24-hour urine collection during four different 1-day diets, including an energy-balanced diet, fasting, and two 75% carbohydrate diets (5% fat) given at 200% of energy requirements with either HFCS or whole-wheat foods as the carbohydrate source. In eight volunteers, hunger was assessed with visual analog scales the morning after the diets. Compared with energy balance, 24-hour EE increased 12.8% ± 6.9% with carbohydrate overfeeding (P < 0.0001). No differences in 24-hour EE or macronutrient utilization were observed between the two high-carbohydrate diets; however, sleeping metabolic rate was higher after the HFCS diet (Δ = 35 ± 48 kcal [146 ± 200 kJ]; P = 0.01). Insulin, ghrelin, and triglycerides increased the morning after both overfeeding diets. Urinary cortisol concentrations (82.8 ± 35.9 vs. 107.6 ± 46.9 nmol/24 h; P = 0.01) and morning-after hunger scores (Δ = 2.4 ± 2.0 cm; P = 0.01) were higher with HFCS overfeeding. The dietary carbohydrate source while overeating did not affect 24-hour EE, but HFCS overconsumption may predispose individuals to further overeating due to increased glucocorticoid release and increased hunger the following morning. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Anorectic response to the trichothecene T-2 toxin correspond to plasma elevations of the satiety hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and peptide YY3-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Kun; Zhang, Hua; Yue, Jianming; Gu, Wei; Gu, Chao; Zhang, Haibin; Wu, Wenda

    2018-04-22

    T-2 toxin, a potent type A trichothecene mycotoxin, is produced by various Fusarium species and can negatively impact animal and human health. Although anorexia induction is a common hallmark of T-2 toxin-induced toxicity, the underlying mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and Peptide YY 3-36 (PYY 3-36 ) in anorexia induction by T-2 toxin. Elevations of plasma GIP and PYY 3-36 markedly corresponded to anorexia induction following oral exposure to T-2 toxin using a nocturnal mouse anorexia model. Direct administration of exogenous GIP and PYY 3-36 similarly induced anorectic responses. Furthermore, the GIP receptor antagonist Pro3GIP dose-dependently attenuated both GIP- and T-2 toxin-induced anorectic responses. Pretreatment with NPY2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 induced a dose-dependent attenuation of both PYY 3-36 - and T-2 toxin-induced anorectic responses. To summarize, these findings suggest that both GIP and PYY 3-36 might be critical mediators of anorexia induction by T-2 toxin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the importance of processing conditions, product thickness and egg addition for the glycaemic and hormonal responses to pasta: a comparison with bread made from 'pasta ingredients'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfeldt, Y; Björck, I; Hagander, B

    1991-10-01

    The importance of processing conditions, product thickness and effect of egg addition for the glycaemic and hormonal responses to pasta was studied. Healthy subjects were given test meals with an equivalent amount of available carbohydrate from extruded high-temperature dried spaghetti and three varieties of fresh roll-sheeted linguine (thick, thin, thin with egg) made from the same ingredients (durum wheat, water and monoglycerides). As a reference bread was baked from the same ingredients as in the pasta products. Glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels were measured over a 3 h period. Glycaemic, insulin and C-peptide indexes (GI, II, CI) were calculated using 120 min areas under the curves. Glycaemic index was also calculated using the 90 min area. Also studied were the rates of in vitro starch digestion. The four pasta products produced significantly lower peak values (glucose, insulin, C-peptide) and lower GI (90 min), II (120 min) and CI (120 min) than the corresponding bread. The rate of in vitro starch digestion in pasta was also slower than in bread. In contrast to the pasta products, bread resulted in a prominent hypoglycaemia in the late phase, that is a drop below fasting blood glucose level. Minor differences in metabolic responses also appeared in the pasta products. In particular, the insulin and C-peptide response to the thin linguine was accentuated in the phase around 120 min.

  2. Measurement of the incretin hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma concentrat......The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma...... concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP is often an important endpoint in both clinical and preclinical studies and, therefore, accurate measurement of these hormones is important. Here, we provide an overview of current approaches for the measurement of the incretin hormones, with particular focus on immunological...

  3. Anti-Mullerian hormone levels do not predict response to pulsatile GnRH in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Emma O; Corenblum, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Pulsatile GnRH is used to induce ovulation in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA), but tools to predict response are lacking. We assessed whether baseline AMH levels are associated with response to pulsatile GnRH in 16 women with HA. AMH levels were compared between non-responders and women who achieved follicular development or pregnancy. Median AMH for the cohort was 2.2 ng/mL. AMH levels were undetectable or low in four women, normal in nine and high in three. Follicular development was observed in 13 (81%) women (82% of cycles) and pregnancy achieved in 10 (63%) women (29% of cycles). All four women with low or undetectable AMH had follicular response and three achieved pregnancy. Of the 12 women with normal or high AMH, 10 had a follicular response and seven achieved pregnancy. Median AMH levels were comparable in those who achieved follicular development and those who did not (2.2 ng/mL versus 1.3 ng/mL, p = 0.78) and in those who became pregnant and those who did not (2.2 ng/mL versus 1.9 ng/mL, p = 0.52). In summary, low AMH does not preclude response to ovulation induction in women with HA, suggesting that ovarian potential may not be the primary determinant of AMH concentrations in this population.

  4. Responsiveness to Thyroid Hormone and to Ambient Temperature Underlies Differences Between Brown Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle Thermogenesis in a Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Cintia B.; Olivares, Emerson L.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone accelerates energy expenditure (EE) and is critical for cold-induced thermogenesis. To define the metabolic role played by thyroid hormone in the dissipation of calories from diet, hypothyroid mice were studied for 60 d in a comprehensive lab animal monitoring system. Hypothyroidism decreased caloric intake and body fat while down-regulating genes in the skeletal muscle but not brown adipose tissue thermogenic programs, without affecting daily EE. Only at thermoneutrality (30 C) did hypothyroid mice exhibit slower rate of EE, indicating a metabolic response to hypothyroidism that depends on ambient temperature. A byproduct of this mechanism is that at room temperature (22 C), hypothyroid mice are protected against diet-induced obesity, i.e. only at thermoneutrality did hypothyroid mice become obese when placed on a high-fat diet (HFD). This is in contrast to euthyroid controls, which on a HFD gained more body weight and fat at any temperature while activating the brown adipose tissue and accelerating daily EE but not the skeletal muscle thermogenic program. In the liver of euthyroid controls, HFD caused an approximately 5-fold increase in triglyceride content and expression of key metabolic genes, whereas acclimatization to 30 C cut triglyceride content by half and normalized gene expression. However, in hypothyroid mice, HFD-induced changes in liver persisted at 30 C, resulting in marked liver steatosis. Acclimatization to thermoneutrality dramatically improves glucose homeostasis, but this was not affected by hypothyroidism. In conclusion, hypothyroid mice are metabolically sensitive to environmental temperature, constituting a mechanism that defines resistance to diet-induced obesity and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:21771890

  5. Stress hormone release is a key component of the metabolic response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS): studies in hypopituitary and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Ermina; Møller, Andreas Buch; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) generates acute and chronic inflammatory and metabolic responses during acute illness and in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but it is unclear whether these responses depend on intact pituitary release...... but not in HP. LPS increased whole body palmitate fluxes (3-fold) and decreased palmitate specific activity 40-50 % in CTR, but not in HP. G(0)/G(1) Switch Gene 2 (G0S2 - an inhibitor of lipolysis) adipose tissue mRNA was decreased in CTR. LPS increased phenylalanine fluxes significantly more in CTR, whereas...

  6. Fructose intervention for 12 weeks does not impair glycemic control or incretin hormone responses during oral glucose or mixed meal tests in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, N; Söderlund, S; Björnson, E; Bogl, L H; Pietiläinen, K H; Hakkarainen, A; Lundbom, N; Eliasson, B; Räsänen, S M; Rivellese, A; Patti, L; Prinster, A; Riccardi, G; Després, J-P; Alméras, N; Holst, J J; Deacon, C F; Borén, J; Taskinen, M-R

    2017-06-01

    Incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are affected early on in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies consistently link high fructose consumption to insulin resistance but whether fructose consumption impairs the incretin response remains unknown. As many as 66 obese (BMI 26-40 kg/m 2 ) male subjects consumed fructose-sweetened beverages containing 75 g fructose/day for 12 weeks while continuing their usual lifestyle. Glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP were measured during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and triglycerides (TG), GLP-1, GIP and PYY during a mixed meal test before and after fructose intervention. Fructose intervention did not worsen glucose and insulin responses during OGTT, and GLP-1 and GIP responses during OGTT and fat-rich meal were unchanged. Postprandial TG response increased significantly, p = 0.004, and we observed small but significant increases in weight and liver fat content, but not in visceral or subcutaneous fat depots. However, even the subgroups who gained weight or liver fat during fructose intervention did not worsen their glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or PYY responses. A minor increase in GIP response during OGTT occurred in subjects who gained liver fat (p = 0.049). In obese males with features of metabolic syndrome, 12 weeks fructose intervention 75 g/day did not change glucose, insulin, GLP-1 or GIP responses during OGTT or GLP-1, GIP or PYY responses during a mixed meal. Therefore, fructose intake, even accompanied with mild weight gain, increases in liver fat and worsening of postprandial TG profile, does not impair glucose tolerance or gut incretin response to oral glucose or mixed meal challenge. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University

  7. Effects of different fractions of whey protein on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, L.S.; Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Hartvigsen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives:Exacerbated postprandial lipid responses are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Dietary proteins influence postprandial lipemia differently, and whey protein has a preferential lipid-lowering effect. We compared the effects of different whey protein fractions .......European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 May 2012; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.48....

