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Sample records for paint pigment identification

  1. Combined SERS and Raman analysis for the identification of red pigments in cross-sections from historic oil paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, Kristen A; Mayhew, Hannah E; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2014-12-21

    The analysis of paint cross-sections can reveal a remarkable amount of information about the layers and materials in a painting without visibly altering the artwork. Although a variety of analytical approaches are used to detect inorganic pigments as well as organic binders, proteins, and lipids in cross-sections, they do not provide for the unambiguous identification of natural, organic colorants. Here, we develop a novel combined surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), light microscopy, and normal Raman scattering (NRS) approach for the identification of red organic and inorganic pigments in paint cross-sections obtained from historic 18th and 19th century oil paintings. In particular, Ag nanoparticles are directly applied to localized areas of paint cross-sections mounted in polyester resin for SERS analysis of the organic pigments. This combined extractionless non-hydrolysis SERS and NRS approach provides for the definitive identification of carmine lake, madder lake, and vermilion in multiple paint layers. To our knowledge, this study represents the first in situ identification of natural, organic pigments within paint cross-sections from oil paintings. Furthermore, the combination of SERS and normal Raman, with light microscopy provides conservators with a more comprehensive understanding of a painting from a single sample and without the need for sample pretreatment.

  2. Pigments identification in Havana Colonial wall painting by portable XRF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazca, J.; Mendoza, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Havana City historical center is being recuperated in the las years. Numerous are the colonial houses with values typical wall painting as internal decoration that need to be investigated and restored. The pigment identification is essential to have knowledge about pictorial technique and to help and monitor the restoration process. The identification of inorganic pigments in the Havana colonial wall painting has been not almost studied. The opportunity to have a new Portable XRF system in the Archaeometry laboratory of the Conservation and Restoration Gabinet of Havana Historitian Office allows to investigate the wall painting, samples that because of its more of this nature it would be impossible to move to the laboratory for non destructive analysis. The most of the pigment are made of inorganic elements and they can be identified property by XRF technique. All complete archaeometric investigation has to use several technique and to work in a multidisciplinary research team to give a fundamental answer about the past, The suitable techniques selection to employ depends of the art Historitian and archaeologist's questions. The pictorial technique are traditionally investigated using stratigraphical information obtained by Optical Microscopy and organic compound determination by Gas Chromatography. The global analysis of the results from the different employed techniques and the discussion from the restaurateur point of view is presented

  3. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him.

  4. The Comparison Between Nmf and Ica in Pigment Mixture Identification of Ancient Chinese Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Lyu, S.; Hou, M.; Yin, Q.

    2018-04-01

    Since the colour in painting cultural relics observed by our naked eyes or hyperspectral cameras is usually a mixture of several kinds of pigments, the mixed pigments analysis will be an important subject in the field of ancient painting conservation and restoration. This paper aims to find a more effective method to confirm the types of every pure pigment from mixture on the surface of paintings. Firstly, we adopted two kinds of blind source separation algorithms, which are independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization, to extract the pure pigment component from mixed spectrum respectively. Moreover, we matched the separated pure spectrum with the pigments spectra library built by our team to determine the pigment type. Furthermore, three kinds of data including simulation data, mixed pigments spectral data measured in laboratory, and the spectral data of an ancient painting were chosen to evaluate the performance of the different algorithms. And the accuracy was compared between the two algorithms. Finally, the experimental results show that non-negative matrix factorization method is more suitable for endmember extraction in the field of ancient painting conservation and restoration.

  5. THE COMPARISON BETWEEN NMF AND ICA IN PIGMENT MIXTURE IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT CHINESE PAINTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the colour in painting cultural relics observed by our naked eyes or hyperspectral cameras is usually a mixture of several kinds of pigments, the mixed pigments analysis will be an important subject in the field of ancient painting conservation and restoration. This paper aims to find a more effective method to confirm the types of every pure pigment from mixture on the surface of paintings. Firstly, we adopted two kinds of blind source separation algorithms, which are independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization, to extract the pure pigment component from mixed spectrum respectively. Moreover, we matched the separated pure spectrum with the pigments spectra library built by our team to determine the pigment type. Furthermore, three kinds of data including simulation data, mixed pigments spectral data measured in laboratory, and the spectral data of an ancient painting were chosen to evaluate the performance of the different algorithms. And the accuracy was compared between the two algorithms. Finally, the experimental results show that non-negative matrix factorization method is more suitable for endmember extraction in the field of ancient painting conservation and restoration.

  6. Pigment Identification on "The Ecstasy of St. Theresa" Painting by Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, D.; Marmontelli, M.; De Benedetto, G. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Vona, F.

    A study of the pigments of "The Ecstasy of St. Theresa," a seventeenth century oil painting on canvas, was performed by Raman microscopy. Lazurite was identified in both Jesus Christ's and St. Theresa's mantles as the pigment responsible for the blue coloration. Litharge was identified inside the black bitumen layer. Usually the bitumen needed a lot of time to dry in the air when mixed with drying oil. Litharge was used by the artist to decrease the oil drying time. A complementary study, using micro-Raman and SEM, allowed us to identify red ochre as the pigment responsible for the red coloration in the altar on the left side of the painting.

  7. An ESR study of the spectra of paint pigments in 'drying' linseed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slogett, R.; Troup, G.; Hutton, D.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Since previous ESR work on the identification of RAW paint pigments, mainly mineral, looked promising, we decided to examine the spectra when the pigments were applied, in oil, to a non-reactive, microwave transparent polymer. The polymer used shows no significant ESR signals in the range 2000-4000 gauss at ∼9.1 GHz and room temperature. The oil used is Winsor and Newton Drying Linseed Oil, and contains 'manganese driers'. The spectrum of the pure liquid oil is shown, as well as that of the dried oil on the substrate. Many of the pigment spectra shown are so strong that not a trace of the oil Mn(2+) can be seen at the pigment concentrations used. The effect of the linseed oil on modern synthetic indigo, an organic pigment still available made from plants, is also shown. ESR still looks to be a useful supplementary technique for paint pigment identification

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies of yellow organic dyestuffs and lake pigments in oil paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E; Fabian, David M; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2013-08-21

    Identifying natural, organic dyes and pigments is important for the conservation, preservation, and historical interpretation of works of art. Although previous SERS studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for red lake pigments using various pretreatment conditions, corresponding investigations of yellow lake pigments and paints are relatively sparse. Here, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is used to identify a variety of yellow organic dyestuffs and lake pigments in oil paint. High-quality SERS spectra of yellow dyestuffs (i.e., turmeric, old fustic, Buckthorn berries) and corresponding paints could be obtained with or without sample pretreatment using microliter quantities of HCl and methanol at room temperature. However, the SERS spectra of yellow lake pigments (i.e., Stil de Grain, Reseda lake) and their corresponding oil paints were only observed upon sample pretreatment. Ultimately, we demonstrate a reliable sample treatment protocol for SERS-based identification of turmeric, old fustic, Buckthorn berries, Stil de Grain, and Reseda lake as well as for microscopic samples of the corresponding oil paints.

  9. Identification of lapis-lazuli pigments in paint layers by PIGE measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.; Mandò, P. A.; Calvo del Castillo, H.

    2004-06-01

    Lapis-lazuli is a semi-precious stone used in the past to produce a blue pigment. Its main component is lazurite, 3Na 2O·3Al 2O 3·6SiO 2·2Na 2S. The possibility of using PIXE to identify this pigment in canvas and wood painting is severely limited by the strong absorption of low-energy X-rays in the protective varnish and - when, as typical, the pigment is mixed with lead white - by the overlapping of Pb M lines with S K α. In this work we discuss the possibility of identifying lapis-lazuli by detecting sodium with PIGE. PIXE and PIGE measurements have been performed on samples containing lapis-lazuli mixed to lead white in different percentage, covered with polymeric foils to simulate the presence of varnish. At a percentage of lapis-lazuli below 50%, Na X-rays are hardly detectable even with the thinner foil; on the contrary the characteristic γ-rays are clearly detected down to about 1%. A first application has been successfully performed on the "Madonna dei fusi" by Leonardo da Vinci, in the framework of an extensive scientific investigation on the painting techniques used by the Renaissance genius.

  10. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na + with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  11. Identification of Pigments in Colored Layers of a Painting by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, O. I.; Pankin, D. V.; Povolotckaia, A. V.; Borisov, E. V.; Beznosova, M. O.; Krivul'ko, T. A.; Kurochkin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Using the method of Raman spectroscopy the pigment composition is investigated of, and the brushwork technique used in, the original layer of a 19th century painting is established. It is an overdoor worked, presumably, by Antoine Jean-Etienne Faivre. It is established that the artist used the following pigments: cinnabar and dyes on the basis of goethite and hematite (for red, yellow-orange, and brown shades), ultramarine and Prussian blue (for blue shades), and Emerald green and a mixture of blue and yellow shades (to obtain a green color). It is determined that white lead was used a primer.

  12. Paintings - high-energy protons detect pigments and paint-layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denker, A.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy PIXE was used to identify pigment composition, sequencing and the thickness of paint-layers. Before applying the technique to valuable masterpieces, mock-ups were examined in a collaboration with the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. The results of high-energy PIXE were compared to conventional cross-section analysis. In addition, the non-destructiveness of the technique was investigated thoroughly. After this preparative work, two ancient paintings have been examined and the results are presented in this paper

  13. Pigment identification on medieval manuscripts, paintings and other artefacts by Raman microscopy: applications to the study of three German manuscripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Lucia; Ciomartan, Dan A.; Clark, Robin J. H.

    1997-03-01

    The identification of the pigments used to illuminate medieval manuscripts, paintings and other artefacts has received a major boost recently through perceptive studies carried out by Raman microscopy. A brief summary of the background of the technique is given. The results of studies on three illuminated German manuscripts are presented. The pigments vermilion HgS, iron oxide Fe 2O 3, azurite 2CuCO 3.Cu(OH) 2, malachite CuCo 3.Cu(OH) 2, lampblack (essentially carbon), white lead 2PbCO 3.Pb(OH) 2, lead tin yellow type I Pb 2SnO 4, and lazurite Na 8[Al 6Si 6O 24]S n (but only in admixture with Pb 2SnO 4, whereby it forms a green pigment), have been identified on these manuscripts on the basis of Raman microscopy and the results discussed.

  14. The influence of paint dispersion parameters on the spectral selectivity of black-pigmented coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunde, M.K.; Orel, Z.C. [National Institute of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hutchins, M.G. [Oxford Brookes University, Oxford (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    2003-10-31

    The optical properties of variously prepared black-pigmented solar absorbing paints were calculated in terms of their effective absorption and scattering abilities. The phenomenological two-parameter Kubelka-Munk effective medium theory was applied. Paints with the same composition were prepared for different degrees of pigment dispersion and characterized by the average size of pigment agglomerates present in the pigment/vehicle system. Prepared paints were applied to aluminium foil in two ways, by coil coating and by spraying. The size of coarse pigment particles and the paint application technique influence the spectral selectivity and thus determine the final performance of spectrally selective surfaces. (author)

  15. Superpixel segmentation and pigment identification of colored relics based on visible spectral image

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    Li, Junfeng; Wan, Xiaoxia

    2018-01-01

    To enrich the contents of digital archive and to guide the copy and restoration of colored relics, non-invasive methods for extraction of painting boundary and identification of pigment composition are proposed in this study based on the visible spectral images of colored relics. Superpixel concept is applied for the first time to the field of oversegmentation of visible spectral images and implemented on the visible spectral images of colored relics to extract their painting boundary. Since different pigments are characterized by their own spectrum and the same kind of pigment has the similar geometric profile in spectrum, an automatic identification method is established by comparing the proximity between the geometric profiles of the unknown spectrum from each superpixel and the pre-known spectrum from a deliberately prepared database. The methods are validated using the visible spectral images of the ancient wall paintings in Mogao Grottoes. By the way, the visible spectral images are captured by a multispectral imaging system consisting of two broadband filters and a RGB camera with high spatial resolution.

  16. An investigation of multispectral imaging for the mapping of pigments in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Berns, Roy S.; Taplin, Lawrence A.; Coddington, James

    2008-02-01

    Compared with colorimetric imaging, multispectral imaging has the advantage of retrieving spectral reflectance factor of each pixel of a painting. Using this spectral information, pigment mapping is concerned with decomposing the spectrum into its constituent pigments and their relative contributions. The output of pigment mapping is a series of spatial concentration maps of the pigments comprising the painting. This approach was used to study Vincent van Gogh's The Starry Night. The artist's palette was approximated using ten oil pigments, selected from a large database of pigments used in oil paintings and a priori analytical research on one of his self portraits, executed during the same time period. The pigment mapping was based on single-constant Kubelka-Munk theory. It was found that the region of blue sky where the stars were located contained, predominantly, ultramarine blue while the swirling sky and region surrounding the moon contained, predominantly, cobalt blue. Emerald green, used in light bluish-green brushstrokes surrounding the moon, was not used to create the dark green in the cypresses. A measurement of lead white from Georges Seurat's La Grande Jatte was used as the white when mapping The Starry Night. The absorption and scattering properties of this white were replaced with a modern dispersion of lead white in linseed oil and used to simulate the painting's appearance before the natural darkening and yellowing of lead white oil paint. Pigment mapping based on spectral imaging was found to be a viable and practical approach for analyzing pigment composition, providing new insight into an artist's working method, the possibility for aiding in restorative inpainting, and lighting design.

  17. First accelerator carbon-14 date for pigment from a rock painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Merwe, N.J.; Sealy, J.; Yates, R.

    1987-01-01

    South Africa is particularly blessed with rock art: thousands of paintings and engravings provide a window on the cognitive systems of prehistoric populations. A major stumbling block in studying the art is the lack of a method for dating it. This article shows that some of the paintings can be directly dated by means of accelerator 14 C counting of carbon from black pigment. The advent of accelerator 14 C provides the capability of analysing very small samples and brings pigments from rock paintings into the realm of datable materials

  18. Identificação por microscopia Raman de pigmentos da pintura a óleo "Retrato de Murilo Mendes" de Cândido Portinari Identification of pigments from Candido Portinari's oil painting "Portrait of Murilo Mendes" by Raman microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Cappa de Oliveira

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work "ex situ"Raman microscopy was employed in the identification of some of the pigments present in the painting "Portrait of Murilo Mendes" by Cândido Portinari. In the investigated samples it was possible to identify unambiguously two pigments: Prussian blue and lapis-lazuli (or its synthetic analogue, ultramarine blue - the former is observed together with organic substances, possibly used as dispersants, what suggests a further use of a mass for recover the painting.

  19. Neutron-induced autoradiography used in the investigation of modern pigments in paintings of known composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, H.C.; Taft, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron-Induced Autoradiography is an effective analytical technique for mapping the location of a number of specified pigments in paintings. Most paintings which have been examined through neutron-induced autoradiography to date were painted prior to the introduction of the most common of modern pigments. By understanding die nuclear properties of these pigments, as revealed by this technique, a more informed analysis of modem paintings may result This investigation is part of an ongoing program to develop case studies for presentation to an undergraduate class at Cornell University, 'Art, Isotopes and Analysis'. We have found that this technique is a graphic and effective method of presenting nuclear reactions and radioactivity to non-specialists. Sample paintings are produced using pigments of known composition. A sequence of discreet layers, each a separate image, is documented in order to establish a reference for accurately interpreting the autoradiographs. The painting is then activated in the Cornell TRIGA reactor and a series of autoradiographs produced Gamma spectra taken before and after each film exposure gives us detailed information on which radioisotopes (and therefore, which pigments), are active. (author)

  20. The performance of 2-nitroso-1-naphthol chelating pigment in paint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of 2-nitroso-1-naphthol chelating pigment in paint formulation with gum Arabic and polyvinyl acetate as binders, Paper I: UV- visible spectroscopy, viscosity and breaking stress of the paints.

  1. Analytical evidences of the use of iron-gall ink as a pigment on miniature paintings

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    Aceto, Maurizio; Calà, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    Iron-gall ink (IGI) has been used by scribes for writing since at least the 4th century CE. Another typical use of this ink was for drawing: many Old Masters created beautiful sketches in brown-black hues. Despite its widespread use to draw lines, it seems like IGI was hardly used for painting as well. In fact, the number of identification on manuscripts is very low at present. This could be partially due to a lack of reliable diagnostic information. In this work we tried to better define the possibility of identifying IGI as a pigment on illuminate manuscripts, evaluating the pros and cons of three different techniques: UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optic fibres (FORS), Raman spectroscopy and XRF spectrometry. With concern to in situ non-invasive analysis, Raman spectroscopy has the best diagnostic power but FORS seems to provide the better compromise between selectivity and ease of application. Moreover, new analytical evidences was given on the particular use of IGI by ancient illuminators: a non-invasive and micro-invasive diagnostic survey on Western manuscripts datable in the range 6-16th centuries was carried out showing that, apart from its widespread use as an ink for writing and drawing, IGI was largely used as a pigment too. The large number of identification obtained allows us to hypothesise that this pigment was used all through medieval Europe up to at least the Renaissance, where its use is already documented in drawing. The occurrence of IGI in miniature paintings older than 6th century or more recent than 16th century cannot be excluded, as is its use beyond Europe; further measurements could instead widen the time range and the geographic area. Nevertheless, the present study allows shedding a new light on the use of this colourant all along the period of medieval and Renaissance miniature painting art.

  2. Dissolution rate measurements of sea water soluble pigments for antifouling paints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yebra, Diego Meseguer; Kiil, Søren; Erik Weinell, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution of soluble pigments from both tin-based and tin-free chemically active antifouling (AF) paints is a key process influencing their polishing and biocide leaching rates. In this context, a low time- and resources-consuming method capable of screening the pigment behaviour in the sea...

  3. The Bone Black Pigment Identification by Noninvasive, In Situ Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

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    Alessia Daveri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two real case studies, an oil painting on woven paper and a cycle of mural paintings, have been presented to validate the use of infrared reflection spectroscopy as suitable technique for the identification of bone black pigment. By the use of the sharp weak band at 2013 cm−1, it has been possible to distinguish animal carbon-based blacks by a noninvasive method. Finally, an attempt for an eventual assignment for the widely used sharp band at 2013 cm−1 is discussed.

  4. Seawater-Soluble Pigments and Their Potential Use in Self-Polishing Antifouling Paints: Simulation-based Screening Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Erik Weinell, Claus

    2002-01-01

    This work concerns the on-going development of efficient and environmentally friendly antifouling paints for biofouling control on large ocean-going ships. It is illustrated how a detailed mathematical model for a self-polishing antifouling paint exposed to seawater can be used as a product...... solubility and seawater diffusivity of dissolved pigment species have a significant influence on the polishing and leaching behaviour of a typical self-polishing paint system. The pigment size distribution, on the other hand, only has a minor influence on the paint-seawater interaction. Simulations also...... indicate that only compounds which are effective against biofouling at very low seawater concentrations are useful as active antifouling paint ingredients. The need for model verification and exploration of practical issues, subsequent a given pigment has been found of interest, is discussed. The model...

  5. [Spectral analysis of green pigments of painting and colored drawing in northern Chinese ancient architectures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Qin; Yan, Jing; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Tao

    2010-02-01

    It is important to identify pigments of painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures in order to restore and conserve them. The components of green pigments were detected with X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). Twenty-seven samples were collected from painting and colored drawing in northern Chinese ancient architectures in Beijing, Shanxi province and Gansu province. The experiment results showed that emerald green [CuCH3COO]2 x Cu(AsO2)2], a complex of copper aceto-arsenite pigment, had been used as the colored component in fifteen samples, whereas organic materials synthesized in the rest. However, in all samples there were no malachite and atacamite, green pigments commonly used in ancient time a long time ago. These two pigments have been found in Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army and the wall paintings at Mogao Grettoes, Dunhuang, and some other famous wall paintings and color pottery figurines. However, emerald green was used many years later. It was reported that emerald green was synthesized by Germany in 1814 and had been widely used in China as watercolor on pith paper works and on scroll paintings since the 1850s. Because painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures stands outside, under sunlight and rain, it must be repaired and repainted in less than fifty years. Therefore, it is not surprising that emerald green was used in them. In recent years, artificial organic materials are increasingly used in painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures. From experiments it was also showed that in the same recolored painting and colored drawing, organic materials are usually in the later layers, but emerald green is in the earlier layers. This work supplies a lot of data for the purpose of selecting restoration materials and identifying painting and colored drawing in ancient architectures with a new method.

  6. Analytical characterization of artists' pigments used in old and modern paintings by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Bohlen, A. von; Moens, L.; Devos, W.

    1993-01-01

    The analytical characterization of artists' pigments is a most helpful tool for art history, conservation and restoration of paintings. A very gentle method of ultra-microsampling was developed that is especially applicable to paintings under restoration. It provides a sample mass of about 1 μg and is virtually non-destructive. This minute amount is sufficient for total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) to determine most of those elements building inorganic pigments. The convenient and fast method was applied to oil paintings. Various pigments were identified and their mixing proportion was determined even quantitatively. (author)

  7. The development of a new analytical model for the identification of saccharide binders in paint samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluveras-Tenorio, Anna; Mazurek, Joy; Restivo, Annalaura; Colombini, Maria Perla; Bonaduce, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for reliably identifying saccharide materials in paintings. Since the 3(rd) millennium B.C., polysaccharide materials such as plant gums, sugar, flour, and honey were used as binding media and sizing agents in paintings, illuminated manuscripts, and polychrome objects. Although it has been reported that plant gums have a stable composition, their identification in paint samples is often doubtful and rarely discussed. Our research was carried out independently at two different laboratories: the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI) and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI). It was shown in a previous stage of this research that the two methods give highly comparable data when analysing both reference paint samples and paint layers from art objects, thus the combined data was used to build a large database. In this study, the simultaneous presence of proteinaceous binders and pigments in fresh and artificially aged paint replicas was investigated, and it highlighted how these can affect the sugar profile of arabic, tragacanth, and fruit tree gums. The environmental contamination due to sugars from various plant tissues is also discussed. The results allowed the development of a new model for the reliable identification of saccharide binders in paintings based on the evaluation of markers that are stable to ageing and unaffected by pigments. This new model was applied to the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of a large number of samples from murals, easel paintings, manuscripts, and polychrome objects from different geographical areas and dating from the 13(th) century BC to the 20(th) century AD, thus demonstrating its reliability.

  8. The development of a new analytical model for the identification of saccharide binders in paint samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lluveras-Tenorio

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for reliably identifying saccharide materials in paintings. Since the 3(rd millennium B.C., polysaccharide materials such as plant gums, sugar, flour, and honey were used as binding media and sizing agents in paintings, illuminated manuscripts, and polychrome objects. Although it has been reported that plant gums have a stable composition, their identification in paint samples is often doubtful and rarely discussed. Our research was carried out independently at two different laboratories: the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI. It was shown in a previous stage of this research that the two methods give highly comparable data when analysing both reference paint samples and paint layers from art objects, thus the combined data was used to build a large database. In this study, the simultaneous presence of proteinaceous binders and pigments in fresh and artificially aged paint replicas was investigated, and it highlighted how these can affect the sugar profile of arabic, tragacanth, and fruit tree gums. The environmental contamination due to sugars from various plant tissues is also discussed. The results allowed the development of a new model for the reliable identification of saccharide binders in paintings based on the evaluation of markers that are stable to ageing and unaffected by pigments. This new model was applied to the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of a large number of samples from murals, easel paintings, manuscripts, and polychrome objects from different geographical areas and dating from the 13(th century BC to the 20(th century AD, thus demonstrating its reliability.

  9. The Development of a New Analytical Model for the Identification of Saccharide Binders in Paint Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Annalaura; Colombini, Maria Perla; Bonaduce, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for reliably identifying saccharide materials in paintings. Since the 3rd millennium B.C., polysaccharide materials such as plant gums, sugar, flour, and honey were used as binding media and sizing agents in paintings, illuminated manuscripts, and polychrome objects. Although it has been reported that plant gums have a stable composition, their identification in paint samples is often doubtful and rarely discussed. Our research was carried out independently at two different laboratories: the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI) and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI). It was shown in a previous stage of this research that the two methods give highly comparable data when analysing both reference paint samples and paint layers from art objects, thus the combined data was used to build a large database. In this study, the simultaneous presence of proteinaceous binders and pigments in fresh and artificially aged paint replicas was investigated, and it highlighted how these can affect the sugar profile of arabic, tragacanth, and fruit tree gums. The environmental contamination due to sugars from various plant tissues is also discussed. The results allowed the development of a new model for the reliable identification of saccharide binders in paintings based on the evaluation of markers that are stable to ageing and unaffected by pigments. This new model was applied to the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of a large number of samples from murals, easel paintings, manuscripts, and polychrome objects from different geographical areas and dating from the 13th century BC to the 20th century AD, thus demonstrating its reliability. PMID:23166654

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies of perceptible color fading of decorative paints consisting of mixed pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, Jean-Claude; McLoughlin, Daragh

    2017-01-01

    We study the color fading of paints films composed of mixtures of white rutile titanium dioxide and yellow arylide pigments dispersed in two polymer binders at different volume concentrations. The samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiations in an accelerated weathering tester during three weeks. The measured patterns in color variations appeared to be independent of the chemistry of the binders. We then developed a theoretical framework, based on the Radiative transfer Equation of light and the One Particle T-Matrix formalism to simulate the color fading process. The loss of color is correlated to the progressive decrease of the original colored pigment volume-filling fraction as the destructive UV radiations penetrate deeper into the films. The calculated patterns of color variations of paints film composed by mixtures of white pigments with yellow Cadmium Sulfate (CdS) and red Cerium Sulfide (Ce_2S_3) pigments showed the same trend as that seen experimentally. - Highlights: • Theoretical framework to simulate color-fading process of paints. • Good comparison between simulation and experimental data. • Color Fading depends on total amount of perceptible pigments.

  11. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints: synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, K.; Mass, J.; Meirer, F.; Pottasch, C.; van Loon, A.; Hull, A.; Church, J.; Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; Mehta, A.

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  12. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints : synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Meirer, Florian; Pottasch, Carol; van Loon, Annelies; Hull, Alyssa; Church, Jonathan; Pouyet, Emeline; Cotte, Marine; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  13. Microstudies on thermal and UV treated silicone-acrylic paints with different pigment volume concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, K.W.; Abdul Kariem Arof; Yahaya, A.H.; Yahya, R.; Puteh, R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of pigment volume concentration (PVC) on morphology of pigment particles employed in the silicone-acrylic compositions suitable for high temperature corrosion protection application, has been investigated using SEM. Silicone-acrylic based paints with 50% silicone resin have been selected to prepare paints with PVC values from 10% to 60%. The paints were applied on mild steel panels of size of 5 cm x 7.5 cm. After curing for one week, the panels were subjected to 24 hours of heating ranging from room temperature up to 300 degree C and 400 hours of UV weathering. After the corrosion test, SEM micrographs were taken to investigate the gloss, rusting and adhesion properties of the coating films. (Author)

  14. Visualization of pigment distributions in paintings using synchrotron K-edge imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, K.; Dik, J.; Leeuw, M.; Whitson, A. den; Tortora, J.; Coan, P.; Nemoz, C.; Bravin, A.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray radiography plays an important role in the study of artworks and archaeological artifacts. The internal structure of objects provides information on genesis, authenticity, painting technique, material condition and conservation history. Transmission radiography, however, does not provide information on the exact elemental composition of objects and heavy metal layers can shadow or obscure the ones including lighter elements. This paper presents the first application of synchrotron-based K-edge absorption imaging applied to paintings. Using highly monochromatic radiation, K-edge imaging is used to obtain elemental distribution images over large areas. Such elemental maps visualize the distribution of an individual pigment throughout the paint stratigraphy. This provides color information on hidden paint layers, which is of great relevance to art historians and painting conservators. The main advantage is the quick data acquisition time and the sensitivity to elements throughout the entire paint stratigraphy. The examination of a test painting is shown and further instrumental developments are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Independent component analysis-based algorithm for automatic identification of Raman spectra applied to artistic pigments and pigment mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vidal, Juan José; Pérez-Pueyo, Rosanna; Soneira, María José; Ruiz-Moreno, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    A new method has been developed to automatically identify Raman spectra, whether they correspond to single- or multicomponent spectra. The method requires no user input or judgment. There are thus no parameters to be tweaked. Furthermore, it provides a reliability factor on the resulting identification, with the aim of becoming a useful support tool for the analyst in the decision-making process. The method relies on the multivariate techniques of principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA), and on some metrics. It has been developed for the application of automated spectral analysis, where the analyzed spectrum is provided by a spectrometer that has no previous knowledge of the analyzed sample, meaning that the number of components in the sample is unknown. We describe the details of this method and demonstrate its efficiency by identifying both simulated spectra and real spectra. The method has been applied to artistic pigment identification. The reliable and consistent results that were obtained make the methodology a helpful tool suitable for the identification of pigments in artwork or in paint in general.

  16. Clay and iron oxide pigments in the history of painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradil, David; Grygar, Tomáš; Hradilová, J.; Bezdička, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2003), s. 223-236 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : earthy pigments * ochres * historical painting Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.287, year: 2003

  17. Identification of copper-based green pigments in Jaume Huguet's Gothic altarpieces by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó, N; Pradell, T; Pantos, E; Papiz, M Z; Molera, J; Seco, M; Vendrell-Saz, M

    2002-07-01

    The scientific investigation of ancient paintings gives a unique insight into ancient painting techniques and their evolution through time and geographic location. This study deals with the identification of the green pigments used by one of the most important Catalan masters in Gothic times, Jaume Huguet. Other pigments and materials have also been characterized by means of conventional techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction has been used to produce maps of phases at a spatial resolution of 100 microm across chromatic layers.

  18. Three-dimensional characterization of pigment dispersion in dried paint films using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jui-Ching; Heeschen, William; Reffner, John; Hook, John

    2012-04-01

    The combination of integrated focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) serial sectioning and imaging techniques with image analysis provided quantitative characterization of three-dimensional (3D) pigment dispersion in dried paint films. The focused ion beam in a FIB-SEM dual beam system enables great control in slicing paints, and the sectioning process can be synchronized with SEM imaging providing high quality serial cross-section images for 3D reconstruction. Application of Euclidean distance map and ultimate eroded points image analysis methods can provide quantitative characterization of 3D particle distribution. It is concluded that 3D measurement of binder distribution in paints is effective to characterize the order of pigment dispersion in dried paint films.

  19. Synthesis of Copper Pigments, Malachite and Verdigris: Making Tempera Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sally D.; Rutkowsky, Susan A.; Mahon, Megan L.; Halpern, Erica M.

    2011-01-01

    Malachite and verdigris, two copper-based pigments, are synthesized in this experiment intended for use in a general chemistry laboratory. The preparation of egg tempera paint from malachite is also described. All procedures can be done with a magnetic stir plate, standard glassware present in any first-year laboratory, and household chemicals.…

  20. EPR spectroscopy can help with paint pigment provenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troup, G.J.; Hutton, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The microwave magnetic spectroscopic technique EPR can be used to determine the presence of paramagnetic impurities in paint pigments, and the purity of composition regarding the main colourant. Hence EPR can help determine provenance of pigments, just as it can for gemstones. Specimens of Lapis Lazuli (synthetic, Afghanistan, Chile, Greenland) showed quite recognisably different spectra, at room temperature, in a Varian E-12 X-band spectrometer (9.1 GHz frequency). Similarly, specimens of yellow ochre, two imported into Australia, one North Australian, another 95% pure Goethite, showed recognisably different spectra. The North Australian one uniquely gave a known radiation damage signal from quartz, perhaps to be expected, given the abundance of radioactive ores in the region. Further samples have been obtained and the results from these will be reported

  1. Identification and imaging of modern paints using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with MeV ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdanović Radović, Iva; Siketić, Zdravko; Jembrih-Simbürger, Dubravka

    2017-01-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry using MeV ion excitation was applied to analyse modern paint materials containing synthetic organic pigments and binders. It was demonstrated that synthetic organic pigments and binder components with molecular masses in the m/z range from 1 to 1200 could be identi......Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry using MeV ion excitation was applied to analyse modern paint materials containing synthetic organic pigments and binders. It was demonstrated that synthetic organic pigments and binder components with molecular masses in the m/z range from 1 to 1200 could...... be identified in different paint samples with a high efficiency and in a single measurement. Different ways of mounting of mostly insulating paint samples were tested prior to the analysis in order to achieve the highest possible yield of pigment main molecular ions. As Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer for Me......V Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry is attached to the heavy ion microprobe, molecular imaging on cross-sections of small paint fragments was performed using focused ions. Due to the fact that molecules are extracted from the uppermost layer of the sample and to avoid surface contamination, the paint samples...

  2. Tensile properties of latex paint films with TiO2 pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Eric W. S.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Young, Christina T.; Learner, Thomas J. S.; Hackney, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    The tensile properties of latex paint films containing TiO2 pigment were studied with respect to temperature, strain-rate and moisture content. The purpose of performing these experiments was to assist museums in defining safe conditions for modern paintings held in collections. The glass transition temperature of latex paint binders is in close proximity to ambient temperature, resulting in high strain-rate dependence in typical exposure environments. Time dependence of modulus and failure strain is discussed in the context of time-temperature superposition, which was used to extend the experimental time scale. Nonlinear viscoelastic material models are also presented, which incorporate a Prony series with the Ogden or Neo-Hookean hyperelastic function for different TiO2 concentrations.

  3. Raman Identification of Pigments in Wall Paintings of the Colonial Period from Bolivian Churches in the Ruta De La Plata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rúa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze and identify pigments and determine the palette of color in wall paintings from four churches of the Colonial Period, in the Bolivian highlands. The ancient churches Santiago de Callapa, Curahuara de Carangas, NuestraSeñora de Copacabana de Andamarca and San José de Soracachi were constructed during the 17th and 18th centuries, around the important colonial Ruta de la Plata, between Potosí city and Arica harbor on the Pacific coast of South America. Most pigments used in the wall paintings correspond to inorganic minerals as well as to organic colorants. Fully chlorinated copper phthalocyanine (green, copper phthalocyanine (blue, β-naphthol (yellow and benzoimidazolone (red, were identified in the corresponding colored areas suggesting subsequent recent interventions or restorations. Ground layer materials were also characterized. The present results allow for discussion of the pictorial techniques used in the Andean highland during the colonial period and allow conservators and restorers to make important decisions regarding the type of intervention to perform in the case of these important historical and patrimonial monuments.

  4. Application of instrumental neutron activation analysis in investigation of pigments from historic paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stverak, B.; Tluchor, D.; Kokta, L.; Dryak, P.; Rowinska, L.; Walis, L.; Vosatka, A.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was used in determining the composition of used pigments, their age and origin. Microsamples from paintings with a weight of less than 10 -7 kg were taken with a hollow needle, irradiated in quartz ampoules for 20 hours in a reactor with a density of thermal neutrons of 10 13 cm -2 .s -1 and then in different configurations measured with a Ge(Li) detector. From the amount of obtained data (various paintings, different colours) a data bank will be established enabling speedy comparative evaluations. As an example the problem of the excellent white in Rubens' paintings is dealt with and the dating is discussed of the early beginnings of the use of zinc white in Guardi's paintings. (M.D.)

  5. High-resolution fluorescence mapping of impurities in historical zinc oxide pigments: hard X-ray nanoprobe applications to the paints of Pablo Picasso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadio, Francesca; Rose, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Here for the first time we describe the use of high resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping for the analysis of artists' paints, hierarchically complex materials typically composed of binder, pigments, fillers, and other additives. The work undertaken at the nanoprobe sought to obtain highly spatially resolved, highly sensitive mapping of metal impurities (Pb, Cd, Fe, and other metals) in submicron particles of zinc oxide pigments used in early 20th century artists' tube paints and enamel paints, with particular emphasis on Ripolin, a popular brand of French house paint used extensively by Pablo Picasso and some of his contemporaries. Analysis revealed that the Zn oxide particles only contain a little Fe, proving that the highest quality Zn oxide pigment, free of Pb and Cd, was used for Ripolin house paints as well as artists' paints. Nanoprobe XRF mapping also demonstrated that artists' tube paints generally have more abundant fillers and additional whites (based on Pb, Ti, Ca) than Ripolin paints, which contain mostly pure zinc oxide. The chemical characterization of paints at the nanoscale opens the path to a better understanding of their fabrication and chemical reactivity. (orig.)

  6. High-resolution fluorescence mapping of impurities in historical zinc oxide pigments: hard X-ray nanoprobe applications to the paints of Pablo Picasso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Francesca [The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rose, Volker [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Here for the first time we describe the use of high resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping for the analysis of artists' paints, hierarchically complex materials typically composed of binder, pigments, fillers, and other additives. The work undertaken at the nanoprobe sought to obtain highly spatially resolved, highly sensitive mapping of metal impurities (Pb, Cd, Fe, and other metals) in submicron particles of zinc oxide pigments used in early 20th century artists' tube paints and enamel paints, with particular emphasis on Ripolin, a popular brand of French house paint used extensively by Pablo Picasso and some of his contemporaries. Analysis revealed that the Zn oxide particles only contain a little Fe, proving that the highest quality Zn oxide pigment, free of Pb and Cd, was used for Ripolin house paints as well as artists' paints. Nanoprobe XRF mapping also demonstrated that artists' tube paints generally have more abundant fillers and additional whites (based on Pb, Ti, Ca) than Ripolin paints, which contain mostly pure zinc oxide. The chemical characterization of paints at the nanoscale opens the path to a better understanding of their fabrication and chemical reactivity. (orig.)

  7. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigment particles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.S.; Chen, B.; Zhang, F.; Berenguer, F.; Bean, R.; Kewish, C.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Rodenburg, J.; Robinson, I.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  8. Identification and imaging of modern paints using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with MeV ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović Radović, Iva; Siketić, Zdravko; Jembrih-Simbürger, Dubravka; Marković, Nikola; Anghelone, Marta; Stoytschew, Valentin; Jakšić, Milko

    2017-09-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry using MeV ion excitation was applied to analyse modern paint materials containing synthetic organic pigments and binders. It was demonstrated that synthetic organic pigments and binder components with molecular masses in the m/z range from 1 to 1200 could be identified in different paint samples with a high efficiency and in a single measurement. Different ways of mounting of mostly insulating paint samples were tested prior to the analysis in order to achieve the highest possible yield of pigment main molecular ions. As Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer for MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry is attached to the heavy ion microprobe, molecular imaging on cross-sections of small paint fragments was performed using focused ions. Due to the fact that molecules are extracted from the uppermost layer of the sample and to avoid surface contamination, the paint samples were not embedded in the resin as is usually done when imaging of paint samples using different techniques in the field of cultural heritage.

  9. Iron-containing pigment from an archaeological rupestrian painting of the Planalto Tradition in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floresta, D. L., E-mail: denise.floresta@ifmg.edu.br [Instituto Federal Minas Gerais campus Santa Luzia (Brazil); Fagundes, M.; Fabris, J. D. [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (Brazil); Ardisson, J. D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    Archaeological rupestrian arts of the Planalto Tradition are of relatively widespread occurrence all over the land area of the state of Minas Gerais (MG), Brazil. They are typically composed by monochromic zoomorphic figures, especially of cervids, mainly in red or orange color. A fragment of a rock wall containing an archaeological painting was collected at the Itanguá site, in the municipality of Senador Modestino Gonçalves (geographical coordinates, 17° 56′ 51″ S 43° 13′ 22″ W), MG. The rock piece was covered with an archaeological painting with pigments of two different hues of red. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis revealed only a slight difference in Fe and P content for the two different color zones. The pigment materials on this small fragment of rock were analyzed by X-ray diffraction on the conventional incidence mode (XRD) and on grazing incidence X-ray mode (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray detector (SEM/EDS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) at room temperature. Results indicated the occurrence of mainly hematite but also of diopside in the pigment. CEMS at RT reveal the presence of hematite and (super)paramagnetic ferric components. In order to confirm these results a small amount of powder from the painting pigments was also analyzed by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at 20 K.

  10. Iron-containing pigment from an archaeological rupestrian painting of the Planalto Tradition in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floresta, D. L.; Fagundes, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Ardisson, J. D.

    2015-06-01

    Archaeological rupestrian arts of the Planalto Tradition are of relatively widespread occurrence all over the land area of the state of Minas Gerais (MG), Brazil. They are typically composed by monochromic zoomorphic figures, especially of cervids, mainly in red or orange color. A fragment of a rock wall containing an archaeological painting was collected at the Itanguá site, in the municipality of Senador Modestino Gonçalves (geographical coordinates, 17° 56' 51″ S 43° 13' 22″ W), MG. The rock piece was covered with an archaeological painting with pigments of two different hues of red. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis revealed only a slight difference in Fe and P content for the two different color zones. The pigment materials on this small fragment of rock were analyzed by X-ray diffraction on the conventional incidence mode (XRD) and on grazing incidence X-ray mode (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray detector (SEM/EDS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) at room temperature. Results indicated the occurrence of mainly hematite but also of diopside in the pigment. CEMS at RT reveal the presence of hematite and (super)paramagnetic ferric components. In order to confirm these results a small amount of powder from the painting pigments was also analyzed by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at 20 K.

  11. Iron-containing pigment from an archaeological rupestrian painting of the Planalto Tradition in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floresta, D. L.; Fagundes, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Ardisson, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological rupestrian arts of the Planalto Tradition are of relatively widespread occurrence all over the land area of the state of Minas Gerais (MG), Brazil. They are typically composed by monochromic zoomorphic figures, especially of cervids, mainly in red or orange color. A fragment of a rock wall containing an archaeological painting was collected at the Itanguá site, in the municipality of Senador Modestino Gonçalves (geographical coordinates, 17° 56′ 51″ S 43° 13′ 22″ W), MG. The rock piece was covered with an archaeological painting with pigments of two different hues of red. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis revealed only a slight difference in Fe and P content for the two different color zones. The pigment materials on this small fragment of rock were analyzed by X-ray diffraction on the conventional incidence mode (XRD) and on grazing incidence X-ray mode (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray detector (SEM/EDS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) at room temperature. Results indicated the occurrence of mainly hematite but also of diopside in the pigment. CEMS at RT reveal the presence of hematite and (super)paramagnetic ferric components. In order to confirm these results a small amount of powder from the painting pigments was also analyzed by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at 20 K

  12. Selective paint coatings for coloured solar absorbers: Polyurethane thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paints (Part II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, B.; Spreizer, H.; Surca Vuk, A.; Fir, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Merlini, D.; Vodlan, M. [Color d.d., Cesta komandanta Staneta 4, SI-1230 Medvode (Slovenia); Koehl, M. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-01-23

    Red, green and blue paints were prepared for use as thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paint coatings for solar facade absorbers. The paints were composed of a polyurethane resin binder in which various pigments were incorporated in such a way that they formed stable paint dispersions, satisfying stability criteria for facade coatings. A low emittance of the paints was achieved by using low-emittance aluminium flake pigments combined with iron oxide (red coloured paints). Black pigment was added to adjust solar absorptance. Blue and green paints were made by the addition of coloured aluminium flake pigment and the solar absorptance was also adjusted by the addition of black pigment. Efficiency for photo-thermal conversion of solar radiation was assessed by evaluation of the corresponding performance criteria, which enabled the selection of paints whose performance criteria values were higher than 0 (spectrally non-selective black coating). The results confirmed that blue and green paints and to minor extent red ones, combined selectivity with colour. The morphology of the paints was assessed, revealing that the colours originated from the deposition of finely dispersed colour and/or black pigment on the surface of the aluminium flakes during paint preparation. (author)

  13. EDXRF Analysis of pigments of the Joaquin Sorolla Artistic Paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, Jose L.; Roldan Clodoaldo, David; Mario Alvarez, Juanes

    1999-01-01

    The study of the pictorial work of Joaquin Sorolla has not been carried out from the point of view of the scientific analysis. Analytical techniques give us objective information about materials and process used in artistic works of art. In this sense, the Archaeometry Unit of the Institute of Material Science of the Valencia University (ICMUV), has carried out the first analysis of pigments of the paintings of Sorolla by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence(EDXRF)

  14. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skapin, A. Sever; Ropret, P.; Bukovec, P.

