WorldWideScience

Sample records for pair bp dna

  1. Performance of various density functionals for the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, T.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of seven popular density functionals (B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, mPW, OPBE, PBE, PW91) for describing the geometry and stability of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. For the gas-phase situation, the hydrogen-bond lengths and strengths in the DNA pairs have been

  2. The mitochondrial DNA 4,977-bp deletion and its implication in copy number alteration in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Qualitative and quantitative changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in various cancer types. A 4,977 bp deletion in the major arch of the mitochondrial genome is one of the most common mutations associated with a variety of human diseases and aging. Methods We conducted a comprehensive study on clinical features and mtDNA of 104 colorectal cancer patients in the Wenzhou area of China. In particular, using a quantitative real time PCR method, we analyzed the 4,977 bp deletion and mtDNA content in tumor tissues and paired non-tumor areas from these patients. Results We found that the 4,977 bp deletion was more likely to be present in patients of younger age (≤65 years, p = 0.027). In patients with the 4,977 bp deletion, the deletion level decreased as the cancer stage advanced (p = 0.031). Moreover, mtDNA copy number in tumor tissues of patients with this deletion increased, both compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues and with in tumors of patients without the deletion. Such mtDNA content increase correlated with the levels of the 4,977 bp deletion and with cancer stage (p deletion may play a role in the early stage of colorectal cancer, and it is also implicated in alteration of mtDNA content in cancer cells. PMID:21232124

  3. TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Irene; Christiansen, Signe Korbo; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Lisby, Michael; Oestergaard, Vibe H

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is crucial to avoid cancer and other genetic diseases. Thus faced with DNA damage, cells mount a DNA damage response to avoid genome instability. The DNA damage response is partially inhibited during mitosis presumably to avoid erroneous processing of the segregating chromosomes. Yet our recent study shows that TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis is highly important to reduce transmission of DNA damage to daughter cells. (1) Here we provide an overview of the DNA damage response and DNA repair during mitosis. One role of TopBP1 during mitosis is to stimulate unscheduled DNA synthesis at underreplicated regions. We speculated that such genomic regions are likely to hold stalled replication forks or post-replicative gaps, which become the substrate for DNA synthesis upon entry into mitosis. Thus, we addressed whether the translesion pathways for fork restart or post-replicative gap filling are required for unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis. Using genetics in the avian DT40 cell line, we provide evidence that unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis does not require the translesion synthesis scaffold factor Rev1 or PCNA ubiquitylation at K164, which serve to recruit translesion polymerases to stalled forks. In line with this finding, translesion polymerase η foci do not colocalize with TopBP1 or FANCD2 in mitosis. Taken together, we conclude that TopBP1 promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis independently of the examined translesion polymerases.

  4. 4977-bp mitochondrial DNA deletion in infertile patients with varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashti, N G; Salehi, Z; Madani, A H; Dalivandan, S T

    2014-04-01

    Varicocele is the abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus within spermatic cord and is one of the amendable causes of male infertility. It can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in semen and cause oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to analyse spermatozoa mtDNA 4977-bp deletion in infertile men with varicocele. To detect 4977-bp deletion in spermatozoa mtDNA, semen samples of 60 infertile patients with clinical varicocele and 90 normal men from northern Iran were prepared. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap polymerase chain reaction (Gap PCR) was performed. 4977-bp deletion was observed in 81.66% of patients with varicocele, while approximately 15.55% of controls had this deletion. As spermatozoa from patients with varicocele had a high frequency of occurrence of 4977-bp deletion in mtDNA [OR = 24.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.15-57.57, P deletion in spermatozoa and cause infertility in north Iranian men. However, to determine the relation between sperm mtDNA 4977-bp deletion and varicocele-induced infertility, larger population-based studies are needed. It is concluded that there is an association between sperm mtDNA 4977-bp deletion and varicocele-induced infertility in the population studied. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Free energy landscape and transition pathways from Watson–Crick to Hoogsteen base pairing in free duplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changwon; Kim, Eunae; Pak, Youngshang

    2015-01-01

    Houghton (HG) base pairing plays a central role in the DNA binding of proteins and small ligands. Probing detailed transition mechanism from Watson–Crick (WC) to HG base pair (bp) formation in duplex DNAs is of fundamental importance in terms of revealing intrinsic functions of double helical DNAs beyond their sequence determined functions. We investigated a free energy landscape of a free B-DNA with an adenosine–thymine (A–T) rich sequence to probe its conformational transition pathways from WC to HG base pairing. The free energy landscape was computed with a state-of-art two-dimensional umbrella molecular dynamics simulation at the all-atom level. The present simulation showed that in an isolated duplex DNA, the spontaneous transition from WC to HG bp takes place via multiple pathways. Notably, base flipping into the major and minor grooves was found to play an important role in forming these multiple transition pathways. This finding suggests that naked B-DNA under normal conditions has an inherent ability to form HG bps via spontaneous base opening events. PMID:26250116

  6. Free energy landscape and transition pathways from Watson-Crick to Hoogsteen base pairing in free duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changwon; Kim, Eunae; Pak, Youngshang

    2015-09-18

    Houghton (HG) base pairing plays a central role in the DNA binding of proteins and small ligands. Probing detailed transition mechanism from Watson-Crick (WC) to HG base pair (bp) formation in duplex DNAs is of fundamental importance in terms of revealing intrinsic functions of double helical DNAs beyond their sequence determined functions. We investigated a free energy landscape of a free B-DNA with an adenosine-thymine (A-T) rich sequence to probe its conformational transition pathways from WC to HG base pairing. The free energy landscape was computed with a state-of-art two-dimensional umbrella molecular dynamics simulation at the all-atom level. The present simulation showed that in an isolated duplex DNA, the spontaneous transition from WC to HG bp takes place via multiple pathways. Notably, base flipping into the major and minor grooves was found to play an important role in forming these multiple transition pathways. This finding suggests that naked B-DNA under normal conditions has an inherent ability to form HG bps via spontaneous base opening events. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  8. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA...... damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence...

  9. Mutant p53 perturbs DNA replication checkpoint control through TopBP1 and Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Graves, Joshua D; Lee, Yu-Ju; Lin, Weei-Chin

    2017-05-09

    Accumulating evidence supports the gain-of-function of mutant forms of p53 (mutp53s). However, whether mutp53 directly perturbs the DNA replication checkpoint remains unclear. Previously, we have demonstrated that TopBP1 forms a complex with mutp53s and mediates their gain-of-function through NF-Y and p63/p73. Akt phosphorylates TopBP1 and induces its oligomerization, which inhibits its ATR-activating function. Here we show that various contact and conformational mutp53s bypass Akt to induce TopBP1 oligomerization and attenuate ATR checkpoint response during replication stress. The effect on ATR response caused by mutp53 can be exploited in a synthetic lethality strategy, as depletion of another ATR activator, DNA2, in mutp53-R273H-expressing cancer cells renders cells hypersensitive to cisplatin. Expression of mutp53-R273H also makes cancer cells more sensitive to DNA2 depletion or DNA2 inhibitors. In addition to ATR-activating function during replication stress, TopBP1 interacts with Treslin in a Cdk-dependent manner to initiate DNA replication during normal growth. We find that mutp53 also interferes with TopBP1 replication function. Several contact, but not conformational, mutp53s enhance the interaction between TopBP1 and Treslin and promote DNA replication despite the presence of a Cdk2 inhibitor. Together, these data uncover two distinct mechanisms by which mutp53 enhances DNA replication: ( i ) Both contact and conformational mutp53s can bind TopBP1 and attenuate the checkpoint response to replication stress, and ( ii ) during normal growth, contact (but not conformational) mutp53s can override the Cdk2 requirement to promote replication by facilitating the TopBP1/Treslin interaction.

  10. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    2014-01-01

    yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion...

  11. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Susanne M; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Gallina, Irene; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Lisby, Michael

    2014-01-06

    DNA anaphase bridges are a potential source of genome instability that may lead to chromosome breakage or nondisjunction during mitosis. Two classes of anaphase bridges can be distinguished: DAPI-positive chromatin bridges and DAPI-negative ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs). Here, we establish budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion of TopBP1/Dpb11 led to an accumulation of chromatin bridges. Importantly, the NoCut checkpoint that delays progression from anaphase to abscission in yeast was activated by both UFBs and chromatin bridges independently of Dpb11, and disruption of the NoCut checkpoint in Dpb11-depleted cells led to genome instability. In conclusion, we propose that TopBP1/Dpb11 prevents accumulation of anaphase bridges via stimulation of the Mec1/ATR kinase and suppression of homologous recombination.

  12. Radiosensitivity evaluation of Human tumor cell lines by detecting 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yipei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using the assay of mtDNA4977bp deletion. Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction(SF), the ratio of mtDNA4977bp deletion and DNA damage were detected by MTT assay and nested PCR technique respectively. Results: MTT assay: The SF of HepG 2 and EC-9706 after irradiated by 2, 4and 8Gy was lower significantly than that of MCF-7, which showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. But there was no statistical difference of SF between HepG 2 and EC-9706. PCR method:The differences on mtDNA 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA among HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7 were not significant after 1Gy and 4Gy γ-ray irradiation. The ratio of 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA of HepG 2 and EC-9706 increased while that of MCF-7 decreased after 8Gy irradiation. The ratio of mtDNA 4977bp deletion of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher significantly than that of MCF-7, which implies that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF -7. Conclusion: As a new biological marker, mtDNA4977bp deletion may be hopeful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more objectively and exactly. (authors)

  13. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin recruitment of SLX4 and by facilitating unscheduled DNA synthesis. PMID:26283799

  14. Construction and confirmation of the plasmid of human mitochondrial DNA 4977 bp deletion induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaosui; Zhou Lijun; Wang Yuxiao; Qu Jia; Feng Jiangbing; Lu Xue; Chen Deqing; Liu Qingjie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To construct a stable plasmid that spanning deleted human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 4977 bp induced by ionizing radiation and another one for control DNA fragment, in order to use in the human mitochondrial genome study in the future. Methods: The peripheral blood, which had no mtDNA 4977 bp deletion found in previous study, was exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays in vitro. The total cell DNA was extracted and PCR was carried out: a nest-PCR of three-round PCR was used for the mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and one- round regular PCR was used for the control ND1 gene. The PCR products were used for transfection by electroporation and the positive clones were obtained after screening. The plasmid DNA was isolated and sequenced after enzymatic digestion and purification. The sequence result was BLASTed with the human mitochondrial genome. Results: The sizes of PCR products for the flanked 4977 bp deletion and the ND1 gene were similar with those predicted according to GeneBank. The sequences for the positive clones were above 99 per cent homologous with the human mitochondrial genome after BLASTed. Conclusion: The plasmids for deleted human mtDNA 4977 bp and control DNA fragment have been constructed successfully, and they could be used in the quality and quantity studies on human mtDNA 4977 bp deletion. (authors)

  15. Detection the human mitochondrial DNA 4977 bp deletion induced by 60Co γ-rays in vitro by nest-PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jiangbing; Lu Xue; Chen Deqing; Liu Qingjie; Chen Xiaosui

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method for detecting the mitochondrial DNA 4977 bp deletion (mtDNA 4977) induced by different doses of ionizing radiation. Methods: A nest-PCR method was established with 3 primer pairs for detecting the human peripheral mtDNA 4977. The final PCR products were sequenced after purified and the sequence was BLASTed with the standard genome information of human mitochondrion. The mtDNA 4977 level induced by 0-5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays of 5 healthy individuals was analyzed with the established nest-PCR. Results: The mtDNA 4977 could be detected by the established nest-PCR method. The mtDNA 4977 was observed on samples after exposed to 1-5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays, but it was not observed before (0 Gy) exposure. Conclusion: The nest-PCR method established in this study could be used to detect the mtDNA 4977 induced by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  16. VARIAN NON-DELESI 9 PASANG BASA DNA MITOKONDRIA MANUSIA SAMPEL FORENSIK BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Gun Gumilar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available One of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variant is a 9 base pairs (bp deletion in the COII/tRNALys intergenic region. In construction mtDNA nomenclature, 9-bp deletion database consist of primary and secondary data is needed, including Bali bombing forensic samples. Here we report a 9-bp non- deletion mtDNA variant from Bali bombing forensic samples to complete primary data. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique with 2 set primer was used to detect 9-bp deletion. The PCR result was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, which showed two bands (0.1 and 0.4 kb for non-deletion variant control, and one band (0.4 kb for deletion variant control. If the sample has 9-bp deletion, only one of the primer pairs could amplify a fragment of 0.4 kb. If the sample does not have 9-bp deletion, the other primer pair will amplify a 0.1 kb product. The result showed that none of the 24 samples has 9-bp deletion. These results are contributed to the human mtDNA database and nomenclature construction. Keywords: mtDNA, 9-bp deletion, PCR

  17. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  18. Fis protein induced λF-DNA bending observed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Cheng, Fu; Wunshain, Fann; Yuan Hanna, S.

    2006-03-01

    Fis, a site-specific DNA binding protein, regulates many biological processes including recombination, transcription, and replication in E.coli. Fis induced DNA bending plays an important role in regulating these functions and bending angle range from ˜50 to 95 dependent on the DNA sequence. For instance, the average bending angle of λF-DNA (26 bp, 8.8nm long, contained λF binding site on the center) measured by gel mobility shift assays was ˜ 94 . But the traditional method cannot provide information about the dynamics and the angle distribution. In this study, λF-DNA was labeled with donor (Alexa Fluor 546) and acceptor (Alexa Fluor 647) dyes on its two 5' ends and the donor-acceptor distances were measured using single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sp-FRET) with and without the present of Fis protein. Combing with structure information of Fis-DNA complex, the sp-FRET results are used to estimate the protein induced DNA bending angle distribution and dynamics.

  19. Prediction of radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro by determining 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Qinglin; Cao Yongzhen; Zhang Yaowen; Zhao Xinran; Wang Qin; Li Jin; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of predicting the radiosensitivity of tumor cell lines using the assay of the mtDNA4977bp deletion. Methods: The mtDNA4977bp deletion of HepG 2 cells and PC-3 cells were detected by nested PCR after irradiated by various doses of x-ray. Results: The radiation-induced mtDNA4977bp deletion of the tumor cell lines of HepG 2 and PC-3 were detected after irradiated. There was a dose dependent in the mtDNA4977bp deletion of two tumor cell lines. The deletion rate of HepG 2 was higher significantly than that of PC-3 at each point of radiation dose (P 2 was higher than that of PC-3. Conclusion: The assay of the mtDNA4977bp deletion may be an approach to predict the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. (authors)

  20. Effect of turmeric and curcumin on BP-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, M A; Chacko, M C; Annapurna, V V; Krishnaswamy, K

    1993-03-01

    Many human cancers that are widely prevalent today can be prevented through modifications in life-styles, of which diet appears to be an important agent. Several dietary constituents modulate the process of carcinogenesis and prevent genotoxicity. Many plant constituents including turmeric appear to be potent antimutagens and antioxidants. Therefore the modulatory effects of turmeric and curcumin on the levels of benzo[a]pyrene induced DNA adducts in the livers of rats were studied by the newly developed 32P-postlabelling assay method. Turmeric when fed at 0.1, 0.5 and 3% and the active principle of turmeric (curcumin) when fed at a level of 0.03% in the diet for 4 weeks significantly reduced the level of BP-DNA adducts including the major adduct dG-N2-BP, formed within 24 h in response to a single i.p. injection of benzo[a]pyrene. The significance of these effects in terms of the potential anticarcinogenic effects of turmeric is discussed. Further, these results strengthen the various other biological effects of turmeric which have direct relevance to anticarcinogenesis and chemoprevention.

  1. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise...... temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin...

  2. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  3. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH. A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL, 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL, and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  4. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  5. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes. PMID:27129245

  6. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    stress increases the frequency of chromosomal lesions that are transmitted to daughter cells. Throughout G1, these lesions are sequestered in nuclear compartments marked by p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and other chromatin-associated genome caretakers. We show that the number of such 53BP1 nuclear bodies...... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....

  7. GEMC1 is a TopBP1 interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Many factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication in complex multicellular organisms is poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1, a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes xGEMC1 binding to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 directly interacts with replication factors such as Cdc45 and Cdk2-CyclinE by which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents DNA replication onset due to impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Likewise, inhibition of GEMC1 expression by morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in higher eukaryotes by mediating TopBP1 and Cdk2 dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins. PMID:20383140

  8. Silver(I)-Mediated Base Pairs in DNA Sequences Containing 7-Deazaguanine/Cytosine: towards DNA with Entirely Metallated Watson-Crick Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Arriaga, José M; Maldonado, Carmen R; Dobado, José A; Galindo, Miguel A

    2018-03-26

    DNA sequences comprising noncanonical 7-deazaguanine ( 7C G) and canonical cytosine (C) are capable of forming Watson-Crick base pairs via hydrogen bonds as well as silver(I)-mediated base pairs by coordination to central silver(I) ions. Duplexes I and II containing 7C G and C have been synthesized and characterized. The incorporation of silver(I) ions into these duplexes has been studied by means of temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and DFT calculations. The results suggest the formation of DNA molecules comprising contiguous metallated 7C G-Ag I -C Watson-Crick base pairs that preserve the original B-type conformation. Furthermore, additional studies performed on duplex III indicated that, in the presence of Ag I ions, 7C G-C and 7C A-T Watson-Crick base pairs ( 7C A, 7-deazadenine; T, thymine) can be converted to metallated 7C G-Ag I -C and 7C A-Ag I -T base pairs inside the same DNA molecule whilst maintaining its initial double helix conformation. These findings are very important for the development of customized silver-DNA nanostructures based on a Watson-Crick complementarity pattern. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Primary quantitative analysis of the mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by lonizing radiation in human peripheral blood u-sing real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhikai; Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by different dose of γ ray in human peripheral blood in order to explore the feasibility of mtDNA4977bp deletion as biodosimeter. Methods: Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy donors and irradiated by γ ray, MtDNA4977bp deletion was detected by real-time PCR. Results: It indicated that that from the range of 0 ∼ 8 Gy, the relationship between mtDNA4977bp deletion and irradiation dose represents certain curvilinear correlation (Y=1.2693+1.0660X+0.0198X 2 ). Conclusion: We find that γ ray has influence on the mtDNA4977bp deletion, so it may be an important biodosmeter in future. (authors)

  10. Micromechanics of base pair unzipping in the DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergey N; Paramonova, Ekaterina V; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov’yov, Andrey V

    2012-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA duplex unzipping in a water environment were performed. The investigated DNA double helix consists of a Drew-Dickerson dodecamer sequence and a hairpin (AAG) attached to the end of the double-helix chain. The considered system is used to examine the process of DNA strand separation under the action of an external force. This process occurs in vivo and now is being intensively investigated in experiments with single molecules. The DNA dodecamer duplex is consequently unzipped pair by pair by means of the steered MD. The unzipping trajectories turn out to be similar for the duplex parts with G⋅C content and rather distinct for the parts with A⋅T content. It is shown that during the unzipping each pair experiences two types of motion: relatively quick rotation together with all the duplex and slower motion in the frame of the unzipping fork. In the course of opening, the complementary pair passes through several distinct states: (i) the closed state in the double helix, (ii) the metastable preopened state in the unzipping fork and (iii) the unbound state. The performed simulations show that water molecules participate in the stabilization of the metastable states of the preopened base pairs in the DNA unzipping fork. (paper)

  11. GEMC1 is a TopBP1-interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Many of the factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication is poorly understood in multicellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1 (geminin coiled-coil containing protein 1), a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to the checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes binding of xGEMC1 to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 interacts directly with replication factors such as Cdc45 and the kinase Cdk2-CyclinE, through which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication, whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents the onset of DNA replication owing to the impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Similarly, inhibition of GEMC1 expression with morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in multicellular organisms by mediating TopBP1- and Cdk2-dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins.

  12. Imidazopyridine/Pyrrole and hydroxybenzimidazole/pyrrole pairs for DNA minor groove recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneberg, Dorte; Dervan, Peter B

    2003-05-14

    The DNA binding properties of fused heterocycles imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ip) and hydroxybenzimidazole (Hz) paired with pyrrole (Py) in eight-ring hairpin polyamides are reported. The recognition profile of Ip/Py and Hz/Py pairs were compared to the five-membered ring pairs Im/Py and Hp/Py on a DNA restriction fragment at four 6-base pair recognition sites which vary at a single position 5'-TGTNTA-3', where N = G, C, T, A. The Ip/Py pair distinguishes G.C from C.G, T.A, and A.T, and the Hz/Py pair distinguishes T.A from A.T, G.C, and C.G, affording a new set of heterocycle pairs to target the four Watson-Crick base pairs in the minor groove of DNA.

  13. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage lambda Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X Qiu; D Rau; V Parsegian; L Fang; C Knobler; W Gelbart

    2011-12-31

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage {lambda} with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5 x 10{sup 3} base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1 kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  14. SSR_pipeline: a bioinformatic infrastructure for identifying microsatellites from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Knaus, Brian J.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (e.g., microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains 3 analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to 1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass Illumina quality standards, 2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and 3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites (both simple and compound) conforming to user-specified parameters. The microsatellite search algorithm is extremely efficient, and we have used it to identify repeats with motifs from 2 to 25bp in length. Each of the 3 analysis modules can also be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc.). We demonstrate use of the program with data from the brine fly Ephydra packardi (Diptera: Ephydridae) and provide empirical timing benchmarks to illustrate program performance on a common desktop computer environment. We further show that the Illumina platform is capable of identifying large numbers of microsatellites, even when using unenriched sample libraries and a very small percentage of the sequencing capacity from a single DNA sequencing run. All modules from SSR_pipeline are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, and Windows).

  15. SSR_pipeline: a bioinformatic infrastructure for identifying microsatellites from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P; Knaus, Brian J; Mullins, Thomas D; Haig, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (e.g., microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains 3 analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to 1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass Illumina quality standards, 2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and 3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites (both simple and compound) conforming to user-specified parameters. The microsatellite search algorithm is extremely efficient, and we have used it to identify repeats with motifs from 2 to 25 bp in length. Each of the 3 analysis modules can also be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc.). We demonstrate use of the program with data from the brine fly Ephydra packardi (Diptera: Ephydridae) and provide empirical timing benchmarks to illustrate program performance on a common desktop computer environment. We further show that the Illumina platform is capable of identifying large numbers of microsatellites, even when using unenriched sample libraries and a very small percentage of the sequencing capacity from a single DNA sequencing run. All modules from SSR_pipeline are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, and Windows).

  16. [Under what conditions does G.C Watson-Crick DNA base pair acquire all four configurations characteristic for A.T Watson-Crick DNA base pair?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O O

    2013-01-01

    At the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory it was established for the first time, that the Löwdin's G*.C* DNA base pair formed by the mutagenic tautomers can acquire, as the A-T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, four biologically important configurations, namely: Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen. This fact demonstrates rather unexpected role of the tautomerisation of the one of the Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, in particular, via double proton transfer: exactly the G.C-->G*.C* tautomerisation allows to overcome steric hindrances for the implementation of the above mentioned configurations. Geometric, electron-topological and energetic properties of the H-bonds that stabilise the studied pairs, as well as the energetic characteristics of the latters are presented.

  17. Low-dose ionizing irradiation triggers a 53BP1 response to DNA double strand breaks in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Qi, Lixin; Li, Jiaxuan; Wu, DengIong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and reveal the underlying pathways for the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Eighteen one-month-old mice were divided into 6 groups and sacrificed separately at 45 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after 0.1Gy X-ray irradiation (mice without receiving ionizing irradiation served as control). After perfusion fixation, testes were removed, sectioned, and followed by staining of γH2AX, 53BP1, Caspase 3, and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) for analysis among the different groups. The staining was observed by immunofluorescence visualized by confocal laser scanning. After low-dose irradiation, only 53BP1, but not Caspase3 or γH2AX was upregulated in PLZF positive SSCs within 45 minutes. The expression level of 53BP1 gradually decreased 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, low-dose irradiation had no effect on the cell number and apoptotic status of SSCs. However other spermatogenic cells highly expressed γH2AX shortly after irradiation which was dramatically reduced following the events of DNA repair. It appears that low-dose ionizing irradiation may cause the DNA DSB of mouse spermatogenic cells. 53BP1, but not γH2AX, is involved in the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Our data indicates that 53BP1 plays an important role in the pathophysiological repair of DNA DSB in SSCs. This may open a new avenue to understanding the mechanisms of DNA repair of SSCs and male infertility.

  18. Envisaging quantum transport phenomenon in a muddled base pair of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Rajan; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh

    2018-05-01

    The effect of muddled base pair on electron transfer through a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule connected to the gold electrodes has been elucidated using tight binding model. The effect of hydrogen and nitrogen bonds on the resistance of the base pair has been minutely observed. Using the semiempirical extended Huckel approach within NEGF regime, we have determined the current and conductance vs. bias voltage for disordered base pairs of DNA made of thymine (T) and adenine (A). The asymmetrical behaviour amid five times depreciation in the current characteristics has been observed for deviated Au-AT base pair-Au devices. An interesting revelation is that the conductance of the intrinsic AT base pair configuration attains dramatically high values with the symmetrical zig-zag pattern of current, which clearly indicates the transformation of the bond length within the strands of base pair when compared with other samples. A thorough investigation of the transmission coefficients T( E) and HOMO-LUMO gap reveals the misalignment of the strands in base pairs of DNA. The observed results present an insight to extend this work to build biosensing devices to predict the abnormality with the DNA.

  19. Radiosensitivity evaluation of human tumor cell lines by detecting 4977 bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA and comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Liping; Liu Qiang; Wang Qin; Li Jin; Yue Jingyin; Mu Chuanjie; Fan Feiyue

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using the assay of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and comet assay. Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction(SF), the ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and DNA damage were detected by MTY assay, nested PCR technique and comet assay, respectively. Results: The results of MTT assay showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher significantly than that of MCF-7 (P 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The difference of radiosensitivity among these three tumor cell lines was significant after 8 Gy γ-ray irradiation. Conclusions: Combination of many biological parameter is helpful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more accurately. (authors)

  20. Architecture of the 99 bp DNA-six-protein regulatory complex of the lambda att site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingmin; Mierke, Dale F; Biswas, Tapan; Lee, Sang Yeol; Landy, Arthur; Radman-Livaja, Marta

    2006-11-17

    The highly directional and tightly regulated recombination reaction used to site-specifically excise the bacteriophage lambda chromosome out of its E. coli host chromosome requires the binding of six sequence-specific proteins to a 99 bp segment of the phage att site. To gain structural insights into this recombination pathway, we measured 27 FRET distances between eight points on the 99 bp regulatory DNA bound with all six proteins. Triangulation of these distances using a metric matrix distance-geometry algorithm provided coordinates for these eight points. The resulting path for the protein-bound regulatory DNA, which fits well with the genetics, biochemistry, and X-ray crystal structures describing the individual proteins and their interactions with DNA, provides a new structural perspective into the molecular mechanism and regulation of the recombination reaction and illustrates a design by which different families of higher-order complexes can be assembled from different numbers and combinations of the same few proteins.

  1. Novel and differential accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in Swedish and vietnamese patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Jan; Hong, Thai Trinh; Skarstedt, Marita; Löfgren, Sture; Zar, Niklas; Matussek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis and aging. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion is one of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations in human tissues and may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in CRC tissues and its association with clinical factors. We determined the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion in cancer and normal paired tissue samples from 105 Swedish and 88 Vietnamese patients with CRC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion was shown to be significantly more frequent in normal tissues in comparison with paired cancer tissues in both Swedish and Vietnamese patients. The 4977 bp common deletion was significantly more frequent in cancer tissues of the Vietnamese patients compared to the Swedish patients, and in Vietnamese cancer tissues, the 4977 bp deletion was significantly over represented in those with localized disease compared to those with disseminated disease. Moreover, we detected nine novel mtDNA deletions and found a significantly higher rate of these in CRC tissues in Swedish in comparison to Vietnamese patients. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion seems to have an impact on the clinical outcome of CRC in Vietnamese patients, that the Swedish patients accumulate more of the detected novel deletions in CRC tissue compared to Vietnamese patients probably indicates divergent mechanisms in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  2. Hoogsteen base pairs proximal and distal to echinomycin binding sites on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, D.; Dervan, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Forms of the DNA double helix containing non-Watson-Crick base-pairing have been discovered recently based on x-ray diffraction analysis of quionoxaline antibiotic-oligonucleotide complexes. In an effort to find evidence for Hoogsteen base-pairing at quinoxaline-binding sites in solution, chemical footprinting (differential cleavage reactivity) of echinomycin bound to DNA restriction fragments was examined. The authors report that purines (A>G) in the first and/or fourth base-pair positions of occupied echinomycin-binding sites are hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate. The correspondence of the solid-state data and the sites of diethyl pyrocarbonate hyperreactivity suggests that diethyl pyrocarbonate may be a sensitive reagent for the detection of Hoogsteen base-pairing in solution. Moreover, a 12-base-pair segment of alternating A-T DNA, which is 6 base pairs away from the nearest strong echinomycin-binding site, is also hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence of echinomycin. This hyperreactive segment may be an altered form of right-handed DNA that is entirely Hoogsteen base-paired

  3. Widespread Transient Hoogsteen Base-Pairs in Canonical Duplex DNA with Variable Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvey, Heidi S.; Gottardo, Federico L.; Nikolova, Evgenia N.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2015-01-01

    Hoogsteen base-pairing involves a 180 degree rotation of the purine base relative to Watson-Crick base-pairing within DNA duplexes, creating alternative DNA conformations that can play roles in recognition, damage induction, and replication. Here, using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion, we show that transient Hoogsteen base-pairs occur across more diverse sequence and positional contexts than previously anticipated. We observe sequence-specific variations in Hoogsteen base-pair energetic stabilities that are comparable to variations in Watson-Crick base-pair stability, with Hoogsteen base-pairs being more abundant for energetically less favorable Watson-Crick base-pairs. Our results suggest that the variations in Hoogsteen stabilities and rates of formation are dominated by variations in Watson-Crick base pair stability, suggesting a late transition state for the Watson-Crick to Hoogsteen conformational switch. The occurrence of sequence and position-dependent Hoogsteen base-pairs provide a new potential mechanism for achieving sequence-dependent DNA transactions. PMID:25185517

  4. Unstable Hoogsteen base pairs adjacent to echinomycin binding sites within a DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Feigon, J.

    1989-01-01

    The bisintercalation complex present between the DNA octamer [d(ACGTACGT)] 2 and the cyclic octadepsipeptide antibiotic echinomycin has been studied by one- and two-dimensional proton NMR, and the results obtained have been compared with the crystal structures of related DNA-echinomycin complexes. Two echinomycins are found to bind cooperatively to each DNA duplex at the CpG steps, with the two quinoxaline rings of each echinomycin bisintercalating between the C·G and A·T base pairs. At low temperatures, the A·T base pairs on either side of the intercalation site adopt the Hoogsteen conformation, as observed in the crystal structures. However, as the temperature is raised, the Hoogsteen base pairs in the interior of the duplex are destabilized and are observed to be exchanging between the Hoogsteen base pair and either an open or a Watson-Crick base-paired state. The terminal A·T base pairs, which are not as constrained by the helix as the internal base pairs, remain stably Hoogsteen base-paired up to at least 45 degree C. The implications of these results for the biological role of Hoogsteen base pairs in echinomycin-DNA complexes in vivo are discussed

  5. Dpb11/TopBP1 plays distinct roles in DNA replication, checkpoint response and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Østergaard, Vibe Hallundbæk; Haas, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    DPB11/TopBP1 is an essential evolutionarily conserved gene involved in initiation of DNA replication and checkpoint signaling. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dpb11 forms nuclear foci that localize to sites of DNA damage in G1, S and G2 phase, a recruitment that is conserved for its...... and Tel1, and of the checkpoint mediator Rad9. In a site-directed mutagenesis screen, we identify a separation-of-function mutant, dpb11-PF, that is sensitive to DSB-inducing agents yet remains proficient for DNA replication and the S-phase checkpoint at the permissive temperature. The dpb11-PF mutant...... homologue TopBP1 in Gallus gallus. Damage-induced Dpb11 foci are distinct from Sld3 replication initiation foci. Further, Dpb11 foci are dependent on the checkpoint proteins Mec3 (9-1-1 complex) and Rad24, and require the C-terminal domain of Dpb11. Dpb11 foci are independent of the checkpoint kinases Mec1...

  6. ssDNA Pairing Accuracy Increases When Abasic Sites Divide Nucleotides into Small Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Peacock-Villada

    Full Text Available Accurate sequence dependent pairing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA molecules plays an important role in gene chips, DNA origami, and polymerase chain reactions. In many assays accurate pairing depends on mismatched sequences melting at lower temperatures than matched sequences; however, for sequences longer than ~10 nucleotides, single mismatches and correct matches have melting temperature differences of less than 3°C. We demonstrate that appropriately grouping of 35 bases in ssDNA using abasic sites increases the difference between the melting temperature of correct bases and the melting temperature of mismatched base pairings. Importantly, in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites mismatches near one end of a long dsDNA destabilize the annealing at the other end much more effectively than in systems without the abasic sites, suggesting that the dsDNA melts more uniformly in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites. In sum, the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites allows temperature to more accurately discriminate correct base pairings from incorrect ones.

  7. Enhanced Stability of DNA Nanostructures by Incorporation of Unnatural Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Guocheng; Wang, Ting; Fu, Jing; Li, Rujiao; Song, Linlin; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan; Chen, Fei

    2017-11-03

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures hold great promise in the fields of nanofabrication, biosensing and nanomedicine. However, the inherent low stability of the DNA double helices, formed by weak interactions, largely hinders the assembly and functions of DNA nanostructures. In this study, we redesigned and constructed a six-arm DNA junction by incorporation of the unnatural base pairs 5-Me-isoC/isoG and A/2-thioT into the double helices. They not only retained the structural integrity of the DNA nanostructure, but also showed enhanced thermal stability and resistance to T7 Exonuclease digestion. This research may expand the applications of DNA nanostructures in nanofabrication and biomedical fields, and furthermore, the genetic alphabet expansion with unnatural base pairs may enable us to construct more complicated and diversified self-assembled DNA nanostructures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Normal-Mode Analysis of Circular DNA at the Base-Pair Level. 2. Large-Scale Configurational Transformation of a Naturally Curved Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tobias, Irwin; Olson, Wilma K

    2005-01-01

    Fine structural and energetic details embedded in the DNA base sequence, such as intrinsic curvature, are important to the packaging and processing of the genetic material. Here we investigate the internal dynamics of a 200 bp closed circular molecule with natural curvature using a newly developed normal-mode treatment of DNA in terms of neighboring base-pair "step" parameters. The intrinsic curvature of the DNA is described by a 10 bp repeating pattern of bending distortions at successive base-pair steps. We vary the degree of intrinsic curvature and the superhelical stress on the molecule and consider the normal-mode fluctuations of both the circle and the stable figure-8 configuration under conditions where the energies of the two states are similar. To extract the properties due solely to curvature, we ignore other important features of the double helix, such as the extensibility of the chain, the anisotropy of local bending, and the coupling of step parameters. We compare the computed normal modes of the curved DNA model with the corresponding dynamical features of a covalently closed duplex of the same chain length constructed from naturally straight DNA and with the theoretically predicted dynamical properties of a naturally circular, inextensible elastic rod, i.e., an O-ring. The cyclic molecules with intrinsic curvature are found to be more deformable under superhelical stress than rings formed from naturally straight DNA. As superhelical stress is accumulated in the DNA, the frequency, i.e., energy, of the dominant bending mode decreases in value, and if the imposed stress is sufficiently large, a global configurational rearrangement of the circle to the figure-8 form takes place. We combine energy minimization with normal-mode calculations of the two states to decipher the configurational pathway between the two states. We also describe and make use of a general analytical treatment of the thermal fluctuations of an elastic rod to characterize the

  9. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  10. Production of DNA minicircles less than 250 base pairs through a novel concentrated DNA circularization assay enabling minicircle design with NF-κB inhibition activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Thomas; Degrouard, Jeril; Baril, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Midoux, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Double-stranded DNA minicircles of less than 1000 bp in length have great interest in both fundamental research and therapeutic applications. Although minicircles have shown promising activity in gene therapy thanks to their good biostability and better intracellular trafficking, minicircles down to 250 bp in size have not yet been investigated from the test tube to the cell for lack of an efficient production method. Herein, we report a novel versatile plasmid-free method for the production of DNA minicircles comprising fewer than 250 bp. We designed a linear nicked DNA double-stranded oligonucleotide blunt-ended substrate for efficient minicircle production in a ligase-mediated and bending protein-assisted circularization reaction at high DNA concentration of 2 μM. This one pot multi-step reaction based-method yields hundreds of micrograms of minicircle with sequences of any base composition and position and containing or not a variety of site-specifically chemical modifications or physiological supercoiling. Biochemical and cellular studies were then conducted to design a 95 bp minicircle capable of binding in vitro two NF-κB transcription factors per minicircle and to efficiently inhibiting NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity in human cells. Therefore, our production method could pave the way for the design of minicircles as new decoy nucleic acids. PMID:27899652

  11. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-09-27

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. TopBP1 associates with NBS1 and is involved in homologous recombination repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Junya; Izumi, Hideki; Suda, Tetsuji; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    TopBP1 is involved in DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoint. Recent studies have demonstrated that TopBP1 is a direct positive effecter of ATR. However, it is not known how TopBP1 recognizes damaged DNA. Here, we show that TopBP1 formed nuclear foci after exposure to ionizing radiation, but such TopBP1 foci were abolished in Nijmegen breakage syndrome cells. We also show that TopBP1 physically associated with NBS1 in vivo. These results suggested that NBS1 might regulate TopBP1 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage. TopBP1-depleted cells showed hypersensitivity to Mitomycin C and ionizing radiation, an increased frequency of sister-chromatid exchange level, and a reduced frequency of DNA double-strand break induced homologous recombination repair. Together, these results suggested that TopBP1 might be a mediator of DNA damage signaling from NBS1 to ATR and promote homologous recombination repair

  14. Around and beyond 53BP1 Nuclear Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Vidal, Anne; Vignard, Julien; Mirey, Gladys

    2017-12-05

    Within the nucleus, sub-nuclear domains define territories where specific functions occur. Nuclear bodies (NBs) are dynamic structures that concentrate nuclear factors and that can be observed microscopically. Recently, NBs containing the p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), a key component of the DNA damage response, were defined. Interestingly, 53BP1 NBs are visualized during G1 phase, in daughter cells, while DNA damage was generated in mother cells and not properly processed. Unlike most NBs involved in transcriptional processes, replication has proven to be key for 53BP1 NBs, with replication stress leading to the formation of these large chromatin domains in daughter cells. In this review, we expose the composition and organization of 53BP1 NBs and focus on recent findings regarding their regulation and dynamics. We then concentrate on the importance of the replication stress, examine the relation of 53BP1 NBs with DNA damage and discuss their dysfunction.

  15. Around and beyond 53BP1 Nuclear Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Fernandez-Vidal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the nucleus, sub-nuclear domains define territories where specific functions occur. Nuclear bodies (NBs are dynamic structures that concentrate nuclear factors and that can be observed microscopically. Recently, NBs containing the p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1, a key component of the DNA damage response, were defined. Interestingly, 53BP1 NBs are visualized during G1 phase, in daughter cells, while DNA damage was generated in mother cells and not properly processed. Unlike most NBs involved in transcriptional processes, replication has proven to be key for 53BP1 NBs, with replication stress leading to the formation of these large chromatin domains in daughter cells. In this review, we expose the composition and organization of 53BP1 NBs and focus on recent findings regarding their regulation and dynamics. We then concentrate on the importance of the replication stress, examine the relation of 53BP1 NBs with DNA damage and discuss their dysfunction.

  16. Production of DNA minicircles less than 250 base pairs through a novel concentrated DNA circularization assay enabling minicircle design with NF-κB inhibition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Thomas; Degrouard, Jeril; Baril, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Midoux, Patrick; Malinge, Jean-Marc

    2017-03-17

    Double-stranded DNA minicircles of less than 1000 bp in length have great interest in both fundamental research and therapeutic applications. Although minicircles have shown promising activity in gene therapy thanks to their good biostability and better intracellular trafficking, minicircles down to 250 bp in size have not yet been investigated from the test tube to the cell for lack of an efficient production method. Herein, we report a novel versatile plasmid-free method for the production of DNA minicircles comprising fewer than 250 bp. We designed a linear nicked DNA double-stranded oligonucleotide blunt-ended substrate for efficient minicircle production in a ligase-mediated and bending protein-assisted circularization reaction at high DNA concentration of 2 μM. This one pot multi-step reaction based-method yields hundreds of micrograms of minicircle with sequences of any base composition and position and containing or not a variety of site-specifically chemical modifications or physiological supercoiling. Biochemical and cellular studies were then conducted to design a 95 bp minicircle capable of binding in vitro two NF-κB transcription factors per minicircle and to efficiently inhibiting NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity in human cells. Therefore, our production method could pave the way for the design of minicircles as new decoy nucleic acids. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Detection of mitochondrial DNA deletions in human cells induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Xue; Li, Yu-Wen; Chen, De-Qing

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To screen the novel mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) deletions induced by ionizing radiation, and analyze the several kinds of mt DNA deletions, known as 3895 bp, 889 bp, 7436 bp or 4934 bp deletions. Methods: Long-range PCR with two pairs of primers, which could amplify the whole human mitochondrial genome, was used to analyze the lymphoblastoid cell line before and after exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The limited condition PCR was used to certify the possible mt DNA deletion showed by long-range PCR. The PCR products were purified, cloned, sequenced and the sequence result were BLASTed. Regular PCR or nest-PCR were used to analyze the 3895 bp, 889 bp, 7436 bp or 4934 bp deletions before and after radiation exposure. The final PCR products were purified, sequenced and BALSTed on standard human mitochondrial genome sequence database. Results: (1) The predicted bands of mt DNA were observed on the control cell lines, and the possible mt DNA deletions were also detected on the irradiated cell lines. The deletions were certified by the limited condition PCR. The sequence BLAST results of the cloned PCR products showed that two kinds of deletions, 7455 bp deletion (nt 475-7929 in heavy strand) and 9225 bp deletion (nt 7714-369 in heavy strand), which were between two 8 bp direct repeats. Further bioinformatics analysis showed that the two deletions were novel deletions. (2) The 889 bp and 3895 bp deletion were not detected for the cell line samples not exposed to 60 Co γ-rays. The 889 bp and 3895 bp deletions were detected on samples exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The BALST results showed that the 889 bp and 3895 deletions flanked nt 11688 bp-12576, nt 548 bp-4443, respectively. The 7436 bp deletion levels were not changed much before and after irradiation. (3) The 4934 bp deletions had the same pattern as 7436 bp deletion, but it could induced by radiation. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation could induce the human lymphoblastoid two novel mt DNA

  18. Watson-Crick base pairing controls excited-state decay in natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Dominik B; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-10-13

    Excited-state dynamics are essential to understanding the formation of DNA lesions induced by UV light. By using femtosecond IR spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the lifetimes of the excited states of all four bases in the double-stranded environment of natural DNA. After UV excitation of the DNA duplex, we detected a concerted decay of base pairs connected by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. A comparison of single- and double-stranded DNA showed that the reactive charge-transfer states formed in the single strands are suppressed by base pairing in the duplex. The strong influence of the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds indicates that proton transfer opens an efficient decay path in the duplex that prohibits the formation or reduces the lifetime of reactive charge-transfer states. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Network clustering coefficient approach to DNA sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, Guenther J.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul-Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350/sala 2040/90035-003 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica e Quimica da Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Rua Francisco Getulio Vargas 1130, 95001-970 Caxias do Sul (Brazil); Lemke, Ney [Programa Interdisciplinar em Computacao Aplicada, Unisinos, Av. Unisinos, 950, 93022-000 Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Corso, Gilberto [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, 59072 970 Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: corso@dfte.ufrn.br

    2006-05-15

    In this work we propose an alternative DNA sequence analysis tool based on graph theoretical concepts. The methodology investigates the path topology of an organism genome through a triplet network. In this network, triplets in DNA sequence are vertices and two vertices are connected if they occur juxtaposed on the genome. We characterize this network topology by measuring the clustering coefficient. We test our methodology against two main bias: the guanine-cytosine (GC) content and 3-bp (base pairs) periodicity of DNA sequence. We perform the test constructing random networks with variable GC content and imposed 3-bp periodicity. A test group of some organisms is constructed and we investigate the methodology in the light of the constructed random networks. We conclude that the clustering coefficient is a valuable tool since it gives information that is not trivially contained in 3-bp periodicity neither in the variable GC content.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of some non-hydrogen-bonding base pair DNA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Ojha, Rajendra P.; Tiwari, Gargi; Pandey, Vishnudatt; Mall, Vijaysree

    2018-05-01

    In order to elucidate the structural activity of hydrophobic modified DNA, the DMMO2-D5SICS, base pair is introduced as a constituent in different set of 12-mer and 14-mer DNA sequences for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit water solvent. AMBER 14 force field was employed for each set of duplex during the 200ns production-dynamics simulation in orthogonal-box-water solvent by the Particle-Mesh-Ewald (PME) method in infinite periodic boundary conditions (PBC) to determine conformational parameters of the complex. The force-field parameters of modified base-pair were calculated by Gaussian-code using Hartree-Fock /ab-initio methodology. RMSD Results reveal that the conformation of the duplex is sequence dependent and the binding energy of the complex depends on the position of the modified base-pair in the nucleic acid strand. We found that non-bonding energy had a significant contribution to stabilising such type of duplex in comparison to electrostatic energy. The distortion produced within strands by such type of base-pair was local and destabilised the duplex integrity near to substitution, moreover the binding energy of duplex depends on the position of substitution of hydrophobic base-pair and the DNA sequence and strongly supports the corresponding experimental study.

  1. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick, mismatched, and modified DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Celia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed a complete series of Watson–Crick and mismatched DNA base pairs, both in gas phase and in solution. Solvation causes a weakening and lengthening of the hydrogen bonds between the DNA bases because of the stabilization of the lone pairs involved in these bonds. We have

  2. Charge transfer in DNA: role of base pairing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Bunček, M.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, Suppl. (2009), S123-S123 ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /7./. Genoa, 11.07.2009-15.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : DNA * charge transport * base pairing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2009

  3. DNA base dimers are stabilized by hydrogen-bonding interactions including non-Watson-Crick pairing near graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Akshaya; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2012-10-11

    Single- and double-stranded DNA are increasingly being paired with surfaces and nanoparticles for numerous applications, such as sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. Unlike the majority of DNA structures in bulk that are stabilized by canonical Watson-Crick pairing between Ade-Thy and Gua-Cyt, those adsorbed on surfaces are often stabilized by noncanonical base pairing, quartet formation, and base-surface stacking. Not much is known about these kinds of interactions. To build an understanding of the role of non-Watson-Crick pairing on DNA behavior near surfaces, one requires basic information on DNA base pair stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. All-atom molecular simulations of DNA bases in two cases--in bulk water and strongly adsorbed on a graphite surface--are conducted to study the relative strengths of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions for each of the 10 possible combinations of base pairs. The key information obtained from these simulations is the free energy as a function of distance between two bases in a pair. We find that stacking interactions exert the dominant influence on the stability of DNA base pairs in bulk water as expected. The strength of stability for these stacking interactions is found to decrease in the order Gua-Gua > Ade-Gua > Ade-Ade > Gua-Thy > Gua-Cyt > Ade-Thy > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Cyt-Thy > Cyt-Cyt. On the other hand, mutual interactions of surface-adsorbed base pairs are stabilized mostly by hydrogen-bonding interactions in the order Gua-Cyt > Ade-Gua > Ade-Thy > Ade-Ade > Cyt-Thy > Gua-Gua > Cyt-Cyt > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Gua-Thy. Interestingly, several non-Watson-Crick base pairings, which are commonly ignored, have similar stabilization free energies due to interbase hydrogen bonding as Watson-Crick pairs. This clearly highlights the importance of non-Watson-Crick base pairing in the development of secondary structures of oligonucleotides near surfaces.