  8. Prolonged Growth Hormone/Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor Nutrient Response Signaling Pathway as a Silent Killer of Stem Cells and a Culprit in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Bartke, Andrzej; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2017-08-01

    The dream of slowing down the aging process has always inspired mankind. Since stem cells are responsible for tissue and organ rejuvenation, it is logical that we should search for encoded mechanisms affecting life span in these cells. However, in adult life the hierarchy within the stem cell compartment is still not very well defined, and evidence has accumulated that adult tissues contain rare stem cells that possess a broad trans-germ layer differentiation potential. These most-primitive stem cells-those endowed with pluripotent or multipotent differentiation ability and that give rise to other cells more restricted in differentiation, known as tissue-committed stem cells (TCSCs) - are of particular interest. In this review we present the concept supported by accumulating evidence that a population of so-called very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) residing in adult tissues positively impacts the overall survival of mammals, including humans. These unique cells are prevented in vertebrates from premature depletion by decreased sensitivity to growth hormone (GH), insulin (INS), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling, due to epigenetic changes in paternally imprinted genes that regulate their resistance to these factors. In this context, we can envision nutrient response GH/INS/IGF signaling pathway as a lethal factor for these most primitive stem cells and an important culprit in aging.

  9. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Treatment Impact on Response to Growth Hormone Therapy: Results from the ANSWER Program, a Non-Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susan R; Reeves, Grafton; Gut, Robert; Germak, John

    2015-12-01

    To examine whether attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant medication modified the linear growth response to growth hormone (GH) treatment in children enrolled in the American Norditropin Studies: Web-Enabled Research Program. Short, GH treatment-naive children with or without GH deficiency (GHD) received GH therapy. A subset also received ADHD stimulant medication (n = 1190), and others did not (n = 7230). Linear mixed models (adjusted means) examined height SDS (HSDS) and body mass index (BMI) SDS from baseline through year 4. Analyses were repeated with ADHD groups matched for baseline age, height, weight, BMI, and sex. Groups with and without GHD were compared between ADHD groups. Adjusted change in HSDS for the group receiving ADHD stimulant medication was slightly lower than that for patients not receiving stimulant medication at years 1 to 4 (P -2. Year 4 adjusted change in BMI SDS was greater in the patients receiving ADHD stimulant medication compared with both groups not receiving ADHD stimulant medication (P growth response of children treated with GH when those receiving or not receiving ADHD stimulant medication were matched for baseline measurements. Underlying reasons for the observed greater increase in BMI in patients with GHD concomitantly treated with ADHD medication remain to be elucidated. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01009905. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incretin hormones as a target for therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously.......Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously....

  11. Respostas hormonais agudas a diferentes intensidades de exercícios resistidos em mulheres idosas Acute hormonal responses to different intensities of resistance exercises in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jacó de Oliveira

    2008-08-01

    to minimize muscle mass and strength decline observed with advancing age, however, its acute hormonal responses need to be better characterized. The purposes of the present study were characterize and compare the acute hormonal responses to different resistance exercises intensities performed by older women. Sample was composed by 15 women with a mean age of 67,5 years, who performed, in a randomized order, three visits at the laboratory: 1 resistance exercises performed at 50% of 1-RM (G50; 2 resistance exercises performed at 80% of 1-RM (G80 and 3 control session (GC. Blood samples were taken immediately before and after (T0 and T1, respectively each session, as well as three and 48 hour after (T2 and T3, respectively, for subsequent hormonal analyses by the enzyme immunoassay chemiluminescent method. ANOVA and ANCOVA were used, respectively, to examine intra and inter sessions differences. No significant differences were observed between sessions for any of the evaluated hormone. In T2, cortisol concentrations were significantly reduced when compared to T0 for the three examined sessions, while testosterone was reduced after (T2 GC. Only G80 elicited a significant transient elevation in testosterone/cortisol ratio and none of the sessions provoked alterations on serum GH concentrations. It's concluded that resistance exercises performed at 50% or 80% of 1-RM do not acutely induce significant elevation of cortisol, testosterone or GH in the studied population. On the other hand, the session performed at 80% of 1-RM promoted significant elevations on the testosterone/cortisol ratio three hours post exercises when compared to basal values, in older women.

  12. Increased Postprandial GIP and Glucagon Responses, But Unaltered GLP-1 Response after Intervention with Steroid Hormone, Relative Physical Inactivity, And High-Calorie Diet in Healthy Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine B; Vilsbøll, Tina; Bagger, Jonatan I

    2011-01-01

    Objective:Increased postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon responses and reduced postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) responses have been observed in some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The causality of these pathophysiological traits...... postprandial GLP-1 responses as observed in some individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus....... is unknown. We aimed to determine the impact of insulin resistance and reduced glucose tolerance on postprandial GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon responses in healthy subjects. Research Design and Methods:A 4-h 2200 KJ-liquid meal test was performed in 10 healthy Caucasian males without family history of diabetes...

  13. Variation in the biochemical response to l-thyroxine therapy and relationship with peripheral thyroid hormone conversion efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Midgley, John E M; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W; Hoermann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Several influences modulate biochemical responses to a weight-adjusted levothyroxine (l-T4) replacement dose. We conducted a secondary analysis of the relationship of l-T4 dose to TSH and free T3 (FT3), using a prospective observational study examining the interacting equilibria between thyroid parameters. We studied 353 patients on steady-state l-T4 replacement for autoimmune thyroiditis or after surgery for malignant or benign thyroid disease. Peripheral deiodinase activity was calculated a...

  14. Effect of two phyto hormone producer rhizobacteria on the bermuda grass growth response and tolerance to phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Zuniga, A.; Rojas-Contreras, A.; Rodriguez-Dorantes, A.; Montes-Villafan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are free-living bacteria that have the ability to relieve environmental stress in plants, increasing the plant growth potential. Of importance to phytoremediation, PGPR stimulate plant root development and enhance root growth.This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to phenanthrene of Bermuda grass: Cynodon dactylon inoculated with two phytohormone producer rhizobacteria: strains II and III, isolated from a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons. (Author)

  15. Effect of two phyto hormone producer rhizobacteria on the bermuda grass growth response and tolerance to phenanthrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Zuniga, A.; Rojas-Contreras, A.; Rodriguez-Dorantes, A.; Montes-Villafan, S.

    2009-07-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are free-living bacteria that have the ability to relieve environmental stress in plants, increasing the plant growth potential. Of importance to phytoremediation, PGPR stimulate plant root development and enhance root growth.This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to phenanthrene of Bermuda grass: Cynodon dactylon inoculated with two phytohormone producer rhizobacteria: strains II and III, isolated from a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons. (Author)

  16. Histamine-induced paradoxical GH response to TRH/GnRH in men and women: dependence on gonadal steroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Thuesen, B; Dejgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    .025), but not during the early follicular phase of the cycle (GH peak: 1.7 +/- 0.5 vs 1.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/l). In luteal-phase women the GH response to TRH/GnRH correlated with the serum estradiol-17 beta level (GH area/E2: r = 0.98; p less than 0.005) and the serum estrone level (GH area/E1: r = 0.81; p less than 0...

  17. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    regulation in a captive dolphin population PI: Cory Champagne This project examines roles of CBG and rT3 in the sister study on the Navy captive...bottlenose dolphin population. Molecular indicators of chronic stress in a model pinniped - the northern elephant seal. PI: Cory Champagne This...Khudyakov J.I., C.D. Champagne , L. Preeyanon, R.M. Ortiz, D.E. Crocker. 2015. Muscle transcriptome response to ACTH administration in a free-ranging

  18. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...... has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens....