    2007-01-01

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods

  15. Phthalocyanine identification in paintings by reflectance spectroscopy. A laboratory and in situ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldi, G.; Caglio, S.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of identifying pigments using non invasive (n.i.) analyses has gained increasing importance in the field of spectroscopy applied to art conservation and art studies. Among the large set of pigments synthesized and marketed during 20th century, surely phthalocyanine blue and green pigments occupy an important role in the field of painting (including restoration) and printing, thanks to their characteristics like brightness and fastness. This research focused on the most used phthalocyanine blue (PB15:1 and PB15:3) and green pigments (PG7), and on the possibility to identify these organic compounds using a methodology like reflectance spectroscopy in the UV, visible and near IR range (UV-vis-NIR RS), performed easily through portable instruments. Laboratory tests and three examples carried out on real paintings are discussed.

  16. Microanalysis of clay-based pigments in painted artworks by the means of Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košařová, V.; Hradil, David; Němec, I.; Bezdička, Petr; Kanický, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 11 (2013), s. 1570-1577 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * clay-based pigments * clay minerals * iron oxides * microanalysis of paintings Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013

  17. Identification of additives in poly(vinylacetate) artist's paints using PY-GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Miguel F; Doménech-Carbó, Maria Teresa; Fuster-López, Laura; Mecklenburg, Marion F; Martin-Rey, Susana

    2010-05-01

    Commercial poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) paint formulations for artists include a number of compounds in addition to the PVAc polymer and pigments to improve the physical and chemical properties of the resulting product. Among the most common additives are surfactants, coalescing agents, defoamers, freeze-thaw agents and thickeners. These products significantly influence the behaviour of the dried film. Nevertheless, they are usually difficult to detect with conventional analytical methods given their low concentration. In order to identify these additives, present in the dried film as minor components, an analytical method based on in situ thermally assisted pyrolysis-silylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using hexamethyldisilazane as a derivatisation reagent is proposed. This method improves the conventional GC-MS analysis performed by direct pyrolysis and enables the simultaneous identification of the PVAc binding medium and the additives included by the manufacturer in the commercial paint. Five different commercial PVAc paints have been analysed, namely, armour green, burnt umber, oriental red, raw umber and white from Flashe. Internal plasticiser VeoVa consisting of C(10) fatty acids with highly branched chains has been recognised from the MS spectra. On the other hand, the differences found in the additive content of the studied paints, in particular the poly(ethylene glycol)-type surfactant, are in good agreement with their mechanical properties.

  18. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  19. X-ray fluorescence and imaging analyses of paintings by the Brazilian artist Oscar Pereira Da Silva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, P.H.O.V.; Kajiya, E.A.M.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Neiva, A.C.; Pinto, H.P.F.; Almeida, P.A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive analyses, such as EDXRF (Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence) spectroscopy, and imaging were used to characterize easel paintings. The analyzed objects are from the collection of the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. EDXRF results allowed us to identify the chemical elements present in the pigments, showing the use of many Fe-based pigments, modern pigments, such as cobalt blue and cadmium yellow, as well as white pigments containing lead and zinc used by the artist in different layers. Imaging analysis was useful to identify the state of conservation, the localization of old and new restorations and also to detect and unveil the underlying drawings revealing the artist's creative processes. - Highlights: • Performed Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and image analysis to characterize easel paintings • The analyses allow the identification of the pigments elements • Intensity ratio between the emitted characteristic rays is affected by the absorption of the outgoing rays. • Image analysis allow some identification as hidden underlying lines,

  20. Identification of green pigments from fragments of Roman mural paintings of three Roman sites from north of Germania Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debastiani, Rafaela; Simon, Rolf; Goettlicher, Joerg; Heissler, Stefan; Steininger, Ralph; Batchelor, David; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-10-01

    Roman mural green pigment painting fragments from three Roman sites in the north of the Roman province Germania Superior: Koblenz Stadtwald Remstecken (KOSR), Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann" (WEIS) and Mendig Lungenkärchen (MELU), dating from second and third centuries AD were analyzed. The experiments were performed nondestructively using synchrotron-based scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-MA-XRF), synchrotron-based scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF), synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Correlation between SR-MA-XRF, SR-μ-XRF elemental map distributions and optical images of scanned areas was mainly found for the elements Ca, Fe and K. With XRF, Fe and K were identified correlated with green pigment, but in samples from two sites, Mendig Lungenkärchen and Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann", also Cu was detected in minor concentration. The results of SR-XRD and Raman spectroscopy were limited to one sample from Weißenthurm " Am guten Mann". In this sample, green earth and calcium carbonate were identified by SR-XRD and, additionally, malachite by Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Non-Destructive Multi-Analytical Approach to Study the Pigments of Wall Painting Fragments Reused in Mortars from the Archaeological Site of Pompeii (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Miriello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the excavations carried out in Via di Mercurio (Regio VI, 9, 3 in Pompeii, in 2015, some red, green, black, and brown wall painting fragments were found in the preparatory layer of an ancient pavement which was probably built after the 62 AD earthquake. These fragments, derived from the rubble, were used as coarse aggregate to prepare the mortar for building the pavement. The wall painting fragments are exceptionally well preserved, which is an uncommon occurrence in the city of Pompeii. However, as they were enclosed in the mortar, the wall painting fragments were protected from the high temperatures (probably ranging between 180 °C and 380 °C produced by the eruption in 79 AD. The pigmented outer surface of each sample was analyzed using a non-destructive multi-analytical approach, by combining spectrophotometric colorimetry and portable X-ray fluorescence with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositional characterization of the samples revealed the presence of cuprorivaite, goethite, and celadonite in the green pigments; hematite in the red pigments; goethite in the brown pigment; and charcoal in the black pigment. These data probably provide us with the most “faithful picture” of the various red, green, black, and brown pigments used in Pompeii prior to the 79 AD eruption.

  2. Spectrally selective paint coatings. Preparation and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crnjak Orel, Z.C.; Klanjsek Gunde, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2001-06-01

    Preparation and characterization of spectrally selective paint coating for photothermal solar energy conversion are discussed. The applied methods for preparation of paints with described measurements and calculations of black-pigmented coatings were reviewed. The article represents not only possible future applications but also past and current applications of spectrally selective paint coating which are used all over the world since the 1980s. Spectrally selective paint coatings based on combinations of two types of resins, various types of pigments and three types of silica, were prepared. The influence of pigment type and pigment volume concentration (PVC) was studied by applying the Kubelka-Munk (K-M) theory. The relation between the degrees of dispersion and distribution of pigment particles across the paint layer is discussed in terms of K-M coefficients.

  3. Staicele Paint Manufactory, Ochre Deposit of Reciems: A Retrospective Journey Through the History of Staicele Paint Manufactory and Evaluation of Production Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokins Aigars

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A historical paint manufactory in Staicele, Latvia (1967, was using local resources – colour earth. Oil paint composition consisted of pigment, drying oil, varnish and siccative. It had two different tones that are obtained by using natural colour earth pigments: ochre and its burnt form (burnt umber. Pigment quality was analyzed using historical documents, modern pigment tests, and manufactory technology. Chemical composition, particle size, and pigment tone were determined, and the coating ability was calculated. A palette of oil paints based on the historical recipes for restoring Staicele oil paints was created. Properties of colour earth pigments were compared to specimens taken from the local source of iron that is located near the old paint factory. Results provide a historical and technological insight as well as insight in the properties of the basic paint composition.

  4. A multi-technique approach for the characterization of Roman mural paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toschi, Francesco [CNR-IMIP (Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi), Area della Ricerca Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo, Roma, (Italy); Paladini, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.paladini@cnr.it [CNR-IMIP (Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi), Area della Ricerca Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo, Roma, (Italy); Colosi, Francesca [CNR-ITABC (Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali), Area della Ricerca Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo, Roma (Italy); Cafarelli, Patrizia; Valentini, Veronica [CNR-IMIP (Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi), Area della Ricerca Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo, Roma, (Italy); Falconieri, Mauro; Gagliardi, Serena [ENEA, C.R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Roma (Italy); Santoro, Paola [CNR-ISMA (Istituto di Studi sul Mediterraneo Antico), Area della Ricerca Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo, Roma (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    In the frame of an ongoing archeological study on the Sabina area, a countryside close to Rome, white and red samples of roman wall paintings have been investigated by combining X-ray diffraction and different spectroscopic methodologies, namely laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, μ-Raman and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The used multi-technique approach has allowed the unambiguous identification of the red pigment as red ochre and has provided insight on the provenance of both the pigment and the material used for the realization of the wall paintings. The experimental results have confirmed some assumptions on the use of local materials in roman rural architecture.

  5. A Short History of the Chemistry of Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedstein, Harriet G.

    1981-01-01

    Includes information on: (1) relationship of art and science; (2) paintings' early history; (3) Egyptian, Greek, Chinese, Byzantine, and Medieval painting; (4) chemical analysis of pigments; (5) chemistry of early pigments; and (6) paint media. Tabular data are provided on chemical names for artists' pigments with their earliest known dates. (CS)

  6. Raman spectroscopic analysis of a `noli me tangere' painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberts, Stephen; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Abdel-Ghani, Mona; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The discovery of an oil painting in seriously damaged condition with an important historical and a heterodox detail with possible origins in the late fifteenth century has afforded the opportunity for Raman microscopic analysis prior to its restoration being undertaken. The painting depicts a risen Christ following His crucifixion in a `noli me tangere' pose with three women in an Italian terrace garden with a stone balustrade overlooking a rural landscape and an undoubted view of late-medieval Florence. The picture has suffered much abuse and is in very poor condition, which is possibly attributable to its controversial portrayal of a polydactylic Christ with six toes on His right foot. By the late sixteenth century, after the Council of Trent, this portrayal would almost certainly have been frowned upon by the Church authorities or more controversially as a depiction of the holy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments places the painting as being consistent chronologically with the Renaissance period following the identification of cinnabar, haematite, red lead, lead white, goethite, verdigris, caput mortuum and azurite with no evidence of more modern synthetic pigments or of modern restoration having been carried out. An interesting pigment mixture found here is that of the organic dye carmine and cinnabar to produce a particular bright red pigment coloration. Stratigraphic examination of the paint fragments has demonstrated the presence of an orange resin layer immediately on top of the canvas substrate, effectively rendering the pigment as a sandwich between this substratal resin and the overlying varnish. The Raman spectroscopic evidence clearly indicates that an attribution of the artwork to the Renaissance is consistent with the scientific analysis of the pigment composition. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  7. Raman spectroscopic analysis of a 'noli me tangere' painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberts, Stephen; Edwards, Howell G M; Abdel-Ghani, Mona; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2016-12-13

    The discovery of an oil painting in seriously damaged condition with an important historical and a heterodox detail with possible origins in the late fifteenth century has afforded the opportunity for Raman microscopic analysis prior to its restoration being undertaken. The painting depicts a risen Christ following His crucifixion in a 'noli me tangere' pose with three women in an Italian terrace garden with a stone balustrade overlooking a rural landscape and an undoubted view of late-medieval Florence. The picture has suffered much abuse and is in very poor condition, which is possibly attributable to its controversial portrayal of a polydactylic Christ with six toes on His right foot. By the late sixteenth century, after the Council of Trent, this portrayal would almost certainly have been frowned upon by the Church authorities or more controversially as a depiction of the holy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments places the painting as being consistent chronologically with the Renaissance period following the identification of cinnabar, haematite, red lead, lead white, goethite, verdigris, caput mortuum and azurite with no evidence of more modern synthetic pigments or of modern restoration having been carried out. An interesting pigment mixture found here is that of the organic dye carmine and cinnabar to produce a particular bright red pigment coloration. Stratigraphic examination of the paint fragments has demonstrated the presence of an orange resin layer immediately on top of the canvas substrate, effectively rendering the pigment as a sandwich between this substratal resin and the overlying varnish. The Raman spectroscopic evidence clearly indicates that an attribution of the artwork to the Renaissance is consistent with the scientific analysis of the pigment composition.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. The Effect of Ash and Inorganic Pigment Fill on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers and Paints (ISMSE-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Simmons, Julie C.; de Groh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Low atomic oxygen fluence (below 1x10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm) exposure of polymers and paints that have a small ash content and/or inorganic pigment fill does not cause a significant difference in erosion yield compared to unfilled (neat) polymers or paints. However, if the ash and/or inorganic pigment content is increased, the surface population of the inorganic content will begin to occupy a significant fraction of the surface area as the atomic oxygen exposure increases because the ash is not volatile and remains as a loosely attached surface layer. This results in a reduction of the flux of atomic oxygen reacting with the polymer and a reduction in the rate of erosion of the polymer remaining. This paper presents the results of ground laboratory and low Earth orbital (LEO) investigations to evaluate the fluence dependence of atomic oxygen erosion yields of polymers and paints having inorganic fill content.

  9. Conservation of 19th and early 20th century oil paintings - in situ studies using the environmental scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.; Phillips, M.; Wuhrer, R.; Thomas, D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Most 19th and early 20th century oil paintings suffer from fading, discolouration, pitting, cracking swelling or the loss of material due to the embrittlement or the extreme friability of the paint layers. As a consequence of this deterioration, they require special care by experienced conservators to ensure their continued preservation. These aging processes are a consequence of (i) chemical interactions between pigments, oils and binders used by the artist and (ii) the action of air, water and ultra-violet irradiation on these materials. The influence of chemical interactions is pertinent for paintings of this era as the industrial revolution brought forth new colourful chemicals that were quickly adopted as pigments with varying success. The conservation of oil paintings requires an understanding of the individual structure of each work of art and what mechanisms underlie its deterioration. This generally involves the need for (i) correct identification of the pigments used by the artist, (ii) a detailed knowledge of the chemical interaction between these pigments, (iii) an understanding of the artist's method of mixing colours and laying paint on the canvas and (iv) a detailed knowledge of the role of the atmosphere, moisture and UV irradiation on painting deterioration. In addition to dealing with the deterioration that occurs within the painting, conservators spend a large portion of their time correcting earlier failed conservation attempts. Most oil paintings from this era are valuable from an artistic or historic perspective and only an extremely small sample may be excised from the work, hence microscopy is an indispensable technique in art preservation. Optical microscopy is the core analysis technique used, however, in recent years a limited number of conservators have begun to use Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) technology to examine paint layers to take advantage of the accurate and rapid identification of elements present

  10. The results of spectrographic analysis of pigments from known aboriginal quarries and other outcrops in South Australia, and from painting sites in the Olary district of South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobbs, J.M.; Nobbs, M.F.; Moyle, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Pigments are minerals that provide the colour to paints and the pigments most commonly used by Aboriginal people are derived from red and yellow ochre and white minerals for example, gypsum and kaolin. During the early 1980s, the opportunity arose to collect pigments from many sources in South Australia. The sources included samples from known Aboriginal quarries and other outcrops. Pinhead-size samples of paint were collected from figures in some of the rock painting sites in the Olary District. These samples were analysed using Emission Spectrography with the aim of determining the nature of the pigments that is their constituent elements, and to investigate the possibility of finger-printing the sources of the pigments used by Aboriginal people. The ability of being able to source pigments found on the decorated surface of artefacts; pieces of ochre found in archaeological deposits or painted figures in a rock painting is important for understanding the trading and exchange network known to criss-cross Australia in the past. Facilities for Emission Spectrographic analyses were readily available and the capability to analyse (for twenty six elements) samples in milligram proportions suggested its use for the determination of the composition of material from unlimited sources and the compilation of a data-base detailing the results of the analyses in a form suitable for comparison. Examination of this database could then lead to further investigations with narrower and more specific aims. The results of the spectrographic analyses for red ochre from eighteen sources and yellow ochres from eight sources were tabulated as: strongly present >10%; present 1-10%; strong trace 0.1-1% ; trace 0.01-0.1%; faint trace <0.01%. Major elements, for example iron, aluminium, and silica showed in the Strongly Present and Present categories, while Trace and Faint Trace elements were variable. The results of the analyses of seventeen samples of red pigment and five

  11. Analysis of pigments in polychromes by use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, M.; Martín, M.; Silva, D.; Stratoudaki, T.; Anglos, D.; Burgio, L.; Clark, R. J. H.

    2000-09-01

    Two laser-based analytical techniques, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman microscopy, have been used for the identification of pigments on a polychrome from the Rococo period. Detailed spectral data are presented from analyses performed on a fragment of a gilded altarpiece from the church of Escatrón, Zaragoza, Spain. LIBS measurements yielded elemental analytical data which suggest the presence of certain pigments and, in addition, provide information on the stratigraphy of the paint layers. Identification of most pigments and of the materials used in the preparation layer was performed by Raman microscopy.

  12. Micro-analytical evidence of origin and degradation of copper pigments found in Bohemian Gothic murals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarcová, Silvie; Hradil, David; Hradilová, Janka; Kocí, Eva; Bezdicka, Petr

    2009-12-01

    Correct identification of pigments and all accompanying phases found in colour layers of historical paintings are relevant for searching their origin and pigment preparation pathways and for specification of their further degradation processes. We successfully applied the analytical route combining non-destructive in situ X-ray fluorescence analyses with subsequent laboratory investigation of micro-samples by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray powder micro-diffraction (micro-XRD) to obtain efficiently all the data relevant for mineralogical interpretations of the copper pigments origin. Cu salts (carbonates, chlorides, sulphates, etc.) used as pigments exist in a range of polymorphs with similar or identical composition. The efficiency of the micro-XRD for direct identification of such crystal phases present in micro-samples of colour layers was demonstrated in the presented paper. A new, until now unpublished, type of copper pigment--cumengeite, Pb(21)Cu(20)Cl(42)(OH)(40)--used as a blue pigment on a sacral wall painting in the Czech Republic was found by means of micro-XRD. Furthermore, azurite, malachite, paratacamite, atacamite and posnjakite were identified in fragments of colour layers of selected Gothic wall paintings. We found Cu-Zn arsenates indicating the natural origin of azurite and malachite; artificial malachite was distinguishable according to its typical spherulitic crystals. The corrosion of blue azurite to green basic Cu chloride was clearly evidenced on some places exposed to the action of salts and moisture-in a good agreement with the results of laboratory experiments, which also show that oxalic acid accelerates the corrosion of Cu pigments.

  13. A study of selective precipitation techniques used to recover refined iron oxide pigments for the production of paint from a synthetic acid mine drainage solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.; Kney, A.D.; Carley, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    New resource recovery methods of acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment aim to reduce waste by extracting iron contaminants in usable forms, specifically iron oxides as industrial inorganic pigments, which can be marketed and sold to subsidize treatment costs. In this study, iron oxide pigments of varying colors and properties were recovered from a synthetic AMD solution through a stepwise selective precipitation process using oxidation, pH adjustment, and filtration. Chemical and physical design variables within the process, such as alkaline addition rate, reaction temperature, drying duration, and target pH, were altered and observed for their effects on iron oxide morphology as a means of reducing—or even eliminating—the need for refining after synthesis. Resulting iron oxide pigment powders were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and visually evaluated for color and coating ability. Drying duration resulted in increased redness in paint streaks and enhanced crystallinity, as amorphous phases of iron oxide transformed into hematite. Alkaline addition rate showed no effect on the crystallinity of the powders and no consistent effect on color. Conversely, increasing reaction temperature darkened the color of pigments and increased surface area of pigment particles (thus improving coating ability) without changing the crystallinity of the samples. Iron oxides precipitated at pH 3 displayed the highest purity and possessed a distinct yellow color suggestive of jarosite, while other paint streaks darkened in color as trace metal impurities increased. The choice to use lower pH for higher quality iron oxides comes with the compromise of reduced iron recovery efficiency. Manganese and nickel did not begin to precipitate out of solution up to pH 7 and thus require increased pH neutralization in the field if natural AMD is found to contain those metals. All pigments developed in this study were found to be adequate for use as

  14. The use of combined synchrotron radiation micro FT-IR and XRD for the characterization of Romanesque wall paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvado, N.; Buti, S.; Pantos, E.; Bahrami, F.; Labrador, A.; Pradell, T.

    2008-01-01

    The high analytical sensitivity and high spatial resolution of synchrotron radiation-based techniques, in particular SR-XRD and SR-FT-IR, allows the identification of complex micrometric mixtures of compounds that constitute the different layers of ancient paintings. The reliability of the measurements even with an extremely small amount of sampled material is very high, and this is particularly important when analyzing art works. Furthermore, the micro size (10 x 10μm for FT-IR and 30 to 50 μm squared spot size for XRD) of the beam enables one to obtain detailed compositional profiles from the different chromatic and preparation layers. The sensitivity of the techniques is high enough for the determination of minor and trace compounds, such as reaction and weathering compounds. We report here the identification of pigments in the Romanesque wall paintings found in situ in the church of Saint Eulalia of Unha place in the Aran valley (central Pyrenees). During the first centuries of the second millennium numerous religious buildings were built in Western Europe in the Romanesque style. In particular, a great number of churches were built in the Pyrenees, most of which were decorated with wall paintings. Although only a few of these paintings have survived, they represent one of the most important collections of Romanesque art, both for their quantity and quality. A full identification of the pigments, binder, supports, and reaction and weathering compounds has been obtained. The results obtained, in particular aerinite as a pigment, indicate a clear connection between the paintings found in this Occitanian church and the Catalan Romanesque paintings from the south bound of the Pyrenees. (orig.)

  15. The use of combined synchrotron radiation micro FT-IR and XRD for the characterization of Romanesque wall paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvado, N.; Buti, S. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Dpt. d' Enginyeria Quimica, EPSEVG, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Pantos, E.; Bahrami, F. [CCLRC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Labrador, A. [LLS, BM16-ESRF, BP 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Pradell, T. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Dpt. Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    The high analytical sensitivity and high spatial resolution of synchrotron radiation-based techniques, in particular SR-XRD and SR-FT-IR, allows the identification of complex micrometric mixtures of compounds that constitute the different layers of ancient paintings. The reliability of the measurements even with an extremely small amount of sampled material is very high, and this is particularly important when analyzing art works. Furthermore, the micro size (10 x 10{mu}m for FT-IR and 30 to 50 {mu}m squared spot size for XRD) of the beam enables one to obtain detailed compositional profiles from the different chromatic and preparation layers. The sensitivity of the techniques is high enough for the determination of minor and trace compounds, such as reaction and weathering compounds. We report here the identification of pigments in the Romanesque wall paintings found in situ in the church of Saint Eulalia of Unha place in the Aran valley (central Pyrenees). During the first centuries of the second millennium numerous religious buildings were built in Western Europe in the Romanesque style. In particular, a great number of churches were built in the Pyrenees, most of which were decorated with wall paintings. Although only a few of these paintings have survived, they represent one of the most important collections of Romanesque art, both for their quantity and quality. A full identification of the pigments, binder, supports, and reaction and weathering compounds has been obtained. The results obtained, in particular aerinite as a pigment, indicate a clear connection between the paintings found in this Occitanian church and the Catalan Romanesque paintings from the south bound of the Pyrenees. (orig.)

  16. Oil-based paint poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paint - oil-based - poisoning ... Hydrocarbons are the primary poisonous ingredient in oil paints. Some oil paints have heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cobalt, and barium added as pigment. These heavy metals can cause additional ...

  17. Characterization and origin of black and red Magdalenian pigments from Grottes de la Garenne (Vallée moyenne de la Creuse-France): a mineralogical and geochemical approach of the study of prehistorical paintings

    OpenAIRE

    Jezequel , Pierre; Wille , Guillaume; Bény , Claire; Delorme , Fabian; Jean-Prost , Véronique; Cottier , Roger; Breton , Jean; Duré , Frédéric; Despriée , Jackie

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Pigments sampled from wall paintings and from crayons taken on the floor, at the Grottes de la Garenne (Saint-Marcel e Indre, France) have been analyzed and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, Raman micro-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, ICP/MS and analytical TEM. The red pigment used for the wall paintings is mainly composed by hematite, clays, carbon matter and carbonates. Results on the red pigments show that the compositions of the paintings are similar to that...

  18. Physicochemical characterization of pigments and supports in mural paints: Mayapan, Yucatan case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Peraza L, C.A.; Bautista M, J.P.; Arenas A, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is focused in the study of pigments and supports located in mural paintings belonging to the archaeological site of Mayapan. The raw materials utilized by the pre hispanic are revealed by means of the use of different techniques of characterization such as Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM, respectively), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The pigments analyzed cover the following colors: yellow, blue, white, orange, black, red, olive and aqua green. In general, the elements O, Ca and C were the main elements present, as well as quantities of Si and Fe were very significant in all the cases. The manufacture techniques for the production of pigments and supports coincided with all those reported in literature for the Maya culture; however, influence from the Central Altiplane could be appreciated. The results obtained by XRD show the phases of calcite (CaCO 3 ) and dolomite ferroan (Ca(Mg,Fe)(CO 3 ) 2 ) in all the support. The analyses by FTIR indicated the presence of some agglutinating, but it has not been identified yet. (Author)

  19. THz Spectroscopic Identification of Red Mineral Pigments in Ancient Chinese Artworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuping; Zhai, Dongwei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Zhang, Cunlin

    2017-10-01

    Nondestructive analysis of historical objects is of significance for cultural heritage conservation. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used to distinguish seven red mineral pigments used in ancient Chinese artworks. Two absorption features of natural minerals HgS and four highly resolved spectral features of mineral pigment Pb3O4 were observed and identified as their fingerprints in the range 0.2 to 3.0 THz, based on which the spatial distribution of individual chemical substances including cinnabar, vermilion, and red lead were clearly revealed at various frequencies using terahertz spectroscopy imaging. Moreover, a noncontact evaluation of thickness changing and dehydration of a wet painting was monitored by inferring time delay as well as signal amplitude of THz pulses transmitted through the painting. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of THz-TDS and THz imaging for authentic artworks detection, a complete set of THz analysis of two nineteenth century wall paintings discovered in the Fuchen Temple of the Forbidden City, Beijing, was performed and the results indicate that THz measurement techniques provide a noninvasive and nondestructive solution for the care, preservation, and restoration of cultural relics.

  20. Electrochemical assessment of magnetite anti corrosive paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, D. M.; Arroyave, C.; Jaramillo, F.; Mattos, O. R.; Margarit, I. c.; Calderon, J.

    2003-01-01

    With the purpose of deepening in the understanding of the mechanisms of protection of anticorrosive pigments based on iron oxides, this work has been carried out on the production of pure magnetite, and copper and chromium doped magnetite, which were evaluated by different characterization techniques. The paints were prepared with a solvent less epoxy resin maintaining the Pigment volume Content near the Practical Critical value (CPVC), established for each pigment. The paints were applied on polished steel and monitored with electrochemical techniques at total immersion conditions. Permeability and impedance measurements of free films were also done. Impedance data were simulated with the Boukamp software. Results show that the paints pigmented with doped magnetite present better behaviour than a paint prepared with commercial hematite. (Author) 8 refs

  1. On the study of oil paint adhesion on optically transparent glass: Conservation of reverse paintings on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayle, M.; Waugh, D.G.; Colston, B.J.; Lawrence, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adhesion characteristics analysed with respect to reverse paintings on glass. • Physical properties of surfaces and pigments found to affect cohesion and adhesion. • Environmental effects on pigment adhesion to glass have been documented. • Vermillion pigment hardest compared to other pigments, especially with adhesives. • Wettability used to assess adhesion properties relating to reverse paintings on glass. - Abstract: Reverse painting on glass is a technique which consists of applying a cold paint layer on the reverse-side of glass. The main challenge facing these artworks is the fragile adhesion of the pictorial layer – a simple movement can modify the appearance of the painting. This paper details a study into the adhesion parameters of pigments on glass and the comparison between different pigments. The relationships between the binder (linseed oil) with pigments and the glass with or without the use of an adhesive are studied. Physical analyses by surface characterisation have been carried out to better understand the influence of the pigment. The use of a sessile drop device, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a surface 3D profiler and a pencil hardness scratch tester were necessary to establish a comparison of the pictorial layer adhesion. A comparison of the effect of two adhesives, namely ox gall and gum arabic, has shown that the adhesion is not only linked to the physical parameters but that possible chemical reactions can influence the results. Finally, a treatment based on humidity-extreme storage has shown the weakness of some pictorial layers.

  2. On the study of oil paint adhesion on optically transparent glass: Conservation of reverse paintings on glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, M. [Historic and Ancient Materials Group, School of Chemistry, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Waugh, D.G., E-mail: d.waugh@chester.ac.uk [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Thornton Science Park, Ince, Chester CH2 4NU (United Kingdom); Colston, B.J. [Historic and Ancient Materials Group, School of Chemistry, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Thornton Science Park, Ince, Chester CH2 4NU (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Adhesion characteristics analysed with respect to reverse paintings on glass. • Physical properties of surfaces and pigments found to affect cohesion and adhesion. • Environmental effects on pigment adhesion to glass have been documented. • Vermillion pigment hardest compared to other pigments, especially with adhesives. • Wettability used to assess adhesion properties relating to reverse paintings on glass. - Abstract: Reverse painting on glass is a technique which consists of applying a cold paint layer on the reverse-side of glass. The main challenge facing these artworks is the fragile adhesion of the pictorial layer – a simple movement can modify the appearance of the painting. This paper details a study into the adhesion parameters of pigments on glass and the comparison between different pigments. The relationships between the binder (linseed oil) with pigments and the glass with or without the use of an adhesive are studied. Physical analyses by surface characterisation have been carried out to better understand the influence of the pigment. The use of a sessile drop device, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a surface 3D profiler and a pencil hardness scratch tester were necessary to establish a comparison of the pictorial layer adhesion. A comparison of the effect of two adhesives, namely ox gall and gum arabic, has shown that the adhesion is not only linked to the physical parameters but that possible chemical reactions can influence the results. Finally, a treatment based on humidity-extreme storage has shown the weakness of some pictorial layers.

  3. Influence of composition and roughness on the pigment mapping of paintings using mid-infrared fiberoptics reflectance spectroscopy (mid-IR FORS) and multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Clarimma; Bagán, Héctor; García, Jose Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Mid-infrared fiberoptics reflectance spectroscopy (mid-IR FORS) is a very interesting technique for artwork characterization purposes. However, the fact that the spectra obtained are a mixture of surface (specular) and volume (diffuse) reflection is a significant drawback. The physical and chemical features of the artwork surface may produce distortions in the spectra that hinder comparison with reference databases acquired in transmission mode. Several studies attempted to understand the influence of the different variables and propose procedures to improve the interpretation of the spectra. This article is focused on the application of mid-IR FORS and multivariate calibration to the analysis of easel paintings. The objectives are the evaluation of the influence of the surface roughness on the spectra, the influence of the matrix composition for the classification of unknown spectra, and the capability of obtaining pigment composition mappings. A first evaluation of a fast procedure for spectra management and pigment discrimination is discussed. The results demonstrate the capability of multivariate methods, principal component analysis (PCA), and partial least squares discrimination analysis (PLS-DA), to model the distortions of the reflectance spectra and to delimitate and discriminate areas of uniform composition. The roughness of the painting surface is found to be an important factor affecting the shape and relative intensity of the spectra. A mapping of the major pigments of a painting is possible using mid-IR FORS and PLS-DA when the calibration set is a palette that includes the potential pigments present in the artwork mixed with the appropriate binder and that shows the different paint textures.

  4. Oils, paintings and chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eduarda Machado de Araújo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil paintings artists use oils to apply pigments. These oils firstly are liquid and then solidify in a thin film. Many chemical reactions are involved in drying and also in the aging of these oils. Drying is a continuous process that begins with the oxidation of insaturated fatty acids from triglycerides to originate peroxides. These compounds suffer a cascade of reactions that lead to cross linking bonds between fatty acids residues, transforming the oil in a solid film. Identification of the film oil is possible using the palmitic/stearic ratio (P/S by chromatographic (GC and/or spectroscopic techniques. Sterol composition, phytosterols or cholesterol, determined by GC-MS or FTIR techniques, allows investigators to distinguish between oil painting and a temper one that used egg as the binding medium.

  5. Two rapid pigmentation tests for identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, C S; Merz, W G

    1982-01-01

    Two tests were developed for the rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans based on pigment produced by the organism's phenoloxidase activity. Caffeic acid was incorporated into cornmeal agar, a medium used routinely for yeast identification. When tested on this medium, only C. neoformans isolates produced brown pigment. All other yeasts maintained their normal morphology and did not produce the reaction product. A non-medium-based test was developed for same-day identification of C. neoformans isolates. Paper strips saturated with a buffered L-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-ferric citrate solution were inoculated with isolates and incubated at 37 degrees C. Pigment production occurred only with C. neoformans isolates, many within 60 to 90 min. All other yeasts remained negative. PMID:7040452

  6. Alteration of blue pigment in artificial iris in ocular prosthesis: effect of paint, drying method and artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Fernandes, Aline Úrsula Rocha; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Hadadd, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2011-02-01

    The artificial iris is the structure responsible for the dissimulation and aesthetics of ocular prosthesis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the color stability of artificial iris of microwaveable polymerized ocular prosthesis, as a function of paint type, drying method and accelerated aging. A total of 40 discs of microwaveable polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated, and divided according to the blue paint type (n = 5): hydrosoluble acrylic, nitrocellulose automotive, hydrosoluble gouache and oil paints. Paints where dried either at natural or at infrared light bulb method. Each specimen was constituted of one disc in colorless acrylic resin and another colored with a basic sclera pigment. Painting was performed in one surface of one of the discs. The specimens were submitted to an artificial aging chamber under ultraviolet light, during 1008 h. A reflective spectrophotometer was used to evaluate color changes. Data were evaluated by 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). All paints suffered color alteration. The oil paint presented the highest color resistance to artificial aging regardless of drying method. Copyright © 2010 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of the Mamluk painting materials in Cairo, Egypt: El-Ashraf Bersbay Madrasa (826 A.H/ 1423 A.D) a case study.

    OpenAIRE

    prof.Atef Brania

    2010-01-01

    The painting materials in the Islamic monuments in Cairo were variable and distinguished. The accurate identification and characterization of painting materials in an art object or in a paint layer is certainly an important step in the history of art, technology and conservation. The main objective of the present paper is to examine and investigate the different painting materials (pigments, gilding, binding media and painting ground) employed in the decorated ceilings of Madrasa of Al-Ashraf...

  8. Non-destructive micro-analytical differentiation of copper pigments in paint layers of works of art using laboratory-based techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švarcová, Silvie; Čermáková, Zdeňka; Hradilová, J.; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 132, NOV (2014), s. 514-525 ISSN 1386-1425 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Copper pigments * Infrared spectroscopy * Microanalysis * Model experiments * Paintings * Powder X-ray micro-diffraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.353, year: 2014

  9. Cleaning of Easel Paintings: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordalo, R.; Morais, P.J.; Gouveia, H.; Young, C.

    2006-01-01

    The application of laser cleaning to paintings is relatively recent despite its use on stone-based materials for over 30 years. The cleaning of paintings is of high importance, because it is the least reversible invasive intervention, as well as the most usual of all conservation treatments. Paintings are multilayer system of heterogeneous nature, often very sensitive and inherent difficult to clean. Being a noncontact method, laser cleaning has advantages compared to alternative techniques. Over the last decade, there have been important research studies and advances. However, they are far from sufficient to study the effects on painting materials and to establish the best parameters for each material under investigation. This paper presents a historical overview of the application of laser technology to the cleaning of paintings giving special emphasis on the research of the last decade. An overview of the current research into the interaction between the radiation and the different painting materials (varnish, pigments, and medium) is also given. The pigment's mechanisms of discoloration and the presence of media as a variable factor in the discoloration of pigments are discussed.

  10. Differential PIXE for investigating the layer structure of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandò, P. A.; Fedi, M. E.; Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports an example of how the differential PIXE technique can be successfully applied to the investigation of wood or canvas paintings. The work analysed is a famous wood painting by Leonardo da Vinci, the "Madonna dei fusi" (ex-Reford version, 1501), chosen for a pilot study in a wide international project aimed at analysing Leonardo's works of art by means of non-destructive techniques. While illustrating the results obtained concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of the stratigraphy of layers, the merits and limits of differential PIXE in general are pointed out.

  11. Differential PIXE for investigating the layer structure of paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mando, P.A.; Fedi, M.E.; Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an example of how the differential PIXE technique can be successfully applied to the investigation of wood or canvas paintings. The work analysed is a famous wood painting by Leonardo da Vinci, the 'Madonna dei fusi' (ex-Reford version, 1501), chosen for a pilot study in a wide international project aimed at analysing Leonardo's works of art by means of non-destructive techniques. While illustrating the results obtained concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of the stratigraphy of layers, the merits and limits of differential PIXE in general are pointed out

  12. Study on the Spectral Mixing Model for Mineral Pigments Based on Derivative of Ratio Spectroscopy-Take Vermilion and Stone Yellow for Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Hao, Y.; Liu, X.; Hou, M.; Zhao, X.

    2018-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is a completely non-invasive technology for measurement of cultural relics, and has been successfully applied in identification and analysis of pigments of Chinese historical paintings. Although the phenomenon of mixing pigments is very usual in Chinese historical paintings, the quantitative analysis of the mixing pigments in the ancient paintings is still unsolved. In this research, we took two typical mineral pigments, vermilion and stone yellow as example, made precisely mixed samples using these two kinds of pigments, and measured their spectra in the laboratory. For the mixing spectra, both fully constrained least square (FCLS) method and derivative of ratio spectroscopy (DRS) were performed. Experimental results showed that the mixing spectra of vermilion and stone yellow had strong nonlinear mixing characteristics, but at some bands linear unmixing could also achieve satisfactory results. DRS using strong linear bands can reach much higher accuracy than that of FCLS using full bands.

  13. Murillo's paintings revealed by spectroscopic techniques and dedicated laboratory-made micro X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, A., E-mail: adrian@icmse.csic.es [Materials Science Institute of Seville, Avda Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF-CNRS), Palais du Louvre, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Siguenza, M.B.; Franquelo, M.L.; Haro, M.C. Jimenez de; Justo, A.; Perez-Rodriguez, J.L. [Materials Science Institute of Seville, Avda Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2010-06-25

    This paper describes one of the first case studies using micro-diffraction laboratory-made systems to analyse painting cross-sections. Pigments, such as lead white, vermilion, red ochre, red lac, lapis lazuli, smalt, lead tin yellow type I, massicot, ivory black, lamp black and malachite, were detected in cross-sections prepared from six Bartolome Esteban Murillo paintings by micro-Raman and micro-XRD combined with complementary techniques (optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR). The use of micro-XRD was necessary due to the poor results obtained with conventional XRD. In some cases, pigment identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques utilised in this study.

  14. A multi-analytical study of the fifteenth century mural paintings of the Batalha Monastery (Portugal) in view of their conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadas, S.; Candeias, A.; Dias, C.; Schiavon, N.; Cotovio, M.; Pestana, J.; Gil, M.; Mirão, J.

    2013-12-01

    The systematic characterization of the painting's palette and technique applied on the execution of the mural paintings of the Batalha Monastery (Batalha, Leiria, Portugal) is presented. These are the oldest mural paintings known in Portugal (apart from Roman frescoes) and represent the beginning of an artistic Portuguese tradition that continues until the nineteenth century. The aim of the study was to identify for the first time by adopting a multi-analytical physico-chemical approach of the pigments, binder, and alteration products (white veils, crusts, and pigment alteration) of these unique works of arts in order not only to better understand the painting technique, but also to support a conservation-restoration intervention that took place from April to August 2010. Micro-sampling of paint layers was performed on representative areas of the paintings. The characterization of the pigments and binders was carried out by microscopy and microanalysis of cross sections using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), micro-FTIR, and micro X-ray diffraction. The combined analysis of the paintings allowed the identification of the painting's palette: Vermillion (HgS) and red ochre for the reds, yellow ochres for the yellows, green earths and malachite for the greens, azurite for the blues, and carbon for the blacks. The use of the pigment is dependent of the motive painted while the most expensive materials were used in the most important iconographic motives. Alteration of malachite was identified in darkened layers in green areas of the paintings. White veil areas on the surface of the paintings were identified as calcite from precipitation/dissolution processes due to water run-off on the sacristy dome ceiling and walls.