  4. A quantum theoretical study of reactions of methyldiazonium ion with DNA base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Ganapathy, Vinay; Mishra, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Reactions of methyldiazonium ion at the different sites of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs were investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Display Omitted Highlights: → Methylation of the DNA bases is important as it can cause mutation and cancer. → Methylation reactions of the GC and AT base pairs with CH 3 N 2 + were not studied earlier theoretically. → Experimental observations have been explained using theoretical methods. - Abstract: Methylation of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs by the methyldiazonium ion was investigated employing density functional and second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Methylation at the N3, N7 and O6 sites of guanine, N1, N3 and N7 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine and the O2 and O4 sites of thymine were considered. The computed reactivities for methylation follow the order N7(guanine) > N3(adenine) > O6(guanine) which is in agreement with experiment. The base pairing in DNA is found to play a significant role with regard to reactivities of the different sites.

  5. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science. PMID:25973536

  6. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag(+)-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swasey, Steven M; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-05-14

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag(+) is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg(2+). In contrast to prior studies of Ag(+) incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag(+)-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag(+) bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag(+)-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science.

  7. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-05-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science.

  8. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. DNA electronic circular dichroism on the inter-base pair scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Meo, Florent; Nørby, Morten Steen; Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    A successful elucidation of the near-ultraviolet electronic circular dichroism spectrum of a short double-stranded DNA is reported. Time-dependent density functional theory methods are shown to accurately predict spectra and assign bands on the microscopic base-pair scale, a finding that opens...... the field for using circular dichroism spectroscopy as a sensitive nanoscale probe of DNA to reveal its complex interactions with the environment. (Chemical Equation Presented)....

  10. Characterization of a cancer cell line that expresses a splicing variant form of 53BP1: Separation of checkpoint and repair functions in 53BP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Matsui, Tadashi; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Kurihara, Takayuki; Date, Takayasu

    2008-01-01

    53BP1 plays important roles in checkpoint signaling and repair for DNA double-strand breaks. We found that a colon cancer cell line, SW48, expressed a splicing variant form of 53BP1, which lacks the residues corresponding to exons 10 and 11. Activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM and ATR targets occurred in SW48 cells in response to X-irradiation, and these X-ray-induced responses were not enhanced by expression of full-length 53BP1 in SW48 cells, indicating that this splicing variant fully activates the major checkpoint signaling in SW48 cells. In contrast, the expression of full-length 53BP1 in SW48 cells promoted the repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage, evidenced by faster disappearance of X-ray-induced γ-H2AX foci, a marker for DNA damage, and less residual chromosomal aberrations after X-irradiation. We conclude that the two major roles of 53BP1, the checkpoint signaling and repair for DNA damage, can be functionally separated

  11. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  12. Stability of non-Watson-Crick G-A/A-G base pair in synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuko; Sone, Yumiko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2004-03-01

    A non-Watson-Crick G-A/A-G base pair is found in SECIS (selenocysteine-insertion sequence) element in the 3'-untranslated region of Se-protein mRNAs and in the functional site of the hammerhead ribozyme. We studied the stability of G-A/A-G base pair (bold) in 17mer GT(U)GACGGAAACCGGAAC synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides by thermal melting experiments and gel electrophoresis. The measured Tm value of DNA oligonucleotide having G-A/A-G pair showed an intermediate value (58 degrees C) between that of Watson-Crick G-C/C-G base pair (75 degrees C) and that of G-G/A-A of non-base-pair (40 degrees C). Similar thermal melting patterns were obtained with RNA oligonucleotides. This result indicates that the secondary structure of oligonucleotide having G-A/A-G base pair is looser than that of the G-C type Watson-Crick base pair. In the comparison between RNA and DNA having G-A/A-G base pair, the Tm value of the RNA oligonucleotide was 11 degrees C lower than that of DNA, indicating that DNA has a more rigid structure than RNA. The stained pattern of oligonucleotide on polyacrylamide gel clarified that the mobility of the DNA oligonucleotide G-A/A-G base pair changed according to the urea concentration from the rigid state (near the mobility of G-C/C-G oligonucleotide) in the absence of urea to the random state (near the mobility of G-G/A-A oligonucleotide) in 7 M urea. However, the RNA oligonucleotide with G-A/A-G pair moved at an intermediate mobility between that of oligonucleotide with G-C/C-G and of the oligonucleotide with G-G/A-A, and the mobility pattern did not depend on urea concentration. Thus, DNA and RNA oligonucleotides with the G-A/A-G base pair showed a pattern indicating an intermediate structure between the rigid Watson-Crick base pair and the random structure of non-base pair. RNA with G-A/A-G base pair has the intermediate structure not influenced by urea concentration. Finally, this study indicated that the intermediate rigidity imparted by Non

  13. Comparison between Mt-DNA D-Loop and Cyt B primers for porcine DNA detection in meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Azhana; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products in the market using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and commercial PCR-southern hybridization analysis. Porcine DNA detection in meat products was tested due to some issues associated with the adulteration of food products in Malaysia. This is an important issue especially for Halal authentication which is required for some religious practices such as in Islam and Hinduisms. Many techniques have been developed for determining the Halal status of food products. In this paper, mt-DNA D-loop primer and cytochrome (cyt) b were used to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products. Positive and negative controls were always present for each batch of extraction. DNA of raw pork meat was used as a positive control while nucleus free water is used as negative control. A pair of oligonucleotide primer was used namely Pork1 and Pork2 which produced amplicon of 531 base pair (bp) in size. While, PCR-southern hybridization was conducted using primers readily supplied by commercial PCR-Southern hybridization and produced amplicon with 276 bp in size. In the present study, demonstrated that none of the samples were contaminated with porcine residuals but selected samples with pork meat were positive. The species-specific PCR amplification yielded excellent results for identification of pork derivatives in food products and it is a potentially reliable and suitable technique in routine food analysis for Halal certification.

  14. Master equation approach to DNA breathing in heteropolymer DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K; Lomholt, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    After crossing an initial barrier to break the first base-pair (bp) in double-stranded DNA, the disruption of further bps is characterized by free energies up to a few k(B)T. Thermal motion within the DNA double strand therefore causes the opening of intermittent single-stranded denaturation zones......, the DNA bubbles. The unzipping and zipping dynamics of bps at the two zipper forks of a bubble, where the single strand of the denatured zone joins the still intact double strand, can be monitored by single molecule fluorescence or NMR methods. We here establish a dynamic description of this DNA breathing...... in a heteropolymer DNA with given sequence in terms of a master equation that governs the time evolution of the joint probability distribution for the bubble size and position along the sequence. The transfer coefficients are based on the Poland-Scheraga free energy model. We derive the autocorrelation function...

  15. Triple helical DNA in a duplex context and base pair opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Nilsson, Lennart; Villa, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    It is fundamental to explore in atomic detail the behavior of DNA triple helices as a means to understand the role they might play in vivo and to better engineer their use in genetic technologies, such as antigene therapy. To this aim we have performed atomistic simulations of a purine-rich antiparallel triple helix stretch of 10 base triplets flanked by canonical Watson–Crick double helices. At the same time we have explored the thermodynamic behavior of a flipping Watson–Crick base pair in the context of the triple and double helix. The third strand can be accommodated in a B-like duplex conformation. Upon binding, the double helix changes shape, and becomes more rigid. The triple-helical region increases its major groove width mainly by oversliding in the negative direction. The resulting conformations are somewhere between the A and B conformations with base pairs remaining almost perpendicular to the helical axis. The neighboring duplex regions maintain a B DNA conformation. Base pair opening in the duplex regions is more probable than in the triplex and binding of the Hoogsteen strand does not influence base pair breathing in the neighboring duplex region. PMID:25228466

  16. InterProScan Result: BP184018 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP184018 BP184018_2_ORF2 4FEA411FDBEADEDD PANTHER PTHR21347 CLEFT LIP AND PALATE ASSOCIATED TRANSME...MBRANE PROTEIN-RELATED 6.1e-73 T IPR008429 Cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1 ...

  17. AcEST: BP912127 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D09 582 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D09. BP912127 - Show BP91212...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D09. Accession BP912127 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...n database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912127|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA,... clone: YMU001_000015_D09. (582 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 total ...p|P42825|DNAJ2_ARATH Chaperone protein dnaJ 2 OS=Arabidopsis th... 79 2e-14 sp|Q09912|PSI1_SCHPO Protein psi

  18. Effect of base-pair inhomogeneities on charge transport along the DNA molecule, mediated by twist and radial polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmero, F; Archilla, J F R; Hennig, D; Romero, F R

    2004-01-01

    Some recent results for a three-dimensional, semi-classical, tight-binding model for DNA show that there are two types of polarons, namely radial and twist polarons, which can transport charge along the DNA molecule. However, the existence of two types of base pairs in real DNA makes it crucial to find out if charge transport also exists in DNA chains with different base pairs. In this paper, we address this problem in its simple case, a homogeneous chain except for a single different base pair, which we call a base-pair inhomogeneity, and its effect on charge transport. Radial polarons experience either reflection or trapping. However, twist polarons are good candidates for charge transport along real DNA. This transport is also very robust with respect to weak parametric and diagonal disorder

  19. InterProScan Result: BP116799 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP116799 BP116799_1_ORF2 D3F3F8C61868AD4C PANTHER PTHR11792 ARRESTIN 3.5e-15 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biological... Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: BP116799 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP116799 BP116799_1_ORF2 D3F3F8C61868AD4C PRINTS PR00309 ARRESTIN 6e-17 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biological... Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  1. The MCM-associated protein MCM-BP is important for human nuclear morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Sakwe, Amos M; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Mini-chromosome maintenance complex-binding protein (MCM-BP) was discovered as a protein that is strongly associated with human MCM proteins, known to be crucial for DNA replication in providing DNA helicase activity. The Xenopus MCM-BP homologue appears to play a role in unloading MCM complexes from chromatin after DNA synthesis; however, the importance of MCM-BP and its functional contribution to human cells has been unclear. Here we show that depletion of MCM-BP by sustained expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) results in highly abnormal nuclear morphology and centrosome amplification. The abnormal nuclear morphology was not seen with depletion of other MCM proteins and was rescued with shRNA-resistant MCM-BP. MCM-BP depletion was also found to result in transient activation of the G2 checkpoint, slowed progression through G2 and increased replication protein A foci, indicative of replication stress. In addition, MCM-BP depletion led to increased cellular levels of MCM proteins throughout the cell cycle including soluble MCM pools. The results suggest that MCM-BP makes multiple contributions to human cells that are not limited to unloading of the MCM complex.

  2. Discrimination among individual Watson–Crick base pairs at the termini of single DNA hairpin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah A.; Winters-Hilt, Stephen; DeGuzman, Veronica S.; Deamer, David; Ridino, Sam E.; Rodgers, Joseph T.; Olsen, Hugh E.; Marziali, Andre; Akeson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale α-hemolysin pores can be used to analyze individual DNA or RNA molecules. Serial examination of hundreds to thousands of molecules per minute is possible using ionic current impedance as the measured property. In a recent report, we showed that a nanopore device coupled with machine learning algorithms could automatically discriminate among the four combinations of Watson–Crick base pairs and their orientations at the ends of individual DNA hairpin molecules. Here we use kinetic analysis to demonstrate that ionic current signatures caused by these hairpin molecules depend on the number of hydrogen bonds within the terminal base pair, stacking between the terminal base pair and its nearest neighbor, and 5′ versus 3′ orientation of the terminal bases independent of their nearest neighbors. This report constitutes evidence that single Watson–Crick base pairs can be identified within individual unmodified DNA hairpin molecules based on their dynamic behavior in a nanoscale pore. PMID:12582251

  3. InterProScan Result: BP117067 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP117067 BP117067_1_ORF2 D483359C05197373 PFAM PF00067 p450 6e-05 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  4. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madsen, Charlotte S.

    2013-01-01

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand.......Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand....

  5. InterProScan Result: BP124291 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP124291 BP124291_5_ORF1 92B626ADD33C8436 PFAM PF00067 p450 1.8e-09 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: BP123442 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP123442 BP123442_1_ORF1 331440C6CA592A17 PRINTS PR00385 P450 6.3e-05 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  7. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; DeSmet, Marsha; Thomas, Yanique; Morgan, Iain M.; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication

  8. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana, E-mail: skangina@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); DeSmet, Marsha, E-mail: mdesmet@iupui.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Thomas, Yanique, E-mail: ysthomas@umail.iu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Morgan, Iain M., E-mail: immorgan@vcu.edu [VCU Philips Institute for Oral Health Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Androphy, Elliot J., E-mail: eandro@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  9. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1–2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. PMID:26507855

  10. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  11. A LDR-PCR approach for multiplex polymorphisms genotyping of severely degraded DNA with fragment sizes <100 bp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Bao-Jie; Guan, Hong-Yu; Pang, Hao; Xuan, Jin-Feng

    2009-11-01

    Reducing amplicon sizes has become a major strategy for analyzing degraded DNA typical of forensic samples. However, amplicon sizes in current mini-short tandem repeat-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mini-sequencing assays are still not suitable for analysis of severely degraded DNA. In this study, we present a multiplex typing method that couples ligase detection reaction with PCR that can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and small-scale insertion/deletions in a sample of severely fragmented DNA. This method adopts thermostable ligation for allele discrimination and subsequent PCR for signal enhancement. In this study, four polymorphic loci were used to assess the ability of this technique to discriminate alleles in an artificially degraded sample of DNA with fragment sizes <100 bp. Our results showed clear allelic discrimination of single or multiple loci, suggesting that this method might aid in the analysis of extremely degraded samples in which allelic drop out of larger fragments is observed.

  12. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O'Neil, Ian A; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Bates, Andrew D; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-11-01

    8-Nitro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesion, which is sufficiently stable to be incorporated into ODNs. Physicochemical studies demonstrated that 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine adopts a syn conformation about the glycosidic bond; thermal melting studies and molecular modelling suggest a relatively stable syn-8-nitroG·anti-G base pair. Interestingly, when this lesion analogue was placed in a primer-template system, extension of the primer by either avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase (AMV-RT) or human DNA polymerase β (pol β), was significantly impaired, but where incorporation opposite 8-nitroguanine did occur, pol β showed a 2:1 preference to insert dA over dC, while AMV-RT incorporated predominantly dC. The fact that no 8-nitroG·G base pairing is seen in the primer extension products suggests that the polymerases may discriminate against this pairing system on the basis of its poor geometric match to a Watson-Crick pair.

  13. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O’Neil, Ian A.; Iwanejko, Lesley A.; Bates, Andrew D.; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    8-Nitro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesion, which is sufficiently stable to be incorporated into ODNs. Physicochemical studies demonstrated that 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine adopts a syn conformation about the glycosidic bond; thermal melting studies and molecular modelling suggest a relatively stable syn-8-nitroG·anti-G base pair. Interestingly, when this lesion analogue was placed in a primer-template system, extension of the primer by either avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase (AMV-RT) or human DNA polymerase β (pol β), was significantly impaired, but where incorporation opposite 8-nitroguanine did occur, pol β showed a 2:1 preference to insert dA over dC, while AMV-RT incorporated predominantly dC. The fact that no 8-nitroG·G base pairing is seen in the primer extension products suggests that the polymerases may discriminate against this pairing system on the basis of its poor geometric match to a Watson–Crick pair. PMID:22965127

  14. Sequence Dependent Electrophoretic Separations of DNA in Pluronic F127 Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Seungyong; van Winkle, David H.

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis has successfully been used to visualize the separation of DNA fragments of the same length. We electrophorese a double-stranded DNA ladder in an Agarose gel for the first dimension and in gels of Pluronic F127 for the second dimension at room temperature. The 1000 bp band that travels together as a single band in an Agarose gel is split into two bands in Pluronic gels. The slower band follows the exponential decay trend that the other ladder constituents do. After sequencing the DNA fragments, the faster band has an apparently random sequence, while the slower band and the others have two A-tracts in each 250 bp segment. The A-tracts consist of a series of at least five adenine bases pairing with thymine bases. This result leads to the conclusion that the migration of the DNA molecules bent with A-tracts is more retarded in Pluronic gels than the wild-type of DNA molecules.

  15. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swasey, Steven M; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson–Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag + , as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag + –DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag + -induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2–24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag + can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag + -mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg 2+ , higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag + -mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag + -mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’. (paper)

  16. Watson-Crick base pairs with thiocarbonyl groups: How sulfur changes the hydrogen bonds in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed mimics of Watson-Crick AT and GC base pairs in which N-H•••O hydrogen bonds are replaced by N-H•••S, using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory at BP86/TZ2P level. The general effect of the above substitutions is an elongation and a

  17. Do mtDNA Deletions Play a Role in the Development of Nasal Polyposis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Tatar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Nasal polyposis (NP is an inflammatory disease of the nasal mucosa and paranasal sinuses. Mitochondria are the cellular organelles which produce cellular energy by Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS, and they have own inheritance material, mtDNA. mtDNA is affected by reactive oxygen samples (ROS which are produced by both OXPHOS and the inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 bp and 7400 bp deletions of mtDNA in nasal polyposis tissue, and to indicate the possible association of mtDNA deletions with NP. Methods:Thirty-three patients, aged 15 to 65 years, with nasal polyposis were selected to be assessed for mitochondrial DNA deletions. The patients with possible mtDNA mutations due to mitochondrial disease, being treated with radiotherapy, of advanced age, with a familiar history, aspirin hypersensitivity, or a history of asthma, were excluded. Polyp excision surgery was applied to the treatment of the NP, and after histopathological diagnosis 1x1 cm of polyp tissue samples were used to isolate mtDNA. The 4977 bp and 7400 bp deletion regions, and two control regions of mtDNA were assessed by using four pairs of primers. DNA extractions from the NP tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients were made, and then Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR were made. PCR products were separated in 2% agarose gel.Results:No patient had either the 4977 bp deletion or the 7400 bp deletion in their NP tissue, and neither were these deletions evident in their peripheral blood. Two control sequences, one of them from a non-deleted region, and the other from a possible deletion region, were detected in the NP tissues and peripheral blood of all the patients.Conclusions:We had anticipated that some mtDNA deletion might have occurred in NP tissue due to the increased ROS levels caused by chronic inflammation, but we did not detect any deletion. Probably, the duration of inflammation in NP is insufficient to form mtDNA

  18. Aviram–Ratner rectifying mechanism for DNA base-pair sequencing through graphene nanogaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapito, Luis A; Gayles, Jacob; Wolowiec, Christian; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that biological molecules such as Watson–Crick DNA base pairs can behave as biological Aviram–Ratner electrical rectifiers because of the spatial separation and weak hydrogen bonding between the nucleobases. We have performed a parallel computational implementation of the ab initio non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) theory to determine the electrical response of graphene—base-pair—graphene junctions. The results show an asymmetric (rectifying) current–voltage response for the cytosine–guanine base pair adsorbed on a graphene nanogap. In sharp contrast we find a symmetric response for the thymine–adenine case. We propose applying the asymmetry of the current–voltage response as a sensing criterion to the technological challenge of rapid DNA sequencing via graphene nanogaps. (paper)

  19. ATM signaling and 53BP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zgheib, Omar; Huyen, Yentram; DiTullio, Richard A.; Snyder, Andrew; Venere, Monica; Stavridi, Elena S.; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2005-01-01

    The ATM (mutated in Ataxia-Telangiectasia) protein kinase is an important player in signaling the presence of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in higher eukaryotes. Recent studies suggest that ATM monitors the presence of DNA DSBs indirectly, through DNA DSB-induced changes in chromatin structure. One of the proteins that sense these chromatin structure changes is 53BP1, a DNA damage checkpoint protein conserved in all eukaryotes and the putative ortholog of the S. cerevisiae RAD9 protein. We review here the mechanisms by which ATM is activated in response to DNA DSBs, as well as key ATM substrates that control cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA repair

  20. Assembly of human C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) into tetramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesis, Andrew G; Jecrois, Anne M; Hayes, Janelle A; Schiffer, Celia A; Royer, William E

    2018-06-08

    C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) and CtBP2 are transcriptional coregulators that repress numerous cellular processes, such as apoptosis, by binding transcription factors and recruiting chromatin-remodeling enzymes to gene promoters. The NAD(H)-linked oligomerization of human CtBP is coupled to its co-transcriptional activity, which is implicated in cancer progression. However, the biologically relevant level of CtBP assembly has not been firmly established; nor has the stereochemical arrangement of the subunits above that of a dimer. Here, multi-angle light scattering (MALS) data established the NAD + - and NADH-dependent assembly of CtBP1 and CtBP2 into tetramers. An examination of subunit interactions within CtBP1 and CtBP2 crystal lattices revealed that both share a very similar tetrameric arrangement resulting from assembly of two dimeric pairs, with specific interactions probably being sensitive to NAD(H) binding. Creating a series of mutants of both CtBP1 and CtBP2, we tested the hypothesis that the crystallographically observed interdimer pairing stabilizes the solution tetramer. MALS data confirmed that these mutants disrupt both CtBP1 and CtBP2 tetramers, with the dimer generally remaining intact, providing the first stereochemical models for tetrameric assemblies of CtBP1 and CtBP2. The crystal structure of a subtle destabilizing mutant suggested that small structural perturbations of the hinge region linking the substrate- and NAD-binding domains are sufficient to weaken the CtBP1 tetramer. These results strongly suggest that the tetramer is important in CtBP function, and the series of CtBP mutants reported here can be used to investigate the physiological role of the tetramer. © 2018 Bellesis et al.

  1. Evidence supporting a role for TopBP1 and Brd4 in the initiation but not continuation of human papillomavirus 16 E1/E2-mediated DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Donaldson, Mary M; Dornan, Edward S; Wang, Xu; Bristol, Molly; Bodily, Jason M; Morgan, Iain M

    2015-05-01

    To replicate the double-stranded human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA genome, viral proteins E1 and E2 associate with the viral origin of replication, and E2 can also regulate transcription from adjacent promoters. E2 interacts with host proteins in order to regulate both transcription and replication; TopBP1 and Brd4 are cellular proteins that interact with HPV16 E2. Previous work with E2 mutants demonstrated the Brd4 requirement for the transactivation properties of E2, while TopBP1 is required for DNA replication induced by E2 from the viral origin of replication in association with E1. More-recent studies have also implicated Brd4 in the regulation of DNA replication by E2 and E1. Here, we demonstrate that both TopBP1 and Brd4 are present at the viral origin of replication and that interaction with E2 is required for optimal initiation of DNA replication. Both cellular proteins are present in E1-E2-containing nuclear foci, and the viral origin of replication is required for the efficient formation of these foci. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against either TopBP1 or Brd4 destroys the E1-E2 nuclear bodies but has no effect on E1-E2-mediated levels of DNA replication. An E2 mutation in the context of the complete HPV16 genome that compromises Brd4 interaction fails to efficiently establish episomes in primary human keratinocytes. Overall, the results suggest that interactions between TopBP1 and E2 and between Brd4 and E2 are required to correctly initiate DNA replication but are not required for continuing DNA replication, which may be mediated by alternative processes such as rolling circle amplification and/or homologous recombination. Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in many human cancers, including cervical and head and neck cancers, and is responsible for the annual deaths of hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. The current vaccine will save lives in future generations, but antivirals targeting HPV16 are required for the alleviation of disease

  2. Force fluctuations assist nanopore unzipping of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viasnoff, V; Chiaruttini, N; Muzard, J; Bockelmann, U

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally study the statistical distributions and the voltage dependence of the unzipping time of 45 base-pair-long double-stranded DNA through a nanopore. We then propose a quantitative theoretical description considering the nanopore unzipping process as a random walk of the opening fork through the DNA sequence energy landscape biased by a time-fluctuating force. To achieve quantitative agreement fluctuations need to be correlated over the millisecond range and have an amplitude of order k B T/bp. Significantly slower or faster fluctuations are not appropriate, suggesting that the unzipping process is efficiently enhanced by noise in the kHz range. We further show that the unzipping time of short 15 base-pair hairpins does not always increase with the global stability of the double helix and we theoretically study the role of DNA elasticity on the conversion of the electrical bias into a mechanical unzipping force.

  3. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  4. EST Table: BP117517 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP117517 ce--0464 10/09/28 63 %/173 aa ref|XP_002092422.1| GE14184 [Drosophila yakuba] gb|EDW92134.1| GE14...184 [Drosophila yakuba] 10/08/28 63 %/173 aa FBpp0259194|DyakGE14184-PA 10/08/28 35 %

  5. Cloning of cDNA encoding steroid 11β-hydroxylase (P450c11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, S.C.; Szabo, P.; Vitek, A.; Grzeschik, K.H.; John, M.; White, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated bovine and human adrenal cDNA clones encoding the adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for 11β-hydroxylation (P450c11). A bovine adrenal cDNA library constructed in the bacteriophage λ vector gt10 was probed with a previously isolated cDNA clone corresponding to part of the 3' untranslated region of the 4.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA encoding P450c11. Several clones with 3.2-kb cDNA inserts were isolated. Sequence analysis showed that they overlapped the original probe by 300 base pairs (bp). Combined cDNA and RNA sequence data demonstrated a continuous open reading frame of 1509 bases. P450c11 is predicted to contain 479 amino acid residues in the mature protein in addition to a 24-residue amino-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence. A bovine clone was used to isolate a homologous clone with a 3.5-kb insert from a human adrenal cDNA library. A region of 1100 bp was 81% homologous to 769 bp of the coding sequence of the bovine cDNA except for a 400-bp segment presumed to be an unprocessed intron. Hybridization of the human cDNA to DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines and in situ hybridization to metaphase spreads of human chromosomes localized the gene to the middle of the long arm of chromosome 8. These data should be useful in developing reagents for heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency, the second most frequent cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

  6. The fission yeast minichromosome maintenance (MCM)-binding protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, regulates MCM function during prereplicative complex formation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-03-08

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1(+), two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1(ts)) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1(ts) mutants were suppressed by a mcm5(+) multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1(ts) mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1(ts) mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1(ts) mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex.

  7. The Fission Yeast Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM)-binding Protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, Regulates MCM Function during Prereplicative Complex Formation in DNA Replication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1+, two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1ts) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1ts mutants were suppressed by a mcm5+ multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1ts mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1ts mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1ts mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex. PMID:23322785

  8. Ancient DNA Reveals Late Pleistocene Existence of Ostriches in Indian Sub-Continent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Jain

    Full Text Available Ancient DNA (aDNA analysis of extinct ratite species is of considerable interest as it provides important insights into their origin, evolution, paleogeographical distribution and vicariant speciation in congruence with continental drift theory. In this study, DNA hotspots were detected in fossilized eggshell fragments of ratites (dated ≥25000 years B.P. by radiocarbon dating using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. DNA was isolated from five eggshell fragments and a 43 base pair (bp sequence of a 16S rRNA mitochondrial-conserved region was successfully amplified and sequenced from one of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA sequence revealed a 92% identity of the fossil eggshells to Struthio camelus and their position basal to other palaeognaths, consistent with the vicariant speciation model. Our study provides the first molecular evidence for the presence of ostriches in India, complementing the continental drift theory of biogeographical movement of ostriches in India, and opening up a new window into the evolutionary history of ratites.

  9. EST Table: BP124521 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP124521 epV32477 10/09/28 59 %/164 aa dbj|BAA86911.1| homologue of Sarcophaga 26,29kDa proteinase [Periplan...eta americana] 10/08/29 55 %/163 aa FBpp0160847|DmojGI11630-PA 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/1

  10. EST Table: BP123885 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP123885 epV31590 10/09/28 57 %/174 aa dbj|BAA86911.1| homologue of Sarcophaga 26,29kDa proteinase [Periplan...eta americana] 10/08/29 55 %/163 aa FBpp0160847|DmojGI11630-PA 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/1

  11. EST Table: BP125106 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP125106 fbpv0387 10/09/28 58 %/165 aa dbj|BAA86911.1| homologue of Sarcophaga 26,29kDa proteinase [Periplan...eta americana] 10/08/29 56 %/165 aa FBpp0212871|DsimGD14469-PA 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/1

  12. EST Table: BP125521 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP125521 fbpv0944 10/09/28 59 %/165 aa dbj|BAA86911.1| homologue of Sarcophaga 26,29kDa proteinase [Periplan...eta americana] 10/08/29 56 %/164 aa FBpp0160847|DmojGI11630-PA 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/1

  13. EST Table: BP125005 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP125005 fbpv0197 10/09/28 58 %/185 aa dbj|BAA86911.1| homologue of Sarcophaga 26,29kDa proteinase [Periplan...eta americana] 10/08/29 58 %/173 aa FBpp0160847|DmojGI11630-PA 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/1

  14. EST Table: BP121749 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP121749 ceN-5256 10/09/28 100 %/172 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-related [Bombyx...|GB16561-PA 10/09/10 44 %/178 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS791050 ceN- ...

  15. EST Table: BP121763 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP121763 ceN-5273 10/09/28 99 %/184 aa ref|NP_001036831.1| saposin-related [Bombyx ...GB16561-PA 10/09/10 43 %/192 aa gi|91077504|ref|XP_966852.1| PREDICTED: similar to saposin isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS791050 ceN- ...

  16. Charge transport properties of DNA aperiodic molecule: The role of interbase hopping in Watson-Crick base pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinurat, E. N.; Yudiarsah, E.

    2017-07-01

    The charge transport properties of DNA aperiodic molecule has been studied by considering various interbase hopping parameter on Watson-Crick base pair. 32 base pairs long double-stranded DNA aperiodic model with sequence GCTAGTACGTGACGTAGCTAGGATATGCCTGA on one chain and its complement on the other chain is used. Transfer matrix method has been used to calculate transmission probabilities, for determining I-V characteristic using Landauer Büttiker formula. DNA molecule is modeled using tight binding hamiltonian combined with the theory of Slater-Koster. The result show, the increment of Watson-Crick hopping value leads to the transmission probabilities and current of DNA aperiodic molecule increases.

  17. EST Table: BP182610 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP182610 NRPG0829 10/09/28 35 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen...nl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 NRPG ...

  18. Study of force induced melting of dsDNA as a function of length and conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilowicz, Claudia; Hatch, Kristi; Conover, Alyson; Gunaratne, Ruwan; Coljee, Vincent; Prentiss, Mara; Ducas, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    We measure the constant force required to melt double-stranded (ds) DNA as a function of length for lengths from 12 to 100 000 base pairs, where the force is applied to the 3'3' or 5'5' ends of the dsDNA. Molecules with 32 base pairs or fewer melt before overstretching. For these short molecules, the melting force is independent of the ends to which the force is applied and the shear force as a function of length is well described by de Gennes theory with a de Gennes length of less than 10 bp. Molecules with lengths of 500 base pairs or more overstretch before melting. For these long molecules, the melting force depends on the ends to which the force is applied. The melting force as a function of length increases even when the length exceeds 1000 bp, where the length dependence is inconsistent with de Gennes theory. Finally, we expand de Gennes melting theory to 3'5' pulling and compare the predictions with experimental results.

  19. BP1 Homeoprotein Enhances Metastatic Potential in ER-negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yebo; Lian, Yi; Kim, Kyung Soon; Zhang, Lei; Hindle, A. Katharine; Brody, Fred; Siegel, Robert S.; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Fu, Sidney W.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis remain a major cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. It was reported that BP1, a homeobox isoform of DLX4, is overexpressed in 80% of breast cancer patients and in 100% of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumors. The prevalence of BP1 positive cells and the intensity of BP1 immunoreactivity increased with the extent of ductal proliferation and tumorigenesis. These findings imply that BP1 may play an important role in ER- breast cancer. We sought to determine the effects and mechanisms of BP1 on cell proliferation and metastasis using ER- Hs578T cells as a model. Cells were transfected with either pcDNA3.2 plasmid containing BP1 gene, or pcDNA3.2 vector, then selected and cloned. Overexpression of BP1 increased cell proliferation rate by 2-5 fold (p=2.0. Of those genes, 49 were up-regulated and 22 were down-regulated. Significant pathways were identified involving cell proliferation and metastasis. These data demonstrated that overexpression of BP1 significantly enhanced cell proliferation and metastatic potential in ER- Hs578T cells. Further analysis with more ER- cell lines and patient samples is warranted to establish BP1 as a therapeutic target for ER- breast cancer. PMID:20842225

  20. EST Table: BP121050 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP121050 ceN-4078 10/09/28 35 %/122 aa ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephen...nl|Amel|GB19565-PA 10/09/10 35 %/122 aa gi|91093471|ref|XP_967620.1| PREDICTED: similar to anopheles stephensi ubiquitin, putative [Tribolium castaneum] FS914988 ceN- ...

  1. DNA lability induced by nimustine and ramustine in rat glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineura, K; Fushimi, S; Itoh, Y; Kowada, M

    1988-01-01

    The DNA labile sites induced by two nitrosoureas, nimustine (ACNU) and ramustine (MCNU) synthesised in Japan, have been examined in highly reiterated DNA sequences of rat glioma cells. Reiterated fragments of 167 and 203 base pairs (bp), obtained after Hind III and Hae III restriction endonuclease digestion of rat glioma cells DNA, were used as target DNA sequences to determine the labile sites. In vitro reaction with ACNU and MCNU resulted in scission products corresponding to the locations of guanine. Subsequent piperidine hydrolysis produced more frequent breaks of the phosphodiester bonds at guanine positions, thus forming alkali-labile sites. Images PMID:3236017

  2. MCM-BP regulates unloading of the MCM2–7 helicase in late S phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Atsuya; Frappier, Lori; Méchali, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Origins of DNA replication are licensed by recruiting MCM2–7 to assemble the prereplicative complex (pre-RC). How MCM2–7 is inactivated or removed from chromatin at the end of S phase is still unclear. Here, we show that MCM-BP can disassemble the MCM2–7 complex and might function as an unloader of MCM2–7 from chromatin. In Xenopus egg extracts, MCM-BP exists in a stable complex with MCM7, but is not associated with the MCM2–7 hexameric complex. MCM-BP accumulates in nuclei in late S phase, well after the loading of MCM2–7 onto chromatin. MCM-BP immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts inhibits replication-dependent MCM dissociation without affecting pre-RC formation and DNA replication. When excess MCM-BP is incubated with Xenopus egg extracts or immunopurified MCM2–7, it binds to MCM proteins and promotes disassembly of the MCM2–7 complex. Recombinant MCM-BP also releases MCM2–7 from isolated late-S-phase chromatin, but this activity is abolished when DNA replication is blocked. MCM-BP silencing in human cells also delays MCM dissociation in late S phase. We propose that MCM-BP plays a key role in the mechanism by which pre-RC is cleared from replicated DNA in vertebrate cells. PMID:21196493

  3. How to open the treasure chest? Optimising DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkinen, Tiina; Staats, Martijn; Richardson, James E; Cowan, Robyn S; Bakker, Freek T

    2012-01-01

    Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource for DNA studies, but the use of herbarium specimens in molecular studies has thus far been slowed down by difficulty in obtaining amplifiable DNA. Here we compare a set of commercially available DNA extraction protocols and their performance in terms of DNA purity and yield, and PCR amplification success as measured by using three differentially sized markers, the rbcL barcoding marker (cpDNA), the LEAFY exon 3 (nrDNA), and the trnL((UAA)) P6 loop (cpDNA). Results reveal large differences between extraction methods, where DNA purity rather than yield is shown to be strongly correlated with PCR success. Amplicon size shows similarly strong correlation with PCR success, with the shortest fragment showing the highest success rate (78%, P6 loop, 10-143 base pairs (bp)) and the largest fragment the lowest success (10%, rbcL, 670 bp). The effect of specimen preparation method on PCR success was also tested. Results show that drying method strongly affects PCR success, especially the availability of fragments longer than 250 bp, where longer fragments are more available for PCR amplification in air dried material compared to alcohol dried specimens. Results from our study indicate that projects relying on poor-quality starting material such as herbarium or scat samples should focus on extracting pure DNA and aim to amplify short target regions (herbarium samples available into barcoding initiatives and other molecular studies.

  4. Type I-E CRISPR-Cas Systems Discriminate Target from Non-Target DNA through Base Pairing-Independent PAM Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Wiedenheft, Blake; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts are processed into small RNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to invading nucleic acids by complementary base pairing. However, to avoid autoimmunity it is essential that these RNA-guides exclusively target invading DNA and not complementary DNA sequences (i.e., self-sequences) located in the host's own CRISPR locus. Previous work on the Type III-A CRISPR system from Staphylococcus epidermidis has demonstrated that a portion of the CRISPR RNA-guide sequence is involved in self versus non-self discrimination. This self-avoidance mechanism relies on sensing base pairing between the RNA-guide and sequences flanking the target DNA. To determine if the RNA-guide participates in self versus non-self discrimination in the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli we altered base pairing potential between the RNA-guide and the flanks of DNA targets. Here we demonstrate that Type I-E systems discriminate self from non-self through a base pairing-independent mechanism that strictly relies on the recognition of four unchangeable PAM sequences. In addition, this work reveals that the first base pair between the guide RNA and the PAM nucleotide immediately flanking the target sequence can be disrupted without affecting the interference phenotype. Remarkably, this indicates that base pairing at this position is not involved in foreign DNA recognition. Results in this paper reveal that the Type I-E mechanism of avoiding self sequences and preventing autoimmunity is fundamentally different from that employed by Type III-A systems. We propose the exclusive targeting of PAM-flanked sequences to be termed a target versus non-target discrimination mechanism. PMID:24039596

  5. Non-destructive sampling of ancient insect DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Elias, Scott; Gilbert, Tom

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies on insect remains is that sampling procedures involve at least partial destruction of the specimens. A recent extraction protocol reveals the possibility of obtaining DNA from past insect remains without causing visual morphological...... of 77-204 base pairs (-bp) in size using species-specific and general insect primers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The applied non-destructive DNA extraction method shows promising potential on insect museum specimens of historical age as far back as AD 1820, but less so on the ancient permafrost......-preserved insect fossil remains tested, where DNA was obtained from samples up to ca. 26,000 years old. The non-frozen sediment DNA approach appears to have great potential for recording the former presence of insect taxa not normally preserved as macrofossils and opens new frontiers in research on ancient...

  6. EST Table: BP182659 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP182659 NRPG0886 10/09/28 51 %/153 aa ref|XP_001659582.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39285.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Aedes aegypti] 10/08/29 ...33738|ref|XP_971576.2| PREDICTED: similar to xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Tribolium castaneum] FS768084 NRPG ...

  7. EST Table: BP125370 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10 56 %/150 aa gi|189241063|ref|XP_967018.2| PREDICTED: similar to restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906662 fbpv ... ...n (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] 10/08/29 55...BP125370 fbpv0758 10/09/28 56 %/150 aa ref|XP_967018.2| PREDICTED: similar to resti

  8. EST Table: BP182152 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP182152 NRPG0186 10/09/28 87 %/125 aa ref|NP_001098702.1| nanos-like protein [Bomb...yx mori] gb|ABS17681.1| nanos-like protein [Bombyx mori] 10/08/29 low homology 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 low homology NM_001105232 NRPG ...

  9. Glucose-nucleobase pairs within DNA: impact of hydrophobicity, alternative linking unit and DNA polymerase nucleotide insertion studies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04850e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengut-Climent, Empar; Peñalver, Pablo; Lucas, Ricardo; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Aviñó, Anna; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Galbis, Elsa; de Paz, M. Violante; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Eritja, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Recently, we studied glucose-nucleobase pairs, a binding motif found in aminoglycoside–RNA recognition. DNA duplexes with glucose as a nucleobase were able to hybridize and were selective for purines. They were less stable than natural DNA but still fit well on regular B-DNA. These results opened up the possible use of glucose as a non-aromatic DNA base mimic. Here, we have studied the incorporation and thermal stability of glucose with different types of anchoring units and alternative apolar sugar-nucleobase pairs. When we explored butanetriol instead of glycerol as a wider anchoring unit, we did not gain duplex thermal stability. This result confirmed the necessity of a more conformationally restricted linker to increase the overall duplex stability. Permethylated glucose-nucleobase pairs showed similar stability to glucoside-nucleobase pairs but no selectivity for a specific nucleobase, possibly due to the absence of hydrogen bonds between them. The three-dimensional structure of the duplex solved by NMR located both, the hydrophobic permethylated glucose and the nucleobase, inside the DNA helix as in the case of glucose-nucleobase pairs. Quantum chemical calculations on glucose-nucleobase pairs indicate that the attachment of the sugar to the DNA skeleton through the OH1 or OH4 positions yields the highest binding energies. Moreover, glucose was very selective for guanine when attached through OH1 or OH4 to the DNA. Finally, we examined DNA polymerase insertion of nucleotides in front of the saccharide unit. KF– polymerase from E. coli inserted A and G opposite glc and 6dglc with low efficiency but notable selectivity. It is even capable of extending the new pair although its efficiency depended on the DNA sequence. In contrast, Bst 2.0, SIII and BIOTAQ™ DNA polymerases seem to display a loop-out mechanism possibly due to the flexible glycerol linker used instead of deoxyribose. PMID:29780486

  10. EST Table: BP183868 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP183868 P5PG0462 10/09/28 50 %/126 aa ref|XP_001659582.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39285.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Aedes aegypti] 10/08/29 ...33738|ref|XP_971576.2| PREDICTED: similar to xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Tribolium castaneum] FS768084 P5PG ...

  11. EST Table: BP126151 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP126151 ps4M0084 10/09/28 52 %/232 aa ref|XP_001659582.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39285.1| xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Aedes aegypti] 10/08/29 ...33738|ref|XP_971576.2| PREDICTED: similar to xaa-pro dipeptidase pepd/pepq(e.coli) [Tribolium castaneum] FS768084 ps4M ...

  12. A DNA Mini-Barcoding System for Authentication of Processed Fish Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokralla, Shadi; Hellberg, Rosalee S; Handy, Sara M; King, Ian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-10-30

    Species substitution is a form of seafood fraud for the purpose of economic gain. DNA barcoding utilizes species-specific DNA sequence information for specimen identification. Previous work has established the usability of short DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-for identification of specimens harboring degraded DNA. This study aims at establishing a DNA mini-barcoding system for all fish species commonly used in processed fish products in North America. Six mini-barcode primer pairs targeting short (127-314 bp) fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase I (CO1) DNA barcode region were developed by examining over 8,000 DNA barcodes from species in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Seafood List. The mini-barcode primer pairs were then tested against 44 processed fish products representing a range of species and product types. Of the 44 products, 41 (93.2%) could be identified at the species or genus level. The greatest mini-barcoding success rate found with an individual primer pair was 88.6% compared to 20.5% success rate achieved by the full-length DNA barcode primers. Overall, this study presents a mini-barcoding system that can be used to identify a wide range of fish species in commercial products and may be utilized in high throughput DNA sequencing for authentication of heavily processed fish products.

  13. Energy Landscape and Pathways for Transitions between Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen Base Pairing in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J

    2018-01-04

    The recent discovery that Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs are widespread in DNA across diverse sequences and positional contexts could have important implications for understanding DNA replication and DNA-protein recognition. While evidence is emerging that the Hoogsteen conformation could be a thermodynamically accessible conformation of the DNA duplex and provide a means to expand its functionality, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the Watson-Crick (WC) to HG transition. In this Perspective, we describe pathways and kinetics for this transition at an atomic level of detail, using the energy landscape perspective. We show that competition between the duplex conformations results in a double funnel landscape, which explains some recent experimental observations. The interconversion pathways feature a number of intermediates, with a variable number of WC and HG base pairs. The relatively slow kinetics, with possible deviations from two-state behavior, suggest that this conformational switch is likely to be a challenging target for both simulation and experiment.

  14. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  16. Crystal structure of metallo DNA duplex containing consecutive Watson-Crick-like T-Hg(II)-T base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Yamada, Tom; Hirose, Chika; Okamoto, Itaru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira

    2014-02-24

    The metallo DNA duplex containing mercury-mediated T-T base pairs is an attractive biomacromolecular nanomaterial which can be applied to nanodevices such as ion sensors. Reported herein is the first crystal structure of a B-form DNA duplex containing two consecutive T-Hg(II)-T base pairs. The Hg(II) ion occupies the center between two T residues. The N3-Hg(II) bond distance is 2.0 Å. The relatively short Hg(II)-Hg(II) distance (3.3 Å) observed in consecutive T-Hg(II)-T base pairs suggests that the metallophilic attraction could exist between them and may stabilize the B-form double helix. To support this, the DNA duplex is largely distorted and adopts an unusual nonhelical conformation in the absence of Hg(II). The structure of the metallo DNA duplex itself and the Hg(II)-induced structural switching from the nonhelical form to the B-form provide the basis for structure-based design of metal-conjugated nucleic acid nanomaterials. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Intercalation of a Zn(II) complex containing ciprofloxacin drug between DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Asadian, Ali Ashraf; Mahdavi, Mryam

    2017-11-02

    In this study, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of a Zn(II) complex containing an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin, with calf thymus DNA using spectroscopic methods. It was found that Zn(II) complex could bind with DNA via intercalation mode as evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV-Vis spectrum; these spectral characteristics suggest that the Zn(II) complex interacts with DNA most likely through a mode that involves a stacking interaction between the aromatic chromophore and the base pairs of DNA. DNA binding constant (K b = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1 ) from spectrophotometric studies of the interaction of Zn(II) complex with DNA is comparable to those of some DNA intercalative polypyridyl Ru(II) complexes 1.0 -4.8 × 10 4 M -1 . CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of DNA in the presence of Zn(II) complex as observed for the classical intercalator methylene blue. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH DNA-MB, indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with MB for the intercalation.

  18. Watson-Crick Base Pair Radical Cation as a Model for Oxidative Damage in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maitre, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2017-07-06

    The deleterious cellular effects of ionizing radiation are well-known, but the mechanisms causing DNA damage are poorly understood. The accepted molecular events involve initial oxidation and deprotonation at guanine sites, triggering hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from the sugar moieties, causing DNA strand breaks. Probing the chemistry of the initially formed radical cation has been challenging. Here, we generate, spectroscopically characterize, and examine the reactivity of the Watson-Crick nucleobase pair radical cation in the gas phase. We observe rich chemistry, including proton transfer between the bases and propagation of the radical site in deoxyguanosine from the base to the sugar, thus rupturing the sugar. This first example of a gas-phase model system providing molecular-level details on the chemistry of an ionized DNA base pair paves the way toward a more complete understanding of molecular processes induced by radiation. It also highlights the role of radical propagation in chemistry, biology, and nanotechnology.

  19. BP1 Homeoprotein Enhances Metastatic Potential in Er-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yebo Fu, Yi Lian, Kyung Soon Kim, Lei Zhang, A. Katharine Hindle, Fred Brody, Robert S. Siegel, Timothy A. McCaffrey, Sidney W. Fu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor invasion and metastasis remain a major cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. It was reported that BP1, a homeobox isoform of DLX4, is overexpressed in 80% of breast cancer patients and in 100% of estrogen receptor negative (ER- tumors. The prevalence of BP1 positive cells and the intensity of BP1 immunoreactivity increased with the extent of ductal proliferation and tumorigenesis. These findings imply that BP1 may play an important role in ER- breast cancer. I sought to determine the effects and mechanisms of BP1 on cell proliferation and metastasis using ER- Hs578T cells as a model. Cells were transfected with either pcDNA3.2 plasmid containing BP1 gene, or pcDNA3.2 vector, then selected and cloned. Overexpression of BP1 increased cell proliferation rate by 2-5 fold (p<0.005, and enhanced the in vitro invasive activity by 25-65 fold (p<0.001. Microarray experiments were performed to identify differentially expressed genes when BP1 is overexpressed. The gene expression profile of the transfected cell lines were compared, resulting in 71 differentially expressed genes with a fold-change of >=2.0. Of those genes, 49 were up-regulated and 22 were down-regulated. Significant pathways were identified involving cell proliferation and metastasis. These data demonstrated that overexpression of BP1 significantly enhanced cell proliferation and metastatic potential in ER- Hs578T cells. Further analysis with more ER- cell lines and patient samples is warranted to establish BP1 as a therapeutic target.