  19. Concentrations of steroid hormones, estrous, ovarian and reproductive responses in sheep estrous synchronized with different prostaglandin-based protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, S; Viñoles, C; Olivera-Muzante, J

    2016-04-01

    To determine estrous, ovarian and reproductive responses after different prostaglandin (PG)-based protocols, ewes were assigned to groups PG10, PG12, PG14 or PG16 (twoPG injections administered 10, 12, 14 or 16 days apart; respectively). Experiment I (n=132) was conducted to evaluate the estrous response, ovulation rate (OR), conception and fertility. Experiment II (n=24) was conducted to evaluate ovarian follicle growth, steroid concentrations and the interval from the second PG injection to estrus (PG-estrus) and ovulation (PG-ovulation). Estrous response was less with the PG16 (P0.05). From 8 to 4 days before estrus, progesterone (P4) concentrations were greater for the PG14 and PG16 than for the PG10 and PG12 (P<0.05) groups. There were more days where concentrations of P4 were above 3.18 nmol/L with the PG14 and PG16 than PG10 and PG12 (P<0.05) treatments. Use of the PG14 and PG16 treatments resulted in greater estradiol (E2) at estrus and 12h later than use of the PG10 and PG12 treatments. A positive correlation was observed between the duration of the luteal phase and maximum E2 concentrations, and between duration of the luteal phase and days with E2 concentrations above 10 pmol/L. Conception and fertility were greater with use of the PG14 compared with PG10 and PG12 (P<0.05) treatments. The administration of two PG injections 10, 12, 14 or 16 days apart resulted in different durations of the luteal phase that were positively associated with E2 concentrations and the reproductive outcome. The shorter luteal phases were associated with greater synchrony in time of estrus. The intervals for the variables PG-estrus, PG-ovulation and OR were similar among groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young C.; Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S.; Park, Jae H.; Kim, Sung Y.

    2007-01-01

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards

  1. The effect of training on responses of beta-endorphin and other pituitary hormones to insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Kjær, Michael; Hagen, C

    1985-01-01

    in untrained (25 +/- 6 mU X l-1) subjects (P less than 0.05). Levels of thyrotropin (TSH) changed in neither of the groups. It is concluded that, in contrast to what has been formerly proposed, training does not result in a general increase in secretory capacity of the anterior pituitary gland. TSH responds......We studied whether the previously reported intensified beta-endorphin response to exercise after training might result from a training-induced general increase in anterior pituitary secretory capacity. Identical hypoglycemia was induced by insulin infusion in 7 untrained (VO2max 49 +/- 4 ml X (kg X...

  2. No effects of acclimation to heat on immune and hormonal responses to passive heating in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Heat acclimation results in whole body-adaptations that increase heat tolerance, and might also result in changed immune responses. We hypothesized that, after heat acclimation, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 and the lymphocyte count would be altered. Heat acclimation was induced in 6 healthy men by 100 min of heat exposure for 9 days. Heat exposure consisted of (1) 10 min of immersion up to chest-level in water at 42°C and (2) 90 min of passive heating by a warm blanket to maintain tympanic temperature at 37.5°C. The climatic chamber was maintained at 40°C and a relative humidity of 50%. Blood samples were analyzed before and after heat acclimation for natural killer (NK) cell activity, counts of lymphocytes B and T, before and after heat acclimation for peripheral blood morphology, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and cortisol. A Japanese version of the profile of mood states questionnaire was also administered before and after acclimation. The concentrations of white blood cells, lymphocytes B and T, cortisol, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha and NK cell activity showed no significant differences between pre- and post-acclimation, but there was a significantly lower platelet count after acclimation and, with the profile of mood states questionnaire, there was a significant rise in anger after acclimation. It is concluded that heat acclimation by passive heating does not induce alterations in immune or endocrine responses.

  3. GH Responsiveness to Combined GH-Releasing Hormone and Arginine Administration in Obese Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello E. Rigamonti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportedly, fibromyalgia (FM is frequently associated with reduced IGF-1 levels and GH hyporesponsiveness to different GH stimulation tests. Since there is a high prevalence of obesity in FM, and obesity itself is characterized by hyposomatotropism, the aim of this study was to assess IGF-1 levels and GH responsiveness in sixteen severely obese women suffering from FM, who, subdivided into two subgroups on the basis of their age-dependent IGF-1 values (> or <−2 SDS, underwent the combined GHRH plus arginine test. Four out of 16 obese women with FM (25% had low IGF-1 SDS values, 2 cases of this subgroup (12.5% failing also to normally respond to the test. Among patients with normal GH responses, 4 showed a delayed GH peak. The subgroup with low IGF-1 SDS values had higher BMI than that with normal IGF-1 SDS. GH peak and area under the curve were not correlated with CRP, ESR, or tender point score, while significant correlations were found with fat-free mass and fat mass. In conclusion, this study shows the existence of a high prevalence of GH-IGF-1 dysfunction in patients with both FM and obesity, presumably as a consequence of the obese rather than fibromyalgic condition.

  4. Interactions between hormones and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubøll, Erik; Sveberg, Line; Svalheim, Sigrid

    2015-05-01

    There is a complex, bidirectional interdependence between sex steroid hormones and epilepsy; hormones affect seizures, while seizures affect hormones thereby disturbing reproductive endocrine function. Both female and male sex steroid hormones influence brain excitability. For the female sex steroid hormones, progesterone and its metabolites are anticonvulsant, while estrogens are mainly proconvulsant. The monthly fluctuations in hormone levels of estrogen and progesterone are the basis for catamenial epilepsy described elsewhere in this issue. Androgens are mainly anticonvulsant, but the effects are more varied, probably because of its metabolism to, among others, estradiol. The mechanisms for the effects of sex steroid hormones on brain excitability are related to both classical, intracellularly mediated effects, and non-classical membrane effects due to binding to membrane receptors. The latter are considered the most important in relation to epilepsy. The different sex steroids can also be further metabolized within the brain to different neurosteroids, which are even more potent with regard to their effect on excitability. Estrogens potentiate glutamate responses, primarily by potentiating NMDA receptor activity, but also by affecting GABA-ergic mechanisms and altering brain morphology by increasing dendritic spine density. Progesterone and its main metabolite 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α-5α-THP) act mainly to enhance postsynaptic GABA-ergic activity, while androgens enhance GABA-activated currents. Seizures and epileptic discharges also affect sex steroid hormones. There are close anatomical connections between the temporolimbic system and the hypothalamus controlling the endocrine system. Several studies have shown that epileptic activity, especially mediated through the amygdala, alters reproductive function, including reduced ovarian cyclicity in females and altered sex steroid hormone levels in both genders. Furthermore, there is an asymmetric

  5. Hormonal, Metabolic and Cardiorespiratory Responses of Young and Adult Athletes to a Single Session of High Intensity Cycle Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Florian; Härtel, Sascha; Wagner, Matthias Oliver; Strahler, Jana; Bös, Klaus; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a single High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) session on salivary cortisol (SC) levels, physiological responses and performance in trained boys and men. Twenty-three boys (11.5±0.8 years) and 25 men (29.7±4.6 years) performed HIIT (four consecutive Wingate Anaerobic Tests). SC in boys and men increased after HIIT from 5.55±3.3 nmol/l to 15.13±9.7 nmol/l (+173%) and from 7.07±4.7 nmol/l to 19.19±12.7 nmol/l (+171%), respectively (p

  6. Effects of sitagliptin and metformin treatment on incretin hormone and insulin secretory responses to oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardarli, Irfan; Arndt, Elisabeth; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    ,000 mg/day), sitagliptin (100 mg/day), or their combination, on GLP-1 responses and on the incretin effect in 20 patients with type 2 diabetes, comparing an oral glucose challenge (75 g, day 5) and an "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose infusion (day 6). Fasting total GLP-1 was significantly increased...... by metformin and not changed by sitagliptin. After oral glucose, metformin increased and sitagliptin significantly decreased (by 53%) total GLP-1. Fasting and postload intact GLP-1 increased with sitagliptin but not with metformin. After oral glucose, only sitagliptin, but not metformin, significantly...... the numerical contribution of the incretin effect. Insulin secretion with sitagliptin treatment was similarly stimulated with oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose. This points to an important contribution of small changes in incretin concentrations within the basal range or to additional insulinotropic...

  7. GH Responsiveness to Combined GH-Releasing Hormone and Arginine Administration in Obese Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, Antonello E; Grugni, Graziano; Arreghini, Marco; Capodaglio, Paolo; De Col, Alessandra; Agosti, Fiorenza; Sartorio, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Reportedly, fibromyalgia (FM) is frequently associated with reduced IGF-1 levels and GH hyporesponsiveness to different GH stimulation tests. Since there is a high prevalence of obesity in FM, and obesity itself is characterized by hyposomatotropism, the aim of this study was to assess IGF-1 levels and GH responsiveness in sixteen severely obese women suffering from FM, who, subdivided into two subgroups on the basis of their age-dependent IGF-1 values (> or BMI than that with normal IGF-1 SDS. GH peak and area under the curve were not correlated with CRP, ESR, or tender point score, while significant correlations were found with fat-free mass and fat mass. In conclusion, this study shows the existence of a high prevalence of GH-IGF-1 dysfunction in patients with both FM and obesity, presumably as a consequence of the obese rather than fibromyalgic condition.