  15. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  16. The art in science: electron microscopy and paintings conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: When examining a painting, a conservator uses many different and complementary methods of analysis to build an understanding of the materials and way the painting was constructed. Common methods of examination include x-radiography, infrared reflectography, ultraviolet fluorescence and optical microscopy of the surface of the painting. Minute samples of paint prepared as cross-sections are sometimes taken for optical examination under the microscope, and it is these that can, conveniently, be further analysed with electron microscopy to yield another level of information. Electron microscopy has a valuable role to play within the examination of paintings, be it for pigment identification alone, or at the other end of the spectrum, for informing issues around the attribution of works of art. This paper provides an overview of the use of electron microscopy in the conservation of paintings by discussing examples of work undertaken by the National Gallery of Victoria and the CSIRO. Work described includes the problem of distinguishing between restorers' original paint in a landscape by Arthur Streeton, and the examination of the ground or priming layer in a Rembrandt portrait which clarified its attribution to his studio. Copyright (2003) Australian Microbeam Analysis Society

  17. Identification of Painting Layers of Sennefer Tomb by Ion Beam Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El-Aal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Egypt has many pharaonic tombs for kings, queens and noblemen. The Sennefer tomb, one of the most important nobleman tombs, is located in the southern hillside of Sheikh Abd El-Qurna - west side of Luxor. It is dated back to 1439-1413 B.C. (18 th Dynasty) and is usually referred as the Tomb of Vines, due to the large part of the ceiling of the burial chamber. The vine tomb was carved inside a mountain, its walls are covered with plaster and were painted using the tempera technique (pigments mixed with organic binding medium). The analysis was performed by using particle-induced X-ray emission, microbeam particle-induced X-ray emission and optical microscope for the six samples from the Vine tomb such as white, black, red, yellow, blue and green pigments and for the ground layers of the tomb in order to identify the composition of plaster layers and pigments. The data about the nature of these materials are indispensable for conservation and cleaning. (author)

  18. Effects of Wood Roughness, Light Pigments, and Water Repellent on the Color Stability of Painted Spruce Subjected to Natural and Accelerated Weathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Reinprecht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the color stability of painted Norway spruce (Picea abies samples subjected to natural and accelerated weathering, using Duncan’s tests and correlation analyses. The following effects were studied: (1 the different initial roughness of the wood; (2 use of transparent or lightly-pigmented top-coat layers; and (3 the presence of the final water-repellent layer. Natural weathering at a 45° slope in an industrial zone lasted 104 weeks, whereas accelerated weathering in Xenotest with 0.55 W/m2 UV irradiation at 340 nm and sprayed water lasted 12 weeks. The color stability of painted spruce, measured in a CIE-L*a*b* system, was not, in the majority of cases, significantly affected by the initial roughness of the wood, the type of top-coat (WoodCare UV or PerlColor layer, or presence of the final water repellent (AquaStop layer. The light pine or larch pigments in the top-coat layers had positive color stabilizing effects. In their presence, the darkening (-L* and total color differences (E* of the painted samples dropped ca. 2.5 times during exterior weathering and ca. 5 times during Xenotest weathering. Samples painted with transparent coatings turned a reddish shade (+a* during the Xenotest, while those exposed to the exterior absorbed dirt and became more blue (-b*.

  19. Proton beam modification of lead white pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gutiérrez, P.C.; Miserque, F.; Thomé, L.

    2013-01-01

    Pigments and paint materials are known to be sensitive to particle irradiation. Occasionally, the analysis of paintings by PIXE can induce a slight or dark stain depending on the experimental conditions (beam current, dose, particle energy). In order to understand this discoloration, we have irradiated various types of art white pigments – lead white (hydrocerussite and basic lead sulfate), gypsum, calcite, zinc oxide and titanium oxide – with an external 3 MeV proton micro-beam commonly used for PIXE experiments. We have observed various sensitivities depending on the pigment. No visible change occurs for calcite and titanium oxide, whereas lead white pigments are very sensitive. For the majority of the studied compounds, the discoloration is proportional to the beam current and charge. The damage induced by proton beam irradiation in lead white pigments was studied by micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. Structural modifications and dehydration were detected. Damage recovery was investigated by thermal treatment and UV-light irradiation. The discoloration disappeared after one week of UV illumination, showing that PIXE experiments could be safely undertaken for pigments and paintings

  20. Characterization of paint and varnish on a medieval Coptic-Byzantine icon: Novel usage of dammar resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, M.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Stern, B.; Janaway, R.

    2009-08-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken into a 13th century Coptic-Byzantine icon from the St. Mercurius Church, St. Mercurius monastery, Old Cairo, Egypt. The layered structure, pigment composition and varnish identification were revealed by means of optical and Raman microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The structure of the icon comprised six layers; wooden panel, canvas, white ground, two bole layers and a single paint layer. Azurite (2CuCO 3·Cu(OH) 2), cinnabar (mercuric (II) sulfide α-HgS), yellow ochre (Fe 2O 3·H 2O), hydromagnesite Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·4H 2O and lamp black (carbon, C) are the pigments identified in the icon. The green paint area is of interest as it is applied neither with a green pigment nor with a mixture of a blue and yellow pigment. Instead, a yellow layer of dammar resin was applied on top of blue azurite to obtain the green colour. Pinaceae sp. resin mixed with drying oil was used as a protective varnish.

  1. Identification of Vivianite in Painted Works of Art and Its Significance for Provenance and Authorship Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, Zdeňka; Hradilová, J.; Jehlička, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Massanek, A.; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl1 (2014), s. 148-167 ISSN 0003-813X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Vivianite * Pigment degradation * Jean george de hamilton * Microanalysis * Paint layers Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2014

  2. An investigation into the use of micro-Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of car paints and single textile fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zięba-Palus, Janina; Wąs-Gubała, Jolanta

    2011-05-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied to identification and differentiation between criminalistic traces such as micropaint chips and single fibres. The aim was to determine the degree of discrimination between fibres coloured by defined chemical dye classes and to differentiate between paint samples on the basis of pigment/dye content. Samples of coloured cotton fibres and samples of green car paints were examined. It was found that the majority of the obtained Raman spectra provided information about the main dyes present in the sample. However, in some cases fluorescence of the samples made dye identification impossible. Spectral libraries for examined paint samples and single fibres were created in order to facilitate quick recognition of similar forensic traces using this analytical method.

  3. Micro-XRF complemented by x-radiography and digital microscopy imaging for the study of hidden paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanova, Svetlana; Hermon, Sorin

    2017-07-01

    The present study describes a novel approach to the study of hidden by integrating the non-invasive micro-X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy, X-radiography and digital microscopy. The case study analysed is a portrait of a male figure discovered under the painting of Ecce Homo, attributed to Titian's studio with an estimated date in the 1550s. The X-radiography images exposed the details of the underpainting, which appeared to be a nearly finished portrait of a standing man, overpainted by the current composition of Ecce Homo at a 180° angle. The microscopy observations of the upper painting's cracks and flaked areas enabled the study of the exposed underlayers in terms of their colour appearance and pigment particles. The subsequent pigment analysis was performed by micro-XRF. Since the described XRF analysis was performed not in scanner mode, the correct selection of the measurement spots for the micro analysis and separation between pigments of the lower and the upper painting was of paramount importance. The described approach for spot selection was based on the results of the preceding X-radiography and digital microscopy tests. The presence of lead white, vermilion, copper green and iron earth in the underlying portrait was confirmed by the multiple point XRF analysis of Pb, Hg, Cu, Fe and Mn lines. The described investigation method proved to be useful in the identification of the pigments of the underlying painting and consequently assisted in the tentative reconstruction of its colour palette. Moreover, the undertaken approach allowed discovering the potential of micro-XRF technique in the study of hidden compositions.

  4. Use of infrared hyperspectral imaging as an aid for paint identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Polak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Art authentication is a complicated process that often requires the extensive study of high value objects. Although a series of non-destructive techniques is already available for art scientists, new techniques, extending current possibilities, are still required. In this paper, the use of a novel mid-infrared tunable imager is proposed as an active hyperspectral imaging system for art work analysis. The system provides access to a range of wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum (2500–3750 nm which are otherwise difficult to access using conventional hyperspectral imaging (HSI equipment. The use of such a tool could be beneficial if applied to the paint classification problem and could help analysts map the diversity of pigments within a given painting. The performance of this tool is demonstrated and compared with a conventional, off-the-shelf HSI system operating in the near infrared spectral region (900–1700 nm. Various challenges associated with laser-based imaging are demonstrated and solutions to these challenges as well as the results of applying classification algorithms to datasets captured using both HSI systems are presented. While the conventional HSI system provides data in which more pigments can be accurately classified, the result of applying the proposed laser-based imaging system demonstrates the validity of this technique for application in art authentication tasks.

  5. Simulations of color development in tinted paints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, A.; Barkema, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to investigate how several thermodynamic and kinetic factors affect the distribution of pigments, when a water-based pigment dispersion is added to a solvent-borne paint. Our model contains three types of lattice particles: water, pigment and organic solvent,

  6. Preparation, characterization and application of some anti- corrosive molybdate pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Ghaffar, M.A.; El-Sawy, S.M.; Ahmed, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Some molybdate pigments of single and mixed metal ions, namely, zinc, calcium and zinc-calcium molybdates were prepared, characterized and evaluated according to international standard methods. The evaluated pigments were incorporated in some paint formulations. The physicomechanical, chemical and corrosion protective properties of the paint films were measured; this was done in comparison with a commercial imported molybdate pigment. It was found that, the prepared pigments under investigation are fine white crystalline powders of suitable pigment properties. They can be successfully used as environmentally acceptable anti corrosive pigments. They can replace satisfactorily the similar commercial imported pigment and possess adequate or superior properties against corrosion

  7. Multi-analytical study of historical semiconductor pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporosso, V.

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused on the study of semiconductor-based pigments, which substituted traditional pigments in the second half of the 19. century. Synthetic semiconductor pigments may be chemically unstable due to the presence of many impurities unintentionally introduced during manufacturing. The aim of this work is to provide an insight on the application of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) for the analysis of these painting materials, including both Cd- and Zn-based pigments. Three different approaches have been followed: the semi-quantitative analysis of samples with similar elemental composition, the complementary use of XRF and Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of elemental and molecular composition and the synchrotron-based XRF and XANES for the detection of impurities. The synergetic combination of different techniques provides information useful for the definition of specific markers for future analysis of paint-samples with implications for the conservation and treatment of late 19. and early 20. century paintings.

  8. Western European influences on Post-Byzantine panel painting technique through binding media identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouloumpi, E.; Lawson, G.; Pavlidis, B.

    2006-01-01

    Post-Byzantine is called the period after the invasion of the Ottomans in Constantinople, the capital of Byzantium in 1453, which lasted until the establishment of the first Greek State in 1836. The Post - Byzantine era is one of the most important artistic periods of the Neo-Hellenic Pictorial Art, since, through cultural exchanges with Western Europe, it sets the fundaments for oil painting. The thematology changes from religious to civil, the technique changes from egg yolk to egg-oil emulsion in order to end up to pure oil painting and finally, it opens 'the gates' for the modern artistic movements of the world. The current research is focused on the study of the effects of western influences on the technique and pictorial characteristics of the post-Byzantine icons by the study of any changes in the pigment's binding media through scientific analyses (SEM-EDX, micro-FTIR and GC), as well as of any changes in the painting style of the icons through comparison with both Byzantine and western painting standards. Research never ends and the results of this work give rise to further analysis, in order to throw some light to this transitional period of art. (Author)

  9. Zinc, Paint loss and Harmony in blue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Krarup Andersen, Cecil; Baadsgaard, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    P.S. Krøyer’s late and most popular paintings have proven very difficult to preserve, and as zinc white has been known to cause structural problems in paintings, the authors investigate if the damage seen in the late paintings can be related to the use of this relatively new pigment. Eight painti...

  10. Conservation problems with paintings containing fluorescent layers of paint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie De Winter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available L’artiste moderne cherche continuellement de nouvelles techniques. Des nouveaux matériaux tels que l’éponge, le polyester, le sable, etc. sont devenus courants. Ces développements amènent de nouveaux problèmes dans le domaine de la conservation (préventive des matériaux en question. Chaque matériau doit être analysé individuellement afin de préserver  le mieux possible l’intention de l’artiste à long terme. La présente recherche concerne des matériaux très récents: les pigments et les couleurs fluorescentes. Ces derniers n’ont fait leur apparition qu’au vingtième siècle. Pour cette raison les données concernant leur dégradation et leur conservation sont peu nombreuses. La majorité des tableaux fluorescents sont conçus pour être montrés sous éclairage UV. En cas de dommage, si l’œuvre a besoin d’être retouchée, ceci pose un grand problème esthétique. La retouche devient visible sous les lampes UV. La première partie de la recherche concerne la composition des différentes sortes de pigments et de peintures. Par la suite, les différentes causes de dégradation- lumière UV, chaleur, etc.- sont analysées en détail. Pour conclure, un possible remède est proposé.In modern art we can see that artists are breaking with traditional techniques. New materials like sponge, polyester, sand, etc. are being used. This causes a lot of new problems in the (preventive conservation of works containing these materials. Every material needs to be researched individually so the exact intention of the artist can be preserved for a (relatively long period. My research is about very recent materials: fluorescent pigments and paints. These only started to be used by artists from the 60’s. That's why there is not much information about their aging and ways to (preventively conserve them. A lot of fluorescent paintings are meant to be shown under UV-light. If a fluorescent painting has damage and needs to be retouched

  11. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, K.; Mass, J.; Mehta, A.; Church, J.; Meirer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system.

  12. X-ray fluorescence analysis of yellow pigments in altarpieces by Valencian artists of the XV and XVI centuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, J.L.; Roldan, C.; Ardid, M.; Navarro, E.

    1999-01-01

    XRF analysis has allowed a quick and precise detection and identification of the inorganic elements that compose the yellow pigments in altarpieces of the XV and XVI centuries painted by the Valencian artists Miguel Alcaniz, Vicente Macip, Juan de Juanes, Hernando Yanez de la Almedina and Hernando Llanos. The analyses have been carried out with an XRF portable system that consists of a tube of X-rays and detectors of Si(Li) and cadmium zinc telluride. This system has enabled a non-aggressive and non-destructive analysis of many pieces at the Museo de Bellas Artes of Valencia (Spain). Among the yellow pigments we have identified a pigment composed by lead and tin oxides named lead-tin yellow (Pb 2 SnO 4 ), frequently used in European paintings from the XIV century until the first half of the XVIII century. This fact demonstrates the influence of elements and pictorial techniques from Europe to the region of Valencia

  13. Non-destructive micro-X-ray diffraction analysis of painted artefacts: Determination of detection limits for the chromium oxide-zinc oxide matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Lau, D.; Hay, D.; Wright, N.

    2006-01-01

    The development of micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) enables non-destructive, in situ analysis of crystalline pigments on artworks and archaeological objects. Pigments with X-ray diffraction patterns with large peak intensities may complicate the identification of other components with lower absorption coefficients, especially if present in low concentrations in the paint sample. Investigation of this issue involved: (1) micro-XRD examination and analysis of the amorphous and crystalline phases of fifteen pigment films and (2) micro-XRD examination and semi-quantitative analysis of various chromium oxide-zinc oxide mixtures, which established detection limits as low as 5 ± 2%

  14. Natural pigments and sacred art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  15. Spectroscopic analysis of XIV century wall paintings from Patriarchate of Peć Monastery, Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marić-Stojanović, M.; Bajuk-Bogdanović, D.; Uskoković-Marković, S.; Holclajtner-Antunović, I.

    2018-02-01

    The Church of the Holy Mother of God Hodegetria in Peć is decorated with wall paintings that date from the beginning of the 14th century. In terms of style they correspond to Byzantine wall paintings from the epoch of Paleologos. The painting technique and pigment pallete has been examined on micro fragments in thin cross-sections by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro- Raman spectroscopy. Use of the fresco technique and two supporting plaster layers was noted on the majority of samples, while in large blue painted areas, a combination of fresco and secco techniques was used. The SEM-EDS results showed the presence of Ca as the main component of plaster besides the traces of Si and Mg. In some samples egg white as a binder was identified. The paint film is often multilayered. Twelve pigments were identified, mainly natural earth pigments such as red ochre, yellow ochre and green earth. A mixture of pigments was used for attaining desirable optical and aesthetical impressions. As decay product only weddelite was detected in many preparatory and painted samples.

  16. New approaches for investigating paintings by ion beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Viguerie, L. de; Walter, Ph.; Pichon, L.; Gutierrez, P.C.; Salomon, J.; Menu, M.; Sorieul, S.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, among the IBA techniques, only PIXE has been used for analyzing paintings. However, quantitative PIXE analysis is sometimes difficult to interpret due to the layered structure, the presence of varnish and organic binder and, in some cases, discoloration of the pigments has been observed due to the interaction of the ion beam with the compounds. In order to improve the characterization of paintings, we propose some alternative experimental procedures. First of all, backscattering spectrometry (BS) and PIXE are simultaneously combined in order to collect complementary information such as layer thickness and organic compound quantification. The simultaneous PIXE and BS experiments also have the advantage of being able to analyze the same area in one experiment. This combination, implemented with an external beam, was directly applied on paintings and on painting cross-sections for the study of Italian Renaissance masterpieces. We have obtained valuable results not only on the pigment itself but also, for the first time, on the binder to pigment proportion which is not well documented in the ancient recipes. Moreover, in order to restrain beam damages due to the ion stopping power, we propose to analyze very thin painting cross-sections by a combination of PIXE-RBS and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM).

  17. New approaches for investigating paintings by ion beam techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, L.; de Viguerie, L.; Walter, Ph.; Pichon, L.; Gutiérrez, P. C.; Salomon, J.; Menu, M.; Sorieul, S.

    2010-06-01

    Up to now, among the IBA techniques, only PIXE has been used for analyzing paintings. However, quantitative PIXE analysis is sometimes difficult to interpret due to the layered structure, the presence of varnish and organic binder and, in some cases, discoloration of the pigments has been observed due to the interaction of the ion beam with the compounds. In order to improve the characterization of paintings, we propose some alternative experimental procedures. First of all, backscattering spectrometry (BS) and PIXE are simultaneously combined in order to collect complementary information such as layer thickness and organic compound quantification. The simultaneous PIXE and BS experiments also have the advantage of being able to analyze the same area in one experiment. This combination, implemented with an external beam, was directly applied on paintings and on painting cross-sections for the study of Italian Renaissance masterpieces. We have obtained valuable results not only on the pigment itself but also, for the first time, on the binder to pigment proportion which is not well documented in the ancient recipes. Moreover, in order to restrain beam damages due to the ion stopping power, we propose to analyze very thin painting cross-sections by a combination of PIXE-RBS and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM).

  18. New approaches for investigating paintings by ion beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, L., E-mail: Lucile.beck@cea.f [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS-UMR 171, Palais du Louvre - Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Viguerie, L. de; Walter, Ph.; Pichon, L. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS-UMR 171, Palais du Louvre - Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Gutierrez, P.C. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Salomon, J.; Menu, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS-UMR 171, Palais du Louvre - Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Sorieul, S. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, IN2P3, UMR 5797, Universite de Bordeaux 1, Chemin du Solarium BP120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)

    2010-06-15

    Up to now, among the IBA techniques, only PIXE has been used for analyzing paintings. However, quantitative PIXE analysis is sometimes difficult to interpret due to the layered structure, the presence of varnish and organic binder and, in some cases, discoloration of the pigments has been observed due to the interaction of the ion beam with the compounds. In order to improve the characterization of paintings, we propose some alternative experimental procedures. First of all, backscattering spectrometry (BS) and PIXE are simultaneously combined in order to collect complementary information such as layer thickness and organic compound quantification. The simultaneous PIXE and BS experiments also have the advantage of being able to analyze the same area in one experiment. This combination, implemented with an external beam, was directly applied on paintings and on painting cross-sections for the study of Italian Renaissance masterpieces. We have obtained valuable results not only on the pigment itself but also, for the first time, on the binder to pigment proportion which is not well documented in the ancient recipes. Moreover, in order to restrain beam damages due to the ion stopping power, we propose to analyze very thin painting cross-sections by a combination of PIXE-RBS and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM).

  19. Simultaneous identification of historical pigments Prussian blue and indigo in paintings by electrospray mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pauk, V.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Papoušková, B.; Sulovský, P.; Lemr, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 8 (2013), s. 927-930 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mass spectrometry * electrospray * historical painting Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.709, year: 2013

  20. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  1. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the Maya wall paintings in Ek'Balam, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, P.; Bodé, S.; Alonso, A.; Moens, L.

    2005-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the examination of wall painting fragments from the archaeological site of Ek'Balam (Yucatán, Mexico). Thirty-three samples have been studied, all originating from room 23 of the Acropolis, and being representative of the painting technique at Ek'Balam during the late Classic Maya period. Several pigments such as haematite, calcite, carbon, cinnabar and indigo were identified in these samples. The latter pigment was presumed to be present as 'Maya blue', which is an intercalation product of indigo and palygorskite clay. The observed Raman spectra are reported and some band assignments have been made. This survey is the first Raman spectroscopic examination of a whole set of pigments in archaeological Maya wall painting fragments.

  2. Elemental composition of paint cross sections by nuclear microprobe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nens, B.; Trocellier, P.; Engelmann, C.; Lahanier, C.

    1982-09-01

    Physico-chemical characterization of pigments used in artistic painting give precious indications on age of paintings and sometimes on geographical origin of ores. After recalling the principle of protons microprobe, first results obtained by microanalysis of painting cross sections for non destructive microanalysis of impurities in white lead are given [fr

  3. Characterization of Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings, the Excavations of Cairo University at Saqqara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at characterizing some Egyptian wall paintings discovered during the excavations of Cairo University (since 1988 and recently in 2005 at Saqqara area in the south of Cairo. There, a number of tombs dating back to the 19th dynasty (c.1293–1185 BC were discovered. The walls of these tombs are carved with bass and raised reliefs and painted with different colours. The characterization of the wall paintings was done by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (backscattered electron mode, BSE equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS, micro XRF spectrometry (µ-XRF, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The analysis of the examined samples indicated that the blue pigment is Egyptian blue (Cuprorivaite, the green pigment is Egyptian green, the red pigment is red ochre, and the yellow pigment is a blended layer of yellow ochre and orpiment (As2S3. The results will help in providing an image concerning some painting materials used during the new Kingdom in ancient Egypt

  4. Characterization of the Mamluk painting materials in Cairo, Egypt: El-Ashraf Bersbay Madrasa (826 A.H/ 1423 A.D a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    prof.Atef Brania

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The painting materials in the Islamic monuments in Cairo were variable and distinguished. The accurate identification and characterization of painting materials in an art object or in a paint layer is certainly an important step in the history of art, technology and conservation. The main objective of the present paper is to examine and investigate the different painting materials (pigments, gilding, binding media and painting ground employed in the decorated ceilings of Madrasa of Al-Ashraf Bersbay (Mamluk Jarkasy period. X-ray diffraction (X.R.D., scanning electron microscope SEM (EDAX, light optical microscope (LOM and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, together with determination of physical properties of the support (water content and density and microbiological study, adapted for analysis, investigation and evaluation of the current status. The study revealed the severe damage of painting materials. Gypsum, ultramarine, smalt, prussian blue, red ochre, emerald green, red lead (minium and gold leaves were identified in El-Ashraf Bersbay Madrasa decoration painting.

  5. Identification and hazard prediction of tattoo pigments by means of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Andree, Sarah; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The implementation of regulation for tattoo ink ingredients across Europe has generated the need for analytical methods suitable to identify prohibited compounds. Common challenges of this subject are the poor solubility and the lack of volatility for most pigments and polymers applied in tattoo inks. Here, we present pyrolysis coupled to online gas chromatography and electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) as quick and reliable tool for pigment identification using both purified pigments and tattoo ink formulations. Some 36 organic pigments frequently used in tattoo inks were subjected to py-GC/MS with the aim to establish a pyrogram library. To cross-validate pigment identification, 28 commercially available tattoo inks as well as 18 self-made pigment mixtures were analyzed. Pyrograms of inks and mixtures were evaluated by two different means to work out the most reliable and fastest strategy for an otherwise rather time-consuming data review. Using this approach, the declaration of tattoo pigments currently used on the market could be verified. The pyrolysis library presented here is also assumed suitable to predict decomposition patterns of pigments when affected by other degradation scenarios, such as sunlight exposure or laser irradiation. Thus, the consumers' risk associated with the exposure to toxicologically relevant substances that originate from pigment decomposition in the dermal layers of the skin can be assessed. Differentiation between more or less harmful pigments for this field of application now will become feasible.

  6. Identification and comparison of lead white of the 15-th century Gdansk panel paintings by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewska-Swietlik, J.; Panczyk, E.

    2005-01-01

    The lead white has been used in painting science the middle ages both as a priming ground and pigment. Purity of the lead white is directly connected with the lead purification methods that have undergone considerable changes throughout centuries. Marked progress in this respect was noted in the 19-th century. That is why determination of such elements a Ag, Hg, Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Ba and Sb in the lead white gives reliable information regarding the age of the painting in question. Analyses of samples of the lead white taken from genuine 15-th century panel paintings representing the so-called Pomeranian school were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. The total of 32 elements were determined in those samples; also the comparison of the data for Malopolska and Silesian schools was performed. (author)

  7. A new concept for anti-fouling paint for Yachts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallstroem, Eva; Jespersen, Henrik T.; Schaumburg, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    It is shown to be possible to develop yacht paint with a reduction of 70% of biocide, without pigments/fillers (cuprous oxide and zinc oxide) that may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment, and to obtain application and usage properties that match present commercial anti......-fouling products for yachts. To be able to reduce the amount of biocide, in this case zinc pyrithione, it is necessary to have control over the amount of biocide present in the surface layer. The control is achieved by encapsulating the biocide in a silica gel. The silica gel is dispersed together with pigments...... that is formulated without introducing new compounds and with reduced amount of zinc pyrithione (1/3). Finally, it is shown that it is possible to make antifouling paint for yachts without zinc or copper based pigments by using other traditional pigments and fillers, which have no known long-term adverse effect...

  8. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  9. Discoloration of Ancient Egyptian Mural Paintings by Streptomyces Strains and Methods of Its Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Ali SAKR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces isolated from mural paintings at Tell Basta and Tanis tombs were identified using 16S rDNA sequencing method. These Streptomyces strains caused discoloration of mural paintings with irreversible red stains of carotenoid pigment. A mixture of n-hexan and acetone (92:8 v/v was the best solvent for extracting and purification of red pigment from biomass of Streptomyces. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF were the most effective in treatment of these red stains without changing the paintings or stone surfaces.

  10. X-Ray microfluorescence analysis of pigments in decorative paintings from sarcophagus cartonage of an Egyptian mummy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Cristiane; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Brancaglion Junior, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This work evaluated the pigments used in decorative paintings from sarcophagus cartonage fragments of an Egyptian mummy using X-Ray Microfluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation technique. This female mummy (n.158) is considered one of the most important pieces of the National Museum (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) because of its unconventional embalming with legs and arms swathed separately. This embalming procedure probably was used by a Theban family from the Roman period (first century BC), whose tomb was recently discovered. Only seven mummies like this were discovered and they are exposed in European museums. The results obtained for the cartonage samples were compared to those obtained for a linen wrapping fragment of which provenance was known. The objective of this work was to characterize the elemental composition of the cartonage pigments and to verify if they were according to those used by Egyptian craftsmen in the Roman period. The measurements were performed at the XRF beamline of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using white beam and a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 165 eV. The elements found in the samples were: Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Hg and Pb. (author)

  11. Surface analysis characterisation of gum binders used in modern watercolour paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoko; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Conducting this study has demonstrated that not only SEM-EDX but also XPS can be an efficient tool for characterising watercolour paint surfaces. We find that surface effects are mediated by water. Once the powdered components in the watercolour come into contact with water they dramatically transform their chemical structures at the surface and show the presence of pigment components with a random dispersion within the gum layer. Hence the topmost surface of the paint is confirmed as being composed of the gum binder components. This result is difficult to confirm using just one analytical technique (either XPS or SEM-EDX). In addition, peak fitting of C1s XPS spectra suggests that the gum binder in the commercial watercolour paints is probably gum arabic (by comparison with the reference materials). This identification is not conclusive, but the combination techniques of XPS and SEM shows the surface structure with material distribution of the gum binder and the other ingredients of the watercolour paints. Therefore as a unique technique, XPS combined with SEM-EDX may prove a useful method in the study of surface structure for not only watercolour objects but also other art objects; which may in future help in the conservation for art.

  12. The physicochemical characterization of cave paintings of Baja California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, B.; Cobo, J.; Schorr, M.; Cota, L.; Oviedo, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeolithic paintings of Baja California constitute an important contribution to the national, historic and cultural patrimony of Mexico. The aim of this investigation was to determine the physicochemical characteristics, the microstructure and texture of these polychrome paintings, painted on rocks encountered in the mountainous, desert/arid zones of Baja California and Baja California South. The first stage of this work was devoted to the examination and recording of the cave paintings of 'El Vallecito', a narrow fluvial valley displaying large granitic rocks emerging from the sandy soil. Tiny painting samples were collected and analyzed by SEM, EDS and FTIR techniques. The painters used four main colours: red, black, yellow and white. The paint raw materials are mineral pigments: white (kaolin, calcite, and gypsum), red (hematite), yellow (ochre, limonite), black (charcoal from burnt wood or calcined bones) and water as a diluent and/or a binder, all encountered in the painters habitat. The minerals were collected, ground and sometimes heated to change their tone. By mixing with water, a spreadable paste or a thick slurry was produced, which was applied with the fingers for lines or a piece of animal skin for figures, respectively. The 100% solids, dry paint converts into a dense, hard layer, incrusted into the grainy, rough, hollow granite rock surface. This paint might be called s tone on stone , explaining its permanence for centuries enduring heat, wind and weather. A simulation of the painting technique was done at the Materials and Corrosion Laboratory, UABC by collecting mineral pigments, preparing the paint as a paste or slurry and applying it on a granitic rock. Knowing the paint composition, production and application techniques will be useful in e conservation and restoration of cave paintings and stone-built, ancient structures such as pyramids, cathedrals and monuments. (Author)

  13. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Synthetic Organic Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Naeko; Takahashi, Mitsuko; Sakurai, Katsumi; Tanaka, Nobuko; Okubo, Ichiro; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2018-04-18

    Though synthetic organic colorants are used in various applications nowadays, there is the concern that impurities by-produced during the manufacturing and degradation products in some of these colorants are persistent organic pollutants and carcinogens. Thus, it is important to identify the synthetic organic colorants in various products, such as commercial paints, ink, cosmetics, food, textile, and plastics. Dyes, which are soluble in water and other solvents, could be analyzed by chromatographic methods. In contrast, it is difficult to analyze synthetic organic pigments by these methods because of their insolubility. This review is an overview of mass spectrometric analysis of synthetic organic pigments by various ionization methods. We highlight a recent study of textile samples by atmospheric pressure solid analysis probe MS. Furthermore, the mass spectral features of synthetic organic pigments and their separation from other components such as paint media and plasticizers are discussed.

  14. High mass and spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging of Nicolas Poussin painting cross section by cluster TOF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noun, M; Van Elslande, E; Touboul, D; Glanville, H; Bucklow, S; Walter, P; Brunelle, A

    2016-12-01

    The painting Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well, which hangs in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK, is possibly one of the last figure painting executed by Nicolas Poussin at the very end of his life and is usually dated to the early 1660s. In this perspective special feature, Philippe Walter, Alain Brunelle and colleagues give new insights on the artist's working methods by a careful stateof-the-art imaging ToF-SIMS study of one sample taken on the edge of the painting. This approach allowed for the identification of the pigments used in the painting, their nature and components and those of the ground and preparatory layers, with the identification of the binder(s) and possible other additions of organic materials such as glue. This study paves the way to a wider use of ToF-SIMS for the analysis of ancient cultural heritage artefacts. Dr. Walter is the Director of the Molecular and Structural Archeology Laboratory (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France). Dr. Brunelle is Head of the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles (CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France). Their long standing collaboration has led to several seminal publications on the analysis of ancient artefacts by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A preliminary study of the composition of commercial oil, acrylic and vinyl paints and their behaviour after accelerated ageing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Caterina Izzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a research project dealing with the establishment of monitoring and damage prevention plans for contemporary artworks. For this purpose, some commercial paints, among the most currently used by young artists, were selected: Winton oil paint (Winsor & Newton, UK, Heavy Body acrylic paint (Liquitex, USA and Flashe vinyl paint (Lefranc & Bourgeois, France. The paints were subjected to different treatments of accelerated ageing, the results indicating different behaviour in relation both to the type of binders and pigments present in the different formulations. In particular, it was observed that ageing produced by ozone plays an important role in the stability of the oil paints, above all in those containing organic azo pigments. Thermal ageing, as expected, influences the stability of all the commercial paints examined, with the formation of alteration products and visible changes in the paint films. Ageing produced by moisture clearly affects the synthetic polymer-based paints, particularly evident in the changes in mass. In all cases, the accelerated ageing treatments produced chromatic variations, more evidently for the oil paints containing organic pigment.

  16. Prediction of optical properties of paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurikovič, Roman; Ágošton, Tomaš

    2007-09-01

    The field of predictive rendering concerns itself with those methods of image synthesis which yield results that do not only look real, but are also radiometrically correct renditions of nature, i.e., which are accurate predictions of what a real scene would look like under given lighting conditions. A real coating consists of pigments, effect pigments, clear lacquer and glaze. A novel and unique combination of real parameters that are commonly measured in the industry and a theoretical reflectance model consisting of measurable parameters is required. Here, the authors design perception parameters and put them into well known surface reflection functions such as He and Torrance. The original contributions are the study of the sub-surface scattering of real paint and the prediction of its appearance in rendered images by the proposed model of light reflection beneath the paint surface.

  17. The Pigment Analysis of 18th Century Pastel Paintings by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour (1704-1788) and Jean Valade (1710-1787)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombaud, Cecile; Buti, David; Nielsen, Johanne Marie

    Pastel paintings are rarely studied unless they are unframed [1-3]. The conservation treatment of three French pastel portraits by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour (1704-1788) and Jean Valade (1710-1787) at the paper conservation studio of the National Museum of Sweden gave the opportunity to study...... by two of the leading pastellists of the time and, in order to outline their colour palette, characterize the white filler and the pigments used as well as the binders. The combination of photographic analysis, including UV and infrared photographs, together with different spectroscopic techniques...... allowed to characterize part of the artists’ palettes, both pigment and possible binding medium, and to have information about the paper support. After a first non-invasive campaign by means of X-rays fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), which allowed an overall elemental investigation of the different...

  18. Chemical and optical aspects of appearance changes in oil paintings from the 19th and early 20th century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimazu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes leading to appearance changes of oil paintings is saponification of basic pigments due to a decrease of reflected light. This thesis contributes to a deeper understanding of appearance changes due to saponification of white pigments. Furthermore, effects on painting appearance,

  19. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.

    2007-01-01

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  20. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France - CNRS UMR 171, Paris (France); Bleuet, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P. [Institut Neel CNRS-UPR 503-1, 25, Av. des Martyrs, BP 166, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-12-15

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  1. Non-invasive in situ Examination of Colour Changes of Blue Paints in Danish Golden Age Paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buti, David; Vila, Anna; Filtenborg, Troels Folke

    A non-invasive study of some paintings containing areas of paint with a Prussian blue component has been conducted at the Statens Museum for Kunst. The in situ campaign has been carried out with a range of different spectroscopic portable techniques, provided by the MOLAB transnational access...... of the frame. Prussian blue is a hydrated iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) complex of variable composition depending on the manufacturing [1]. It has been reported that the method of preparation, as well as the use of white pigments or extenders to dilute the blue pigment, may be a factor contributing to its......, the current in situ campaign aimed at mapping and understanding the degradation of Prussian blue and lead white admixtures using non-invasive portable techniques. The presence of Prussian blue was detected, with the MOLAB analytical means, in all the exposed, faded areas, although the colour had turned pale...

  2. Interdisciplinary study of the panel painting depicting the "Pentecostes", attributed to Fernão Gomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Conde

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the technique and materials used in the panel painting entitled Pentecostes, attributed to the artist Fernão Gomes (XVIIth century, housed in the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, in Lisbon. The study also includes the diagnosis of the conservation state of the painting and the description of the cleaning intervention. For identification of the materials and determination of the conservation state, several analytical techniques were used: micro-FTIR and GC-MS, for identification of the binder and varnish; micro-Raman and micro-FTIR, for identification of fillers and pigments; micro-XRF and SEM-EDX, for elemental analysis; optical microscopy, with visible and fluorescent radiation, and infrared photography, for morphological observation and study of pictorial technique. The analytical approach led to the identification of materials common at the time: gypsum with animal glue, lead white, yellow and red ochres, black earths (based on Mn, Bi, Fe, azurite, possible green earth, lead red, oil and oily varnish with residues of cholesterol. After various cleaning tests, a gel suggested by the literature was chosen (recipe no. 105.4 developed by R. Wolbers and proved to be effective in the removal of the aged and polymerized varnish.

  3. Forensic Art History: the Ädel Painting Dispute 1839-1841

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingalill Nyström

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns a 19th century dispute about twenty pieces of decorated furniture painted by the 19th century painter Anders Erik Ädel (1809-1888 from Söderhamn, Hälsingland, Sweden. Ädel is considered to be one of the foremost painters in Hälsingland. His art works - painted furniture and interiors - are displayed in museums and can also be found in the Decorated Farmhouses of Hälsingland, UNESCO World Heritage. In 1839, Ädel accused his client, the farmer Erik Olofsson, in court of having paid too little for the objects he had painted as he had used more pigments than those for which he had been paid. Almost 180 years later scientific methods combined with historic source research were used to understand what pigments Ädel actually used. Through this study we demonstrate how multidisciplinary collaboration between sciences and humanities can contribute to deeper knowledge and new interpretations. The scientific analyses were preceded by analyses of the judicial protocols found. Non-invasive analyses using XRF instruments were conducted in situ, supplemented by other spectroscopic methods in the lab. The judicial protocols give an insight into what pigments Ädel had access to, and when combined with the scientific analyses, this information provides historic evidence of the artist's materials and painting technique.

  4. Enhanced identification of trace element fingerprint of prehistoric pigments by PIXE mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, M.; Pichon, L.; Beck, L.

    2018-02-01

    The elemental composition of Fe rich rocks used as pigment during prehistoric periods can provide valuable information about the type of material used and their geological origin. However, these materials present several analytical constraints since their patrimonial value involve using non-invasive techniques maintaining a high sensitivity of the detection and the quantification of trace elements. Micro-beam techniques also require to take into account the heterogeneity of these geomaterials from the macroscopic to microscopic scales. Several previous studies have demonstrated that PIXE analysis satisfies these analytical conditions. However, application of micro-PIXE analysis is still complex when thin and discontinuous layer of pigment is deposed on the surface of other materials such as rocks or bones. In such case, PIXE imaging could improve the ability to take into account the high heterogeneity of such archaeological objects. In study, we used PIXE imaging system developed at the NewAGLAE facility in order to visualize distribution of elements associated with iron-rich pigment phase. The results obtained show that PIXE maps can improve the identification of the main trace elements specific to the iron mineral phase. By grouping pixels of iron-rich areas and performing quantitative treatment, it was possible to reveal additional trace elements associated to pigment. This study highlights the contribution of PIXE imaging to the identification of elements associated with mineral phases of interest and to use them as proxies to discriminate different geological materials used in archaeological context.

  5. Fluorescence from colours used for japanese painting under N_2 laser excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki

    1988-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra have been measured for various colours used for Japanese painting in order to identify the pigments in paintings. Fluorescence was observed in various natural and synthetic colours. The fluorescence intensities of these colours are generally weaker than those of oil colours.

  6. PIXE analysis of historical paintings: Is the gain worth the risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, UMR8247, 75005 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS – Ministère de la Culture – IRCP, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Gonzalez, V. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, UMR8247, 75005 Paris (France); Pichon, L. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 Quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Fédération de recherche NewAGLAE, FR3506 CNRS – Ministère de la Culture – IRCP, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France)

    2015-11-15

    The PIXE analysis of easel paintings constitutes a challenging task. Despite recognized merits and a few emblematic applications, PIXE has never been routinely applied to these fragile, complex and precious targets. The present work discusses the place of PIXE in the study of easel paintings and opens up perspectives for a more systematic usage of this analytical technique. Progress achieved since decades in the implementation of PIXE to study such fragile cultural heritage artefacts is reviewed, notably at the LABEC laboratory in Italy and at the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF in France. Two specific techniques developed for paintings are detailed and exemplified on Renaissance painting masterpieces: differential PIXE for paint layers depth profiling and multi-scale elemental mapping for the imaging of pigment distribution. Beam-induced damage, a major concern, notably depends on the employed beam fluence in particle/cm{sup 2} or μC/cm{sup 2}. After recalling previous works on damage induced in chemical products comparable to pigments, we present the behaviour under different fluences of protons of a few MeV (1–300 μC/cm{sup 2}) of targets having high resemblance to historical easel paintings: pellets of specially synthesized lead white pigments, layers of lead white mixed with linseed oil and areas containing lead white of two 19th century paintworks. The results shed new lights on the behaviour of paintworks under the beam and pave the way to strategies for damage mitigation. In particular, the lowering of PIXE performance induced by the decrease of the beam fluence sets a trade-off between risk of damage and gained information which also impacts the PIXE scanning protocol for paintings. As an illustration of an adequate adjustment of this balance, we report the exploratory application of PIXE mapping to a large area of a 19th century easel painting without damage. The recorded elemental maps are compared to elemental maps collected on the same area using

  7. PIXE analysis of historical paintings: Is the gain worth the risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Pichon, L.

    2015-01-01

    The PIXE analysis of easel paintings constitutes a challenging task. Despite recognized merits and a few emblematic applications, PIXE has never been routinely applied to these fragile, complex and precious targets. The present work discusses the place of PIXE in the study of easel paintings and opens up perspectives for a more systematic usage of this analytical technique. Progress achieved since decades in the implementation of PIXE to study such fragile cultural heritage artefacts is reviewed, notably at the LABEC laboratory in Italy and at the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF in France. Two specific techniques developed for paintings are detailed and exemplified on Renaissance painting masterpieces: differential PIXE for paint layers depth profiling and multi-scale elemental mapping for the imaging of pigment distribution. Beam-induced damage, a major concern, notably depends on the employed beam fluence in particle/cm"2 or μC/cm"2. After recalling previous works on damage induced in chemical products comparable to pigments, we present the behaviour under different fluences of protons of a few MeV (1–300 μC/cm"2) of targets having high resemblance to historical easel paintings: pellets of specially synthesized lead white pigments, layers of lead white mixed with linseed oil and areas containing lead white of two 19th century paintworks. The results shed new lights on the behaviour of paintworks under the beam and pave the way to strategies for damage mitigation. In particular, the lowering of PIXE performance induced by the decrease of the beam fluence sets a trade-off between risk of damage and gained information which also impacts the PIXE scanning protocol for paintings. As an illustration of an adequate adjustment of this balance, we report the exploratory application of PIXE mapping to a large area of a 19th century easel painting without damage. The recorded elemental maps are compared to elemental maps collected on the same area using laboratory

  8. PIXE analysis of historical paintings: Is the gain worth the risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Pichon, L.