  20. Influence of DNA conformation on radiation-induced single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, F.; Belli, M.; Mazzei, F.

    1994-01-01

    We performed experiments on two DNA fragments of about 300 bp having different conformation to test whether radiation-induced single-strand breakage is dependent on DNA conformation. Breakage analysis was carried out by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which allows determination of the broken site at single nucleotide resolution. We found uniform cutting patterns in B-form regions. On the contrary, X- or γ-irradiation of curved fragments of kinetoplast DNA showed that the distribution of single-strand breaks was not uniform along the fragment, as the cleavage pattern was modulated in phase with the runs of A-T pairs. This modulation likely reflected the reduced accessibility of the sites which on hydroxyl-radical attack give rise to strand breaks. The cleavage pattern was phased with the runs of A-T pairs. Moreover, the overall yield of strand breaks was considerably lower in curved DNA fragments than in those with extended straight regions. The conformation effect found here indicates that the cleavage pattern reflects the fine structural features of DNA. (orig./MG)

  1. Highly Stable Double-Stranded DNA Containing Sequential Silver(I)-Mediated 7-Deazaadenine/Thymine Watson-Crick Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Díaz, Noelia; Méndez-Arriaga, José M; Salas, Juan M; Galindo, Miguel A

    2016-05-17

    The oligonucleotide d(TX)9 , which consists of an octadecamer sequence with alternating non-canonical 7-deazaadenine (X) and canonical thymine (T) as the nucleobases, was synthesized and shown to hybridize into double-stranded DNA through the formation of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs. dsDNA with metal-mediated base pairs was then obtained by selectively replacing W-C hydrogen bonds by coordination bonds to central silver(I) ions. The oligonucleotide I adopts a duplex structure in the absence of Ag(+) ions, and its stability is significantly enhanced in the presence of Ag(+) ions while its double-helix structure is retained. Temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and ESI mass spectrometry were used to confirm the selective formation of the silver(I)-mediated base pairs. This strategy could become useful for preparing stable metallo-DNA-based nanostructures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. EST Table: BP183486 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] 10/08/29 56...43 aa gnl|Amel|GB30360-PB 10/09/10 54 %/174 aa gi|189241063|ref|XP_967018.2| PREDICTED: similar to restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expres...sed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906662 NRPG ... ...BP183486 NRPG1970 10/09/28 54 %/174 aa ref|XP_967018.2| PREDICTED: similar to resti

  3. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Nguyen

    Full Text Available MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  4. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin; Jagannathan, Madhav; Shire, Kathy; Frappier, Lori

    2012-01-01

    MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  5. A cell cycle-dependent regulatory circuit composed of 53BP1-RIF1 and BRCA1-CtIP controls DNA repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; Orthwein, Alexandre; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Xing, Mengtan; Young, Jordan T F; Tkáč, Ján; Cook, Michael A; Rosebrock, Adam P; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D; Xu, Dongyi; Durocher, Daniel

    2013-03-07

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice is governed by the opposing activities of 53BP1 and BRCA1. 53BP1 stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), whereas BRCA1 promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here we show that 53BP1 is an inhibitor of BRCA1 accumulation at DSB sites, specifically in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of 53BP1 physically recruits RIF1 to DSB sites, and we identify RIF1 as the critical effector of 53BP1 during DSB repair. Remarkably, RIF1 accumulation at DSB sites is strongly antagonized by BRCA1 and its interacting partner CtIP. Lastly, we show that depletion of RIF1 is able to restore end resection and RAD51 loading in BRCA1-depleted cells. This work therefore identifies a cell cycle-regulated circuit, underpinned by RIF1 and BRCA1, that governs DSB repair pathway choice to ensure that NHEJ dominates in G1 and HR is favored from S phase onward. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metalophillic attraction in the consecutive T-HgII-T DNA base pairs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Ladislav; Straka, Michal; Bouř, Petr; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 50-50 ISSN 1210-8529. [10th Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. 22.03.2012-24.03.2012, Nové Hrady] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : T-HgII-T * DNA base pairs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  7. Validation of the Welch Allyn SureBP (inflation) and StepBP (deflation) algorithms by AAMI standard testing and BHS data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Bruce S

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated two new Welch Allyn automated blood pressure (BP) algorithms. The first, SureBP, estimates BP during cuff inflation; the second, StepBP, does so during deflation. We followed the American National Standards Institute/Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP10:2006 standard for testing and data analysis. The data were also analyzed using the British Hypertension Society analysis strategy. We tested children, adolescents, and adults. The requirements of the American National Standards Institute/Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP10:2006 standard were fulfilled with respect to BP levels, arm sizes, and ages. Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP10 Method 1 data analysis was used. The mean±standard deviation for the device readings compared with auscultation by paired, trained, blinded observers in the SureBP mode were -2.14±7.44 mmHg for systolic BP (SBP) and -0.55±5.98 mmHg for diastolic BP (DBP). In the StepBP mode, the differences were -3.61±6.30 mmHg for SBP and -2.03±5.30 mmHg for DBP. Both algorithms achieved an A grade for both SBP and DBP by British Hypertension Society analysis. The SureBP inflation-based algorithm will be available in many new-generation Welch Allyn monitors. Its use will reduce the time it takes to estimate BP in critical patient care circumstances. The device will not need to inflate to excessive suprasystolic BPs to obtain the SBP values. Deflation is rapid once SBP has been determined, thus reducing the total time of cuff inflation and reducing patient discomfort. If the SureBP fails to obtain a BP value, the StepBP algorithm is activated to estimate BP by traditional deflation methodology.

  8. Low frequency of extra-pair fertilizations in the Great Tit Parus major revealed by DNA fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboven, N.; Mateman, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Multilocus DNA fingerprinting was used to estimate the frequency of extra-pair fertilizations in a low density, island population of Great Tits Parus major. A total of 69 pairs and 516 offspring from 82 breeding attempts were examined. Only 18 offspring (3.5%) in seven different nests were not

  9. [Quantum-chemical investigation of tautomerization ways of Watson-Crick DNA base pair guanine-cytosine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', O O; Hovorun, D M

    2010-01-01

    A novel physico-chemical mechanism of the Watson-Crick DNA base pair Gua.Cyt tautomerization Gua.Cyt*Gua.CytGua*.Cyt (mutagenic tautomers of bases are marked by asterisks) have been revealed and realized in a pathway of single proton transfer through two mutual isoenergetic transition states with Gibbs free energy of activation 30.4 and 30.6 kcal/mol and they are ion pairs stabilized by three (N2H...N3, N1H...N4- and O6+H...N4-) and five (N2H...O2, N1H...O2, N1H...N3, O6+H...N4- and 06+H...N4-) H-bonds accordingly. Stable base pairs Gua-Cyt* and Gua*.Cyt which dissociate comparably easy into monomers have acceptable relative Gibbs energies--12.9 and 14.3 kcal/mol--for the explanation of the nature of the spontaneous transitions of DNA replication. Results are obtained at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-31 1++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum approach.

  10. 1,8-Naphthyridine-2,7-diamine: a potential universal reader of Watson-Crick base pairs for DNA sequencing by electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2012-11-21

    With the aid of Density Functional Theory (DFT), we designed 1,8-naphthyridine-2,7-diamine as a recognition molecule to read DNA base pairs for genomic sequencing by electron tunneling. NMR studies show that it can form stable triplets with both A : T and G : C base pairs through hydrogen bonding. Our results suggest that the naphthyridine molecule should be able to function as a universal base pair reader in a tunneling gap, generating distinguishable signatures under electrical bias for each of DNA base pairs.

  11. Solid state radiation chemistry of co-crystallized DNA base pairs studied with EPR and ENDOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.H.; Nimmala, S.; Hole, E.O.; Sagstuen, E.; Close, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    For a number of years, the authors' group has focused on identification of radicals formed from x-irradiation of DNA components by application of EPR and ENDOR spectroscopic techniques to samples in the form of single crystals. With single crystals as samples, it is possible to use the detailed packing and structural information available from x-ray or neutron diffraction reports. This report summarizes results from two crystal systems in which DNA bases are paired by hydrogen bonding. Extensive results are available from one of these, 1-methyl-thymine:9-methyladenine (MTMA), in which the base pairing is the Hoogsteen configuration. Although this configuration is different from that found by Watson-Crick in DNA, nonetheless the hydrogen bond between T(O4) and A(NH 2 ) is present. Although MTMA crystals have been studied previously, the objective was to apply the high-resolution technique of ENDOR to crystals irradiated and studied at temperatures of 10 K or lower in the effort to obtain direct evidence for specific proton transfers. The second system, from which the results are only preliminary, is 9-ethylguanine:1-methyl-5-fluorocytosine (GFC) in which the G:C bases pair is in the Watson Crick configuration. Both crystal systems are anhydrous, so the results include no possible effects from water interactions

  12. The Influence of Square Planar Platinum Complexes on DNA Bases Pairing. An ab initio DFT Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burda, J. V.; Šponer, Jiří; Leszczynski, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 19 (2001), s. 4404-4411 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : DNA base pairing * platinated base pairs * ab initio DFT study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.787, year: 2001

  13. 2-Methoxypyridine as a Thymidine Mimic in Watson-Crick Base Pairs of DNA and PNA: Synthesis, Thermal Stability, and NMR Structural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosjolova, Irina; Kennedy, Scott D; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-11-02

    The development of nucleic acid base-pair analogues that use new modes of molecular recognition is important both for fundamental research and practical applications. The goal of this study was to evaluate 2-methoxypyridine as a cationic thymidine mimic in the A-T base pair. The hypothesis was that including protonation in the Watson-Crick base pairing scheme would enhance the thermal stability of the DNA double helix without compromising the sequence selectivity. DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences containing the new 2-methoxypyridine nucleobase (P) were synthesized and studied by using UV thermal melting and NMR spectroscopy. Introduction of P nucleobase caused a loss of thermal stability of ≈10 °C in DNA-DNA duplexes and ≈20 °C in PNA-DNA duplexes over a range of mildly acidic to neutral pH. Despite the decrease in thermal stability, the NMR structural studies showed that P-A formed the expected protonated base pair at pH 4.3. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of cationic unnatural base pairs; however, future optimization of such analogues will be required. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the specific binding between Ag⁺ ion and C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA to form C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Itaru; Dairaku, Takenori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Metal ion-nucleic acid interactions have attracted considerable interest for their involvement in structure formation and catalytic activity of nucleic acids. Although interactions between metal ion and mismatched base pair duplex are important to understand mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions, they have not been well-characterized. We recently found that the Ag(+) ion stabilized a C:C mismatched base pair duplex DNA. A C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair was supposed to be formed by the binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C mismatched base pair to stabilize the duplex. Here, we examined specificity, thermodynamics and structure of possible C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair. UV melting indicated that only the duplex with the C:C mismatched base pair, and not of the duplexes with the perfectly matched and other mismatched base pairs, was specifically stabilized on adding the Ag(+) ion. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion specifically bound with the C:C base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with a binding constant of 10(6) M(-1), which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also supported the specific 1:1 binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C base pair. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the Ag(+) ion may bind with the N3 positions of the C:C base pair without distorting the higher-order structure of the duplex. We conclude that the specific formation of C-Ag-C base pair with large binding affinity would provide a binding mode of metal ion-DNA interactions, similar to that of the previously reported T-Hg-T base pair. The C-Ag-C base pair may be useful not only for understanding of molecular mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions but also for wide variety of potential applications of metal-mediated base pairs in various fields, such as material, life and environmental sciences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  15. Roles of the Amino Group of Purine Bases in the Thermodynamic Stability of DNA Base Pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G•C > D•T ≈ I•C > A•T > G•T > I•T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  16. Positive cooperativity of the specific binding between Hg2+ ion and T:T mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio. ► The binding constant between Hg 2+ and the T:T mismatched base pair was 10 6 M −1 . ► The binding constant was larger than those for nonspecific metal–DNA interactions. ► The binding constant for the second Hg 2+ was larger than that for the first Hg 2+ . ► The positive cooperative binding was observed between Hg 2+ and multiple T:T. - Abstract: Metal-mediated base pairs by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for their potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural T:T mismatched base pair bound with Hg 2+ ion to form a novel T–Hg–T base pair. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between Hg 2+ and each of the single and double T:T mismatched base pair duplex DNAs by isothermal titration calorimetry. Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with 10 6 M −1 binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion–DNA interactions. In the Hg 2+ –double T:T mismatched base pair interaction, the affinity for the second Hg 2+ binding was significantly larger than that for the first Hg 2+ binding. The positively cooperative binding may be favorable to align multiple Hg 2+ in duplex DNA for the application of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  17. Plasmid origin of replication of herpesvirus papio: DNA sequence and enhancer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, D D; Sung, N S; Pesano, R L; Sexton, C J; Hutchison, C; Pagano, J S

    1990-01-01

    Herpesvirus papio (HVP) is a lymphotropic virus of baboons which is related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and produces latent infection. The nucleotide sequence of the 5,775-base-pair (bp) EcoRI K fragment of HVP, which has previously been shown to confer the ability to replicate autonomously, has been determined. Within this DNA fragment is a region which bears structural and sequence similarity to the ori-P region of EBV. The HVP ori-P region has a 10- by 26-bp tandem array which is related to the 20- by 30-bp tandem array from the EBV ori-P region. In HVP there is an intervening region of 764 bp followed by five partial copies of the 26-bp monomer. Both the EBV and HVP 3' regions have the potential to form dyad structures which, however, differ in arrangement. We also demonstrate that a transcriptional enhancer which requires transactivation by a virus-encoded factor is present in the HVP ori-P. Images PMID:2159548

  18. Response of BP cell lines to γ-radiation: evaluation of DNA repair and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, F.E.; Martin, M.; Le Rhum, Y.; May, E.; Duriez, P; Shah, G.

    1997-01-01

    In the BP cell lines, mutation of p53 gene is associated with an increased radiosensitivity. In order to understand the relation between p53 and radiosensitivity, we looked at DNA repair and cell death. Unexpectedly, after radiation the mutated p53 cell line BPp- Tu and the wild type p53 cell line BPp- Tu cells, both ell lines died by the same non necrotic process: a programmed cell death independent of their p53 status. The cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by an ICE-related protease is considered an early and critical event during apoptosis. The fate of PARP was monitored by Western extensively in the apoptotic BPp- Tu cells than in the BPp cells. This faster PARP cleavage might be linked to the increased radiosensitivity of the BPp- Tu cells. (authors)

  19. Ultraviolet Absorption Induces Hydrogen-Atom Transfer in G⋅C Watson-Crick DNA Base Pairs in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttger, Katharina; Marroux, Hugo J B; Grubb, Michael P; Coulter, Philip M; Böhnke, Hendrik; Henderson, Alexander S; Galan, M Carmen; Temps, Friedrich; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Roberts, Gareth M

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafast deactivation pathways bestow photostability on nucleobases and hence preserve the structural integrity of DNA following absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One controversial recovery mechanism proposed to account for this photostability involves electron-driven proton transfer (EDPT) in Watson-Crick base pairs. The first direct observation is reported of the EDPT process after UV excitation of individual guanine-cytosine (G⋅C) Watson-Crick base pairs by ultrafast time-resolved UV/visible and mid-infrared spectroscopy. The formation of an intermediate biradical species (G[-H]⋅C[+H]) with a lifetime of 2.9 ps was tracked. The majority of these biradicals return to the original G⋅C Watson-Crick pairs, but up to 10% of the initially excited molecules instead form a stable photoproduct G*⋅C* that has undergone double hydrogen-atom transfer. The observation of these sequential EDPT mechanisms across intermolecular hydrogen bonds confirms an important and long debated pathway for the deactivation of photoexcited base pairs, with possible implications for the UV photochemistry of DNA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Anomeric 2'-Deoxycytidines and Silver Ions: Hybrid Base Pairs with Greatly Enhanced Stability and Efficient DNA Mismatch Detection with α-dC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiurong; Seela, Frank

    2017-09-04

    α-d-Nucleosides are rare in nature but can develop fascinating properties when incorporated into DNA. This work reports on the first silver-mediated base pair constructed from two anomeric nucleosides: α-dC and β-dC. The hybrid base pair was integrated into the DNA and DNA/RNA double helix. A 12-mer duplex with α-dC and β-dC pair exhibits a higher thermal stability (T m =43 °C) than that incorporating the β-dC-Ag + -β-dC homo pair (T m =34 °C). Furthermore, α-dC shows excellent mismatch discrimination for DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). All four SNPs were identified on the basis of large T m value differences measured in the presence of silver ions. High resolution melting was not required. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Madsen, Charlotte S; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2013-06-17

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S.; Rocchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH 2 -terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH 2 -terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids

  3. Structure and characterization of a cDNA clone for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from cut-injured roots of sweet potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Makoto; Yamanoto, Naoki; Ohashi, Yuko; Kano-Murakami, Yuriko; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA clone for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) induced in wounded sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) root was obtained by immunoscreening a cDNA library. The protein produced in Escherichia coli cells containing the plasmid pPAL02 was indistinguishable from sweet potato PAL as judged by Ouchterlony double diffusion assays. The M r of its subunit was 77,000. The cells converted [ 14 C]-L-phenylalanine into [ 14 C]-t-cinnamic acid and PAL activity was detected in the homogenate of the cells. The activity was dependent on the presence of the pPAL02 plasmid DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA contained a 2,121-base pair (bp) open-reading frame capable of coding for a polypeptide with 707 amino acids (M r 77,137), a 22-bp 5'-noncoding region and a 207-bp 3'-noncoding region. The results suggest that the insert DNA fully encoded the amino acid sequence for sweet potato PAL that is induced by wounding. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of a PAL cDNA fragment from Phaseolus vulgaris revealed 78.9% homology. The sequence from amino acid residues 258 to 494 was highly conserved, showing 90.7% homology

  4. Sequence characteristics required for cooperative binding and efficient in vivo titration of the replication initiator protein DnaA in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming G.; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Atlung, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Plasmids carrying the mioC promoter region, which contains two DnaA boxes, R5 and R6 with one misfit to the consensus TT(A)/(T)TNCACA, are as efficient in in vivo titration of the DnaA protein as plasmids carrying a replication-inactivated oriC region with its eight DnaA boxes. Three additional Dna......A boxes around the promoter proximal R5 DnaA box were identified and shown by mutational analysis to be necessary for the cooperative binding of DnaA required for titration. These four DnaA boxes are located in the same orientation and with a spacing of two or three base-pairs. The cooperative binding...... was eliminated by insertion of half a helical turn between any of the DnaA boxes. Titration strongly depends on the presence and orientation of the promoter distal R6 DnaA box located 104 bp upstream of the R5 box as well as neighbouring sequences downstream of R6. Titration depends on the integrity of a 43 bp...

  5. Flexibility of short DNA helices with finite-length effect: From base pairs to tens of base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Flexibility of short DNA helices is important for the biological functions such as nucleosome formation and DNA-protein recognition. Recent experiments suggest that short DNAs of tens of base pairs (bps) may have apparently higher flexibility than those of kilo bps, while there is still the debate on such high flexibility. In the present work, we have studied the flexibility of short DNAs with finite-length of 5–50 bps by the all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo simulations with the worm-like chain model. Our microscopic analyses reveal that short DNAs have apparently high flexibility which is attributed to the significantly strong bending and stretching flexibilities of ∼6 bps at each helix end. Correspondingly, the apparent persistence length l p of short DNAs increases gradually from ∼29 nm to ∼45 nm as DNA length increases from 10 to 50 bps, in accordance with the available experimental data. Our further analyses show that the short DNAs with excluding ∼6 bps at each helix end have the similar flexibility with those of kilo bps and can be described by the worm-like chain model with l p ∼ 50 nm

  6. Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks by γH2AX Does Not Result in 53bp1 Recruitment in Mouse Retinal Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Müller

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing is an attractive potential treatment of inherited retinopathies. However, it often relies on endogenous DNA repair. Retinal DNA repair is incompletely characterized in humans and animal models. We investigated recruitment of the double stranded break (DSB repair complex of γH2AX and 53bp1 in both developing and mature mouse neuroretinas. We evaluated the immunofluorescent retinal expression of these proteins during development (P07-P30 in normal and retinal degeneration models, as well as in potassium bromate induced DSB repair in normal adult (3 months retinal explants. The two murine retinopathy models used had different mutations in Pde6b: the severe rd1 and the milder rd10 models. Compared to normal adult retina, we found increased numbers of γH2AX positive foci in all retinal neurons of the developing retina in both model and control retinas, as well as in wild type untreated retinal explant cultures. In contrast, the 53bp1 staining of the retina differed both in amount and character between cell types at all ages and in all model systems. There was strong pan nuclear staining in ganglion, amacrine, and horizontal cells, and cone photoreceptors, which was attenuated. Rod photoreceptors did not stain unequivocally. In all samples, 53bp1 stained foci only rarely occurred. Co-localization of 53bp1 and γH2AX staining was a very rare event (< 1% of γH2AX foci in the ONL and < 3% in the INL, suggesting the potential for alternate DSB sensing and repair proteins in the murine retina. At a minimum, murine retinal DSB repair does not appear to follow canonical pathways, and our findings suggests further investigation is warranted.

  7. DNA translocation by human uracil DNA glycosylase: the case of single-stranded DNA and clustered uracils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhoft, Joseph D; Stivers, James T

    2013-04-16

    Human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG) plays a central role in DNA repair and programmed mutagenesis of Ig genes, requiring it to act on sparsely or densely spaced uracil bases located in a variety of contexts, including U/A and U/G base pairs, and potentially uracils within single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). An interesting question is whether the facilitated search mode of hUNG, which includes both DNA sliding and hopping, changes in these different contexts. Here we find that hUNG uses an enhanced local search mode when it acts on uracils in ssDNA, and also, in a context where uracils are densely clustered in duplex DNA. In the context of ssDNA, hUNG performs an enhanced local search by sliding with a mean sliding length larger than that of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In the context of duplex DNA, insertion of high-affinity abasic product sites between two uracil lesions serves to significantly extend the apparent sliding length on dsDNA from 4 to 20 bp and, in some cases, leads to directionally biased 3' → 5' sliding. The presence of intervening abasic product sites mimics the situation where hUNG acts iteratively on densely spaced uracils. The findings suggest that intervening product sites serve to increase the amount of time the enzyme remains associated with DNA as compared to nonspecific DNA, which in turn increases the likelihood of sliding as opposed to falling off the DNA. These findings illustrate how the search mechanism of hUNG is not predetermined but, instead, depends on the context in which the uracils are located.

  8. Branched DNA nanostructures efficiently stabilised and monitored by novel pyrene-perylene 2'-α-l-amino-LNA FRET pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Santhosh Kumar, T; Campbell, Meghan A

    2013-01-01

    Novel pyrene-perylene α-l-LNA FRET pairs described herein effectively detect assembly of 2- and 3-way branched DNA nanostructures prepared by postsynthetic microwave-assisted CuAAC click chemistry. The fluorescent signalling of assembly by internally positioned FRET pairs is achieved with low...

  9. Differentially Methylated DNA Regions in Monozygotic Twin Pairs Discordant for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Gervin, Kristina; Lyle, Robert

    2016-01-01

    : Smoking was significantly associated with hypomethylation of a DMR overlapping the promoter region of the RNF5 and the AGPAT1, which are implicated in inflammation and autoimmunity, whereas DMARD treatment induced hypermethylation of the same region. Additionally, the promotor region of both S100A6......OBJECTIVES: In an explorative epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) to search for gene independent, differentially methylated DNA positions and regions (DMRs) associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by studying monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for RA. METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated......: We identified several differentially methylated regions associated with RA, which may represent environmental effects or consequences of the disease and plausible biological pathways pertinent to the pathogenesis of RA....

  10. Epigenomic profiling of DNA methylation in paired prostate cancer versus adjacent benign tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geybels, Milan S; Zhao, Shanshan; Wong, Chao-Jen; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Wu, Michael; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation may promote prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiles in prostate cancer (PCa) compared to adjacent benign tissue to identify differentially methylated CpG sites. The study included paired PCa and adjacent benign tissue samples from 20 radical prostatectomy patients. Epigenetic profiling was done using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Linear models that accounted for the paired study design and False Discovery Rate Q-values were used to evaluate differential CpG methylation. mRNA expression levels of the genes with the most differentially methylated CpG sites were analyzed. In total, 2,040 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in PCa versus adjacent benign tissue (Q-value Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data provided confirmatory evidence for our findings. This study of PCa versus adjacent benign tissue showed many differentially methylated CpGs and regions in and outside gene promoter regions, which may potentially be used for the development of future epigenetic-based diagnostic tests or as therapeutic targets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MR exams of human subjects are associated with significant increases in the DNA repair marker 53BP1, but not the damage marker γH2AX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S McDonald

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is considered low risk, yet recent studies have raised a concern of potential damage to DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes. This prospective Institutional Review Board-approved study examined potential double-strand DNA damage by analyzing changes in the DNA damage and repair markers γH2AX and 53BP1 in patients who underwent a 1.5 T gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (MR exam. Sixty patients were enrolled (median age 55 years, 39 males. Patients with history of malignancy or who were receiving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or steroids were excluded. MR sequence data were recorded and blood samples obtained immediately before and after MR exposure. An automated immunofluorescence assay quantified γH2AX or 53BP1 foci number in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Changes in foci number were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinical and MR procedural characteristics were compared between patients who had a >10% increase in γH2AX or 53BP1 foci numbers and patients who did not. The number of γH2AX foci did not significantly change following cardiac MR (median foci per cell pre-MR = 0.11, post-MR = 0.11, p = .90, but the number of 53BP1 foci significantly increased following MR (median foci per cell pre-MR = 0.46, post-MR = 0.54, p = .0140. Clinical and MR characteristics did not differ significantly between patients who had at least a 10% increase in foci per cell and those who did not. We conclude that MR exposure leads to a small (median 25% increase in 53BP1 foci, however the clinical relevance of this increase is unknown and may be attributable to normal variation instead of MR exposure.

  12. Expression of the Transcription Factor E4BP4 in Human Basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Gohr, Maria; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cytokine IL-3 plays an important role for human basophil development, function and survival. IL-3 is also reported to induce the expression of the transcription factor E4BP4, but it is not known whether E4BP4 is expressed in basophils and influences basophil responsiveness. The aim...... by Alcian blue. RNA was extracted (0.005-0.02 µg RNA from 0.5 - 1 x 106 cells), and the corresponding cDNA analyzed by real-time PCR where E4BP4 expression was calculated as 2-(CT(E4BP4) - CT(β-actin)). E4BP4 protein expression was visualized in basophil lysates (107 cells/ml) by Western blot followed...... the transcription factor E4BP4 which might have an impact on basophil histamine release....

  13. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  14. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine †

    OpenAIRE

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O’Neil, Ian A.; Iwanejko, Lesley A.; Bates, Andrew D.; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    8-Nitro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2′-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesi...

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of satellite DNA sequences from constitutive heterochromatin of the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Seki, Risako; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences of the centromeric heterochromatin provide valuable molecular cytogenetic markers for the investigation of genomic compartmentalization in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of sauropsids. Here, the relationship between centromeric heterochromatin and karyotype evolution was examined using cloned repetitive DNA sequences from two snake species, the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Crotalinae, Viperidae) and Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae). Three satellite DNA (stDNA) families were isolated from the heterochromatin of these snakes: 168-bp PFL-MspI from P. flavoviridis and 196-bp PBI-DdeI and 174-bp PBI-MspI from P. bivittatus. The PFL-MspI and PBI-DdeI sequences were localized to the centromeric regions of most chromosomes in the respective species, suggesting that the two sequences were the major components of the centromeric heterochromatin in these organisms. The PBI-MspI sequence was localized to the pericentromeric region of four chromosome pairs. The PFL-MspI and the PBI-DdeI sequences were conserved only in the genome of closely related species, Gloydius blomhoffii (Crotalinae) and Python molurus, respectively, although their locations on the chromosomes were slightly different. In contrast, the PBI-MspI sequence was also in the genomes of P. molurus and Boa constrictor (Boidae), and additionally localized to the centromeric regions of eight chromosome pairs in B. constrictor, suggesting that this sequence originated in the genome of a common ancestor of Pythonidae and Boidae, approximately 86 million years ago. The three stDNA sequences showed no genomic compartmentalization between the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes, suggesting that homogenization of the centromeric and/or pericentromeric stDNA sequences occurred in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of these snakes.

  16. Dpb11/TopBP1 contributes to genomicstability via homologous recombinationand checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela

    for recruitment. Also, the chicken homologue TopBP1 colocalizes with RPA1 as well as Rad51 when DNA damage is induced. Previously, dpb11 mutants have been shown to be sensitive to DNA-damaging agents that cause DSBs, DNA alkylation and stalled replication forks. Interestingly, we found the point mutants dpb11-PF...

  17. Determination of redox potentials for the Watson-Crick base pairs, DNA nucleosides, and relevant nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Hernandez, Carlos E; Close, David M; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-05-17

    Redox potentials for the DNA nucleobases and nucleosides, various relevant nucleoside analogues, Watson-Crick base pairs, and seven organic dyes are presented based on DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and B3YLP/6-311+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels of calculations. The values are determined from an experimentally calibrated set of equations that correlate the vertical ionization (electron affinity) energy of 20 organic molecules with their experimental reversible oxidation (reduction) potential. Our results are in good agreement with those estimated experimentally for the DNA nucleosides in acetonitrile solutions (Seidel et al. J. Phys. Chem. 1996, 100, 5541). We have found that nucleosides with anti conformation exhibit lower oxidation potentials than the corresponding syn conformers. The lowering in the oxidation potential is due to the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between the 5'-OH group of the sugar and the N3 of the purine bases or C2=O of the pyrimidine bases in the syn conformation. Pairing of adenine or guanine with its complementary pyrimidine base decreases its oxidation potential by 0.15 or 0.28 V, respectively. The calculated energy difference between the oxidation potential for the G.C base pair and that of the guanine base is in good agreement with the experimental value estimated recently (0.34 V: Caruso, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 15040). The complete and consistent set of reversible redox values determined in this work for the DNA constituents is expected to be of considerable value to those studying charge and electronic energy transfer in DNA.

  18. A QM/MM refinement of an experimental DNA structure with metal-mediated base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Sadhana; Johannsen, Silke; Sigel, Roland K O; Waller, Mark P; Müller, Jens

    2013-10-01

    A series of hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations was performed on models of a DNA duplex with artificial silver(I)-mediated imidazole base pairs. The optimized structures were compared to the original experimental NMR structure (Nat. Chem. 2 (2010) 229-234). The metal⋯metal distances are significantly shorter (~0.5Å) in the QM/MM model than in the original NMR structure. As a result, argentophilic interactions are feasible between the silver(I) ions of neighboring metal-mediated base pairs. Using the computationally determined metal⋯metal distances, a re-refined NMR solution structure of the DNA duplex was obtained. In this new NMR structure, all experimental constraints remain fulfilled. The new NMR structure shows less deviation from the regular B-type conformation than the original one. This investigation shows that the application of QM/MM models to generate additional constraints to be used during NMR structural refinements represents an elegant approach to obtaining high-resolution NMR structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA damage response mediators MDC1 and 53BP1: constitutive activation and aberrant loss in breast and lung cancer, but not in testicular germ cell tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartkova, J.; Hořejší, Zuzana; Sehested, M.; Nesland, J.M.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Stucki, M.; Jackson, S.; Lukas, J.; Bartek, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 53 (2007), s. 7414-7422 ISSN 0950-9232 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * cancer * MDC1 and 53BP1 defects * tumour suppressors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.440, year: 2007

  20. Subnucleosomes and their relationships to the arrangement of histone binding sites along nucleosome deoxyribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.A.; Mencke, A.J.; Chambers, S.A.; Oosterhof, D.K.; Rill, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease cleaves within nucleosomes at sites spaced about 10.4 base pairs (bp) apart. Cleavages at sites equivalent to 30-35 bp from the ends of 146-bp cores cause spontaneous loss of an H2a-H2b pair associated with 30-40 bp length DNA. Cleavages at certain other sites do not affect the nucleosome integrity unless a solvent perturbant such as urea is added. Chromatin moderately digested with micrococcal nuclease, when fractionated by sedimentation or electrophoresis in the presence of 3 M urea, yielded four previously unobserved subnucleosomes with the following histone/DNA compositions: (H3) 2 (H4) 2 (H2a)(H2b)/95-115 bp; (H3)(H4)/70-80 bp DNA; (H2a)(H2b)/50-60 bp DNA; and (H1)/60-70 bp DNA. All but the latter subnucleosome were also obtained upon DNase I digestion of purified nucleosome cores labeled on the 5' ends with 32 P. Only subnucleosomes that retained H2a and H2b also retained labeled ends. These results show that H2a and H2b are paired on the terminal 30-40 bp of core DNA, as suggested from analyses of histone-DNA cross-link products by Mirzabekov and coworkers. Considerations of the orgins and compositions of subnucleosomes and of cross-linking data suggest an expanded model for the locations of histone binding sites along nucleosome core DNA. The principal features of this model are (i) strong electrostatic binding sites of H2a and H2b occur at positions approximately 20-30 bp from the core ends, (ii) strong electrostatic binding sites of H3 and H4 occur primarily on the central 40 bp of core DNA, (iii) strong nonelectrostatic, urea-sensitive binding sites of H3 and H4 occur at positions approximately 30-50 bp from the core ends, and (iv) urea-sensitive binding sites of H2a or H2b may occur on the terminal 10-20 bp of core DNA

  1. Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of hydrogen-bonded A:T base pairs of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Salazar, Miguel; Kang, Mijeong; Dunbar, Kim R.; Li Wang, Andy C.

    2003-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects and fractionation factors of N1...H3-N3 hydrogen bonded Watson-Crick A:T base pairs of two DNA dodecamers are presented here. Specifically, two-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of 13 C2 and 13 C4, 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4, and equilibrium deuterium/protium fractionation factors of H3, Φ, were measured and seen to correlate with the chemical shift of the corresponding imino proton, δ H3 . Downfield-shifted imino protons associated with larger values of 2 Δ 13 C2 and 2 Δ 13 C4 and smaller Φ values, which together suggested that the effective H3-N3 vibrational potentials were more anharmonic in the stronger hydrogen bonds of these DNA molecules. We anticipate that 2 Δ 13 C2, 2 Δ 13 C4 and Φ values can be useful gauges of hydrogen bond strength of A:T base pairs

  2. Dissociation of single-strand DNA: single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids by Watson-Crick base-pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seungwon; Cha, Misun; Park, Jiyong; Jeong, Namjo; Kim, Gunn; Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2010-08-18

    It has been known that single-strand DNA wraps around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by pi-stacking. In this paper it is demonstrated that such DNA is dissociated from the SWNT by Watson-Crick base-pairing with a complementary sequence. Measurement of field effect transistor characteristics indicates a shift of the electrical properties as a result of this "unwrapping" event. We further confirm the suggested process through Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Experimental results are verified in view of atomistic mechanisms with molecular dynamics simulations and binding energy analyses.

  3. Evolution of closely linked gene pairs in vertebrate genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franck, E.; Hulsen, T.; Huynen, M.A.; Jong, de W.W.; Lunsen, N.H.; Madsen, O.

    2008-01-01

    The orientation of closely linked genes in mammalian genomes is not random: there are more head-to-head (h2h) gene pairs than expected. To understand the origin of this enrichment in h2h gene pairs, we have analyzed the phylogenetic distribution of gene pairs separated by less than 600 bp of

  4. Complexes of DNA bases and Watson-Crick base pairs with small neutral gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryachko, E S; Remacle, F

    2005-12-08

    The nature of the DNA-gold interaction determines and differentiates the affinity of the nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) to gold. Our preliminary computational study [Kryachko, E. S.; Remacle, F. Nano Lett. 2005, 5, 735] demonstrates that two major bonding factors govern this interaction: the anchoring, either of the Au-N or Au-O type, and the nonconventional N-H...Au hydrogen bonding. In this paper, we offer insight into the nature of nucleobase-gold interactions and provide a detailed characterization of their different facets, i.e., geometrical, energetic, and spectroscopic aspects; the gold cluster size and gold coordination effects; proton affinity; and deprotonation energy. We then investigate how the Watson-Crick DNA pairing patterns are modulated by the nucleobase-gold interaction. We do so in terms of the proton affinities and deprotonation energies of those proton acceptors and proton donors which are involved in the interbase hydrogen bondings. A variety of properties of the most stable Watson-Crick [A x T]-Au3 and [G x C]-Au3 hybridized complexes are described and compared with the isolated Watson-Crick A x T and G x C ones. It is shown that enlarging the gold cluster size to Au6 results in a rather short gold-gold bond in the Watson-Crick interbase region of the [G x C]-Au6 complex that bridges the G x C pair and thus leads to a significant strengthening of G x C pairing.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Pax9 paired domain bound to a DC5 enhancer DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Hilbig, Antonia; Udayasuryan, Barath; Jayabal, Sriram; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Pax genes belong to a family of metazoan transcription factors that are known to play a critical role in eye, ear, kidney and neural development. The mammalian Pax family of transcription factors is characterized by a ∼128-amino-acid DNA-binding paired domain that makes sequence-specific contacts with DNA. The diversity in Pax gene activities emerges from complex modes of interaction with enhancer regions and heterodimerization with multiple interaction partners. Based on in vitro optimal binding-site selection studies and enhancer identification assays, it has been suggested that Pax proteins may recognize and bind their target DNA elements with different binding modes/topologies, however this hypothesis has not yet been structurally explored. One of the most extensively studied DNA target elements of the Pax6 paired domain is the eye-lens specific DC5 (δ-crystallin) enhancer element. In order to shed light on Pax6-DC5 DNA interactions, the related paired-domain prototype Pax9 was crystallized with the minimal δ-crystallin DC5 enhancer element and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was attempted. A 3.0 Å resolution native data set was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven from crystals grown in a solution consisting of 10%(w/v) PEG 20K, 20%(v/v) PEG 550 MME, 0.03 M NaNO3, 0.03 M Na2HPO4, 0.03 M NH2SO4, 0.1 M MES/imidazole pH 6.5. The data set was indexed and merged in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.74, b = 165.59, c = 70.14 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The solvent content in the unit cell is consistent with the presence of one Pax9 paired domain bound to duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Pax9 paired domain bound to a DC5 enhancer DNA element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Hilbig, Antonia; Udayasuryan, Barath; Jayabal, Sriram; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Pax genes belong to a family of metazoan transcription factors that are known to play a critical role in eye, ear, kidney and neural development. The mammalian Pax family of transcription factors is characterized by a ∼128-amino-acid DNA-binding paired domain that makes sequence-specific contacts with DNA. The diversity in Pax gene activities emerges from complex modes of interaction with enhancer regions and heterodimerization with multiple interaction partners. Based on in vitro optimal binding-site selection studies and enhancer identification assays, it has been suggested that Pax proteins may recognize and bind their target DNA elements with different binding modes/topologies, however this hypothesis has not yet been structurally explored. One of the most extensively studied DNA target elements of the Pax6 paired domain is the eye-lens specific DC5 (δ-crystallin) enhancer element. In order to shed light on Pax6–DC5 DNA interactions, the related paired-domain prototype Pax9 was crystallized with the minimal δ-crystallin DC5 enhancer element and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was attempted. A 3.0 Å resolution native data set was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven from crystals grown in a solution consisting of 10%(w/v) PEG 20K, 20%(v/v) PEG 550 MME, 0.03 M NaNO3, 0.03 M Na2HPO4, 0.03 M NH2SO4, 0.1 M MES/imidazole pH 6.5. The data set was indexed and merged in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.74, b = 165.59, c = 70.14 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The solvent content in the unit cell is consistent with the presence of one Pax9 paired domain bound to duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit. PMID:25286939

  7. Analysis of mtDNT 4977bp deletion induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood nucleated cells using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Tianli; Wang Ping; Han Lin; Liu Yulong; Liu Yumin

    2010-01-01

    To detect mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) 4977bp deletion(triangle open mtDNA 4977 ) in human peripheral blood nucleated cells exposed to ionizing radiation in vitro by using real-time PCR, and explore possibility of the index as biodosimetry for estimating biological dose in radiation accident,six healthy individuals' peripheral blood was collected,and the blood samples were irradiated with 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 Gy 60 Co gamma-ray. The triangle open mtDNA 4977 and total mtDNA copy number(mtDNA total ) in the mtDNA samples were detected, and then the deletion rates were calculated. The results showed that the mtDNA total and triangle open mtDNA 4977 copy number, and the deletion rates of mtDNA 4977bp in the mtDNA samples from 6 healthy individuals' blood exposed to 1-5 Gy radiation were higher than that with the samples exposed to 0 Gy radiation(p 0.05). The results indicated that ionizing radiation can induce accumulation of the triangle open mtDNA 4977 and increase of mtDNA total copy number in human peripheral blood nucleated cells,but both the mtDNA 4977bp deletion and exposure dose(0-5 Gy) were not obviously correlated. (authors)

  8. NMR scalar couplings across Watson–Crick base pair hydrogen bonds in DNA observed by transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervushin, Konstantin; Ono, Akira; Fernández, César; Szyperski, Thomas; Kainosho, Masatsune; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the NMR observation of 15N—15N and 1H—15N scalar couplings across the hydrogen bonds in Watson–Crick base pairs in a DNA duplex, hJNN and hJHN. These couplings represent new parameters of interest for both structural studies of DNA and theoretical investigations into the nature of the hydrogen bonds. Two dimensional [15N,1H]-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) with a 15N-labeled 14-mer DNA duplex was used to measure hJNN, which is in the range 6–7 Hz, and the two-dimensional hJNN-correlation-[15N,1H]-TROSY experiment was used to correlate the chemical shifts of pairs of hydrogen bond-related 15N spins and to observe, for the first time, hJHN scalar couplings, with values in the range 2–3.6 Hz. TROSY-based studies of scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds should be applicable for large molecular sizes, including protein-bound nucleic acids. PMID:9826668

  9. Fidelity and mutational spectrum of Pfu DNA polymerase on a human mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, P; Kim, A; Khrapko, K; Thilly, W G

    1997-08-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10(-6) must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or "PCR noise". Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 x 10(-7), and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC-->TA, AT-->TA, and AT-->CG), one transition (AT-->GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be reduced.

  10. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Strongyluris calotis (Nematoda: Ascaridida: Heterakidae) in South East and East Asian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Binh Thi; Ong, An Vinh; Luc, Pham Van; Sato, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Strongyluris calotis is a heterakid nematode in the large intestine of agamid lizards (Reptilia: Sauria: Agamidae) from the Oriental Region. The standard light microscopic definition of the species counts the "caudal papillae" as 10 pairs on male worms. However, previous work from our group using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the heterakid from agamid lizards in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore revealed that this counting contained a pair of phasmids and that two pairs of postcloacal papillae were completely fused to form a pair of united papillae, thus resulting in "10 pairs." In the present study, we examined S. calotis specimens from the Emma Gray's forest lizard, Calotes emma (Agamidae), living in the plain forest at low altitude, and the Vietnam false bloodsucker, Pseudocalotes brevipes (Agamidae), living in the mountainous forest at high altitude in the northern part of Vietnam. Using SEM, the arrangement of caudal papillae in male worms from an Emma Gray's forest lizard was found to be comparable to classical S. calotis specimens from agamid lizards collected in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore. However, male worms from Vietnam false bloodsuckers did not have a pair of united papillae but had 10 pairs of independent caudal papillae with a pair of phasmids. Molecular genetic analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of worms of the classical S. calotis morphotype from Japan and Singapore and two S. calotis morphotypes from Vietnam demonstrated absolutely identical nucleotide sequences of partial 18S rDNA (at least 1764 base pairs (bp)) and 5.8S rDNA (158 bp). However, intraspecific differences were detected in other regions of the rDNA, related to the geographical distribution of hosts regardless of morphotype: 97.8-98.5 % identity (443-446 bp/453 bp) in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region, 96.6-98.0 % identity (425-431 bp/440 bp) in the ITS-2 region, and 99.6-99.7 % identity (1149-1151 bp/1154 bp) in the 28S rDNA. Thus, in the future, taxonomic

  11. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  12. Quantification of DNA fragmentation in processed foods using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Junichi; Nishitsuji, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Fukudome, Shin-Ichi; Hayashida, Takuya; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Kurimoto, Youichi; Noguchi, Akio; Kondo, Kazunari; Teshima, Reiko; Takabatake, Reona; Kitta, Kazumi

    2017-07-01

    DNA analysis of processed foods is performed widely to detect various targets, such as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Food processing often causes DNA fragmentation, which consequently affects the results of PCR analysis. In order to assess the effects of DNA fragmentation on the reliability of PCR analysis, we investigated a novel methodology to quantify the degree of DNA fragmentation. We designed four real-time PCR assays that amplified 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences common to various plants at lengths of approximately 100, 200, 400, and 800 base pairs (bp). Then, we created an indicator value, "DNA fragmentation index (DFI)", which is calculated from the Cq values derived from the real-time PCR assays. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the quality control of GMO detection in processed foods by evaluating the relationship between the DFI and the limit of detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Delplanque

    Full Text Available Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+ act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5 modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+ and the acceptor (Cy5 with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  14. DNA base pair resolution measurements using resonance energy transfer efficiency in lanthanide doped nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delplanque, Aleksandra; Wawrzynczyk, Dominika; Jaworski, Pawel; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Buckle, Malcolm; Nyk, Marcin; Nogues, Claude; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio) probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+) act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm) NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA) by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5' amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5' fluorophore (Cy5) modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+) and the acceptor (Cy5) with sensitivity at a nanometre scale.