  8. Effects of gender, body weight, and blood glucose dynamics on the growth hormone response to the glucagon stimulation test in patients with pituitary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica R; Utz, Andrea L; Devin, Jessica K

    2016-02-01

    Body weight blunts the growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli. The appropriate GH cut-off to confirm GH deficiency in obese and overweight patients undergoing the glucagon stimulation test (GST) has recently been questioned. We hypothesized that the peak GH would be inversely related to the nadir blood glucose (BG) after glucagon and that this may be a mechanism influencing peak GH in overweight patients. This retrospective study examined effects of gender, body weight, and BG dynamics on GH response to GST in patients evaluated in our Pituitary Center. Adult patients who underwent GST from September 2009-2014 were included. Continuous variable comparisons were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and categorical data by Fisher's Exact Test. Spearman correlation was used to determine associations between continuous variables. 42 patients (N=28, 66.7% female) had sufficient data for analysis. Obese patients (N=26) had a reduced GH response, summarized as GH area under the curve (AUC) (p=0.03 vs. non-obese patients) and higher BG during GST, summarized as AUC (pAUC (rs=-0.45; p=0.01), peak GH response (rs=-0.42; p=0.02) and nadir BG (rs=0.48; pAUC (rs=-0.38; p=0.03) and peak GH (rs=-0.37; p=0.04) such that patients (N=32) with higher nadir BG had lower peak GH in response to glucagon. Obese patients, particularly women, do not respond as robustly to glucagon stimulation. These data suggest that there exists an altered BG profile during GST in obese individuals, and that a less robust hypoglycemic stimulus may contribute to an impaired GH response. We suggest measuring BG levels during glucagon stimulation testing to assist with clinical interpretation of GH dynamics. The diagnostic accuracy of the GST in patients with known disorders in glucose metabolism and those taking anti-diabetic medications deserves further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plant hormones in defense response of Brassica napus to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum - reassessing the role of salicylic acid in the interaction with a necrotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Miroslava; Sašek, Vladimír; Dobrev, Petre I; Valentová, Olga; Burketová, Lenka

    2014-07-01

    According to general model, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are induced in Arabidopsis after an attack of necrotroph, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) also seem to play a role. While signaling events in Arabidopsis have been intensively studied recently, information for the natural host Brassica napus is limited. In this study, multiple plant hormone quantification and expression analysis of marker genes of the signaling pathways was used to gain a complete view of the interaction of B. napus with S. sclerotiorum. Strong response of ET biosynthetic gene ACS2 was observed, accompanied by increases of SA and JA levels that correspond to the elevated expression of marker genes PR1 and LOX3. Interestingly, the level of ABA and the expression of its marker gene RD26 were also elevated. Furthermore, induction of the SA-dependent defense decreased disease symptoms. In addition, SA signaling is suggested as a possible target for manipulation by S. sclerotiorum. A gene for putative chorismate mutase SS1G_14320 was identified that is highly expressed during infection but not in vitro. Our results bring the evidence of SA involvement in the interaction of plant with the necrotroph that conflict with the current model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pre-treatment growth and IGF-I deficiency as main predictors of response to growth hormone therapy in neural models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Smyczyn´ska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models have been applied in prediction of growth hormone treatment effectiveness in children since the end of 1990s. Usually they were multiple linear regression models; however, there are also examples derived by empirical non-linear methods. Proposed solution consists in application of machine learning technique – artificial neural networks – to analyse this problem. This new methodology, contrary to previous ones, allows detection of both linear and non-linear dependencies without assuming their character a priori. The aims of this work included: development of models predicting separately growth during 1st year of treatment and final height as well as identification of important predictors and in-depth analysis of their influence on treatment’s effectiveness. The models were derived on the basis of clinical data of 272 patients treated for at least 1 year, 133 of whom have already attained final height. Starting from models containing 17 and 20 potential predictors, respectively for 1st year and final height model, we were able to reduce their number to 9 and 10. Basing on the final models, IGF-I concentration and earlier growth were indicated as belonging to most important predictors of response to GH therapy, while results of GH secretion tests were automatically excluded as insignificant. Moreover, majority of the dependencies were observed to be non-linear, thus using neural networks seems to be reasonable approach despite it being more complex than previously applied methods.

  11. Nutrition-dependent fertility response to juvenile hormone in non-social Euodynerus foraminatus wasps and the evolutionary origin of sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Elizabeth A; Mettler, Alexander; Donajkowski, Kellie

    2013-03-01

    The reproductive ground plan hypothesis (RGPH) proposes that the ovarian cycle in solitary insects provides the basis for social evolution, so similar mechanisms are predicted to influence reproductive plasticity in social and solitary species. Specifically, reproductive plasticity in social species originated via modification of nutrition-dependent fertility response to juvenile hormone (JH) in solitary insects. Testing this prediction requires information about the factors that influence fertility in non-social relatives of the eusocial hymenoptera. However, no previous studies have examined how JH or nutritional condition influence fertility in Eumenines, the non-social group most closely related to social wasps. Here, we find support for the RGPH, as JH increases Euodynerus foraminatus fertility. Fertility is also condition-dependent, as heavy E. foraminatus are more fertile than light E. foraminatus. In addition, we measure the factors associated with mating success in E. foraminatus, finding that multiple factors influence mating success, including male weight, male mating experience, and female age. There is also higher variance in male than female reproductive success, suggesting that males may experience substantial sexual selection in this species. Overall, the relationships between JH, body weight, and fertility in E. foraminatus support the RGPH for the origin of sociality by demonstrating that there are strong parallels in the mechanisms that mediate fertility of social and non-social wasps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pairing mechanism in oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A useful way to learn about the pairing mechanism that is responsible for high T c superconductivity is to study properties of model Hamiltonians on small systems. The goal is to find the simplest model that can describe the essential physics of high T c superconductivity. The authors have used Monte Carlo simulation and exact diagonalization techniques to study properties of systems of up to 64 sites. Their results show that spin fluctuations and other spin related mechanisms induced by a Hubbard on-site repulsion U are not likely to give rise to pairing, neither in one nor in multiple band models. In contrast, charge fluctuations in a model with both strong U and V (repulsion between Cu and O) are shown to give rise to pairing and it is suggested that this model provides a plausible mechanism for high T c superconductivity

  13. The structural basis of gas-responsive transcription by the human nuclear hormone receptor REV-ERBbeta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith I Pardee

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR REV-ERBalpha and REV-ERBbeta, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO, and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. A 1.9 A crystal structure of the REV-ERBbeta LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBbeta complex reveal that the Fe(II form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions.

  14. The Structural Basis of Gas-Responsive Transcription by the Human Nuclear Hormone Receptor REV-ERBβ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith I; Xu, Xiaohui; Reinking, Jeff; Schuetz, Anja; Dong, Aiping; Liu, Suya; Zhang, Rongguang; Tiefenbach, Jens; Lajoie, Gilles; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Botchkarev, Alexey; Krause, Henry M; Edwards, Aled

    2009-01-01

    Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR) REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO), and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). A 1.9 Å crystal structure of the REV-ERBβ LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III) form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBβ complex reveal that the Fe(II) form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II) LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions. PMID:19243223

  15. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome: A sensitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Growth Hormone Insensitivity have characteristic phenotypic features and severe short stature. The underlying basis are mutations in the growth hormone receptor gene which gives rise to a characteristic hormonal profile. Although a scoring system has been devised for the diagnosis of this disorder, it has not been indisputably validated. The massive expense incurred in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition with suboptimal therapeutic response necessitates a judicious approach in this regard in our country.