    2015-11-01

    The PIXE analysis of easel paintings constitutes a challenging task. Despite recognized merits and a few emblematic applications, PIXE has never been routinely applied to these fragile, complex and precious targets. The present work discusses the place of PIXE in the study of easel paintings and opens up perspectives for a more systematic usage of this analytical technique. Progress achieved since decades in the implementation of PIXE to study such fragile cultural heritage artefacts is reviewed, notably at the LABEC laboratory in Italy and at the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF in France. Two specific techniques developed for paintings are detailed and exemplified on Renaissance painting masterpieces: differential PIXE for paint layers depth profiling and multi-scale elemental mapping for the imaging of pigment distribution. Beam-induced damage, a major concern, notably depends on the employed beam fluence in particle/cm2 or μC/cm2. After recalling previous works on damage induced in chemical products comparable to pigments, we present the behaviour under different fluences of protons of a few MeV (1-300 μC/cm2) of targets having high resemblance to historical easel paintings: pellets of specially synthesized lead white pigments, layers of lead white mixed with linseed oil and areas containing lead white of two 19th century paintworks. The results shed new lights on the behaviour of paintworks under the beam and pave the way to strategies for damage mitigation. In particular, the lowering of PIXE performance induced by the decrease of the beam fluence sets a trade-off between risk of damage and gained information which also impacts the PIXE scanning protocol for paintings. As an illustration of an adequate adjustment of this balance, we report the exploratory application of PIXE mapping to a large area of a 19th century easel painting without damage. The recorded elemental maps are compared to elemental maps collected on the same area using laboratory-based scanning

  9. Inorganic pigments doped with tris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate lanthanide complexes: A photoluminescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheno, Giulia, E-mail: giulia.gheno@unive.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Bortoluzzi, Marco; Ganzerla, Renzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Enrichi, Francesco [CIVEN, Coordinamento Interuniversitario Veneto per le Nanotecnologie, Via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera, Venezia (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    The inorganic pigments malachite, Egyptian blue, Ercolano blue and chrome yellow have been doped with the neutral homoleptic Ln(III) complex Ln(Tp){sub 3} (Ln=Eu, Tb; Tp=hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate) in the presence of arabic gum or acrylic emulsion as binders, in order to obtain photoluminescent materials of interest for cultural heritage restoration. The doped pigments have shown emissions associated to f–f transitions in the visible range upon excitation with UV light. Thermal and UV-light ageings have been carried out. In all the cases the photoluminescent behaviour is maintained, but in the cases of acrylic-based paints emission spectra and lifetimes are strongly influenced by thermal treatments. The choice of binder and pigments influences the photoluminescent behaviour of the corresponding film paints. -- Highlights: • Inorganic pigments doped with photoluminescent lanthanide complexes. • Hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate (Tp) as antenna-ligand for Eu(III) and Tb(III). • Emission associated to f–f transitions upon excitation with UV light. • Photoluminescence of paints influenced by the choice of binder and pigments. • Photoluminescence after ageing depending upon the type of binder.

  10. Corrosion Protection of Carbon Steel Using Poly aniline Composite with Inorganic Pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dulaimi, A.A.; Shahrir Hashim; Khan, M.I.

    2011-01-01

    Two inorganic pigments (TiO 2 and SiO 2 ) were used to prepare composites with poly aniline (PANI) by situ polymerization method. PANI and PANI composites with SiO 2 and TiO 2 were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The morphology of the synthesized pigments (PANI , PANI-SiO 2 and PANI-TiO 2 ) was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Samples were then used as pigments through blending them with acrylic paint and applied on the surface of carbon steel panels. Corrosion was evaluated for coating of carbon steel panels through full immersion test up to standard ASTMG 31. Mass loss was calculated after they have been exposed in acidic media. A digital camera was also used for monitoring corrosion visually on the surface of carbon steel specimens. The results revealed that acrylic paint pigmented by PANI-SiO 2 composite was more efficient in corrosion protection for carbon steel compared with the other synthesized pigments. (author)

  11. Analysis of metallic pigments by ion microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicon, P.; Klanjsek-Gunde, M.; Kunaver, M.; Simcic, J.; Budnar, M.

    2002-01-01

    Metallic paints consist of metallic flakes dispersed in a resinous binder, i.e. a light-element polymer matrix. The spatial distribution and orientation of metallic flakes inside the matrix determines the covering efficiency of the paint, glossiness, and its angular-dependent properties such as lightness flop or color flop (two-tone). Such coatings are extensively used for a functional (i.e. security) as well as decorative purpose. The ion microbeam analysis of two types of silver paint with imbedded metallic flakes has been performed to determine the spatial distribution of the aluminum flakes in paint layer. The average sizes of the aluminum flakes were 23 μm (size distribution 10-37) and 49 μm (size distribution 34-75), respectively. The proton beam with the size of 2x2 μm 2 at Ljubljana ion microprobe has been used to scan the surface of the pigments. PIXE mapping of Al Kα map shows lateral distribution of the aluminum flakes, whereas the RBS slicing method reveals tomograms of the flakes in uppermost 7 μm of the pigment layer. The series of point analysis aligned over the single flake reveal the flake angle in respect to the polymer matrix surface. The angular sensitivity is well below 1 angular degree

  12. Ion microprobe analysis of metallic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simcic, J.; Budnar, M.; Klanjsek-Gunde, M.; Kunavaer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Metallic paints consist of metallic flakes dispersed m a resinous binder, i.e. a light-element polymer matrix. The spatial distribution and orientation of metallic flakes inside the matrix determines the covering efficiency of the paint, glossiness, and its angular-dependent properties such as lightness flop or color flop (two-tone). Such coatings are extensively used for a functional (i.e. security) as well as decorative purpose. The ion microbeam analysis of two types of silver paint with imbedded metallic flake has been performed to test the ability of the ion microbeam spectroscopic methods on this type of samples. The average sizes of the aluminium flakes were 23 (size distribution 10-37) and 49 (size distribution 34-75) micrometers, respectively. The proton beam with the size of 2x2 micrometers at Ljubljana ion microprobe has been used to scan the surface of the pigments. PIXE mapping of Al Kα map shows lateral distribution of the aluminum flakes, whereas the RBS slicing method reveals tomographic image of the flakes in uppermost 5 micrometers of the pigment layer. The flake distribution in the larger layer depths has been accessed by RBS analysis in a point mode. (author)

  13. New insights into the ageing of linseed oil paint binder: a qualitative and quantitative analytical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Bonaduce

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical investigation of paint reconstructions prepared with linseed oil that have undergone typical 19th century treatments in preparation for painting. The oil was mechanically extracted from the same seed lot, which was then processed by various methods: water washing, heat treatments, and the addition of driers, with and without heat. A modern process lead white (Dutch source, Schoonhoven and a commercially available vine black were used as pigments. The reconstructions were prepared in 1999, and naturally aged from then onwards. We compared thermogravimetric analysis (TG, which yields macromolecular information, with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and direct exposure mass spectrometry (DEMS, which both provide molecular information. The study enabled us to quantitatively demonstrate, for the first time, that the parameters used to identify drying oils are deeply influenced by the history of the paint. In particular, here we show that the ratio between the relative amounts of palmitic and stearic acid (P/S, which is used as an index for differentiating between drying oils, is extremely dependent on the pigments present and the age of the paint. Moreover the study revealed that neither the P/S parameter nor the ratios between the relative amounts of the various dicarboxylic acids (azelaic over suberic and azelaic over sebacic can be used to trace the sorts of pre-treatment undergone by the oil investigated in this study. The final results represent an important milestone for the scientific community working in the field, highlighting that further research is still necessary to solve the identification of drying oils in works of art.

  14. The Effect of Pigment Volume Concentration on Film Formation and the Mechanical Properties of Coatings Based on Water-Dispersion Paint and Varnish Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, I. M.; Kramarenko, V. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of pigment volume concentration (PVC) on the film formation process and properties of coatings based on the water dispersion of an Acronal 290D styrene-acrylate copolymer and a pigment/filler system used for paint materials in construction was investigated. An analysis of the results obtained is performed within the framework of the concept of the critical PVC. It is shown that the initiation and development of internal stresses occurs the faster, the higher the PVC, but the position of the maximum or the inflection point of the internal stress-drying time curve complies with a universal value of the solid volume content in the compositions. It is found that the internal stresses and Young's modulus of coatings are characterized by an extreme concentration relation that, for the reduced elastic modulus, can be described by a system of equations based on the Halpin-Tsai equation.

  15. Quantitative analysis of ancient Egyptian pigments by external PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, M.; Tsunokami, T.; Murai, R.; Maeda, K.; Harigai, I.; Nakayama, Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakurai, K.; Sasa, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Pigments painted on Egyptian excavations in the 18th Dynasty were analyzed successfully by external PIXE with the aid of the X-ray diffraction. A white pigment was composed on Mg 3 Ca(CO 3 ) 4 ; red: αFe 2 O 3 , αFeO.OH and AsS; pink: Mixtures of white and red pigments; yellow: αFeO.OH and As 2 S 3 ; and blue: CaO.CuO.4SiO 2 . (orig.)

  16. EDXRF as an analytical tool in art. Case studies from pigment identification and treatment assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.

    2004-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was employed for the identification of pigments decorating Hellenistic figurines, and the assessment of the efficiency of a treatment with barium hydroxide applied to stone. Elements present in the colored areas of the figurines, as well as the treated stone was identified by EDXRF. These data together with complementary information obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) led to the identification of several precious pigments. As far as the treatment efficiency is concerned, EDXRF analysis revealed that barium is unevenly distributed on the treated surface and reaches a maximum depth of 2.5 mm. (author)

  17. A spectroscopic study of Brazilwood paints in medieval books of hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Maria João; Otero, Vanessa; Vitorino, Tatiana; Araújo, Rita; Muralha, Vânia S F; Lemos, Ana; Picollo, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    In this work, microspectrofluorimetry was for the first time applied to the identification of the red organic lakes that are characteristic of the lavish illuminations found in 15(th) century books of hours. Microspectrofluorimetry identified those red paints, ranging from opaque pink to dark red glazes, as brazilwood lakes. An unequivocal characterization was achieved by comparison with reference paints produced following recipes from the medieval treatise The Book on How to Make Colours, and was further confirmed by fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS). For these treasured cultural objects, microspectrofluorimetry and FORS proved to be the only techniques that could identify, in situ or in microsamples, the chromophore responsible for the pinkish hues: a brazilein-Al(3+) complex. Additionally, a multi-analytical approach provided a full characterization of the color paints, including pigments, additives, and binders. Microspectroscopic techniques, based on infrared and X-ray radiation, enabled us to disclose the full palette of these medieval manuscripts, including the elusive greens, for which, besides malachite, basic copper sulfates were found; Raman microscopy suggested a mixture of brochantite and langite. Infrared analysis proved invaluable for a full characterization of the additives that were applied as fillers or whites (chalk, gypsum, and white lead) as well as the proteinaceous and polysaccharide binders that were found pure or in mixture.

  18. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  19. Painting with polygons: a procedural watercolor engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVerdi, Stephen; Krishnaswamy, Aravind; Měch, Radomír; Ito, Daichi

    2013-05-01

    Existing natural media painting simulations have produced high-quality results, but have required powerful compute hardware and have been limited to screen resolutions. Digital artists would like to be able to use watercolor-like painting tools, but at print resolutions and on lower end hardware such as laptops or even slates. We present a procedural algorithm for generating watercolor-like dynamic paint behaviors in a lightweight manner. Our goal is not to exactly duplicate watercolor painting, but to create a range of dynamic behaviors that allow users to achieve a similar style of process and result, while at the same time having a unique character of its own. Our stroke representation is vector based, allowing for rendering at arbitrary resolutions, and our procedural pigment advection algorithm is fast enough to support painting on slate devices. We demonstrate our technique in a commercially available slate application used by professional artists. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the different vector-rendering technologies available.

  20. Artificial neural network model for photosynthetic pigments identification using multi wavelength chromatographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Hariyanto, S.; Natali, F. D. D.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid and automatic pigment characterization method become an important issue due to the fact that there are only less than 1% of plant pigments in the earth have been explored. In this research, a mathematical model based on artificial intelligence approach was developed to simplify and accelerate pigment characterization process from HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) procedure. HPLC is a widely used technique to separate and identify pigments in a mixture. Input of the model is chromatographic data from HPLC device and output of the model is a list of pigments which is the spectrum pattern is discovered in it. This model provides two dimensional (retention time and wavelength) fingerprints for pigment characterization which is proven to be more accurate than one dimensional fingerprint (fixed wavelength). Moreover, by mimicking interconnection of the neuron in the nervous systems of the human brain, the model have learning ability that could be replacing expert judgement on evaluating spectrum pattern. In the preprocessing step, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the huge dimension of the chromatographic data. The aim of this step is to simplify the model and accelerate the identification process. Six photosynthetic pigments i.e. zeaxantin, pheophytin a, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene and lutein could be well identified by the model with accuracy up to 85.33% and processing time less than 1 second.

  1. Elemental identification of blue paintings traces present in historic cemeteries in the São Martinho region, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Thiago G.; Richter, Fábio Andreas; Castro, Elisiana Trilha; Gonçalves, Samantha; Spudeit, Daniel A.; Micke, Gustavo A.

    2018-03-01

    Cemeteries are of great significance in many communities, often being considered of invaluable historical, artistic, architectural and cultural significance and thus they need to be preserved. In this regard, understanding the historical aspects and the construction techniques used is essential for their protection. The purpose of this paper is to describe historical aspects of the funerary heritage present in the region of São Martinho in southern Brazil, along with an analysis of the blue paint found in cemeteries of German colonies in the region studied. FTIR analysis suggests that the binder is composed mostly of a protein resin and a small amount of lipid. The morphology of the pigment was investigated by SEM and EDS and the spectra revealed that the major elements present in the blue pigment are Na, Al, Si and S, with an overlap in the elemental mapping, indicative of ultramarine pigments. The GC-MS results are consistent with the type of binder identified by FTIR and indicate a mixture of oils, probably from vegetal sources, and proteins.

  2. Identification of Painting Layers of Sennefer Tomb by Ion Beam Analysis;PACS: 78.70.En, 07.60.Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-El-Aal, S [Conservation Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Fayoum University, P.O. Box 63511 (Egypt)

    2011-07-15

    Egypt has many pharaonic tombs for kings, queens and noblemen. The Sennefer tomb, one of the most important nobleman tombs, is located in the southern hillside of Sheikh Abd El-Qurna - west side of Luxor. It is dated back to 1439-1413 B.C. (18{sup th} Dynasty) and is usually referred as the Tomb of Vines, due to the large part of the ceiling of the burial chamber. The vine tomb was carved inside a mountain, its walls are covered with plaster and were painted using the tempera technique (pigments mixed with organic binding medium). The analysis was performed by using particle-induced X-ray emission, microbeam particle-induced X-ray emission and optical microscope for the six samples from the Vine tomb such as white, black, red, yellow, blue and green pigments and for the ground layers of the tomb in order to identify the composition of plaster layers and pigments. The data about the nature of these materials are indispensable for conservation and cleaning. (author)

  3. XRF, μ-XRD and μ-spectroscopic techniques for revealing the composition and structure of paint layers on polychrome sculptures after multiple restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquelo, M L; Duran, A; Castaing, J; Arquillo, D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2012-01-30

    This paper presents the novel application of recently developed analytical techniques to the study of paint layers on sculptures that have been restored/repainted several times across centuries. Analyses were performed using portable XRF, μ-XRD and μ-Raman instruments. Other techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM-EDX and μ-FTIR, were also used. Pigments and other materials including vermilion, minium, red lac, ivory black, lead white, barium white, zinc white (zincite), titanium white (rutile and anatase), lithopone, gold and brass were detected. Pigments from both ancient and modern times were found due to the different restorations/repaintings carried out. μ-Raman was very useful to characterise some pigments that were difficult to determine by μ-XRD. In some cases, pigments identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques used in this work. This work is the first article devoted to the study of sculpture cross-section samples using laboratory-made μ-XRD systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of pre-hispanic pigments by modern analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega A, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the study of mural painting pigments from two archaeological sites (The Great Temple in Mexico city and Cacaxtla) was performed to know their materials composition, identify their structural characteristics and properties by using modern analytical techniques. Blue, ochre, red and black pigments of Mexica culture (1325-1521 a.C. / late Post Classic period); blue, ochre, red, brown, pink, green and white of Olmeca- Xicalanca culture (700-900 a.C. / Epiclassic period) were studied. Data about materials used, technological evolution, mineralogical background, cultural interchange and origin was obtained. Environmental exposition of these paintings since their discovering has produced changes and damage on their materials. Therefore, stability of some pigments has been notorious, ''Maya Blue'' specially presents extraordinary resistance to diluted and concentrated acids and alkalis including boiling condition, acqua regia, solvents, oxidant and reducing agents, moderate heat and biocorrosi6n; for that reason its study was emphasized. ''Maya Blue'' pigment was synthesized in laboratory using the processes described by historic sources (with indigophera suffruticosa leaves and synthetic indigo) up to obtain a stable pigment including acqua regia action. Clay matrix sorbs nearly 0.4 weight percent of organic dye, which cover 79% of palygorskita surface area. (Author)

  5. Analysis of the painting 'The first mass in Brazil' (Vitor Meireles) using a portable XRF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Cristiane; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2007-01-01

    Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence was used to analyze the painting 'The First Mass in Brazil', identifying the pigments used by the artist, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and visible alterations in the paint layer, in order to settle the best procedures to its recovery. This painting, executed by Vitor Meireles in 1860, is one of the most powerful and definitive images ever created by a Brazilian artist. The measurements were carried out with a portable EDXRF system consisting of a TF3005 x-ray tube from Oxford with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 μA, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of zinc and lead white pigments. Some pigments used by the artist were: ochre, umbra, vermilion, Prussian blue, chromium oxide and cobalt blue. (author)

  6. XRF and UV-Vis-NIR analyses of medieval wall paintings of al-Qarawiyyin Mosque (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikri, I.; El Amraoui, M.; Haddad, M.; Ettahiri, A. S.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Falguères, C.; Lebon, M.; Nespoulet, R.; Ait Lyazidi, S.; Bejjit, L.

    2018-05-01

    Medieval wall painting fragments, taken at the medieval Mosque of al-Qarawiyyin in Fez, have been investigated by means of X-ray fluorescence and UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopies. The analyses permitted to determine the palette of pigments used by craftsmen of the time. Hematite or red ochre were used to obtain red brown colours, calcite for white, copper-based pigments for blue and blue-grey shades while a mixture of cinnabar, lead-based pigments and hematite was adopted to make red-orange colours. Furthermore, the analysis of mortars (external layer and plaster) on these wall painting samples revealed that they are composed mainly by calcite and sometimes by additional compounds such as quartz and gypsum.

  7. Thermodynamics of Paint Related Systems with Engineering Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Thomas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2001-01-01

    Paints are complex materials composed of polymers (binders) dissolved in one or more solvents, pigments, and other additives. The thermodynamics of such systems is essential, for example, for selecting improved solvents and understanding a number of phenomena related especially! to adhesion...

  8. Physicochemical characterization of pigments and supports in mural paints: Mayapan, Yucatan case; Caracterizacion fisicoquimica de pigmentos y soportes en pinturas murales: caso Mayapan, Yucatan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva V, Y. [FIME-UANL, Pedro A. del Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Peraza L, C.A. [Centro INAH Yucatan (Mexico); Bautista M, J.P. [DRPMZA/INAH. Direccion de Registro Publico de Monumentos y Zonas Arqueologicas, Victoria 110, Copilco El Bajo, 04340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arenas A, J. [IFUNAM, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The present work is focused in the study of pigments and supports located in mural paintings belonging to the archaeological site of Mayapan. The raw materials utilized by the pre hispanic are revealed by means of the use of different techniques of characterization such as Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM, respectively), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The pigments analyzed cover the following colors: yellow, blue, white, orange, black, red, olive and aqua green. In general, the elements O, Ca and C were the main elements present, as well as quantities of Si and Fe were very significant in all the cases. The manufacture techniques for the production of pigments and supports coincided with all those reported in literature for the Maya culture; however, influence from the Central Altiplane could be appreciated. The results obtained by XRD show the phases of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) and dolomite ferroan (Ca(Mg,Fe)(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}) in all the support. The analyses by FTIR indicated the presence of some agglutinating, but it has not been identified yet. (Author)

  9. Looking for Common Fingerprints in Leonardo's Pupils Using Nondestructive Pigment Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Letizia; Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Martini, Marco; Galli, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Non-invasive, portable analytical techniques are becoming increasingly widespread for the study and conservation in the field of cultural heritage, proving that a good data handling, supported by a deep knowledge of the techniques themselves, and the right synergy can give surprisingly substantial results when using portable but reliable instrumentation. In this work, pigment characterization was carried out on 21 Leonardesque paintings applying in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and fiber optic reflection spectroscopy (FORS) analyses. In-depth data evaluation allowed to get information on the color palette and the painting technique of the different artists and workshops . Particular attention was paid to green pigments (for which a deeper study of possible pigments and alterations was performed with FORS analyses), flesh tones (for which a comparison with available data from cross-sections was made), and ground preparation.

  10. A scientific approach to the characterization of the painting materials of Fra Mattia della Robbia polychrome terracotta altarpiece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, M. L.; Barcelli, S.; Casoli, A.; Mazzeo, R.; Prati, S.

    2013-12-01

    During the last restoration (2008-2011) of the polychrome terracotta altarpiece called Coronation of Virgin between Saints Rocco, Sebastian, Peter martyr and Antonio abbot, located in the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta in Montecassiano (Macerata, Italy), scientific investigations were carried out to acquire detailed information about the painting technique. The identification of materials allowed a correct restoration. The altarpiece is almost entirely realized by Marco della Robbia (Fra Mattia), dates back to the first half of the XVI century and represents an interesting example of painted terracotta produced by using two different techniques: glazed polychrome terracotta and the "cold painting" technique. The characterization of the samples' material constituents was obtained by analysing the cross-sections and the fragments by different techniques (optical, SEM-EDS and ATR-FTIR microscopy as well as GC-MS), as the real nature of a component is often difficult to assess with one single technique. The optical microscope examination of paint cross-sections shows the presence of many layers, indicating the complexity of the paint stratigraphic morphologies. The original polychromy of della Robbia's masterpiece is constituted of cinnabar, red lake, red lead, orpiment, red ochre, lead white, lead tin yellow, green earth and raw umber. Two different types of gilding technique have been distinguished. The first one presents a glue mordant, and the second one shows an oil mordant composed by a mixture of red lead, red ochre, cinnabar and orpiment. The GC-MS analysis allowed the characterisation of linseed oil and a mixture of animal glue and egg as binding media stratigraphically located by the use of ATR-FTIR mapping microscopy. The analytical results of the painted terracotta integrated investigations show that original technique adopted is characterised by the application of pigments in an oil-binding medium directly applied on the substrates, probably treated

  11. Preparation of precipitated barium sulphate from Egyptian barytes ore and its application in paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sawy, S.M.; Ahmed, N.M.; Abd El-Ghaffar, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitated barium sulphate (Blank fixe) was prepared and evaluated as an extender pigment, making use of the naturally occurring Egyptian barytes ore. X-ray diffraction patterns, transmission electron microscope, thermal gravimetric analysis, color measurements, specific gravity, oil absorption, bulking value, bleed resistance, hydrogen ion concentration, permanence for light and heat and chemical resistance were different methods used for characterization and evaluation of the prepared pigment. Medium oil alkyd resin, melamine-alkyd and epoxy resin were used as different binding media for the application and testing of the prepared pigments as an extender- in some paint formulations, this was done in comparison with a commercial imported blank fixe sample and the Egyptian barytes ore that it was prepared from. It was found that; a white bright fine powder of precipitated barium sulfate could be successfully prepared from the locally abundant Egyptian barytes ore. It has a suitable properties as an extender pigment. Paints pigmented with blank fixe offered favourable rheological and protective properties exceeding that of the imported commercial sample and the ore that was prepared from

  12. Quantitative X-ray analysis of pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M. Marrocos de

    1987-01-01

    The 'matrix-flushing' and the 'adiabatic principle' methods have been applied for the quantitative analysis through X-ray diffraction patterns of pigments and extenders mixtures, frequently used in paint industry. The results obtained have shown the usefulness of these methods, but still ask for improving their accuracy. (Author) [pt

  13. Self-Cleaning Mineral Paint for Application in Architectural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipto Pal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A mineral silicate paint has been developed for architectural heritage. To enhance durability, any type of organic additive has been avoided. Potassium silicate was the binder agent intended to give strong adherence and durability to stone and concretes. Incorporation of mainly anatase titanium dioxide was intended to act both as a white, bright pigment and as a photocatalyst. Reflectivity analyses on the paint in the visible-to-near infrared wavelength region show high solar heat reflection. The self-cleaning activity of the mineral paint was evaluated by the degradation of organic dyes under solar light irradiation. Anatase titania was effective in decomposing organic and airborne pollutants with the solar radiation. The optical properties and self-cleaning activity were compared with the organic binder-based paints and commercial paints. Developed paints possess high stability: since they contain only inorganic components that do not fade with exposure to solar radiation, photocatalytic self-cleaning capability further enhances such stability.

  14. Salt damage of stone, plaster and painted layers at a medieval church, South-Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Ákos; Galambos, Éva

    2016-04-01

    The Chapel of Pécsvárad is one of the best preserved and oldest medieval stone monument in South Hungary. It dates back to the 11th century. The interior of the chapel is decorated with wall paintings, which are later and probably originating from the late 12th century. The wall painting is partly preserved and it is located on an interior stone wall of the chapel facing to the East. The wall painting shows various forms of damage from salt efflorescence to chipping. The current research provides information on the in situ and laboratory analyses of salts, plasters, pigments and stone material suggesting mechanisms of decay that lead to partial loss of the painting. Both on site techniques and laboratory analyses were performed. Imaging techniques such as UV luminescence and IR thermography were used to identify the moist and salt covered zones on the wall surface. Portable moisture meter were also applied to map the wet zones in the interior and also at the external part of the chapel. Schmidt hammer and Duroscop were used for testing the surface strength of stone. Laboratory tests were focused on mineralogical and chemical compositional analyses. Small samples of stone, mortar, plaster and pigments were tested by optical microscopy, SEM-EDX, XRD and Thermogravimetric analyses. According to our tests the chapel was predominantly made of porous limestone and sandstone. Laboratory analyses proved that the major salt responsible for the damage of external walls are gypsum and halite, while in the interior part higher amount of halite and significant amount of sodium-nitrate were found besides gypsum. The painted layers are on Byzantine-type of plaster with organic compounds (plant fragments) and with a substrate layer rich in calcium carbonate. The identified pigments are dominantly earth pigments such as iron-oxide containing red and yellow (ochre) and green earth. A unique preservation of ultramarine blue in Hungary was found on the wall painting. The partial

  15. The effect of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane dispersant and low surface energy additives on spectrally selective paint coatings with self-cleaning properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, Ivan; Kozelj, Matjaz; Orel, Boris [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-02-15

    Thickness-Insensitive Spectrally Selective (TISS) paint coatings were made of fluoropolymer resin binder (Lumiflon (LF), Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., Japan) and their water- and oil-repellent properties were obtained (contact angle: {theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}150 , {theta}{sub n-hexadecane}{proportional_to}55 ) by the addition of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) characterized by amino (AP), isooctyl (IO) and perfluoro (PF) groups (i.e. AP{sub 2}IO{sub 4}PF{sub 2}) attached on the silsesquioxane cube (-SiO{sub 3/2}){sub 8}. Paint dispersions were made by modifying of black spinel pigment with trisilanol isobutyl (IB{sub 7}T{sub 7}(OH){sub 3}) POSS dispersant and with a single-capped silane isobutyltrimethoxysilane (IBTMS). Infrared and {sup 29}Si NMR spectra measurements were used for the identification of the structural characteristic of the corresponding POSS compounds. Surface free energy values of the pure cross-linked (no pigment added) LF binder which was determined from the measured contact angles for water, diiodomethane and formamide revealed the {gamma}{sup tot} value of the LF unpigmented resin with added AP{sub 2}IO{sub 4}PF{sub 2} T{sub 8} POSS was about 16.4 mN/m, which led to the {theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}110 , indicating enhancement of the hydrophobicity of the pure LF resin binder ({theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}89 ). SEM micrographs, which were used for the assessment of the TISS paint coating surface morphology confirmed the beneficial dispersive effect of IB{sub 7} T{sub 7}(OH){sub 3} dispersant as compared to the IBTMS silane. The presence of large Aluminium flake pigment and finely ground black pigment led to the formation of TISS paint coating surface, which exhibited bi-hierarchical roughness, resulting in water sliding angles of less than 10 , indicating the possible self-cleaning effect ({theta}{sub water}>150 and {theta}{sub n-hexadecane}{proportional_to}55 ). The use of POSS dispersant and POSS low surface energy

  16. Identification of protein binding in pictorial art Cuban

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Ariadna; Correa, Maurin; Maqueira, Isis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper were implemented microanalysis methodologies by histochemical analysis, and infrared spectroscopy to determine the nature of the binder in paintings and Gas Chromatography (GC) coupled to Mass Spectrometry (MS) for identification of protein binders of common use in tempera technique with the aim of having these methods as part of the identification of artistic materials in Cuban cultural heritage carried out by Archaeometry Laboratory of Havana city's Historian Cabinet. The methodologies implemented were evaluated using model samples of traditional painting techniques with variable protein binder: yolk, egg white, casein, nut oil and animal glue; ageing for 5 years. The models samples were correctly identified. It was determined the interference of pigments with the presence of nitrogen by histochemical analysis with Amido Black dye. IR spectroscopy technique allowed to differentiate between oily and mixed (oil plus protein) techniques and tempera with yolk. Oily technique was identified in wall paintings of the New San Francisco church (XIX century) and the Obrapia House (XVII century) and the technique of tempera with animal glue in the polychrome of the XVIII century which represents St. John the Evangelist belonging to the San Juan de Letran church

  17. Development of Bio-Based Paint by using Methyl Esters from Palm Oil for Corrosion Inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohibah Musa; Miradatul Najwa Muhd Rodhi; Najmiddin Yaakob; Ku Halim Ku Hamid; Juferi Idris

    2013-01-01

    Paint is used as a means of protection to prevent surfaces from being corroded over time. This research is focused on the development of a Bio-based paint made from palm oil methyl ester (POME) which originated from crude palm oil (CPO). New formulation paint has been developed to protect the pipeline from corrosion thus reducing the cost of the operation. Bio-based paint is made up of four components which are solvent, binder, additives, and pigment. The solvent in the bio-based paint is POME. The additives used are wetting and dispersing agent. The pigment used in the bio-based paint is TiO 2 . The formulation was developed by using a constant amount of additives and binder but varying the amount of POME at 10 ml, 15 ml, 20 ml, 25 ml and 30 ml with addition of water. The Standard Testing Methods for measuring the corrosion rate (ASTM G5-94(2011)) was carried out for each sample. In conclusion, it is proven that in the making of bio-based paint formulation for better corrosion inhibitor; the best amount of binder, additives and de-foam that should be used is 20 ml, 10 ml and 10 ml, respectively. (author)

  18. The application and processing of paints hardened by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Electron beam hardening is a process for changing liquid surface coatings of different thicknesses by irradiation with electrons of high energy into solid, hard, elastic films. In contrast to the UV process, one can harden pigmented paints with electron beams. An electron accelerator, which remits free electrons is used as the energy source for starting the chemical reaction in the coating material. In order to irradiate flat parts, which were coated with liquid paint by rolling, pouring or spraying, equally with electrons, one must produce an 'electron curtain', similar to that in a paint pouring machine. (orig./PW) [de

  19. Depth-resolved multilayer pigment identification in paintings: combined use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszewska, Ewa A; Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Marczak, Jan; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Szmit-Naud, Elżbieta; Anglos, Demetrios; Targowski, Piotr

    2013-08-01

    A detailed feasibility study on the combined use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with optical coherence tomography (LIBS/OCT), aiming at a realistic depth-resolved elemental analysis of multilayer stratigraphies in paintings, is presented. Merging a high spectral resolution LIBS system with a high spatial resolution spectral OCT instrument significantly enhances the quality and accuracy of stratigraphic analysis. First, OCT mapping is employed prior to LIBS analysis in order to assist the selection of specific areas of interest on the painting surface to be examined in detail. Then, intertwined with LIBS, the OCT instrument is used as a precise profilometer for the online determination of the depth of the ablation crater formed by individual laser pulses during LIBS depth-profile analysis. This approach is novel and enables (i) the precise in-depth scaling of elemental concentration profiles, and (ii) the recognition of layer boundaries by estimating the corresponding differences in material ablation rate. Additionally, the latter is supported, within the transparency of the object, by analysis of the OCT cross-sectional views. The potential of this method is illustrated by presenting results on the detailed analysis of the structure of an historic painting on canvas performed to aid planned restoration of the artwork.

  20. Portable XRF as a valuable device for preliminary in situ pigment investigation of wooden inventory in the Trski Vrh Church in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnica, V.; Skaric, K.; Mudronja, D.; Pavlicic, M.; Peranic, I.; Jembrih-Simbuerger, D.; Schreiner, M.; Fazinic, S.; Jaksic, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was the investigation of pigments from the painted wooden inventory of the pilgrimage church of Saint Mary of Jerusalem in Trski Vrh - one of the most beautiful late-baroque sacral ensembles in Croatia. Being an object of high relevance for the national cultural heritage, an extensive research on the wooden polychromy was undertaken in order to work out a proposal for a conservation treatment. It consists mainly of two painted and gilded layers (the original one from the 18th century and a later one from 1903), partly overpainted during periodic conservation treatments in the past. The approach was to carry out extensive preliminary in situ pigment investigations using a portable XRF (X-ray fluorescence) device, and only the problems not resolved by this method on site were further analyzed using sophisticated laboratory equipment. Therefore, the XRF results acted as a valuable guideline for subsequent targeted sampling actions, thus minimizing the sampling damage. Important questions not answered by XRF (identification of organic pigments, ultramarine, etc.) were subsequently resolved using additional ex situ laboratory methods, primarily μ-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) at the nuclear microprobe of the Rudjer Boskovic accelerator facility as well as μ-Raman spectroscopy at the Institute of the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. It is shown that by the combination of these often complementary methods a thorough characterization of each pigment can be obtained, allowing for a proper strategy of the conservation treatment. (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of new environment-friendly yellow pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Shinya; Masui, Toshiyuki; Imanaka, Nobuhito

    2006-01-01

    New inorganic pigments based on amorphous cerium tungstate, Ce 1-x M x W 2 O 8 (M = Zr or Ti, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6), were synthesized and their color properties were characterized from the viewpoint of possible ecological inorganic pigments. The Ce 1-x M x W 2 O 8 materials absorb the visible and the ultraviolet light under 500 nm efficiently, which is originated in the O 2p -Ce 4f and the O 2p -W 5d double charge transfer transitions, and, as a result, the pigments can show a brilliant yellow color. The optical absorption edge wavelength of these pigments depends on the Zr or Ti content, and the effective yellow hue was observed at x = 0.2 for both pigments. The color properties of the present pigments suggest that they have a potential to be applied as a satisfactory pigment for paints. Furthermore, these pigments can be prepared by a simple co-precipitation method. They are inert and safe and do not produce side effects in the human body because they are composed of non-toxic and safe elements

  2. Development of paints with infrared radiation reflective properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Coser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractLarge buildings situated in hot regions of the Globe need to be agreeable to their residents. Air conditioning is extensively used to make these buildings comfortable, with consequent energy consumption. Absorption of solar visible and infrared radiations are responsible for heating objects on the surface of the Earth, including houses and buildings. To avoid excessive energy consumption, it is possible to use coatings formulated with special pigments that are able to reflect the radiation in the near- infrared, NIR, spectrum. To evaluate this phenomenon an experimental study about the reflectivity of paints containing infrared-reflective pigments has been made. By irradiating with an IR source and by measuring the surface temperatures of the samples we evaluated: color according to ASTM D 2244-14, UV/VIS/NIR reflectance according to ASTM E 903-12 and thermal performance. Additionally, the spectral reflectance and the IR emittance were measured and the solar reflectance of the samples were calculated. The results showed that plates coated with paints containing IR-reflecting pigments displayed lower air temperature on the opposite side as compared to conventional coatings, indicating that they can be effective to reflect NIR and decrease the temperature of buildings when used in roofs and walls.

  3. Seperation, identification and analysis of pigment (melanin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine strains among 180 Streptomyces isolates produce a diffusible dark brown pigment on both peptone-yeast extract agar and synthetic tyrosine-agar. They also show the positive reaction to Ltyrosine or L-dopa substrates. The pigment has been referred to be as merely as dark brown watersoluble pigment, as melanoid or ...

  4. Pigments Characterization and Molecular Identification of Bacterial Symbionts of Brown Algae Padinasp. Collected from Karimunjawa Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damar Bayu Murti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The search for carotenoids in nature has been extensively studied because of their applications in foods. One treasure of the biopigment source is symbiotic-microorganisms with marine biota. The advantages of symbiont bacteria are easy to culture and sensitize pigments. The use of symbiont bacteria helps to conserve fish, coral reefs, seagrass, and seaweed. Therefore, the bacteria keeps their existence in their ecosystems. In this study, bacterial symbionts were successfully isolated from brown algae Padina sp. The bacterial symbionts had yellow pigment associated with carotenoids. The pigments were characterized using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC with a Photo Diode Array (PDA detector. The carotenoid pigments in the bacterial symbionts were identified as dinoxanthin, lutein and neoxanthin. Molecular identification by using a 16S rRNA gene sequence method, reveals that the bacterial symbionts were closely related to Bacillus marisflavi with a homology of 99%. Keywords :carotenoid pigments, brown algae, Padina, bacterial symbionts, 16S rRNA

  5. Micro-Raman spectroscopy in the identification of wulfenite and vanadinite in a Sasanian painted stucco fragment of the Ghaleh Guri in Ramavand, western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holakooei, Parviz; Karimy, Amir-Hossein; Hasanpour, Ata; Oudbashi, Omid

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the results of studies performed on a painted stucco fragment excavated at the Ghaleh Guri in Ramavand, western Iran, and dated back to the late Sasanian period (224-651 AD). Analytical studies including micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman), micro-X-ray spectrometry (μ-XRF) and optical microscopy showed that red lead and vermilion were used as main pigments on this fragment. Moreover, carbon black was diagnosed to thinly cover some parts of the red lead. Peculiarly, wulfenite (PbMoO4) associated with vanadinite (Pb5(VO4)3Cl) was identified to compose a yellow stain sporadically dispersed on the other pigments.

  6. The characterization of canvas painting by the Serbian artist Milo Milunović using X-ray fluorescence, micro-Raman and FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damjanović, Lj.; Gajić-Kvaščev, M.; Đurđević, J.; Andrić, V.; Marić-Stojanović, M.; Lazić, T.; Nikolić, S.

    2015-01-01

    A canvas painting by Milo Milunović “The Inspiration of the poet” was studied by energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence (EDXRF), micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in order to identify materials used by the artist and his painting technique. Study is perfomed combining in situ non-destructive method with the preparation and study of cross-section samples and raw fragments of the samples. Milo Milunović, an eminent painter from Balkan region, made a copy of the Nicolas Poussin's original painting in Louvre in 1926/27. Obtained results revealed following pigments on the investigated canvas painting: vermilion, minium, cobalt blue, ultramarine, lead white, zinc white, cadmium yellow, chrome-based green pigment and several earth pigments – red and yellow ocher, green earth and umber. Ground layer was made of lead white mixed with calcium carbonate. - Highlights: • In situ EDXRF, micro-Raman and FTIR spectroscopy were employed. • Pallete of painting “The Inspiration of the poet” by Milunović has been determined. • Obtained results allowed evaluation of the painter’s technique. • Milo Milunović worked on the clay ground imitating Nicoals Poussin’s technique

  7. Romano-British wall paintings: Raman spectroscopic analysis of fragments from two urban sites of early military colonisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Middleton, P. S.; Hargreaves, M. D.

    2009-08-01

    Raman spectroscopic analyses of 1st century AD Romano-British villa wall-painting fragments from two important military and early urban centres at Colchester and Lincoln have demonstrated some interesting contrasts in technique and palette usage. Colchester, the earliest fortified settlement, developed a sophisticated painting and craft industry compared with Lincoln in the assimilation of novel substrate preparation ideas and pigment adoption. The earliest use of the rather rare purple mineral pigment, caput mortuum, hitherto reported in only a few Roman villas elsewhere in mainland Europe, is in evidence in this early phase settlement and the use of gypsum as a special ground preparation agent as an additive to the more common limewash putty to enhance the effect of the use of lazurite as a pigment is worthy of note in this context. Otherwise, the pigments are seen to be those that are quite normally encountered in Roman villas, namely, haematite, goethite, terre verte, and carbon. The results of this study indicate that at Colchester there was a continued development in technique into the colonial phase compared with a stagnation in Lincoln; these scientific results have created a stimulus for further historical research into pigment and techniques development for wall paintings at the fringe of the Roman Empire in the 1st-3rd Centuries AD.

  8. The use of neutron activation to detect a photographic image under a painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.; Bird, R.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron activation followed by autoradiography has been used in a number of studies of oil paintings to reveal brush technique, overpainting, pigment types and other information. The facilities of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment have been used to investigate whether there is a photographic image underlying a painting by the Swedish born artist Carl Magnus Oscar Fristrom (1856-1919)

  9. 3D synchrotron x-ray microtomography of paint samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Boon, Jaap J.; van der Horst, Jerre; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray microtomography is a novel way to examine paint samples. The three dimensional distribution of pigment particles, binding media and their deterioration products as well as other features such as voids, are made visible in their original context through a computing environment without the need of physical sectioning. This avoids manipulation related artefacts. Experiments on paint chips (approximately 500 micron wide) were done on the TOMCAT beam line (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, CH, using an x-ray energy of up to 40 keV. The x-ray absorption images are obtained at a resolution of 350 nm. The 3D dataset was analysed using the commercial 3D imaging software Avizo 5.1. Through this process, virtual sections of the paint sample can be obtained in any orientation. One of the topics currently under research are the ground layers of paintings by Cuno Amiet (1868- 1961), one of the most important Swiss painters of classical modernism, whose early work is currently the focus of research at the Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA). This technique gives access to information such as sample surface morphology, porosity, particle size distribution and even particle identification. In the case of calcium carbonate grounds for example, features like microfossils present in natural chalks, can be reconstructed and their species identified, thus potentially providing information towards the mineral origin. One further elegant feature of this technique is that a target section can be selected within the 3D data set, before exposing it to obtain chemical data. Virtual sections can then be compared with cross sections of the same samples made in the traditional way.