  15. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  16. The Influence of the Thymine C5 Methyl Group on Spontaneous Base Pair Breathing in DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wärmländer, S.; Šponer, Jiří; Leijon, M.; Šponer, Judit E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 32 (2002), s. 28491-28497 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : thymine * DNA * base pairs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.696, year: 2002

  17. Optimized mtDNA Control Region Primer Extension Capture Analysis for Forensically Relevant Samples and Highly Compromised mtDNA of Different Age and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Eduardoff

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has proven useful in forensic genetics and ancient DNA (aDNA studies, where specimens are often highly compromised and DNA quality and quantity are low. In forensic genetics, the mtDNA control region (CR is commonly sequenced using established Sanger-type Sequencing (STS protocols involving fragment sizes down to approximately 150 base pairs (bp. Recent developments include Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS of (multiplex PCR-generated libraries using the same amplicon sizes. Molecular genetic studies on archaeological remains that harbor more degraded aDNA have pioneered alternative approaches to target mtDNA, such as capture hybridization and primer extension capture (PEC methods followed by MPS. These assays target smaller mtDNA fragment sizes (down to 50 bp or less, and have proven to be substantially more successful in obtaining useful mtDNA sequences from these samples compared to electrophoretic methods. Here, we present the modification and optimization of a PEC method, earlier developed for sequencing the Neanderthal mitochondrial genome, with forensic applications in mind. Our approach was designed for a more sensitive enrichment of the mtDNA CR in a single tube assay and short laboratory turnaround times, thus complying with forensic practices. We characterized the method using sheared, high quantity mtDNA (six samples, and tested challenging forensic samples (n = 2 as well as compromised solid tissue samples (n = 15 up to 8 kyrs of age. The PEC MPS method produced reliable and plausible mtDNA haplotypes that were useful in the forensic context. It yielded plausible data in samples that did not provide results with STS and other MPS techniques. We addressed the issue of contamination by including four generations of negative controls, and discuss the results in the forensic context. We finally offer perspectives for future research to enable the validation and accreditation of the PEC MPS

  18. Roles of the active site residues and metal cofactors in noncanonical base-pairing during catalysis by human DNA polymerase iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Alena V; Ignatov, Artem; Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-10-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota (Pol ι) is a Y-family polymerase that can bypass various DNA lesions but possesses very low fidelity of DNA synthesis in vitro. Structural analysis of Pol ι revealed a narrow active site that promotes noncanonical base-pairing during catalysis. To better understand the structure-function relationships in the active site of Pol ι we investigated substitutions of individual amino acid residues in its fingers domain that contact either the templating or the incoming nucleotide. Two of the substitutions, Y39A and Q59A, significantly decreased the catalytic activity but improved the fidelity of Pol ι. Surprisingly, in the presence of Mn(2+) ions, the wild-type and mutant Pol ι variants efficiently incorporated nucleotides opposite template purines containing modifications that disrupted either Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base-pairing, suggesting that Pol ι may use various types of interactions during nucleotide addition. In contrast, in Mg(2+) reactions, wild-type Pol ι was dependent on Hoogsteen base-pairing, the Y39A mutant was essentially inactive, and the Q59A mutant promoted Watson-Crick interactions with template purines. The results suggest that Pol ι utilizes distinct mechanisms of nucleotide incorporation depending on the metal cofactor and reveal important roles of specific residues from the fingers domain in base-pairing and catalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiosensitivity in breast cancer assessed by the histone γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuzenova, Cholpon S; Elsner, Ines; Katzer, Astrid; Worschech, Eike; Distel, Luitpold V; Flentje, Michael; Polat, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    High expression of constitutive histone γ-H2AX, a sensitive marker of DNA damage, might be indicative of defective DNA repair pathway or genomic instability. 53BP1 (p53-binding protein 1) is a conserved checkpoint protein with properties of a DNA double-strand breaks sensor. This study explores the relationship between the clinical radiosensitivity of tumor patients and the expression/induction of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 in vitro. Using immunostaining, we assessed spontaneous and radiation-induced foci of γ-H2AX and 53 BP1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from unselected breast cancer (BC) patients (n=57) undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Cells from apparently healthy donors (n=12) served as references. Non-irradiated cells from controls and unselected BC patients exhibited similar baseline levels of DNA damage assessed by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci. At the same time, the γ-H2AX assay of in vitro irradiated cells revealed significant differences between the control group and the group of unselected BC patients with respect to the initial (0.5 Gy, 30 min) and residual (2 Gy, 24 h post-radiation) DNA damage. The numbers of 53BP1 foci analyzed in 35 BC patients were significantly higher than in controls only in case of residual DNA damage. A weak correlation was found between residual foci of both proteins tested. In addition, cells from cancer patients with an adverse acute skin reaction (grade 3) to RT showed significantly increased radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci and their protracted disappearance compared to the group of BC patients with normal skin reaction (grade 0–1). The mean number of γ-H2AX foci after 5 clinical fractions was significantly higher than that before RT, especially in clinically radiosensitive patients. The γ-H2AX assay may have potential for screening individual radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients.

  20. Clusters of DNA induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber comprised of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and delta rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers >100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of OH, H, eaq, etc.; (2) OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks: (3) OH attack on bases; (4) direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; (5) direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 bp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. The shapes of the spectra of DNA fragment lengths depend on the symmetries or approximate symmetries of the chromatin structure. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, Radiat, Res. 145, 200-209, 1996) after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the

  1. Mispairs with Watson-Crick base-pair geometry observed in ternary complexes of an RB69 DNA polymerase variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Konigsberg, William H

    2014-04-01

    Recent structures of DNA polymerase complexes with dGMPCPP/dT and dCTP/dA mispairs at the insertion site have shown that they adopt Watson-Crick geometry in the presence of Mn(2+) indicating that the tautomeric or ionization state of the base has changed. To see whether the tautomeric or ionization state of base-pair could be affected by its microenvironment, we determined 10 structures of an RB69 DNA polymerase quadruple mutant with dG/dT or dT/dG mispairs at position n-1 to n-5 of the Primer/Template duplex. Different shapes of the mispairs, including Watson-Crick geometry, have been observed, strongly suggesting that the local environment of base-pairs plays an important role in their tautomeric or ionization states. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  2. Note: Primer Amysat 001; Fragment size is 211bp

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renuka

    Bhandara : Lanes 1–14 represent different strains of Bhandara Ecorace. Note: Primer Amysat 001; Fragment size is 211bp. Fig. 1. SSR profiles generated from genomic DNA of 16 strains from different individuals of (A.L, D. TV, D. BV, Modal, Sukinda, Raily, Bhandara) ecoraces of tasar silk worm, Antheraea mylitta using the.

  3. Isolation and sequence of cDNA encoding a cytochrome P-450 from an insecticide-resistant strain of the house fly, Musca domestica.

    OpenAIRE

    Feyereisen, R; Koener, J F; Farnsworth, D E; Nebert, D W

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA expression library from phenobarbital-treated house fly (Musca domestica) was screened with rabbit antisera directed against partially purified house fly cytochrome P-450. Two overlapping clones with insert lengths of 1.3 and 1.5 kilobases were isolated. The sequence of a 1629-base-pair (bp) cDNA was obtained, with an open reading frame (nucleotides 81-1610) encoding a P-450 protein of 509 residues (Mr = 58,738). The insect P-450 protein contains a hydrophobic NH2 terminus and a 22-res...

  4. Rapid and simple method by combining FTA™ card DNA extraction with two set multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains and virulence genes in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S A; Park, S H; Lee, S I; Ricke, S C

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research was to optimize two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays that could simultaneously detect six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) as well as the three virulence genes. We also investigated the potential of combining the FTA™ card-based DNA extraction with the multiplex PCR assays. Two multiplex PCR assays were optimized using six primer pairs for each non-O157 STEC serogroup and three primer pairs for virulence genes respectively. Each STEC strain specific primer pair only amplified 155, 238, 321, 438, 587 and 750 bp product for O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 respectively. Three virulence genes were successfully multiplexed: 375 bp for eae, 655 bp for stx1 and 477 bp for stx2. When two multiplex PCR assays were validated with ground beef samples, distinctive bands were also successfully produced. Since the two multiplex PCR examined here can be conducted under the same PCR conditions, the six non-O157 STEC and their virulence genes could be concurrently detected with one run on the thermocycler. In addition, all bands clearly appeared to be amplified by FTA card DNA extraction in the multiplex PCR assay from the ground beef sample, suggesting that an FTA card could be a viable sampling approach for rapid and simple DNA extraction to reduce time and labour and therefore may have practical use for the food industry. Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were optimized for discrimination of six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and identification of their major virulence genes within a single reaction, simultaneously. This study also determined the successful ability of the FTA™ card as an alternative to commercial DNA extraction method for conducting multiplex STEC PCR assays. The FTA™ card combined with multiplex PCR holds promise for the food industry by offering a simple and rapid DNA sample method for reducing time, cost and labour for detection of STEC in

  5. Physical signals for protein–DNA recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Jia; Yan, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper discovers consensus physical signals around eukaryotic splice sites, transcription start sites, and replication origin start and end sites on a genome-wide scale based on their DNA flexibility profiles calculated by three different flexibility models. These salient physical signals are localized highly rigid and flexible DNAs, which may play important roles in protein–DNA recognition by the sliding search mechanism. The found physical signals lead us to a detailed hypothetical view of the search process in which a DNA-binding protein first finds a genomic region close to the target site from an arbitrary starting location by three-dimensional (3D) hopping and intersegment transfer mechanisms for long distances, and subsequently uses the one-dimensional (1D) sliding mechanism facilitated by the localized highly rigid DNAs to accurately locate the target flexible binding site within 30 bp (base pair) short distances. Guided by these physical signals, DNA-binding proteins rapidly search the entire genome to recognize a specific target site from the 3D to 1D pathway. Our findings also show that current promoter prediction programs (PPPs) based on DNA physical properties may suffer from lots of false positives because other functional sites such as splice sites and replication origins have similar physical signals as promoters do

  6. DNA-assisted binding of microspheres on glass substrates and their laser-induced release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sejong; Geiss, Erik; Yu, Phillip; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Marcus, Harris L.

    2006-01-01

    DNA hybridization has been increasingly adopted in materials sciences due to its complementary nature of single stranded DNAs. This unique property could be potentially used in the realization of 2 dimensional (2D) arrays of colloidal microspheres as a precursor to further build more complicated superstructures. In order to precisely understand this DNA-assisted assembly of colloidal particles, we quantitatively assessed the surface density of grafted and hybridizing accessible DNA oligomers on both substrate and colloidal particles. The DNA grafting densities were determined by UV-Vis of dye-functionalized complementary DNA oligomers, in conjunction with theoretical models. The variations of the concentration of hybridized DNA as a function of parameters such as the number of DNA base pairs (bp), the length of spacer and the size of sphere were also investigated to determine the immobilization strength of colloidal microspheres on the substrate. Dehybridization of the particle was conducted by utilizing a focused laser beam. These results were also compared with the particle hybridization energies and modeled according to the sum of DNA bindings as a function of the number of hybridized bases

  7. A Novel 3670-Base Pair Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Resulting in Multi-systemic Manifestations in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ming Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletion is a rare occurrence that results in defects to oxidative phosphorylation. The common clinical presentations of mtDNA deletion vary but include mitochondrial myopathy, Pearson syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with progressive deterioration of his clinical status (which included hypoglycemia, short stature, sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and chronic gastrointestinal dysmotility that progressed to acute deterioration with pancreatitis, Fanconi syndrome, lactic acidosis, and acute encephalopathy. Following treatment, the patient was stabilized and his neurological condition improved. Through a combination of histological examinations and biochemical and molecular analyses, mitochondrial disease was confirmed. A novel 3670-base pair deletion (deletion of mtDNA nt 7,628-11,297 was identified in the muscle tissue. A direct repeat of CTACT at the breakpoints was also detected.

  8. DNA barcoding commercially important aquatic invertebrates of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Emre; Atar, Hasan Hüseyin

    2013-08-01

    DNA barcoding was used in order to identify aquatic invertebrates sampled from fisheries bycatch and discards. A total of 440 unique cytochrome c oxidase sub unit I (COI) barcodes were generated for 22 species from three important phyla (Arthropoda, Cnidaria, and Mollusca). All the species were sequenced and submitted to GenBank and Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) databases using 654 bp-long fragment of mitochondrial COI gene. Two of them (Pontastacus leptodactylus and Rapana bezoar) were first records of the species for the BOLD database and six of them (Carcinus aestuarii, Loligo vulgaris, Melicertus kerathurus, Nephrops norvegicus, Scyllarides latus, and Scyllarus arctus) were first standard (>648 bp) COI barcode records for the GenBank database. COI barcodes were analyzed for nucleotide composition, nucleotide pair frequencies, and Kimura's two-parameter genetic distance. Mean genetic distance among species was found increasing at higher taxonomic levels. Neighbor-joining trees generated were congruent with morphometric-based taxonomic classification. Findings of this study clearly demonstrate that DNA barcodes could be used as an efficient molecular tool in identification of not only target species from fisheries but also bycatch and discard species, and so it could provide us leverage for a better understanding in monitoring and management of fisheries and biodiversity.

  9. Development of a novel device to trap heavy metal cations: application of the specific interaction between heavy metal cation and mismatch DNA base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Fukushi, Miyako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    We have already found that Hg(II) cation specifically binds to T:T mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving T:T mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. We have also found that Ag(I) cation specifically binds to C:C mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving C:C mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. Using the specific interaction, we developed a novel device to trap each of Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation. The device is composed of 5'-biotinylated T-rich or C-rich DNA oligonucleotides, BIO-T20: 5'-Bio-T(20)-3' or BIO-C20: 5'-Bio-C(20)-3' (Bio is a biotin), immobilized on streptavidin-coated polystylene beads. When the BIO-T20-immobilized beads were added to a solution containing Hg(II) cation, and the beads trapping Hg(II) cation were collected by centrifugation, almost all of Hg(II) cation were removed from the solution. Also, when the BIO-C20-immobilized beads were added to a solution containing Ag(I) cation, and the beads trapping Ag(I) cation were collected by centrifugation, almost all of Ag(I) cation were removed from the solution. We conclude that, using the novel device developed in this study, Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation can be effectively removed from the solution.

  10. Dual door entry to exciplex emission in a chimeric DNA duplex containing non-nucleoside-nucleoside pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Talukdar, Sangita; Kundu, Rajen; Saito, Isao; Jana, Subhashis

    2014-01-25

    Dual door entry to exciplex formation was established in a chimeric DNA duplex wherein a fluorescent non-nucleosidic base surrogate () is paired against a fluorescent nucleosidic base surrogate (). Packing of the nucleobases via intercalative stacking interactions led to an exciplex emission either via FRET from the donor or direct excitation of the FRET acceptor .

  11. Crystallization of a self-assembled three-dimensional DNA nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendek, Kimberly N.; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The powerful and specific molecular-recognition system present in the base-pairing of DNA allows for the design of a plethora of nanostructures. In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The DNA nanostructure consists of six single-stranded oligonucleotides that hybridize to form a three-dimensional tetrahedron of 80 kDa in molecular mass and 20 bp on each edge. Crystals of the tetrahedron have been successfully produced and characterized. These crystals may form the basis for an X-ray structure of the tetrahedron in the future. Nucleotide crystallography poses many challenges, leading to the fact that only 1352 X-ray structures of nucleic acids have been solved compared with more than 80 000 protein structures. In this work, the crystallization optimization for three-dimensional tetrahedra is also described, with the eventual goal of producing nanocrystals to overcome the radiation-damage obstacle by the use of free-electron laser technology in the future

  12. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  13. Pyrrolo-dC Metal-Mediated Base Pairs in the Reverse Watson-Crick Double Helix: Enhanced Stability of Parallel DNA and Impact of 6-Pyridinyl Residues on Fluorescence and Silver-Ion Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haozhe; Mei, Hui; Seela, Frank

    2015-07-06

    Reverse Watson-Crick DNA with parallel-strand orientation (ps DNA) has been constructed. Pyrrolo-dC (PyrdC) nucleosides with phenyl and pyridinyl residues linked to the 6 position of the pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine base have been incorporated in 12- and 25-mer oligonucleotide duplexes and utilized as silver-ion binding sites. Thermal-stability studies on the parallel DNA strands demonstrated extremely strong silver-ion binding and strongly enhanced duplex stability. Stoichiometric UV and fluorescence titration experiments verified that a single (2py) PyrdC-(2py) PyrdC pair captures two silver ions in ps DNA. A structure for the PyrdC silver-ion base pair that aligns 7-deazapurine bases head-to-tail instead of head-to-head, as suggested for canonical DNA, is proposed. The silver DNA double helix represents the first example of a ps DNA structure built up of bidentate and tridentate reverse Watson-Crick base pairs stabilized by a dinuclear silver-mediated PyrdC pair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Pairing of heterochromatin in response to cellular stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, H.I.; Mullenders, L.H.F.; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure of human cells to DNA-damaging agents (X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC)) induces pairing of the homologous paracentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 (9q12-13). Here, we show that UV irradiation and also heat shock treatment of human cells lead to similar effects. Since the various agents induce very different types and frequencies of damage to cellular constituents, the data suggest a general stress response as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, local UV irradiation experiments revealed that pairing of heterochromatin is an event that can be triggered without induction of DNA damage in the heterochromatic sequences. The repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group F) previously shown to fail pairing after MMC displayed elevated pairing after heat shock treatment but not after UV exposure. Taken together, the present results indicate that pairing of heterochromatin following exposure to DNA-damaging agents is initiated by a general stress response and that the sensing of stress or the maintenance of the paired status of the heterochromatin might be dependent on DNA repair

  15. Part-per-trillion level detection of estradiol by competitive fluorescence immunoassay using DNA/dye conjugate as antibody multiple labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shengchao; Zhang, Qin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2008-08-22

    Fluorescent organic dyes are currently the standard signal-generating labels used in microarray quantification. However, new labeling strategies are needed to meet the demand for high sensitivity in the detection of low-abundance proteins and small molecules. In this report, a long-chain DNA/dye conjugate was used to attach multiple fluorescence labels on antibodies to improve signal intensity and immunoassay sensitivity. Compared with the 30 base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide used in our previous work [Q. Zhang, L.-H. Guo, Bioconjugate Chem. 18 (2007) 1668-1672], conjugation of a 219 bp DNA in solution with a fluorescent DNA binder SYBR Green I resulted in more than sixfold increase in signal intensity, consistent with the increase in bp number. In a direct immunoassay for the detection of goat anti-mouse IgG in a mouse IgG-coated 96-well plate, the long DNA conjugate label also produced higher fluorescence than the short one, accompanied by about 15-fold improvement in the detection limit. To demonstrate its advantage in real applications, the DNA/dye conjugate was employed in the competitive immunoassay of 17beta-estradiol, a clinically and environmentally important analyte. The biotin-terminated DNA was attached to biotinylated anti-estradiol antibody through the biotin/streptavidin/biotin bridge after the immuno-reaction was completed, followed by conjugation with SYBR Green I. The limit of detection for 17beta-estradiol is 1.9 pg mL(-1), which is 200-fold lower than the assay using fluorescein-labeled antibodies. The new multiple labeling strategy uses readily available reagents, and is also compatible with current biochip platform. It has great potential in the sensitive detection of protein and antibody microarrays.

  16. Identification and Molecular Characterization of the cDNA Encoding Cucumis melo Allergen, Cuc m 3, a Plant Pathogenesis-Related Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melon (Cucumis melo allergy is one of the most common food allergies, characterized by oral allergy syndrome. To date, two allergen molecules, Cuc m 1 and Cuc m 2, have been fully characterized in melon pulp, but there are few reports about the molecular characteristics of Cuc m 3. Methods:The Cuc m 3 cDNA has been characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE, which revealed a 456 base-pair (bp fragment encoding a 151-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 16.97 kDa, and identified 79 and 178 bp untranslated sequences at the 5′ and 3´ ends, respectively. Results: In silico analysis showed strong similarities between Cuc m 3 and other plant pathogen-related protein 1s from cucumber, grape, bell pepper, and tomato. Conclusion: Here we report the identification and characterization of the Cuc m 3 cDNA, which will be utilized for further analyses of structural and allergenic features of this allergen

  17. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting...... can lead to anaphase bridges that impair accurate chromosome segregation. The recent decade featured many advances in our understanding of how cells cope with underreplicated loci in mitosis. A major advance was the description of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs), a class of anaphase bridges...... established Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study anaphase bridges, and we identified Dpb11/TopBP1 as a novel UFB-associated protein in yeast and avian DT40 cells, respectively. TopBP1 localized to confined areas on replication-stress induced UFBs. Upon onset of mitosis we observed a burst...

  18. Raman spectroscopy of DNA-metal complexes. II. The thermal denaturation of DNA in the presence of Sr2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, J G; Bloomfield, V A; Benevides, J M; Thomas, G J

    1995-12-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, laser Raman spectroscopy, optical densitometry, and pH potentiometry have been used to investigate DNA melting profiles in the presence of the chloride salts of Ba2+, Sr2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+. Metal-DNA interactions have been observed for the molar ratio [M2+]/[PO2-] = 0.6 in aqueous solutions containing 5% by weight of 160 bp mononucleosomal calf thymus DNA. All of the alkaline earth metals, plus Mn2+, elevate the melting temperature of DNA (Tm > 75.5 degrees C), whereas the transition metals Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ lower Tm. Calorimetric (delta Hcal) and van't Hoff (delta HVH) enthalpies of melting range from 6.2-8.7 kcal/mol bp and 75.6-188.6 kcal/mol cooperative unit, respectively, and entropies from 17.5 to 24.7 cal/K mol bp. The average number of base pairs in a cooperative melting unit () varied from 11.3 to 28.1. No dichotomy was observed between alkaline earth and transition DNA-metal complexes for any of the thermodynamic parameters other than their effects on Tm. These results complement Raman difference spectra, which reveal decreases in backbone order, base unstacking, distortion of glycosyl torsion angles, and rupture of hydrogen bonds, which occur after thermal denaturation. Raman difference spectroscopy shows that transition metals interact with the N7 atom of guanine in duplex DNA. A broader range of interaction sites with single-stranded DNA includes ionic phosphates, the N1 and N7 atoms of purines, and the N3 atom of pyrimidines. For alkaline earth metals, very little interaction was observed with duplex DNA, whereas spectra of single-stranded complexes are very similar to those of melted DNA without metal. However, difference spectra reveal some metal-specific perturbations at 1092 cm-1 (nPO2-), 1258 cm-1 (dC, dA), and 1668 cm-1 (nC==O, dNH2 dT, dG, dC). Increased spectral intensity could also be observed near 1335 cm-1 (dA, dG) for CaDNA. Optical densitometry, employed to detect DNA

  19. Surprising conformers of the biologically important A·T DNA base pairs: QM/QTAIM proofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Tsiupa, Kostiantyn S.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2018-02-01

    For the first time novel high-energy conformers – A·T(wWC) (5.36), A·T(wrWC) (5.97), A·T(wH) (5.78) and A·T(wrH) (ΔG=5.82 kcal•mol-1) were revealed for each of the four biologically important A·T(WC) DNA base pairs – Watson-Crick A·T(WC), reverse Watson-Crick A·T(rWC), Hoogsteen A·T(H) and reverse Hoogsteen A·T(rH) at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of quantum-mechanical theory in the continuum with ɛ=4 under normal conditions. Each of these conformers possesses substantially non-planar wobble (w) structure and is stabilized by the participation of the two anti-parallel N6H/N6H'…O4/O2 and N3H…N6 H-bonds, involving the pyramidalized amino group of the A DNA base as an acceptor and a donor of the H-bonding. The transition states – TSA·T(WC)↔A·T(wWC), TSA·T(rWC)↔A·T(wrWC), TSA·T(H)↔A·T(wH) and TSA·T(rH)↔A·T(wrH), controlling the dipole-active transformations of the conformers from the main plane-symmetric state into the high-energy, significantly non-planar state and vice versa, were localized. They also possess wobble structures similarly to the high-energy conformers and are stabilized by the participation of the N6H/N6H'…O4/O2 and N3H…N6 H-bonds. Discovered conformers of the A·T DNA base pairs are dynamically stable short-lived structures (lifetime τ = (1.4-3.9) ps). Their possible biological significance and future perspectives have been briefly discussed.

  20. Surprising Conformers of the Biologically Important A·T DNA Base Pairs: QM/QTAIM Proofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ha O. Brovarets'

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time novel high-energy conformers–A·T(wWC (5.36, A·T(wrWC (5.97, A·T(wH (5.78, and A·T(wrH (ΔG = 5.82 kcal·mol−1 (See Graphical Abstract were revealed for each of the four biologically important A·T DNA base pairs – Watson-Crick A·T(WC, reverse Watson-Crick A·T(rWC, Hoogsteen A·T(H and reverse Hoogsteen A·T(rH at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p level of quantum-mechanical theory in the continuum with ε = 4 under normal conditions. Each of these conformers possesses substantially non-planar wobble (w structure and is stabilized by the participation of the two anti-parallel N6H/N6H′…O4/O2 and N3H…N6 H-bonds, involving the pyramidalized amino group of the A DNA base as an acceptor and a donor of the H-bonding. The transition states – TSA·T(WC↔A·T(wWC, TSA·T(rWC↔A·T(wrWC, TSA·T(H↔A·T(wH, and TSA·T(rH↔A·T(wrH, controlling the dipole-active transformations of the conformers from the main plane-symmetric state into the high-energy, significantly non-planar state and vice versa, were localized. They also possess wobble structures similarly to the high-energy conformers and are stabilized by the participation of the N6H/N6H′…O4/O2 and N3H…N6 H-bonds. Discovered conformers of the A·T DNA base pairs are dynamically stable short-lived structures [lifetime τ = (1.4–3.9 ps]. Their possible biological significance and future perspectives have been briefly discussed.

  1. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis.

  2. Substrate interactions and promiscuity in a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aathavan, K; Politzer, Adam T; Kaplan, Ariel; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Chemla, Yann R; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Anderson, Dwight L; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    The ASCE (additional strand, conserved E) superfamily of proteins consists of structurally similar ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities involving metabolism and transport of proteins and nucleic acids in all forms of life. A subset of these enzymes consists of multimeric ringed pumps responsible for DNA transport in processes including genome packaging in adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poxviruses and tailed bacteriophages. Although their mechanism of mechanochemical conversion is beginning to be understood, little is known about how these motors engage their nucleic acid substrates. Questions remain as to whether the motors contact a single DNA element, such as a phosphate or a base, or whether contacts are distributed over several parts of the DNA. Furthermore, the role of these contacts in the mechanochemical cycle is unknown. Here we use the genome packaging motor of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage varphi29 (ref. 4) to address these questions. The full mechanochemical cycle of the motor, in which the ATPase is a pentameric-ring of gene product 16 (gp16), involves two phases-an ATP-loading dwell followed by a translocation burst of four 2.5-base-pair (bp) steps triggered by hydrolysis product release. By challenging the motor with a variety of modified DNA substrates, we show that during the dwell phase important contacts are made with adjacent phosphates every 10-bp on the 5'-3' strand in the direction of packaging. As well as providing stable, long-lived contacts, these phosphate interactions also regulate the chemical cycle. In contrast, during the burst phase, we find that DNA translocation is driven against large forces by extensive contacts, some of which are not specific to the chemical moieties of DNA. Such promiscuous, nonspecific contacts may reflect common translocase-substrate interactions for both the nucleic acid and protein translocases of the ASCE superfamily.

  3. Amplification of DNA of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri from historic citrus canker herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2006-05-01

    Herbaria are important resources for the study of the origins and dispersal of plant pathogens, particularly bacterial plant pathogens that incite local lesions in which large numbers of pathogen genomes are concentrated. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker disease, is a notable example of such a pathogen. The appearance of novel strains of the pathogen in Florida and elsewhere make it increasingly important to understand the relationships among strains of this pathogen. USDA-ARS at Beltsville, Maryland maintains approximately 700 herbarium specimens with citrus canker disease lesions up to 90 years old, originally collected from all over the world, and so is an important resource for phytogeographic studies of this bacterium. Unfortunately, DNA in herbarium specimens is degraded and may contain high levels of inhibitors of PCR. In this study, we compared a total of 23 DNA isolation techniques in combination with 31 novel primer pairs in order to develop an efficient protocol for the analysis of Xac DNA in herbarium specimens. We identified the most reliable extraction method, identified in terms of successful amplification by our panel of 31 primer pairs. We also identified the most robust primer pairs, identified as successful in the largest number of extracts prepared by different methods. We amplified Xac genomic sequences up to 542 bp long from herbarium samples up to 89 years old. Primers varied in effectiveness, with some primer pairs amplifying Xac DNA from a 1/10,000 dilution of extract from a single lesion from a citrus canker herbarium specimen. Our methodology will be useful to identify pathogens and perform molecular analyses of bacterial and possibly fungal genomes from herbarium specimens.

  4. A fully automated 384 capillary array for DNA sequencer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, T

    2003-03-20

    Phase I SpectruMedix has successfully developed an automatic 96-capillary array DNA prototype based on the multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system originated from Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University. With computer control of all steps involved in a 96-capillary array running cycle, the prototype instrument (the SCE9600) is now capable of sequencing 450 base pairs (bp) per capillary, or 48,000 bp per instrument run within 2 hrs. Phase II of this grant involved the advancement of the core 96 capillary technologies, as well as designing a high density 384 capillary prototype. True commercialization of the 96 capillary instrument involved finalization of the gel matrix, streamlining the instrument hardware, creating a more reliable capillary cartridge, and further advancement of the data processing software. Together these silos of technology create a truly commercializable product (the SCE9610) capable of meeting the operation needs of the sequencing centers.

  5. Comet assay optimization for assessment of DNA damage due to radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwi Ramadhani; Devita Tetriana; Viria Agesti Suvifan

    2016-01-01

    Comet assay can be used to measure the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage level caused by ionizing radiation exposure in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The principle of the comet assay is based on the amount of denatured DNA fragments that migrated out of the cell nucleus during electrophoresis. There are several aspects that must be concerned when doing the comet assay. For example the agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature, and voltage gradient), and the measurement parameters that used in analyze the comet. Percentage of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) is strongly recommended as a parameter when analyze the comet because it can be converted to lesions per 106 base pairs (bp) using calibration curve that show relationship between the dose of ionizing radiation and % tail DNA. To obtain an accurate result, the calibration curve must be made and comet should be analyzing using image processing analysis software since it can be increase the precision and reduce the subjectivity of the measurement process. (author)

  6. Recruitment kinetics of DNA repair proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but not 53BP1 depend on damage complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Hable

    Full Text Available The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET = 370 keV/µm to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET = 2.6 keV/µm to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T(0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times τ(1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T(0 = 17 ± 2 s, τ(1 = 98 ± 11 s than 53BP1 (T(0 = 77 ± 7 s, τ(1 = 310 ± 60 s after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T(0 = 73 ± 16 s, τ(1 = 1050 ± 270 s after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time τ(1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies.

  7. Lune/eye gone, a Pax-like protein, uses a partial paired domain and a homeodomain for DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S; Wallen, R V; Goriely, A; Kalionis, B; Desplan, C

    1998-11-10

    Pax proteins, characterized by the presence of a paired domain, play key regulatory roles during development. The paired domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain that contains two helix-turn-helix domains joined by a linker region. Each of the subdomains, the PAI and RED domains, has been shown to be a distinct DNA-binding domain. The PAI domain is the most critical, but in specific circumstances, the RED domain is involved in DNA recognition. We describe a Pax protein, originally called Lune, that is the product of the Drosophila eye gone gene (eyg). It is unique among Pax proteins, because it contains only the RED domain. eyg seems to play a role both in the organogenesis of the salivary gland during embryogenesis and in the development of the eye. A high-affinity binding site for the Eyg RED domain was identified by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment techniques. This binding site is related to a binding site previously identified for the RED domain of the Pax-6 5a isoform. Eyg also contains another DNA-binding domain, a Prd-class homeodomain (HD), whose palindromic binding site is similar to other Prd-class HDs. The ability of Pax proteins to use the PAI, RED, and HD, or combinations thereof, may be one mechanism that allows them to be used at different stages of development to regulate various developmental processes through the activation of specific target genes.

  8. Meraculous: De Novo Genome Assembly with Short Paired-End Reads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jarrod A.; Ho, Isaac; Sunkara, Sirisha; Luo, Shujun; Schroth, Gary P.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2011-08-18

    We describe a new algorithm, meraculous, for whole genome assembly of deep paired-end short reads, and apply it to the assembly of a dataset of paired 75-bp Illumina reads derived from the 15.4 megabase genome of the haploid yeast Pichia stipitis. More than 95% of the genome is recovered, with no errors; half the assembled sequence is in contigs longer than 101 kilobases and in scaffolds longer than 269 kilobases. Incorporating fosmid ends recovers entire chromosomes. Meraculous relies on an efficient and conservative traversal of the subgraph of the k-mer (deBruijn) graph of oligonucleotides with unique high quality extensions in the dataset, avoiding an explicit error correction step as used in other short-read assemblers. A novel memory-efficient hashing scheme is introduced. The resulting contigs are ordered and oriented using paired reads separated by ~280 bp or ~3.2 kbp, and many gaps between contigs can be closed using paired-end placements. Practical issues with the dataset are described, and prospects for assembling larger genomes are discussed.

  9. Detection of endonuclease III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-sensitive base modifications in γ-irradiated DNA and cells by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin Ali, M.; Kurisu, Satofumi; Yoshioka, Yoshihiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Ide Hiroshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates diverse DNA lesions that differentially induce cell death and mutations. In the present study, calf thymus DNA (400 μg/ml) and HeLa cells were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays, and abasic (AP) sites and endonuclease (Endo) III- and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1)-sensitive base modifications in DNA were quantitated by the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) assay. The irradiation of calf thymus DNA in phosphate buffer generated 91 Endo III- and 100 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and 110 AP sites per 10 6 base pairs (bp) per Gy. The yield of the lesions in Tris buffer was 41- to 91-fold lower than that in phosphate, demonstrating a radioprotective effect of Tris. The HeLa cell chromosomal DNA contained 12 Endo III- and 3.8 hOGG1-sensitive base modifications and less than 1 AP sites per 10 6 bp as endogenous damage, and their level was increased by irradiation. The yields of the damage at 1 Gy (roughly equivalent to the lethal dose of HeLa cells [1.6-1.8 Gy]) were 0.13 Endo III, 0.091 hOGG1, and 0.065 AP sites per 10 6 bp, showing that irradiation with a lethal dose brought about only a marginal increase in base damage relative to an endogenous one. A comparison of the present data with those reported for DNA strand breaks supports the primary importance of double-strand breaks and clustered lesions as lethal damages formed by ionizing radiation. (author)

  10. Accommodation of an N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct in the active site of human DNA polymerase iota: Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base pairing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donny-Clark, Kerry; Shapiro, Robert; Broyde, Suse

    2009-01-13

    Bypass across DNA lesions by specialized polymerases is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Human DNA polymerase iota (poliota) is a bypass polymerase of the Y family. Crystal structures of poliota suggest that Hoogsteen base pairing is employed to bypass minor groove DNA lesions, placing them on the spacious major groove side of the enzyme. Primer extension studies have shown that poliota is also capable of error-free nucleotide incorporation opposite the bulky major groove adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-AAF). We present molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggesting that Watson-Crick base pairing could be employed in poliota for bypass of dG-AAF. In poliota with Hoogsteen-paired dG-AAF the bulky AAF moiety would reside on the cramped minor groove side of the template. The Hoogsteen-capable conformation distorts the active site, disrupting interactions necessary for error-free incorporation of dC opposite the lesion. Watson-Crick pairing places the AAF rings on the spacious major groove side, similar to the position of minor groove adducts observed with Hoogsteen pairing. Watson-Crick-paired structures show a well-ordered active site, with a near reaction-ready ternary complex. Thus our results suggest that poliota would utilize the same spacious region for lesion bypass of both major and minor groove adducts. Therefore, purine adducts with bulk on the minor groove side would use Hoogsteen pairing, while adducts with the bulky lesion on the major groove side would utilize Watson-Crick base pairing as indicated by our MD simulations for dG-AAF. This suggests the possibility of an expanded role for poliota in lesion bypass.

  11. PCR detection of a Maell polymorphism in the human major breakpoint cluster region (BCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, J.S.; Litz, C.E. (Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1991-09-25

    Nested primer pairs flanking the second intron of the breakpoint cluster region were constructed from the published cDNA sequence. The outer primer pair 5{prime}BCR Exon 2 (5{prime}-GTT TCA GAA GCT TCT CCC TG-3{prime}) and 3{prime}BCR Exon 3 (5{prime}-ACT CTG CTT AAA TCC AGT GG-3{prime}), amplified a fragment of genomic DNA approximately 810 bp in length. The inner primer pair, 3{prime}BCR Exon 2(5{prime}-CGC TGA CCA TCA ATA AGG AA-3{prime}) and 5{prime}BCR Exon 3 (5{prime}-AGA AAC CCA TAG AGC CCC GG-3{prime}), amplified a fragment approximately 730 bp in length. Double stranded DNA amplified with the outer primer pair was subjected to asymmetric PCR using the inner primer pair. Sequencing reactions were performed using the Sequenase dideoxy sequencing kit with S{sup 35}-dATP. Sequences in homozygotes revealed either an A or a G 85 bp 5{prime} of the BCR BamHI site. Heterozygotes demonstrated both bands at the corresponding position.

  12. The regulation of transactivator of transcription on the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianyi; Zhang Shimeng; Qin Xia; Li Bing; Liu Xiaodan; Zhou Pingkun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (TAT) on the promoter activity of DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Methods: The truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs were cloned by PCR from the template DNA from HeLa genomic DNA, and the pGL3-basic-DNA-PKcs promoter reporter plasmids were constructed. The activity of DNA-PKcs promoters was detected by dual-luciferase reporter assay system. A Lac-repressor and Lacoperator based green fluorescent protein imaging system was used to assay the chromatin remodeling activity. Results: A series of reporter plasmids harboring the truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs from -939 bp to -1 bp were constructed. The sequence of -64 bp to-1 bp was identified as a critical element for the activity of DNA-PKes promoter. TAT can suppress the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter. TAT participates in the regulation of the large scale chromatin relaxation. Ionizing radiation attenuates the activity of TAT played in the chromatin remodeling. Conclusion: TAT represses the promoter activity of DNA repair protein DNA-PKcs, and also play a role of large scale chromatin remodeling which can te attenuated by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  13. BP volume reduction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Yoshinori; Muroo, Yoji; Hamanaka, Isao

    2003-01-01

    A new type of burnable poison (BP) volume reduction system is currently being developed. Many BP rods, a subcomponent of spent fuel assemblies are discharged from nuclear power reactors. This new system reduces the overall volume of BP rods. The main system consists of BP rod cutting equipment, equipment for the recovery of BP cut pieces, and special transport equipment for the cut rods. The equipment is all operated by hydraulic press cylinders in water to reduce operator exposure to radioactivity. (author)

  14. Pathway-Enriched Gene Signature Associated with 53BP1 Response to PARP Inhibition in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saima; Esch, Amanda; Liby, Tiera; Gray, Joe W; Heiser, Laura M

    2017-12-01

    Effective treatment of patients with triple-negative (ER-negative, PR-negative, HER2-negative) breast cancer remains a challenge. Although PARP inhibitors are being evaluated in clinical trials, biomarkers are needed to identify patients who will most benefit from anti-PARP therapy. We determined the responses of three PARP inhibitors (veliparib, olaparib, and talazoparib) in a panel of eight triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. Therapeutic responses and cellular phenotypes were elucidated using high-content imaging and quantitative immunofluorescence to assess markers of DNA damage (53BP1) and apoptosis (cleaved PARP). We determined the pharmacodynamic changes as percentage of cells positive for 53BP1, mean number of 53BP1 foci per cell, and percentage of cells positive for cleaved PARP. Inspired by traditional dose-response measures of cell viability, an EC 50 value was calculated for each cellular phenotype and each PARP inhibitor. The EC 50 values for both 53BP1 metrics strongly correlated with IC 50 values for each PARP inhibitor. Pathway enrichment analysis identified a set of DNA repair and cell cycle-associated genes that were associated with 53BP1 response following PARP inhibition. The overall accuracy of our 63 gene set in predicting response to olaparib in seven breast cancer patient-derived xenograft tumors was 86%. In triple-negative breast cancer patients who had not received anti-PARP therapy, the predicted response rate of our gene signature was 45%. These results indicate that 53BP1 is a biomarker of response to anti-PARP therapy in the laboratory, and our DNA damage response gene signature may be used to identify patients who are most likely to respond to PARP inhibition. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(12); 2892-901. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Quantitative analysis of plasma cell-free DNA and its DNA integrity in patients with metastatic prostate cancer using ALU sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, A.; Sweify, K.M.; Nofal, N.; El-Fayoumy, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer affecting men, it accounts for 29% of all male cancer and 11% of all male cancer related death. DNA is normally released from an apoptotic source which generates small fragments of cell-free DNA, whereas cancer patients have cell-free circulating DNA that originated from necrosis, autophagy, or mitotic catastrophe, which produce large fragments. Aim of work: Differentiate the cell free DNA levels (cfDNA) and its integrity in prostate cancer patients and control group composed of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and healthy persons. Methodology: cf-DNA levels were quantified by real-time PCR amplification in prostate cancer patients ( n = 50), (BPH) benign prostate hyperplasia ( n = 25) and healthy controls ( n = 30) using two sets of ALU gene (product size of 115 bp and 247-bp) and its integrity was calculated as a ratio of qPCR results of 247 bp ALU over 115 bp ALU. Results: Highly significant levels of cf-DNA and its integrity in PC patients compared to BPH. Twenty-eight (56%) patients with prostate cancer had bone metastasis. ALU115 qpcr is superior to the other markers in discriminating metastatic patients with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 86.4% and (AUC = 0.981) Conclusion: ALU115 qpcr could be used as a valuable biomarker helping in identifying high risk patients, indicating early spread of tumor cells as a potential seed for future metastases

  16. Geant4-DNA coupling and validation in the GATE Monte Carlo platform for DNA molecules irradiation in a calculation grid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Quang Trung

    2014-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation methods are successfully being used in various areas of medical physics but also at different scales, for example, from the radiation therapy treatment planning systems to the prediction of the effects of radiation in cancer cells. The Monte Carlo simulation platform GATE based on the Geant4 tool-kit offers features dedicated to simulations in medical physics (nuclear medicine and radiotherapy). For radiobiology applications, the Geant4-DNA physical models are implemented to track particles till very low energy (eV) and are adapted for estimation of micro-dosimetric quantities. In order to implement a multi-scale Monte Carlo platform, we first validated the physical models of Geant4-DNA, and integrated them into GATE. Finally, we validated this implementation in the context of radiation therapy and proton therapy. In order to validate the Geant4-DNA physical models, dose point kernels for monoenergetic electrons (10 keV to 100 keV) were simulated using the physical models of Geant4-DNA and were compared to those simulated with Geant4 Standard physical models and another Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The range and the stopping powers of electrons (7.4 eV to 1 MeV) and protons (1 keV to 100 MeV) calculated with GATE/Geant4-DNA were then compared with literature. We proposed to simulate with the GATE platform the impact of clinical and preclinical beams on cellular DNA. We modeled a clinical proton beam of 193.1 MeV, 6 MeV clinical electron beam and a X-ray irradiator beam. The beams models were validated by comparing absorbed dose computed and measured in liquid water. Then, the beams were used to calculate the frequency of energy deposits in DNA represented by different geometries. First, the DNA molecule was represented by small cylinders: 2 nm x 2 nm (∼10 bp), 5 nm x 10 nm (nucleosome) and 25 nm x 25 nm (chromatin fiber). All these cylinders were placed randomly in a sphere of liquid water (500 nm radius). Then we reconstructed the DNA

  17. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  18. SSR_pipeline--computer software for the identification of microsatellite sequences from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Knaus, Brian J.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs; for example, microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains three analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can be used to automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to (1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass quality standards, (2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and (3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites conforming to user specified parameters. Each of the three separate analysis modules also can be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc). All modules are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, Windows). The program suite relies on a compiled Python extension module to perform paired-end alignments. Instructions for compiling the extension from source code are provided in the documentation. Users who do not have Python installed on their computers or who do not have the ability to compile software also may choose to download packaged executable files. These files include all Python scripts, a copy of the compiled extension module, and a minimal installation of Python in a single binary executable. See program documentation for more information.

  19. Inhibition of 53BP1: Potential for Restoring Homologous Recombination In Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    likely that this approach will be useful to other scientists in the DNA damage response field who wish to probe how other proteins recognize...Regulation of 53BP1 recruitment to DNA damage sites. This is an invited Extra View article to be published in the journal Nucleus. Federal support will...2 and 3. Funding Support: Mayo Clinic Name: James Thompson, Ph.D. Project Role: Research Scientist Researcher Identifier (e.g

  20. DNA Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...10 1 + Cre 1 500 1,000 length (bp) chromatogram alignment template − Cre   4 Supplementary Figure 3 DNA camouflage with a switchable

  1. Solar radiation and mitochondrial DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.Z.; Locitzer, J.; Nassrin, E.; Ogbonnaya, A.; Hubbard, K.

    2003-01-01

    The 16.6 kB human mitochondrial DNA contains two homologous 13 base pair direct repeats separated by about 5 kB. During asynchronous mitochondrial DNA replication, the distant repeat sequences are thought to anneal, resulting in the looping out of a portion of the non-template strand which is subsequently deleted as a result of interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS). A normal daughter and a deleted daughter mitochondrion result from such insults. This deletion has been termed the common deletion as it is the most frequent of the known mitochondrial DNA deletions. The common deletion is present in high frequency in several mitochondrial disorders, accumulates with age in slow turnover tissues and is increased in sun-exposed skin. Berneburg, et al. (Photochem. Photobiol. 66: 271, 1997) induced the common deletion in normal human fibroblasts after repeated exposures to UVA. In this study, the common deletion has been shown to be induced by repeated non-lethal exposures to FS20 sunlamp irradiation. Increases in the common deletion were demonstrated using nested PCR which produced a 303 bp product that was compared to a 324 bp product that required the presence of the undeleted 5 kB region. The cells were exposed to 10 repeated doses ranging from 0.5 (UVB) - 0.24 (UVA) J/sq m to 14.4 (UVB) - 5.8 J/sq m (UVA) measured using a UVX digital radiometer and UVB and UVA detectors respectively. Comparison with the earlier study by Berneberg, et al. suggests that this type of simulated solar damage is considerably more effective in fewer exposures than UVA radiation alone. The common deletion provides a cytoplasmic end-point for ROS damage produced by low dose chronic irradiations and other low level toxic exposures and should prove useful in evaluating cytoplasmic damage produced by ionizing radiation as well

  2. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Bending by HUαβ: Interfaces of the Three Binding Modes Characterized by Salt Dependent Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Junseock; Shkel, Irina; Saecker, Ruth M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Previous ITC and FRET studies demonstrated that Escherichia coli HUαβ binds nonspecifically to duplex DNA in three different binding modes: a tighter-binding 34 bp mode which interacts with DNA in large (>34 bp) gaps between bound proteins, reversibly bending it 140° and thereby increasing its flexibility, and two weaker, modestly cooperative small-site-size modes (10 bp, 6 bp) useful for filling gaps between bound proteins shorter than 34 bp. Here we use ITC to determine the thermodynamics of these binding modes as a function of salt concentration, and deduce that DNA in the 34 bp mode is bent around but not wrapped on the body of HU, in contrast to specific binding of IHF. Analyses of binding isotherms (8, 15, 34 bp DNA) and initial binding heats (34, 38, 160 bp DNA) reveal that all three modes have similar log-log salt concentration derivatives of the binding constants (Ski) even though their binding site sizes differ greatly; most probable values of Ski on 34 bp or larger DNA are − 7.5 ± 0.5. From the similarity of Ski values, we conclude that binding interfaces of all three modes involve the same region of the arms and saddle of HU. All modes are entropy-driven, as expected for nonspecific binding driven by the polyelectrolyte effect. The bent-DNA 34 bp mode is most endothermic, presumably because of the cost of HU-induced DNA bending, while the 6 bp mode is modestly exothermic at all salt concentrations examined. Structural models consistent with the observed Ski values are proposed. PMID:21513716

  3. Sensitive detection of porcine DNA in processed animal proteins using a TaqMan real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegels, N; González, I; Fernández, S; García, T; Martín, R

    2012-01-01

    A TaqMan real-time PCR method was developed for specific detection of porcine-prohibited material in industrial feeds. The assay combines the use of a porcine-specific primer pair, which amplifies a 79 bp fragment of the mitochondrial (mt) 12 S rRNA gene, and a locked nucleic acid (LNA) TaqMan probe complementary to a target sequence lying between the porcine-specific primers. The nuclear 18 S rRNA gene system, yielding a 77 bp amplicon, was employed as a positive amplification control to monitor the total content of amplifiable DNA in the samples. The specificity of the porcine primers-probe system was verified against different animal and plant species, including mammals, birds and fish. The applicability of the real-time PCR protocol to detect the presence of porcine mt DNA in feeds was determined through the analysis of 190 industrial feeds (19 known reference and 171 blind samples) subjected to stringent processing treatments. The performance of the method allows qualitative and highly sensitive detection of short fragments from porcine DNA in all the industrial feeds declared to contain porcine material. Although the method has quantitative potential, the real quantitative capability of the assay is limited by the existing variability in terms of composition and processing conditions of the feeds, which affect the amount and quality of amplifiable DNA.

  4. pH-Modulated Watson-Crick duplex-quadruplex equilibria of guanine-rich and cytosine-rich DNA sequences 140 base pairs upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucek, Pavel; Jaumot, Joaquim; Aviñó, Anna; Eritja, Ramon; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2009-11-23

    Guanine-rich regions of DNA are sequences capable of forming G-quadruplex structures. The formation of a G-quadruplex structure in a region 140 base pairs (bp) upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site was recently proposed (Fernando et al., Biochemistry, 2006, 45, 7854). In the present study, the acid-base equilibria and the thermally induced unfolding of the structures formed by a guanine-rich region and by its complementary cytosine-rich strand in c-kit were studied by means of circular dichroism and molecular absorption spectroscopies. In addition, competition between the Watson-Crick duplex and the isolated structures was studied as a function of pH value and temperature. Multivariate data analysis methods based on both hard and soft modeling were used to allow accurate quantification of the various acid-base species present in the mixtures. Results showed that the G-quadruplex and i-motif coexist with the Watson-Crick duplex over the pH range from 3.0 to 6.5, approximately, under the experimental conditions tested in this study. At pH 7.0, the duplex is practically the only species present.