  16. Effects of preoperative carprofen on cardio-respiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response in calves during umbilical surgery under isoflurane inhalation anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, I; Poos, E M; Meyer, H; List, A K; Kaestner, S B R; Rehage, J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of preoperative carprofen on the cardiorespiratory, hormonal and metabolic stress response during umbilical surgery under isoflurane anaesthesia combined with local anaesthesia, in calves. A randomised, blinded experimental study was conducted in 24 calves. Carprofen (n = 12; 1.4 mg/kg) or physiological saline solution (controls; n = 12) was administered 1 h prior to surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with xylazine (0.1 mg/kg, IM) and, after the onset of sedation (i.e. after 5-8 min), ketamine was administered (2 mg/kg, IV). Anaesthesia was then maintained with isoflurane (ISO) in oxygen to effect and completed by infiltration of the incision line with 20 mL of 2% procaine. Cardiorespiratory, endocrine and metabolic parameters were examined before, during and after surgery at short intervals. In both groups, anaesthesia appeared adequate for the surgical intervention. Heart rate, stroke index and arterial blood pressure were significantly elevated after the onset of surgery. Oxygen partial pressure and oxygen delivery increased, while the oxygen extraction ratio decreased intraoperatively, ensuring sufficient oxygen supply. In the control group, the mean surge in serum cortisol concentrations tended to be higher (P = 0.089) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was significantly greater (P carprofen group during surgery. In conclusion, the anaesthetic protocol used in this study induced reliable analgesia in both groups. The lower serum cortisol levels and SVR may indicate a reduced surgical stress response in calves undergoing umbilical surgery under ISO anaesthesia after administering carprofen preoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptomics-based identification of WRKY genes and characterization of a salt and hormone-responsive PgWRKY1 gene in Panax ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Cao, Hongzhe; Xiu, Hao; Luo, Tiao; Li, Jijia; Chen, Xianghui; Luo, Junli; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    WRKY proteins belong to a transcription factor (TF) family and play dynamic roles in many plant processes, including plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as secondary metabolism. However, no WRKY gene in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer has been reported to date. In this study, a number of WRKY unigenes from methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-treated adventitious root transcriptome of this species were identified using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 48 promising WRKY unigenes encoding WRKY proteins were obtained by eliminating wrong and incomplete open reading frame (ORF). Phylogenetic analysis reveals 48 WRKY TFs, including 11 Group I, 36 Group II, and 1 Group III. Moreover, one MeJA-responsive unigene designated as PgWRKY1 was cloned and characterized. It contains an entire ORF of 1077 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 358 amino acid residues. The PgWRKY1 protein contains a single WRKY domain consisting of a conserved amino acid sequence motif WRKYGQK and a C2H2-type zinc-finger motif belonging to WRKY subgroup II-d. Subcellular localization of PgWRKY1-GFP fusion protein in onion and tobacco epidermis cells revealed that PgWRKY1 was exclusively present in the nucleus. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the expression of PgWRKY1 was relatively higher in roots and lateral roots compared with leaves, stems, and seeds. Importantly, PgWRKY1 expression was significantly induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and NaCl, but downregulated by MeJA treatment. These results suggested that PgWRKY1 might be a multiple stress-inducible gene responding to hormones and salt stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Effect of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphism on high density lipoprotein levels in response to hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nogueira-de-Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that estrogen replacement therapy and estrogen plus progestin replacement therapy alter serum levels of total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. However, HDL cholesterol levels in women vary considerably in response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT. A significant portion of the variability of these levels has been attributed to genetic factors. Therefore, we investigated the influence of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphisms on HDL levels in response to postmenopausal HRT. We performed a prospective cohort study on 54 postmenopausal women who had not used HRT before the study and had no significant general medical illness. HRT consisted of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate continuously for 1 year. The lipoprotein levels were measured from blood samples taken before the start of therapy and after 1 year of HRT. ESR1 polymorphism (MspI C>T, HaeIII C>T, PvuII C>T, and XbaI A>G frequencies were assayed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A general linear model was used to describe the relationships between HDL levels and genotypes after adjusting for age. A significant increase in HDL levels was observed after HRT (P = 0.029. Women with the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype showed a statistically significant increase in HDL levels after HRT (P = 0.032. No association was found between other ESR1 polymorphisms and HDL levels. According to our results, the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype was associated with increased levels of HDL after 1 year of HRT.

  19. Genome Wide Identification of LIM Genes in Cicer arietinum and Response of Ca-2LIMs in Development, Hormone and Pathogenic Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Srivastava

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic lineage-specific LIM protein (LIN11, ISL1, and MEC3 family play pivotal role in modulation of actin dynamics and transcriptional regulation. The systematic investigation of this family has not been carried in detail and rare in legumes. Current study involves the mining of Cicer arietinum genome for the genes coding for LIM domain proteins and displayed significant homology with LIM genes of other species. The analysis led to the identification of 15 members, which were positioned on chickpea chromosomes. The phylogenetic and motif analysis suggested their categorization into two sub-families i.e., Ca-2LIMs and Ca-DA1/DAR, which comprised of nine and six candidates, respectively. Further sub-categories of Ca-2LIMs were recognised as αLIM, βLIM, δLIM and γLIM. The LIM genes within their sub-families displayed conserved genomic and motif organization. The expression pattern of Ca-2LIMs across developmental and reproductive tissues demonstrated strong correlation with established consensus. The Ca-2LIM belongs to PLIM and GLIM (XLIM was found highly expressed in floral tissue. Others showed ubiquitous expression pattern with their dominance in stem. Under hormonal and pathogenic conditions these LIMs were found to up-regulate during salicylic acid, abscisic acid and Ascochyta rabiei treatment or infection; and down-regulated in response to jasmonic acid treatment. The findings of this work, particularly in terms of modulation of LIM genes under biotic stress will open up the way to further explore and establish the role of chickpea LIMs in plant defense response.

  20. Genome Wide Identification of LIM Genes in Cicer arietinum and Response of Ca-2LIMs in Development, Hormone and Pathogenic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vikas; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic lineage-specific LIM protein (LIN11, ISL1, and MEC3) family play pivotal role in modulation of actin dynamics and transcriptional regulation. The systematic investigation of this family has not been carried in detail and rare in legumes. Current study involves the mining of Cicer arietinum genome for the genes coding for LIM domain proteins and displayed significant homology with LIM genes of other species. The analysis led to the identification of 15 members, which were positioned on chickpea chromosomes. The phylogenetic and motif analysis suggested their categorization into two sub-families i.e., Ca-2LIMs and Ca-DA1/DAR, which comprised of nine and six candidates, respectively. Further sub-categories of Ca-2LIMs were recognised as αLIM, βLIM, δLIM and γLIM. The LIM genes within their sub-families displayed conserved genomic and motif organization. The expression pattern of Ca-2LIMs across developmental and reproductive tissues demonstrated strong correlation with established consensus. The Ca-2LIM belongs to PLIM and GLIM (XLIM) was found highly expressed in floral tissue. Others showed ubiquitous expression pattern with their dominance in stem. Under hormonal and pathogenic conditions these LIMs were found to up-regulate during salicylic acid, abscisic acid and Ascochyta rabiei treatment or infection; and down-regulated in response to jasmonic acid treatment. The findings of this work, particularly in terms of modulation of LIM genes under biotic stress will open up the way to further explore and establish the role of chickpea LIMs in plant defense response. PMID:26418014

  1. Response of lactating dairy cows with or without purulent vaginal discharge to gonadotropin-releasing hormone and prostaglandin F2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelz, B E; Rocha, L; Scortegagna, F; Stevenson, J S; Mendonça, L G D

    2018-02-15

    Purulent vaginal discharge (PVD) is a common uterine disease in dairy cattle that has negative effects on reproductive performance. Reproductive management programs that synchronize ovulation use gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) to induce ovulation and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) to induce luteolysis. The objectives of this study were to evaluate ovarian response to treatment with GnRH and the odds of bearing a corpus luteum or being inseminated in dairy cows with or without PVD. Another objective was to determine the hazard of insemination after administration of PGF2α in dairy cows with or without PVD. Primiparous (n = 291) and multiparous (n = 402) cows were evaluated for PVD using a Metricheck device at 46 ± 3 and 35 ± 3 days in milk (DIM) (study day 0), respectively. On study day 14, primiparous (n = 107) and multiparous (n = 197) cows were treated with GnRH and subsequent ovulation was recorded. Primiparous (n = 178) and multiparous (n = 368) cows not inseminated by study day 21 were administered PGF2α and response to PGF2α treatment was determined by detection of estrus. Furthermore, cows were categorized by the presence of a CL or being inseminated by study days 14, 21, and 35. Overall prevalence of PVD was 28.5% and 13.4% for primiparous and multiparous cows, respectively. Projected 305-d milk yield was less (P PVD+ multiparous cows compared with PVD- multiparous cows, however, no (P = 0.26) difference was detected between primiparous PVD+ and PVD- cows. Ovulatory response to GnRH treatment was 51.8% and 47.8% for primiparous and multiparous cows, respectively. Primiparous PVD- cows tended (P = 0.06) to be less likely to ovulate to GnRH than primiparous PVD+ cows, whereas multiparous PVD+ cows were less (P = 0.04) likely to ovulate to GnRH than PVD- multiparous cows. The odds of bearing a corpus luteum or being inseminated by study days 14, 21, or 35 was not associated with PVD in primiparous cows. In contrast, the odds of bearing a corpus luteum

  2. Pairing correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, C.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    There are many similarities between the properties of nucleons in nuclei and electrons in metals. In addition to the properties explainable in terms of independent particle motion, there are many important co-operative effects suggesting correlated motion. Pairing correlation which leads to superconductivity in metals and several important properties in nuclei , is an exmple of such correlations. An attempt has been made to review the effects of pairing correlations in nuclei. Recent indications of reduction in pairing correlations at high angular momenta is discussed. A comparision between pairing correlations in the cases of nuclei and electrons in metals is attempted. (author). 20 refs., 10 figs

  3. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.; Stein, J.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  4. Determinants of Growth Hormone Resistance in Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    States of under-nutrition are characterized by growth hormone resistance. Decreased total energy intake, as well as isolated protein-calorie malnutrition and isolated nutrient deficiencies result in elevated growth hormone levels and low levels of IGF-I. We review various states of malnutrition and a disease state characterized by chronic under-nutrition -- anorexia nervosa -- and discuss possible mechanisms contributing to the state of growth hormone resistance, including FGF-21 and SIRT1. We conclude by examining the hypothesis that growth hormone resistance is an adaptive response to states of under-nutrition, in order to maintain euglycemia and preserve energy. PMID:24363451

  5. Secure pairing with biometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhan, I.R.; Boom, B.J.; Doumen, J.M.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    Secure pairing enables two devices that share no prior context with each other to agree upon a security association, which they can use to protect their subsequent communication. Secure pairing offers guarantees of the association partner identity and it should be resistant to eavesdropping and to a

  6. Affine pairings on ARM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acar, T.; Lauter, K.; Naehrig, M.; Shumow, D.