  10. Microscopy and the Mystery of Pablo Picasso's Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker

    A deep connection to our past and shared cultural heritage must be preserved to foster a balanced society where all humanity can thrive. This talk will describe analysis of paint materials used by Pablo Picasso at the nanoscale, as only possible at the brightest synchrotron sources. It will highlight how new imaging techniques can reveal the invisible, bringing to light underlying compositions of old masters' paintings. This in turn enables the writing of new art history and provides important material clues that can assist with attribution and authentication. We will explain how the use of new technology can lead to new discoveries, which, in turn, can change the public's and the specialists' perception of great works of art. ∖In collaboration with scientists from The Art Institute of Chicago we have teamed up to study the chemical make up of zinc oxide pigments used in artworks by Pablo Picasso. We will show how highly focused X-ray beams with nanoscale spatial resolution and trace element sensitivity have helped to determine that Picasso has used conventional house paint in some of his paintings. Surprisingly, the study gives also new insights into the pigment material zinc oxide, which has also great potential in a variety of applications such as in spintronics or as transparent electrodes in solar panels. Work at the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under contract DEAC02-06CH11357.

  11. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  12. Cinnabar alteration in archaeological wall paintings: an experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Madeleine Kegelman; Balonis, Magdalena; Kakoulli, Ioanna

    2015-11-01

    The red mineral pigment known as cinnabar (HgS) was commonly employed in Roman fresco wall paintings. Fresco artists of the period favored this pigment for its striking red color. However, upon excavation and exposure to air and light, cinnabar-pigmented surfaces recovered from archaeological contexts often proved to be unstable. Mural paintings colored with cinnabar that have been exposed in the open air frequently demonstrate a disfiguring, irreversible darkening of the surface. Traditionally, scholars have attributed this alteration to a light-induced phase change from red α-cinnabar to black β-cinnabar (meta-cinnabar). While this transformation has not been totally excluded, the prevailing view among conservation scientists is that chlorine plays a key role in the darkening process through the formation of light-sensitive mercury chloride compounds, or as a catalyst in the photochemical redox of Hg(II)S into Hg(0) and S(0). Using laboratory-based experiments and thermodynamic modeling, this paper attempts to further clarify the mechanism(s) and kinetics of cinnabar alteration in fresco applications, especially the role of light, humidity, and chlorine ions. Additionally, it explores possible pathways and preventive as well as remedial conservation treatments during or immediately following excavation, to inhibit or retard darkening of cinnabar-pigmented fresco surfaces.

  13. Portable and micro x-ray fluorescence investigations of the wall paintings belonging to different periods of anatolian history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zararsiz, A.; Ozen, L.; Kalayci, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: In this study portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and micro x-ray fluorescence spectrometer were used for investigating the pigments on the Chatalhoyuk wall paintings from the neolithic period which are located in Museum of Anatolian Civilizations. Totally 15 artifacts were investigated in this study and the elemental compositions of the pigments were identified on this paintings. The communities which have lived in different periods of time have revealed different cultures during the 12 000 years old cultural heritage in our country

  14. FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis of pigments from an Augustinian friary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Newton, Emma M; O'Connor, Sonia; Evans, D

    2010-08-01

    The Raman spectroscopic analysis of several stone samples with applied red pigments obtained from an archaeological excavation of an Augustinian friary discovered during the construction of an extension to Hull Magistrates Court in 1994 has revealed a surprising diversity of composition. Cinnabar, red lead and haematite have all been identified alone or in admixture; the cinnabar is exceptional in that it has only been found heavily adulterated with red ochre and red lead, as the other two pigments are found alone. There are signatures of limewash putty, which has been applied to the stone substrate prior to the painting, which is characteristic of the Roman method of wall painting, and there are no traces of gypsum found in the specimens studied. This evidence indicates an early mediaeval method of stone decoration.

  15. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS identification of light harvesting and light screening pigments in the lake sediments at Edmonson Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Rita; Alibabaei, Leila; Zannotti, Marco; Ferraro, Stefano; Petetta, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The composition of sedimentary pigments in the Antarctic lake at Edmonson Point has been investigated and compared with the aim to provide a useful analytical method for pigments separation and identification, providing reference data for future assessment of possible changes in environmental conditions. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection and diode array detection (DAD) has been used to identify light screening and light harvesting pigments. The results are discussed in terms of local environmental conditions.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inorganic pigment study of the San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls using total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Custo, Graciela; Barrio, Nestor; Burucua, Jose; Boeykens, Susana; Marte, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the study carried out on a series of oil paintings on canvas from the eighteenth century that were restored at Centro de Produccion e Investigacion en Restauracion y Conservacion Artistica y Bibliografica - Tarea (CEIRCAB-Tarea), Buenos Aires, Argentina: the San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls. Experimental study was undertaken to identify inorganic pigments and the technique used in their confection; and, in this way, try to add information about their local origin. Therefore special emphasis was put to infer technologies used in the manufacturing of these paintings. Elemental analysis was performed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) and complemented by optical and polarized light microscopy. Microsampling was carefully done over areas of the paintings which were damaged and where a small additional loss will not be noticed. This investigation has shown that a variety of pigments were used, namely earth pigments (red and yellow ochres), white lead, vermilion, etc., and they were used either pure or in mixtures. This characterization helped conservators in their decisions regarding a better understanding of the deterioration processes. In addition, this research about the material composition allowed the art historians and restorers the possibility to obtain information about where, when or by whom The San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls may have been painted.

  18. Inorganic pigment study of the San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls using total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Cristina, E-mail: vazquez@cnea.gov.a [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Colon 850. C1063ACU, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gerencia Quimica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); Custo, Graciela, E-mail: custo@cnea.gov.a [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gerencia Quimica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); Barrio, Nestor, E-mail: nbarrio@unsam.edu.a [CEIRCAB-TAREA, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (UNSAM), Escuela de Humanidades, Campus Miguelete, 25 de Mayo y Francia, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); Burucua, Jose, E-mail: gburucua@unsam.edu.a [CEIRCAB-TAREA, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (UNSAM), Escuela de Humanidades, Campus Miguelete, 25 de Mayo y Francia, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); Boeykens, Susana [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Colon 850. C1063ACU, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marte, Fernando, E-mail: fmarte@unsam.edu.a [CEIRCAB-TAREA, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (UNSAM), Escuela de Humanidades, Campus Miguelete, 25 de Mayo y Francia, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina)

    2010-09-15

    This article describes the study carried out on a series of oil paintings on canvas from the eighteenth century that were restored at Centro de Produccion e Investigacion en Restauracion y Conservacion Artistica y Bibliografica - Tarea (CEIRCAB-Tarea), Buenos Aires, Argentina: the San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls. Experimental study was undertaken to identify inorganic pigments and the technique used in their confection; and, in this way, try to add information about their local origin. Therefore special emphasis was put to infer technologies used in the manufacturing of these paintings. Elemental analysis was performed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) and complemented by optical and polarized light microscopy. Microsampling was carefully done over areas of the paintings which were damaged and where a small additional loss will not be noticed. This investigation has shown that a variety of pigments were used, namely earth pigments (red and yellow ochres), white lead, vermilion, etc., and they were used either pure or in mixtures. This characterization helped conservators in their decisions regarding a better understanding of the deterioration processes. In addition, this research about the material composition allowed the art historians and restorers the possibility to obtain information about where, when or by whom The San Pedro Gonzalez Telmo Sibyls may have been painted.

  19. Raman spectroscopic study of “The Malatesta”: A Renaissance painting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  20. Raman spectroscopic study of a post-medieval wall painting in need of conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Farwell, Dennis W; Brooke, Christopher J

    2005-09-01

    Raman spectroscopic studies of four specimens from an important angel wall painting in need of conservation work in a medieval church have provided some information about the pigments and pigment compositions which will influence possible future preservation and restoration strategies. Excitation of the Raman spectra at 1,064 nm in macroscopic mode and at 785 nm in microscopic mode revealed that the white pigment on the angel's wings was a mixture of barytes with calcite and lead white in minor composition. Although the specimens provided were not directly associated with coloured regions of the painting, yellow and blue microcrystals were found and they were identified as chrome yellow and lazurite, respectively. Red and brown particles were identified as cinnabar/vermilion and haematite. Several green particles were also found but could not be identified. The green and blue crystals could be related to neighbouring coloured regions of the artwork and the yellow colour could be identified as a background to the angel figure. Particles of carbon were found to be dispersed throughout the specimens and can be ascribed to soot from candles, heating stoves or oil lamps providing lighting in the church. No evidence for biological deterioration was found from the spectra. The unusual pigment palette is strongly suggestive of a later date of painting than was originally believed but there is a possibility that an earlier rendition exists underneath. Following a review of the spectroscopic data, a more extensive sampling protocol is recommended, from which some stratigraphic evidence could identify the underlying plaster and possible artwork.

  1. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS Identification of Light Harvesting and Light Screening Pigments in the Lake Sediments at Edmonson Point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Giovannetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of sedimentary pigments in the Antarctic lake at Edmonson Point has been investigated and compared with the aim to provide a useful analytical method for pigments separation and identification, providing reference data for future assessment of possible changes in environmental conditions. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS detection and diode array detection (DAD has been used to identify light screening and light harvesting pigments. The results are discussed in terms of local environmental conditions.

  2. Core-Shell Processing of Natural Pigment: Upper Palaeolithic Red Ochre from Lovas, Hungary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István E Sajó

    Full Text Available Ochre is the common archaeological term for prehistoric pigments. It is applied to a range of uses, from ritual burials to cave art to medications. While a substantial number of Palaeolithic paint mining pits have been identified across Europe, the link between ochre use and provenance, and their antiquity, has never yet been identified. Here we characterise the mineralogical signature of core-shell processed ochre from the Palaeolithic paint mining pits near Lovas in Hungary, using a novel integration of petrographic and mineralogical techniques. We present the first evidence for core-shell processed, natural pigment that was prepared by prehistoric people from hematitic red ochre. This involved combining the darker red outer shell with the less intensely coloured core to efficiently produce an economical, yet still strongly coloured, paint. We demonstrate the antiquity of the site as having operated between 14-13 kcal BP, during the Epigravettian period. This is based on new radiocarbon dating of bone artefacts associated with the quarry site. The dating results indicate the site to be the oldest known evidence for core-shell pigment processing. We show that the ochre mined at Lovas was exported from the site based on its characteristic signature at other archaeological sites in the region. Our discovery not only provides a methodological framework for future characterisation of ochre pigments, but also provides the earliest known evidence for "value-adding" of products for trade.

  3. Core-Shell Processing of Natural Pigment: Upper Palaeolithic Red Ochre from Lovas, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajó, István E; Kovács, János; Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E; Jáger, Viktor; Lengyel, György; Viola, Bence; Talamo, Sahra; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Ochre is the common archaeological term for prehistoric pigments. It is applied to a range of uses, from ritual burials to cave art to medications. While a substantial number of Palaeolithic paint mining pits have been identified across Europe, the link between ochre use and provenance, and their antiquity, has never yet been identified. Here we characterise the mineralogical signature of core-shell processed ochre from the Palaeolithic paint mining pits near Lovas in Hungary, using a novel integration of petrographic and mineralogical techniques. We present the first evidence for core-shell processed, natural pigment that was prepared by prehistoric people from hematitic red ochre. This involved combining the darker red outer shell with the less intensely coloured core to efficiently produce an economical, yet still strongly coloured, paint. We demonstrate the antiquity of the site as having operated between 14-13 kcal BP, during the Epigravettian period. This is based on new radiocarbon dating of bone artefacts associated with the quarry site. The dating results indicate the site to be the oldest known evidence for core-shell pigment processing. We show that the ochre mined at Lovas was exported from the site based on its characteristic signature at other archaeological sites in the region. Our discovery not only provides a methodological framework for future characterisation of ochre pigments, but also provides the earliest known evidence for "value-adding" of products for trade.

  4. In-situ{sup 57}Fe Mössbauer characterization of iron oxides in pigments of a rupestrian painting from the Serra da Capivara National Park, in Brazil, with the backscattering Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares Meneses Lage, Maria Conceiç ao; Duarte Cavalcante, Luis Carlos [Federal University of Piauí (UFPI), Center of Natural Sciences (Brazil); Klingelhöfer, Göstar [Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institut Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Germany); Fabris, José Domingos, E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Department of Chemistry – ICEx (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    It is reported the use of the miniaturized portable {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer backscattering spectrometer MIMOS II to perform in situ measurements in the archaeological site known as Toca do Boqueirão do Sítio da Pedra Furada (BPF), in Serra da Capivara National Park, in order to specifically examine shades of dark red pigments and compare their differences relatively to the light red part of the same painting. The hyperfine Mössbauer parameters reveal that the dark red area of the rupestrian painting is composed of three populations of hematite and of a small proportion of maghemite, whereas the light red are of the same painting contain hematite mixed with a small proportion of maghemite and a (super)paramagnetic Fe {sup 3+}. The Fe content in the dark red area from the rupestrian painting is of approximately twice the amount in the light red of the same prehistoric graphism. The corresponding analysis of red ochre sample collected in the excavation of these archaeological site exhibited two populations of hematite and also a small proportion of maghemite.

  5. Super-cool paints: optimizing composition with a modified four-flux model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Marc A.; Arnold, Matthew D.; Gentle, Angus R.; Smith, Geoffrey B.

    2017-09-01

    The scope for maximizing the albedo of a painted surface to produce low cost new and retro-fitted super-cool roofing is explored systematically. The aim is easy to apply, low cost paint formulations yielding albedos in the range 0.90 to 0.95. This requires raising the near-infrared (NIR) spectral reflectance into this range, while not reducing the more easily obtained high visible reflectance values. Our modified version of the four-flux method has enabled results on more complex composites. Key parameters to be optimized include; fill factors, particle size and material, using more than one mean size, thickness, substrate and binder materials. The model used is a variation of the classical four-flux method that solves the energy transfer problem through four balance differential equations. We use a different approach to the characteristic parameters to define the absorptance and scattering of the complete composite. This generalization allows extension to inclusion of size dispersion of the pigment particle and various binder resins, including those most commonly in use based on acrylics. Thus, the pigment scattering model has to take account of the matrix having loss in the NIR. A paint ranking index aimed specifically at separating paints with albedo above 0.80 is introduced representing the fraction of time at a sub-ambient temperature.

  6. Identification of organic pigments in tattoo inks and permanent make-up using laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Markus; Hauri, Urs; Kroll, Lydia; Hohl, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, about 12% of the European and 20% of the US population are tattooed. Rising concerns regarding consumer safety, led to legal restrictions on tattoo and permanent make-up (PMU) inks. Restrictions also include bans on certain colourants. Both ink types use organic pigments for colour-giving, plus inorganic pigments for white and black and colour tones. Pigments are only sparingly soluble in common solvents and occur as suspended particles in the ink matrix. Their detection and identification therefore pose a major challenge for laboratories involved in monitoring the legal compliance of tattoo inks and PMU. We overcame this challenge by developing a direct laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry method, which included an easy sample clean up. The method proved to be capable of detecting and identifying organic pigments in almost all of the tested ink samples. Method validation and routine deployment during market surveys showed the method to be fit for purpose. Pigment screening of 396 tattoo inks and 55 PMU taken from the Swiss market between 2009 and 2017 lead to the following conclusions: Pigment variety is much greater in tattoo inks (18) than in PMU (10); four prohibited pigments (Pigment Green 7, Pigment Red 122, Pigment Violet 19 and 23) were found in both ink types; for PMU, these four pigments made up 12% of the pigment findings, compared to 32% for tattoo inks. Therefore, legal compliance of PMU was at a higher level. A comparison of pigments found with those declared on tattoo ink labels clearly showed that banned pigments are rarely declared, but rather masked by listing non present legal pigments and label forging; therefore, highlighting the urgency of widespread market controls.

  7. Artificial orpiment, a new pigment in Rembrandt’s palette

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, A.; Noble, Petria; Krekeler, Anna; van der Snickt, G.R.; Janssens, Koen; Abe, Yoshinari; Nakai, Izumi; Dik, J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on how the application of macro X-ray fluorescence (MA-XRF) imaging, in combination with the re-examination of existing paint cross-sections, has led to the discovery of a new pigment in Rembrandt’s palette: artificial orpiment. In the NWO Science4Arts ‘ReVisRembrandt’ project, novel chemical imaging techniques are being developed and applied to the study of Rembrandt’s late paintings in order to help resolve outstanding questions and to gain a better understanding of his l...

  8. Shades of green in 15th century paintings: combined microanalysis of the materials using synchrotron radiation XRD, FTIR and XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvado, Nati; Buti, Salvador; Cotte, Marine; Cinque, Gianfelice; Pradell, Trinitat

    2013-01-01

    A representative selection of green paintings from fifteenth century Catalonia and the Crown of Aragon are analyzed by a combination of synchrotron radiation microanalytical techniques including FTIR, XRD, and XRF. The green pigments themselves are found to be a mixture of copper acetates/basic copper acetates and basic copper chlorides. Nevertheless, a broader range of green shades were obtained by mixing the green pigment with yellow, white, and blue pigments and applied forming a sequence of micrometric layers. Besides the nature of the pigments themselves, degradation and reaction products, such as carboxylates, formates and oxalates were also identified. Some of the copper based compounds, such as the basic copper chloride, may be either part of the original pigment or a weathering product. The high resolution, high brilliance, and small footprint of synchrotron radiation proved to be essential for the analysis of those submillimetric paint layers made of a large variety of compounds heterogeneous in nature and distribution and present in extremely low concentrations. (orig.)

  9. Exploiting external reflection FTIR spectroscopy for the in-situ identification of pigments and binders in illuminated manuscripts. Brochantite and posnjakite as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Guglielmi, Vittoria; Faraone, Silvio; Vinaccia, Alessandro; Bruni, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the use of portable instrumentation allowing in-situ reflection FTIR analyses is exploited to identify the coloring matters of northern-Italian illuminations dating to the XVI century. In order to build a database of spectra, reference paint samples were prepared spreading the pigments on parchment with two different binders, i.e. gum arabic and egg white, used in antiquity. Pigments for the database were chosen considering their use in the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance and their response in the mid- and near-IR region. The reflection FTIR spectra obtained resulted to be dominated by the specular reflection component, allowing the use of the Kramers-Kronig transform to convert them to the more conventional absorbance FTIR spectra. Several pigments could thus be identified in ancient illuminations, even if some green details showed a spectral pattern different with respect to the most common commercial green pigments of the database. Therefore, in addition, basic copper sulfates brochantite and posnjakite were synthesized and characterized. In three green details, posnjakite was identified, both as a pure compound and together with malachite.

  10. A quasi-monochromatic X-rays source for art painting pigments investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertin, F.; Franconieri, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Petrucci, F.; Chiozzi, S. [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Moro, D. [University of Padova, Department of Physics, Padova (Italy); LNL - INFN, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    Monochromatic X-ray sources can be used for several applications, like in medicine or in studying our cultural heritage. We are investigating imaging systems based on a tuneable energy band X-ray source, to obtain an element mapping of painting layers using the K-edge technique. The narrow energy band beams are obtained with conventional X-ray source via Bragg diffraction on a mosaic crystal; such an analysis has been performed at different diffraction angles, tuning the energy to investigate spectra of interest from the artistic point of view, like zinc and copper. In this paper the characteristics of the system in terms of fluence rate are reported, and first results of this technique on canvas samples and painting are presented. (orig.)

  11. Influence of pigments and opacifiers on color stability of an artificially aged facial silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Moreno, Amália; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Haddad, Marcela Filiè

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two pigments (ceramic powder and oil paint) and one opacifier (barium sulfate) on the color stability of MDX4-4210 facial silicone submitted to accelerated aging. Sixty specimens of silicone were fabricated and divided into six groups--colorless (G1), colorless with opacifier (G2), ceramic (G3), ceramic with opacifier (G4), oil (G5), oil with opacifier (G6). All replicas were submitted to accelerated aging for 1008 hours. The evaluations of chromatic alteration through visual analysis and reflection spectrophotometry were carried out initially and after 252, 504, and 1008 hours of aging. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% level of significance. All groups exhibited chromatic alteration (ΔE > 0); however, this color alteration was not perceptible through visual analysis of the color. The pigmented groups with opacifier presented the lowest ΔE values, with a statistical difference from the other groups. For the groups without opacifier, the group pigmented with oil paint exhibited the lowest ΔE values in the different aging periods, with a statistical difference. Accelerated aging generated significant chromatic alterations in all groups after 252 hours, except for the colorless and oil groups, both with opacifier (G2 and G6). The opacifier protects facial silicones against color degradation, and oil paint is a stable pigment even without addition of opacifier. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Scientific Basis for Paint Stripping: Elucidated Combinatorial Mechanism of Methylene Chloride and Phenol Based Paint Removers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-22

    TiO2 9.5 Isobutyl ketone 0.1 Iron oxide hydrate 2.5 n-Butyl acid phosphate 0.1 Carbazole dioxazine violet ɘ.1 Bentone 0.5 Table 3: MIL-PRF-85285...partial formulation films, with pigments and no fillers, and full formulation films of current military polyurethane coatings were analyzed in this...time of the solvents. 22-01-2014 Memorandum Report Paint stripper Methylene chloride Phenol Polyurethane 7 June 2012 – 6 June 2013 SERDP WP-2244

  13. X-ray analysis of pigments on ancient Egyptian monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, M.; Sassa, S.; Yoshioka, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ancient pigments were analyzed using PIXE and XRD methods in the laboratory, which were painted on ancient Egyptian monuments. On the other hand, those on monuments remaining with entire shape were investigated using the hand-held type of an XRF spectrometer and an X-ray diffractometer in the field. For the laboratory experiment, several wall fragments of the Malqata palace in ancient Egypt (18th Dynasty, ca. 1390 B.C.) were investigated. In the field experiment, the block of Ramesses II (19th Dynasty, ca. 1270 B.C.), the Wooden Coffin of Neb-sny (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.), the Funerary Stele of Amenemhat (11th Dynasty, ca. 2000 B.C.), and the painted walls of the Tomb of Userhat (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.) were investigated. From white and blue colored parts, huntite and Egyptian blue were found, respectively, which are a very rare mineral and an artificial pigment prepared only in ancient Egypt, respectively. (author)

  14. X-ray analysis of pigments on ancient Egyptian monuments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, M.; Sassa, S.; Yoshioka, T. [Waseda Univ., Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo (JP)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    Ancient pigments were analyzed using PIXE and XRD methods in the laboratory, which were painted on ancient Egyptian monuments. On the other hand, those on monuments remaining with entire shape were investigated using the hand-held type of an XRF spectrometer and an X-ray diffractometer in the field. For the laboratory experiment, several wall fragments of the Malqata palace in ancient Egypt (18th Dynasty, ca. 1390 B.C.) were investigated. In the field experiment, the block of Ramesses II (19th Dynasty, ca. 1270 B.C.), the Wooden Coffin of Neb-sny (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.), the Funerary Stele of Amenemhat (11th Dynasty, ca. 2000 B.C.), and the painted walls of the Tomb of Userhat (18th Dynasty, ca. 1400 B.C.) were investigated. From white and blue colored parts, huntite and Egyptian blue were found, respectively, which are a very rare mineral and an artificial pigment prepared only in ancient Egypt, respectively. (author)

  15. Simulating reflectance at interfaces coated with household paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisland, Zachary

    The paint and coatings industry is constantly working to improve their product, making a more efficient product at a cheaper cost. This requires some research and learning on the part of the companies, particularly in optical studies. For example, Burgess Pigment Company has developed a method, using a flash calciner, to quickly dehydrate clay, essentially popping it like popcorn, in order to add air pockets to the individual particles of clay. Clay that has undergone this process can improve the reflective properties of paint. The human eye, as a sensory organ, relies on reflected light in order to provide vision. As the major goal of paint is to be seen, it is easy to infer that it would be of utmost importance for the paint to reflect large amounts of light to appear more visible to the human eye and so using clay that has air pockets would be more desirable. The primary goal of this thesis will be to explore optical theory in an attempt to explain why the addition of air pockets could produce a more effective product.

  16. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of iron corrosion underneath painting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, R.K.; Hajela, B.P.; Sengupta, S.; Srivastava, B.C.; Gupta, K.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of pigments on the development of corrosion products between the painting system and metal surface when exposed to marine environments has been discussed. The pigments studied were: red mud zinc chromate, zinc chromate, red oxide zinc phosphate, manganese phosphate barium chromate and basic lead silico chromate. Moessbauer spectroscopy revealed that the upper rust layer in all the cases consisted of γ-Fe 2 O 3 , γ-FeOOH and α-FeOOH. The lower rust layer immediately in contact with the metal surface consisted of an asymmetrical doublet due to γ-FeOOH. (Auth.)

  17. Use of ETBAmethod (Energy Trace and Barrier Analysis forhazard identification in a paint shop of an automobile production factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH. Heidari

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   Occupational accidents and diseases cost 1.25 thousands billion $ to economic of world & links 2 million annually. Rate of death due to occupational accidents in developing countries in some cases is 4 times to developed industrial countries. To control accidents & resultant damages, identification of potential agents causing accidents in  necessary. One of the modern methods for identification these agents is ETBA. This method is  based on energy model. This model present energy as potential agent causing accident & according  to this, propose a set of control strategies that are in different levels of priority due to their  effectiveness   Methods   This research is a case study that is a kind of qualitative researches and it had done in an  automobile factory's paint shop. First in this study ETBA method used to identify hazards, then  risks were analysed and in the last phase, approaches were proposed for decrease level of   unacceptable risks.   Results   This study determined that in this field, two category of hazards are in first priority for   performing control measures:  First category contains chemical hazards that might lead to catastrophic consequences like fire &  cancer. Highest risk portion o this paint shop is manually spray painting booth and spray painting  stations that is placed in repair lines.  Second category contains hazards that causes accidents repeatedly the highest risk portions are stations where ground conveyor moves car bodies (pain and repair lines.   Conclusion   Because of these two category of hazards are concentrated in paint and repair lines, these lines should be in first priority for control hazards.

  18. The genesis of Jan Steens painting 'As the old ones sing, so the young ones pipe' from the Gemaeldegalerie Berlin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denker, A.; Kleinert, K.; Laurenze-Landsberg, C.; Reimelt, M.; Schroeder-Smeibidl, B.

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the research reactor of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, the Gemaeldegalerie Berlin is the only institute worldwide, which systematically employs the method of Neutron-Activation-Autoradiography to analyze paintings and painting techniques. To date more than 70 paintings were investigated with this effective, non-destructive, and exceptional method. It allows the visualization of structures and layers beneath the top surface and, in addition, enables the identification of elements contained in the pigments. The instrument B8 at the research reactor BER II is dedicated to this research. Jan Steen is one of the prolific artists from the 17th century. Like other artists from that time he produced several versions of one specific topic during life-time. The topic 'As the old ones sing, so the young ones pipe' was painted by Jan Steen in 13 versions. The painting from the Gemaeldegalerie is an exception in this series as it differs in style and content from the other oeuvres. The question arises: why did the artist deviate from his usual scheme? The possible answer is provided by X-ray images and neutron autoradiographs made of the painting, allowing insight into hidden paint layers and, therefore, in the genesis of the painting. Jan Steen did not simply change the composition of the room and the figures. He originally intended an altogether different topic. Assumedly it was supposed to be a so-called merry company, located in a generous, stately room. Many pieces of this sophisticated ambiance have been eliminated from the version visible today; others were modified and integrated into the composition of the new painting. Thus, Jan Steen commenced the topic 'As the old ones sing, so the young ones pipe' from a different context.

  19. Spectroscopic study of an icon painted on wooden panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Sofija R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian icon painted on wooden panel analyzed in this work is interesting for art historians because there is no precise information in which workshops it was made or who the author was. Similar icons are often found in churches and monasteries in our region. In order to obtain information about materials used for creation of investigated icon two micro-analytical techniques were used: Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Obtained results confirmed presence of following materials: lead-white, vermilion, minium, ultramarine, brown and green earth pigments and silver in combination with yellow organic varnish, which served to an iconographer for gilding. Ground layer was made of calcite. Blue pigment ultramarine was probably used for blue colour as well as for obtaining particulars hues in several parts of the paint layer. This can be important information for further research concerning particular workshop in which the icon was made. Identified materials are typical for Russian iconography of the 19th century. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 177021 i OI 177012

  20. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, Mariagrazia, E-mail: Mariagrazia.Tortora@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), I-67100, Loc. Coppito, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Sfarra, Stefano, E-mail: Stefano.Sfarra@univaq.it [Las.E.R. Laboratory, University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ, Italy, (Italy); Chiarini, Marco, E-mail: mchiarini@unite.it [University of Teramo, Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food Agriculture and Environment, Via Carlo Lerici 1, I-64023, Mosciano Sant’Angelo, Teramo, TE, Italy, (Italy); Daniele, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Daniele@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Taglieri, Giuliana, E-mail: Giuliana.Taglieri@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Cerichelli, Giorgio, E-mail: Giorgio.Cerichelli@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), I-67100, Loc. Coppito, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Infrared thermography allowed to identify structural damage and rising damp effect. • The present approach provided insights on the used pigments and painting techniques. • FT-IR, XRF and XRD analyses of the mortar sample showed the peculiar composition. • 1D, 2D NMR analyses were useful for the identification of the restoration polymer. • NMR technique also allowed to characterize the plasticizing agents. - Abstract: In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L’Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  1. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Infrared thermography allowed to identify structural damage and rising damp effect. • The present approach provided insights on the used pigments and painting techniques. • FT-IR, XRF and XRD analyses of the mortar sample showed the peculiar composition. • 1D, 2D NMR analyses were useful for the identification of the restoration polymer. • NMR technique also allowed to characterize the plasticizing agents. - Abstract: In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L’Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  2. Identification and characterization of historical pigments with x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRA) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochleitner, B.

    2002-11-01

    This thesis presents a systematic characterization of historical inorganic pigments with respect to their crystallographic structure, main components, and trade elements, utilizing three complementary methods. The results are compiled in a computer-database containing the experimentally obtained information. The specimens examined in this study originate from a collection of 19th and 20th century pigments, dyes and binders with a wide variety of colors and materials at the Institute of Natural Sciences and Technologies in Art of the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Approximately 400 different inorganic pigments were analysed for this first study of its kind by combining the experimental techniques explained in the next paragraph. For analyzing the inorganic pigments three different methods were applied: x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) proved to be suitable techniques to identify and characterize the composition of the materials. The experimental work was focused on x-ray diffraction to detect the main components and to perform phase analysis for the identification of the crystallographic structure. To facilitate the analysis of the diffractograms and investigate differences in the elemental composition, XRF-measurements were carried out and complemented by FTIR-spectroscopy. The latter technique supports the identification of organic components of the samples and both ease phase analysis. In some cases, the obtained results show remarkable differences in composition for pigments having the same trade name. These differences consist either with respect to the identified elements or added components, such as pure white pigments. However, in most cases the chemical structure of the phase determining the color of the relevant pigment group was similar. Knowledge of the composition of the originally used pigments is of great importance for the restoration and conservation of art objects. In order to

  3. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS Identification of Light Harvesting and Light Screening Pigments in the Lake Sediments at Edmonson Point

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Rita; Alibabaei, Leila; Zannotti, Marco; Ferraro, Stefano; Petetta, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The composition of sedimentary pigments in the Antarctic lake at Edmonson Point has been investigated and compared with the aim to provide a useful analytical method for pigments separation and identification, providing reference data for future assessment of possible changes in environmental conditions. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection and diode array detection (DAD) has been used to identify light screeni...

  4. Moessbauer study of rock paintings from Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, G.M. da; Jesus Filho, M.F. de; Cruz Souza, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Four samples of a wall containing rock paintings have been studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy analysis and X-ray diffraction. Hematite and goethite were identified as the pigments responsible for the colors and the mineral tinsleyite, as the principal component of a light pink layer that is present in some parts of the wall. (orig.)

  5. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.; Krebs, M.P.; Schoenmaker, F.E.; Hicks, W.; Yu, M.; Shi, L.; Rowe, L.; Collin, G.B.; Charette, J.R.; Letteboer, S.J.; Neveling, K.; Moorsel, T.W. van; Abu-Ltaif, S.; Baere, E. De; Walraedt, S.; Banfi, S.; Simonelli, F.; Cremers, F.P.; Boon, C.J.; Roepman, R.; Leroy, B.P.; Peachey, N.S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Nishina, P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the CTNNA1 gene (encoding alpha-catenin 1) in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment

  6. Study of Pictorial technique in a colonial wall painting from El Padre coffee plantation using XRF and complementary technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Mendoza, A.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation is based on the study of the pictorial technique employed in a wall painting from El Padre coffee plantation situation in Madruga, Havana, and built at beginning of XIX century. The knowledge about pictorical techniques that was used in a painting is a typical research in Archaeometry, because it is so important the art historical information as scientific results to conclude about the real materials and procedures that were used in the past by the artists . The prediction of a wall painting pictorical technique is carrying out trough the knowledge of pigments, mortars layers and binding substance composition. The non destructive inorganic microanalysis of mortars layers and pigments was determined by a portable XRF system, which is very useful because of the most of pigments are of inorganic nature. A pinpoint samples microanalysis of each color from the painting were done by complementary and traditional technique in stratigraphic studies such as: optical microscopy, micro- chemical drop test, Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray attachment (SEM-EDX), gas chromatography and Fourier Transformed Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The overlapping of layers was obtained by optical microscopy, The mortars composition was investigated by micro-chemical drop test and SEM/EDX and further confirmed by FTIR. The presence of binding substances in colors layers was identified by specific staining test and Gas Chromatography

  7. Identification of the chemical inventory of different paint types applied in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina Tietze; Foreman, M.R.St.J.; Ekberg, CH.H.; Chalmers University of Technology, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Goeteborg; Dongen van, B.E.

    2013-01-01

    The floors, concrete walls and many of the metal surfaces in nuclear power plant containments are coated with zinc primers or paint films to preserve the metal surfaces and simplify decontamination in the containment after the occurrence of a severe nuclear incident or accident. A chemical examination of paint films from different nuclear installations out of operation, as well as current operating ones, reveals that different types of paints are used whose composition can vary significantly. Results obtained for one type of paint at a certain nuclear site are in most cases unlikely to be comparable with sites painted with another type of paint. During normal operation and particularly during nuclear accidents, the paints will degrade under the high temperature, steam and irradiation influence. As paint and its degradation products can act as sources and depots for volatile iodine compounds, the type and aging conditions of the paint films will have a significant impact on the source term of the volatile fission product iodine. Thus, great care should be taken when extrapolating any results obtained for the interaction of radioactive iodine with one paint product to a different paint product. The main focus of the study is a comparison of the chemical profile of paint films applied in Swedish nuclear power plants. Teknopox Aqua V A, an epoxy paint recently used at Ringhals 2, and an emulsion paint used in the scrubber buildings of Ringhals 1-4 are compared with a paint film from Barsebaeck nuclear power plant unit 1 that had been aged under real reactor conditions for 20 years. In addition, two paint films, an emulsion and a gloss paint, used in an international nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, are compared with the paints from the Swedish nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. Artificial orpiment, a new pigment in Rembrandt’s palette

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, A.; Noble, Petria; Krekeler, Anna; van der Snickt, G.R.; Janssens, Koen; Abe, Yoshinari; Nakai, Izumi; Dik, J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on how the application of macro X-ray fluorescence (MA-XRF) imaging, in combination with the re-examination of existing paint cross-sections, has led to the discovery of a new pigment in Rembrandt’s palette: artificial orpiment. In the NWO Science4Arts ‘ReVisRembrandt’ project,

  9. Characterization of pigment/binder - systems in arts via FTIR and UV/Vis/NIR - spectroscopy with special consideration of nondestructive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this doctoral thesis is on the non-destructive analysis of art objects by using compound specific reflection-UV/Vis/NIR and reflection-FTIR spectroscopy. Based on commercially available instruments, measuring systems have been designed and built to meet the specific requirements of material analysis in the field of art. These systems have been utilized to analyse different types of art objects (watercolour paintings, easel paintings, contemporary graphic art objects) in order to identify the materials used by the artists. Furthermore, two new procedures are presented which allow to build up adequate reference databases from only minimal sample amounts of original watercolour materials of the 19th century. This is a crucial point as both methods require references for the identification of the materials. The results obtained demonstrate that UV/Vis/NIR and FTIR spectroscopy in reflection mode enable the non-destructive identification of a variety of both, organic and inorganic materials, particularly in combination with element specific XRF (X-ray fluorescence analysis) and thus are valuable tools for the analysis of cultural heritage objects. Furthermore, the results have shown that a comparison of the complementary methods strongly facilitated the evaluation of spectra obtained by the particular analytical techniques and hence reliable results could be obtained in many cases. As expected, several frequently used pigments e.g. carbon based blacks, earth pigments and lake pigments could not be identified unambiguously due to methodical limitations. Therefore, the use of additional complementary methods such as Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) would be highly desirable. Except a few examples, the characteristics of the radiation used for the investigations did not allow to draw conclusions about the distribution of materials in multilayer structures. For this reason, it still remains necessary to analyse cross-sections of samples for a

  10. Identification of reaction compounds in micrometric layers from gothic paintings using combined SR-XRD and SR-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Nicholson, James; Emerich, Hermann; Labrador, Ana; Pradell, Trinitat

    2009-07-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (micro-SR-XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-SR-FTIR) are used in the non-destructive identification of reaction and aging compounds from micrometric ancient painting layers. The combination of the micrometer size and non-destructive nature of the techniques together with the high resolution and brilliance of the synchrotron radiation has proved to be a procedure most advantageous for the study of reaction, aging and degradation processes. Copper, lead and calcium carboxylates and oxalates are determined in the chromatic, preparation and alteration layers from 15th century egg tempera and oil paintings. Their nature and crystallinity have been assessed. Some hypothesis about the mechanisms of development of both carboxylates and oxalates are presented.

  11. Characterization of paint layers and stained glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi Maino, D.; Ciancabilla, L.; Gandolfi, G.; Maino, G.; Bruni, S.; Ferriani, S.; Visparelli, D.

    2000-01-01

    Due to the higher magnification with respect to traditional optical microscopes, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been extensively applied in recent years to the investigation of elemental composition of many different types of artistic objects. The back-scattered and secondary electrons produced when the SEM electron beam hits the sample can be detected and converted in electronic signals which give rise to images of the scanned area. These images can be recorded in digital format and stored on a computer for subsequent processing. Moreover, in addition to the back-scattered and secondary electrons, the impact of the electron beam on the sample produces a X-ray spectrum, which can be further processed and analysed using an X-ray spectrometer coupled to the SEM. Therefore, it is possible to yield the chemical composition of the sample, analogously to the X-ray fluorescence analysis. Moreover, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be applied to the characterization of paint layers, making ultra-thin sections in which the paint and ground layers are preserved intact. In comparison with usual SEM measurements, the TEM technique is more precise, because of the higher spatial resolution in both the microanalysis and diffraction modes, of the order of 10-20 nm. This precision allows unique identification of each component in the layer and determination of the crystallographic structure, thus characterizing even the smallest particles of each pigment and pointing out minor components. It is then possible to establish whether a pigment is natural, manufactured, its origin as well as approximate datations. In this work, we describe the research activities performed in the laboratory recently established at the ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) Applied Physics Division, where dedicated SEM and TEM are connected by a suitable imaging system to a powerful computing system for image acquisition and processing. Use has

  12. The darkening of zinc yellow: XANES speciation of chromium in artist;s paints after light and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanella, Luciana; Casadio, Francesca; Gray, Kimberly A.; Warta, Richard; Ma, Qing; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2012-03-14

    The color darkening of selected brushstrokes of the masterpiece A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - 1884 (by Georges Seurat) has been attributed to the alteration of the chromate pigment zinc yellow. The pigment originally displays a bright greenish-yellow color but may undergo, after aging, darkening to a dull, ocher tone. We used XANES to probe the oxidation state of Cr on paint reconstructions, and show that color changes are associated with the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Paint mixtures containing the pigment and linseed oil to mimic mixtures used in La Grande Jatte were subjected to artificial aging in the presence of light, SO{sub 2}, and variable air humidity - 50 and 90% relative humidity. High relative humidity led to the largest degree of Cr(VI) reduction whereas low relative humidity promoted light-induced alterations. These results are corroborated by visible reflectance measurements on the same laboratory samples and contribute to a better understanding of the chemical reactivity of chromate pigments, which are present in many historical works of art.

  13. Raman identification of cuneiform tablet pigments: emphasis and colour technology in ancient Mesopotamian mid-third millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Chiriu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cuneiform tablets tell the life and culture of Sumerian people in a sort of black and white tale because of the binary engraving technique. A leading question arises: did Mesopotamian people apply some kind of colour to decorate their tablets or to put emphasis on selected words? Some administrative and literary Sumerian cuneiform tablets of mid-third Millennium B.C. from the site of Kish (central Mesopotamia, modern Iraq were dug up in twentieth-century and stored at the Ashmolean Museum of the Oxford University. Non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to detect the presence of residual pigments eventually applied to the engraving signs. Yellow, orange, red and white pigments have been detected and a possible identification has been proposed in this work. In particular yellow pigments are identified as Crocoite (PbCrO4, Lead stannate (Pb2SnO4; red pigments − hematite (Fe2O3 and cuprite (Cu2O; White pigments − Lead carbonate (PbCO3, calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO42, titanium dioxide (TiO2, gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O; orange pigment a composition of red and yellow compounds. These results suggest that Sumerian people invented a new editorial style, to overcome the binary logic of engraving process and catch the reader’s eye by decorating cuneiform tablets. Finally, the coloured rendering of the tablet in their original view is proposed.

  14. Painting rusted steel: The role of aluminum phosphosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselli, S.N.; Amo, B. del; Carbonari, R.O.; Di Sarli, A.R.; Romagnoli, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Aluminum phosphosilicate is an acid pigment which could act as mild phosphating agent. •Aluminum phosphosilicate can phosphatize iron oxides on rusted surfaces. •Aluminum phosphosilicate is compatible with acid binders. •Aluminum phosphosilicate could replace chromate in complete painting schemes. •Aluminum phosphosilicate primers improve paints adhesion on rusted surfaces. -- Abstract: Surface preparation is a key factor for the adequate performance of a paint system. The aim of this investigation is to employ a wash-primer to accomplish the chemical conversion of rusted surface when current cleaning operations are difficult to carry out. The active component of the wash-primer was aluminum phosphosilicate whose electrochemical behavior and the composition of the generated protective layer, both, were studied by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Primed rusted steel panels were coated with an alkyd system to perform accelerated tests in the salt spray chamber and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS). These tests were conducted in parallel with a chromate wash primer and the same alkyd system. Results showed that the wash-primer containing aluminum phosphosilicate could be used satisfactorily to paint rusted steel exhibiting a similar performance to the chromate primer

  15. Intrastromal Injection of China Painting Ink in Corneas of Male Rabbits: Clinical and Histological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmman Hassan, Alahmady Hamad; Abd Elhaliem Soliman, Nesreen Gamal-Eldeen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many patients with corneal opacity or complicated cataract in blind eye ask for cosmoses. In this study we tried to investigate the staining of corneas of male rabbits by Rotring China painting ink and to study the histological changes. Method. 10 eyes of 10 male Baladi Egyptian rabbits were injected (0.1 mL) intrastromally in the cornea by the use of China painting ink (Rotring Tinta China) through insulin syringe (27-gauge needle) by single injection; clinical follow-up is for 6 months and lastly the rabbits were scarified and the stained eyes were enucleated for histological analysis. Results. Clinically the stain was stable in color and distribution in corneas with no major complications. Histological results of the stained rabbit corneas showed blackish pigmentation in the corneal stroma without any inflammatory cellular infiltration. Some fibroblast cells had pigment granules in their cytoplasm in the adjacent layers. Conclusion. Corneal staining by China painting ink is effective and safe in staining of male rabbits cornea; however further study in human corneas with longer follow-up period is advisable.