  5. Theoretical study on the structure, stability, and electronic properties of the guanine-Zn-cytosine base pair in M-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri; Petit, Leon; Wells, Jack C.

    2007-01-01

    M-DNA is a type of metalated DNA that forms at high pH and in the presence of Zn, Ni, and Co, with the metals placed in between each base pair, as in G-Zn-C. Experiments have found that M-DNA could be a promising candidate for a variety of nanotechnological applications, as it is speculated that the metal d-states enhance the conductivity, but controversy still clouds these findings. In this paper, we carry out a comprehensive ab initio study of eight G-Zn-C models in the gas phase to help discern the structure and electronic properties of Zn-DNA. Specifically, we study whether a model prefers to be planar and has electronic properties that correlate with Zn-DNA having a metallic-like conductivity. Out of all the studied models, there is only one which preserves its planarity upon full geometry optimization. Nevertheless, starting from this model, one can deduce a parallel Zn-DNA architecture only. This duplex would contain the imino proton, in contrast to what has been proposed experimentally. Among the nonplanar models, there is one that requires less than 8 kcal/mol to flatten (both in gas and solvent conditions), and we propose that it is a plausible model for building an antiparallel duplex. In this duplex, the imino proton would be replaced by Zn, in accordance with experimental models. Neither planar nor nonplanar models have electronic properties that correlate with Zn-DNA having a metallic-like conductivity due to Zn d-states. To understand whether density functional theory (DFT) can describe appropriately the electronic properties of M-DNAs, we have investigated the electronic properties of G-Co-C base pairs. We have found that when self-interaction corrections (SIC) are not included the HOMO state contains Co d-levels, whereas these levels are moved below the HOMO state when SIC are considered. This result indicates that caution should be exercised when studying the electronic properties of M-DNAs with functionals that do not account for strong

  6. A rhodium(III) complex for high-affinity DNA base-pair mismatch recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, Henrik; Hart, Jonathan R.; Kisko, Jennifer; Glebov, Oleg; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    A rhodium(III) complex, rac-[Rh(bpy)2phzi]3+ (bpy, 2,2′-bipyridine; phzi, benzo[a]phenazine-5,6-quinone diimine) has been designed as a sterically demanding intercalator targeted to destabilized mismatched sites in double-helical DNA. The complex is readily synthesized by condensation of the phenazine quinone with the corresponding diammine complex. Upon photoactivation, the complex promotes direct strand scission at single-base mismatch sites within the DNA duplex. As with the parent mismatch-specific reagent, [Rh(bpy)2(chrysi)]3+ [chrysene-5,6-quinone diimine (chrysi)], mismatch selectivity depends on the helix destabilization associated with mispairing. Unlike the parent chrysi complex, the phzi analogue binds and cleaves with high affinity and efficiency. The specific binding constants for CA, CC, and CT mismatches within a 31-mer oligonucleotide duplex are 0.3, 1, and 6 × 107 M−1, respectively; site-specific photocleavage is evident at nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, the specificity, defined as the ratio in binding affinities for mispaired vs. well paired sites, is maintained. The increase in affinity is attributed to greater stability in the mismatched site associated with stacking by the heterocyclic aromatic ligand. The high-affinity complex is also applied in the differential cleavage of DNA obtained from cell lines deficient in mismatch repair vs. those proficient in mismatch repair. Agreement is found between photocleavage by the mismatch-specific probes and deficiency in mismatch repair. This mismatch-specific targeting, therefore, offers a potential strategy for new chemotherapeutic design. PMID:12610209

  7. FDG goes BP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A monograph for Fluorodeoxyglucose F-18 Injection (FDG) was first released in Supplement 1 of the United States Pharmacopoeia 1990 (USP 90) on 1 November 1989 to become effective on 1 January 1990. As this was the only monograph available until recently it served as the applicable standard to be followed. The Therapeutic Goods Act states that the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) is the precedent to be followed in Australia and implies that if a monograph exists for a finished product then this needs to be applied to achieve a certain standard of quality. If the monograph does not exist in the BP then other pharmacopoeia monographs can be sourced starting with the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph Eur) then the USP. A monograph for FDG first appeared in the Ph Eur in a 1999 Supplement (effective 1 January 1999 and now included in the Ph Eur 2000) and then in the BP 1999 (effective 1 December 1999). The Commonwealth Government Gazette (Notice 48, 1/12/99) published that the BP 99 was adopted on the 1st December 1999. Since then manufacturers have been required to comply with the monograph for FDG in the BP 99. This presentation looks at the content of the BP 99 monograph and compares it with that in the USP. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  9. Co-located hAT transposable element and 5S rDNA in an interstitial telomeric sequence suggest the formation of Robertsonian fusion in armored catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glugoski, Larissa; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo R; Nogaroto, Viviane

    2018-04-15

    Co-located 5S rDNA genes and interstitial telomeric sites (ITS) revealed the involvement of multiple 5S rDNA clusters in chromosome rearrangements of Loricariidae. Interstitial (TTAGGG)n vestiges, in addition to telomeric sites, can coincide with locations of chromosomal rearrangements, and they are considered to be hotspots for chromosome breaks. This study aimed the molecular characterization of 5S rDNA in two Rineloricaria latirostris populations and examination of roles of 5S rDNA in breakpoint sites and its in situ localization. Rineloricaria latirostris from Brazil's Das Pedras river (2n = 46 chromosomes) presented five pairs identified using a 5S rDNA probe, in addition to a pair bearing a co-located ITS/5S rDNA. Rineloricaria latirostris from the Piumhi river (2n = 48 chromosomes) revealed two pairs containing 5S rDNA, without ITS. A 702-bp amplified sequence, using 5S rDNA primers, revealed an insertion of the hAT transposable element (TE), referred to as a degenerate 5S rDNA. Double-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) demonstrated co-localization of 5S rDNA/degenerate 5S rDNA, 5S rDNA/hAT and ITS/5S rDNA from the Das Pedras river population. Piumhi river isolates possessed only 5S rDNA sites. We suggest that the degenerate 5S rDNA was generated by unequal crossing over, which was driven by invasion of hAT, establishing a breakpoint region susceptible to chromosome breakage, non-homologous recombination and Robertsonian (Rb) fusion. Furthermore, the presence of clusters of 5S rDNA at fusion points in other armored catfish species suggests its re-use and that these regions represent hotspots for evolutionary rearrangements within Loricariidae genomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Accommodation of an N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct in the active site of human DNA polymerase ι: Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base pairing?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donny-Clark, Kerry; Shapiro, Robert; Broyde, Suse

    2009-01-01

    Bypass across DNA lesions by specialized polymerases is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Human DNA polymerase ι (polι) is a bypass polymerase of the Y family. Crystal structures of polι suggest that Hoogsteen base pairing is employed to bypass minor groove DNA lesions, placing them on the spacious major groove side of the enzyme. Primer extension studies have shown that polι is also capable of error-free nucleotide incorporation opposite the bulky major groove adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetyl-aminofluorene (dG-AAF). We present molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggesting that Watson-Crick base pairing could be employed in polι for bypass of dG-AAF. In polι with Hoogsteen paired dG-AAF the bulky AAF moiety would reside on the cramped minor groove side of the template. The Hoogsteen-capable conformation distorts the active site, disrupting interactions necessary for error-free incorporation of dC opposite the lesion. Watson-Crick pairing places the AAF rings on the spacious major groove side, similar to the position of minor groove adducts observed with Hoogsteen pairing. Watson-Crick paired structures show a well-ordered active site, with a near reaction-ready ternary complex. Thus our results suggest that polι would utilize the same spacious region for lesion bypass of both major and minor groove adducts. Therefore, purine adducts with bulk on the minor groove side would use Hoogsteen pairing, while adducts with the bulky lesion on the major groove side would utilize Watson-Crick base pairing as indicated by our MD simulations for dG-AAF. This suggests the possibility of an expanded role for polι in lesion bypass. PMID:19072536

  11. Risk assessment of cadmium-contaminated soil on plant DNA damage using RAPD and physiological indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wan; Yang, Y.S.; Li, P.J.; Zhou, Q.X.; Xie, L.J.; Han, Y.P.

    2009-01-01

    Impact assessment of contaminants in soil is an important issue in environmental quality study and remediation of contaminated land. A random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) 'fingerprinting' technique was exhibited to detect genotoxin-induced DNA damage of plants from heavy metal contaminated soil. This study compared the effects occurring at molecular and population levels in barley seedlings exposed to cadmium (Cd) contamination in soil. Results indicate that reduction of root growth and increase of total soluble protein level in the root tips of barley seedlings occurred with the ascending Cd concentrations. For the RAPD analyses, nine 10-base pair (bp) random RAPD primers (decamers) with 60-70% GC content were found to produce unique polymorphic band patterns and subsequently were used to produce a total of 129 RAPD fragments of 144-2639 base pair in molecular size in the root tips of control seedlings. Results produced from nine primers indicate that the changes occurring in RAPD profiles of the root tips following Cd treatment included alterations in band intensity as well as gain or loss of bands compared with the control seedlings. New amplified fragments at molecular size from approximately 154 to 2245 bp appeared almost for 10, 20 and 40 mg L -1 Cd with 9 primers (one-four new polymerase chain reaction, (PCR) products), and the number of missing bands enhanced with the increasing Cd concentration for nine primers. These results suggest that genomic template stability reflecting changes in RAPD profiles were significantly affected and it compared favourably with the traditional indices such as growth and soluble protein level at the above Cd concentrations. The DNA polymorphisms detected by RAPD can be applied as a suitable biomarker assay for detection of the genotoxic effects of Cd stress in soil on plants. As a tool in risk assessment the RAPD assay can be used in characterisation of Cd hazard in soil

  12. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  13. Charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmi, Kinanti Aldilla, E-mail: kinanti.aldilla@ui.ac.id; Yudiarsah, Efta [Physics Department, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    By using tight binding Hamiltonian model, charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion is studied. The DNA chain used is 32 base pairs long poly(dA)-poly(dT) molecule. The molecule is contacted to electrode at both ends. The influence of environment on charge transport in DNA is modeled as variation of backbone disorder. The twisting motion amplitude is taking into account by assuming that the twisting angle distributes following Gaussian distribution function with zero average and standard deviation proportional to square root of temperature and inversely proportional to the twisting motion frequency. The base-pair twisting motion influences both the onsite energy of the bases and electron hopping constant between bases. The charge transport properties are studied by calculating current using Landauer-Buttiker formula from transmission probabilities which is calculated by transfer matrix methods. The result shows that as the backbone disorder increases, the maximum current decreases. By decreasing the twisting motion frequency, the current increases rapidly at low voltage, but the current increases slower at higher voltage. The threshold voltage can increase or decrease with increasing backbone disorder and increasing twisting frequency.

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding rat mammary gland medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safford, R.; de Silva, J.; Lucas, C.

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A) + RNA from pregnant rat mammary glands was size-fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and fractions enriched in medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (MCH) were identified by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. A cDNA library was constructed, in pBR322, from enriched poly(A) + RNA and screened with two oligonucleotide probes deduced from rat MCH amino acid sequence data. Cross-hybridizing clones were isolated and found to contain cDNA inserts ranging from ∼ 1100 to 1550 base pairs (bp). A 1550-bp cDNA insert, from clone 43H09, was confirmed to encode MCH by hybrid-select translation/immunoprecipitation studies and by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the clone to the amino acid sequence of the MCH peptides. Northern blot analysis revealed the size of the MCH mRNA to be 1500 nucleotides, and it is therefore concluded that the 1550-bp insert (including G x C tails) of clone 43H09 represents a full- or near-full-length copy of the MCH gene. The rat MCH sequence is the first reported sequence of a thioesterase from a mammalian source, but comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of MCH and the recently published mallard duck medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioesterase reveals significant homology. In particular, a seven amino acid sequence containing the proposed active serine of the duck thioesterase is found to be perfectly conserved in rat MCH

  15. Characterization of DNA antigens from immune complexes deposited in the skin of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾凡钦; 尹若菲; 谭国珍; 郭庆; 许德清

    2004-01-01

    Background Skin lesions are common manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is still unknown what the definite pathogenesis of skin involvement was and whether DNA participated in it. Our study was designed to explore the pathogenetic role and nature of nuclear antigen (DNA) deposited in the skin lesions of patients with SLE.Methods Thirty skin samples from patients with SLE and 2 normal skin samples were studied. Extracellular DNA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence methods. The deposited immune complexes were extracted by cryoprecipitation, and DNA was then isolated with phenol and chloroform. DNA fragment sizes were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Finally, 8 different probes were used to analyze the origin of these DNA molecules using Dot hybridization.Results Extracellular DNA staining was found only in skin lesions, mainly those located in the basement membrane zone, vascular wall, and hair follicle wall. Normal skin and non-lesion SLE skin showed no fluorescence at locations outside the nuclei. There were no differences in the rate and intensity of extracellular DNA staining when comparing active phase to remission phase patients. No relationship was found between extracellular DNA and circulating anti-dsDNA antibodies. Deposited DNA fragments clustered into four bands of somewhat discrete sizes: 20 000 bp, 1300 bp, 800-900 bp, 100-200 bp. Small sized fragments (100-200 bp) were positively correlated with disease activity (P<0.05, r=0.407). Dot hybridization showed significant homology of the various extracellular DNA fragments examined with human genomic DNA, but not with DNA from the microorganisms and viruses we examined. There were also homologies between DNA samples from different individuals.Conclusions DNA and its immune complexes may contribute to the pathogenesis of skin lesions in SLE. These DNA molecules range in size from 100 bp to 20 kb and may be endogenous in origin.

  16. An effective approach for identification of in vivo protein-DNA binding sites from paired-end ChIP-Seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Zoe A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChIP-Seq, which combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP with high-throughput massively parallel sequencing, is increasingly being used for identification of protein-DNA interactions in vivo in the genome. However, to maximize the effectiveness of data analysis of such sequences requires the development of new algorithms that are able to accurately predict DNA-protein binding sites. Results Here, we present SIPeS (Site Identification from Paired-end Sequencing, a novel algorithm for precise identification of binding sites from short reads generated by paired-end solexa ChIP-Seq technology. In this paper we used ChIP-Seq data from the Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS, which is expressed within the anther during pollen development, the results show that SIPeS has better resolution for binding site identification compared to two existing ChIP-Seq peak detection algorithms, Cisgenome and MACS. Conclusions When compared to Cisgenome and MACS, SIPeS shows better resolution for binding site discovery. Moreover, SIPeS is designed to calculate the mappable genome length accurately with the fragment length based on the paired-end reads. Dynamic baselines are also employed to effectively discriminate closely adjacent binding sites, for effective binding sites discovery, which is of particular value when working with high-density genomes.

  17. Antibody Drug Conjugates Differentiate Uptake and DNA Alkylation of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines in Tumors from Organs of Xenograft Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Erickson, Hans K; Polson, Andrew; Pillow, Thomas H; Yu, Shang-Fan; Wang, Hong; Dragovich, Peter S; Zhang, Donglu

    2016-12-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-dimer is a DNA minor groove alkylator, and its CD22 THIOMAB antibody drug conjugate (ADC) demonstrated, through a disulfide linker, an efficacy in tumor reduction for more than 7 weeks with minimal body weight loss in xenograft mice after a single 0.5-1 mg/kg i.v. dose. The DNA alkylation was investigated here in tumors and healthy organs of mice to understand the sustained efficacy and tolerability. The experimental procedures included the collection of tumors and organ tissues of xenograft mice treated with the ADC followed by DNA isolation/hydrolysis/quantitation and payload recovery from reversible DNA alkylation. PBD-dimer formed a considerable amount of adducts with tissue DNA, representing approximately 98% (at 24 hours), and 99% (at 96 hours) of the total PBD-dimer in tumors, and 78-89% in liver and lung tissues, suggesting highly efficient covalent binding of the released PBD-dimer to tissue DNA. The amount of PBD-DNA adducts in tumor tissues was approximately 24-fold (at 24 hours) and 70-fold (at 96 hours) greater than the corresponding amount of adducts in liver and lung tissues. In addition, the DNA alkylation levels increased 3-fold to 4-fold from 24 to 96 hours in tumors [41/10 6 base pairs (bp) at 96 hours] but remained at the same level (1/10 6 bp) in livers and lungs. These results support the typical target-mediated cumulative uptake of ADC into tumors and payload release that offers an explanation for its sustained antitumor efficacy. In addition, the low level of DNA alkylation in normal tissues is consistent with the tolerability observed in mice. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. A k-mer-based barcode DNA classification methodology based on spectral representation and a neural gas network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiannaca, Antonino; La Rosa, Massimo; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, an alignment-free method for DNA barcode classification that is based on both a spectral representation and a neural gas network for unsupervised clustering is proposed. In the proposed methodology, distinctive words are identified from a spectral representation of DNA sequences. A taxonomic classification of the DNA sequence is then performed using the sequence signature, i.e., the smallest set of k-mers that can assign a DNA sequence to its proper taxonomic category. Experiments were then performed to compare our method with other supervised machine learning classification algorithms, such as support vector machine, random forest, ripper, naïve Bayes, ridor, and classification tree, which also consider short DNA sequence fragments of 200 and 300 base pairs (bp). The experimental tests were conducted over 10 real barcode datasets belonging to different animal species, which were provided by the on-line resource "Barcode of Life Database". The experimental results showed that our k-mer-based approach is directly comparable, in terms of accuracy, recall and precision metrics, with the other classifiers when considering full-length sequences. In addition, we demonstrate the robustness of our method when a classification is performed task with a set of short DNA sequences that were randomly extracted from the original data. For example, the proposed method can reach the accuracy of 64.8% at the species level with 200-bp fragments. Under the same conditions, the best other classifier (random forest) reaches the accuracy of 20.9%. Our results indicate that we obtained a clear improvement over the other classifiers for the study of short DNA barcode sequence fragments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactions between Al₁₂X (X = Al, C, N and P) nanoparticles and DNA nucleobases/base pairs: implications for nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhang, Shengbai B; Chen, Zhongfang

    2012-02-01

    The interactions between neutral Al(12)X(I ( h )) (X = Al, C, N and P) nanoparticles and DNA nucleobases, namely adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G) and cytosine (C), as well as the Watson-Crick base pairs (BPs) AT and GC, were investigated by means of density functional theory computations. The Al(12)X clusters can tightly bind to DNA bases and BPs to form stable complexes with negative binding Gibbs free energies at room temperature, and considerable charge transfers occur between the bases/BPs and the Al(12)X clusters. These strong interactions, which are also expected for larger Al nanoparticles, may have potentially adverse impacts on the structure and stability of DNA and thus cause its dysfunction.

  20. Visualization of complex DNA damage along accelerated ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Bulanova, Tatiana; Ježková, Lucie; Zadneprianetc, Mariia; Smirnova, Elena

    2018-04-01

    The most deleterious DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are clustered DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Clustered or complex DNA damage is a combination of a few simple lesions (single-strand breaks, base damage etc.) within one or two DNA helix turns. It is known that yield of complex DNA lesions increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation. For investigation of the induction and repair of complex DNA lesions, human fibroblasts were irradiated with high-LET 15N ions (LET = 183.3 keV/μm, E = 13MeV/n) and low-LET 60Co γ-rays (LET ≈ 0.3 keV/μm) radiation. DNA DSBs (γH2AX and 53BP1) and base damage (OGG1) markers were visualized by immunofluorecence staining and high-resolution microscopy. The obtained results showed slower repair kinetics of induced DSBs in cells irradiated with accelerated ions compared to 60Co γ-rays, indicating induction of more complex DNA damage. Confirming previous assumptions, detailed 3D analysis of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 15N ions tracks revealed more complicated structure of the foci in contrast to γ-rays. It was shown that proteins 53BP1 and OGG1 involved in repair of DNA DSBs and modified bases, respectively, were colocalized in tracks of 15N ions and thus represented clustered DNA DSBs.

  1. Visualization of DNA in highly processed botanical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengfei; Rubinsky, Maria; Babajanian, Silva; Zhang, Yanjun; Chang, Peter; Swanson, Gary

    2018-04-15

    DNA-based methods have been gaining recognition as a tool for botanical authentication in herbal medicine; however, their application in processed botanical materials is challenging due to the low quality and quantity of DNA left after extensive manufacturing processes. The low amount of DNA recovered from processed materials, especially extracts, is "invisible" by current technology, which has casted doubt on the presence of amplifiable botanical DNA. A method using adapter-ligation and PCR amplification was successfully applied to visualize the "invisible" DNA in botanical extracts. The size of the "invisible" DNA fragments in botanical extracts was around 20-220 bp compared to fragments of around 600 bp for the more easily visualized DNA in botanical powders. This technique is the first to allow characterization and visualization of small fragments of DNA in processed botanical materials and will provide key information to guide the development of appropriate DNA-based botanical authentication methods in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA encoding a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease: Identification as the microtubule-associated protein tau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, M.; Wischik, C.M.; Crowther, R.A.; Walker, J.E.; Klug, A.

    1988-01-01

    Screening of cDNA libraries prepared from the frontal cortex of an Alzheimer's disease patient and from fetal human brain has led to isolation of the cDNA for a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease. The partial amino acid sequence of this core protein was used to design synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The cDNA encodes a protein of 352 amino acids that contains a characteristic amino acid repeat in its carboxyl-terminal half. This protein is highly homologous to the sequence of the mouse microtubule-associated protein tau and thus constitutes the human equivalent of mouse tau. RNA blot analysis indicates the presence of two major transcripts, 6 and 2 kilobases long, with a wide distribution in normal human brain. Tau protein mRNAs were found in normal amounts in the frontal cortex from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The proof that at least part of tau protein forms a component of the paired helical filament core opens the way to understanding the mode of formation of paired helical filaments and thus, ultimately, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

  3. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Congenital Arthrogryposis: An Extension of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 Microdeletion Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Usrey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal 15q11–q13 region contains 5 breakpoints (BP1–BP5. The BP1-BP2 region spans approximately 500 kb and contains four evolutionarily conserved genes. The genes in this region are known to play a role in central nervous system development and/or function. Microdeletions within the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region have been reported in patients with neurological dysfunction, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and dysmorphic features. We report two unrelated subjects with the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 microdeletion and presenting with congenital arthrogryposis, a feature which has not been previously reported as part of this newly recognized microdeletion syndrome. While arthrogryposis seen in these two subjects may be coincidental, we propose that congenital arthrogryposis may result from neurological dysfunction and involvement of the microdeletion of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region, further expanding the phenotype of this microdeletion syndrome. We encourage others to report patients with this chromosome microdeletion and neurological findings to further characterize the clinical phenotype.

  5. Prevalence of parvovirus B19 and parvovirus V9 DNA and antibodies in paired bone marrow and serum samples from healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heegaard, Erik D; Petersen, Bodil Laub; Heilmann, Carsten J; Hornsleth, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Parvovirus B19 (hereafter referred to as B19) exhibits a marked tropism to human bone marrow (BM), and infection may lead to erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, hydrops fetalis, and various hematologic disorders. Recently, a distinct parvovirus isolate termed V9 with an unknown clinical spectrum was discovered. In contrast to the many studies of B19 serology and viremia, valid information on the frequency of B19 or V9 DNA in the BM of healthy individuals is limited. To develop a reference value, paired BM and serum samples from healthy subjects were tested for the presence of B19 and V9 DNA and specific antibodies. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) was not found in any of the serum samples. The prevalence of IgG showed a gradual and steady increase from 37% in children aged 1 to 5 years to 87% in people aged >50 years. When 190 well-characterized subjects were examined, B19 DNA was detected in the BM of 4 individuals (2.1%; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 5.3%) while none of the paired serum samples showed evidence of circulating viral DNA. V9 DNA was not found in any of the BM or serum samples. The finding of B19 DNA probably indicated a primary infection in one 7-year-old individual and reinfection or reactivation of persistent infection in the remaining three persons, aged 47 to 58 years. Serving as a benchmark for future studies, these findings are useful when interpreting epidemiologic data, performing BM transplantation, or considering clinical implications of parvovirus infection.

  6. Intrinsically bent DNA in replication origins and gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, F; Takeda, K I; Fiorini, A; Gouveia, F S; Fernandez, M A

    2008-06-24

    Intrinsically bent DNA is an alternative conformation of the DNA molecule caused by the presence of dA/dT tracts, 2 to 6 bp long, in a helical turn phase DNA or with multiple intervals of 10 to 11 bp. Other than flexibility, intrinsic bending sites induce DNA curvature in particular chromosome regions such as replication origins and promoters. Intrinsically bent DNA sites are important in initiating DNA replication, and are sometimes found near to regions associated with the nuclear matrix. Many methods have been developed to localize bent sites, for example, circular permutation, computational analysis, and atomic force microscopy. This review discusses intrinsically bent DNA sites associated with replication origins and gene promoter regions in prokaryote and eukaryote cells. We also describe methods for identifying bent DNA sites for circular permutation and computational analysis.

  7. Construction of recombinant DNA clone for bovine viral diarrhea virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, S.G.; Cho, H.J.; Masri, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular cloning was carried out on the Danish strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to construct strategy for the diagnostic tools and effective vaccine of BVD afterwards. A recombinant DNA clone (No. 29) was established successfully from cDNA for viral RNA tailed with adenine homopolymer at 3 -end. 32 P-labeled DNA probes of 300~1, 800bp fragments, originating from the clone 29, directed specific DNA-RNA hybridization results with BVDV RNA. Recombinant DNA of the clone 29 was about 5,200bp representing 41.6% of the full length of Danish strain's RNA, and restriction sites were recognized for EooR I, Sst I, Hind III and Pst I restriction enzymes in the DNA fragment

  8. Development of a novel method to determine the concentration of heavy metal cations: application of the specific interaction between heavy metal cation and mismatch DNA base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozasa, Tetsuo; Miyakawa, Yukako; Fukushi, Miyako; Ono, Akira; Torigoe, Hidetaka

    2009-01-01

    We have already found that Hg(II) cation specifically binds to T:T mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving T:T mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. We have also found that Ag(I) cation specifically binds to C:C mismatch base pair in heteroduplex DNA, which increases the melting temperature of heteroduplex DNA involving C:C mismatch base pair by about 4 degrees C. Using the specific interaction, we developed a novel sensor to determine the concentration of each of Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation. The sensor is composed of a dye-labelled T-rich or C-rich DNA oligonucleotide, F2T6W2D: 5'-Fam-T(2)CT(2)CT(2)C(4)T(2)GT(2)GT(2)-Dabcyl-3' or F2C6W2D: 5'-Fam-C(2)TC(2)TC(2)T(4)C(2)AC(2)AC(2)-Dabcyl-3', where 6-carboxyfluorescein (Fam) is a fluorophore and Dabcyl is a quencher. The addition of Hg(II) cation decreased the intensity of Fam emission of F2T6W2D at 520 nm in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, the addition of Ag(I) cation decreased the intensity of Fam emission of F2C6W2D at 520 nm in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that, using the novel sensor developed in this study, the concentration of each of Hg(II) and Ag(I) cation can be determined from the intensity of Fam emission at 520 nm.

  9. Sequential action of ATPase, ATP, ADP, Pi and dsDNA in procapsid-free system to enlighten mechanism in viral dsDNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Huang, Lisa; Guo, Peixuan

    2012-03-01

    Many cells and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses contain an AAA(+) ATPase that assembles into oligomers, often hexamers, with a central channel. The dsDNA packaging motor of bacteriophage phi29 also contains an ATPase to translocate dsDNA through a dodecameric channel. The motor ATPase has been investigated substantially in the context of the entire procapsid. Here, we report the sequential action between the ATPase and additional motor components. It is suggested that the contact of ATPase to ATP resulted in its conformational change to a higher binding affinity toward dsDNA. It was found that ATP hydrolysis led to the departure of dsDNA from the ATPase/dsDNA complex, an action that is speculated to push dsDNA to pass the connector channel. Our results suggest that dsDNA packaging goes through a combined effort of both the gp16 ATPase for pushing and the channel as a one-way valve to control the dsDNA translocation direction. Many packaging models have previously been proposed, and the packaging mechanism has been contingent upon the number of nucleotides packaged per ATP relative to the 10.5 bp per helical turn for B-type dsDNA. Both 2 and 2.5 bp per ATP have been used to argue for four, five or six discrete steps of dsDNA translocation. Combination of the two distinct roles of gp16 and connector renews the perception of previous dsDNA packaging energy calculations and provides insight into the discrepancy between 2 and 2.5 bp per ATP.

  10. Molecular characterization of the rDNA-ITS sequence and a PCR diagnostic technique for Pileolaria terebinthi, the cause of pistachio rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein ALAEI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleven samples of the most important pistachio rust (caused by Pileolaria terebinthi (DC. Cast.,, which causes disease on Beneh (Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. mutica (Fisch. & Mey. Rech. F and Kasoor (Pistacia khinjuk Stocks., were collected from herbarium specimens and pistachio fields at the Pistachio Research Institute in Rafsanjan, Iran. The complete sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 (rDNA ITS from the samples were determined and analysed. In general, very little rDNA ITS sequence variation was observed between rDNA ITS sequences of P. terebinthi samples. The length of the PCR fragments was 621 bp (for ITS1F-ITS4 and 1177 bp (for ITS1F-rust1, and consisted of 67 bp at the 3 ́ end of 18S rDNA, 93 bp of ITS1 region, 154 bp of 5.8S rDNA, 246 bp of the ITS2 region, 57 bp (for ITS1F-ITS4 and 613 bp (for ITS1F-rust1 at the 5 ́ end of the 28S rDNA. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs of the rDNA-ITS region were used to identify Pileolaria terebinthi. Three strong bands of 105, 134 and 381 bp and five bands of 105, 134, 200, 301 and 437 bp are observed for the fragment of “ITS1F-ITS4” and “ITS1F-rust1”, respectively. A PCR-RFLP diagnostic technique provided effective identification of the species by a unique pattern with the specific restriction enzyme XapI (ApoI.

  11. Tunnel conductance of Watson-Crick nucleoside-base pairs from telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shuai; He Jin; Lin Lisha; Zhang Peiming; Liang Feng; Huang Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart; Young, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor of two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break.

  12. Reconstitution of RPA-covered single-stranded DNA-activated ATR-Chk1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael; Mason, Aaron C; Wold, Marc S; Sancar, Aziz

    2010-08-03

    ATR kinase is a critical upstream regulator of the checkpoint response to various forms of DNA damage. Previous studies have shown that ATR is recruited via its binding partner ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP) to replication protein A (RPA)-covered single-stranded DNA (RPA-ssDNA) generated at sites of DNA damage where ATR is then activated by TopBP1 to phosphorylate downstream targets including the Chk1 signal transducing kinase. However, this critical feature of the human ATR-initiated DNA damage checkpoint signaling has not been demonstrated in a defined system. Here we describe an in vitro checkpoint system in which RPA-ssDNA and TopBP1 are essential for phosphorylation of Chk1 by the purified ATR-ATRIP complex. Checkpoint defective RPA mutants fail to activate ATR kinase in this system, supporting the conclusion that this system is a faithful representation of the in vivo reaction. Interestingly, we find that an alternative form of RPA (aRPA), which does not support DNA replication, can substitute for the checkpoint function of RPA in vitro, thus revealing a potential role for aRPA in the activation of ATR kinase. We also find that TopBP1 is recruited to RPA-ssDNA in a manner dependent on ATRIP and that the N terminus of TopBP1 is required for efficient recruitment and activation of ATR kinase.

  13. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  14. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To simulate single gene retrieval from ancient DNA, several related factors have been investigated. By monitoring a 889 bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and genomic DNA degradation, we find that heat and oxygen (especially heat) are both crucial factors influencing DNA degradation. The heat influence ...

  15. BP's emissions trading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor, David G.; House, Joshua C.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2001, BP reduced its emissions of greenhouse gases by more than 10%. BP's success in cutting emissions is often equated with its use of an apparently market-based emissions trading program. However no independent study has ever examined the rules and operation of BP's system and the incentives acting on managers to reduce emissions. We use interviews with key managers and with traders in several critical business units to explore the bound of BP's success with emissions trading. No money actually changed hands when permits were traded, and the main effect of the program was to create awareness of money-saving emission controls rather than strong price incentives. We show that the trading system did not operate like a 'textbook' cap and trade scheme. Rather, the BP system operated much like a 'safety valve' trading system, where managers let the market function until the cost of doing so surpassed what the company was willing to tolerate

  16. BP1, an Isoform of DLX4 Homeoprotein, Negatively Regulates BRCA1 in Sporadic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluk, Brian J.; Fu, Yebo; Formolo, Trina A.; Zhang, Lei; Hindle, Anne K.; Man, Yan-gao; Siegel, Robert S.; Berg, Patricia E.; Deng, Chuxia; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Fu, Sidney W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Several lines of evidence point to an important role for BP1, an isoform of DLX4 homeobox gene, in breast carcinogenesis and progression. BRCA1 is a well-known player in the etiology of breast cancer. While familial breast cancer is often marked by BRCA1 mutation and subsequent loss of heterozygosity, sporadic breast cancers exhibit reduced expression of wild type BRCA1, and loss of BRCA1 expression may result in tumor development and progression. Methods: The Cister algorithm and Genomatix program were used to identify potential BP1 binding sites in BRCA1 gene. Real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to verify the expression of BRCA1 and BP1 in cell lines and breast cancer tissues. Double-stranded siRNA transfection was carried out for silencing BP1 expression. ChIP and EMSA were used to confirm that BP1 specifically binds to BRCA1. Results: A putative BP1 binding site was identified in the first intron of BRCA1, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipiation and electrophoresis mobility shift assay. BP1 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated in breast cancer cell lines and tissues, suggesting that BP1 may suppress BRCA1 transcription through consensus sequence binding. Conclusions: BP1 homeoprotein represses BRCA1 expression through direct binding to its first intron, which is consistent with a previous study which identified a novel transcriptional repressor element located more than 500 base pairs into the first intron of BRCA1, suggesting that the first intron plays an important role in the negative regulation of BRCA1. Although further functional studies are necessary to confirm its repressor activity towards BRCA1, the elucidation of the role of BP1 in breast tumorigenesis holds great promise in establishing BP1 as a novel target for drug therapy. PMID:20877436

  17. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  18. Experimental and computational studies on the DNA translocation mechanism of the T4 viral packaging motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is a double stranded DNA virus that infects E.coli by injecting the viral genome through the cellular wall of a host cell. The T4 genome must be ejected from the viral capsid with sufficient force to ensure infection. To generate high ejection forces, the genome is packaged to high density within the viral capsid. A DNA translocation motor, in which the protein gp17 hydrolyzes ATP and binds to the DNA, is responsible for translocating the genome into the capsid during viral maturation of T4. This motor generates forces in excess of 60 pN and packages DNA at rates exceeding 2000 base pairs/second (bp/s)1. Understanding these small yet powerful motors is important, as they have many potential applications. Though much is known about the activity of these motors from bulk and single molecule biophysical techniques, little is known about their detailed molecular mechanism. Recently, two structures of gp17 have been obtained: a high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure showing a monomeric compacted form of the enzyme, and a cryo-electron microscopic structure of the extended form of gp17 in complex with actively packaging prohead complexes. Comparison of these two structures indicates several key differences, and a model has been proposed to explain the translocation action of the motor2. Key to this model are a set of residues forming ion pairs across two domains of the gp17 molecule that are proposed to be involved in force generation by causing the collapse of the extended form of gp17. Using a dual optical trap to measure the rates of DNA packaging and the generated forces, we present preliminary mutational data showing that these several of these ion pairs are important to motor function. We have also performed preliminary free energy calculations on the extended and collapsed state of gp17, to confirm that these interdomain ion pairs have large contributions to the change in free energy that occurs upon the collapse of gp17 during the

  19. Protective role of OH scavengers and DNA/chromatin organization in the induction of DNA breaks: mechanistic models and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballarini, F.; Rossetti, M.; Scannicchio, D.; Jacob, P.; Molinelli, S.; Ottolenghi, A.; Volata, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage can be modulated by various factors, including the environment scavenging capacity (SC) and the DNA organization within the cell nucleus (chromatin compactness, DNA-binding proteins etc.). In this context the induction of ssb and dsb by photons and light ions of different energies impinging on different DNA structures (e.g. linear DNA, SV40 'minichromosomes' and cellular DNA) at different OH-radical SC values was modelled with the Monte Carlo PARTRAC code. Presently PARTRAC can transport electrons, photons, protons and alpha particles in liquid water with an 'event-by-event' approach, and can simulate the DNA content of mammalian cells with an 'atom-by-atom' description, from nucleotide pairs to chromatin fibre loops and chromosome territories. Energy depositions in the sugar-phosphate were considered as potential (direct) ssb. The production, diffusion and reaction of chemical species were explicitly simulated; reactions of OH radicals with the sugar-phosphate were assumed to lead to 'indirect' ssb with probability 65%. Two ssb on opposite strands within 10 bp were considered as a dsb. Yields of ssb and dsb/Gy/Dalton were calculated for different DNA structures as a function of the OH mean life time. By Zyuzikov, N.; Michael, B.D. (Gray Cancer Institute, (GB)); Wu, L. (Ch Zyuzdirect damage yields. In general, also depending on radiation quality, linear DNA was found to be more susceptible to strand breakage than SV40 minichromosomes, which in turn showed higher damage yields with respect to cellular DNA. The very good agreement found with available experimental data provided a validation of the model and allowed us to quantify separately the protective effect of OH scavengers and DNA/chromatin organization. Comparisons with data on nucleoids (DNA unfolded and depleted of histones) suggested that the experimental procedures used to obtain such targets might lower the environment SC, due to the loss of cellular scavenging compounds

  20. Ancient DNA analyses of museum specimens from selected Presbytis (primate: Colobinae) based on partial Cyt b sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aifat, N. R.; Yaakop, S.; Md-Zain, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species has categorized Malaysian primates from being data deficient to critically endanger. Thus, ancient DNA analyses hold great potential to understand phylogeny, phylogeography and population history of extinct and extant species. Museum samples are one of the alternatives to provide important sources of biological materials for a large proportion of ancient DNA studies. In this study, a total of six museum skin samples from species Presbytis hosei (4 samples) and Presbytis frontata (2 samples), aged between 43 and 124 years old were extracted to obtain the DNA. Extraction was done by using QIAGEN QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit and the ability of this kit to extract museum skin samples was tested by amplification of partial Cyt b sequence using species-specific designed primer. Two primer pairs were designed specifically for P. hosei and P. frontata, respectively. These primer pairs proved to be efficient in amplifying 200bp of the targeted species in the optimized PCR conditions. The performance of the sequences were tested to determine genetic distance of genus Presbytis in Malaysia. From the analyses, P. hosei is closely related to P. chrysomelas and P. frontata with the value of 0.095 and 0.106, respectively. Cyt b gave a clear data in determining relationships among Bornean species. Thus, with the optimized condition, museum specimens can be used for molecular systematic studies of the Malaysian primates.

  1. Anchoring of self-assembled plasmid DNA/ anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid micelles on bisphosphonate-modified stent for cardiovascular gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guilei Ma,1,# Yong Wang,1,# Ilia Fishbein,2 Mei Yu,1 Linhua Zhang,1 Ivan S Alferiev,2 Jing Yang,1 Cunxian Song,1 Robert J Levy2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Abramson Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, USA #These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the anchoring of plasmid DNA/anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid tri-complex (DAC micelles onto bisphosphonate-modified 316 L coronary stents for cardiovascular site-specific gene delivery. Methods: Stents were first modified with polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PAA-BP, thereby enabling the retention of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer that permits the anchoring (via vector-binding molecules of DAC micelles. DAC micelles were then chemically linked onto the PAA-BP-modified stents by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol-propionate (SPDP as a crosslinker. Rhodamine-labeled DNA was used to assess the anchoring of DAC micelles, and radioactive-labeled antibody was used to evaluate binding capacity and stability. DAC micelles (encoding green fluorescent protein were tethered onto the PAA-BP-modified stents, which were assessed in cell culture. The presence of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer on the steel surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope analysis. Results: The anchoring of DAC micelles was generally uniform and devoid of large-scale patches of defects. Isotopic quantification confirmed that the amount of antibody chemically linked on the stents was 17-fold higher than that of the physical adsorbed control stents and its retention time was also significantly longer. In cell culture, numerous green fluorescent protein-positive cells were found on the PAA-BP modified stents, which demonstrated high localization and efficiency of gene delivery. Conclusion: The DAC micelle

  2. Mechanism of Androgen Receptor Corepression by CKβBP2/CRIF1, a Multifunctional Transcription Factor Coregulator Expressed in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jiann-an; Bai, Suxia; Grossman, Gail; Titus, Mark A.; Ford, O. Harris; Pop, Elena A.; Smith, Gary J.; Mohler, James L.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; French, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor coregulator Casein kinase IIβbinding protein 2 or CR6-interacting factor 1 (CKβBP2/CRIF1) binds the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells and in response to dihydrotestosterone localizes with AR on the prostate-specific antigen gene enhancer, but does not bind DNA suggesting CKβBP2/CRIF1 localization in chromatin is determined by AR. In this study we show also that CKβBP2/CRIF1 inhibits wild-type AR and AR N-terminal transcriptional activity, binds to the AR...

  3. Sliding window analyses for optimal selection of mini-barcodes, and application to 454-pyrosequencing for specimen identification from degraded DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Boyer

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding remains a challenge when applied to diet analyses, ancient DNA studies, environmental DNA samples and, more generally, in any cases where DNA samples have not been adequately preserved. Because the size of the commonly used barcoding marker (COI is over 600 base pairs (bp, amplification fails when the DNA molecule is degraded into smaller fragments. However, relevant information for specimen identification may not be evenly distributed along the barcoding region, and a shorter target can be sufficient for identification purposes. This study proposes a new, widely applicable, method to compare the performance of all potential 'mini-barcodes' for a given molecular marker and to objectively select the shortest and most informative one. Our method is based on a sliding window analysis implemented in the new R package SPIDER (Species IDentity and Evolution in R. This method is applicable to any taxon and any molecular marker. Here, it was tested on earthworm DNA that had been degraded through digestion by carnivorous landsnails. A 100 bp region of 16 S rDNA was selected as the shortest informative fragment (mini-barcode required for accurate specimen identification. Corresponding primers were designed and used to amplify degraded earthworm (prey DNA from 46 landsnail (predator faeces using 454-pyrosequencing. This led to the detection of 18 earthworm species in the diet of the snail. We encourage molecular ecologists to use this method to objectively select the most informative region of the gene they aim to amplify from degraded DNA. The method and tools provided here, can be particularly useful (1 when dealing with degraded DNA for which only small fragments can be amplified, (2 for cases where no consensus has yet been reached on the appropriate barcode gene, or (3 to allow direct analysis of short reads derived from massively parallel sequencing without the need for bioinformatic consolidation.

  4. Sliding window analyses for optimal selection of mini-barcodes, and application to 454-pyrosequencing for specimen identification from degraded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stephane; Brown, Samuel D J; Collins, Rupert A; Cruickshank, Robert H; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Wratten, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding remains a challenge when applied to diet analyses, ancient DNA studies, environmental DNA samples and, more generally, in any cases where DNA samples have not been adequately preserved. Because the size of the commonly used barcoding marker (COI) is over 600 base pairs (bp), amplification fails when the DNA molecule is degraded into smaller fragments. However, relevant information for specimen identification may not be evenly distributed along the barcoding region, and a shorter target can be sufficient for identification purposes. This study proposes a new, widely applicable, method to compare the performance of all potential 'mini-barcodes' for a given molecular marker and to objectively select the shortest and most informative one. Our method is based on a sliding window analysis implemented in the new R package SPIDER (Species IDentity and Evolution in R). This method is applicable to any taxon and any molecular marker. Here, it was tested on earthworm DNA that had been degraded through digestion by carnivorous landsnails. A 100 bp region of 16 S rDNA was selected as the shortest informative fragment (mini-barcode) required for accurate specimen identification. Corresponding primers were designed and used to amplify degraded earthworm (prey) DNA from 46 landsnail (predator) faeces using 454-pyrosequencing. This led to the detection of 18 earthworm species in the diet of the snail. We encourage molecular ecologists to use this method to objectively select the most informative region of the gene they aim to amplify from degraded DNA. The method and tools provided here, can be particularly useful (1) when dealing with degraded DNA for which only small fragments can be amplified, (2) for cases where no consensus has yet been reached on the appropriate barcode gene, or (3) to allow direct analysis of short reads derived from massively parallel sequencing without the need for bioinformatic consolidation.

  5. The tilt-dependent potential of mean force of a pair of DNA oligomers from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between DNA molecules have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, but several aspects (e.g. its role in determining the pitch of the cholesteric DNA phase) still remain unclear. Here, we performed large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water and 150 mM sodium chloride, to reconstruct the potential of mean force (PMF) of two DNA oligomers 24 base pairs long as a function of their interaxial angle and intermolecular distance. We find that the potential of mean force is dominated by total DNA charge, and not by the helical geometry of its charged groups. The theory of homogeneously charged cylinders fits well all our simulation data, and the fit yields the optimal value of the total compensated charge on DNA to ≈65% of its total fixed charge (arising from the phosphorous atoms), close to the value expected from Manning's theory of ion condensation. The PMF calculated from our simulations does not show a significant dependence on the handedness of the angle between the two DNA molecules, or its size is on the order of 1k B T. Thermal noise for molecules of the studied length seems to mask the effect of detailed helical charge patterns of DNA. The fact that in monovalent salt the effective interaction between two DNA molecules is independent on the handedness of the tilt may suggest that alternative mechanisms are required to understand the cholesteric phase of DNA.

  6. Detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in paired serum and urine samples using polymerase chain reaction-based systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Ximenes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF aims to eliminate this disease by the year 2020. However, the development of more specific and sensitive tests is important for the success of the GPELF. The present study aimed to standardise polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based systems for the diagnosis of filariasis in serum and urine. Twenty paired biological urine and serum samples from individuals already known to be positive for Wuchereria bancrofti were collected during the day. Conventional PCR and semi-nested PCR assays were optimised. The detection limit of the technique for purified W. bancrofti DNA extracted from adult worms was 10 fg for the internal systems (WbF/Wb2 and 0.1 fg by using semi-nested PCR. The specificity of the primers was confirmed experimentally by amplification of 1 ng of purified genomic DNA from other species of parasites. Evaluation of the paired urine and serum samples by the semi-nested PCR technique indicated only two of the 20 tested individuals were positive, whereas the simple internal PCR system (WbF/Wb2, which has highly promising performance, revealed that all the patients were positive using both samples. This study successfully demonstrated the possibility of using the PCR technique on urine for the diagnosis of W. bancrofti infection.

  7. Involvement of a bifunctional, paired-like DNA-binding domain and a transpositional enhancer in Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Khare, Dheeraj; Behlke, Joachim; Heinemann, Udo; Plasterk, Ronald H; Ivics, Zoltán

    2002-09-13

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is the most active Tc1/mariner-like transposon in vertebrate species. Each of the terminal inverted repeats (IRs) of SB contains two transposase-binding sites (DRs). This feature, termed the IR/DR structure, is conserved in a group of Tc1-like transposons. The DNA-binding region of SB transposase, similar to the paired domain of Pax proteins, consists of two helix-turn-helix subdomains (PAI + RED = PAIRED). The N-terminal PAI subdomain was found to play a dominant role in contacting the DRs. Transposase was able to bind to mutant sites retaining the 3' part of the DRs; thus, primary DNA binding is not sufficient to determine the specificity of the transposition reaction. The PAI subdomain was also found to bind to a transpositional enhancer-like sequence within the left IR of SB, and to mediate protein-protein interactions between transposase subunits. A tetrameric form of the transposase was detected in solution, consistent with an interaction between the IR/DR structure and a transposase tetramer. We propose a model in which the transpositional enhancer and the PAI subdomain stabilize complexes formed by a transposase tetramer bound at the IR/DR. These interactions may result in enhanced stability of synaptic complexes, which might explain the efficient transposition of Sleeping Beauty in vertebrate cells.