    2011-01-01

    Pairings on elliptic curves are being used in an increasing number of cryptographic applications on many different devices and platforms, but few performance numbers for cryptographic pairings have been reported on embedded and mobile devices. In this paper we give performance numbers for affine and

  7. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  8. Pair correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Except for the closed shell nuclei, almost all nuclei are in the superconducting state at their ground states. This well-known pair correlation in nuclei causes various interesting phenomena. It is especially to be noted that the pair correlation becomes weak in the excited states of nuclei with high angular momentum, which leads to the pair phase transition to the normal state in the high spin limit. On the other hand, the pair correlation becomes stronger in the nuclei with lower nucleon density than in those with normal density. In the region of neutron halo or skin state of unstable nuclei, this phenomenon is expected to be further enhanced to be observed compared to the ground state of stable nuclei. An overview of those interesting aspects caused via the pair correlation is presented here in the sections titled 'pair correlations in ground states', pair correlations in high spin states' and 'pair correlations in unstable nuclei' focusing on the high spin state. (S. Funahashi)

  9. The prediction of semantic consistency in self-descriptions: characteristics of persons and of terms that affect the consistency of responses to synonym and antonym pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L R; Kilkowski, J M

    1985-01-01

    Subjects described themselves, using an alphabetically ordered list of 191 trait adjectives, which included sets of synonyms and antonyms, half of each type more difficult than the other half. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two experimental conditions. In one condition, each adjective was listed with its dictionary definition; in the other condition, only the adjectives were listed. All subjects were administered a battery of demographic, cognitive, and personality measures. We analyzed both the relative consistency elicited by different pairs of terms and the individual differences in semantic consistency displayed by different sorts of subjects. Although the provision of definitions served to increase consistency (especially for the difficult antonyms), it did not decrease the range of consistency values across either synonym or antonym pairs. And, although interpair differences in semantic consistency were as difficult to predict in this study as in previous ones, individual differences were highly predictable. The implications of our many findings are discussed in the context of various hypotheses about semantic inconsistency in self-reports.

  10. Thyroid hormone deiodinase type 2 mRNA levels in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) are regulated during metamorphosis and in response to a thyroid challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilborn, S Salina M; Manzon, Lori A; Schauenberg, Jennifer D; Manzon, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are crucial for normal vertebrate development and are the one obligate morphogen that drives amphibian metamorphosis. However, contrary to other metamorphosing vertebrates, lampreys exhibit a sharp drop in serum TH early in metamorphosis, and anti-thyroid agents such as potassium perchlorate (KClO(4)) induce metamorphosis. The type 2 deiodinase (D2) enzyme is a key regulator of TH availability during amphibian metamorphosis. We set out to determine how D2 may be involved in the regulation of lamprey metamorphosis and thyroid homeostasis. We cloned a 1.8Kb Petromyzon marinus D2 cDNA that includes the entire protein coding region and a selenocysteine (Sec) codon. Northern blotting indicated that the lamprey D2 mRNA is the longest reported to date (>9Kb). Using real-time PCR, we showed that intestinal and hepatic D2 mRNA levels were elevated prior to and during the early stages of metamorphosis and then declined dramatically to low levels that were sustained for the remainder of metamorphosis. These data are consistent with previously reported changes in serum TH levels and deiodinase activity. Treatment of larvae with either TH or KClO(4) significantly affected D2 mRNA levels in the intestine and liver. These D2 mRNA levels during metamorphosis and in response to thyroid challenges suggest that D2 may function in the regulation of TH levels during lamprey metamorphosis and the maintenance of TH homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, James

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions.

  12. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    pair-sending families in the Philippines, this dissertation examines the long-term trajectories of these young Filipinas. It shows how the au pairs’ local and transnational family relations develop over time and greatly influence their life trajectories. A focal point of the study is how au pairs...... that Filipina au pairs see their stay abroad as an avenue of personal development and social recognition, I examine how the au pairs re-position themselves within their families at home through migration, and how they navigate between the often conflicting expectations of participation in the sociality......Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...

  13. Hormonal signaling in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, L.

    2016-01-01

    Insect hervivores and pathogens are a major problem in agriculture and therefore, control of these pests and diseases is essential. For this, understanding the plant immune response can be instrumental. The plant hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) play an essential role in defense

  14. Hormone-Balancing Effect of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon): (III) Clinical responses of early-postmenopausal women to Maca in double blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled, crossover configuration, outpatient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, H O; Mscisz, A; Reich-Bilinska, H; Mrozikiewicz, P; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, T; Kedzia, B; Lowicka, A; Barchia, I

    2006-12-01

    This is the second, conclusive part of the clinical study on clinical responses of early-postmenopausal women to standardized doses of pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Maca-GO). Total of 34 Caucasian women volunteers participated in a double-blind, randomized, four months outpatient crossover configuration Trial. After fulfilling the criteria of being early-postmenopausal: blood Estrogen (E230 IU/ml) at admission, they were randomly allocated to Placebo (P) and Maca-GO (M) treatments (2 groups of 11 participants each). Two 500 mg vegetable hard gel capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo powder were self-administered twice daily with meals (total 2 g/day). At admission and follow-up monthly intervals, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, levels of gonadal, pituitary, thyroid and adrenal hormones, lipids and key minerals were measured. Bone markers were determined after four months M and P use in 12 participants. Menopausal symptoms were assessed according to Greene's Score (GMS) and Kupperman's Index (KMI). Data were analyzed using multivariate technique on blocs of monthly. Results and canonical variate technique was applied to GMS and KMI matrices. Two months application of Maca-GO stimulated (PMaca-GO noticeably increased bone density markers. In conclusion, Maca-GO applied to early-postmenopausal women (i) acted as a toner of hormonal processes along the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovarian axis, (ii) balanced hormone levels and (iii) relieved symptoms of menopausal discomfort, (hot flushes and night sweating in particular), thus, (iv) exhibited a distinctive function peculiar to adaptogens, providing an alternative non-hormonal plant option to reduce dependence on hormone therapy programs (HRT).

  15. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  16. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  17. Mesoscopic pairing without superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    We discuss pairing signatures in mesoscopic nanowires with a variable attractive pairing interaction. Depending on the wire length, density, and interaction strength, these systems realize a simultaneous bulk-to-mesoscopic and BCS-BEC crossover, which we describe in terms of the parity parameter that quantifies the odd-even energy difference and generalizes the bulk Cooper pair binding energy to mesoscopic systems. We show that the parity parameter can be extracted from recent measurements of conductance oscillations in SrTiO3 nanowires by Cheng et al. [Nature (London) 521, 196 (2015), 10.1038/nature14398], where it marks the critical magnetic field that separates pair and single-particle currents. Our results place the experiment in the fluctuation-dominated mesoscopic regime on the BCS side of the crossover.

  18. Investigations into nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is divided in two main sections focusing on different aspects of collective nuclear behavior. In the first section, solutions are considered for the collective pairing Hamiltonian. In particular, an approximate solution at the critical point of the pairing transition from harmonic vibration (normal nuclear behavior) to deformed rotation (superconducting behavior) in gauge space is found by analytic solution of the Hamiltonian. The eigenvalues are expressed in terms of the zeros of Bessel functions of integer order. The results are compared to the pairing bands based on the Pb isotopes. The second section focuses on the experimental search for the Giant Pairing Vibration (GPV) in nuclei. After briefly describing the origin of the GPV, and the reasons that the state has remained unidentified, a novel idea for populating this state is presented. A recent experiment has been performed using the LIBERACE+STARS detector system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of LBNL to test the idea. (Author)

  19. A Single Base Pair Mutation Encoding a Premature Stop Codon in the MIS type II receptor is Responsible for Canine Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Wan, Shengqin; Pujar, Shashikant; Haskins, Mark E.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Lee, Mary M.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a secreted glycoprotein in the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of growth factors, mediates regression of the Müllerian ducts during embryonic sex differentiation in males. In Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), rather than undergoing involution, the Müllerian ducts persist in males, giving rise to the uterus, Fallopian tubes, and upper vagina. Genetic defects in MIS or its receptor (MISRII) have been identified in patients with PMDS. The phenotype in the canine model of PMDS derived from the miniature schnauzer breed is strikingly similar to that of human patients. In this model, PMDS is inherited as a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait. Previous studies indicated that a defect in the MIS receptor or its downstream signaling pathway was likely to be causative of the canine syndrome. In this study the canine PMDS phenotype and clinical sequelae are described in detail. Affected and unaffected members of this pedigree are genotyped, identifying a single base pair substitution in MISRII that introduces a stop codon in exon 3. The homozygous mutation terminates translation at 80 amino acids, eliminating much of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains. Findings in this model may enable insights to be garnered from correlation of detailed clinical descriptions with molecular defects, which are not otherwise possible in the human syndrome. PMID:18723470

  20. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  1. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... THYROID HORMONES? Desiccated ( dried and powdered ) animal thyroid ( Armour ®), now mainly obtained from pigs, was the most ... hormone can increase the risk or heart rhythm problems and bone loss making the use of thyroxine ...