  16. Intrastromal Injection of China Painting Ink in Corneas of Male Rabbits: Clinical and Histological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alahmady Hamad Alsmman Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many patients with corneal opacity or complicated cataract in blind eye ask for cosmoses. In this study we tried to investigate the staining of corneas of male rabbits by Rotring China painting ink and to study the histological changes. Method. 10 eyes of 10 male Baladi Egyptian rabbits were injected (0.1 mL intrastromally in the cornea by the use of China painting ink (Rotring Tinta China through insulin syringe (27-gauge needle by single injection; clinical follow-up is for 6 months and lastly the rabbits were scarified and the stained eyes were enucleated for histological analysis. Results. Clinically the stain was stable in color and distribution in corneas with no major complications. Histological results of the stained rabbit corneas showed blackish pigmentation in the corneal stroma without any inflammatory cellular infiltration. Some fibroblast cells had pigment granules in their cytoplasm in the adjacent layers. Conclusion. Corneal staining by China painting ink is effective and safe in staining of male rabbits cornea; however further study in human corneas with longer follow-up period is advisable.

  17. Composition and stratigraphy of the paint layers: investigation on the Madonna dei Fusi by ion beam analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, N.

    2005-06-01

    In the framework of the extensive study on the wood painting "Madonna dei fusi" attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques were used at the Florence accelerator laboratory to get information about the elemental composition of the paint layers. After a brief description of the basic principle and the general features of IBA techniques, we will illustrate in detail how the analysis allowed us to characterise the pigments of original and restored areas and the substrate composition, and to obtain information about the stratigraphy of the painting, also providing an estimate of the paint layer thickness.

  18. Characterization of constitutive materials and technology of the mural painting of the acropolis of the archaeological zone of Ek Balam, Yucatan, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso O, A.; Vazquez N, J.; Ruiz M, C.; Mendoza A, D.; Espinosa P, M.; Ruvalcaba, J.L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    The conservation project of Ek'Balam is one of the few experiences of systematic conservation applied in an archaeological Maya site at the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The project started in the year 2001 when important stone, stucco and painting decorations were discovered during archaeological excavations. Being a recently discovered site, the conservation program includes a research program based on particular conservation issues detected as potential risk of archaeological data losses. One of the research topics is based on deter- mining the ancient painting technology used in mural and stucco decorations through the characterization of building and decorative composite materials. Archaeometric techniques have been used to fulfil the proposed goal. Raman, X-ray Fluorescence, Light and Electron Microscopy were practiced on a set of 35 wall painting samples. Preliminary results obtained on pigments characterization have partially revealed general features of wall painting technique at Ek'Balam during the late Classic period. Some particular pigments, not reported ever for mural paintings, have been identified in Ek'Balam samples. (Author)

  19. Atomic Oxygen Treatment as a Method of Recovering Smoke Damaged Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Forkapa, Mark; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward; Malinowski, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Smoke damage, as a result of a fire, can be difficult to remove from some types of painting media without causing swelling, leaching or pigment movement or removal. A non-contact technique has been developed which can remove soot from the surface of a painting by use of a gently flowing gas containing atomic oxygen. The atomic oxygen chemically reacts with the soot on the surface creating gasses such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide which can be removed through the use of an exhaust system. The reaction is limited to the surface so that the process can be timed to stop when the paint layer is reached. Atomic oxygen is a primary component of the low Earth orbital environment, but can be generated on Earth through various methods. This paper will discuss the results of atomic oxygen treatment of soot exposed acrylic gesso, ink on paper, and a varnished oil painting. Reflectance measurements were used to characterize the surfaces before and after treatment.

  20. Bacteria isolated from rock art paintings: the case of Atlanterra shelter (south Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, I; Laiz, L; Hermosin, B; Caballero, B; Incerti, C; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    1999-05-01

    The Sierra de la Plata is an Aljibe yellow sandstone formation from the Acheulian period. There are a few shelters, some of them with rock art paintings. The most representative one, and subjected to anthropogenic pressure, is that of Atlanterra, situated in a residential area. This shelter contains some rock art paintings made with iron oxides. The bacteria present in these paintings were isolated and identified using an automatic method: fatty acid methyl esters profiling. Most of the bacteria belong to the Bacillus genus, B. megaterium being the most abundant species. The isolated strains are able to reduce hematite. This is significant due to the fact that Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides are the most abundant pigments in rock art.

  1. Micro-analytical study of interactions between oil and lead compounds in paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotte, M.; Checroun, E.; Susini, J.; Walter, P.

    2007-01-01

    Oil paintings are complex hybrid materials, made of organic binders associated with inorganic minerals, susceptible to evolving over centuries. In particular, interactions of oil with lead compounds may give rise to the formation of lead soap aggregates, so-called protrusions. This phenomenon is studied here via X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of an ancient painting dated from 1610. In complement, the synthesis of modern preparations, reconstructed from ancient recipes was assessed. Molecular and atomic images are obtained by combining synchrotron-based FTIR and X-ray fluorescence microscopies. Protrusions are identified in both ancient and modern samples, more particularly, in the ground layer of the paintings, below the colored layer. These observations imply that lead oxide, introduced as a siccative and not as a pigment, may be the element mainly responsible for the protrusions formation, and that this degradation may appear very rapidly on paintings. (orig.)

  2. Piezoelectric paints as one approach to smart structural materials with health-monitoring capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Shigenori; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1998-08-01

    Piezoelectric paints have a potential to change a conventional structural material into an intelligent material system with health-monitoring capabilities such as vibration sensing and damage detection. Such paints were prepared using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic powder as a pigment and epoxy resin as a binder. The obtained paints were coated on aluminum test specimens, and were cured at room temperature or at 150 0964-1726/7/4/002/img5, thus forming the paint films having different thicknesses of 25-300 0964-1726/7/4/002/img6. These films were then poled at room temperature, and were evaluated with regard to the sensitivities as vibration and acoustic emission sensors in the frequency ranges of 0-250 Hz and 0-1.0 MHz, respectively. This paper mainly describes the effects of the film thickness and the cure temperature on the poling behavior of the PZT/epoxy paint film. This paper describes also the application of the paint film as a vibration modal sensor integrated into a structural material.

  3. Portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy/diffuse reflectance hybrid spectrometer for analysis of inorganic pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siozos, Panagiotis; Philippidis, Aggelos; Anglos, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    A novel, portable spectrometer, combining two analytical techniques, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, was developed with the aim to provide an enhanced instrumental and methodological approach with regard to the analysis of pigments in objects of cultural heritage. Technical details about the hybrid spectrometer and its operation are presented and examples are given relevant to the analysis of paint materials. Both LIBS and diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible and part of the near infrared, corresponding to several neat mineral pigment samples, were recorded and the complementary information was used to effectively distinguish different types of pigments even if they had similar colour or elemental composition. The spectrometer was also employed in the analysis of different paints on the surface of an ancient pottery sherd demonstrating the capabilities of the proposed hybrid diagnostic approach. Despite its instrumental simplicity and compact size, the spectrometer is capable of supporting analytical campaigns relevant to archaeological, historical or art historical investigations, particularly when quick data acquisition is required in the context of surveys of large numbers of objects and samples.

  4. Microanalysis of clay-based pigments in paintings by XRD techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradil, David; Bezdička, Petr; Hradilová, J.; Vašutová, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, MAR (2016), s. 10-20 ISSN 0026-265X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22984S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Clay minerals * Earth pigments * Clay-binder interaction * Powder X-ray micro-diffraction * Quantitative phase microanalysis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.034, year: 2016

  5. Moessbauer Spectroscopic Study of a Mural Painting from Morgadal Grande, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, A.; Matsuo, M.; Soto, A. Pascual; Tsukamoto, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy has been applied to fragments of a mural painting excavated at Morgadal Grande, Mexico, to characterize the pigments used. A sextet attributable to hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was clearly detected in the red fragments. The spectra of orange fragments showed a doublet attributable to paramagnetic high-spin Fe 3+ , which presumably originates from goethite (α-FeOOH) exhibiting superparamagnetic relaxation due to its small particle size. The blue fragments contained little iron. The scattered X-ray Moessbauer spectra revealed that the thickness of the pigments was larger than 20 μm.

  6. Study of the Wall Paintings of the Cenador Del Leon in the Real Alcazar of Seville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robador, Maria Dolores; Mancera, Inmaculada; Perez-Maqueda, Rafael; Albardonedo, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The paintings on the walls of the Cenador del Leon located in the gardens of the Real Alcazar in Seville next to the Pabellon de Carlos V in the Jardin Ingles area have been studied. The components of the wall paintings cross-sections, which were prepared using small samples taken from the walls of Cenador del Leon, were characterized using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The cross-sections of the collected samples indicated that the paint layer is well adhered to the preparation layer without any discontinuity, and only one carbonation layer exists at the top of the sequence of layers. These data suggest that the paint was applied on a fresco surface, and therefore, the adopted technique was fresco. Based on the different elements detected by EDX analysis of the cross-sections, the detected pigments included iron oxides accompanied by clay minerals (or earths) in the red pink, golden yellow and yellow colours, blue smelt for the blue colour and basic copper chloride (atacamite) for the green colour. In one sample, the particles were composed of Ba and S from barium sulphate and Ti and O from rutile titanium oxide due to a modern pigment.

  7. Application and processing of paints hardened by electron beams. Anwendung und Verarbeitung von EB-haertenden Lacken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Electron beam hardening is a process for changing liquid surface coatings of different thicknesses by irradiation with electrons of high energy into solid, hard, elastic films. In contrast to the UV process, one can harden pigmented paints with electron beams. An electron accelerator, which remits free electrons is used as the energy source for starting the chemical reaction in the coating material. In order to irradiate flat parts, which were coated with liquid paint by rolling, pouring or spraying, equally with electrons, one must produce an electron curtain, similar to that in a paint pouring machine.

  8. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  9. Clay pigments as indicators of paint authenticity and material provenance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezdička, Petr; Grygar, Tomáš; Hradil, David; Hradilová, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, S (2004), s. 13 ISSN 0365-8066. [Mid-European Clay Conference /2./. Miskolc, 20.09.2004-24.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028; GA ČR GA203/04/2091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : earthy pigments * clay minerals * microanalysis Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  10. The physicochemical characterization of cave paintings of Baja California; Caracterizacion fisicoquimica de pigmentos y soportes en pinturas murales: caso Mayapan, Yucatan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, B.; Cobo, J.; Schorr, M. [Area de Corrosion y Materiales, Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez, S/N, 21280, Mexicali, B.C. (Mexico); Cota, L. [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, UNAM, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Oviedo, F. [Centro INAH - BC, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)]. e-mail: benval@iing.mxl.uabc.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Palaeolithic paintings of Baja California constitute an important contribution to the national, historic and cultural patrimony of Mexico. The aim of this investigation was to determine the physicochemical characteristics, the microstructure and texture of these polychrome paintings, painted on rocks encountered in the mountainous, desert/arid zones of Baja California and Baja California South. The first stage of this work was devoted to the examination and recording of the cave paintings of 'El Vallecito', a narrow fluvial valley displaying large granitic rocks emerging from the sandy soil. Tiny painting samples were collected and analyzed by SEM, EDS and FTIR techniques. The painters used four main colours: red, black, yellow and white. The paint raw materials are mineral pigments: white (kaolin, calcite, and gypsum), red (hematite), yellow (ochre, limonite), black (charcoal from burnt wood or calcined bones) and water as a diluent and/or a binder, all encountered in the painters habitat. The minerals were collected, ground and sometimes heated to change their tone. By mixing with water, a spreadable paste or a thick slurry was produced, which was applied with the fingers for lines or a piece of animal skin for figures, respectively. The 100% solids, dry paint converts into a dense, hard layer, incrusted into the grainy, rough, hollow granite rock surface. This paint might be called {sup s}tone on stone{sup ,} explaining its permanence for centuries enduring heat, wind and weather. A simulation of the painting technique was done at the Materials and Corrosion Laboratory, UABC by collecting mineral pigments, preparing the paint as a paste or slurry and applying it on a granitic rock. Knowing the paint composition, production and application techniques will be useful in e conservation and restoration of cave paintings and stone-built, ancient structures such as pyramids, cathedrals and monuments. (Author)

  11. Analytical characterization of the palette and painting techniques of Jorge Afonso, the great 16th century Master of Lisbon painting workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Vanessa; Candeias, António; Mirão, José; Carvalho, Maria L.; Dias, Cristina Barrocas; Manhita, Ana; Cardoso, Ana; Francisco, Maria J.; Lauw, Alexandra; Manso, Marta

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a study on a set of paintings from the most significant altarpiece assigned to Master Jorge Afonso (c. 1470-1540) painting workshop is presented. This altarpiece is composed by fourteen paintings made to the church of Convento de Jesus, in Setúbal, Portugal, and was made circa 1517-19/1530, according to art-history. This set of paintings is compared to one of the other most important Portuguese altarpieces from the 16th century: the panels of the Round Church of the Convento de Cristo, in Tomar, made circa 1510-1515. The aim of this study is to characterize the wooden support, pigments, ground layers materials and technique used in Jorge Afonso workshop by means of complementary analyses. A dendrochronological approach was made in order to corroborate (or not) the historical date initially assigned. Infrared photography (IRP) and reflectography (IRR) allowed the study of the underdrawing technique and macro photography (MP) was used to recognize overlapping layers technique. Cross-sections from the paintings were examined by optical microscopy (OM), and analyzed by μ-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman), micro-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR), Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (py-GC/MS). The characterization of the palette and ground layers and the study of the overlapping of paint layers brought a new insight of the adopted painting techniques by the most important group of painters working in Portugal in the 16th century - the Lisbon workshop, leaded by Master Jorge Afonso.

  12. Characterization of pre-hispanic pigments by modern analytical techniques; Caracterizacion de pigmentos prehispanicos por tecnicas analiticas modernas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega A, M

    2003-07-01

    In this work, the study of mural painting pigments from two archaeological sites (The Great Temple in Mexico city and Cacaxtla) was performed to know their materials composition, identify their structural characteristics and properties by using modern analytical techniques. Blue, ochre, red and black pigments of Mexica culture (1325-1521 a.C. / late Post Classic period); blue, ochre, red, brown, pink, green and white of Olmeca- Xicalanca culture (700-900 a.C. / Epiclassic period) were studied. Data about materials used, technological evolution, mineralogical background, cultural interchange and origin was obtained. Environmental exposition of these paintings since their discovering has produced changes and damage on their materials. Therefore, stability of some pigments has been notorious, ''Maya Blue'' specially presents extraordinary resistance to diluted and concentrated acids and alkalis including boiling condition, acqua regia, solvents, oxidant and reducing agents, moderate heat and biocorrosi6n; for that reason its study was emphasized. ''Maya Blue'' pigment was synthesized in laboratory using the processes described by historic sources (with indigophera suffruticosa leaves and synthetic indigo) up to obtain a stable pigment including acqua regia action. Clay matrix sorbs nearly 0.4 weight percent of organic dye, which cover 79% of palygorskita surface area. (Author)

  13. Characterization of pre-hispanic pigments by modern analytical techniques; Caracterizacion de pigmentos prehispanicos por tecnicas analiticas modernas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega A, M

    2003-07-01

    In this work, the study of mural painting pigments from two archaeological sites (The Great Temple in Mexico city and Cacaxtla) was performed to know their materials composition, identify their structural characteristics and properties by using modern analytical techniques. Blue, ochre, red and black pigments of Mexica culture (1325-1521 a.C. / late Post Classic period); blue, ochre, red, brown, pink, green and white of Olmeca- Xicalanca culture (700-900 a.C. / Epiclassic period) were studied. Data about materials used, technological evolution, mineralogical background, cultural interchange and origin was obtained. Environmental exposition of these paintings since their discovering has produced changes and damage on their materials. Therefore, stability of some pigments has been notorious, ''Maya Blue'' specially presents extraordinary resistance to diluted and concentrated acids and alkalis including boiling condition, acqua regia, solvents, oxidant and reducing agents, moderate heat and biocorrosi6n; for that reason its study was emphasized. ''Maya Blue'' pigment was synthesized in laboratory using the processes described by historic sources (with indigophera suffruticosa leaves and synthetic indigo) up to obtain a stable pigment including acqua regia action. Clay matrix sorbs nearly 0.4 weight percent of organic dye, which cover 79% of palygorskita surface area. (Author)

  14. Imaging, photophysical properties and DFT calculations of manganese blue (barium manganate(VI) sulphate)--a modern pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, Gianluca; Verri, Giovanni; Acocella, Angela; Zerbetto, Francesco; Lerario, Giovanni; Gigli, Giuseppe; Saunders, David; Billinge, Rachel

    2014-12-18

    Manganese blue is a synthetic barium manganate(VI) sulphate compound that was produced from 1935 to the 1990s and was used both as a blue pigment in works of art and by conservators in the restoration of paintings. The photophysical properties of the compound are described as well as the setup needed to record the spatial distribution of the pigment in works of art.

  15. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2009-01-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 μA, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 μA, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  16. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], e-mail: ccalza@lin.ufrj.br; Pedreira, Andrea [Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 {mu}A, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 {mu}A, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  17. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  18. Effects of gamma rays on a restored painting from the XVIIth century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, M.M.; Machado, L.D.B.; Borrely, S.I.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.; Farah, J.P.S.; Schumacher, R.I.

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this study is a Peruvian painting from the 17th century, which has been recently restored and then contaminated by mould. It received different unsuccessful treatments. Therefore, radiation process was suggested as an alternative once it is an effective technology for decontamination and conservation purposes. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of irradiation process on the original painting and on the products used in the restoration process. These products were irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays applying doses in the range of 6-25 kGy. The polymeric materials were characterized by thermal analysis techniques before and after irradiation. The colour of the pigments irradiated and non-irradiated were compared by spectrophotometric analysis. Small samples removed of the original painting were also irradiated and investigated. The results obtained until now allowed concluding that the irradiation with the appropriated dose of 6.0 kGy, according to the literature, will not damage the restored painting

  19. NASA logo painted on orbiter Endeavour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    A KSC worker paints the NASA logo on the port wing of the orbiter Endeavour, which is scheduled to launch in December for STS-88. The paint is a special pigment that takes 18 hours to dry; the whole process takes approximately two weeks to complete. The NASA logo, termed 'meatball,' was originally designed in the late 1950s. It symbolized NASA's role in aeronautics and space in the early years of the agency. The original design included a white border surrounding it. The border was dropped for the Apollo 7 mission in October 1968, replaced with royal blue to match the background of the emblem. In 1972 the logo was replaced by a simple and contemporary design -- the 'worm' -- which was retired from use last year. NASA reverted to its original logo in celebration of the agency's 40th anniversary in October, and the 'golden age' of America's space program. All the orbiters will bear the new logo.

  20. Non-destructive synchrotron X-ray diffraction mapping of a Roman painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooryhee, E.; Anne, M.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Martinetto, P.; Rondot, S.; Bardies, I.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    The history and the properties of materials are deduced not only from their elemental and molecular signatures, but also from their exact phase compositions, and from the structures and the defects of their constituents. Here we implement a non-destructive synchrotron X-ray based method, which combines both the quantitative structural content of diffraction and the imaging mode. As a demonstration case, the pigments of a Roman wall painting are examined. The joined elemental and mineral maps mimic the major features of the painting. Different structural phases made of common atomic elements are differentiated. Textures and graininess are measured and related to the artist's know-how. (orig.)

  1. Capabilities and limitations of handheld Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for the analysis of colourants and binders in 20th-century reverse paintings on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Simon; Stege, Heike; Bretz, Simone; Hahn, Oliver

    2018-04-01

    A non-invasive method has been carried out to show the capabilities and limitations of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for identifying of colourants and binders in modern reverse glass paintings. For this purpose, the reverse glass paintings "Zwei Frauen am Tisch" (1920-22), "Bäume" (1946) (both by Heinrich Campendonk), "Lofoten" (1933) (Edith Campendonk-van Leckwyck) and "Ohne Titel" (1954) (Marianne Uhlenhuth), were measured. In contrast to other techniques (e.g. panel and mural painting), the paint layers are applied in reverse succession. In multi-layered paint systems, the front paint layer may no longer be accessible. The work points out the different spectral appearance of a given substance (gypsum, basic lead white) in reverse glass paintings. However, inverted bands, band overlapping and derivative-shaped spectral features can be interpreted by comparing the spectra from the paintings with spectra from pure powders and pigment/linseed oil mock-ups. Moreover, the work focuses on this method's capabilities in identifying synthetic organic pigments (SOP). Reference spectra of three common SOP (PG7, PY1, PR83) were obtained from powders and historical colour charts. We identified PR83 and PY1 in two reverse glass paintings, using the measured reference spectra. The recorded DRIFTS spectra of pure linseed oil, gum Arabic, mastic, polyvinyl acetate resin and bees wax can be used to classify the binding media of the measured paintings.

  2. Study of Materials and Techniques for the Conservation of Two Miniature Paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Attia Mohie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research includes a study on the conservation of two miniature paintings produced by unknown artists and probably dated to the second half of the 18th century. These paintings are registered at the Museum of Helwan University, Faculty of Applied Arts, Giza, Egypt, No. (A of 100/6.This research also includes a historical and artistic study of the paintings. To study the materials and techniques used in their execution, several methods were used. XRD, XRD-EDAX was used for the examination and analysis of inorganic materials; in the case of organic materials, FTIR, UV was used to identify the pigment materials, glue, varnish, isolation layer or condition of the paper support. The oil medium in the paint layer was identified by the GLC method. Cross sections of both paintings were examined to find out about the technical knowledge used in constructing the painting / pictorial layers.Finally, this research involves a study of how to separate two oil paintings executed on one paper support, and the most important procedures needed to carry out this step, as well as those necessary for reconstructing the painting layers. In addition, a new method is described to treat cracks.Another new method was used to protect the paper support of these paintings from high relative humidity. This research also proposes a new tear mending method for paper objects instead of the traditional methods used in international paper and manuscript conservation laboratories.

  3. PIXE analysis of cave sediments, prehispanic paintings and obsidian cutting tools from Baja California Sur caves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Oliver, A.; Dacal, A.; Ruvalcaba, J.L.; Cruz, F.; Ortiz, M.E.; Vinas, R.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental PIXE analysis of cave sediments, minerals, pigments of the prehispanic paintings and obsidian cutting tools from caves in Baja California Sur has been carried out with a 0.7 MeV proton beam. The elements analysed in this sample set (Al to Co) provide an idea of the environment of the caves. The obsidian data analysis suggests that the human communities who made these painting used more than one obsidian source to manufacture cutting tools. (orig.)

  4. PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COATINGS CONTAINING PIGMENTS WITH SURFACE MODIFIED WITH A LAYER OF ZnFe2O4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Nechvílová

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work is focussed on the properties of organic coatings containing pigments whose surface was chemically coated with zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4 layer. Four silicate types with different particle shapes were selected as the cores: diatomite, talc, kaolin and wollastonite. The untreated particles exhibit a barrier effect. The aim of this project was to apply the surface treatment approach with a view to enhancing not only the model paint films’ anticorrosion properties but also their resistance to physico- mechanical tests pursuant to ISO standards (cupping, bending, impact, adhesion. Other parameters examined included: particle size and morphology, density of the modified pigment, oil consumption, pH, conductivity, and electrochemical properties of the paint film. A solvent-based epoxy-ester resin was used as the binder and also served as the reference material. The pigment volume concentration (PVC was 1% and 10%. During the last stage of the experiment, the paint films were exposed to a corrosive environment stimulating seaside conditions or conditions roads treated with rock salt. The accelerated cyclic corrosion test in a neutral salt mist atmosphere was conducted for 864 hours. The results served to ascertain a suitable environment for organic coatings.

  5. Single crystal X-ray structure of the artists’ pigment zinc yellow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær; Christiansen, Marie Bitsch; Vinum, Morten Gotthold

    2017-01-01

    electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), showed that the synthesised products and the industrial pigment were identical. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography......The artists’ pigment zinc yellow is in general described as a complex potassium zinc chromate with the empirical formula 4ZnCrO4·K2O·3H2O. Even though the pigment has been in use since the second half of the 19th century also in large-scale industrial applications, the exact structure had hitherto...... been unknown. In this work, zinc yellow was synthesised by precipitation from an aqueous solution of zinc nitrate and potassium chromate under both neutral and basic conditions, and the products were compared with the pigment used in industrial paints. Analyses by Raman microscopy (MRS), scanning...

  6. Identification of organic pigments in tattoo inks and permanent make-ups using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Niederer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, about 12% of the European and 20% of the US population are tattooed. Rising concerns regarding consumer safety, led to legal restrictions on tattoo inks and permanent make-up (PMU inks. Restrictions also include bans on certain hazardous colourants. Both ink types use organic pigments for colour-giving, plus inorganic pigments for white and black and colour tones. Pigments are only sparingly soluble in common solvents and occur as suspended particles in the ink matrix. Their detection and identification therefore pose a major challenge for laboratories involved in monitoring the legal compliance of tattoo inks and PMUs. We overcame this challenge by developing a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry method, which included an easy sample clean up. The method proved to be capable of detecting and identifying organic pigments in almost all of the tested ink samples. Method validation and routine deployment during market surveys showed the method to be fit for purpose. Pigment screening of 396 tattoo inks and 55 PMUs taken from the Swiss market between 2009 and 2017 lead to the following conclusions: Pigment variety is much greater in tattoo inks (18 than in PMUs (10; four prohibited pigments (Pigment Green 7, Pigment Red 122, Pigment Violet 19 and 23 were found in both ink types; for PMUs, these four pigments made up 12% of the pigment findings, compared to 32% for tattoo inks. Therefore, legal compliance of PMUs was at a higher level. A comparison of pigments found with those declared on tattoo ink labels clearly showed that banned pigments are rarely declared, but rather masked by listing not present legal pigments and label forging; therefore, highlighting the urgency of widespread market controls.

  7. Photoacoustic signal attenuation analysis for the assessment of thin layers thickness in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserevelakis, George J.; Dal Fovo, Alice; Melessanaki, Krystalia; Fontana, Raffaella; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2018-03-01

    This study introduces a novel method for the thickness estimation of thin paint layers in works of art, based on photoacoustic signal attenuation analysis (PAcSAA). Ad hoc designed samples with acrylic paint layers (Primary Red Magenta, Cadmium Yellow, Ultramarine Blue) of various thicknesses on glass substrates were realized for the specific application. After characterization by Optical Coherence Tomography imaging, samples were irradiated at the back side using low energy nanosecond laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength. Photoacoustic waves undergo a frequency-dependent exponential attenuation through the paint layer, before being detected by a broadband ultrasonic transducer. Frequency analysis of the recorded time-domain signals allows for the estimation of the average transmitted frequency function, which shows an exponential decay with the layer thickness. Ultrasonic attenuation models were obtained for each pigment and used to fit the data acquired on an inhomogeneous painted mock-up simulating a real canvas painting. Thickness evaluation through PAcSAA resulted in excellent agreement with cross-section analysis with a conventional brightfield microscope. The results of the current study demonstrate the potential of the proposed PAcSAA method for the non-destructive stratigraphic analysis of painted artworks.

  8. The painting technique of the vaulted roof at the Saadian Tomb of Mulay Ahmed Al Mansour: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreotti, A.; Colombini, M. P.; Lluveras, A.; Raihan, M.; Ibnoussina, M.; Tanouti, B.; Boujamid, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Saadian tombs date back from the time of the sultan Ahmed Al Mansour (1578-1603). the tombs have, because of the beauty of their decoration, been a major attraction for visitors of Marrakech. The central mausoleum, the Hall of Twelve Columns, contains the tombs of ahmed Al Mansour and his family. It's dark, lavish, and ornate, with a huge vaulted roof, carved cedar doors and moucharabia (carved wooden screens traditionally to separate the sexes), and gray Italian marble columns. Samples from the painted roof have been collected and are currently under analysis to understand the executive technique used in its decoration. Generally, samples from painted works of art are characterised by the presence of several different organic materials together with pigments, fillers and dryers. A GC-MS analytical procedure for the characterisation of lipids, waxes, resins, pitch, tar, proteinaceous and polysaccharide material in the same paint micro-sample is applied to each collected micro-sample. The analytical procedure is based on a multi step sample pre-treatment that is able to separate the various organic components into different fractions (polysacharide, lipiresinous and proteinaceous), which are separately analyzed by GC-MS after purification and derivatisation. In particuler, this method achieves: -- the identification of proteinaceous binder (egg, collagen, casein) on the basis of the quantitative determination of the amino acid profile processed by principal component analysis -- the identification of lipids (linseed oil, poppy seed oil, walnut oil and egg), plant resins, animal resins,tar or pitches and natural waxes on the basis of the quantitative determination of fatty and dicarboxylic acids, and molecular pattern recognition of alchols and hydrocarbons and terpenic molecular markers -- the identification of th polysaccharide binder( starch, tragacanth gum, arabic gum, fruit tree gum, guar gum, karayagum) on the basis of the quantitative

  9. Význam pigmentů pro posouzení datace a provenience v kontextu vývoje techniky malby

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradilová, J.; Hradil, David

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 68, prosinec (2012), s. 144-158 ISSN 0231-5793 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : material research * pigments * paitimgs * provenance and dating * painting technique Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  10. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy

  11. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Impact on the environment from steel bridge paint deterioration using lead isotopic tracing, paint compositions and soil deconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulson, Brian, E-mail: brian.gulson@mq.edu.au [Department of Environmental Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Energy Flagship, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Chiaradia, Massimo [Department of Mineralogy, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Davis, Jeffrey [CSIRO Energy Flagship, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); O' Connor, Gary [Queensland Department of Environment & Heritage Protection, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Deterioration and repair of lead paint on steel structures can result in contamination of the ambient environment but other sources of lead such as from past use of leaded paint and gasoline and industrial activities can also contribute to the contamination. Using a combination of high precision lead isotopic tracing, detailed paint examination, including with scanning electron microscopy, and soil deconstruction we have compared paint on a steel bridge and bulk soil and lead-rich particles separated from soil. The majority of Pb found in the paint derives from Australian sources but some also has a probable US origin. The isotopic data for the bulk soils and selected particles lie on a mixing line with end members the geologically ancient Broken Hill lead and possible European lead which is suggested to be derived from old lead paint and industrial activities. Data for gasoline-derived particulates lie on this array and probably contribute to soil Pb. Although paint from the bridge can be a source of lead in the soils, isotopic tracing, paint morphology and mineralogical identification indicate that other sources, including from paint, gasoline and industrial activities, are contributing factors to the lead burden. Even though physical characteristics and elemental composition are the same in some particles, the isotopic signatures demonstrate that the sources are different. Plots using {sup 206}Pb/{sup 208}Pb vs {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, the common representation these days, do not allow for source discrimination in this investigation. - Highlights: • Soil Pb values up to 1200 mg/kg below Pb painted bridge • Microscopy & SEM characterised up to 6 different paint layers. • Isotopes identified different sources of Pb including paint and gasoline. • Multiple methods provide definitive answers.

  13. Study by micro-Raman spectroscopy of wall paints (external parts and cross-sections) from reales alcazares of Seville (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, José Luis; Centeno, Miguel Angel; Robador, María Dolores; Siguenza, Belinda; Durán, Adrián

    2013-04-01

    The Reales Alcazares of Sevilla was originally builded by the Arabic in the year 913. The Mudejar Palace was built by Christian King Pedro I between 1364 and 1366. At the end of XV century the Catholic Kings, Isabel and Fernando made important transformations especially in the Mudejar Palace. Recently, wall paints from Catholic Kings periods were found during works of conservations in the first floor of the Palace. The study of these paints by non-destructive techniques was considered of great interest in order to determine the technology of manufacture and the originality of the artwork. The main objective of this work was to apply the Raman spectroscopy technique on the surface of the wall and on the different layers of the cross-sections prepared in order to characterize the pigments and the plaster present in these wall paints. Little information was obtained using a portable Raman spectrometer. In this case the dispersive integrated Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRaman HR800 system was employed. Small samples of black, red, yellow, white and green colour were taken from the artwork. The surface of the samples were directly studed by the Raman spectroscopy instrument using red (785 nm) and green (522 nm) lasers, similarly to non-invasive experimental technique. This technique showed the presence of gypsum (SO4Ca.2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) in all the studied samples However, the pigments responsible of different colours were not detected. The surface of these wall paints was covered with gypsum and calcite due to contamination. These mineras were also characterized by XRD and SEM-EDX. The presence of these compounds and the heterogeneous surface did not permit the characterization of the pigments responsible of the colour. In order to better characterization of the pigments and plaster used the study was carried out on cross-sections. The black colour was performed using carbon black. Two different red layers were detected one constituted by cinnabar and lead carbonate and

  14. The History and the Technological Study of Traditional Tibetan Painting Pigment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DanbaRabden; Ngawang; SonamRechen; ChimeDorje; ZhuHong

    2003-01-01

    Like all societies whose origins predate the invention of the written word, many aspects of prehistoric Tibet are lost in a blur of mystery. Yet archeologists are digging into the ruins left by Tibet's earliest human inhabitants to help carve away the lack of knowledge,just as art historians are examining ancient paintings left inside Tibetan caves to sketch out the contours of prehistoric life and art on the Roof of the World.

  15. Identification of organic pigments in tattoo inks and permanent make-up using laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Niederer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, about 12% of the European and 20% of the US population are tattooed. Rising concerns regarding consumer safety, led to legal restrictions on tattoo and permanent make-up (PMU inks. Restrictions also include bans on certain colourants. Both ink types use organic pigments for colour-giving, plus inorganic pigments for white and black and colour tones. Pigments are only sparingly soluble in common solvents and occur as suspended particles in the ink matrix. Their detection and identification therefore pose a major challenge for laboratories involved in monitoring the legal compliance of tattoo inks and PMU. We overcame this challenge by developing a direct laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry method, which included an easy sample clean up. The method proved to be capable of detecting and identifying organic pigments in almost all of the tested ink samples. Method validation and routine deployment during market surveys showed the method to be fit for purpose. Pigment screening of 396 tattoo inks and 55 PMU taken from the Swiss market between 2009 and 2017 lead to the following conclusions: Pigment variety is much greater in tattoo inks (18 than in PMU (10; four prohibited pigments (Pigment Green 7, Pigment Red 122, Pigment Violet 19 and 23 were found in both ink types; for PMU, these four pigments made up 12% of the pigment findings, compared to 32% for tattoo inks. Therefore, legal compliance of PMU was at a higher level. A comparison of pigments found with those declared on tattoo ink labels clearly showed that banned pigments are rarely declared, but rather masked by listing non present legal pigments and label forging; therefore, highlighting the urgency of widespread market controls.

  16. Microanalysis of paint layers in polychrome sculptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, A.; Falcucci, C.; Jaksic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Cross sections paint layers of polychromes sculpture of the 16 century, located at the City Museum of Havana and currently in the restoration process, have been analyzed by capillary based μXRF , μPIXE , SEM -EDX and light microscopy. Experimental parameters (geometry measurement time) of the capillary based μXRF set up (nominal end diameter equal to 10 μm) were optimized to achieve the resolution required for meaningful scintigraphic studies of the art and archaeological objects, Cumulative x-rays spectra for each layer were obtained in order to perform semi-quantitative analysis. The employed pigments were identified by the characteristics elements and the elemental maps precisely reproduced photographs obtained by means of light microscopy. In the case of nuclear microprobe, RBS for Stoichiometry analysis of paint layers was also performed. additional information on the organic materials was also obtained by chemical analysis. Complementary results obtained by using the analytical techniques are presented and discussed from the point of view of the restoration processes

  17. Development of new imaging techniques for the study and interpretation of late Rembrandt paintings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, P.; van Loon, A.; van der Snickt, G.; Janssens, K.; Alfeld, M.; Dik, J.; Bridgland, J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent macro-XRF scanning of Rembrandt’s Selfportrait from 1669 in the Mauritshuis – as part of the ReVisRembrandt project – has revealed significant new information about the pigments and build-up of the painting. The elemental distribution maps make clear that the umber-rich ground plays a very

  18. Development of new imaging techniques for the study and interpretation of late Rembrandt paintings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, Petria; van Loon, A.; van der Snickt, G.R.; Janssens, Koen; Alfeld, Matthias; Dik, J.; Bridgland, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Recent macro-XRF scanning of Rembrandt’s Selfportrait from 1669 in the Mauritshuis – as part of the ReVisRembrandt project – has revealed significant
    new information about the pigments and build-up of the painting. The elemental distribution maps make clear that the umber-rich ground plays a

  19. Method Development for Binding Media Analysis in Painting Cross-Sections by Desorption Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Kristen; Lagalante, Anthony

    2018-06-06

    Art conservation science is in need of a relatively nondestructive way of rapidly identifying the binding media within a painting cross-section and isolating binding media to specific layers within the cross-section. Knowledge of the stratigraphy of cross-sections can be helpful for removing possible unoriginal paint layers on the artistic work. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was used in ambient mode to study cross-sections from mock-up layered paint samples and samples from a 17th century baroque painting. The DESI spray was raster scanned perpendicular to the cross-section layers to maximize lateral resolution then analyzed with a triple quadrupole mass analyzer in linear ion trap mode. From these scans, isobaric mass maps were created to map the locations of masses indicative of particular binding media onto the cross-sections. Line paint-outs of pigments in different binding media showed specific and unique ions to distinguish between the modern acrylic media and the lipid containing binding media. This included: OP (EO) 9 surfactant in positive ESI for acrylic (m/z 621), and oleic (m/z 281), stearic (m/z 283), and azelaic (m/z 187) acids in negative ESI for oil and egg tempera. DESI-MS maps of mock-up cross-sections of layered pigmented binding media showed correlation between these ions and the layers with a spatial resolution of 100 μm. DESI-MS is effective in monitoring binding media within an intact painting cross-section via mass spectrometric methods. This includes distinguishing between lipid-containing and modern binding materials present in a known mockup cross section matrix as well as identifying lipid binding media in a 17th century baroque era painting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Paintings on copper by the Flemish artist Frans Francken II: PIXE characterization by external microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corregidor, V.; Oliveira, A.R.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Alves, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    Resorting to an external proton microbeam, PIXE analyses of three oil paintings on copper support dated from the XVII century and attributed to the Flemish artist Frans Francken II, were undertaken. The present work aims to contribute to the compositional study of the painting materials employed by XVII century artists that exploited copper as a support for oil painting, and specifically the materials used by Francken’s workshop, particularly copper plates. Because of the low thickness of the pictorial layers of this type of paintings and its non-destructive character, PIXE is the ideal technique to study the elemental composition of the paintings. Several spots in each painting were chosen for analysis in order to cover almost all the pigments used in the colour palette. Lead and calcium were detected in practically every analysed regions, probably related to the presence of lead white and chalk, usually used as ground layer on copper paintings. Small quantities of gold were also detected, which is present in many of this artist’s works to embellish some details of the representations. Also this work reports the first application of the external proton microbeam set-up available at CTN/IST in Portugal for the characterization of oil paintings

  1. Laboratory two-dimensional X-ray microdiffraction technique: a support for authentication of an unknown Ghirlandaio painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontempi, E.; Benedetti, D.; Zacco, A.; Borgese, L.; Depero, L.E.; Massardi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Europe has a very rich and diversified cultural heritage of art works, including buildings, monuments and objects of all sizes, involving a great variety of materials. The continuous discovery of new art works opens the problem of their authentication. Advanced analytical techniques can be fundamental to understand the way of life, the culture and the technical and intellectual know-how of the artists. Indeed, the authentication of an art work involves the identification of the used materials, their production techniques and procedures used for the work realization. It is possible to know the origin and provenance of materials, including the location of the natural sources. Advanced analytical techniques also help one to understand degradation processes, corrosion, weathering, and preservation-conservation protocols. In this paper we present a painting attributed to Domenico Ghirlandaio. Ghirlandaio is a well-known artist of fifteenth century who contributes to the apprenticeship of Michelangelo Buonarroti. The study of the pigments used in this painting, which belongs to a private collection, has been supported mainly by means of laboratory two-dimensional X-ray microdiffraction (μXRD 2 ). The possibility to obtain information about not only the phase, but also microstructure allows one to extract interesting consideration and to obtain evidence of the painter's style and intention. (orig.)

  2. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J. [Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, SpLine, B.P. 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Solis, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Hernandez, R. [INAH Subdireccion de Laboratorios y Apoyo Academico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Robles-Camacho, J. [INAH Centro Regional Michoacan, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rojas-Gaytan, J. [INAH Direccion de Salvamento Arqueologico, Naucalpan de Juarez (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few {mu}g of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  3. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  4. Canaletto's Colour: the inspiration and implications of changing grounds, pigments and paint application in the artist's English period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Sperber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the English period of Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto from a technical perspective. Six paintings by the artist, from the collection of the Yale Center for British Art, compose the focus of the study. Addressing the question of whether Canaletto’s English paintings were different or, as has long been held, inferior to his Venetian works, this article details changes to the artist’s grounds, painting technique, and palette when working in England.

  5. Preventive conservation applied to "Casa dos Patudos" oil painting collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was the identification of specific risks affecting the collection of oil paintings in the historic house "Casa dos Patudos" (Alpiarça, Portugal and the development of mitigation strategies for the risks encountered. The methodology used was proposed by the Canadian Conservation Institute. The results showed that the main risks affecting this collection result from incorrect handling, increase in paint detachment due to the maintenance of paintings with paint lifting on display, occurrence of insect pests, high fluctuations in relative humidity and, excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Several preventive conservation strategies to mitigate these risks are proposed.