  8. KlenTaq polymerase replicates unnatural base pairs by inducing a Watson-Crick geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Karin; Malyshev, Denis A; Lavergne, Thomas; Welte, Wolfram; Diederichs, Kay; Dwyer, Tammy J; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Romesberg, Floyd E; Marx, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Many candidate unnatural DNA base pairs have been developed, but some of the best-replicated pairs adopt intercalated structures in free DNA that are difficult to reconcile with known mechanisms of polymerase recognition. Here we present crystal structures of KlenTaq DNA polymerase at different stages of replication for one such pair, dNaM-d5SICS, and show that efficient replication results from the polymerase itself, inducing the required natural-like structure.

  9. DNA Polymerase Fidelity: Beyond Right and Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, M Todd

    2016-11-01

    Accurate DNA replication depends on the ability of DNA polymerases to discriminate between correctly and incorrectly paired nucleotides. In this issue of Structure, Batra et al. (2016) show the structural basis for why DNA polymerases do not efficiently add correctly paired nucleotides immediately after incorporating incorrectly paired ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Typical signature of DNA damage in white blood cells: a pilot study on etheno adducts in Danish mother-newborn child pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arab, K; Pedersen, Marie; Nair, J

    2009-01-01

    The impact of DNA damage commonly thought to be involved in chronic degenerative disease causation is particularly detrimental during fetal development. Within a multicenter study, we analyzed 77 white blood cell (WBC) samples from mother-newborn child pairs to see if imprinting of DNA damage...... in mother and newborn shows a similar pattern. Two adducts 1,N(6)-ethenodeoxyadenosine (epsilondA) and 3,N(4)-ethenodeoxycytidine (epsilondC) were measured by our ultrasensitive immunoaffinity (32)P-post-labeling method. These miscoding etheno-DNA adducts are generated by the reaction of lipid peroxidation...... arising from endogenous reactive aldehydes in WBC of both mother and newborn can be reliably assessed by epsilondA and epsilondC as biomarkers. The high correlation of etheno adduct levels in mother and child WBC suggests that a typical signature of DNA damage is induced similarly in fetus and mother...

  11. The nucleotide sequence of human transition protein 1 cDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luerssen, H; Hoyer-Fender, S; Engel, W [Universitaet Goettingen (West Germany)

    1988-08-11

    The authors have screened a human testis cDNA library with an oligonucleotide of 81 mer prepared according to a part of the published nucleotide sequence of the rat transition protein TP 1. They have isolated a cDNA clone with the length of 441 bp containing the coding region of 162 bp for human transition protein 1. There is about 84% homology in the coding region of the sequence compared to rat. The human cDNA-clone encodes a polypeptide of 54 amino acids of which 7 are different to that of rat.

  12. AcEST: BP918406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000113_B06 468 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000113_B06. BP918406 - Show BP918406...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000113_B06. Accession BP918406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918406|Adiantum capillus-vene...ams, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918406|Adiantum capillus-veneris m

  13. AcEST: BP918011 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_E11 519 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_E11. BP918011 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_E11. Accession BP918011 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918011|Adiant...se search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918011|Adiantum cap

  14. Long span DNA paired-end-tag (DNA-PET sequencing strategy for the interrogation of genomic structural mutations and fusion-point-guided reconstruction of amplicons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yao

    Full Text Available Structural variations (SVs contribute significantly to the variability of the human genome and extensive genomic rearrangements are a hallmark of cancer. While genomic DNA paired-end-tag (DNA-PET sequencing is an attractive approach to identify genomic SVs, the current application of PET sequencing with short insert size DNA can be insufficient for the comprehensive mapping of SVs in low complexity and repeat-rich genomic regions. We employed a recently developed procedure to generate PET sequencing data using large DNA inserts of 10-20 kb and compared their characteristics with short insert (1 kb libraries for their ability to identify SVs. Our results suggest that although short insert libraries bear an advantage in identifying small deletions, they do not provide significantly better breakpoint resolution. In contrast, large inserts are superior to short inserts in providing higher physical genome coverage for the same sequencing cost and achieve greater sensitivity, in practice, for the identification of several classes of SVs, such as copy number neutral and complex events. Furthermore, our results confirm that large insert libraries allow for the identification of SVs within repetitive sequences, which cannot be spanned by short inserts. This provides a key advantage in studying rearrangements in cancer, and we show how it can be used in a fusion-point-guided-concatenation algorithm to study focally amplified regions in cancer.

  15. Plasma cell-free DNA and its DNA integrity as biomarker to distinguish prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients with increased serum prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiang; Gang, Feng; Li, Xiao; Jin, Tang; Houbao, Huang; Yu, Cao; Guorong, Li

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) or its integrity could differentiate prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in patients with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 4 ng/ml. Ninety-six patients with prostate cancer and 112 patients with BPH were enrolled. cfDNA levels in plasma before prostate biopsy were quantified by real-time PCR amplification of ALU gene (product size of 115 bp), and quantitative ratio of ALU (247 bp) to ALU (115 bp) reflected the integrity of cfDNA. In patients with serum PSA ≥ 4 ng/ml, there were significant differences in plasma cfDNA or its integrity between the patients with prostate cancer (19.74 ± 4.43, 0.34 ± 0.05) and patients with BPH (7.36 ± 1.58, 0.19 ± 0.03; P Prostate cancer could be differentiated with a sensitivity of 73.2 % and a specificity of 72.7 % by cfDNA (AUC = 0.864). The integrity of cfDNA had a sensitivity of 81.7 % and a specificity of 78.8 % for the distinguishing prostate cancer from BPH (AUC = 0.910). cfDNA and its integrity could be applied to differentiate prostate cancer from BPH in patients with serum PSA ≥ 4 ng/ml.

  16. Polymer-Based Black Phosphorus (bP) Hybrid Materials by in Situ Radical Polymerization: An Effective Tool To Exfoliate bP and Stabilize bP Nanoflakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus (bP) has been recently investigated for next generation nanoelectronic multifunctional devices. However, the intrinsic instability of exfoliated bP (the bP nanoflakes) toward both moisture and air has so far overshadowed its practical implementation. In order to contribute to fill this gap, we report here the preparation of new hybrid polymer-based materials where bP nanoflakes (bPn) exhibit a significantly improved stability. The new materials have been prepared by different synthetic paths including: (i) the mixing of conventionally liquid-phase exfoliated bP (in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solution; (ii) the direct exfoliation of bP in a polymeric solution; (iii) the in situ radical polymerization after exfoliating bP in the liquid monomer (methyl methacrylate, MMA). This last methodology concerns the preparation of stable suspensions of bPn–MMA by sonication-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) of bP in the presence of MMA followed by radical polymerization. The hybrids characteristics have been compared in order to evaluate the bP dispersion and the effectiveness of the bPn interfacial interactions with polymer chains aimed at their long-term environmental stabilization. The passivation of the bPn is particularly effective when the hybrid material is prepared by in situ polymerization. By using this synthetic methodology, the nanoflakes, even if with a gradient of dispersion (size of aggregates), preserve their chemical structure from oxidation (as proved by both Raman and 31P-solid state NMR studies) and are particularly stable to air and UV light exposure. The feasibility of this approach, capable of efficiently exfoliating bP while protecting the bPn, has been then verified by using different vinyl monomers (styrene and N-vinylpyrrolidone), thus obtaining hybrids where the nanoflakes are embedded in polymer matrices with a variety of intriguing thermal, mechanical, and solubility characteristics.

  17. Autofluorescence microscopy for paired-matched morphological and molecular identification of individual chigger mites (Acari: Trombiculidae, the vectors of scrub typhus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawadee Kumlert

    Full Text Available Conventional gold standard characterization of chigger mites involves chemical preparation procedures (i.e. specimen clearing for visualization of morphological features, which however contributes to destruction of the arthropod host DNA and any endosymbiont or pathogen DNA harbored within the specimen.In this study, a novel work flow based on autofluorescence microscopy was developed to enable identification of trombiculid mites to the species level on the basis of morphological traits without any special preparation, while preserving the mite DNA for subsequent genotyping. A panel of 16 specifically selected fluorescence microscopy images of mite features from available identification keys served for complete chigger morphological identification to the species level, and was paired with corresponding genotype data. We evaluated and validated this method for paired chigger morphological and genotypic ID using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (coi in 113 chigger specimens representing 12 species and 7 genera (Leptotrombidium, Ascoschoengastia, Gahrliepia, Walchia, Blankaartia, Schoengastia and Schoutedenichia from the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR to the species level (complete characterization, and 153 chiggers from 5 genera (Leptotrombidium, Ascoschoengastia, Helenicula, Schoengastiella and Walchia from Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR to the genus level. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 77 coi gene sequences (approximately 640 bp length, n = 52 new coi sequences and n = 25 downloaded from GenBank, demonstrated clear grouping of assigned morphotypes at the genus levels, although evidence of both genetic polymorphism and morphological plasticity was found.With this new methodology, we provided the largest collection of characterized coi gene sequences for trombiculid mites to date, and almost doubled the number of available characterized coi gene sequences with a single study. The ability to provide paired

  18. AcEST: BP911801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000009_C12 487 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000009_C12. BP911801 - Show BP911801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000009_C12. Accession BP911801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP911801.... 25:3389-3402. Query= BP911801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000

  19. Complexes of DNA bases and Watson-Crick base pairs interaction with neutral silver Agn (n = 8, 10, 12) clusters: a DFT and TDDFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruby

    2018-03-01

    We study the binding of the neutral Ag n (n = 8, 10, 12) to the DNA base-adenine (A), guanine (G) and Watson-Crick -adenine-thymine, guanine-cytosine pairs. Geometries of complexes were optimized at the DFT level using the hybrid B3LYP functional. LANL2DZ effective core potential was used for silver and 6-31 + G ** was used for all other atoms. NBO charges were analyzed using the Natural population analysis. The absorption properties of Ag n -A,G/WC complexes were also studied using time-dependent density functional theory. The absorption spectra for these complexes show wavelength in the visible region. It was revealed that silver clusters interact more strongly with WC pairs than with isolated DNA complexes. Furthermore, it was found that the electronic charge transferred from silver to isolated DNA clusters are less than the electronic charge transferred from silver to the Ag n -WC complexes. The vertical ionization potential, vertical electron affinity, hardness, and electrophilicity index of Ag n -DNA/WC complexes have also been discussed.

  20. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  1. DNA sequence of 15 base pairs is sufficient to mediate both glucocorticoid and progesterone induction of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straehle, U.; Klock, G.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-01-01

    To define the recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor and its relationship with that of the progesterone receptor, oligonucleotides derived from the glucocorticoid response element of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene were tested upstream of a heterologous promoter for their capacity to mediate effects of these two steroids. The authors show that a 15-base-pair sequence with partial symmetry is sufficient to confer glucocorticoid inducibility on the promoter of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. The same 15-base-pair sequence mediates induction by progesterone. Point mutations in the recognition sequence affect inducibility by glucocorticoids and progesterone similarly. Together with the strong conservation of the sequence of the DNA-binding domain of the two receptors, these data suggest that both proteins recognize a sequence that is similar, if not the same

  2. AcEST: BP920145 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E11 274 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E11. BP920145 - Show BP92014...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E11. Accession BP920145 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I..., Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920145|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_E11.... database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920145|Adian

  3. AcEST: BP920142 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E05 486 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E05. BP920142 - Show BP92014...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E05. Accession BP920142 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...rotein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920142|Adiantum capillus-veneris ...rograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920142|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_0001

  4. AcEST: BP919406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000124_G04 562 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000124_G04. BP919406 - Show BP919406...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000124_G04. Accession BP919406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...ion of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP919406|Adiantum capillus-...ucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP919406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, c

  5. AcEST: BP921000 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_D05 407 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D05. BP921000 - Show BP921000...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D05. Accession BP921000 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...eneration of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP921000|Adiantum cap...ein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP921000|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRN

  6. AcEST: BP920995 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C12 350 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C12. BP920995 - Show BP92099...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C12. Accession BP920995 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099...ew generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099

  7. AcEST: BP918015 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F03 437 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F03. BP918015 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F03. Accession BP918015 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I.... 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918015|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000108_F03. (437 letters) Data...eration of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91801

  8. AcEST: BP918018 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F06 436 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F06. BP918018 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F06. Accession BP918018 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...cids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918018|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YM...and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91801

  9. AcEST: BP912801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000023_A07 527 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000023_A07. BP912801 - Show BP912801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000023_A07. Accession BP912801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...w generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912801...es. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_0

  10. A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitani, Ayako; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling Feng

    2008-01-01

    Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage

  11. Complete chloroplast DNA sequence from a Korean endemic genus, Megaleranthis saniculifolia, and its evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Park, Chong-wook; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2009-03-31

    The chloroplast DNA sequences of Megaleranthis saniculifolia, an endemic and monotypic endangered plant species, were completed in this study (GenBank FJ597983). The genome is 159,924 bp in length. It harbors a pair of IR regions consisting of 26,608 bp each. The lengths of the LSC and SSC regions are 88,326 bp and 18,382 bp, respectively. The structural organizations, gene and intron contents, gene orders, AT contents, codon usages, and transcription units of the Megaleranthis chloroplast genome are similar to those of typical land plant cp DNAs. However, the detailed features of Megaleranthis chloroplast genomes are substantially different from that of Ranunculus, which belongs to the same family, the Ranunculaceae. First, the Megaleranthis cp DNA was 4,797 bp longer than that of Ranunculus due to an expanded IR region into the SSC region and duplicated sequence elements in several spacer regions of the Megaleranthis cp genome. Second, the chloroplast genomes of Megaleranthis and Ranunculus evidence 5.6% sequence divergence in the coding regions, 8.9% sequence divergence in the intron regions, and 18.7% sequence divergence in the intergenic spacer regions, respectively. In both the coding and noncoding regions, average nucleotide substitution rates differed markedly, depending on the genome position. Our data strongly implicate the positional effects of the evolutionary modes of chloroplast genes. The genes evidencing higher levels of base substitutions also have higher incidences of indel mutations and low Ka/Ks ratios. A total of 54 simple sequence repeat loci were identified from the Megaleranthis cp genome. The existence of rich cp SSR loci in the Megaleranthis cp genome provides a rare opportunity to study the population genetic structures of this endangered species. Our phylogenetic trees based on the two independent markers, the nuclear ITS and chloroplast matK sequences, strongly support the inclusion of the Megaleranthis to the Trollius. Therefore, our

  12. AcEST: BP914068 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_E04 420 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E04. BP914068 - Show BP91406...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E04. Accession BP914068 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91406...se search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914068|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone:

  13. AcEST: BP915406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000071_B11 433 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000071_B11. BP915406 - Show BP915406...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000071_B11. Accession BP915406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP915406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: Y...leic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP915406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000071_B11. (433

  14. AcEST: BP912099 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_B05 315 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_B05. BP912099 - Show BP912099...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_B05. Accession BP912099 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912099...of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912099|Adiantum capillus-vene

  15. AcEST: BP918801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000117_F03 542 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000117_F03. BP918801 - Show BP918801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000117_F03. Accession BP918801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...earch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU0...generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918801|Adiantum ca

  16. AcEST: BP917801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000105_F04 280 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000105_F04. BP917801 - Show BP917801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000105_F04. Accession BP917801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917801|Adiantum capillus-ve... Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000105_F04.

  17. AcEST: BP918017 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F05 267 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F05. BP918017 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F05. Accession BP918017 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...otein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918017|Adiantum capillus-veneris m...cleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918017|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000108_F05. (26

  18. AcEST: BP915801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000077_B02 555 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000077_B02. BP915801 - Show BP915801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000077_B02. Accession BP915801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I... Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP915801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000077_B02. ...ST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP915801|A

  19. Intramolecular CH···O hydrogen bonds in the AI and BI DNA-like conformers of canonical nucleosides and their Watson-Crick pairs. Quantum chemical and AIM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Samijlenko, Svitlana P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to cast some light on the H-bonds in double-stranded DNA in its AI and BI forms. For this purpose, we have performed the MP2 and DFT quantum chemical calculations of the canonical nucleoside conformers, relative to the AI and BI DNA forms, and their Watson-Crick pairs, which were regarded as the simplest models of the double-stranded DNA. Based on the atoms-in-molecules analysis (AIM), five types of the CH···O hydrogen bonds, involving bases and sugar, were detected numerically from 1 to 3 per a conformer: C2'H···O5', C1'H···O2, C6H···O5', C8H···O5', and C6H···O4'. The energy values of H-bonds occupy the range of 2.3-5.6 kcal/mol, surely exceeding the kT value (0.62 kcal/mol). The nucleoside CH···O hydrogen bonds appeared to "survive" turns of bases against the sugar, sometimes in rather large ranges of the angle values, pertinent to certain conformations, which points out to the source of the DNA lability, necessary for the conformational adaptation in processes of its functioning. The calculation of the interactions in the dA·T nucleoside pair gives evidence, that additionally to the N6H···O4 and N1···N3H canonical H-bonds, between the bases adenine and thymine the third one (C2H···O2) is formed, which, though being rather weak (about 1 kcal/mol), satisfies the AIM criteria of H-bonding and may be classified as a true H-bond. The total energy of all the CH···O nontraditional intramolecular H-bonds in DNA nucleoside pairs appeared to be commensurable with the energy of H-bonds between the bases in Watson-Crick pairs, which implies their possible important role in the DNA shaping.

  20. Genetic study of Dravidian castes of Tamil Nadu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of 256 base pairs (bp) of a 285-bp Alu element at the CD4 locus (Edwards and ..... out procedure for extracting DNA from human nucleated cells. Nucleic Acids ... Ota T. 1993 DISPAN: Genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. Pennsylvania ...

  1. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and δ rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of circ OH, circ H, e aq , etc.; circ OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; circ OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs

  2. Identification of multiple PEPC isogenes in leaves of the facultative Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv. Tom Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, H; Taybi, T; Kluge, M; Brulfert, J

    1995-12-27

    In the facultative Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) plant Kulanchoe blossfeldiana cv. Tom Thumb, CAM can be induced by short-day treatment or water deficiency stress. From young leaves of well-watered and water-stressed individuals of this plant, cDNA clones coding for a partial sequence of the key enzyme of CAM, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, were isolated after transcription of mRNA. cDNA polymorphism was established by enzyme restriction profiles and sequencing data. Four PEPC isogenes could be shown to exist in K. blossfeldiana forming two gene pairs, with 95%-98% homology inside and only 75% between the pairs. One cDNA sequence pair having a length of 1113 bp and an open reading frame of 371 AA was identified as PEPC isoform specific for the C3 state, whereas the pair having a length of 1116 bp and an open reading frame of 372 AA could be attributed to the CAM state. These results were confirmed by Southern Blot hybridization.

  3. AcEST: BP920147 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_F01 365 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F01. BP920147 - Show BP92014...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F01. Accession BP920147 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...ch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920147|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_...97), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP9201

  4. AcEST: BP920144 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E09 265 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E09. BP920144 - Show BP92014...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E09. Accession BP920144 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...rch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920144|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001...LAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92014

  5. AcEST: BP920141 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E04 528 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E04. BP920141 - Show BP92014...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E04. Accession BP920141 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...cids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920141|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_E04. (528 lette...cleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920141|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_E04. (52

  6. AcEST: BP913406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000029_H06 570 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000029_H06. BP913406 - Show BP913406...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000029_H06. Accession BP913406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...arch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU00...eration of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913406|Adiantum capil...LDVTRGLVNGARGVVVAFES--GKHG---------------LPH 406 Query: 387 VRFACNRAEIVIGPDRQTVESGGMQVARRIQVPLILAWALSVHKCQGM

  7. AcEST: BP918012 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_E12 547 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_E12. BP918012 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_E12. Accession BP918012 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...grams, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918012|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000108...ms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918012|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000108_E1

  8. Super-resolution optical DNA Mapping via DNA methyltransferase-directed click chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vranken, Charlotte; Deen, Jochem; Dirix, Lieve

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to optical DNA mapping, which enables near single-molecule characterization of whole bacteriophage genomes. Our approach uses a DNA methyltransferase enzyme to target labelling to specific sites and copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition to couple a fluorophore...... to the DNA. We achieve a labelling efficiency of ∼70% with an average labelling density approaching one site every 500 bp. Such labelling density bridges the gap between the output of a typical DNA sequencing experiment and the long-range information derived from traditional optical DNA mapping. We lay...... the foundations for a wider-scale adoption of DNA mapping by screening 11 methyltransferases for their ability to direct sequence-specific DNA transalkylation; the first step of the DNA labelling process and by optimizing reaction conditions for fluorophore coupling via a click reaction. Three of 11 enzymes...

  9. AcEST: BP912406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000018_F09 348 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000018_F09. BP912406... CL1894Contig1 Show BP912406 Clone id YMU001_000018_F09 Library YMU01 Length 348 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000018_F09. Accession BP912406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...in database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912406

  10. AcEST: BP917406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000100_D10 492 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000100_D10. BP917406... CL2033Contig1 Show BP917406 Clone id YMU001_000100_D10 Library YMU01 Length 492 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000100_D10. Accession BP917406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917406...Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA,

  11. AcEST: BP916801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000091_G06 127 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000091_G06. BP916801... CL2168Contig1 Show BP916801 Clone id YMU001_000091_G06 Library YMU01 Length 127 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000091_G06. Accession BP916801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ds Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP916801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU0...a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP916801

  12. AcEST: BP913801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000035_D11 562 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000035_D11. BP913801... CL482Contig1 Show BP913801 Clone id YMU001_000035_D11 Library YMU01 Length 562 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000035_D11. Accession BP913801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...tabase search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913801|Adiantum...earch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU0

  13. AcEST: BP920801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000141_G10 454 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000141_G10. BP920801... CL819Contig1 Show BP920801 Clone id YMU001_000141_G10 Library YMU01 Length 454 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000141_G10. Accession BP920801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage... Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: ...ion of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920801|Adiantum capillus-

  14. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76......(s) of tetranectin. The sequence analysis revealed a difference in both sequence and size of the noncoding regions between mouse and human cDNAs. Northern analysis of the various tissues from mouse, rat, and cow showed the major transcript(s) to be approximately 1 kb, which is similar in size to that observed...

  15. The complete chloroplast genome of Sinopodophyllum hexandrum Ying (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lihua; Liu, Ruijuan; Chen, Jianbing; Ding, Chenxu

    2017-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the Sinopodophyllum hexandrum Ying chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined based on next-generation sequencing technologies in this study. The genome was 157 203 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeat (IRa and IRb) regions of 25 960 bp, which were separated by a large single-copy (LSC) region of 87 065 bp and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 18 218 bp, respectively. The cpDNA contained 148 genes, including 96 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 44 tRNA genes. In these genes, eight harbored a single intron, and two (ycf3 and clpP) contained a couple of introns. The cpDNA AT content of S. hexandrum cpDNA is 61.5%.

  16. Heat degradation of eukaryotic and bacterial DNA: an experimental model for paleomicrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Hieu Tung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theoretical models suggest that DNA degradation would sharply limit the PCR-based detection of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA within ancient specimens. However, the relative extent of decay of eukaryote and prokaryote DNA over time is a matter of debate. In this study, the murine macrophage cell line J774, alone or infected with Mycobacterium smegmatis bacteria, were killed after exposure to 90°C dry heat for intervals ranging from 1 to 48 h in order to compare eukaryotic cells, extracellular bacteria and intracellular bacteria. The sizes of the resulting mycobacterial rpoB and murine rpb2 homologous gene fragments were then determined by real-time PCR and fluorescent probing. Findings The cycle threshold (Ct values of PCR-amplified DNA fragments from J774 cells and the M. smegmatis negative controls (without heat exposure varied from 26–33 for the J774 rpb2 gene fragments and from 24–29 for M. smegmatis rpoB fragments. After 90°C dry heat incubation for up to 48 h, the Ct values of test samples increased relative to those of the controls for each amplicon size. For each dry heat exposure time, the Ct values of the 146-149-bp fragments were lower than those of 746-747-bp fragments. During the 4- to 24-h dry heat incubation, the non-infected J774 cell DNA was degraded into 597-bp rpb2 fragments. After 48 h, however, only 450-bp rpb2 fragments of both non-infected and infected J774 cells could be amplified. In contrast, the 746-bp rpoB fragments of M. smegmatis DNA could be amplified after the 48-h dry heat exposure in all experiments. Infected and non-infected J774 cell DNA was degraded more rapidly than M. smegmatis DNA after dry heat exposure (ANOVA test, p  Conclusion In this study, mycobacterial DNA was more resistant to dry-heat stress than eukaryotic DNA. Therefore, the detection of large, experimental, ancient mycobacterial DNA fragments is a suitable approach for paleomicrobiological studies.

  17. Molecular dosimetry of DNA adducts in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to benzo(a)pyrene by different routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, D.; Clarius, T.M.; Wright, A.S.; Watson, W.P.

    1994-01-01

    Farm raised rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed by various routes to benzo(a)pyrene (BP) as a representative carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Following exposure of fish to the chemical by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, 32 P-postlabelling studies indicated that non-feral trout were relatively resistant to the formation of BP-DNA adducts in liver. No adducts were detected in fish exposed to single doses (20 mg/kg) of BP. Multiple exposures (e.g. 2 x 25 mg/kg) were necessary in order for adducts to be detected, indicating that induction of the metabolising enzymes required for the bioactivation of BP is necessary. These studies provided reference information on DNA adducts for comparison with data from subsequent experiments at environmentally realistic low level exposures. Two types of low level aquatic exposure were carried out. The first procedure exposed fish for 30 days to a nominally constant low level (1.2 and 0.4 μg/l) of a homogeneous dispersion of BP in water, to simulate low level aquatic environmental exposures. Following 32 P-postlabelling analysis of the liver DNA of exposed fish, BP-DNA adducts were not detected. In the second procedure, fish were exposed to a constant low level of BP (ca. 0.5 μg/l) for 15 days then to a pulse (60 μg/l) which was allowed to naturally decline (to ca. 2 μg/l) during a further 15 days. Following this exposure, significant levels of BP-DNA adducts were detected in livers of trout. The effect of dietary exposures was investigated by feeding trout a diet containing either 58 μg or 288 μg BP per day for 6 days, equivalent to total doses of 43 mg/kg and 216 mg/kg. In both cases BP-DNA adducts were detected in livers of exposed fish. The results provide useful information on the types of exposures to PAHs which may pose a genotoxic risk to fish in the environment. (orig.)

  18. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  19. Influence of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage on enzyme recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Ionising radiation is unique in inducing DNA clustered damage together with the simple isolated lesions. Understanding how these complex lesions are recognised and repaired by the cell is key to understanding the health risks associated with radiation exposure. This study focuses on whether ionising radiation-induced complex single-strand breaks (SSB) are recognised by DNA-PK and PARP, and whether the complexity of DSB influence their ligation by either DNA ligase lV/XRCC4 (LX) complex or T4 DNA ligase. Plasmid DNA, irradiated in aqueous solution using sparsely ionising γ-rays and densely ionising α-particles produce different yields of complex DNA damages, used as substrates for in vitro DNA-PK and PARP activity assays. The activity of DNA-PK to phosphorylate a peptide was determined using HF19 cell nuclear extracts as a source of DNA-PK. PARP ADP-ribosylation activity was determined using purified PARP enzyme. The activation of DNA-PK and PARP by irradiated DNA is due to SSB and not the low yield of DSB (linear plasmid DNA <10%). A ∼2 fold increase in DNA-PK activation and a ∼3-fold reduction in PARP activity seen on increasing the ionising density of the radiation (proportion of complex damage) are proposed to reflect changes in the complexity of SSB and may relate to damage signalling. Complex DSB synthesised as double-stranded oligonucleotides, with a 2 bp 5'-overhang, and containing modified lesions, 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites, at known positions relative to the termini were used as substrates for in vitro ligation by DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 or T4 ligase. The presence of a modified lesion 2 or 3 bp but not 4 bp from the 3'-termini and 2 or 6 bp from the 5'-termini caused a drastic reduction in the extent of ligation. Therefore, the presence of modified lesions near to the termini of a DSB may compromise their rejoining by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) involving the LX complex. (author)

  20. AcEST: BP920140 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E03 489 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E03. BP92014...0 CL2574Contig1 Show BP920140 Clone id YMU001_000133_E03 Library YMU01 Length 489 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E03. Accession BP920140 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag... database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920140|Adian... and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92014

  1. AcEST: BP920143 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E07 533 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E07. BP92014...3 CL2377Contig1 Show BP920143 Clone id YMU001_000133_E07 Library YMU01 Length 533 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E07. Accession BP920143 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920143|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_E0...tabase search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920143|Adiantum

  2. AcEST: BP920146 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_E12 401 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E12. BP92014...6 CL388Contig1 Show BP920146 Clone id YMU001_000133_E12 Library YMU01 Length 401 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_E12. Accession BP920146 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920146|Adiantum ca...rams, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920146|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_

  3. AcEST: BP920148 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_F02 429 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F02. BP92014...8 CL3819Contig1 Show BP920148 Clone id YMU001_000133_F02 Library YMU01 Length 429 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F02. Accession BP920148 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...rograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920148|Adiantum capillus-vener...ed BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92014

  4. AcEST: BP920149 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000133_F03 624 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F03. BP92014...9 CL2860Contig1 Show BP920149 Clone id YMU001_000133_F03 Library YMU01 Length 624 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000133_F03. Accession BP920149 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920149|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000133_F03. (624 l...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92014

  5. AcEST: BP914065 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_E01 548 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E01. BP91406...5 CL604Contig1 Show BP914065 Clone id YMU001_000039_E01 Library YMU01 Length 548 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E01. Accession BP914065 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...earch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914065|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU0...cids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914065|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000039_E01. (548 lette

  6. AcEST: BP914061 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_D09 599 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D09. BP91406...1 CL1730Contig1 Show BP914061 Clone id YMU001_000039_D09 Library YMU01 Length 599 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D09. Accession BP914061 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag... a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914061|Adia...database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914061|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, c

  7. AcEST: BP914069 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_E05 368 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E05. BP91406...9 CL2761Contig1 Show BP914069 Clone id YMU001_000039_E05 Library YMU01 Length 368 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_E05. Accession BP914069 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...rograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914069|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_0000...rch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914069|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001

  8. AcEST: BP914064 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_D12 560 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D12. BP91406...4 CL532Contig1 Show BP914064 Clone id YMU001_000039_D12 Library YMU01 Length 560 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D12. Accession BP914064 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...f protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914064|Adiantum capillus-vener...: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914064|Adi

  9. AcEST: BP916406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000087_D01 556 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000087_D01. BP916406... CL1913Contig1 Show BP916406 Clone id YMU001_000087_D01 Library YMU01 Length 556 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000087_D01. Accession BP916406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ration of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP916406|Adiantum capill...database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP916406|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, c

  10. AcEST: BP914406 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000058_E09 562 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000058_E09. BP914406... CL513Contig1 Show BP914406 Clone id YMU001_000058_E09 Library YMU01 Length 562 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000058_E09. Accession BP914406 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...tion of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914406|Adiantum capillus...PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914406

  11. AcEST: BP914060 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_D08 539 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D08. BP91406...0 CL1835Contig1 Show BP914060 Clone id YMU001_000039_D08 Library YMU01 Length 539 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D08. Accession BP914060 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...rotein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914060|Adiantum capillus-veneris ...Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914060|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000039_D08. (539 lett

  12. AcEST: BP920998 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_D03 529 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D03. BP92099...8 CL1935Contig1 Show BP920998 Clone id YMU001_000144_D03 Library YMU01 Length 529 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D03. Accession BP920998 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...abase search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920998|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clon... of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920998|Adiantum capillus-ven

  13. AcEST: BP920999 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_D04 588 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D04. BP92099...9 CL317Contig1 Show BP920999 Clone id YMU001_000144_D04 Library YMU01 Length 588 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D04. Accession BP920999 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...nd PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099... and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099

  14. AcEST: BP920996 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_D01 496 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D01. BP92099...6 CL262Contig1 Show BP920996 Clone id YMU001_000144_D01 Library YMU01 Length 496 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D01. Accession BP920996 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920996|Adiantum capillus-ve

  15. AcEST: BP920993 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C06 517 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C06. BP92099...3 CL547Contig1 Show BP920993 Clone id YMU001_000144_C06 Library YMU01 Length 517 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C06. Accession BP920993 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...rograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920993|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_0001...w generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920993|Adiantum

  16. AcEST: BP920992 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C05 525 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C05. BP92099...2 CL2523Contig1 Show BP920992 Clone id YMU001_000144_C05 Library YMU01 Length 525 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C05. Accession BP920992 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920992|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000144_C05. (525 lett...ograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920992|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_00014

  17. AcEST: BP919801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000129_C11 513 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000129_C11. BP919801... CL1Contig3 Show BP919801 Clone id YMU001_000129_C11 Library YMU01 Length 513 Definition Adiantum capil...lus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000129_C11. Accession BP919801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage -...es. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP919801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000129_C11. (435 letters) Da...eration of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP919801|Adiantum capil

  18. AcEST: BP918013 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F01 490 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F01. BP918013 - Show BP91801...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F01. Accession BP918013 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91801...idylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 1 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica GN=PIPK1 PE=2 SV=2 Length = 801 Score = ..., Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91801

  19. AcEST: BP914801 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000063_A07 396 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000063_A07. BP914801... CL1121Contig1 Show BP914801 Clone id YMU001_000063_A07 Library YMU01 Length 396 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000063_A07. Accession BP914801 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914801...ase search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP914801|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone:

  20. Validation of the iHealth BP5 wireless upper arm blood pressure monitor for self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Fujun; Zhu, Yizheng; Zhu, Zhenlai; Liu, Lei; Wan, Yi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the iHealth BP5 wireless upper arm blood pressure (BP) monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. The ESH-IP revision 2010 for validation of BP measuring devices in adults was followed precisely. A total of 99 pairs of test device and reference BP measurements (three pairs for each of the 33 participants) were obtained in the study. The device produced 71, 89, and 97 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 73, 90, and 99 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respectively. The mean ± SD device-observer difference was -1.21 ± 5.87 mmHg for SBP and -1.04 ± 5.28 mmHg for DBP. The number of participants with two or three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg was 25 for SBP and 28 for DBP. In addition, three participants had no device-observer difference within 5 mmHg for SBP and none of the participants had the same for DBP. According to the validation results on the basis of the ESH-IP revision 2010, the iHealth BP5 wireless upper arm BP monitor can be recommended for self/home measurement in an adult population.

  1. 53BP1 loss suppresses the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai; Yao, Jing; Liu, Tao; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Hong

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of the expression of P53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), a key component in DNA damage repair pathways, on the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this influence. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to verify the gene-knockout effect of 53BP1 small hairpin RNA (ShRNA), and colony formation assay was employed to investigate the influence of 53BP1 downregulation on the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib hydrochloride in HCT116 cells. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle distributions, and histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) fluorescence foci after 53BP1 knockdown were evaluated. Relative protein expression in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM)-checkpoint kinase-2 (CHK2)-P53 pathway was measured by Western blot analysis to unravel the molecular mechanisms linking the pathway to the above phenomena. Icotinib hydrochloride increased the radiosensitivity of HCT116 cells; however, this effect was suppressed by the downregulation of 53BP1 expression, a change that inhibited cell apoptosis, increased the percentage of HCT116 cells arrested in S-phase and inhibited the protein expression of key molecules in the ATM-CHK2-P53 apoptotic pathway. Our studies confirmed that the loss of 53BP1 serves as a negative regulator of the radiosensitizing effect of icotinib in part by suppressing the ATM-CHK2-P53 apoptotic pathway.

  2. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  3. Association between mutation spectra and stable and unstable DNA adduct profiles in Salmonella for benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, David M., E-mail: demarini.david@epa.gov [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hanley, Nancy M.; Warren, Sarah H.; Adams, Linda D.; King, Leon C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: {yields} Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) induces stable DNA adducts and mutations primarily at guanine. {yields} Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) induces them primarily at adenine. {yields} BP induces abasic sites, but DBP does not in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. {yields} Stable DNA adducts alone appear to account for the mutation spectrum of DBP. {yields} Stable DNA adducts and possibly abasic sites account for the mutation spectrum of BP. - Abstract: Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) are two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that exhibit distinctly different mutagenicity and carcinogenicity profiles. Although some studies show that these PAHs produce unstable DNA adducts, conflicting data and arguments have been presented regarding the relative roles of these unstable adducts versus stable adducts, as well as oxidative damage, in the mutagenesis and tumor-mutation spectra of these PAHs. However, no study has determined the mutation spectra along with the stable and unstable DNA adducts in the same system with both PAHs. Thus, we determined the mutagenic potencies and mutation spectra of BP and DBP in strains TA98, TA100 and TA104 of Salmonella, and we also measured the levels of abasic sites (aldehydic-site assay) and characterized the stable DNA adducts ({sup 32}P-postlabeling/HPLC) induced by these PAHs in TA104. Our results for the mutation spectra and site specificity of stable adducts were consistent with those from other systems, showing that DBP was more mutagenic than BP in TA98 and TA100. The mutation spectra of DBP and BP were significantly different in TA98 and TA104, with 24% of the mutations induced by BP in TA98 being complex frameshifts, whereas DBP produced hardly any of these mutations. In TA104, BP produced primarily GC to TA transversions, whereas DBP produced primarily AT to TA transversions. The majority (96%) of stable adducts induced by BP were at guanine, whereas the majority (80%) induced by DBP were at adenine

  4. AcEST: BP920994 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C10 322 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C10. BP92099...4 CL2871Contig1 Show BP920994 Clone id YMU001_000144_C10 Library YMU01 Length 322 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C10. Accession BP920994 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099...ped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099

  5. AcEST: BP920990 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C03 445 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C03. BP92099...0 CL4123Contig1 Show BP920990 Clone id YMU001_000144_C03 Library YMU01 Length 445 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C03. Accession BP920990 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...97), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP9209...LAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP92099

  6. AcEST: BP920991 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_C04 521 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C04. BP92099...1 CL3173Contig1 Show BP920991 Clone id YMU001_000144_C04 Library YMU01 Length 521 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_C04. Accession BP920991 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...s. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920991|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000144_C04. (521 letters) Dat...ucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920991|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000144_C04. (5

  7. AcEST: BP918016 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F04 434 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F04. BP91801...6 CL3779Contig1 Show BP918016 Clone id YMU001_000108_F04 Library YMU01 Length 434 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F04. Accession BP918016 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag..., Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91801...ic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP918016|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000108_F04. (434 l

  8. How Cations Can Assist DNase I in DNA Binding and Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéroult, Marc; Picot, Daniel; Abi-Ghanem, Joséphine; Hartmann, Brigitte; Baaden, Marc

    2010-01-01

    DNase I requires Ca2+ and Mg2+ for hydrolyzing double-stranded DNA. However, the number and the location of DNase I ion-binding sites remain unclear, as well as the role of these counter-ions. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that bovine pancreatic (bp) DNase I contains four ion-binding pockets. Two of them strongly bind Ca2+ while the other two sites coordinate Mg2+. These theoretical results are strongly supported by revisiting crystallographic structures that contain bpDNase I. One Ca2+ stabilizes the functional DNase I structure. The presence of Mg2+ in close vicinity to the catalytic pocket of bpDNase I reinforces the idea of a cation-assisted hydrolytic mechanism. Importantly, Poisson-Boltzmann-type electrostatic potential calculations demonstrate that the divalent cations collectively control the electrostatic fit between bpDNase I and DNA. These results improve our understanding of the essential role of cations in the biological function of bpDNase I. The high degree of conservation of the amino acids involved in the identified cation-binding sites across DNase I and DNase I-like proteins from various species suggests that our findings generally apply to all DNase I-DNA interactions. PMID:21124947

  9. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  10. Fidelity and Mutational Spectrum of Pfu DNA Polymerase on a Human Mitochondrial DNA Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Paulo; Kim, Andrea; Khrapko, Konstantin; Thilly, William G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10−6 must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or “PCR noise”. Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 × 10−7, and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC → TA, AT → TA, and AT → CG), one transition (AT → GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be

  11. Description of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing DNA Mycobacterium tuberculosis from specimen sputum of tuberculosis patients in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lily; Siregar, Y.; Ilyas, S.

    2018-03-01

    This study purposed to describe the product Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing of DNA Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis from sputum of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Medan. Sputum was collected from patients that diagnosed with pulmonary TB by a physician. Specimen processed by PCR method of Li et al. and sequencing at Macrogen Laboratory. All of 12 product PCR were showed brightness bands at 126 base pair (bp). These results indicated similarity to the study of Li et al. Sequencing analysis showed the presence of a mutation and non-mutation groups of M. tuberculosis. The reference and outcome berange of the mutation and non-mutation of M. tuberculosis were 56-107, 59-85, 60-120 and 63-94, respectively. The percentage bp difference between the outcome and references for mutation and non-mutation were 3.448-6.569and 3.278-7.428%, respectively. In conclusion, the successful amplification of PCR products in a 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis where all 12 sputa contained rpoB-positive M. tuberculosis and 0.644% difference was found between the outcome with reference bp of the mutation and non-mutation M. tuberculosis groups.

  12. AcEST: BP918019 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000108_F08 47 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F08. BP918019 - Show BP91801... mRNA. clone: YMU001_000108_F08. Accession BP918019 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID

  13. The First Report of a 290-bp Deletion in β-Globin Gene in the South of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Nejad, Ladan Dawoody; Shariati, Gholamreza; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Alihossein; Mohammadi-Anaei, Marziye

    2017-01-01

    Background: β-thalassemia is one of the most widespread diseases in the world, including Iran. In this study, we reported, for the first time, a 290-bp β-globin gene deletion in the south of Iran. Methods: Four individuals from three unrelated families with Arabic ethnic background were studied in Khuzestan Province. Red blood cell indices and hemoglobin analysis were carried out according to the standard methods. Genomic DNA was obtained from peripheral blood cells by salting out procedures. β-globin gene amplification, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and DNA sequencing were performed. Results: The PCR followed by sequencing and MLPA test of the β-globin gene confirmed the presence of a 290-bp deletion in the heterozygous form, along with -88C>A mutation. All the individuals had elevated hemoglobin A2 and normal fetal hemoglobin levels. Conclusions: This mutation causes β0-thalassemia and can be highly useful for prenatal diagnosis in compound heterozygous condition with different β-globin gene mutations. PMID:26948378

  14. Acute Toxicity and Ecological Risk Assessment of Benzophenone-3 (BP-3 and Benzophenone-4 (BP-4 in Ultraviolet (UV-Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters are used in personal care products for the protection of human skin and hair from damage by UV radiation. Although these substances are released into the environment in the production and consumption processes, little is known about their ecotoxicology effects. The acute toxicity and potential ecological risk of UV filters benzophenone-3 (BP-3 and benzophenone-4 (BP-4 on Chlorella vulgaris, Daphnia magna, and Brachydanio rerio were analyzed in the present study. The EC50 values (96 h of BP-3 and BP-4 on C. vulgaris were 2.98 and 201.00 mg/L, respectively. The 48 h-LC50 of BP-3 and BP-4 on D. magna were 1.09 and 47.47 mg/L, respectively. The 96 h-LC50 of BP-3 and BP-4 on B. rerio were 3.89 and 633.00 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of a mixture of BP-3 and BP-4 on C. vulgaris, D. magna, and B. rerio all showed antagonistic effects. The induced predicted no-effect concentrations of BP-3 and BP-4 by the assessment factor method were 1.80 × 10−3 and 0.47 mg/L, respectively, by assessment factor (AF method, which were both lower than the concentrations detected in the environment at present, verifying that BP-3 and BP-4 remain low-risk chemicals to the aquatic ecosystem.

  15. [Clonage of the "malA" region of "Escherichia coli" K12: nucleotide sequence of the regulatory region and the promoters, identification and purification of the MalT-activator protein (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaud, O; Débarbouillé, M; Cossart, P

    1982-01-01

    A 5,800-bp (base pair) HindIII-EcoRI DNA fragment containing malT, the positive regulator gene of the maltose regulon, and most of malP, the structural gene for maltodextrin phosphorylase, was cloned into pBR322. A sequence of 802 bp was established in a DNA segment containing the promotor for malPQ and the promoter for malT. A total of 611 bp separates the initiation codons for these two genes, which are transcribed in opposite directions. The malT product was identified as a 94,000 dalton polypeptide.

  16. Cyclic AMP regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone α-subunit gene is mediated by an 18-base-pair element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, B.J.; Bokar, J.A.; Virgin, J.B.; Vallen, E.A.; Milsted, A.; Nilson, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    cAMP regulates transcription of the gene encoding the α-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the choriocarcinoma cells (BeWo). To define the sequences required for regulation by cAMP, the authors inserted fragments from the 5' flanking region of the α-subunit gene into a test vector containing the simian virus 40 early promoter (devoid of its enhancer) linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Results from transient expression assays in BeWo cells indicated that a 1500-base-pair (bp) fragment conferred cAMP responsiveness on the CAT gene regardless of position or orientation of the insert relative to the viral promoter. A subfragment extending from position -169 to position -100 had the same effect on cAMP-induced expression. Furthermore, the entire stimulatory effect could be achieved with an 18-bp synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide corresponding to a direct repeat between position -146 and -111. In the absence of cAMP, the α-subunit 5' flanking sequence also enhanced transcription from the simian virus 40 early promoter. They localized this enhancer activity to the same -169/-100 fragment containing the cAMP response element. The 18-bp element alone, however, had no effect on basal expression. Thus, this short DNA sequence serves as a cAMP response element and also functions independently of other promoter-regulatory elements located in the 5' flanking sequence of the α-subunit gene

  17. Expanding the BP1-BP2 15q11.2 Microdeletion Phenotype: Tracheoesophageal Fistula and Congenital Cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal q arm of chromosome 15 contains breakpoint regions BP1–BP5 with the classic deletion of BP1–BP3 best known to be associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The region is approximately 500 kb and microdeletions within the BP1-BP2 region have been reported in patients with developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and motor apraxia as well as dysmorphic features including hypertelorism, cleft or narrow palate, ear abnormalities, and recurrent upper airway infections. We report two patients with unique, never-before-reported 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome findings, one with proximal esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (type C and one with congenital cataracts. Cataracts have been described in Prader-Willi syndrome but we could not find any description of cataracts in Angelman syndrome. Esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula have not been reported to our knowledge in either syndrome. A chance exists that both cases are sporadic birth defects; however, the findings of the concomitant microdeletion cannot be overlooked as a possible cause. Based on our review of the literature and the presentation of our patients, we recommend that esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula as well as congenital cataracts be included in the phenotypic spectrum of 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome.

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Raman; Lee, Do-Hyung; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-05-01

    The complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicine was reported and characterized. The cpDNA of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is 149,539 bp, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,803 bp is separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 82,805 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,128 bp). It encodes 85 protein-coding genes, 36 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Of 129 individual genes, 13 genes encoded one intron and three genes have two introns.

  19. A novel pseudo-complementary PNA G-C base pair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne G.; Dahl, Otto; Petersen, Asger Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo-complementary oligonucleotide analogues and mimics provide novel opportunities for targeting duplex structures in RNA and DNA. Previously, a pseudo-complementary A-T base pair has been introduced. Towards sequence unrestricted targeting, a pseudo-complementary G-C base pair consisting...

  20. Insights into the Structures of DNA Damaged by Hydroxyl Radical: Crystal Structures of DNA Duplexes Containing 5-Formyluracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Tsunoda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals are potent mutagens that attack DNA to form various base and ribose derivatives. One of the major damaged thymine derivatives is 5-formyluracil (fU, which induces pyrimidine transition during replication. In order to establish the structural basis for such mutagenesis, the crystal structures of two kinds of DNA d(CGCGRATfUCGCG with R = A/G have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The fU residues form a Watson-Crick-type pair with A and two types of pairs (wobble and reversed wobble with G, the latter being a new type of base pair between ionized thymine base and guanine base. In silico structural modeling suggests that the DNA polymerase can accept the reversed wobble pair with G, as well as the Watson-Crick pair with A.