  2. Antidiuretic hormone blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003702.htm Antidiuretic hormone blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antidiuretic blood test measures the level of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in ...

  3. Hormonal effects in newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb, babies ...

  4. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003377.htm Growth hormone stimulation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of ...

  5. Effect of altering the intervals between consecutive superovulatory doses of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone on ovarian responses and embryo yields in anestrous ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlewski, P M; Murawski, M; Schwarz, T; Oliveira, M E F

    2017-05-01

    The effect of varying intervals between successive gonadotropin injections on the superovulatory outcomes in anestrous Rideau Arcott ewes superstimulated for ovarian follicular development with multiple doses of porcine FSH (pFSH) was evaluated in a single study. Twenty-five animals received six (1×2.5ml and 5×1.25ml) injections of Folltropin ® -V given at 0800 and 1600h or at 0800 and 2000h in Group 1 (n=9) or Group 2 (n=16), respectively. An i.m. injection of 500 IU of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG; Folligon ® ) was given concurrently with the first pFSH dose. Time of estrus was synchronized among ewes with intravaginal sponges containing 60mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate (Veramix ® ) that were left in place for 14days; sponges were removed at the time of the 5th pFSH injection. Six days after insertion of MAP sponges, all ewes received an i.m. injection of estradiol-17β dissolved in 1ml of sesame oil (350μg/ewe) to synchronize follicular wave emergence. Following the last pFSH dose, all animals were given a single i.m. injection of 50μg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; Cystorelin ® ) to induce ovulations before placing in a pen with four fertile rams for 36h. The ovarian responses were assessed and embryos recovered surgically 7days after GnRH injections. The mean number of corpora lutea was greater (Pewes (21.0±2.9 compared with 10.4±1.6, respectively; mean±SEM) but there was no difference (P>0.05) in the number of transferable embryos (5.4±2.4 compared with 5.4±1.3/ewe, respectively), and Group 1 animals had significantly more degenerated embryos than Group 2 ewes (2.6±1.2 compared with 0.6±0.3/ewe, respectively). A superovulatory protocol wherein pFSH injections were given at 0800 and 1600h was more effective in terms of inducing multiple ovulations than the protocol with 12-h intervals between consecutive pFSH doses, but it was not associated with an increased production of transferable quality embryos by anestrous ewes

  6. Cut-Off Levels of Anti-Mullerian Hormone for The Prediction of Ovarian Response, In Vitro Fertilization Outcome and Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salmassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of anti-mullerian hormone (AMH cut-off levels in assisted reproductive technology (ART as predictive factor for individualization of stimulation protocols and to avoid ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study, 177 infertile patients were assessed for AMH in serum and follicular fluid (FF on the day of follicular puncture (FP, between 2012 and 2013 in Kiel, Germany. AMH levels and pregnancy rates were compared between low, moderate and high responders and cut-off levels of low and high responders. AMH cut-off levels in pathological cases were evaluated in analysis 1 (OHSS and in analysis 2 [polycystic ovarian syndrome, (PCOS] and compared in analysis 3 to normal endocrinological parameters. Results: AMH levels in FF were higher than in serum (P<0.001. AMH levels in serum and FF increased from low through moderate to high responders (P<0.001. Pregnancy rates were 14.7, 23.3 and 44.9% (P=0.009, respectively. AMH cut-off level for poor responders was 0.61 ng/ml in serum with a pregnancy rate of 13.8 and 37.1% for below and above of this level, respectively. For FF, it was 1.43 ng/ml. AMH levels in analysis 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in analysis 3 (P=0.001. AMH cut-off level for OHSS was 1.5 ng/ml in serum with OHSS rates of 80.8 and 19.2 % for above and below of the level, respectively. For FF, it was 2.7 ng/ml. PCOS patients had an AMH cut-off level of 3.9 ng/ml in serum and 6.8 ng/ml in FF, resulting in a PCOS rate of 100% above this level. Conclusion: AMH levels can help to assess ovarian response potential and guide ovarian stimulation while avoiding OHSS.

  7. The use of anti-mullerian hormone in predicting menstrual response after weight loss in overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lisa J; Noakes, Manny; Clifton, Peter M; Norman, Robert J

    2007-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with reproductive and metabolic abnormalities, specifically menstrual dysfunction and anovulation in conjunction with elevated pre-antral follicle number and arrested follicular maturation. Although anti-müllerian hormone (AMH), an inhibitor of follicle recruitment and maturation, is increased in women with PCOS, the usefulness of circulating AMH levels as a clinical predictor of menstrual response to weight loss in PCOS is not known. Overweight women with PCOS (n = 26, age 32.9 +/- 5.8 yr, weight 98.9 +/- 20.8 kg, body mass index 36.1 +/- 7.0 kg/m(2), mean +/- sd) followed an 8-wk weight loss and 6-month weight maintenance program. Net reductions in weight (4.6 +/- 4.8 kg), waist circumference (6.0 +/- 5.3 cm), testosterone (0.3 +/- 0.6 nmol/liter), fasting insulin (3.7 +/- 7.6 mU/liter), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (0.7 +/- 1.3) occurred for all subjects over the entire study duration. Of 26 subjects, 15 (57.7%) responded to the intervention with improvements in menstrual cyclicity (responders). Compared to nonresponders, responders had lower AMH levels at baseline (23.6 +/- 12.0 vs. 37.9 +/- 17.8 pmol/liter; P = 0.021). Only responders had reductions in fasting insulin (6.1 +/- 5.9 mU/liter; P = 0.001) and homeostasis model assessment (1.3 +/- 5.9; P = 0.002) with acute weight loss (wk 0-8). Baseline AMH was most strongly predicted by baseline ghrelin, free testosterone, and insulin (r(2) = 0.528; P = 0.002). Overweight women with PCOS who respond to weight loss with menstrual improvements have significantly reduced preweight loss AMH and demonstrate improvements in surrogate measures of insulin resistance with weight loss. Pretreatment AMH is a potential clinical predictor of menstrual improvements with weight loss in PCOS.

  8. Initial water deficit effects on Lupinus albus photosynthetic performance, carbon metabolism, and hormonal balance: metabolic reorganization prior to early stress responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinheiro, C.; António, C.; Dobrev, Petre; Vaňková, Radomíra; Wilson, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 14 (2011), s. 4965-4974 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Carbon metabolism * hormone balance * LC-MS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.364, year: 2011

  9. Pregnancy, bovine somatotropin, and dietary n-3 fatty acids in lactating dairy cows: I. Ovarian, conceptus, and growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilby, T R; Sozzi, A; Lopez, M M; Silvestre, F T; Ealy, A D; Staples, C R; Thatcher, W W

    2006-09-01

    The objective was to examine effects of bovine somatotropin (bST), pregnancy, and dietary fatty acids on reproductive responses in lactating dairy cows. Beginning at approximately 17 d in milk (DIM), a comparison was made of isoenergetic diets comprising supplementary lipids of whole cottonseed vs. calcium salts of fish oil enriched lipid (FO). Ovulation was synchronized in cows with a presynchronization plus Ovsynch protocol, and cows were inseminated artificially by appointment or not inseminated (d 0 = time of synchronized ovulation; 77 +/- 12 DIM). On d 0 and 11, cows received bST (500 mg) or no bST. All cows were slaughtered on d 17. Number of cows in each group was as follows: control diet had 5 bST-treated cyclic (bST-C), 5 non-bST-treated cyclic (no bST-C), 4 bST-treated pregnant (bST-P), and 5 non-bST-treated pregnant (no bST-P) cows; and cyclic cows fed FO diet had 4 bST-treated (bST-FO) and 5 non-bST-treated cyclic (no bST-FO-C) cows. Feeding FO increased milk production, number of class 1 follicles (2 to 5 mm), and decreased insulin during the period before d 0 compared with control-fed cows. The bST increased milk production, pregnancy rate [83% (5/6) vs. 40% (4/10)], conceptus length (45 vs. 34 cm), and interferon-tau in the uterine luminal flushings (9.4 vs. 5.3 microg) with no effect on interferon-tau mRNA concentration in the conceptus. Treatment with bST increased plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. Among control-fed cows (cyclic and pregnant), bST decreased progesterone concentration in plasma. Cows fed FO had less plasma insulin than control-fed cyclic cows, and FO altered the plasma GH (bST-FO > bST-C) and IGF-I (bST-C > bST-FO-C) responses to bST injections. Endometrial IGF-I mRNA was reduced in pregnant cows and tended to decrease in those fed FO. The IGF-II mRNA was increased in the endometrium of pregnant and bST-treated cows fed the control diet. Cows fed FO had increased concentrations of IGF-II mRNA, when b

  10. Voluntary Explicit versus Involuntary Conceptual Memory Are Associated with Dissociable fMRI Responses in Hippocampus, Amygdala, and Parietal Cortex for Emotional and Neutral Word Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Cristina; Barnard, Philip J.; Kherif, Ferath; Henson, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Although functional neuroimaging studies have supported the distinction between explicit and implicit forms of memory, few have matched explicit and implicit tests closely, and most of these tested perceptual rather than conceptual implicit memory. We compared event-related fMRI responses during an intentional test, in which a group of…

  11. [Paired kidneys in transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro López, Juan C; Leva Vallejo, Manuel; Prieto Castro, Rafael; Anglada Curado, Francisco; Vela Jiménez, Francisco; Ruiz García, Jesús

    2009-02-01

    Many factors affect the graft and patient survival on the renal transplant outcome. These factors depend so much of the recipient and donor. We accomplished a study trying to circumvent factors that depend on the donor. We checked the paired kidneys originating of a same donor cadaver. We examined the risk factors in the evolution and follow-up in 278 couples of kidney transplant. We describe their differences, significance, the graft and patient survival, their functionality in 3 and 5 years and the risk factors implicated in their function. We study immunogenic and no immunogenic variables, trying to explain the inferior results in the grafts that are established secondly. We regroup the paired kidneys in those that they did not show paired initial function within the same couple. The results yield a discreet deterioration in the graft and patient survival for second group establish, superior creatinina concentration, without obtaining statistical significance. The Cox regression study establishes the early rejection (inferior to three months) and DR incompatibility values like risk factors. This model of paired kidneys would be able to get close to best-suited form for risk factors analysis in kidney transplant from cadaver donors, if more patients examine themselves in the same way. The paired kidneys originating from the same donor do not show the same function in spite of sharing the same conditions of the donor and perioperative management.