  6. High-resolution non-invasive 3D imaging of paint microstructure by synchrotron-based X-ray laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reischig, Peter; Helfen, Lukas; Wallert, Arie; Baumbach, Tilo; Dik, Joris

    2013-01-01

    The characterisation of the microstructure and micromechanical behaviour of paint is key to a range of problems related to the conservation or technical art history of paintings. Synchrotron-based X-ray laminography is demonstrated in this paper to image the local sub-surface microstructure in paintings in a non-invasive and non-destructive way. Based on absorption and phase contrast, the method can provide high-resolution 3D maps of the paint stratigraphy, including the substrate, and visualise small features, such as pigment particles, voids, cracks, wood cells, canvas fibres etc. Reconstructions may be indicative of local density or chemical composition due to increased attenuation of X-rays by elements of higher atomic number. The paint layers and their interfaces can be distinguished via variations in morphology or composition. Results of feasibility tests on a painting mockup (oak panel, chalk ground, vermilion and lead white paint) are shown, where lateral and depth resolution of up to a few micrometres is demonstrated. The method is well adapted to study the temporal evolution of the stratigraphy in test specimens and offers an alternative to destructive sampling of original works of art. (orig.)

  7. Pigments produced by the bacteria belonging to the genus Arthrobacter

    OpenAIRE

    Sutthiwong , Nuthathai; Caro , Yanis; Fouillaud , Mireille; Laurent , Philippe; Valla , A.; Dufossé , Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Poster communication, 7th International Congress of Pigments in Food – New technologies towards health, through colors, Novara, Italy, June 18-21, 2013.; International audience; Since several decades, pigments have been used as a taxonomic tool for the identification and classification of bacteria. Nowadays, pigment producing microorganisms have been also widely interested in scientific disciplines because of their biotechnological potential. With the growing interest in microbial pigments be...

  8. Three-dimensional micro-XRF investigations of paint layers with a tabletop setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanngiesser, Birgit; Malzer, Wolfgang; Rodriguez, Alexis Fuentes; Reiche, Ina

    2005-01-01

    The non-destructive investigation of art and archaeological objects with depth sensitivity is now possible using 3D micro-XRF spectroscopy. More detailed answers for questions on painting techniques, on the pigment palette, on the production processes and indirectly on dating or provenancing of objects are accessible now. This was already illustrated by the investigation of Mughal miniatures with a confocal setup at the synchrotron source BESSY. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of 3D micro-XRF spectroscopy with a tabletop setup and discuss its sensitivity in comparison to the synchrotron-based setup. Investigated objects are glass standards and also prepared paint layers. Perspectives for other types of studies are proposed

  9. pXRF and IR Fluorescence Imaging Studies of CdS Alteration in Paintings by Edvard Munch and Henri Matisse in Oslo, Copenhagen, and San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Wadum, Jørgen; Mass, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    -induced visible fluorescence; ultraviolet-induced infrared fluorescence; multispectral imaging; and x-ray fluorescence. Questions addressed included: is the imaging method being tested comprehensive? Is it efficient at surveying an entire painting? Does it reveal the state of preservation of the pigment? Does...... for Kunst, Copenhagen. They were also tested on Edvard Munch’s The Scream (c. 1910, Munch Museum, Oslo). It was found that ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence has the best ability to discriminate between altered and unaltered cadmium yellow paints (even before alteration is visible to the unaided eye......), while multispectral imaging allows for the most efficient and comprehensive localization of the cadmium pigments in a work....

  10. Characterizing microbial diversity and damage in mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Tânia; Mirão, José; Candeias, António; Caldeira, Ana Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Mural paintings are some of the oldest and most important cultural expressions of mankind and play an important role for the understanding of societies and civilizations. These cultural assets have high economic and cultural value and therefore their degradation has social and economic impact. The present work presents a novel microanalytical approach to understand the damages caused by microbial communities in mural paintings. This comprises the characterization and identification of microbial diversity and evaluation of damage promoted by their biological activity. Culture-dependent methods and DNA-based approaches like denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing are important tools in the isolation and identification of the microbial communities allowing characterization of the biota involved in the biodeterioration phenomena. Raman microspectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry are also useful tools for evaluation of the presence of microbial contamination and detection of the alteration products resulting from metabolic activity of the microorganisms. This study shows that the degradation status of mural paintings can be correlated to the presence of metabolically active microorganisms.

  11. Genetic Basis of Melanin Pigmentation in Butterfly Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Martin, Arnaud; Perry, Michael W; van der Burg, Karin R L; Matsuoka, Yuji; Monteiro, Antónia; Reed, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Despite the variety, prominence, and adaptive significance of butterfly wing patterns, surprisingly little is known about the genetic basis of wing color diversity. Even though there is intense interest in wing pattern evolution and development, the technical challenge of genetically manipulating butterflies has slowed efforts to functionally characterize color pattern development genes. To identify candidate wing pigmentation genes, we used RNA sequencing to characterize transcription across multiple stages of butterfly wing development, and between different color pattern elements, in the painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui This allowed us to pinpoint genes specifically associated with red and black pigment patterns. To test the functions of a subset of genes associated with presumptive melanin pigmentation, we used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in four different butterfly genera. pale , Ddc , and yellow knockouts displayed reduction of melanin pigmentation, consistent with previous findings in other insects. Interestingly, however, yellow-d , ebony , and black knockouts revealed that these genes have localized effects on tuning the color of red, brown, and ochre pattern elements. These results point to previously undescribed mechanisms for modulating the color of specific wing pattern elements in butterflies, and provide an expanded portrait of the insect melanin pathway. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. A methodological approach to study the stability of selected watercolours for painting reintegration, through reflectance spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Claudia; Capobianco, Giuseppe; Agresti, Giorgia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Morresi, Fabio; Rossi, Sara; Santamaria, Ulderico; Serranti, Silvia

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the stability to simulated solar radiation of some paintings samples through a new methodological approach adopting non-invasive spectroscopic techniques. In particular, commercial watercolours and iron oxide based pigments were used, these last ones being prepared for the experimental by gum Arabic in order to propose a possible substitute for traditional reintegration materials. Reflectance spectrophotometry in the visible range and Hyperspectral Imaging in the short wave infrared were chosen as non-invasive techniques for evaluation the stability to irradiation of the chosen pigments. These were studied before and after artificial ageing procedure performed in Solar Box chamber under controlled conditions. Data were treated and elaborated in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the chosen techniques in identifying the variations on paint layers, induced by photo-degradation, before they could be observed by eye. Furthermore a supervised classification method for monitoring the painted surface changes adopting a multivariate approach was successfully applied.

  13. Rock paintings in Fern Cave, Lava Beds National Monument, California: Not the 1054 A.D. (Crab Nebula) Supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, R.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    On July 4, 1054 A.D. a supernova brighter than Venus appeared in the sky, remaining visible for approximately 23 days and 650 nights. It was chronicled in five independent historic accounts, four in China and one in Japan. For at least 40 years investigators have attributed certain distinctive rock paintings and carvings in the western United States as recordings of the 1054 A.D. supernova. More than twenty such depictions (circle or star-like symbols and a crescent) have been located. Two panels of rock paintings in Lava Beds National Monument, California, one at Fern Cave and one at Symbol Bridge, were listed as recording the 1054 A.D. supernova. The only direct means of assessing the likelihood that a 'supernova' representation records the 1054 A.D. event is to date the rock painting or carving. At Texas A and M University, was developed a plasma-chemical extraction technique that permits to analyze the 14 C in rock paintings, whether the pigments used were charcoal or inorganic Fe- and Mn- oxides and hydroxides with organic binder/vehicles. This paper presents direct 14 C age estimates on a rock painting suggested to represent the 1054 A.D. supernova. Charcoal pigment samples were collected from three figures in proximity at Fern Cave: a crescent pointing downward and two nearby circles, one above and one below the crescent. The AMS 14 C analysis on each sample using this technique show that these images do not represent the 1054 A.D. supernova

  14. {mu}-XRF/{mu}-RS vs. SR {mu}-XRD for pigment identification in illuminated manuscripts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snickt, G. van der; Nolf, W. de; Vekemans, B.; Janssens, K. [University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2008-07-15

    For the non-destructive identification of pigments and colorants in works of art, in archaeological and in forensic materials, a wide range of analytical techniques can be used. Bearing in mind that every method holds particular limitations, two complementary spectroscopic techniques, namely confocal {mu}-Raman spectroscopy ({mu}-RS) and {mu}-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy ({mu}-XRF), were joined in one instrument. The combined {mu}-XRF and {mu}-RS device, called PRAXIS unites both complementary techniques in one mobile setup, which allows {mu}- and in situ analysis. {mu}-XRF allows one to collect elemental and spatially-resolved information in a non-destructive way on major and minor constituents of a variety of materials. However, the main disadvantages of {mu}-XRF are the penetration depth of the X-rays and the fact that only elements and not specific molecular combinations of elements can be detected. As a result {mu}-XRF is often not specific enough to identify the pigments within complex mixtures. Confocal Raman microscopy ({mu}-RS) can offer a surplus as molecular information can be obtained from single pigment grains. However, in some cases the presence of a strong fluorescence background limits the applicability. In this paper, the concrete analytical possibilities of the combined PRAXIS device are evaluated by comparing the results on an illuminated sheet of parchment with the analytical information supplied by synchrotron radiation {mu}-X-ray diffraction (SR {mu}-XRD), a highly specific technique. (orig.)

  15. The colours of a 16th century panel painting, from the church of Pavia (Mora, Portugal, attributed to Francisco João

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Pinheiro de Melo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main altar of the church of Pavia (Mora, South of Portugal shows a 16th century panel painting depicting The Conversion of Saint Paul attributed to Francisco João, a local painter, born in Évora, active in that region between 1563 and 1595. With the aim of identifying the materials responsible for the colours exhibited by the painting and characterizing its technique, the panel was examined in situ with the naked eye and with the help of a magnifying lens. Nine paint samples were collected for analysis by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC. On top of a ground layer made of gypsum and animal glue, the painting was done with lead white, lead-tin yellow, ochre, minium, red ochre, vermillion, azurite, verdigris or copper resinate, carbon black and a non identified red lake. In most cases, the samples show a succession of two or three layers of paint over the ground. Generally, this structure results from the modelling work of the painter and not from overlapping motives. In each layer, the colours were usually created by mixtures of a coloured pigment with white. In two cases, the pigments were used pure. Only the red areas show mixtures of a larger number of materials.

  16. Limewashed mural paintings as seen by VIS-IR reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, R.; Striova, J.; Barucci, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Mariotti, P.

    2015-06-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) reflectography is a well-established technique for painting diagnostics, offering a fundamental contribution to the conservation of paintings. Since the '80s it has been routinely applied to study the execution technique of the author, as well as the presence of pentimenti, retouches, integrations or underdrawing. In the last decades IR reflectography has been extended to the visible (VIS) spectral range, providing information about the pigment composition. Up to now the multispectral analysis is still applied at an experimental level, as the processing of the image set is not straightforward. Rarely multispectral VIS-IR application has been applied to frescos, probably due to the lack, in most cases, of a scattering background. In this work we present the results provided by a multispectral scanning device based on single sensor acquisition, working in the 380-2500 nm spectral range, that is a laboratory prototype specifically built for research-grade imaging. The technique have been applied on a mock up simulating a mural painting substrate where an underdrawing, made of either carbon or iron-gall ink, was covered by different surface layers of limewash, the so-called scialbo.

  17. Automatic forensic analysis of automotive paints using optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoonen, Guy; Nys, Bart; Vander Haeghen, Yves; De Roy, Gilbert; Scheunders, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The timely identification of vehicles involved in an accident, such as a hit-and-run situation, bears great importance in forensics. To this end, procedures have been defined for analyzing car paint samples that combine techniques such as visual analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This work proposes a new methodology in order to automate the visual analysis using image retrieval. Specifically, color and texture information is extracted from a microscopic image of a recovered paint sample, and this information is then compared with the same features for a database of paint types, resulting in a shortlist of candidate paints. In order to demonstrate the operation of the methodology, a test database has been set up and two retrieval experiments have been performed. The first experiment quantifies the performance of the procedure for retrieving exact matches, while the second experiment emulates the real-life situation of paint samples that experience changes in color and texture over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterisation of preparation layers in nine Danish Golden Age canvas paintings by SEM–EDX, FTIR and GC–MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Cecil Krarup; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Andreotti, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    of the canvas is suspected to respond dimensionally to changes in relative humidity. In this study, pigments, fillers and binding media in the preparation layers of nine paintings by different artists were identified using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform...

  19. Analytical Study of the Materials Used in Mural Paintings in the Love Chamber of El Sakakeny Palace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholod Khairy Salama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a comprehensive investigation has been undertaken into mural paintings dating to the 19 th century and painted by Italian students. They were initially located in El Sakakeny Palace in El Sakakeny Square in Egypt. The analytical instruments used for investigation were Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy with EDX, X-Ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared coupled with Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR. The analysis revealed that the pigments used in the mural paintings were hematite, litharge, zincate, gold oxide, Goethite (brown ochre and malachite mixed with linseed oil or animal glue. The original ground layer comprises zincate with gypsum. The medium used in the ground layer is animal glue and the support is limestone.

  20. A new bioassay for the inspection and identification of TBT-containing antifouling paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueuné, Hervé; Thouand, Gérald; Durand, Marie-José

    2009-11-01

    Since the 1960s tributyl (TBT)-based antifouling paints are widely applied to protect ship's hulls from biofouling. Due to its high toxicity to aquatic ecosystem most of the countries (28 nations in 2008) signed the AFS convention to control the use of harmful antifouling systems on ships. Nevertheless there is currently no simple method to control the presence of organotin in paint. In this study, we propose a bioassay based on the use of a recombinant bioluminescent bacteria to detect directly in paint the presence of TBT. We also propose a simple device as an inspection system to control the absence of organotin in the ship's hull paint. The presence of organotin could be revealed in less than three hours.

  1. Modular spectral imaging system for discrimination of pigments in cells and microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polerecky, Lubos; Bissett, Andrew; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Faerber, Paul; Osmers, Harald; Suci, Peter A; Stoodley, Paul; de Beer, Dirk

    2009-02-01

    Here we describe a spectral imaging system for minimally invasive identification, localization, and relative quantification of pigments in cells and microbial communities. The modularity of the system allows pigment detection on spatial scales ranging from the single-cell level to regions whose areas are several tens of square centimeters. For pigment identification in vivo absorption and/or autofluorescence spectra are used as the analytical signals. Along with the hardware, which is easy to transport and simple to assemble and allows rapid measurement, we describe newly developed software that allows highly sensitive and pigment-specific analyses of the hyperspectral data. We also propose and describe a number of applications of the system for microbial ecology, including identification of pigments in living cells and high-spatial-resolution imaging of pigments and the associated phototrophic groups in complex microbial communities, such as photosynthetic endolithic biofilms, microbial mats, and intertidal sediments. This system provides new possibilities for studying the role of spatial organization of microorganisms in the ecological functioning of complex benthic microbial communities or for noninvasively monitoring changes in the spatial organization and/or composition of a microbial community in response to changing environmental factors.

  2. Identification of pigmented Serratia marcescens symbiotically associated with Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrascia, Maria; Pazzani, Carlo; Valentini, Franco; Oliva, Marta; Russo, Valentina; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Porcelli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To characterize red pigment-producing bacteria (RPPB) regularly released during oviposition by red palm weevil (RPW), RPPB were recovered from eggs deposited in apples supplied as substrate for oviposition. The presence of RPPB was also detected from gut, the reproductive apparatus of dissected adult and virgin insects and from pupal cases collected within infested palms. RPPB were also identified all along the tissue of these palms. Analysis of the 16S rDNA, gyrB, rpoB, recA, and groEL sequences assigned RPPB to the species Serratia marcescens. RPPB exhibited an antimicrobial activity assessed by the agar well diffusion method against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we first report the identification of a red pigment-producing S. marcescens as extracellular symbiont of RPW. Route of transmission, detection within different organs, and a wide spread along the infested palm tissue, suggested S. marcescens is present as extracellular symbiont in different developmental stages of the RPW. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity exhibited versus Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., and Lysinibacillus spp., reported as insect pathogens and potential candidates for biocontrol agents, could ascribe for S. marcescens a potential protective role. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Rupestral paintings of the "La Graja" cave. Pigment characterization and digital image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomo, A.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is part of a wide-ranging research on a group of archaeological sites located in Andalucía (Spain whose main aim was a better understanding of these sites within a geomorphological, biological and climatic context. This specific investigation concerns the alteration processes affecting the rupestral paintings found in the cave of "La Graja". It has been concluded that such processes are related mainly to the high availability of water at the site's location. The paint's composition diverges from that usually encountered in other, previously studied shelters, where iron oxides have been found to prevail. The presence of copper oxides, titanium and cerium represents a departure from the common findings in Andalusian rupestral paintings.

    La presente investigación forma parte de un estudio amplio desarrollado en torno a un conjunto de yacimientos arqueológicos localizados en la Comunidad Autónoma de Andalucía y que tenía como objetivo fundamental el conocimiento de dichos yacimientos dentro de los contextos geomorfológico, biológico y climático. En este caso concreto se abordó el estudio relativo a los procesos de alteración de las pinturas rupestres que se encuentran en la cueva de "La Graja "(provincia de Jaén. Dichos procesos, se ha concluido que están relacionados principalmente con la alta disponibilidad de agua en su zona de ubicación. La composición de las pinturas no es lo que usualmente se encuentra en otros abrigos estudiados con anterioridad, en donde predominan los óxidos de hierro. La presencia de óxidos de cobre, titanio y cerio indican un alejamiento de la tónica común que se da en las pinturas rupestres andaluzas.

  4. EDXRF portable system used in the analysis of altars, sculptures and paintings from XVII and XVIII centuries in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, R.P.; Calza, C.; Lopes, R.T.; Santos, R.O.

    2011-01-01

    the Main Chapel, revealed the original gold covering (hidden by commercial golden paint) and also the original layer of red color, at the bottom, obtained by the use of vermilion. In an altar table, presently covered with modern white paint, were found some layers of ancient paintings from different periods, and identified by the pigments used in each one. The analysis of 15 sculptures - dating from XVII and XVIII centuries - revealed the original pigments, the elemental composition of the clay and materials employed in recent restorations. In most of the cases the original gilding had been covered with commercial golden paint. The analysis of 14 wood panels (XVIII century), at the vault and side walls of the chapel - representing nine episodes of the saint's life - revealed original pigments and retouching regions. The original pigments used in the paintings were: lead white, vermilion, ochre (red, yellow and brown), umber, bone black, green earth, verdigris and Prussian blue. In some regions of retouching were identified: chromium yellow, viridian/chromium oxide and zinc white. (author)

  5. Effect of paint on vapour resistivity in plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Villanueva, L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The vapour resistivity of plaster coatings such as paint and their effectiveness as water repellents were studied in several types of plaster. To this end, painted, unpainted and pigmented specimens were tested. Experimental values were collected on diffusion and vapour permeability, or its inverse, water vapour resistivity.The data obtained were very useful for evaluating moisture exchange between plaster and the surrounding air, both during initial drying and throughout the life of the material. They likewise served as a basis for ensuring the proper evacuation of water vapour in walls, and use of the capacity of the porous network in plaster products to regulate moisture content or serve as a water vapour barrier to avoid condensation.Briefly, the research showed that pigments, water-based paints and silicon-based water repellents scantly raised vapour resistance. Plastic paints, enamels and lacquers, however, respectively induced five-, ten- and twenty-fold increases in vapour resistivity, on average.Se estudia el fenómeno de la resistividad al vapor de los de yeso y el efecto impermeabilizante que producen los recubrimientos de pintura sobre diversos tipos de yeso y escayola. Para ello, se ensayan probetas desnudas y recubiertas con distintos tipos de pintura, así como coloreados en masa. Se obtienen valores experimentales de la difusividad o permeabilidad al vapor o su inverso la resistividad al vapor de agua.Los datos obtenidos son muy útiles para valorar el fenómeno del intercambio de humedad entre el yeso y el ambiente, tanto durante el proceso de su secado inicial, como en el transcurso de su vida. Así como para disponer soluciones adecuadas para la evacuación del vapor de agua a través de los cerramientos, para utilizar la capacidad de regulación de la humedad, que proporciona el entramado poroso de los productos de yeso, o para impedir el paso del vapor de agua y evitar condensaciones.Como resumen de la investigación, se

  6. Radiation-polymerisable paint and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassata, J.C.; Dickie, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    A paint polymerisable under the effect of a radiation is presented. The main components, excluding non-polymerisable solvent, pigment, initiator and particle charge, are as follows: about 90 to 10 parts of a saturated thermoplastic vinyl polymer of average molecular mass around 2000 to 250,000, prepared from monofunctional vinyl monomers to the extent of at least 85% by weight; about 10 to 90 parts of vinyl monomer solvent for the polymer, up to 90% by weight of the solvent consisting of monovinyl monomers and the remainder being chosen amongst divinyl, trivinyl, tetravinyl monomers and their mixtures. The average molecular weight of the thermoplastic vinyl polymer has between 5000 and 50,000 [fr

  7. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  8. Comparative analysis of automotive paints by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and nonparametric permutation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntee, Erin; Viglino, Emilie; Rinke, Caitlin; Kumor, Stephanie; Ni Liqiang; Sigman, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated for the discrimination of automobile paint samples. Paint samples from automobiles of different makes, models, and years were collected and separated into sets based on the color, presence or absence of effect pigments and the number of paint layers. Twelve LIBS spectra were obtained for each paint sample, each an average of a five single shot 'drill down' spectra from consecutive laser ablations in the same spot on the sample. Analyses by a nonparametric permutation test and a parametric Wald test were performed to determine the extent of discrimination within each set of paint samples. The discrimination power and Type I error were assessed for each data analysis method. Conversion of the spectral intensity to a log-scale (base 10) resulted in a higher overall discrimination power while observing the same significance level. Working on the log-scale, the nonparametric permutation tests gave an overall 89.83% discrimination power with a size of Type I error being 4.44% at the nominal significance level of 5%. White paint samples, as a group, were the most difficult to differentiate with the power being only 86.56% followed by 95.83% for black paint samples. Parametric analysis of the data set produced lower discrimination (85.17%) with 3.33% Type I errors, which is not recommended for both theoretical and practical considerations. The nonparametric testing method is applicable across many analytical comparisons, with the specific application described here being the pairwise comparison of automotive paint samples.

  9. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  10. Landscape Painting. Rewriting Painting in the Postmedium Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal, Nissim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Is landscape painting still relevant today? To answer this question the article examines the work of the contemporary artist Yehudit Sasportas. Sasporas offers a unique kind of written-drawn landscape painting that moves between the manual and the mechanical. The theoretical perspectives from which it is approached are taken, among others, from Plato, Heidegger and Derrida on the issue of writing. Sasportas painting, which may be characterized as "painting under erasure" or "Landscape Painting", serves as a key to understanding the status of painting as a relevant medium, not because it defines medium according to the modernist Greenbergian formula, but because it enables an understanding of painting as a field that exists in a variety of media. Painting as a field, in Sasportas's art, works and lives within various techniques and materials, even when it includes within itself a melancholic mark indicating doubt about its own relevance.

  11. Novel environment friendly corrosion inhibitor pigments based on naturally occurring clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohm, S.; McMurray, H.N.; Worsley, D.A. [University of Wales, Swansea (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Powell, S.M. [University of Wales, Swansea (United Kingdom). Engineering Doktorate Centre

    2001-12-01

    Novel, ceramic, corrosion inhibitor pigments consisting of cerium (III) and calcium (II) cation exchanged bentonites have been shown to provide effective cut-edge corrosion resistance in organic coated galvanised steel. The bentonite pigments were prepared from a naturally occurring (Wyoming) bentonite with a cation-exchange-capacity of 0.7 milli-equivalents per gram. Cation exchange was carried out by repeated washing with aqueous solutions of cerium (III) chloride and calcium (II) chloride to produce bentonites containing 31500 ppm exchangeable cerium (III) and 13500 ppm exchangeable calcium (II) respectively. The resulting bentonite pigments were dispersed in a polyester-resin based primer paint system to give a pigment volume concentration of 19%. For comparison, two similar primer systems were prepared containing a commercial calcium (II) exchanged silica pigment Shieldex: 60 000 ppm calcium (II) and a strontium chromate dispersion, both with a 19% pigment volume concentration. All three primer systems were applied (5 {mu}m) to the zinc surface of galvanised 0.7 mm gauge sheet steel and overcoated with an architectural polyester topcoat (18 {mu}m). The performance of the inhibitor pigments was compared by measuring the rate of corrosion-driven organic coating delamination from the cut edge of samples during 1000 h of salt-spray testing. The calcium (II) bentonite pigment exhibited an anti-delamination performance similar to that of strontium chromate but superior to that of Shieldex. However, the cerium (III) bentonite pigment was superior in performance to both strontium chromate and Shieldex. Thus, the bentonite pigments represent promising, environmentally friendly, ion-exchange corrosion inhibitors which exhibit good anti-delamination performance by comparison with current commercial systems. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of the gilding technique in two post-Byzantine wall paintings using micro-analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsibiri, Olga; Boon, Jaap J.

    2004-01-01

    The main churches of two important monasteries in Thessalia, Central Greece, are decorated with wall paintings that hail from the post-Byzantine period. The mural decoration of the main church of the St. Byssarionas Monastery at Doussiko has been attributed to the iconographer Tzortzis. The same painter is believed to have also operated in the main church of the Transfiguration Monastery at the monastic community of Meteora. The light microscopic (LM) examination of the cross-sections of samples taken from the gilded areas of the wall paintings, together with the direct temperature resolved mass spectrometric (DTMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (SEM-EDX) analysis, revealed a further resemblance of the materials and the methodology employed. The gold leaf was applied to the paintings by means of a mordant, which contains linseed oil mixed with a lead-containing dryer and an earth pigment or clay. The present study can constitute additional evidence to reinforce the idea that the two churches may have been painted by the same painter or workshop

  13. Probabilistic classification method on multi wavelength chromatographic data for photosynthetic pigments identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Setiawan, Y.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2014-02-01

    Environmental and health problem caused by artificial colorant encourages the increasing usage of natural colorant nowadays. Natural colorant refers to the colorant that is derivate from living organism or minerals. Extensive research topic has been done to exploit these colorant, but recent data shows that only 0.5% of the wide range of plant pigments in the earth has been exhaustively used. Hence development of the pigment characterization technique is an important consideration. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a widely used technique to separate pigments in a mixture and identify it. In former HPLC fingerprinting, pigment characterization was based on a single chromatogram from a fixed wavelength (one dimensional) and discard the information contained at other wavelength. Therefore, two dimensional fingerprints have been proposed to use more chromatographic information. Unfortunately this method leads to the data processing problem due to the size of its data matrix. The other common problem in the chromatogram analysis is the subjectivity of the researcher in recognizing the chromatogram pattern. In this research an automated analysis method of the multi wavelength chromatographic data was proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress the data matrix and Maximum Likelihood (ML) classification was applied to identify the chromatogram pattern of the existing pigments in a mixture. Three photosynthetic pigments were selected to show the proposed method. Those pigments are β-carotene, fucoxanthin and zeaxanthin. The result suggests that the method could well inform the existence of the pigments in a particular mixture. A simple computer application was also developed to facilitate real time analysis. Input of the application is multi wavelength chromatographic data matrix and the output is information about the existence of the three pigments.

  14. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, N. J.

    2009-02-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful.

  15. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, N J

    2009-01-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful

  16. A new application of hyperspectral radiometry: the characterization of painted surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Salvatici, Teresa; Camaiti, Mara; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Moretti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral sensors, working in the Visible-Near Infrared and Short Wave Infrared (VNIR-SWIR) regions, are widely employed for geological applications since they can discriminate many inorganic (e.g. mineral phases) and organic compounds (i.e. vegetations and soils) [1]. Their advantage is to work in the portion of the solar spectrum used for remote sensors. Some examples of application of the hyperspectral sensors to the conservation of cultural heritage are also known. These applications concern the detection of gypsum on historical buildings [2], and the monitoring of organic protective materials on stone surfaces [3]. On the contrary, hyperspectral radiometry has not been employed on painted surfaces. Indeed, the characterization of these surfaces is mainly performed with sophisticated, micro-destractive and time-consuming laboratory analyses (i.e. SEM-EDS, FTIR and, GC-MS spectroscopy) or through portable and non-invasive instruments (mid FTIR, micro Raman, XRF, FORS) which work in different spectral ranges [4,5]. In this work the discrimination of many organic and inorganic components from paintings was investigated through a hyperspectral spectroradiometer ,which works in the 350-2500 nm region. The reflectance spectra were collected by the contact reflectance probe, equipped with an internal light source with fixed geometry of illumination and shot. Several standards samples, selected among the most common materials of paintings, were prepared and analysed in order to collect reference spectra. The standards were prepared with powders of 7 pure pigments, films of 5 varnishes (natural and synthetic), and films of 3 dried binding media. Monochromatic painted surfaces have also been prepared and investigated to verify the identification of different compounds on the surface. The results show that the discrimination of pure products is possible in the VNIR-SWIR region, except for compounds with similar composition (e.g. natural resins such as dammar and

  17. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the characterization of pigments in prehistoric rock art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resano, Martin; García-Ruiz, Esperanza; Alloza, Ramiro; Marzo, Maria P; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2007-12-01

    In this work, several red-colored paintings of post-Paleolithic schematic style found in 10 different shelters in the vicinity of the Vero River (Huesca) were sampled and subjected to analysis by means of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The goal of this research was to obtain meaningful information on the samples composition, in order to establish differences or similarities among them. The combined use of these techniques proved beneficial, as Raman data permitted structural information on the compounds present (hematite was identified as the main pigment, whereas calcite and gypsum are the main components of the substrate layer, as well as of the accretions that covered the pigments) to be obtained, while the quantitative values obtained by SEM were suitable for the use of Ca as internal reference during LA-ICPMS analysis. However, it was this latter technique that provided the most relevant data for fingerprinting purposes. The potential of this technique for obtaining spatially resolved information allowed the multielement quantitative analysis of the pigment layer, in spite of the presence of superficial accretions. The sensitivity of the technique permitted the determination of more than 40 elements present in a wide concentration range (from microgram per gram to 10% level) with minimum sample consumption (approximately 900 ng for each sample, corresponding to five replicates). Finally, in order to establish significant differences, only those elements showing a high correlation with Fe (As, Co, Mo, Sb, Tl, and Zr, in this case) were selected, as it is expected that these were truly present in the original pigment, while others could have migrated into the pigment layer throughout time. By using this information, it seems feasible to discriminate between various paint pots, as demonstrated for the samples under

  18. Development of environmentally friendly coatings and paints using medium-chain-length poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) as the polymer binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walle, G A; Buisman, G J; Weusthuis, R A; Eggink, G

    1999-01-01

    Unsaturated medium-chain-length poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) (mcl-PHAs) produced by Pseudomonas putida from linseed oil fatty acids (LOFA) and tall oil fatty acids (TOFA), were used as the polymer binder in the formulation of high solid alkyd-like paints. The relatively high concentration of unsaturated alkyl side chains incorporated into the PHA resins resulted in oxidative drying PHA paints having excellent coating properties. The homogeneously pigmented PHA coatings yielded high-gloss, smooth and strong films upon curing and showed an excellent flexibility, a good adhesion to different substrates, cohesive film properties and resistance to chipping.

  19. Age determination of paintings by 210Pb method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilot, E.; Apers, D.

    1977-01-01

    Often the 210 Pb method for age determination of paintings is inoperative because the initial 210 Pb activity of undated lead oxide cannot be determined. This difficulty could be removed if the ores could be identified from which the lead white was prepared. It would be possible to measure the initial 210 Pb activity directly in Pb ores or in identical Pb oxides from properly dated pictures. Some results show that Pb ores can be identified by the isotope ratios 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb. A systematic study of Pb ores and pigment isotopic composition is necessary. (author)

  20. Identification and Profiling of Active Compounds from Golden Apple Snail’s Egg Pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadatun Abdullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata has been known as rice corps pest due to high adaptability and reproductive power. Utilization of Pomacea canaliculata’s eggs as raw materials in the food and health industry is one of the efforts to eradicate the pest snail. This study was aimed to identify the active compounds contained in the extract pigments of Pomacea canaliculata’s eggs. The methods of this study were extraction of pigments using acetone and methanol, analyzing the active compound (secondary metabolite qualitatively, TLC to determine pigment components and LC-MS/MS to identify active compounds semi quantitatively. The results showed that active compounds in the methanol extract contain 11 carotenoid pigments of xanthophyl group, two carotenoid pigments of carotene group, and 2 active compounds in nonpigmented form, whereas the acetone extract contain 11 pigmentcarotenoids of xanthophyl group and 2 compounds active in non-pigment form.

  1. Animal urine as painting materials in African rock art revealed by cluster ToF-SIMS mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazel, Vincent; Richardin, Pascale; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Richard, Caroline; Laval, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Laprévote, Olivier

    2010-08-01

    The rock art site at the village of Songo in Mali is a very important Dogon ritual place where, since the end of the nineteenth century until today, takes place the ceremony of circumcision. During these ceremonies, paintings are performed on the walls of the shelter with mainly three colors: red, black and white. Ethnological literature mentions the use of animal urine of different species such as birds, lizards or snakes as a white pigment. Urine of these animals is mainly composed of uric acid or urate salts. In this article, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is used to compare uric acid, snake urine and a sample of a white pigment of a Dogon painting coming from the rock art site of Songo. ToF-SIMS measurements in both positive and negative ion modes on reference compounds and snake urine proved useful for the study of uric acid and urate salts. This method enables to identify unambiguously these compounds owing to the detection in negative ion mode of the ion corresponding to the deprotonated molecule ([M-H](-) at m/z 167.01) and its fragment ions. Moreover, the mass spectra obtained in positive ion mode permit to differentiate uric acid and urate salts on the basis of specific ions. Applying this method to the Dogon white pigments sample, we show that the sample is entirely composed of uric acid. This proves for the first time, that animal urine was used as a pigment by the Dogon. The presence of uric acid instead of urate salts as normally expected in animal urine could be explained by the preparation of the pigment for its application on the stone. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Enamel paint techniques in archaeology and their identification using XRF and micro-XRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hložek, M.; Trojek, T.; Komoróczy, B.; Prokeš, R.

    2017-08-01

    This investigation focuses in detail on the analysis of discoveries in South Moravia - important sites from the Roman period in Pasohlávky and Mušov. Using X-ray fluorescence analysis and micro-analysis we help identify the techniques of enamel paint and give a thorough chemical analysis in details which would not be possible to determine by means of macroscopic examination. We thus address the influence of elemental composition on the final colour of the enamel paint and describe the less known technique of combining enamel with millefiori. The material analyses of the metal artefacts decorated with enamel paint significantly contribute to our knowledge of the technology being used during the Roman period.

  3. Composition of Renaissance paint layers: simultaneous particle induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, L; Beck, L; Salomon, J; Pichon, L; Walter, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) is now routinely used in the field of cultural heritage. Various setups have been developed to investigate the elemental composition of wood/canvas paintings or of cross-section samples. However, it is not possible to obtain information concerning the quantity of organic binder. Backscattering spectrometry (BS) can be a useful complementary method to overcome this limitation. In the case of paint layers, PIXE brings the elemental composition (major elements to traces) and the BS spectrum can give access to the proportion of pigment and binder. With the use of 3 MeV protons for PIXE and BS simultaneously, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis including C and O for which the non-Rutherford cross sections are intense. Furthermore, with the use of the same conditions for PIXE and BS, the experiment time and the potential damage by the ion beam were reduced. The results obtained with the external beam of the Accélérateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire (AGLAE) facility on various test painting samples and on cross sections from Italian Renaissance masterpieces are shown. Simultaneous combination of PIXE and BS leads to a complete characterization of the paint layers: elemental composition and proportion of the organic binder have been determined and thus provide useful information about ancient oil painting recipes.

  4. Liquid chromatographic separation of terpenoid pigments in foods and food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserháti, T; Forgács, E

    2001-11-30

    The newest achievements in the use of various liquid chromatographic techniques such as adsorption and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography and HPLC employed for the separation and quantitative determination of terpenoid-based color substances in foods and food products are reviewed. The techniques applied for the analysis of individual pigments and pigments classes are surveyed and critically evaluated. Future trends in the separation and identification of pigments in foods and food products are delineated.

  5. Single crystal X-ray structure of the artists' pigment zinc yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær; Christiansen, Marie Bitsch; Vinum, Morten Gotthold; Sanyova, Jana; Bendix, Jesper

    2017-08-01

    The artists' pigment zinc yellow is in general described as a complex potassium zinc chromate with the empirical formula 4ZnCrO4·K2O·3H2O. Even though the pigment has been in use since the second half of the 19th century also in large-scale industrial applications, the exact structure had hitherto been unknown. In this work, zinc yellow was synthesised by precipitation from an aqueous solution of zinc nitrate and potassium chromate under both neutral and basic conditions, and the products were compared with the pigment used in industrial paints. Analyses by Raman microscopy (MRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), showed that the synthesised products and the industrial pigment were identical. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography determined the structure of zinc yellow as KZn2(CrO4)2(H2O)(OH) or as KZn2(CrO4)2(H3O2) emphasizing the μ-H3O2- moiety. Notably, the zinc yellow is isostructural to the recently structurally characterized cadmium analog and both belong to the natrochalcite structure type.

  6. Niacin metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation in malnourished patients with flaky paint dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltos, André Luiz; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Moraes, Giselle Vanessa; Monteiro, Marina Casteli Rodrigues; Vannucchi, Helio; da Cunha, Daniel Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Flaky paint dermatosis, characterized by extensive, often bilateral areas of flaking and pigmentation, mostly in sun unexposed areas is considered a feature of kwashiorkor in both children and adults, and must be differentiated from other dermatosis, including chapped and xerotica skin, and pellagra. In this case series we provide evidence that malnourished patients with flaky paint dermatosis and infection/inflammation shown laboratory data suggestive of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activation, besides decreased urinary excretion of N1-methylnicotinamide (N1 MN), a marker of pellagra. We study nine adult patients showing flaky paint dermatosis and clinical features of infection or inflammation, and increased serum C-reactive protein, characteristic of the presence of acute phase response syndrome. As a group, they had low or deficient urinary N1 MN excretion (0.52 ± 0.39 mg/g creatinine) compatible with pellagra. They also showed low serum tryptophan levels (dermatosis showed laboratory data suggestive of IDO activation, besides decreased N1 MN urinary excretion. Taken together, the data support the idea that flaky paint dermatosis could be a skin manifestation of niacin deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microstructural characterization of material used as supporter in pre hispanic paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Zorrilla, C.; Canetas, J.; Hernandez, R.; Aguilar F, M.; Arenas A, J.; Martinez, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the characterization of pre hispanic paintings mainly of the materials that support the pigments. The samples come from three different archaeological sites, Palenque-Chiapas (two specimens), Teotihuacan-Estado de Mexico (one specimen) and Mitla-Oaxaca (one specimen); Mayan, Teotihuacan and Mixtec-Zapotec culture respectively. The samples were analyzed by Sem, EDS, Tem, XRD and IR. The results show calcite as common phase for all the samples, however exist other phases identified depending on the site as dolomite, ankerite, calcium silicon chloride, etc. The origin of the red color of the analyzed pigments were cinnabar (HgS) by a sample of Palenque and hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) by the other specimen, this last crystalline phase also present in the Mitla and Teotihuacan samples. By IR were identified some organic compounds in all the samples, but not copal. (Author)

  8. Compositional and quantitative microtextural characterization of historic paintings by micro-X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pastor, Julia; Duran, Adrian; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro Basilio; Van Grieken, René; Cardell, Carolina

    2011-11-15

    This work shows the benefits of characterizing historic paintings via compositional and microtextural data from micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) combined with molecular information acquired with Raman microscopy (RM) along depth profiles in paint stratigraphies. The novel approach was applied to identify inorganic and organic components from paintings placed at the 14th century Islamic University-Madrasah Yusufiyya-in Granada (Spain), the only Islamic University still standing from the time of Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). The use of μ-XRD to obtain quantitative microtextural information of crystalline phases provided by two-dimensional diffraction patterns to recognize pigments nature and manufacture, and decay processes in complex paint cross sections, has not been reported yet. A simple Nasrid (14th century) palette made of gypsum, vermilion, and azurite mixed with glue was identified in polychromed stuccos. Here also a Christian intervention was found via the use of smalt, barite, hematite, Brunswick green and gold; oil was the binding media employed. On mural paintings and wood ceilings, more complex palettes dated to the 19th century were found, made of gypsum, anhydrite, barite, dolomite, calcite, lead white, hematite, minium, synthetic ultramarine blue, and black carbon. The identified binders were glue, egg yolk, and oil.

  9. The application of ion-exchanged clay as corrosion inhibiting pigments in organic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisanti, Santi

    High strength aluminum alloys are used in aerospace industry and are normally coated to prevent corrosion. The corrosion protection of the coatings is mainly provided by pigmented-primer layer. Strontium chromate pigments are widely used, but they are toxic and carcinogenic. The objective of the current study is to develop and characterize the ion exchange compounds bentonite and hydrotalcite as corrosion inhibiting pigments. These compounds were synthesized with different cations and anions, and were used either alone or in mixtures as particulate additive in organic coatings. In coating applications as well as bulk solution, the inhibitor release mechanism is based on ion exchange. To evaluate corrosion inhibition, pigments extract solutions were used in potentiodynamic polarization as well as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments on bare aluminum alloy 2024-T3. Cathodic polarization showed that zinc- and cerium-containing filtrate solutions modestly inhibited cathodic current density. These solutions also decreased the extent of pitting damage formed on the surface, as compared to uninhibited 0.5 M NaCl solution. Pigments were also added as primer additives, and painted on AA2024-T3. The coated panels were then subjected to salt spray exposure testing. The possibility of sensing inhibitor exhaustion by means of X-ray diffraction interrogation of the pigment in a coating is demonstrated and discussed on cerium bentonite-pigmented coatings. Although cerium bentonite-pigmented coatings did not show behavior indicative of self-healing, the combination of bentonite and hydrotalcite that released Ce3+, Zn 2+, and PO43- showed potent scribe protection even after 3000 h exposure in salt spray. Promising self-healing was also demonstrated by pigments that consisted of decavanadate-hydrotalcite and zinc pyrovanadate, as indicated by a shiny scribed area after 1000h exposure in salt spray. When these pigments are used, blistering is minimized.

  10. Non-invasive and micro-destructive investigation of the Domus Aurea wall painting decorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Catia; Ciocan, Valeria; Vagnini, Manuela; Doherty, Brenda; Tabasso, Marisa Laurenzi; Conti, Cinzia; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-10-01

    The paper reports on the exploitation of an educated multi-technique analytical approach based on a wide non invasive step followed by a focused micro-destructive step, aimed at the minimally invasive identification of the pigments decorating the ceiling of the Gilded Vault of the Domus Aurea in Rome. The combination of elemental analysis with molecular characterization provided by X-ray fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopies, respectively, allowed for the in situ non-invasive identification of a remarkable number of pigments, namely Egyptian blue, green earth, cinnabar, red ochre and an anthraquinonic lake. The study was completed with the Raman analysis of two bulk samples, in particular, SERS measurements allowed for the speciation of the anthraquinonic pigment. Elemental mapping by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer combined with micro-fluorimetry on cross-section gave an insight into both the distribution of different blend of pigments and on the nature of the inorganic support of the red dye.