  1. AcEST: BP912612 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000020_H07 512 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000020_H07. BP912612 - Show BP912612... Clone id YMU001_000020_H07 Library YMU01 Length 512 Definition Adiantum capillus-vener...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000020_H07. Accession BP912612 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...se search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912612|Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000020_H07. (512 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences;

  2. AcEST: BP912712 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000022_A07 476 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000022_A07. BP912712 - Show BP912712...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000022_A07. Accession BP912712 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...cleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912712|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, cl...one: YMU001_000022_A07. (476 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 total let...8%), Positives = 39/69 (56%), Gaps = 4/69 (5%) Frame = +3 Query: 123 TSRRKSNHDQY--LPNYKVGTVHLLLGVKDQHLVSKIDI

  3. AcEST: BP912212 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000016_D11 457 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000016_D11. BP912212... CL1085Contig1 Show BP912212 Clone id YMU001_000016_D11 Library YMU01 Length 457 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000016_D11. Accession BP912212 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...f protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912212...|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000016_D11. (457 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  4. AcEST: BP912312 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000017_F01 489 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000017_F01. BP912312... CL1779Contig1 Show BP912312 Clone id YMU001_000017_F01 Library YMU01 Length 489 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000017_F01. Accession BP912312 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...on of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912312...|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000017_F01. (489 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  5. AcEST: BP912128 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D10 477 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D10. BP91212...8 CL2328Contig1 Show BP912128 Clone id YMU001_000015_D10 Library YMU01 Length 477 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D10. Accession BP912128 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag... protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91212...8|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000015_D10. (461 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  6. AcEST: BP912912 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000024_C05 413 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000024_C05. BP912912... CL1433Contig1 Show BP912912 Clone id YMU001_000024_C05 Library YMU01 Length 413 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000024_C05. Accession BP912912 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag... of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912912|Adiantum capillus-ven...eris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000024_C05. (413 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  7. AcEST: BP919999 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000131_G09 554 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000131_G09. BP919999... CL2968Contig1 Show BP919999 Clone id YMU001_000131_G09 Library YMU01 Length 554 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000131_G09. Accession BP919999 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...b Miller, and David J. Lipman (1997), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generatio...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP919999|Adiantum capillus-ve

  8. AcEST: BP920997 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000144_D02 534 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D02. BP92099...7 CL10Contig1 Show BP920997 Clone id YMU001_000144_D02 Library YMU01 Length 534 Definition Adiantum capi...llus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000144_D02. Accession BP920997 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage ...a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP920997|Adian...BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 2

  9. Real-time Tracking of DNA Fragment Separation by Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chunxian; Yang, Bo; Li, Zhenqing; Zhang, Dawei; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori

    2017-06-01

    Slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) is the most common method for the separation of DNA fragments; thus, it is broadly applied to the field of biology and others. However, the traditional SGE protocol is quite tedious, and the experiment takes a long time. Moreover, the chemical consumption in SGE experiments is very high. This work proposes a simple method for the separation of DNA fragments based on an SGE chip. The chip is made by an engraving machine. Two plastic sheets are used for the excitation and emission wavelengths of the optical signal. The fluorescence signal of the DNA bands is collected by smartphone. To validate this method, 50, 100, and 1,000 bp DNA ladders were separated. The results demonstrate that a DNA ladder smaller than 5,000 bp can be resolved within 12 min and with high resolution when using this method, indicating that it is an ideal substitute for the traditional SGE method.

  10. Sensing Conformational Changes in DNA upon Ligand Binding Using QCM-D. Polyamine Condensation and Rad51 Extension of DNA Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Lu

    2014-10-16

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Biosensors, in which binding of ligands is detected through changes in the optical or electrochemical properties of a DNA layer confined to the sensor surface, are important tools for investigating DNA interactions. Here, we investigate if conformational changes induced in surface-attached DNA molecules upon ligand binding can be monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. DNA duplexes containing 59-184 base pairs were formed on QCM-D crystals by stepwise assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides of designed base sequences. The DNA films were exposed to the cationic polyamines spermidine and spermine, known to condense DNA molecules in bulk experiments, or to the recombination protein Rad51, known to extend the DNA helix. The binding and dissociation of the ligands to the DNA films were monitored in real time by measurements of the shifts in resonance frequency (Δf) and in dissipation (ΔD). The QCM-D data were analyzed using a Voigt-based model for the viscoelastic properties of polymer films in order to evaluate how the ligands affect thickness and shear viscosity of the DNA layer. Binding of spermine shrinks all DNA layers and increases their viscosity in a reversible fashion, and so does spermidine, but to a smaller extent, in agreement with its lower positive charge. SPR was used to measure the amount of bound polyamines, and when combined with QCM-D, the data indicate that the layer condensation leads to a small release of water from the highly hydrated DNA films. The binding of Rad51 increases the effective layer thickness of a 59bp film, more than expected from the know 50% DNA helix extension. The combined results provide guidelines for a QCM-D biosensor based on ligand-induced structural changes in DNA films. The QCM-D approach provides high discrimination between ligands affecting the thickness and the structural properties of the DNA layer differently. The reversibility of the film

  11. Comparable stability of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs in ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-08

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson-Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson-Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo.

  12. Comparable Stability of Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick Base Pairs in Ionic Liquid Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson–Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson–Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson–Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  13. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation by tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Tandem N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole (Py-Im) polyamides with good sequence-specific DNA-alkylating activities have been designed and synthesized. Three alkylating tandem Py-Im polyamides with different linkers, which each contained the same moiety for the recognition of a 10 bp DNA sequence, were evaluated for their reactivity and selectivity by DNA alkylation, using high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis. All three conjugates displayed high reactivities for the target sequence. In particular, polyamide 1, which contained a β-alanine linker, displayed the most-selective sequence-specific alkylation towards the target 10 bp DNA sequence. The tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates displayed greater sequence-specific DNA alkylation than conventional hairpin Py-Im polyamide conjugates (4 and 5). For further research, the design of tandem Py-Im polyamide conjugates could play an important role in targeting specific gene sequences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Evaluation of fungal- and photo-degradation as potential treatments for the removal of sunscreens BP3 and BP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago-Ferrero, Pablo; Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Olivares, Alba; Piña, Benjamin; Blánquez, Paqui; Vicent, Teresa; Caminal, Gloria; Díaz-Cruz, M. Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Photodecomposition might be regarded as one of the most important abiotic factors affecting the fate of UV absorbing compounds in the environment and photocatalysis has been suggested as an effective method to degrade organic pollutants. However, UV filters transformation appears to be a complex process, barely addressed to date. The white rot fungus Trametes versicolor is considered as a promising alternative to conventional aerobic bacterial degradation, as it is able to metabolise a wide range of xenobiotics. This study focused on both degradation processes of two widely used UV filters, benzophenone-3 (BP3) and benzophenone-1 (BP1). Fungal treatment resulted in the degradation of more than 99% for both sunscreens in less than 24 h, whereas photodegradation was very inefficient, especially for BP3, which remained unaltered upon 24 h of simulated sunlight irradiation. Analysis of metabolic compounds generated showed BP1 as a minor by-product of BP3 degradation by T. versicolor while the main intermediate metabolites were glycoconjugate derivatives. BP1 and BP3 showed a weak, but significant estrogenic activity (EC50 values of 0.058 mg/L and 12.5 mg/L, respectively) when tested by recombinant yeast assay (RYA), being BP1 200-folds more estrogenic than BP3. Estrogenic activity was eliminated during T. versicolor degradation of both compounds, showing that none of the resulting metabolites possessed significant estrogenic activity at the concentrations produced. These results demonstrate the suitability of this method to degrade both sunscreen agents and to eliminate estrogenic activity. - Highlights: ► Fungus T. versicolor is able to degrade totally BP3 and BP1 in few hours in a fluidised bed bioreactor. ► BP3 is not degraded under simulated sunlight. ► Glycoconjugates have been identified as the main intermediate metabolites. ► Decrease in endocrine activity was found in both photodegradation and biodegradation.

  15. Isolation of a sex-linked DNA sequence in cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, W; Fuerst, P A

    2001-01-01

    A female-specific DNA fragment (CSL-W; crane sex-linked DNA on W chromosome) was cloned from female whooping cranes (Grus americana). From the nucleotide sequence of CSL-W, a set of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers was identified which amplify a 227-230 bp female-specific fragment from all existing crane species and some other noncrane species. A duplicated versions of the DNA segment, which is found to have a larger size (231-235 bp) than CSL-W in both sexes, was also identified, and was designated CSL-NW (crane sex-linked DNA on non-W chromosome). The nucleotide similarity between the sequences of CSL-W and CSL-NW from whooping cranes was 86.3%. The CSL primers do not amplify any sequence from mammalian DNA, limiting the potential for contamination from human sources. Using the CSL primers in combination with a quick DNA extraction method allows the noninvasive identification of crane gender in less than 10 h. A test of the methodology was carried out on fully developed body feathers from 18 captive cranes and resulted in 100% successful identification.

  16. Rapid identification and recovery of ENU-induced mutations with next-generation sequencing and Paired-End Low-Error analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Luyuan; Shah, Arish N; Phelps, Ian G; Doherty, Dan; Johnson, Eric A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2015-02-14

    Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) is a reverse genetics approach to directly identify point mutations in specific genes of interest in genomic DNA from a large chemically mutagenized population. Classical TILLING processes, based on enzymatic detection of mutations in heteroduplex PCR amplicons, are slow and labor intensive. Here we describe a new TILLING strategy in zebrafish using direct next generation sequencing (NGS) of 250 bp amplicons followed by Paired-End Low-Error (PELE) sequence analysis. By pooling a genomic DNA library made from over 9,000 N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenized F1 fish into 32 equal pools of 288 fish, each with a unique Illumina barcode, we reduce the complexity of the template to a level at which we can detect mutations that occur in a single heterozygous fish in the entire library. MiSeq sequencing generates 250 base-pair overlapping paired-end reads, and PELE analysis aligns the overlapping sequences to each other and filters out any imperfect matches, thereby eliminating variants introduced during the sequencing process. We find that this filtering step reduces the number of false positive calls 50-fold without loss of true variant calls. After PELE we were able to validate 61.5% of the mutant calls that occurred at a frequency between 1 mutant call:100 wildtype calls and 1 mutant call:1000 wildtype calls in a pool of 288 fish. We then use high-resolution melt analysis to identify the single heterozygous mutation carrier in the 288-fish pool in which the mutation was identified. Using this NGS-TILLING protocol we validated 28 nonsense or splice site mutations in 20 genes, at a two-fold higher efficiency than using traditional Cel1 screening. We conclude that this approach significantly increases screening efficiency and accuracy at reduced cost and can be applied in a wide range of organisms.

  17. Study the Molecular Association between a Deletion Mutation in CHEK2 gene (5395 bp and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Jalilvand

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and the second most common cause of cancer death. Genetic factors play an important role in the development of breast cancer. Among these genetic factors, CHEk2 (checkpoint kinase 2 gene, as a tumor suppressor gene, plays a critical role in DNA repair. Germline mutations in CEHK2 result in the loss of this feature. One of the mutations in CHEK2 gene is a 5395 bp deletion mutation which has been associated with the increasing risk of Breast Cancer in some populations in the world.  In the present study, we investigated the association between a 5395 bp deletion mutation in CHEK2 gene and the risk of Breast Cancer in the women of an Iranian population. Methods: Pathologic information of 38 cases under the age of 45 and 62 cases over the age of 45 referring to surgery ward of Milad Hospital in Tehran were extracted. 100 healthy controls were included in the study as well. After obtaining informed consent, 5 mL whole blood was taken DNA was successfully isolated. Multiplex PCR was used to investigate the association between a 5395bp deletion mutation in CHEK2 gene and increasing risk of Breast Cancer among patients. Results: The 5395bp deletion mutation in CHEK2 gene was not found in any of the participating groups of patients or heathy controls. Conclusion: The present study revealed that there is no significant relation between increasing the risk of Breast Cancer and bearing large deletion mutation in exon 9 and exon 10 of CHECK2 gene.

  18. AcEST: BP913636 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000032_E04 520 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000032_E04. BP913636... CL2643Contig1 Show BP913636 Clone id YMU001_000032_E04 Library YMU01 Length 520 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000032_E04. Accession BP913636 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...ograms, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913636|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_00003...tative phospholipid-transporting ATPase ... 149 8e-36 sp|Q9LNQ4|ALA4_ARATH Putati

  19. AcEST: BP912124 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D06 531 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D06. BP91212...4 CL2988Contig1 Show BP912124 Clone id YMU001_000015_D06 Library YMU01 Length 531 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D06. Accession BP912124 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...n database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912124|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA,... clone: YMU001_000015_D06. (531 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 total

  20. AcEST: BP912125 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D07 558 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D07. BP912125 - Show BP91212...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D07. Accession BP912125 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...ein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912125|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRN...A, clone: YMU001_000015_D07. (558 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 tota...copeptide repeat-containing protein At1g08070 OS=Arabidopsis thaliana GN=PCMP-H12

  1. AcEST: BP912120 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D01 500 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D01. BP912120 - Show BP91212...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D01. Accession BP912120 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...elated Pol polyprotein from transposon TNT 1-94 OS=Nicotiana tabacum Align length 130 Score (bit) 124.0 E-va...: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91212...0|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000015_D01. (500 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  2. AcEST: BP921212 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000147_A09 361 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000147_A09. BP921212 - Show BP921212...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000147_A09. Accession BP921212 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP921212|Adiantum capillus-veneris... mRNA, clone: YMU001_000147_A09. (361 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,...itol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-ki... 30 2.9 sp|O14338|YB33_SCHPO Uncharacterized serine-rich protein C2F12.0... 29

  3. AcEST: BP912126 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D08 484 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D08. BP912126 CL412...4Contig1 Show BP912126 Clone id YMU001_000015_D08 Library YMU01 Length 484 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D08. Accession BP912126 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL412...-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. ...25:3389-3402. Query= BP912126|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000015_D08. (484 letters) Databa

  4. AcEST: BP912812 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000023_B07 575 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000023_B07. BP912812... CL2610Contig1 Show BP912812 Clone id YMU001_000023_B07 Library YMU01 Length 575 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000023_B07. Accession BP912812 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag... new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912812|Adiant...um capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000023_B07. (575 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequ

  5. AcEST: BP912122 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D04 544 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D04. BP91212...2 CL3363Contig1 Show BP912122 Clone id YMU001_000015_D04 Library YMU01 Length 544 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D04. Accession BP912122 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...obium aromaticivorans (strain DSM 12444) Align length 58 Score (bit) 33.1 E-value 0.89 Report BLASTX 2.2.19 ...w generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912122|Adiantum

  6. AcEST: BP912412 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000018_G03 551 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000018_G03. BP912412... CL4248Contig1 Show BP912412 Clone id YMU001_000018_G03 Library YMU01 Length 551 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000018_G03. Accession BP912412 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...tein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912412|Adiantum capillus-veneris mR...NA, clone: YMU001_000018_G03. (551 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 tot

  7. AcEST: BP912012 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000012_A06 542 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000012_A06. BP912012... CL2421Contig1 Show BP912012 Clone id YMU001_000012_A06 Library YMU01 Length 542 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000012_A06. Accession BP912012 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stag...rams, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912012|Adiantum capillus-veneris ...mRNA, clone: YMU001_000012_A06. (542 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 t

  8. AcEST: BP912123 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D05 496 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D05. BP91212...3 CL498Contig1 Show BP912123 Clone id YMU001_000015_D05 Library YMU01 Length 496 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D05. Accession BP912123 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...n of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP91212...3|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000015_D05. (478 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412

  9. AcEST: BP912512 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000019_D01 513 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000019_D01. BP912512... CL17Contig1 Show BP912512 Clone id YMU001_000019_D01 Library YMU01 Length 513 Definition Adiantum capi...llus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000019_D01. Accession BP912512 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage ...earch programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912512|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU0...01_000019_D01. (489 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 total letters Sear

  10. AcEST: BP912129 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_D11 268 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D11. BP91212...9 CL691Contig1 Show BP912129 Clone id YMU001_000015_D11 Library YMU01 Length 268 Definition Adiantum cap...illus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_D11. Accession BP912129 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage...tabase search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912129|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clo...ne: YMU001_000015_D11. (268 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765 total lett

  11. AcEST: BP917373 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000100_A08 270 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000100_A08. BP917373 CL2373...Contig1 Show BP917373 Clone id YMU001_000100_A08 Library YMU01 Length 270 Definition Adiantum ca...pillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000100_A08. Accession BP917373 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL2373...search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917373|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU...EGAVKHVGVLSS 206 K+ GC+S G SRHGES V KE H SS Sbjct: 473 KKEKGCSSPGSSRHGESHKGVSHTPI

  12. Insights into Watson–Crick/Hoogsteen breathing dynamics and damage repair from the solution structure and dynamic ensemble of DNA duplexes containing m1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Shi, Honglue; Zhou, Huiqing; Xue, Yi; Rangadurai, Atul; Merriman, Dawn K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the canonical DNA double helix, Watson–Crick (WC) base pairs (bps) exist in dynamic equilibrium with sparsely populated (∼0.02–0.4%) and short-lived (lifetimes ∼0.2–2.5 ms) Hoogsteen (HG) bps. To gain insights into transient HG bps, we used solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including measurements of residual dipolar couplings and molecular dynamics simulations, to examine how a single HG bp trapped using the N1-methylated adenine (m1A) lesion affects the structural and dynamic properties of two duplexes. The solution structure and dynamic ensembles of the duplexes reveals that in both cases, m1A forms a m1A•T HG bp, which is accompanied by local and global structural and dynamic perturbations in the double helix. These include a bias toward the BI backbone conformation; sugar repuckering, major-groove directed kinking (∼9°); and local melting of neighboring WC bps. These results provide atomic insights into WC/HG breathing dynamics in unmodified DNA duplexes as well as identify structural and dynamic signatures that could play roles in m1A recognition and repair. PMID:28369571

  13. A Damage-Independent Role for 53BP1 that Impacts Break Order and Igh Architecture during Class Switch Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P. Rocha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During class switch recombination (CSR, B cells replace the Igh Cμ or δ exons with another downstream constant region exon (CH, altering the antibody isotype. CSR occurs through the introduction of AID-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs in switch regions and subsequent ligation of broken ends. Here, we developed an assay to investigate the dynamics of DSB formation in individual cells. We demonstrate that the upstream switch region Sμ is first targeted during recombination and that the mechanism underlying this control relies on 53BP1. Surprisingly, regulation of break order occurs through residual binding of 53BP1 to chromatin before the introduction of damage and independent of its established role in DNA repair. Using chromosome conformation capture, we show that 53BP1 mediates changes in chromatin architecture that affect break order. Finally, our results explain how changes in Igh architecture in the absence of 53BP1 could promote inversional rearrangements that compromise CSR.

  14. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  15. Correlation of MFOLD-predicted DNA secondary structures with separation patterns obtained by capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavac, Damjan; Potocnik, Uros; Podpecnik, Darja; Zizek, Teofil; Smerkolj, Sava; Ravnik-Glavac, Metka

    2002-04-01

    We have studied 57 different mutations within three beta-globin gene promoter fragments with sizes 52 bp, 77 bp, and 193 bp by fluorescent capillary electrophoresis CE-SSCP analysis. For each mutation and wild type, energetically most-favorable predicted secondary structures were calculated for sense and antisense strands using the MFOLD DNA-folding algorithm in order to investigate if any correlation exists between predicted DNA structures and actual CE migration time shifts. The overall CE-SSCP detection rate was 100% for all mutations in three studied DNA fragments. For shorter 52 bp and 77 bp DNA fragments we obtained a positive correlation between the migration time shifts and difference in free energy values of predicted secondary structures at all temperatures. For longer 193 bp beta-globin gene fragments with 46 mutations MFOLD predicted different secondary structures for 89% of mutated strands at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the mobility shifts did not necessarily correlate with their secondary structures and free energy values except for the sense strand at 40 degrees C where this correlation was statistically significant (r = 0.312, p = 0.033). Results of this study provided more direct insight into the mechanism of CE-SSCP and showed that MFOLD prediction could be helpful in making decisions about the running temperatures and in prediction of CE-SSCP data patterns, especially for shorter (50-100 bp) DNA fragments. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Energetics and dynamics of the non-natural fluorescent 4AP:DAP base pair

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-01-02

    The fluorescent non-natural 4-aminophthalimide (4AP) base, when paired to the complementary 2,4-diaminopyrimidine (DAP) nucleobase, is accommodated in a B-DNA duplex being efficiently recognized and incorporated by DNA polymerases. To complement the experimental studies and rationalize the impact of the above non-natural bases on the structure, stability and dynamics of nucleic acid structures, we performed quantum mechanics (QM) calculations along with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QM calculations were initially focused on the geometry and energetics of the 4AP:DAP non-natural pair and of H-bonded base pairs between 4AP and all the natural bases in their classical Watson-Crick geometries. The QM calculations indicate that the 4AP:DAP pair, despite the fact that it can form 3 H-bonds in a classic Watson-Crick geometry, has a stability comparable to the A:T pair. Then, we extended the study to reverse Watson-Crick geometries, characteristic of parallel strands. MD simulations were carried out on two 13-mer DNA duplexes, featuring a central 4AP:DAP or A:T pair, respectively. No major structural deformation of the duplex was observed during the MD simulation. Snapshots from the MD simulations were subjected to QM calculations to investigate the 4AP:DAP interaction energy when embedded into a duplex structure, and to investigate the impact of the two non-natural bases on the stacking interactions with adjacent bases in the DNA duplex. We found a slight increase in stacking interactions involving the 4AP:DAP pair, counterbalanced by a moderate decrease in H-bonding interactions of the 4AP:DAP and of the adjacent base pairs in the duplex. The results of our study are in agreement with experimental data and complement them by providing an insight into which factors contribute positively and which factors contribute negatively to the structural compatibility of the fluorescent 4AP:DAP pair with a B-DNA structure.

  17. Temporal Fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea Region Cattle Population Revealed by Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Marianna; Bläuer, Auli; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Harjula, Janne; Nyström Edmark, Veronica; Rannamäe, Eve; Lõugas, Lembi; Sajantila, Antti; Lidén, Kerstin; Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies. Results Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples), Medieval (14), and Post-Medieval (26) periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes) genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples) with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples) revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples) was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples). Conclusions The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle. PMID:25992976

  18. AcEST: BP913939 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000038_B01 468 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000038_B01. BP913939 - Show BP913939...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000038_B01. Accession BP913939 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP913939|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, ... F member 3... 86 9e-17 sp|Q66H39|ABCF3_RAT ATP-binding cassette sub-family F member 3 O... 85 1e-16 sp|Q5R9...aracterized ABC transporter ATP-binding... 56 6e-08 sp|P63390|YHES_ECO57 Uncharacterized ABC transporter ATP

  19. AcEST: BP912112 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000015_C08 546 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_C08. BP912112 - Show BP912112...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000015_C08. Accession BP912112 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...Arabidopsis thaliana Align length 171 Score (bit) 121.0 E-value 3.0e-27 Report BLASTX 2.2.19 [Nov-02-2008] R... protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP912112|Adiantum capillus-veneri...s mRNA, clone: YMU001_000015_C08. (546 letters) Database: uniprot_sprot.fasta 412,525 sequences; 148,809,765

  20. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  1. Benzo(a)pyrene metabolism, DNA-binding and UV-induced repair of DNA damage in cultured skin fibroblasts from a patient with unilateral multiple basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don, P.S.C.; Mukhtar, H.; Das, M.; Berger, N.A.; Bickers, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BP), and its subsequent binding to DNA, and the repair of UV-induced DNA damage were studied in fibroblasts cultured from the skin of a 61-year-old male who had multiple basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (>100) on his left upper trunk. Results suggest that BP metabolism and repair of DNA are altered in tumor-bearing site (TSB) cells and that patients with this type of metabolic profile may be at higher risk of the development of cutaneous neoplasms. It is also possible that fibroblasts from tumour bearing skin undergo some as yet unexplained alteration in carcinogen metabolism as a consequence of the induction of neoplasia. (author)

  2. Evaluation of fungal- and photo-degradation as potential treatments for the removal of sunscreens BP3 and BP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Ferrero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.gago@idaea.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Badia-Fabregat, Marina, E-mail: marina.badia@uab.cat [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Olivares, Alba, E-mail: esalba.olivares@idaea.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Pina, Benjamin, E-mail: benjami.pina@idaea.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Blanquez, Paqui, E-mail: paqui.blanquez@uab.cat [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Vicent, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.vicent@uab.cat [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Caminal, Gloria, E-mail: gloria.caminal@uab.cat [Unitat de Biocatalisi Aplicada associada al IQAC (CSIC-UAB). Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Diaz-Cruz, M. Silvia, E-mail: silvia.diaz@idaea.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2012-06-15

    Photodecomposition might be regarded as one of the most important abiotic factors affecting the fate of UV absorbing compounds in the environment and photocatalysis has been suggested as an effective method to degrade organic pollutants. However, UV filters transformation appears to be a complex process, barely addressed to date. The white rot fungus Trametes versicolor is considered as a promising alternative to conventional aerobic bacterial degradation, as it is able to metabolise a wide range of xenobiotics. This study focused on both degradation processes of two widely used UV filters, benzophenone-3 (BP3) and benzophenone-1 (BP1). Fungal treatment resulted in the degradation of more than 99% for both sunscreens in less than 24 h, whereas photodegradation was very inefficient, especially for BP3, which remained unaltered upon 24 h of simulated sunlight irradiation. Analysis of metabolic compounds generated showed BP1 as a minor by-product of BP3 degradation by T. versicolor while the main intermediate metabolites were glycoconjugate derivatives. BP1 and BP3 showed a weak, but significant estrogenic activity (EC50 values of 0.058 mg/L and 12.5 mg/L, respectively) when tested by recombinant yeast assay (RYA), being BP1 200-folds more estrogenic than BP3. Estrogenic activity was eliminated during T. versicolor degradation of both compounds, showing that none of the resulting metabolites possessed significant estrogenic activity at the concentrations produced. These results demonstrate the suitability of this method to degrade both sunscreen agents and to eliminate estrogenic activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fungus T. versicolor is able to degrade totally BP3 and BP1 in few hours in a fluidised bed bioreactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BP3 is not degraded under simulated sunlight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glycoconjugates have been identified as the main intermediate metabolites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in endocrine activity

  3. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Aslanukov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2 is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/- are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/- mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  4. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanukov, Azamat; Bhowmick, Reshma; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Raz, Dorit; Bush, Ronald A; Sieving, Paul A; Lu, Xinrong; Bock, Cheryl B; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2006-10-01

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s) of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI) via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/-) are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/-) mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  5. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  6. A magnetic bead-based method for concentrating DNA from human urine for downstream detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Hali; Russ, Patricia K; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    Due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, PCR cannot be used directly on most clinical samples, including human urine, without pre-treatment. A magnetic bead-based strategy is one potential method to collect biomarkers from urine samples and separate the biomarkers from PCR inhibitors. In this report, a 1 mL urine sample was mixed within the bulb of a transfer pipette containing lyophilized nucleic acid-silica adsorption buffer and silica-coated magnetic beads. After mixing, the sample was transferred from the pipette bulb to a small diameter tube, and captured biomarkers were concentrated using magnetic entrainment of beads through pre-arrayed wash solutions separated by small air gaps. Feasibility was tested using synthetic segments of the 140 bp tuberculosis IS6110 DNA sequence spiked into pooled human urine samples. DNA recovery was evaluated by qPCR. Despite the presence of spiked DNA, no DNA was detectable in unextracted urine samples, presumably due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. However, following extraction with the magnetic bead-based method, we found that ∼50% of spiked TB DNA was recovered from human urine containing roughly 5×10(3) to 5×10(8) copies of IS6110 DNA. In addition, the DNA was concentrated approximately ten-fold into water. The final concentration of DNA in the eluate was 5×10(6), 14×10(6), and 8×10(6) copies/µL for 1, 3, and 5 mL urine samples, respectively. Lyophilized and freshly prepared reagents within the transfer pipette produced similar results, suggesting that long-term storage without refrigeration is possible. DNA recovery increased with the length of the spiked DNA segments from 10±0.9% for a 75 bp DNA sequence to 42±4% for a 100 bp segment and 58±9% for a 140 bp segment. The estimated LOD was 77 copies of DNA/µL of urine. The strategy presented here provides a simple means to achieve high nucleic acid recovery from easily obtained urine samples, which does not contain inhibitors of PCR.

  7. Hydration of Watson-Crick base pairs and dehydration of Hoogsteen base pairs inducing structural polymorphism under molecular crowding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kaori; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Ohmichi, Tatsuo; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2009-03-18

    It has been revealed recently that molecular crowding, which is one of the largest differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions, is a critical factor determining the structure, stability, and function of nucleic acids. However, the effects of molecular crowding on Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs remain unclear. In order to investigate directly and quantitatively the molecular crowding effects on base pair types in nucleic acids, we designed intramolecular parallel- and antiparallel-stranded DNA duplexes consisting of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs, respectively, as well as an intramolecular parallel-stranded triplex containing both types of base pairs. Thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that the values of free energy change at 25 degrees C for Hoogsteen base-pair formations decreased from +1.45 +/- 0.15 to +1.09 +/- 0.13 kcal mol(-1), and from -1.89 +/- 0.13 to -2.71 +/- 0.11 kcal mol(-1) in the intramolecular duplex and triplex, respectively, when the concentration of PEG 200 (polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 200) increased from 0 to 20 wt %. However, corresponding values for Watson-Crick formation in the duplex and triplex increased from -10.2 +/- 0.2 to -8.7 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1), and from -10.8 +/- 0.2 to -9.2 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Furthermore, it was revealed that the opposing effects of molecular crowding on the Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs were due to different behaviors of water molecules binding to the DNA strands.

  8. Using galaxy pairs to investigate the three-point correlation function in the squeezed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sihan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Garrison, Lehman H.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the three-point correlation function (3PCF) in the squeezed limit by considering galaxy pairs as discrete objects and cross-correlating them with the galaxy field. We develop an efficient algorithm using fast Fourier transforms to compute such cross-correlations and their associated pair-galaxy bias bp, g and the squeezed 3PCF coefficient Qeff. We implement our method using N-body cosmological simulations and a fiducial halo occupation distribution (HOD) and present the results in both the real space and redshift space. In real space, we observe a peak in bp, g and Qeff at pair separation of ∼2 Mpc, attributed to the fact that galaxy pairs at 2 Mpc separation trace the most massive dark matter haloes. We also see strong anisotropy in the bp, g and Qeff signals that track the large-scale filamentary structure. In redshift space, both the 2 Mpc peak and the anisotropy are significantly smeared out along the line of sight due to finger-of-God effect. In both the real space and redshift space, the squeezed 3PCF shows a factor of 2 variation, contradicting the hierarchical ansatz, but offering rich information on the galaxy-halo connection. Thus, we explore the possibility of using the squeezed 3PCF to constrain the HOD. When we compare two simple HOD models that are closely matched in their projected two-point correlation function (2PCF), we do not yet see a strong variation in the 3PCF that is clearly disentangled from variations in the projected 2PCF. Nevertheless, we propose that more complicated HOD models, e.g. those incorporating assembly bias, can break degeneracies in the 2PCF and show a distinguishable squeezed 3PCF signal.

  9. Predicting the Mechanism and Kinetics of the Watson-Crick to Hoogsteen Base Pairing Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Swenson, D.W.H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA duplexes predominantly contain Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs. Yet, a non-negligible number of base pairs converts to the Hoogsteen (HG) hydrogen bonding pattern, involving a 180° rotation of the purine base relative to Watson-Crick. These WC to HG conversions alter the conformation of DNA, and

  10. Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5' to 3' direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation

  11. Construction of C35 gene bait recombinants and T47D cell cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Gui-Hua; Liu, Ye; Xiao, Ting; Zhu, Song; Yan, Ge

    2017-11-20

    C35 is a novel tumor biomarker associated with metastasis progression. To investigate the interaction factors of C35 in its high expressed breast cancer cell lines, we constructed bait recombinant plasmids of C35 gene and T47D cell cDNA library for yeast two-hybrid screening. Full length C35 sequences were subcloned using RT-PCR from cDNA template extracted from T47D cells. Based on functional domain analysis, the full-length C35 1-348bp was also truncated into two fragments C351-153bp and C35154-348bp to avoid auto-activation. The three kinds of C35 genes were successfully amplified and inserted into pGBKT7 to construct bait recombinant plasmids pGBKT7-C351-348bp, pGBKT7-C351-153bp and pGBKT7-C35154-348bp, then transformed into Y187 yeast cells by the lithium acetate method. Auto-activation and toxicity of C35 baits were detected using nutritional deficient medium and X-α-Gal assays. The T47D cell ds cDNA was generated by SMART TM technology and the library was constructed using in vivo recombination-mediated cloning in the AH109 yeast strain using a pGADT7-Rec plasmid. The transformed Y187/pGBKT7-C351-348bp line was intensively inhibited while the truncated Y187/pGBKT7-C35 lines had no auto-activation and toxicity in yeast cells. The titer of established cDNA library was 2 × 10 7 pfu/mL with high transformation efficiency of 1.4 × 10 6 , and the insert size of ds cDNA was distributed homogeneously between 0.5-2.0 kb. Our research generated a T47D cell cDNA library with high titer, and the constructed two C35 "baits" contained a respective functional immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif (ITAM) and the conserved last four amino acids Cys-Ile-Leu-Val (CILV) motif, and therefore laid a foundation for screening the C35 interaction factors in a BC cell line.

  12. Structural variability and the nature of intermolecular interactions in Watson-Crick B-DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyznikowska, Z; Góra, R W; Zaleśny, R; Lipkowski, P; Jarzembska, K N; Dominiak, P M; Leszczynski, J

    2010-07-29

    A set of nearly 100 crystallographic structures was analyzed using ab initio methods in order to verify the effect of the conformational variability of Watson-Crick guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine base pairs on the intermolecular interaction energy and its components. Furthermore, for the representative structures, a potential energy scan of the structural parameters describing mutual orientation of the base pairs was carried out. The results were obtained using the hybrid variational-perturbational interaction energy decomposition scheme. The electron correlation effects were estimated by means of the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and coupled clusters with singles and doubles method adopting AUG-cc-pVDZ basis set. Moreover, the characteristics of hydrogen bonds in complexes, mimicking those appearing in B-DNA, were evaluated using topological analysis of the electron density. Although the first-order electrostatic energy is usually the largest stabilizing component, it is canceled out by the associated exchange repulsion in majority of the studied crystallographic structures. Therefore, the analyzed complexes of the nucleic acid bases appeared to be stabilized mainly by the delocalization component of the intermolecular interaction energy which, in terms of symmetry adapted perturbation theory, encompasses the second- and higher-order induction and exchange-induction terms. Furthermore, it was found that the dispersion contribution, albeit much smaller in terms of magnitude, is also a vital stabilizing factor. It was also revealed that the intermolecular interaction energy and its components are strongly influenced by four (out of six) structural parameters describing mutual orientation of bases in Watson-Crick pairs, namely shear, stagger, stretch, and opening. Finally, as a part of a model study, much of the effort was devoted to an extensive testing of the UBDB databank. It was shown that the databank quite successfully reproduces the

  13. Specific amplification of bacterial DNA by optimized so-called universal bacterial primers in samples rich of plant DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn-In, Samart; Bassitta, Rupert; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann; Hölzel, Christina S

    2015-06-01

    Universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S-rRNA-gene allow quantification of the total bacterial load in variable sample types by qPCR. However, many universal primer pairs also amplify DNA of plants or even of archaea and other eukaryotic cells. By using these primers, the total bacterial load might be misevaluated, whenever samples contain high amounts of non-target DNA. Thus, this study aimed to provide primer pairs which are suitable for quantification and identification of bacterial DNA in samples such as feed, spices and sample material from digesters. For 42 primers, mismatches to the sequence of chloroplasts and mitochondria of plants were evaluated. Six primer pairs were further analyzed with regard to the question whether they anneal to DNA of archaea, animal tissue and fungi. Subsequently they were tested with sample matrix such as plants, feed, feces, soil and environmental samples. To this purpose, the target DNA in the samples was quantified by qPCR. The PCR products of plant and feed samples were further processed for the Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism method followed by sequence analysis. The sequencing results revealed that primer pair 335F/769R amplified only bacterial DNA in samples such as plants and animal feed, in which the DNA of plants prevailed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of human blood plasma cell-free DNA fragment size distribution using EvaGreen chemistry based droplet digital PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, M Rohan; Jiang, Chao; Krzyzanowski, Gary D; Ryan, Wayne L

    2018-04-12

    Plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) fragment size distribution provides important information required for diagnostic assay development. We have developed and optimized droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays that quantify short and long DNA fragments. These assays were used to analyze plasma cfDNA fragment size distribution in human blood. Assays were designed to amplify 76,135, 490 and 905 base pair fragments of human β-actin gene. These assays were used for fragment size analysis of plasma cell-free, exosome and apoptotic body DNA obtained from normal and pregnant donors. The relative percentages for 76, 135, 490 and 905 bp fragments from non-pregnant plasma and exosome DNA were 100%, 39%, 18%, 5.6% and 100%, 40%, 18%,3.3%, respectively. The relative percentages for pregnant plasma and exosome DNA were 100%, 34%, 14%, 23%, and 100%, 30%, 12%, 18%, respectively. The relative percentages for non-pregnant plasma pellet (obtained after 2nd centrifugation step) were 100%, 100%, 87% and 83%, respectively. Non-pregnant Plasma cell-free and exosome DNA share a unique fragment distribution pattern which is different from pregnant donor plasma and exosome DNA fragment distribution indicating the effect of physiological status on cfDNA fragment size distribution. Fragment distribution pattern for plasma pellet that includes apoptotic bodies and nuclear DNA was greatly different from plasma cell-free and exosome DNA. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermodynamic stability of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs in the presence of histone H3-mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Smritimoy; Nakamura, Kaori; Usui, Kenji; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Saxena, Sarika; Matsui, Jun; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2011-03-14

    We found that Hoogsteen base pairs were stabilized by molecular crowding and a histone H3-mimicking peptide, which was not observed for Watson-Crick base pairs. Our findings demonstrate that the type of DNA base pair is critical for the interaction between DNA and histones.

  16. Release of 3-methyladenine from linker and core DNA of chromatin by a purified DNA glycosylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.P.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Oligonucleosomes were isolated from [ 14 C]thymidine-labeled HeLa cells by digestion of the nuclei with micrococcal nuclease and were then alkylated with [ 3 H]methylnitrosourea. Nucleosome core particles were also prepared by further digestion of the oligonucleosomes. The distribution of 3 H-labeled methyl groups in the linker versus the core DNA was established by a determination of 3 H: 14 C ratios in oligonucleosome and core DNA. The ratios in the core DNA of 145 and 165 base pair DNA fragments were 5.2 and 5.4, respectively, while the ratio in the oligonucleosomal DNA was 8.2. Assuming an equal mixture (as determined) of 145 and 165 base pair fragments of DNA in the 185 base pair repeat, the relative concentration of 3 H methyl groups in the linker versus the core DNA was 4.2. Thus, 45% of the 3 H methyl groups were in the linker DNA, and 55% were in the core DNA. Some shielding of the DNA was evident during alkylation. The concentrations of alkyl groups on the linker and core DNA were 67 and 12% of that found on free DNA alkylated under comparable conditions. No evidence for preferential shielding of the major or minor groove was observed. The purified 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I of Escherichia coli released approximately 37% of the 3-methyladenine from the linker DNA and 13% from the core DNA. The limited enzymatic removal of 3-methyladenine in vitro compared to the efficient removal in vivo suggests that conformational changes of the oligonucleosome and core structure must occur for total repair

  17. DNA-repair measurements by use of the modified comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Ersson, Clara; Riso, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of DNA-repair activity by extracts from cells or tissues by means of the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has a high potential to become widely used in biomonitoring studies. We assessed the inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA-repair activity...... on substrate cells that had been incubated with Ro19-8022 plus light to generate oxidatively damaged DNA. Eight laboratories assessed the DNA-repair activity of three cell lines (i.e. one epithelial and two fibroblast cell lines), starting with cell pellets or with cell extracts provided by the coordinating...... laboratory. There was a large inter-laboratory variation, as evidenced by the range in the mean level of repair incisions between the laboratory with the lowest (0.002incisions/10(6)bp) and highest (0.988incisions/10(6)bp) incision activity. Nevertheless, six out of eight laboratories reported the same cell...

  18. Dynamic DNA devices and assemblies formed by shape-complementary, non-base pairing 3D components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Thomas; Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Neuner, Andrea M.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that discrete three-dimensional (3D) DNA components can specifically self-assemble in solution on the basis of shape-complementarity and without base pairing. Using this principle, we produced homo- and heteromultimeric objects, including micrometer-scale one- and two-stranded filaments and lattices, as well as reconfigurable devices, including an actuator, a switchable gear, an unfoldable nanobook, and a nanorobot. These multidomain assemblies were stabilized via short-ranged nucleobase stacking bonds that compete against electrostatic repulsion between the components’ interfaces. Using imaging by electron microscopy, ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility analysis, we show that the balance between attractive and repulsive interactions, and thus the conformation of the assemblies, may be finely controlled by global parameters such as cation concentration or temperature and by an allosteric mechanism based on strand-displacement reactions.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrede, Joanna E; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins...... structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.......06, 0.95; P DNA copy number within twin pairs. Thus every 1-minute decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated...

  20. A Tandemly Arranged Pattern of Two 5S rDNA Arrays in Amolops mantzorum (Anura, Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Song, Menghuan; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to extend the knowledge of the 5S rDNA organization in anurans, the 5S rDNA sequences of Amolops mantzorum were isolated, characterized, and mapped by FISH. Two forms of 5S rDNA, type I (209 bp) and type II (about 870 bp), were found in specimens investigated from various populations. Both of them contained a 118-bp coding sequence, readily differentiated by their non-transcribed spacer (NTS) sizes and compositions. Four probes (the 5S rDNA coding sequences, the type I NTS, the type II NTS, and the entire type II 5S rDNA sequences) were respectively labeled with TAMRA or digoxigenin to hybridize with mitotic chromosomes for samples of all localities. It turned out that all probes showed the same signals that appeared in every centromeric region and in the telomeric regions of chromosome 5, without differences within or between populations. Obviously, both type I and type II of the 5S rDNA arrays arranged in tandem, which was contrasting with other frogs or fishes recorded to date. More interestingly, all the probes detected centromeric regions in all karyotypes, suggesting the presence of a satellite DNA family derived from 5S rDNA. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Proton tunneling in the A∙T Watson-Crick DNA base pair: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    The results and conclusions reached by Godbeer et al. in their recent work, that proton tunneling in the A∙T(WC) Watson-Crick (WC) DNA base pair occurs according to the Löwdin's (L) model, but with a small (~10(-9)) probability were critically analyzed. Here, it was shown that this finding overestimates the possibility of the proton tunneling at the A∙T(WC)↔A*∙T*(L) tautomerization, because this process cannot be implemented as a chemical reaction. Furthermore, it was outlined those biologically important nucleobase mispairs (A∙A*↔A*∙A, G∙G*↔G*∙G, T∙T*↔T*∙T, C∙C*↔C*∙C, H∙H*↔H*∙H (H - hypoxanthine)) - the players in the field of the spontaneous point mutagenesis - where the tunneling of protons is expected and for which the application of the model proposed by Godbeer et al. can be productive.

  2. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  3. HPLC-UV, MALDI-TOF-MS and ESI-MS/MS analysis of the mechlorethamine DNA crosslink at a cytosine-cytosine mismatch pair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornchai Rojsitthisak

    Full Text Available Mechlorethamine [ClCH(2CH(2N(CH(3CH(2CH(2Cl], a nitrogen mustard alkylating agent, has been proven to form a DNA interstrand crosslink at a cytosine-cytosine (C-C mismatch pair using gel electrophoresis. However, the atomic connectivity of this unusual crosslink is unknown.HPLC-UV, MALDI-TOF-MS, and ESI-MS/MS were used to determine the atomic connectivity of the DNA C-C crosslink formed by mechlorethamine, MALDI-TOF-MS of the HPLC-purified reaction product of mechlorethamine with the DNA duplex d[CTCACACCGTGGTTC]•d[GAACCACCGTGTGAG] (underlined bases are a C-C mismatch pair indicated formation of an interstrand crosslink at m/z 9222.088 [M-2H+Na](+. Following enzymatic digestion of the crosslinked duplex by snake venom phosphodiesterase and calf intestinal phosphatase, ESI-MS/MS indicated the presence of dC-mech-dC [mech = CH(2CH(2N(CH(3CH(2CH(2] at m/z 269.2 [M](2+ (expected m/z 269.6, exact mass 539.27 and its hydrolytic product dC-mech-OH at m/z 329.6 [M](+ (expected m/z 329.2. Fragmentation of dC-mech-dC gave product ions at m/z 294.3 and 236.9 [M](+, which are both due to loss of the 4-amino group of cytosine (as ammonia, in addition to dC and dC+HN(CH(3CH = CH(2, respectively. The presence of m/z 269.2 [M](2+ and loss of ammonia exclude crosslink formation at cytosine N(4 or O(2 and indicate crosslinking through cytosine N(3 with formation of two quaternary ammonium ions.Our results provide an important addition to the literature, as the first example of the use of HPLC and MS for analysis of a DNA adduct at the N(3 position of cytosine.

  4. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Venigalla B.; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead’s portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL’s N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage φ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  5. Tandemly repeated sequence in 5'end of mtDNA control region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extensive length variability was observed in 5' end sequence of the mitochondrial DNA control region of the Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius). This length variability was due to the presence of varying numbers of a 56-bp tandemly repeated sequence and a 46-bp insertion/deletion (indel).

  6. A Damage-Independent Role for 53BP1 that Impacts Break Order and Igh Architecture during Class Switch Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Fu, Yi; Kim, JungHyun; Luo, Vincent M; Aljoufi, Arafat; Swanzey, Emily; Pasquarella, Alessandra; Balestrini, Alessia; Miraldi, Emily R; Bonneau, Richard; Petrini, John; Schotta, Gunnar; Skok, Jane A

    2016-06-28

    During class switch recombination (CSR), B cells replace the Igh Cμ or δ exons with another downstream constant region exon (CH), altering the antibody isotype. CSR occurs through the introduction of AID-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) in switch regions and subsequent ligation of broken ends. Here, we developed an assay to investigate the dynamics of DSB formation in individual cells. We demonstrate that the upstream switch region Sμ is first targeted during recombination and that the mechanism underlying this control relies on 53BP1. Surprisingly, regulation of break order occurs through residual binding of 53BP1 to chromatin before the introduction of damage and independent of its established role in DNA repair. Using chromosome conformation capture, we show that 53BP1 mediates changes in chromatin architecture that affect break order. Finally, our results explain how changes in Igh architecture in the absence of 53BP1 could promote inversional rearrangements that compromise CSR. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tunneling in BP-MoS2 heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochi; Qu, Deshun; Kim, Changsik; Ahmed, Faisal; Yoo, Won Jong

    Tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) is considered to be a leading option for achieving SS mV/dec. In this work, black phosphorus (BP) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) heterojunction devices are fabricated. We find that thin BP flake and MoS2 form normal p-n junctions, tunneling phenomena can be observed when BP thickness increases to certain level. PEO:CsClO4 is applied on the surface of the device together with a side gate electrode patterned together with source and drain electrodes. The Fermi level of MoS2 on top of BP layer can be modulated by the side gating, and this enables to vary the MoS2-BP tunnel diode property from off-state to on-state. Since tunneling is the working mechanism of MoS2-BP junction, and PEO:CsClO4\\ possesses ultra high dielectric constant and small equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), a low SS of 55 mV/dec is obtained from MoS2-BP TFET. This work was supported by the Global Research Laboratory and Global Frontier R&D Programs at the Center for Hybrid Interface Materials, both funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning via the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF).