  12. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  13. Junctionless Cooper pair transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu., E-mail: konstantin.yu.arutyunov@jyu.fi [National Research University Higher School of Economics , Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.L. Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems RAS , Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation); Lehtinen, J.S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Centre for Metrology MIKES, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Junctionless Cooper pair box. • Quantum phase slips. • Coulomb blockade and gate modulation of the Coulomb gap. - Abstract: Quantum phase slip (QPS) is the topological singularity of the complex order parameter of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor: momentary zeroing of the modulus and simultaneous 'slip' of the phase by ±2π. The QPS event(s) are the dynamic equivalent of tunneling through a conventional Josephson junction containing static in space and time weak link(s). Here we demonstrate the operation of a superconducting single electron transistor (Cooper pair transistor) without any tunnel junctions. Instead a pair of thin superconducting titanium wires in QPS regime was used. The current–voltage characteristics demonstrate the clear Coulomb blockade with magnitude of the Coulomb gap modulated by the gate potential. The Coulomb blockade disappears above the critical temperature, and at low temperatures can be suppressed by strong magnetic field.

  14. Gastric emptying, glucose metabolism and gut hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Richir, Milan C; Garretsen, Martijn K

    2011-01-01

    To study the gastric-emptying rate and gut hormonal response of two carbohydrate-rich beverages. A specifically designed carbohydrate-rich beverage is currently used to support the surgical patient metabolically. Fruit-based beverages may also promote recovery, due to natural antioxidant and carb......To study the gastric-emptying rate and gut hormonal response of two carbohydrate-rich beverages. A specifically designed carbohydrate-rich beverage is currently used to support the surgical patient metabolically. Fruit-based beverages may also promote recovery, due to natural antioxidant...... and carbohydrate content. However, gastric emptying of fluids is influenced by its nutrient composition; hence, safety of preoperative carbohydrate loading should be confirmed. Because gut hormones link carbohydrate metabolism and gastric emptying, hormonal responses were studied....

  15. Contrasting population and life history responses of a young morph-pair of European whitefish to the invasion of a specialised coregonid competitor, vendace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd Terje Sandlund

    Full Text Available Invasions of non-native species represent a global problem of great scientific interest. Here we study in detail the response in population and life history characteristics of closely related native species, with divergent habitat preferences, that are impacted by an invading species over a sufficient time period to allow a new stable state to become established. A time series of 20 years starting at the first occurrence of the invader (vendace Coregonus albula (L. allows exploration of the long term population and life history response of two ecologically, morphologically, and genetically different native sympatric morphs (DR- and SR- of congeneric whitefish C. lavaretus (L.. The whitefish morphs are taxonomically equally related to the invading vendace, but only the planktivorous DR-whitefish share its pelagic niche. We would expect that the ecological differences between the whitefish morphs may be used as a predictor of competitive effects. Vendace exhibited an initial boom-and-bust development, and has continued to fluctuate in density. The responses of the pelagic DR-whitefish were: i an immediate habitat shift, ii a subsequent population decline caused by increased annual mortality, and iii a new stable state at a lower density and apparently relaxed competition. The ecologically more distant benthivorous SR-whitefish also showed significant, but a much more limited response during this process, indicating damped indirect interactions through the food-web. This long-term case-study found that in two native eco-species equally related to the invader, only one of the eco-species was highly affected. Direct competition for resources is obviously important for species interactions, whereas the taxonomic relatedness per se seems to offer little predictive power for invasion effects.

  16. Thyroid hormones and lipid phosphorus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakare, U R; Ganatra, R D; Shah, D H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Medicine Centre

    1978-04-01

    In vivo studies in mice injected intravenously with /sup 125/I-triiodothyronine (T-3) showed a linear relationship between the uptake of the labelled hormone by the tissue and the lipid phosphorous content of the same tissue. However, studies with /sup 125/I-thyroxine failed to show a similar relationship between the lipid phosphorous content of the organ and the uptake of radioactive hormone by the same organ. In vitro studies using equilibrium dialysis technique with isolated lipid extracts of various organs and radioactive thyroid hormones (T-3 and T-4) did not show any relation between the lipid P and the uptake of labelled hormone. On the basis of the observed discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro studies, it is postulated that an organized lipoprotein structure at the cell membrane may be responsible for the entry of the thyroid hormones.

  17. [Human growth hormone and Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marco, Silvia Beatriz; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José Ignacio; Garagorri Otero, Jesús María

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of clinical and analytical parameters as predictors of the final growth response in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone. A retrospective study was performed on 25 girls with Turner syndrome (17 treated with growth hormone), followed-up until adult height. Auxological, analytical, genetic and pharmacological parameters were collected. A descriptive and analytical study was conducted to evaluate short (12 months) and long term response to treatment with growth hormone. A favourable treatment response was shown during the first year of treatment in terms of height velocity gain in 66.6% of cases (height-gain velocity >3cm/year). A favourable long-term treatment response was also observed in terms of adult height, which increased by 42.82±21.23cm (1.25±0.76 SDS), with an adult height gain of 9.59±5.39cm (1.68±1.51 SDS). Predictors of good response to growth hormone treatment are: A) initial growth hormone dose, B) time on growth hormone treatment until starting oestrogen therapy, C) increased IGF1 and IGFBP-3 levels in the first year of treatment, and D) height gain velocity in the first year of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender and sex hormones influence the response to trauma and sepsis: potential therapeutic approaches Hormônios sexuais influenciam a resposta ao trauma e à sepsis: possíveis soluções terapêuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K. Angele

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated gender dimorphism in immune and organ responsiveness and in the susceptibility to and morbidity from shock, trauma, and sepsis. In this respect, cell-mediated immune responses have been shown to be depressed in males following trauma-hemorrhage, whereas they were aintained/enhanced in proestrus females. Furthermore, sex hormones have been shown to be responsible for this gender-specific immune response following adverse circulatory conditions. More specifically, studies indicate that androgens produce immunodepression following trauma-hemorrhage in males. In contrast, female sex steroids appear to exhibit immunoprotective properties following trauma and severe blood loss. With regard to the underlying mechanisms, receptors for sex hormones have been identified on various immune cells suggesting direct effects of these hormones on the immune cells. Alternatively, indirect effects of sex hormones, ie, modulation of cardiovascular responses or androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes, might contribute to gender-specific immune responses. Recent studies indicate that sex hormones, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, also modulate the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in surgical patients. Thus, the immunomodulatory properties of sex hormones/receptor antagonists/sex steroid synthesizing enzymes following trauma-hemorrhage suggests novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immunodepression in surgical patients.Uma série de estudos clínicos e experimentais demonstram a existência de dimorfismo sexual das respostas imunológicas e orgânicas, bem como da suscetibilidade e morbidade em relação ao choque, ao trauma e à sepse. Respostas imunes celularmente mediadas apresentam-se deprimidas em machos em resposta ao binômio trauma-hemorragia, mas conservados/enaltecidos em fêmeas em proestro. Adicionalmente demonstra-se que os hormônios sexuais são responsáveis por

  19. ACUTE EFFECTS OF MOVEMENT VELOCITY ON BLOOD LACTATE AND GROWTH HORMONE RESPONSES AFTER ECCENTRIC BENCH PRESS EXERCISE IN RESISTANCE-TRAINED MEN

    OpenAIRE

    Calixto, RD; Verlengia, R; Crisp, AH; Carvalho, TB; Crepaldi, MD; Pereira, AA; Yamada, AK; da Mota, GR; Lopes, CR

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of different velocities of eccentric muscle actions on acute blood lactate and serum growth hormone (GH) concentrations following free weight bench press exercises performed by resistance-trained men. Sixteen healthy men were divided into two groups: slow eccentric velocity (SEV; n = 8) and fast eccentric velocity (FEV