  8. Accuracy of the WatchBP office ABI device for office blood pressure measurement over a wide range of arm sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatini, Paolo; Fania, Claudio; Gasparotti, Federica

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the WatchBP Office ABI monitor for office blood pressure measurement over a wide range of arm circumferences using the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 protocol. The device accuracy was tested in 88 participants whose mean±SD age was 54.5±17.6 years, whose arm circumference was 30.6±8.3 cm (range: 15-46 cm), and whose entry blood pressure (BP) was 138.3±23.4 mmHg for systolic and 83.7±14.6 mmHg for diastolic BP. Four cuffs (small, standard, large, and extra-large) suitable for arm circumferences ranging from 14.0 to 52.0 cm were used. The mean device-observer difference in the 264 separate BP data pairs was 0.7±3.8 mmHg for systolic BP and was 0.0±3.7 mmHg for diastolic BP. These data were in agreement with criterion 1 of the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 standard requirements (≤5±8 mmHg). Moreover, criterion 2 was satisfied, the mean±SD device-observer difference of the 88 participants being 0.7±3.1 and 0.0±3.2 mmHg, respectively, for systolic and diastolic BP. Good agreement between observer and device was present across the whole range of arm circumferences. These data show that the Microlife WatchBP Office ABI monitor satisfied the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 standard requirements across a wide range of arm sizes.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the α and the α' subunits of casein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two α or α' subunits (or one of each) and two β subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell λgt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5' untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3' untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5' untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3' untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of α and α' subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the α and α' subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II (α and α') and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human

  10. DNA amplification fingerprinting using 10 x polymerase chain reaction buffer with ammonium sulfate for human identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baransel, Asyun; Dugler, Hikmat E.; Tokdemir, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - based DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) or randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) is based on a strategy using a single arbitrary oligonucleotide primer to generate anonymous amplification of genomic DNA. On this basic strategy, in this study, we aimed to test individual differences and usefulness of 2 basic primers (5-CGCGCCGG-3 and 5-TGCCGAGCTG-3) and examined whether there is a positive effect on results of 10 x PCR buffer with ammonium sulfate. A new approach in DNA fingerprinting, 10 x PCR buffer with ammonium sulfate, is presented in the study. Primers with single 8 and 10 nucleotides in length and 2 different PCR buffers with or without ammonium sulfate were used to identify 135 volunteers with no blood relationship. This study was carried out at the Pharmacology Laboratory, University of Gaziantep, School of Medicine, Turkey between 1999 and 2000. An average of 10 major bands representing 500-1500 base pair (bp) in length was determined as amplified DNA products on standard agarose gels for these volunteers. The use of ammonium sulfate in 10 x PCR buffers has increased to 92% success ratio of individual difference obtained from the 8 nucleotides primer. With this study, more reliable results can be obtained by using ammonium sulfate in 10 x PCR buffers. (author)

  11. Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Krishna B; Courtney, Deborah; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M; Relan, Vandana; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Windsor, Morgan N; Matar, Kevin S; Naidoo, Rishendran; Passmore, Linda; McCaul, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE) is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE. We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index)] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA. Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas) and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p<0.001). Cytology had a sensitivity of 55% in diagnosing MPE. If cytology and pleural fluid DNA integrity index were considered together, they exhibited 81% sensitivity and 87% specificity in distinguishing benign and malignant effusions. In cytology-negative pleural effusions (35 MPE and 28 benign effusions), elevated pleural fluid DNA integrity index had an 81% positive predictive value in detecting MPEs. In the detection of mesothelioma, at a specificity of 90%, pleural fluid DNA integrity index had similar sensitivity to pleural fluid and serum mesothelin (75% each respectively). Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice

  12. Determination of size distribution of small DNA fragments by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1998-01-01

    Size distribution determination of DNA fragments can be normally determined by the agarose gel electrophoresis, including the normal DNA banding pattern analysis. However this method is only good for large DNA, such as the DNA of the size of kilo base pairs to mega base pairs range. DNA of size less than kilo base pairs is difficult to be quantified by the agarose gel method. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis however can be used to measure the quantity of DNA fragments of size less than kilo base pairs in length, down to less than ten base pairs. This method is good for determining the quantity of the smaller size DNA, single stranded polymers or even some proteins, if the known standards are available. In this report detail description of the method of preparing the polyacrylamide gel, and the experimental set up is discussed. Possible uses of this method, and the comparison with the standard sizes of DNA is also shown. This method is used to determine the distribution of the amount of the fragmented DNA after the Calf-thymus DNA has been exposed to various types of radiation and of different doses. The standards were used to determine the sizes of the fragmented Calf-thymus DNA. The higher the dose the higher is the amount of the smaller size DNA measured

  13. A magnetic bead-based method for concentrating DNA from human urine for downstream detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, PCR cannot be used directly on most clinical samples, including human urine, without pre-treatment. A magnetic bead-based strategy is one potential method to collect biomarkers from urine samples and separate the biomarkers from PCR inhibitors. In this report, a 1 mL urine sample was mixed within the bulb of a transfer pipette containing lyophilized nucleic acid-silica adsorption buffer and silica-coated magnetic beads. After mixing, the sample was transferred from the pipette bulb to a small diameter tube, and captured biomarkers were concentrated using magnetic entrainment of beads through pre-arrayed wash solutions separated by small air gaps. Feasibility was tested using synthetic segments of the 140 bp tuberculosis IS6110 DNA sequence spiked into pooled human urine samples. DNA recovery was evaluated by qPCR. Despite the presence of spiked DNA, no DNA was detectable in unextracted urine samples, presumably due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. However, following extraction with the magnetic bead-based method, we found that ∼50% of spiked TB DNA was recovered from human urine containing roughly 5×10(3 to 5×10(8 copies of IS6110 DNA. In addition, the DNA was concentrated approximately ten-fold into water. The final concentration of DNA in the eluate was 5×10(6, 14×10(6, and 8×10(6 copies/µL for 1, 3, and 5 mL urine samples, respectively. Lyophilized and freshly prepared reagents within the transfer pipette produced similar results, suggesting that long-term storage without refrigeration is possible. DNA recovery increased with the length of the spiked DNA segments from 10±0.9% for a 75 bp DNA sequence to 42±4% for a 100 bp segment and 58±9% for a 140 bp segment. The estimated LOD was 77 copies of DNA/µL of urine. The strategy presented here provides a simple means to achieve high nucleic acid recovery from easily obtained urine samples, which does not contain inhibitors of PCR.

  14. Localized Movement and Levels of 53BP1 Protein Are Changed by gamma-irradiation in PML Deficient Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Malyšková, B.; Kuntziger, T.; Collas, P.; Cmarko, D.; Raška, I.; Sorokin, D.V.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 11 (2016), s. 2583-2596 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR GA13-07822S; GA MŠk 7F14369 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA REPAIR * 53BP1 PROTEIN * PML BODIES Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.085, year: 2016

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Joanna E; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Academic clinical research center. 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a "normal" (7-9 h/24) and "short" (sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Insights into Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen breathing dynamics and damage repair from the solution structure and dynamic ensemble of DNA duplexes containing m1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Shi, Honglue; Zhou, Huiqing; Xue, Yi; Rangadurai, Atul; Merriman, Dawn K; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2017-05-19

    In the canonical DNA double helix, Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs (bps) exist in dynamic equilibrium with sparsely populated (∼0.02-0.4%) and short-lived (lifetimes ∼0.2-2.5 ms) Hoogsteen (HG) bps. To gain insights into transient HG bps, we used solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including measurements of residual dipolar couplings and molecular dynamics simulations, to examine how a single HG bp trapped using the N1-methylated adenine (m1A) lesion affects the structural and dynamic properties of two duplexes. The solution structure and dynamic ensembles of the duplexes reveals that in both cases, m1A forms a m1A•T HG bp, which is accompanied by local and global structural and dynamic perturbations in the double helix. These include a bias toward the BI backbone conformation; sugar repuckering, major-groove directed kinking (∼9°); and local melting of neighboring WC bps. These results provide atomic insights into WC/HG breathing dynamics in unmodified DNA duplexes as well as identify structural and dynamic signatures that could play roles in m1A recognition and repair. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  18. Improving enrichment of circulating fetal DNA for genetic testing: size fractionation followed by whole gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgez, Carolina J; Bischoff, Farideh Z

    2009-01-01

    Among the pitfalls of using cell-free fetal DNA in plasma for prenatal diagnosis is quality of the recovered DNA fragments and concomitant presence of maternal DNA (>95%). Our objective is to provide alternative methods for achieving enrichment and high-quality fetal DNA from plasma. Cell-free DNA from 31 pregnant women and 18 controls (10 males and 8 females) were size separated using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA fragments of 100-300, 500-700 and 1,500-2,000 bp were excised and extracted, followed by whole genome amplification (WGA) of recovered fragments. Levels of beta-globin and DYS1 were measured. Distribution of beta-globin size fragments was similar among pregnant women and controls. Among control male cases, distribution of size fragments was the same for both beta-globin and DYS1. Among maternal cases confirmed to be male, the smallest size fragment (100-300 bp) accounted for nearly 50% (39.76 +/- 17.55%) of the recovered DYS1-DNA (fetal) and only 10% (10.40 +/- 6.49%) of beta-globin (total) DNA. After WGA of plasma fragments from pregnant women, DYS1 sequence amplification was best observed when using the 100-300 bp fragments as template. Combination of electrophoresis for size separation and WGA led to enriched fetal DNA from plasma. This novel combination of strategies is more likely to permit universal clinical applications of cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. BP180 dysfunction triggers spontaneous skin inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Hwang, Bin-Jin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Ning; Lough, Kendall; Williams, Scott E; Chen, Jinbo; Burette, Susan W; Diaz, Luis A; Su, Maureen A; Xiao, Shengxiang; Liu, Zhi

    2018-06-04

    BP180, also known as collagen XVII, is a hemidesmosomal component and plays a key role in maintaining skin dermal/epidermal adhesion. Dysfunction of BP180, either through genetic mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or autoantibody insult in bullous pemphigoid (BP), leads to subepidermal blistering accompanied by skin inflammation. However, whether BP180 is involved in skin inflammation remains unknown. To address this question, we generated a BP180-dysfunctional mouse strain and found that mice lacking functional BP180 (termed Δ NC16A ) developed spontaneous skin inflammatory disease, characterized by severe itch, defective skin barrier, infiltrating immune cells, elevated serum IgE levels, and increased expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Severe itch is independent of adaptive immunity and histamine, but dependent on increased expression of TSLP by keratinocytes. In addition, a high TSLP expression is detected in BP patients. Our data provide direct evidence showing that BP180 regulates skin inflammation independently of adaptive immunity, and BP180 dysfunction leads to a TSLP-mediated itch. The newly developed mouse strain could be a model for elucidation of disease mechanisms and development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin inflammation and BP180-related skin conditions.

  20. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  1. Mitochondrial DNA variation, but not nuclear DNA, sharply divides morphologically identical chameleons along an ancient geographic barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Bar Yaacov

    Full Text Available The Levant is an important migration bridge, harboring border-zones between Afrotropical and palearctic species. Accordingly, Chameleo chameleon, a common species throughout the Mediterranean basin, is morphologically divided in the southern Levant (Israel into two subspecies, Chamaeleo chamaeleon recticrista (CCR and C. c. musae (CCM. CCR mostly inhabits the Mediterranean climate (northern Israel, while CCM inhabits the sands of the north-western Negev Desert (southern Israel. AFLP analysis of 94 geographically well dispersed specimens indicated moderate genetic differentiation (PhiPT = 0.097, consistent with the classical division into the two subspecies, CCR and CCM. In contrast, sequence analysis of a 637 bp coding mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA fragment revealed two distinct phylogenetic clusters which were not consistent with the morphological division: one mtDNA cluster consisted of CCR specimens collected in regions northern of the Jezreel Valley and another mtDNA cluster harboring specimens pertaining to both the CCR and CCM subspecies but collected southern of the Jezreel Valley. AMOVA indicated clear mtDNA differentiation between specimens collected northern and southern to the Jezreel Valley (PhiPT = 0.79, which was further supported by a very low coalescent-based estimate of effective migration rates. Whole chameleon mtDNA sequencing (∼17,400 bp generated from 11 well dispersed geographic locations revealed 325 mutations sharply differentiating the two mtDNA clusters, suggesting a long allopatric history further supported by BEAST. This separation correlated temporally with the existence of an at least 1 million year old marine barrier at the Jezreel Valley exactly where the mtDNA clusters meet. We discuss possible involvement of gender-dependent life history differences in maintaining such mtDNA genetic differentiation and suggest that it reflects (ancient local adaptation to mitochondrial-related traits.

  2. Nucleoporin NUP153 guards genome integrity by promoting nuclear import of 53BP1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moudrý, Pavel; Lukas, C.; Macůrek, Libor; Neumann, B.; Heriche, J.K.; Pepperkok, R.; Ellenberg, J.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukas, J.; Bartek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2012), s. 798-807 ISSN 1350-9047 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353; GA ČR GAP301/10/1525; GA ČR GPP305/10/P420 Grant - others:7.RP EU(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * NUP153 * 53BP1 nuclear import Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.371, year: 2012

  3. Lack of Association between Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH 19-bp Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Risk of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour shakiba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Interaction between genetic and environmental factors is considered as major factors in Schizophrenia (SCZ. It has been shown that dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission dysfunction play an essential role in the SCZ pathogenesis.This study aimed to find the impact of functional 19-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del polymorphism in dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH gene on SCZ risk in a sample of Iranian population.Method: This case-control study was conducted on 109 SCZ patients and 116 matched healthy subjects. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood cells using salting out method. Genotyping of 19-bp ins/del DBH polymorphism was done using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method.Results: Neither the overall chi-square comparison of cases and controls (

  4. BP - bisnis põhjas? / Erik Aru

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aru, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Seoses Mehhiko lahe naftareostusega ootab BP-d kuni 21 mld. dollari suurune trahv, kahjude hüvitamiseks peab BP müüma osa oma varast. Ekspertide hinnangul tähendavad Mehhiko lahe sündmused suuri muutusi kogu naftaäris

  5. A 50 bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter lowers enzyme expression but is not associated with ALS in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingre, Caroline; Wuolikainen, Anna; Marklund, Stefan L; Birve, Anna; Press, Rayomand; Andersen, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A 50 base pair (bp) deletion of SOD1 has been suggested to reduce transcription and to be associated with later disease onset in ALS. This study was aimed to reveal if the 50 bp deletion influenced SOD1 enzymatic activity, occurrence and phenotype of the disease in a Swedish ALS/control cohort. Blood samples from 512 Swedish ALS patients and 354 Swedish controls without coding SOD1 mutations were analysed for the 50 bp deletion allele. The enzymatic activity of SOD1 in erythrocytes was analysed and genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed. Results demonstrated that the genotype frequencies of the 50 bp deletion were all found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant differences were found for age of onset, disease duration or site of onset. SOD1 enzymatic activity showed a statistically significant decreasing trend in the control group, in which the allele was associated with a 5% reduction in SOD1 activity. The results suggest that the 50 bp deletion has a moderate reducing effect on SOD1 synthesis. No modulating effects, however, were found on ALS onset, phenotype and survival in the Swedish population.

  6. Effect of pyrimido[1,6-a]benzimidazoles, quinolones, and Ca2+ on the DNA gyrase-mediated cleavage reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmünder, H; Kuratli, K; Keck, W

    1995-01-01

    The quinolones inhibit the A subunit of DNA gyrase in the presence of Mg2+ by interrupting the DNA breakage and resealing steps, and the latter step is also retarded without quinolones if Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+. Pyrimido[1,6-a]benzimidazoles have been found to represent a new class of potent DNA gyrase inhibitors which also act at the A subunit. To determine alterations in the DNA sequence specificity of DNA gyrase for cleavage sites in the presence of inhibitors of both classes or in the presence of Ca2+, we used DNA restriction fragments of 164, 85, and 71 bp from the pBR322 plasmid as model substrates. Each contained, at a different position, the 20-bp pBR322 sequence around position 990, where DNA gyrase preferentially cleaves in the presence of quinolones. Our results show that pyrimido[1,6-a]benzimidazoles have a mode of action similar to that of quinolones; they inhibit the resealing step and influence the DNA sequence specificity of DNA gyrase in the same way. Differences between inhibitors of both classes could be observed only in the preferences of DNA gyrase for these cleavage sites. The 20-bp sequence appeared to have some properties that induced DNA gyrase to cleave all three DNA fragments in the presence of inhibitors within this sequence, whereas cleavage in the presence of Ca2+ was in addition dependent on the length of the DNA fragments. PMID:7695300

  7. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. ► A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after γ-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of γH2AX foci after γ-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of γH2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after γ-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the number of 53BP1 foci compared with wild-type cells. These results suggest that low level of DNA-PK activity causes aberrant DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation

  8. Multivalent display of the antimicrobial peptides BP100 and BP143

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imma Güell

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are considered as promising templates for the display of multiple copies of antimicrobial peptides. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of chimeric structures containing two or four copies of the antimicrobial peptides KKLFKKILKYL-NH2 (BP100 and KKLfKKILKYL-NH2 (BP143 attached to the carbohydrate template cyclodithioerythritol (cDTE or α-D-galactopyranoside (Galp. The synthesis involved the preparation of the corresponding peptide aldehyde followed by coupling to an aminooxy-functionalized carbohydrate template. After purification, the multivalent display systems were obtained in high purities (90–98% and in good yields (42–64%. These compounds were tested against plant and human pathogenic bacteria and screened for their cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells. They showed lower MIC values than the parent peptides against the bacteria analyzed. In particular, the carbopeptides derived from cDTE and Galp, which contained two or four copies of BP100, respectively, were 2- to 8-fold more active than the monomeric peptide against the phytopathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that preassembling antimicrobial peptides to multimeric structures is not always associated with a significant improvement of the activity. In contrast, the carbopeptides synthesized were active against human red blood cells pointing out that peptide preassembly is critical for the hemolytic activity. Notably, peptide preassembly resulted in an enhanced bactericidal effect.

  9. Detection of Ribosomal DNA Sequence Polymorphisms in the Protist Plasmodiophora brassicae for the Identification of Geographical Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawnak Laila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clubroot is a soil-borne disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae (P. brassicae. It is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica rapa and other cruciferous crops as it can cause remarkable yield reductions. Understanding P. brassicae genetics, and developing efficient molecular markers, is essential for effective detection of harmful races of this pathogen. Samples from 11 Korean field populations of P. brassicae (geographic isolates, collected from nine different locations in South Korea, were used in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the clubroot-infected samples to sequence the ribosomal DNA. Primers and probes for P. brassicae were designed using a ribosomal DNA gene sequence from a Japanese strain available in GenBank (accession number AB526843; isolate NGY. The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequence of P. brassicae, comprising 6932 base pairs (bp, was cloned and sequenced and found to include the small subunits (SSUs and a large subunit (LSU, internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2, and a 5.8s. Sequence variation was observed in both the SSU and LSU. Four markers showed useful differences in high-resolution melting analysis to identify nucleotide polymorphisms including single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, oligonucleotide polymorphisms, and insertions/deletions (InDels. A combination of three markers was able to distinguish the geographical isolates into two groups.

  10. Screening and identification of male-specific DNA fragments in common carps Cyprinus carpio using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Du, Q Y; Yue, Y Y; Dang, B J; Chang, Z J

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a sex subtractive genomic DNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between male and female Cyprinus carpio. Twenty-two clones with distinguishable hybridization signals were selected and sequenced. The specific primers were designed based on the sequence data. Those primers were then used to amplify the sex-specific fragments from the genomic DNA of male and female carp. The amplified fragments from two clones showed specificity to males but not to females, which were named as Ccmf2 [387 base pairs (bp)] and Ccmf3 (183 bp), respectively. The sex-specific pattern was analysed in a total of 40 individuals from three other different C. carpio. stocks and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella using Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 as dot-blotting probes. The results revealed that the molecular diversity exists on the Y chromosome of C. carpio. No hybridization signals, however, were detected from individuals of C. idella, suggesting that the two sequences are specific to C. carpio. No significant homologous sequences of Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 were found in GenBank. Therefore, it was interpreted that the results as that Ccmf2 and Ccmf3 are two novel male-specific sequences; and both fragments could be used as markers to rapidly and accurately identify the genetic sex of part of C. carpio. This may provide a very efficient selective tool for practically breeding monosex female populations in aquacultural production.

  11. Effect of Green Tea Catechins and Hydrolyzable Tannins on Benzo[a]pyrene-Induced DNA Adducts and Structure–Activity Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Pengxiao; Cai, Jian; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2010-01-01

    Green tea catechins and hydrolyzable tannins are gaining increasing attention as chemopreventive agents. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four green tea catechins and two hydrolyzable tannins on microsome-induced benzo[a]pyrene (BP)–DNA adducts and the possible structure–activity relationship. BP (1 μM) was incubated with rat liver microsomes and DNA in the presence of the test compound (1–200 μM) or vehicle. The purified DNA was analyzed...

  12. Effects of Circular DNA Length on Transfection Efficiency by Electroporation into HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Benjamin D; Roman, Dany; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M; Engevik, Melinda A; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce extremely small and circular supercoiled vectors has opened new territory for improving non-viral gene therapy vectors. In this work, we compared transfection of supercoiled DNA vectors ranging from 383 to 4,548 bp, each encoding shRNA against GFP under control of the H1 promoter. We assessed knockdown of GFP by electroporation into HeLa cells. All of our vectors entered cells in comparable numbers when electroporated with equal moles of DNA. Despite similar cell entry, we found length-dependent differences in how efficiently the vectors knocked down GFP. As vector length increased up to 1,869 bp, GFP knockdown efficiency per mole of transfected DNA increased. From 1,869 to 4,257 bp, GFP knockdown efficiency per mole was steady, then decreased with increasing vector length. In comparing GFP knockdown with equal masses of vectors, we found that the shorter vectors transfect more efficiently per nanogram of DNA transfected. Our results rule out cell entry and DNA mass as determining factors for gene knockdown efficiency via electroporation. The length-dependent effects we have uncovered are likely explained by differences in nuclear translocation or transcription. These data add an important step towards clinical applications of non-viral vector delivery.

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Middle Pleistocene cave bear reconstructed from ultrashort DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Jesse; Knapp, Michael; Glocke, Isabelle; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Weihmann, Antje; Nickel, Birgit; Valdiosera, Cristina; García, Nuria; Pääbo, Svante; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Meyer, Matthias

    2013-09-24

    Although an inverse relationship is expected in ancient DNA samples between the number of surviving DNA fragments and their length, ancient DNA sequencing libraries are strikingly deficient in molecules shorter than 40 bp. We find that a loss of short molecules can occur during DNA extraction and present an improved silica-based extraction protocol that enables their efficient retrieval. In combination with single-stranded DNA library preparation, this method enabled us to reconstruct the mitochondrial genome sequence from a Middle Pleistocene cave bear (Ursus deningeri) bone excavated at Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that the U. deningeri sequence forms an early diverging sister lineage to all Western European Late Pleistocene cave bears. Our results prove that authentic ancient DNA can be preserved for hundreds of thousand years outside of permafrost. Moreover, the techniques presented enable the retrieval of phylogenetically informative sequences from samples in which virtually all DNA is diminished to fragments shorter than 50 bp.

  14. A novel 5-bp deletion in Clarin 1 in a family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoury, Elie; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Mégarbané, André; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2011-11-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Lebanese family with two sibs diagnosed with Usher Syndrome. Exome capture and sequencing were performed on DNA from one affected member using Agilent in solution bead capture, followed by Illumina sequencing. This analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous 5-bp deletion, in Clarin 1 (CLRN1), a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III. The deletion is inherited from both parents and segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. The 5-bp deletion, c.301_305delGTCAT, p.Val101SerfsX27, is predicted to result in a frameshift and protein truncation after 27 amino acids. Sequencing all the coding regions of the CLRN1 gene in the proband did not reveal any other mutation or variant. Here we describe a novel deletion in CLRN1. Our data support previously reported intra familial variability in the clinical features of Usher syndrome type I and III.

  15. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    DNA). Especially the advance in DNA sequencing technology has revolutionized this field and opened new frontiers in ecology, evolution and environmental sciences. Also, it is becoming a powerful tool for field biologist, with new and efficient methods for monitoring biodiversity. This thesis focuses on the use...... of eDNA in monitoring of biodiversity in different settings. First, it is shown that a diversity of rare freshwater animals – representing amphibians, fish, mammals, insects and crustaceans – can be detected based on eDNA obtained directly from 15 ml water samples of lakes, ponds and streams...... setting, showing that eDNA obtained directly from ½ l seawater samples can account for marine fish biodiversity using NGS. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than any of 9 methods, conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Additionally, it is shown that even short 100-bp. fish e...

  16. Ten helical twist angles of B-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabsch, W; Sander, C; Trifonov, E N

    1982-01-01

    On the assumption that the twist angles between adjacent base-pairs in the DNA molecule are additive a linear system of 40 equations was derived from experimental measurements of the total twist angles for different pieces of DNA of known sequences. This system of equations is found to be statistically consistent providing a solution for all ten possible twist angles of B-DNA by a least squares fitting procedure. Four of the calculated twist angles were not known before. The other six twist angles calculated are very close to the experimentally measured ones. The data used were obtained by the electrophoretic band-shift method, crystallography and nuclease digestion of DNA adsorbed to mica or Ca-phosphate surface. The validity of the principle of additivity of the twist angles implies that the angle between any particular two base-pairs is a function of only these base-pairs, independent of nearest neighbors.

  17. BP report of the business year 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a survey about the development of the energy- and petroleum market during the year 1979. A commentary of the German BP A.G. and its activities is given here: personnel- and management policy, exploration, supply, refining and distribution, investigation, and development. After a survey about the business situation of the German BP A.G. the detailed annual balance sheets of 1979 of the German BP and of the whole enterprise are given.

  18. Allelic association, DNA resequencing and copy number variation at the metabotropic glutamate receptor GRM7 gene locus in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; McQuillin, Andrew; Curtis, David; Gurling, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Genetic markers at the GRM7 gene have shown allelic association with bipolar disorder (BP) in several case-control samples including our own sample. In this report, we present results of resequencing the GRM7 gene in 32 bipolar samples and 32 random controls selected from 553 bipolar cases and 547 control samples (UCL1). Novel and potential etiological base pair changes discovered by resequencing were genotyped in the entire UCL case-control sample. We also report on the association between GRM7 and BP in a second sample of 593 patients and 642 controls (UCL2). The three most significantly associated SNPs in the original UCL1 BP GWAS sample were genotyped in the UCL2 sample, of which none were associated. After combining the genotype data for the two samples only two (rs1508724 and rs6769814) of the original three SNP markers remained significantly associated with BP. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in three cases which were absent in control subjects. A 3'-UTR SNP rs56173829 was found to be significantly associated with BP in the whole UCL sample (P = 0.035; OR = 0.482), the rare allele being less common in cases compared to controls. Bioinformatic analyses predicted a change in the centroid secondary structure of RNA and alterations in the miRNA binding sites for the mutated base of rs56173829. We also validated two deletions and a duplication within GRM7 using quantitative-PCR which provides further support for the pre-existing evidence that copy number variants at GRM7 may have a role in the etiology of BP. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Face recognition based on improved BP neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gaili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the recognition rate of face recognition, face recognition algorithm based on histogram equalization, PCA and BP neural network is proposed. First, the face image is preprocessed by histogram equalization. Then, the classical PCA algorithm is used to extract the features of the histogram equalization image, and extract the principal component of the image. And then train the BP neural network using the trained training samples. This improved BP neural network weight adjustment method is used to train the network because the conventional BP algorithm has the disadvantages of slow convergence, easy to fall into local minima and training process. Finally, the BP neural network with the test sample input is trained to classify and identify the face images, and the recognition rate is obtained. Through the use of ORL database face image simulation experiment, the analysis results show that the improved BP neural network face recognition method can effectively improve the recognition rate of face recognition.

  20. Complete chloroplast genome and 45S nrDNA sequences of the medicinal plant species Glycyrrhiza glabra and Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Hyun Oh; Ahn, Byoung Ohg; Won, So Youn; Sohn, Seong-Han; Kim, Jung Sun

    2017-10-06

    Glycyrrhiza uralensis and G. glabra, members of the Fabaceae, are medicinally important species that are native to Asia and Europe. Extracts from these plants are widely used as natural sweeteners because of their much greater sweetness than sucrose. In this study, the three complete chloroplast genomes and five 45S nuclear ribosomal (nr)DNA sequences of these two licorice species and an interspecific hybrid are presented. The chloroplast genomes of G. glabra, G. uralensis and G. glabra × G. uralensis were 127,895 bp, 127,716 bp and 127,939 bp, respectively. The three chloroplast genomes harbored 110 annotated genes, including 76 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. The 45S nrDNA sequences were either 5,947 or 5,948 bp in length. Glycyrrhiza glabra and G. glabra × G. uralensis showed two types of nrDNA, while G. uralensis contained a single type. The complete 45S nrDNA sequence unit contains 18S rRNA, ITS1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2 and 26S rRNA. We identified simple sequence repeat and tandem repeat sequences. We also developed four reliable markers for analysis of Glycyrrhiza diversity authentication.

  1. DNA extraction from dry museum beetles without conferring external morphological damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Moore, Wendy; Melchior, Linea

    2007-01-01

    undesirable when dealing with rare species or otherwise important specimens, such as type specimens. METHODOLOGY: We describe a method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from dry insects without causing external morphological damage. Using PCR to amplify approximately 220 bp...... of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I, and 250-345 bp fragments of the multi-copy, nuclear 28s ribosomal DNA gene, we demonstrate the efficacy of this method on beetles collected up to 50 years ago. CONCLUSIONS: This method offers a means of obtaining useful genetic information from rare insects without...... conferring external morphological damage. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  2. Microdeletion/microduplication of proximal 15q11.2 between BP1 and BP2: a susceptibility region for neurological dysfunction including developmental and language delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Rachel D; Pasion, Romela; Mikhail, Fady M; Carroll, Andrew J; Robin, Nathaniel H; Youngs, Erin L; Gadi, Inder K; Keitges, Elizabeth; Jaswaney, Vikram L; Papenhausen, Peter R; Potluri, Venkateswara R; Risheg, Hiba; Rush, Brooke; Smith, Janice L; Schwartz, Stuart; Tepperberg, James H; Butler, Merlin G

    2011-10-01

    The proximal long arm of chromosome 15 has segmental duplications located at breakpoints BP1-BP5 that mediate the generation of NAHR-related microdeletions and microduplications. The classical Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome deletion is flanked by either of the proximal BP1 or BP2 breakpoints and the distal BP3 breakpoint. The larger Type I deletions are flanked by BP1 and BP3 in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome subjects. Those with this deletion are reported to have a more severe phenotype than individuals with either Type II deletions (BP2-BP3) or uniparental disomy 15. The BP1-BP2 region spans approximately 500 kb and contains four evolutionarily conserved genes that are not imprinted. Reports of mutations or disturbed expression of these genes appear to impact behavioral and neurological function in affected individuals. Recently, reports of deletions and duplications flanked by BP1 and BP2 suggest an association with speech and motor delays, behavioral problems, seizures, and autism. We present a large cohort of subjects with copy number alteration of BP1 to BP2 with common phenotypic features. These include autism, developmental delay, motor and language delays, and behavioral problems, which were present in both cytogenetic groups. Parental studies demonstrated phenotypically normal carriers in several instances, and mildly affected carriers in others, complicating phenotypic association and/or causality. Possible explanations for these results include reduced penetrance, altered gene dosage on a particular genetic background, or a susceptibility region as reported for other areas of the genome implicated in autism and behavior disturbances.

  3. Determination of h2JNN and h1JHN coupling constants across Watson-Crick base pairs in the Antennapedia homeodomain-DNA complex using TROSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, Konstantin; Fernandez, Cesar; Riek, Roland; Ono, Akira; Kainosho, Masatsune; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes NMR measurements of 15 N- 15 N and 1 H- 15 N scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs, h2 J NN and h1 J HN , in a 17 kDa Antennapedia homeodomain-DNA complex. A new NMR experiment is introduced which relies on zero-quantum coherence-based transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (ZQ-TROSY) and enables measurements of h1 J HN couplings in larger molecules. The h2 J NN and h1 J HN couplings open a new avenue for comparative studies of DNA duplexes and other forms of nucleic acids free in solution and in complexes with proteins, drugs or possibly other classes of compounds

  4. Profile of NF-κBp(65/NFκBp50) among prostate specific antigen sera levels in prostatic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraoui, Y; Ben Jemaa, A; Rodriguez, G; Ben Rais, N; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R; Sellemi, S; Royuela, M; Oueslati, R

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise the immunoexpression of NF-κB (p50/p65) in human prostatic pathologies and to study its profiles of activation among sera prostate specific antigen antigen (PSA) according the three groups: 0-4ng/mL, 4-20ng/mL and >20ng/mL. Twenty-four men with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); 19 men with prostate cancer (PC) and five men with normal prostates (NP). Immunohistochemical and western blot analysis was performed. Serum levels of PSA were assayed by immulite autoanalyser. In BPH and PC samples, immunoexpressions were observed for NF-κBp65 and NF-κBp50; while in NP samples, only were detected NF-κBp50. PC samples showed immunoreactions to NF-κBp65 and NF-κBp50 more intense (respectively 24.18±0.67 and 28.23±2.01) than that observed in BPH samples (respectively18.46±2.04 and 18.66±1.59) with special localisation in the nucleus. Different profiles of NF-κBp65 immunoexpressions were observed and BPH patients with sera PSA levels between 0-4ng/mL presented a significant weak percentage compared to BPH patients with sera PSA levels between 4-20ng/mL and >20ng/mL. No immunoreactions to NF-κBp65 were observed in PC patients with sera PSA levels between 4-20ng/mL. The sensibility of both NF-κB and PSA to inflammation allowed confirming the relationship between these two molecules and its involvement in prostatic diseases progression (inflammatory and neoplasic). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-Threaded DNA Tag/Anti-Tag Library Generator for Multi-Core Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    base pair)  Watson ‐ Crick  strand pairs that bind perfectly within pairs, but poorly across pairs. A variety  of  DNA  strand hybridization metrics...AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2009-131 Final Technical Report May 2009 MULTI-THREADED DNA TAG/ANTI-TAG LIBRARY GENERATOR FOR MULTI-CORE PLATFORMS...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jun 08 – Feb 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MULTI-THREADED DNA TAG/ANTI-TAG LIBRARY GENERATOR FOR MULTI-CORE

  6. Variation of DNA damage levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated in different laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Ersson, Clara; Stępnik, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the levels of DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites, as assessed by the comet assay, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy women from five different countries in Europe. The laboratory in each country (referred...... to as 'centre') collected and cryopreserved PBMC samples from three donors, using a standardised cell isolation protocol. The samples were analysed in 13 different laboratories for DNA damage, which is measured by the comet assay. The study aim was to assess variation in DNA damage in PBMC samples that were......%) by standardisation of the primary comet assay endpoint with calibration curve samples. The level of DNA strand breaks in the samples from two of the centres (0.56-0.61 lesions/10(6) bp) was significantly higher compared with the other three centres (0.41-0.45 lesions/10(6) bp). In contrast, there was no difference...

  7. Molecular Dynamics Insights into Polyamine-DNA Binding Modes: Implications for Cross-Link Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Chan, Chen-Hui; Morell, Christophe; Monari, Antonio; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Dumont, Elise

    2017-09-18

    Biogenic polyamines, which play a role in DNA condensation and stabilization, are ubiquitous and are found at millimolar concentration in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. The interaction modes of three polyamines-putrescine (Put), spermine (Spm), and spermidine (Spd)-with a self-complementary 16 base pair (bp) duplex, are investigated by all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics. The length of the amine aliphatic chain leads to a change of the interaction mode from minor groove binding to major groove binding. Through all-atom dynamics, noncovalent interactions that stabilize the polyamine-DNA complex and prefigure the reactivity, leading to the low-barrier formation of deleterious DNA-polyamine cross-links, after one-electron oxidation of a guanine nucleobase, are unraveled. The binding strength is quantified from the obtained trajectories by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area post-processing (MM-GBSA). The values of binding free energies provide the same affinity order, PutDNA-polyamine cross-link formation through the extraction of average approaching distances between the C8 atom of guanines and the ammonium group. These results imply that the formation of DNA-polyamine cross-links involves deprotonation of the guanine radical cation to attack the polyamines, which must be positively charged to lie in the vicinity of the B-helix. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei; Zhou, Hong; Qian, Jun; Xu, Haibin; Shao, Qingsong; Li, Yonghua; Yao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of Dendrobium officinale, an endangered and economically important traditional Chinese medicine, was reported and characterized. The genome size is 152,018 bp, with 37.5% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26,284 bp are separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 84,944 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 14,506 bp). The complete cp DNA contains 83 protein-coding genes, 39 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Fourteen genes contained one or two introns.

  9. 53BP1 and USP28 mediate p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in response to centrosome loss and prolonged mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chii Shyang; Mazo, Gregory; Das, Tuhin; Goodman, Joshua; Kim, Minhee; O'Rourke, Brian P; Izquierdo, Denisse; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2016-07-02

    Mitosis occurs efficiently, but when it is disturbed or delayed, p53-dependent cell death or senescence is often triggered after mitotic exit. To characterize this process, we conducted CRISPR-mediated loss-of-function screens using a cell-based assay in which mitosis is consistently disturbed by centrosome loss. We identified 53BP1 and USP28 as essential components acting upstream of p53, evoking p21-dependent cell cycle arrest in response not only to centrosome loss, but also to other distinct defects causing prolonged mitosis. Intriguingly, 53BP1 mediates p53 activation independently of its DNA repair activity, but requiring its interacting protein USP28 that can directly deubiquitinate p53 in vitro and ectopically stabilize p53 in vivo. Moreover, 53BP1 can transduce prolonged mitosis to cell cycle arrest independently of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), suggesting that while SAC protects mitotic accuracy by slowing down mitosis, 53BP1 and USP28 function in parallel to select against disturbed or delayed mitosis, promoting mitotic efficiency.

  10. Inferring Genetic Variation and Demographic History of Michelia yunnanensis Franch. (Magnoliaceae from Chloroplast DNA Sequences and Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikang Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Michelia yunnanensis Franch., is a traditional ornamental, aromatic, and medicinal shrub that endemic to Yunnan Province in southwest China. Although the species has a large distribution pattern and is abundant in Yunnan Province, the populations are dramatically declining because of overexploitation and habitat destruction. Studies on the genetic variation and demography of endemic species are necessary to develop effective conservation and management strategies. To generate such knowledge, we used 3 pairs of universal cpDNA markers and 10 pairs of microsatellite markers to assess the genetic diversity, genetic structure, and demographic history of 7 M. yunnanensis populations. We calculated a total of 88 alleles for 10 polymorphic loci and 10 haplotypes for a combined 2,089 bp of cpDNA. M. yunnanensis populations showed high genetic diversity (Ho = 0.551 for nuclear markers and Hd = 0.471 for cpDNA markers and low genetic differentiation (FST = 0.058. Geographical structure was not found among M. yunnanensis populations. Genetic distance and geographic distance were not correlated (P > 0.05, which indicated that geographic isolation is not the primary cause of the low genetic differentiation of M. yunnanensis. Additionally, M. yunnanensis populations contracted ~20,000–30,000 years ago, and no recent expansion occurred in current populations. Results indicated that the high genetic diversity of the species and within its populations holds promise for effective genetic resource management and sustainable utilization. Thus, we suggest that the conservation and management of M. yunnanensis should address exotic overexploitation and habitat destruction.

  11. Canis mtDNA HV1 database: a web-based tool for collecting and surveying Canis mtDNA HV1 haplotype in public database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Quan Ke; Chung, Dung Anh; Tran, Hoang-Dung

    2017-06-26

    Canine and wolf mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which can be used for forensic or phylogenetic analyses, have been defined in various schemes depending on the region analyzed. In recent studies, the 582 bp fragment of the HV1 region is most commonly used. 317 different canine HV1 haplotypes have been reported in the rapidly growing public database GenBank. These reported haplotypes contain several inconsistencies in their haplotype information. To overcome this issue, we have developed a Canis mtDNA HV1 database. This database collects data on the HV1 582 bp region in dog mitochondrial DNA from the GenBank to screen and correct the inconsistencies. It also supports users in detection of new novel mutation profiles and assignment of new haplotypes. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database (CHD) contains 5567 nucleotide entries originating from 15 subspecies in the species Canis lupus. Of these entries, 3646 were haplotypes and grouped into 804 distinct sequences. 319 sequences were recognized as previously assigned haplotypes, while the remaining 485 sequences had new mutation profiles and were marked as new haplotype candidates awaiting further analysis for haplotype assignment. Of the 3646 nucleotide entries, only 414 were annotated with correct haplotype information, while 3232 had insufficient or lacked haplotype information and were corrected or modified before storing in the CHD. The CHD can be accessed at http://chd.vnbiology.com . It provides sequences, haplotype information, and a web-based tool for mtDNA HV1 haplotyping. The CHD is updated monthly and supplies all data for download. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database contains information about canine mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequences with reconciled annotation. It serves as a tool for detection of inconsistencies in GenBank and helps identifying new HV1 haplotypes. Thus, it supports the scientific community in naming new HV1 haplotypes and to reconcile existing annotation of HV1 582 bp sequences.

  12. Structure of 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine - Theobromine Alternate Base Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Callahan, Michael P.; Kabelac, Martin; Rijs, Anouk M.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structure of clusters of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine with 3,7-dimethylxanthine (theobromine) in the gas phase determined by IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in both the near-IR and mid-IR regions in combination with ab initio computations. These clusters represent potential alternate nucleobase pairs, geometrically equivalent to guanine-cytosine. We have found the four lowest energy structures, which include the Watson-Crick base pairing motif. This Watson-Crick structure has not been observed by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in the gas phase for the canonical DNA base pairs.

  13. A new approach for cloning hLIF cDNA from genomic DNA isolated from the oral mucous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y H; Zhu, G Q; Chen, Q J; Wang, Y F; Yang, M M; Song, Y X; Wang, J G; Cao, B Y

    2011-11-25

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) is valuable for investigating protein structure and function in the study of life science, but it is difficult to obtain by traditional reverse transcription. We employed a novel strategy to clone human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) gene cDNA from genomic DNA, which was directly isolated from the mucous membrane of mouth. The hLIF sequence, which is 609 bp long and is composed of three exons, can be acquired within a few hours by amplifying each exon and splicing all of them using overlap-PCR. This new approach developed is simple, time- and cost-effective, without RNA preparation or cDNA synthesis, and is not limited to the specific tissues for a particular gene and the expression level of the gene.

  14. A DNA sequence element that advances replication origin activation time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Thomas J; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2013-11-06

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time.

  15. Brief communication: DNA from early Holocene American dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tito, Raul Y; Belknap, Samuel L; Sobolik, Kristin D; Ingraham, Robert C; Cleeland, Lauren M; Lewis, Cecil M

    2011-08-01

    We present the oldest genetically identified dog in the Americas, directly dated to 9,260 ± 170 Cal. B.P. The DNA was extracted from an occipital condyle imbedded in a human paleofecal sample from Hinds Cave in southwest Texas. A 368 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial genome control region was sequenced. These data were analyzed with comparable data, which included other ancient dogs and extant dogs, wolves and coyotes from around the world. Compiled with published data, our results characterize ancient American dogs within clades rooted by Eurasian wolves. In the Americas, these data provide no evidence of local interbreeding with wolves. This is a departure from the genetic pattern in other areas of the world where interbreeding with local wolf populations is apparent. Our discovery of domestic dog bone in a human paleofecal sample provides the earliest direct evidence for human consumption of dogs in the New World. These data support the hypothesis that dogs were a food source for early Paleoamericans. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Analysis of Canis mitochondrial DNA demonstrates high concordance between the control region and ATPase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Bradley N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic studies of wild Canis species have relied heavily on the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR to infer species relationships and evolutionary lineages. Previous analyses of the CR provided evidence for a North American evolved eastern wolf (C. lycaon, that is more closely related to red wolves (C. rufus and coyotes (C. latrans than grey wolves (C. lupus. Eastern wolf origins, however, continue to be questioned. Therefore, we analyzed mtDNA from 89 wolves and coyotes across North America and Eurasia at 347 base pairs (bp of the CR and 1067 bp that included the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes. Phylogenies and divergence estimates were used to clarify the evolutionary history of eastern wolves, and regional comparisons of nonsynonomous to synonomous substitutions (dN/dS at the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes were used to elucidate the potential role of selection in shaping mtDNA geographic distribution. Results We found high concordance across analyses between the mtDNA regions studied. Both had a high percentage of variable sites (CR = 14.6%; ATP = 9.7% and both phylogenies clustered eastern wolf haplotypes monophyletically within a North American evolved lineage apart from coyotes. Divergence estimates suggest the putative red wolf sequence is more closely related to coyotes (DxyCR = 0.01982 ± 0.00494 SD; DxyATP = 0.00332 ± 0.00097 SD than the eastern wolf sequences (DxyCR = 0.03047 ± 0.00664 SD; DxyATP = 0.00931 ± 0.00205 SD. Neutrality tests on both genes were indicative of the population expansion of coyotes across eastern North America, and dN/dS ratios suggest a possible role for purifying selection in the evolution of North American lineages. dN/dS ratios were higher in European evolved lineages from northern climates compared to North American evolved lineages from temperate regions, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions These results demonstrate high concordance between coding

  17. Sequence specific electronic conduction through polyion-stabilized double-stranded DNA in nanoscale break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatro, Ajit K; Jeong, Kyung J; Lee, Gil U; Janes, David B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of sequence specific electronic conduction through short (15-base-pair) double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, measured by immobilizing 3 ' -thiol-derivatized DNAs in nanometre scale gaps between gold electrodes. The polycation spermidine was used to stabilize the ds-DNA structure, allowing electrical measurements to be performed in a dry state. For specific sequences, the conductivity was observed to scale with the surface density of immobilized DNA, which can be controlled by the buffer concentration. A series of 15-base DNA oligonucleotide pairs, in which the centre sequence of five base pairs was changed from G:C to A:T pairs, has been studied. The conductivity per molecule is observed to decrease exponentially with the number of adjacent A:T pairs replacing G:C pairs, consistent with a barrier at the A:T sites. Conductance-based devices for short DNA sequences could provide sensing approaches with direct electrical readout, as well as label-free detection

  18. Integrating DNA strand-displacement circuitry with DNA tile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Choi, Harry M.T.; Winfree, Erik

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has emerged as a reliable and programmable way of controlling matter at the nanoscale through the specificity of Watson–Crick base pairing, allowing both complex self-assembled structures with nanometer precision and complex reaction networks implementing digital and analog behaviors. Here we show how two well-developed frameworks, DNA tile self-assembly and DNA strand-displacement circuits, can be systematically integrated to provide programmable kinetic control of self-assembly. We demonstrate the triggered and catalytic isothermal self-assembly of DNA nanotubes over 10 μm long from precursor DNA double-crossover tiles activated by an upstream DNA catalyst network. Integrating more sophisticated control circuits and tile systems could enable precise spatial and temporal organization of dynamic molecular structures. PMID:23756381

  19. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED pattern. Circular dichroism (CD titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals.

  20. Why the tautomerization of the G·C Watson-Crick base pair via the DPT does not cause point mutations during DNA replication? QM and QTAIM comprehensive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-01-01

    by the weakening of the lower H-bond. At that point, the upper N4H⋯O6 and O6H⋯N4 H-bonds in the G·C and G*·C* base pairs, respectively, remain constant at the changes of the middle and the lower H-bonds at the beginning and at the ending of the G·C ↔ G*·C* tautomerization. Aiming to answer the question posed in the title of the article, we established that the G*·C* Löwdin's base pair satisfies all the requirements necessary to cause point mutations in DNA except its lifetime, which is much less than the period of time required for the replication machinery to forcibly dissociate a base pair into the monomers (several ns) during DNA replication. So, from the physicochemical point of view, the G*·C* Löwdin's base pair cannot be considered as a source of point mutations arising during DNA replication.