  11. Barumiki antocyjanowe u Iris germanica [Anthocyanin pigments in Iris germanica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szczepańska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin pigments occurring in the flowers of Iris germanica were investigated in five varieties: Rota, Wedgewood, Empress of India, Deputate Nomblot and Joanna. The relation between the colour of the flower and the amount of the pigment was studied. The pigments were extracted from the dry plant material with 1% hydrochloric acid in methanol. Paper chromatography and colorimetric determinations were used for identification of the pigments and their quantitative determination. The results allow the following conclusions: 1. The varieties investigated were characterized toy the occurrence of delphinidine glycoside; 2. The colour intensity is dependent on the anthocyanin pigments; 3. The colour spectrum of Iris sp. flowersis greatly extended by yellow copigments.

  12. Unique Pre-Romanesque murals in Kostol'any pod Tríbečom, Slovakia: The painting technique and causes of damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradil, David; Hradilová, J.; Kočí, Eva; Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Maříková-Kubková, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2013), s. 691-706 ISSN 0003-813X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985912 Keywords : Pre-Romanesque murals * painting materials analysis, * degradation of pigments * portable X-ray fluorescence * X-ray microdifraction Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 1.328, year: 2013

  13. Ion chromatography characterization of polysaccharides in ancient wall paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombin, Maria Perla; Ceccarini, Alessio; Carmignani, Alessia

    2002-08-30

    An analytical procedure for the characterisation of polysaccharides and the identification of plant gums in old polychrome samples is described. The procedure is based on hydrolysis with 2 M trifluoroacetic acid assisted by microwaves (20 min, 120 degrees C, 500 W), clean-up of the hydrolysate by an ion-exchange resin, and analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Using this method the hydrolysis time was reduced to 20 min and the chromatographic separation of seven monosaccharides (fucose, rhamnose, arabinose, galactose, glucose, mannose, xylose) and two uronic acids (galacturonic and glucuronic) was achieved in 40 min. The whole analytical procedure allows sugar determination in plant gums at picomole levels, with an average recovery of 72% with an RSD of 8% as tested on arabic gum. The analytical procedure was tested with several raw gums, watercolour samples and reference painting specimens prepared according to old recipes at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure of Florence (Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Italy). All the data collected expressed in relative sugar percentage contents were submitted to principal components analysis for gum identification: five groups were spatially separated and this enabled the identification of arabic, tragacanth, karaya, cherry+ghatty, and guar+locust bean gum. Wall painting samples from Macedonian tombs (Greece) of the 4th-3rd Centuries B.C., processed by the suggested method, showed the presence of a complex paint media mainly consisting of tragacanth and fruit tree gums. Moreover, starch had probably been added to plaster as highlighted by the presence of a huge amount of glucose.

  14. Prototype of a pigments color chart for the digital conservation of ancient murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinxing; Wan, Xiaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Digital imaging has become a very important technique in the conservation of cultural art relics because it can nondestructively acquire the color and spectral image of cultural art relics for different applications. Imaging accuracy is one of the key factors in digital protection of cultural art relics. In order to improve the color and spectral accuracy for digital imaging of cultural art relics, the idea of making the specific color charts for different kinds of artworks is presented. Taking ancient Chinese Dunhuang murals as the specific object of study, a prototype pigments color chart of the Dunhuang murals (DCC), containing a six-step grayscale and 30 colored pigment samples, is made to investigate its pigment types and painting techniques. Under the premise of considering the difference in the number of samples in color charts, the DCC is tested and compared with the classic and widely used standard Macbeth colorchecker (CC) in two aspects: color correction for RGB imaging and spectral reconstruction for spectral imaging. The results show that the prototype pigments color chart is more effective and exhibits superior performance to the CC in both aspects for digital conservation of the Dunhuang murals.

  15. Painting or relief: The ideal icon in iconophile writing in Byzantium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pentcheva Bissera V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This text is focused on the transformation of the definition of the icon in Byzantine image theory from an identification of graphe with painting in the writings of John of Damascus (ca. 675-754 to the equation of graphe with typos understood as the imprint of an intaglio on matter in the theory of Theodore Studies (759-826. The virtues of painting, therefore, are that its masters see their works admired and feel themselves to be almost like the Creator. Is it not true that painting is the mistress of all the arts or their principal ornament? If I am not mistaken, the architect took from the painter architrave's, capitals, bases, columns and pediments, and all other fine features of buildings. The stonemason, the sculptor, and all the workshops and crafts of artificers are guided by the rule and art of the painter. Indeed hardly any art, except the very meanest, can be found that does not somehow pertain to painting. So I would venture to assert that whatever beauty there is in things, it has been derived from painting.

  16. Simultaneous separation and identification of oligomeric procyanidins and anthocyanin-derived pigments in raw red wine by HPLC-UV-ESI-MSn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, S; Losito, I; Gambacorta, G; La Notte, E; Palmisano, F; Zambonin, P G

    2006-07-01

    Samples of raw red wine (Primitivo di Manduria, Apulia, Southern Italy) were analysed without any pre-treatment (except 1:2 dilution with water) using HPLC with detection based on UV absorbance and Electrospray Ionisation Sequential Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn, with n = 1-3) in a series configuration. In particular, absorbance at 520 nm was monitored for UV detection in order to identify pigments responsible for wine colour. On the other hand, two subsequent stages of MS detection based on positive ions were adopted. The first consisted of an explorative MS acquisition, aimed at the individuation of the m/z ratios for positively charged compounds; the second was based on fragmentation of the detected ions within an ion trap analyser, followed by MS/MS and, if required, MS3 acquisitions. The synergy between UV detection and MSn analysis led to the identification of 41 pigments, which can be classified into five groups: grape anthocyanins, pyranoanthocyanins, vinyl-linked anthocyanin-flavanol pigments, ethyl-bridged anthocyanin-flavanol pigments and flavanol-anthocyanin compounds. Many isomeric and oligomeric structures were found within each group. A further class of compounds, not absorbing in the visible spectrum, could be also characterised by ESI-MSn and corresponded to B-type procyanidins, i.e. proanthocyanidins arising from C4-->C8/C4-->C6 couplings between catechin or epicatechin units. In particular, oligomeric structures (from dimers to pentamers), often present with several isomers, were identified and their fragmentation patterns clarified.

  17. Neutron activation autoradiography and scanning macro-XRF of Rembrandt van Rijn's Susanna and the Elders (Gemaeldegalerie Berlin): a comparison of two methods for imaging of historical paintings with elemental contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Laurenze-Landsberg, Claudia; Denker, Andrea; Janssens, Koen; Noble, Petria

    2015-01-01

    Imaging methods with elemental contrast are of great value for the investigation of historical paintings, as they allow for study of sub-surface layers that provide insight into a painting's creation process. Two of the most important methods are neutron activation autoradiography (NAAR) and scanning macro-XRF (MA-XRF). Given the differences between these methods in the fundamental physical phenomena exploited, a theoretical comparison of their capabilities is difficult and until now a critical comparison of their use on the same painting is missing. In this paper, we present a study of Rembrandt van Rijn's painting Susanna and the Elders from the Gemaeldegalerie in Berlin employing both techniques. The painting features a considerable number of overpainted features and a wide range of pigments with different elemental tracers, including earth pigments (Mn/Fe), Azurite (Cu), lead white (Pb), vermilion (Hg) and smalt (Co, As). MA-XRF can detect all elements above Si (Z = 14), suffers from few spectral overlaps and can be performed in a few tens of hours in situ, i.e. in a museum. NAAR requires the stay of the painting at a research facility for several weeks, and inter-element interferences can be difficult to resolve. Also, only a limited number of elements contribute to the acquired autoradiographs, most notably Mn, Cu, As, Co, Hg and P. However, NAAR provides a higher lateral resolution and is less hindered by absorption in covering layers, which makes it the only method capable of visualizing P in lower paint layers. (orig.)

  18. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-01-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased. - Highlights: ► Experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood were γ-irradiated at two dose rates. ► Changes induced by γ-irradiation were evaluated by vibrational spectroscopy. ► Minor spectral variations of painted layer were observed. ► Raw sienna FTIR spectra showed little changes of egg yolk and lipids at higher dose rate. ► Gamma irradiation is recommended for disinfection of painted wooden artifacts.

  19. Investigation of Environmental-friendly Technology for a Paint Industry Wastewater Plant in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin YAPICIOĞLU

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Paint manufacturing process has several unfavorable aspects to the environment in Turkey. One of these impacts is wastewater treatment. Paint wastewater contains huge amounts of toxic chemical substances, bio refractory compounds, pigments and microorganisms. So, advanced treatment requirement is available to dispose of colour, microorganisms and chemical oxygen demand (COD. The high organic content of wastewater causes serious environmental challenges and contamination for the living organisms and the ecosystem in the receiver media unless it is treated adequately. In this context, the treatment process to be implemented should be preferred in such a way as to give the least damage to the environment. In this study, three treatment scenarios that contain electrocoagulation (Scenario-1, Fenton process (Scenario-2 and membrane distillation (Scenario-3 have been created for wastewater treatment facility of a paint industry in Turkey. For three scenarios, environmental impact assessment has been carried out with Fine-Kinney method. It is aimed to choose best environmental technology before investment. The evaluation results revealed that Scenario-2 has the less environmental impacts that total impact value is 556. Scenario-1 has the highest total impact value as 756, relatively. Total impact value related to Scenario-3 is 637. According to the evaluation results, Fenton process is the best environmental-friendly treatment technology for wastewater treatment of a paint industry in Turkey.

  20. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  1. Pictorial materials database: 1200 combinations of pigments, dyes, binders and varnishes designed as a tool for heritage science and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Tiziana; Buscaglia, Paola; Migliorini, Simonetta; Nervo, Marco; Piccablotto, Gabriele; Piccirillo, Anna; Pisani, Marco; Puglisi, Davide; Vaudan, Dario; Zucco, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    The conservation of artworks requires a profound knowledge about pictorial materials, their chemical and physical properties and their interaction and/or degradation processes. For this reason, pictorial materials databases are widely used to study and investigate cultural heritage. At Centre for Conservation and Restoration La Venaria Reale, we prepared a set of about 1200 mock-ups with 173 different pigments and/or dyes, used across all the historical times or as products for conservation, four binders, two varnishes and four different materials for underdrawings. In collaboration with the Laboratorio Analisi Scientifiche of Regione Autonoma Valle d'Aosta, the National Institute of Metrological Research and the Department of Architecture and Design of the Polytechnic of Turin, we created a scientific database that is now available online (http://www.centrorestaurovenaria.it/en/areas/diagnostic/pictorial-materials-database) designed as a tool for heritage science and conservation. Here, we present a focus on materials for pictorial retouching where the hyperspectral imaging application, conducted with a prototype of new technology, allowed to provide a list of pigments that could be more suitable for conservation treatments and pictorial retouching. Then we present the case study of the industrial painting Notte Barbara (1962) by Pinot Gallizio where the use of the database including modern and contemporary art materials showed to be very useful and where the fibre optics reflectance spectroscopy technique was decisive for pigment identification purpose. Later in this research, the mock-ups will be exploited to study degradation processes, e.g., the lightfastness, or the possible formation of interaction products, e.g., metal carboxylates.

  2. Analysis of basidiomycete pigments in situ by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, James P; Matthäus, Christian; Lenz, Claudius; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Popp, Jürgen

    2018-02-07

    Basidiomycetes, that is, mushroom-type fungi, are known to produce pigments in response to environmental impacts. As antioxidants with a high level of unsaturation, these compounds can neutralize highly oxidative species. In the event of close contact with other microbes, the enzymatically controlled pigment production is triggered and pigment secretion is generated at the interaction zone. The identification and analysis of these pigments is important to understand the defense mechanism of fungi, which is essential to counteract an uncontrolled spread of harmful species. Usually, a detailed analysis of the pigments is time consuming as it depends on laborious sample preparation and isolation procedures. Furthermore, the applied protocols often influence the chemical integrity of the compound of interest. A possibility to noninvasively investigate the pigmentation is Raman microspectroscopy. The methodology has the potential to analyze the chemical composition of the sample spatially resolved at the interaction zone. After the acquisition of a representative spectroscopic library, the pigment production by basidiomycetes was monitored for during response to different fungi and bacteria. The presented results describe a very efficient noninvasive way of pigment analysis which can be applied with minimal sample preparation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Preparation of spherical fine particulate pigments within water-in-oil emulsions and their properties. (II). ; Formation mechanism and characteristic of spherical fine particulate pigment of tartrazine. W/O emulsion wo mochiita kyujo biryushi ganryo no chosei to seishitsu(dai 2 ho). ; Kiiro 4 go kyujo biryushi ganryo no seisei kiko to tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, T.; Iwano, K.; Hotta, H.; Takano, S.; Tsutsumi, H. (Kao Corporation, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-20

    The previous report explained that an excellent spherical particulate pigment with a grain size of 0.5 mm or less can be obtained by preparing multinuclear aluminum lakes from acidic dyes and multinuclear aluminum salt using water droplets in a W/O emulsion as reaction fields. This paper describes preparing pigments varying the charging concentrations of the pigments in a W/O emulsion and the droplet particle size to discuss the mechanism of forming the pigments. As a result, it was found that the particle sizes in the produced pigments have a clear correlation with the charging concentrations of the pigments and the droplet particle sizes in the W/O emulsion. A pigment produced in the W/O emulsion forms only in its own droplets, and reflects its particle sizes. Films dispersed with pigments having different particle sizes were prepared to discuss their tinting abilities, whereas it was clarified that the smaller the particle size, the higher the tinting ability and the higher saturation in colored paint films. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Identification of individual adult female Javan lutungs (Trachypithecus auratus sondaicus) by using patterns of dark pigmentation in the pubic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yamato; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Hadi, Islamul; Suryobroto, Bambang; Watanabe, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    In a series of field surveys of wild Javan lutungs (Trachypithecus auratus sondaicus) conducted at Pangandaran Nature Reserve in West Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012, we tried to use a method of individual identification by using individual-specific patterns of dark pigmentation in the pubic area. During the 2011 dry season, we used a digital SLR camera with a 400-mm telephoto lens to photograph the pubic area of each individual of a habituated group. These photographs were the basis for identifying 14 different adult females. During the rainy season of 2011 and the dry season of 2012, we checked the presence/absence of each of the identified individuals and found that these patterns were stable, at least during our study period. We found that two adult females and one adult female disappeared from the subject group between the first and second and between the second and third surveys, respectively, and that one adult female gave birth between the first and second surveys, but the infant had disappeared from the group between the second and third surveys. We could not confirm the validity of the method for juvenile females because of the dense white hair in their pubic areas and the fact that few individuals had clear patterns. Furthermore, we could not use this method for males because of the lack of pigmentation in the pubic area. As patterns of pigmentation in the pubic area are known to be present in other Trachypithecus species, our method can be useful for identification of individual adult females of these species, on which few individual-based behavioral studies have been conducted. Collecting individual-based behavioral data would enable us to track the presence of individuals in groups or movements between groups; determine the effects of social rank and age on within-group competition and copulation; and examine population data.

  5. Characterization of constitutive materials and technology of the mural painting of the acropolis of the archaeological zone of Ek Balam, Yucatan, Mexico; Caracterizacion de materiales constitutivos y tecnologia de la pintura mural de la acropolis de la zona arquelogica de Ek Balam, Yucatan, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso O, A.; Vazquez N, J.; Ruiz M, C. [INAH, 11000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza A, D.; Espinosa P, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ruvalcaba, J.L. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vandenabeele, P. [Universidad de Ghent, Belgica (Belgium)]. e-mail: alealonsolvera@yahoo.com

    2005-07-01

    The conservation project of Ek'Balam is one of the few experiences of systematic conservation applied in an archaeological Maya site at the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The project started in the year 2001 when important stone, stucco and painting decorations were discovered during archaeological excavations. Being a recently discovered site, the conservation program includes a research program based on particular conservation issues detected as potential risk of archaeological data losses. One of the research topics is based on deter- mining the ancient painting technology used in mural and stucco decorations through the characterization of building and decorative composite materials. Archaeometric techniques have been used to fulfil the proposed goal. Raman, X-ray Fluorescence, Light and Electron Microscopy were practiced on a set of 35 wall painting samples. Preliminary results obtained on pigments characterization have partially revealed general features of wall painting technique at Ek'Balam during the late Classic period. Some particular pigments, not reported ever for mural paintings, have been identified in Ek'Balam samples. (Author)

  6. Contribution to the improvement of heritage mural painting non-destructive testing by stimulated infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Di Pallo, Luigi; Detalle, Vincent; Vallet, Jean-Marc; Duvaut, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of heritage mural paintings by means of stimulated infrared thermography has now become rather efficient [1-14]. However, pigments, which form a pictorial layer, have contrasting radiative properties possibly leading to artifact detection. In this paper, attempts to alleviate this difficulty are presented. Based on the spectroscopic study of different paint layers, one can argue that, in the medium infrared field, this radiative disparity decreases significantly. Then, with similar settings, it can be shown that ceramic radiative sources allow reaching this wavelength band. Finally, on the basis of a study carried out on an academic sample and a partial copy of a fresco from the cathedral of Angers, combining ceramic heat sources with a laboratory SAMMTHIR experimental setup enables to make real headway in terms of defects' detection.

  7. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed in...

  8. In-depth analyses of paleolithic pigments in cave climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touron, Stéphanie; Trichereau, Barbara; Syvilay, Delphine

    2017-07-01

    Painted caves are a specific environment which preservation needs multidisciplinary studies carried out within the different actors. The actions set-up must follow national and European ethics and treaties and be as less invasive as possible to preserve the integrity of the site. Studying colorants in caves should meet these expectations and take into account on-field conditions: high humidity rate, reduced access to electricity, etc. Therefore, non-invasive analyses should be preferred. However, their limits restrict the field of application and sometimes sampling and laboratory analyses must be used to answer the problematic. It is especially true when the pigment is covered by calcite. For this purpose, the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has been assessed to identify the composition with stratigraphic analyses. This study carries out in-depth profile on laboratory samples in conditions close to the ones meet in caves. Samples were prepared on a calcareous substrate using three pigments: red ochre, manganese black and carbon black and two binding media: water and saliva. All samples have been covered by calcite. Four sets of measurements have then been done using the LIBS instrument. The in-depth profiles were obtained using the Standard Normal Variate (SNV) normalization. For all the samples, the pigment layer was identified in the second or third shot, the calcite layer being quite thin. However, the results remain promising with the carbon black pigment but not really conclusive, the carbon being generally quite difficult to quantify.

  9. Analysis of plant gums and saccharide materials in paint samples: comparison of GC-MS analytical procedures and databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluveras-Tenorio, Anna; Mazurek, Joy; Restivo, Annalaura; Colombini, Maria Perla; Bonaduce, Ilaria

    2012-10-10

    Saccharide materials have been used for centuries as binding media, to paint, write and illuminate manuscripts and to apply metallic leaf decorations. Although the technical literature often reports on the use of plant gums as binders, actually several other saccharide materials can be encountered in paint samples, not only as major binders, but also as additives. In the literature, there are a variety of analytical procedures that utilize GC-MS to characterize saccharide materials in paint samples, however the chromatographic profiles are often extremely different and it is impossible to compare them and reliably identify the paint binder. This paper presents a comparison between two different analytical procedures based on GC-MS for the analysis of saccharide materials in works-of-art. The research presented here evaluates the influence of the analytical procedure used, and how it impacts the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of paint samples that contain saccharide materials. The procedures have been developed, optimised and systematically used to characterise plant gums at the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI) and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI). The main steps of the analytical procedures and their optimisation are discussed. The results presented highlight that the two methods give comparable sugar profiles, whether the samples analysed are simple raw materials, pigmented and unpigmented paint replicas, or paint samples collected from hundreds of centuries old polychrome art objects. A common database of sugar profiles of reference materials commonly found in paint samples was thus compiled. The database presents data also from those materials that only contain a minor saccharide fraction. This database highlights how many sources of saccharides can be found in a paint sample, representing an important step forward in the problem of identifying polysaccharide binders in

  10. Characterization of pigments and colors used in ancient Egyptian boat models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huehnerfuss, Katja; Bohlen, Alex von; Kurth, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The analyses of pigments originating from well dated ancient boat models found in Egyptian graves were used for characterization and for dating tasks of unknown objects. A nearly destruction free sampling technique using cotton buds was applied for sampling these valuable artifacts for a subsequent Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF) analysis. Two relevant collections of Egyptian object of art were at our disposal, one of the Agyptisches Museum Berlin and the second of the British Museum London. Three groups of colors were studied, they originate from white, red and blue/green paints, respectively. The results of the analyses performed on micro-amounts of paints (< 1 μg) show that some artifacts were misclassified and belong to other epochs. Some others were retouched with modern colors. In general, it can be stated that results obtained by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry may dissipate some uncertainties when applying classical archaeological dating methods

  11. Characterization of pigments and colors used in ancient Egyptian boat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hühnerfuβ, Katja; von Bohlen, Alex; Kurth, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    The analyses of pigments originating from well dated ancient boat models found in Egyptian graves were used for characterization and for dating tasks of unknown objects. A nearly destruction free sampling technique using cotton buds was applied for sampling these valuable artifacts for a subsequent Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF) analysis. Two relevant collections of Egyptian object of art were at our disposal, one of the Ägyptisches Museum Berlin and the second of the British Museum London. Three groups of colors were studied, they originate from white, red and blue/green paints, respectively. The results of the analyses performed on micro-amounts of paints (< 1 μg) show that some artifacts were misclassified and belong to other epochs. Some others were retouched with modern colors. In general, it can be stated that results obtained by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry may dissipate some uncertainties when applying classical archaeological dating methods.

  12. On the Rock Partridge in the painting “Saint Jerome in the study” by Antonello da Messina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso La Mantia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial work of Antonello da Messina during the Sicilian period (1455-60 is considered less fruitful and less mature than during his stay in Venice (ca 1474-1476. While some art critics consider the painting “Saint Jerome in the study” a work of the first period, others believe that it was produced during the Venice period. The Authors analysed the plumage characters of the Rock Partridge, Alectoris graeca, depicted with symbolic significance in the painting, to try the identification of the population which the subject used as model could belong to. However, they conclude that the identification as a Sicilian as well as an Alpine Rock Partridge is doubtful and in this case the plumage of the bird depicted does not help to resolve the controversy of painting dating.

  13. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3 g/100 g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3 g/100 g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known.

  14. Increased persistence of antifouling paint biocides when associated with paint particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.V.; McHugh, M.; Hilton, M.; Waldock, M.

    2003-01-01

    Release of biocides associated with paint particles into marinas may increase their persistence in the environment. - Current regulatory risk assessment procedures only assess the impact of antifouling paint biocides that are released through leaching from a painted surface. Hull cleaning activities can lead to particles of antifouling paint containing biocides to enter the environment. Comparative pseudo-first order anaerobic degradation rate constants and half-lives were determined for a selection of common antifouling paint booster biocides, their degradation products, and associated with paint particles. Anaerobic half-lives of <0.5 days were calculated for chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and SeaNine 211, between 1 and 3 days for DCPMU and DCPU, between 14 and 35 days for diuron and CPDU, and over 226 days for GS26575 and Irgarol 1051. Increased persistence was observed when the compounds were introduced to sediments associated with antifouling paint particles. When present as antifouling paint particles, an increased half-life of 9.9 days for SeaNine 211 and 1.4 days was calculated for dichlofluanid, no significant degradation was observed for diuron. It is suspected that this is due to much of the biocide being initially bound within the matrix of the paint particle that is slowly released through dissolution processes into the sediment pore water prior to degradation. The release of booster biocides associated with paint particles into marinas has the potential to lead to their accumulation unless activities such as hull cleaning are strictly regulated

  15. Increased persistence of antifouling paint biocides when associated with paint particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.V.; McHugh, M.; Hilton, M.; Waldock, M

    2003-05-01

    Release of biocides associated with paint particles into marinas may increase their persistence in the environment. - Current regulatory risk assessment procedures only assess the impact of antifouling paint biocides that are released through leaching from a painted surface. Hull cleaning activities can lead to particles of antifouling paint containing biocides to enter the environment. Comparative pseudo-first order anaerobic degradation rate constants and half-lives were determined for a selection of common antifouling paint booster biocides, their degradation products, and associated with paint particles. Anaerobic half-lives of <0.5 days were calculated for chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and SeaNine 211, between 1 and 3 days for DCPMU and DCPU, between 14 and 35 days for diuron and CPDU, and over 226 days for GS26575 and Irgarol 1051. Increased persistence was observed when the compounds were introduced to sediments associated with antifouling paint particles. When present as antifouling paint particles, an increased half-life of 9.9 days for SeaNine 211 and 1.4 days was calculated for dichlofluanid, no significant degradation was observed for diuron. It is suspected that this is due to much of the biocide being initially bound within the matrix of the paint particle that is slowly released through dissolution processes into the sediment pore water prior to degradation. The release of booster biocides associated with paint particles into marinas has the potential to lead to their accumulation unless activities such as hull cleaning are strictly regulated.

  16. DLVO THEORY APPLIED TO TIO2 PIGMENTS AND OTHER MATERIALS IN LATEX PAINTS. (R828081E01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding how a paint formulation translates into comparative numbers of particles, how the spacing between particles compares to their size and what controls their stabilization mechanisms improves efficient formulation design. The application of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey...

  17. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer, SEM/EDX, p-XRF and μ-XRF studies on a Dutch painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R., E-mail: lehmann@acc.uni-hannover.de; Schmidt, H.-J. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Costa, B. F. O. [University of Coimbra, CFisUC, Physics Department (Portugal); Blumers, M. [Joh. Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie (Germany); Sansano, A.; Rull, F. [Fisica de Materia Condensata, Centro de Astrobiologia, Universidade de Valladolid (Spain); Wengerowsky, D. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Nürnberger, F.; Maier, H. J. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Werkstoffkunde (Germany); Klingelhöfer, G. [University of Coimbra, CFisUC, Physics Department (Portugal); Renz, F., E-mail: renz@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The painting of a rich Jewish merchant “Bildnis eines jüdischen Kaufmanns” from the Netherlands is dated presumably to the 16{sup th} century. After a vivid historical background, i.e. robbed by the Nazis by order of Hermann Göring, it was recently discovered on an Austrian flea market. Different analysis methods were combined to identify the time of the production of this historically interesting looted art. Non-destructive MIMOS II Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy was utilised for mesurements in selected spots. This mainly revealed haematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the red curtain. In spots of the brown jacket Mössbauer spectra indicated the presence of mainly Iron(III) in super-paramagnetic oxide or oxide-hydroxide. Consecutively SEM measurements revealed a restoration by partly over-painting. The elementary composition of the pigments was examined by a portable-X-ray fluorescence. μ-XRF analysis for element distribution at different areas was performed. The look into a crack showed Zinc-white at the bottom of the crack. Traces of Titanium-white could be found within some locations on the surface of the painting. In terms of provenance of the artwork, the presence of Zink-white suggests that the painting was painted around the 19{sup th} century. Titanium-white indicates a reconstruction during the 20{sup th} century, approximately between 1917 and 1958.

  18. "5"7Fe Mössbauer, SEM/EDX, p-XRF and μ-XRF studies on a Dutch painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Schmidt, H.-J.; Costa, B. F. O.; Blumers, M.; Sansano, A.; Rull, F.; Wengerowsky, D.; Nürnberger, F.; Maier, H. J.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Renz, F.

    2016-01-01

    The painting of a rich Jewish merchant “Bildnis eines jüdischen Kaufmanns” from the Netherlands is dated presumably to the 16"t"h century. After a vivid historical background, i.e. robbed by the Nazis by order of Hermann Göring, it was recently discovered on an Austrian flea market. Different analysis methods were combined to identify the time of the production of this historically interesting looted art. Non-destructive MIMOS II Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy was utilised for mesurements in selected spots. This mainly revealed haematite (α-Fe_2O_3) in the red curtain. In spots of the brown jacket Mössbauer spectra indicated the presence of mainly Iron(III) in super-paramagnetic oxide or oxide-hydroxide. Consecutively SEM measurements revealed a restoration by partly over-painting. The elementary composition of the pigments was examined by a portable-X-ray fluorescence. μ-XRF analysis for element distribution at different areas was performed. The look into a crack showed Zinc-white at the bottom of the crack. Traces of Titanium-white could be found within some locations on the surface of the painting. In terms of provenance of the artwork, the presence of Zink-white suggests that the painting was painted around the 19"t"h century. Titanium-white indicates a reconstruction during the 20"t"h century, approximately between 1917 and 1958.

  19. Analytical Characterization of Rococo Paintings in Egypt: Preliminary Results from El-Gawhara Palace at Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma REFAAT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El-Gawhara palace (1813–1814 AD is situated south of the Mosque of Muhammad Ali in the Cairo Citadel. This palace is an important example of the best early 19th century rococo decorations in Egypt. The present study reports some of the results obtained from the application of different analytical techniques to characterize some rococo paintings at El-Gawhara palace at Cairo, Egypt. The characterization of the studied paintings was carried out by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT−IR. The obtained results allowed the identification of the chemical composition, structure and the painting technique employed in these paintings. This methodology reveals some useful information on some rococo paintings dating back to the 19th century in Egypt.

  20. Painting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2012-01-01

    and discursive battles over the essentially self-reflective question of “What is painting?” Over the last decades it has also become an intermedial laboratory in which artists experiment with developing a connective aesthetic in the interface between painting and other media. Accordingly, it is has become...

  1. Nanostructured molybdenum oxide-based antibacterial paint: effective growth inhibition of various pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Premanathan, Mariappan; Veerapandian, Murugan; Jae Kim, Sang

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of bacterial infections in the health care environment is paramount to providing better treatment. Covering a susceptible environment with an antimicrobial coating is a successful way to avoid bacterial growth. Research on the preparation of durable antimicrobial coatings is promising for both fundamental surface care and clinical care applications. Herein, we report a facile, efficient, and scalable preparation of MoO 3 paint using a cost-effective ball-milling approach. The MoO 3 nanoplates (synthesized by thermal decomposition of ammonium heptamolybdate) are used as a pigment and antibacterial activity moiety in alkyd resin binders and other suitable eco-friendly additives in the preparation of paint. Surface morphology, chemical states, bonding nature, and intermolecular interaction between the MoO 3 and the alkyd resin were studied using Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. The antibacterial properties of a prepared MoO 3 nanoplate against various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) was determined using the microdilution method. Bacterial strains exposed to an MoO 3 paint coated surface exhibit a significant loss of viability in a time-dependent manner. Fundamental modes of antibacterial activities ascribed from a biocompatible and durable MoO 3 nanostructure incorporated into an alkyd resin complex are discussed. The obtained experimental findings suggest the potential utility of prepared MoO 3 -based paint coating for the prevention of health care associated infections. (paper)

  2. Microstructural study of pre hispanic and colonial pigments of diverse sites of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas A, J.; Espinosa P, M.; Fernandez, M.E.; Mondragon G, G.; Perez H, R.; Mendoza A, D.; Rodriguez L, V.; Martinez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show some studies about the pre hispanic paintings, blue paint, green and red colors found in several archaeological sites located in the southeast and center of Mexico, also were analyzed clays samples from Sacalum mine localized in Yucatan state. The samples were analyzed by X Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and Transmission Electron Microscopy both equipped with a microprobe for chemical elemental analysis by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The results obtained by Sem showed that all the pre hispanic paintings are made of fiber-like structures of micrometers order. In other zones of the samples were identified irregular morphologies in which the fibers are supported. The EDS analysis identified the elements C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe. The XRD and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HREM) results showed fiber crystalline structures at nanoscopic level corresponding to paligorskite clay. Other particles were identified as calcite phase. In the red pigments were identified paligorskite fibers in some of them and another sample was identified cinnabar phase. In these last sample no was identify the paligorskite. (Author) 14 refs., 13 figs

  3. Micro transflection on a metallic stick: an innovative approach of reflection infrared spectroscopy for minimally invasive investigation of painting varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Francesca; Legan, Lea; Miliani, Costanza; Ropret, Polonca

    2017-05-01

    A new analytical approach, based on micro-transflection measurements from a diamond-coated metal sampling stick, is presented for the analysis of painting varnishes. Minimally invasive sampling is performed from the varnished surface using the stick, which is directly used as a transflection substrate for micro Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements. With use of a series of varnished model paints, the micro-transflection method has been proved to be a valuable tool for the identification of surface components thanks to the selectivity of the sampling, the enhancement of the absorbance signal, and the easier spectral interpretation because the profiles are similar to transmission mode ones. Driven by these positive outcomes, the method was then tested as tool supporting noninvasive reflection FTIR spectroscopy during the assessment of varnish removal by solvent cleaning on paint models. Finally, the integrated analytical approach based on the two reflection methods was successfully applied for the monitoring of the cleaning of the sixteenth century painting Presentation in the Temple by Vittore Carpaccio. Graphical Abstract Micro-transflection FTIR on a metallic stick for the identification of varnishes during painting cleanings.

  4. IBT-based quantitative proteomics identifies potential regulatory proteins involved in pigmentation of purple sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lili; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Li, Xiaoni; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are an important economic species and exhibit high yield value among aquaculture animals. Purple sea cucumbers are very rare and beautiful and have stable hereditary patterns. In this study, isobaric tags (IBT) were first used to reveal the molecular mechanism of pigmentation in the body wall of the purple sea cucumber. We analyzed the proteomes of purple sea cucumber in early pigmentation stage (Pa), mid pigmentation stage (Pb) and late pigmentation stage (Pc), resulting in the identification of 5580 proteins, including 1099 differentially expressed proteins in Pb: Pa and 339 differentially expressed proteins in Pc: Pb. GO and KEGG analyses revealed possible differentially expressed proteins, including"melanogenesis", "melanosome", "melanoma", "pigment-biosynthetic process", "Epidermis development", "Ras-signaling pathway", "Wnt-signaling pathway", "response to UV light", and "tyrosine metabolism", involved in pigment synthesis and regulation in purple sea cucumbers. The large number of differentially expressed proteins identified here should be highly useful in further elucidating the mechanisms underlying pigmentation in sea cucumbers. Furthermore, these results may also provide the base for further identification of proteins involved in resistance mechanisms against melanoma, albinism, UV damage, and other diseases in sea cucumbers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of corrosion products beneath primer coating containing anticorrosive pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.V.R.; Nigam, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The phase analysis of the rusts generated beneath the primer containing micaceous iron oxide (MIO) and micaceous iron oxide in combination with red lead (RL), zinc phosphate (ZP), basic lead silicochromate (BLSC) and zinc chromate (ZC) has been carried out by Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. The rust beneath the coating obtained after immersion of the painted panel for six months in 3% NaCl, consists mainly of non-stoichiometric magnetite together with small fractions of γ-, α-FeOOH except in the case of panel painted with RL containing MIO showed only a central doublet indicating the formation of γ-FeOOH and SPM α-FeOOH. Non-stoichiometry of magnetite as calculated from the ratio of B/A sites of the peaks of magnetite in the spectrum has been found depending on the nature of anticorrosive pigment present in the primer coating. The order of non-stoichiometry has been found to be in order of ZC > BLSC > ZP > MIO. (author)

  6. X-ray diffraction studies of Pompeian wall paintings using synchrotron radiation and dedicated laboratory made systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, A.; Castaing, J.; Walter, P.

    2010-01-01

    The full identification of artwork materials requires not only elemental analysis but also structural information of the compounds as provided by X-ray diffraction (XRD). This is easily done when taking samples (or micro-samples) from artworks. However, there is an increasing interest in performing non-destructive studies that require adapted XRD systems. Comparative study of synchrotron high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (SR-HRPD) and laboratory non-destructive systems (portable XRD and micro-XRD) is the main objective of this work. There are no qualitative differences among the three systems as for detected phases in the Pompeian wall paintings that were studied, except in the case of minority phases which only were detected by SR-HRPD. The identified pigments were goethite, hematite, cinnabar, glauconite, Pompeian blue, together with calcite, dolomite and aragonite. Synchrotron XRD diagrams show better resolution than the others. In general, the peak widths in the diagrams obtained with the portable XRD system are similar to those obtained by micro-diffraction equipment. Factors such as residual divergence of X-ray sources, incidence angle and slit or collimator size are discussed in relation with the quality of XRD diagrams. (orig.)

  7. Egyptian Tomb Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Liesa

    1999-01-01

    Provides an activity where sixth-grade students replicated the Egyptian art form of tomb painting. Explains that the students researched information about Egyptian culture and history in order to familiarize themselves with Egyptian wall-painting style. Discusses the process of creating tomb paintings in detail. (CMK)

  8. Color alteration of the paint used for iris painting in ocular prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Úrsula Rocha Fernandes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess color alteration of the paints used for iris painting in artificial eyes. Five disks of heat cured acrylic resin were confectioned by microwave energy for each paint analyzed, in a total of 40 specimens. Each specimen consisted of a colorless acrylic resin disk and another of equal size, of scleral white colored acrylic resin, with the painting interposed between the two disks. The specimens were submitted to an accelerated aging process in a chamber under ultraviolet radiation for 1,008 hours. To assess color variation, a reflective spectrophotometer was used. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and the Tukey test (p < 0.05. All the paints underwent chromatic alteration. The oil paint presented the highest resistance to accelerated aging.

  9. A multi-analytical approach for the characterization of wall painting materials on contemporary buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Donata; Bracci, Susanna; Cantisani, Emma; Conti, Claudia; Rava, Antonio; Sansonetti, Antonio; Shank, Will; Colombini, MariaPerla

    2017-02-01

    Samples from Keith Haring's wall painting of the Necker Children Hospital in Paris were studied by a multi-analytical protocol. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), powder X-ray diffraction (XRDP), Electron microscope (SEM-EDS), Infrared and Raman spectroscopy (μ-FT-IR and μ-Raman) measurements were performed in order to characterize the materials and to identify the art technique used to produce this contemporary work. Materials from the mural suffered from severe detachments of materials and several fragments were found on the ground beneath. Some of these fragments, which were representative of the whole palette and stratigraphic sequence, were collected and studied. The fragments were sufficiently large to enable non-invasive measurements to be performed in order to characterize the materials. A comparison of the data of the techniques applied revealed that Haring's palette was composed of organic pigments such as Naphtol red, phthalocyanine blue and green and Hansa yellow, in accordance with those used previously by the artist in other painted murals.

  10. Chromatographic and spectroscopic identification and recognition of ammoniacal cochineal dyes and pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieli, A.; Sanyova, J.; Doherty, B.; Brunetti, B. G.; Miliani, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work a combined chromatographic and spectroscopic approach is used to provide a diagnostic assessment of semi-synthetic ammoniacal cochineal through the syntheses of its dyes and lakes according to art historical recipes. Commercially introduced in the late XIX century as a dye and pigment, it was used to obtain a brilliant purplish/violet nuance which provided a more stable option over carminic acid although its evidenced use in manufacts and artworks of heritage importance have been scarcely documented. Through HPLC-DAD, it has been possible to identify 4-aminocarminic acid as the main component of ammoniacal cochineal highlighting a chemical formula analogous to acid stable carmine, a recent patented food dye. FTIR clearly distinguishes the amine group in the ammoniacal cochineal dye preparation and TLC-SERS allows for an adequate separation and spectral differentiation in its main components to be evidenced. Colloidal SERS has permitted spectral markers useful in discerning ammoniacal cochineal over carminic acid to be highlighted and discussed. Finally, the methods experimented in this study for the identification of ammoniacal cochineal have been validated on analyzing a sample of dyed wool.

  11. Writing on Pigments in Natural History and Art Technology in Sixteenth-Century Germany and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltrogge, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Renaissance painters used a number of inorganic color materials. The development of mineralogy as a discipline opened a new discourse on mineral pigments. Agricola and other naturalists were familiar with the contemporary writings on art technology, but their focus was different. Therefore, the exchange of knowledge between these two color worlds remained selective. One possible meeting point was the Kunstkammer where the study of natural objects and materials was combined with an interest in the manual execution of a painting.

  12. The Byzantine Church of ``40 Holy Martyrs'' in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria: Pigments and Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, E.; Zorba, T.; Pavlidou, E.; Angelova, S.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    The "St. 40 Martyrs" church is the most famous medieval building in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria. It is located in Assenova mahala, just next to Tsarevets. It was built and its walls were painted during the reign of Bulgarian king Ivan Assen II after the victory against Epyrus despot Theodoros Comninos (1230 AD). It consists of two buildings - a six-column basilica and another, smaller building on its western wall, which was built later. During the presence of the Ottoman Turks, maybe until the first half of the 18th century, the church remained christian. When it was converted to a mosque, all the christian symbols in it were destroyed. The archeological researches on site were initiated in 1969. As it is clear, the 40 Martyrs church is a historical monument of culture with great significance. The church had murals, from the earlier period, but in the following years and especially during the Ottoman period, the church has suffered many and different destructions. Nevertheless, the very few pieces of murals that are rescued till nowadays provide important information for the technique and the pigments that were used on its wall paintings. In the present work, twelve series of samples from the wall paintings were studied in order to characterize the materials and the technique used for church iconography. The study was based on the micro-analytical techniques of the Fourier Transform Infrared micro-spectroscopy (μs-FTIR), the Optical Microscopy and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled to an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (EDS). In the FTIR spectra of all pigments the characteristic peaks of calcite were detected, confirming the use of fresco technique for the creation of murals. The combination of FTIR spectroscopy and SEM-EDS analysis, reveal the existence of lapis-lazuli for the blue color, green earth for the green color, cinnabar for the red color, calcite for the white color and carbon black for the black color. Moreover, in other chromatic layers

  13. The Byzantine Church of '40 Holy Martyrs' in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria: Pigments and Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakellariou, E.; Zorba, T.; Pavlidou, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Angelova, S.

    2010-01-01

    The 'St. 40 Martyrs' church is the most famous medieval building in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria. It is located in Assenova mahala, just next to Tsarevets. It was built and its walls were painted during the reign of Bulgarian king Ivan Assen II after the victory against Epyrus despot Theodoros Comninos (1230 AD). It consists of two buildings - a six-column basilica and another, smaller building on its western wall, which was built later. During the presence of the Ottoman Turks, maybe until the first half of the 18th century, the church remained christian. When it was converted to a mosque, all the christian symbols in it were destroyed. The archeological researches on site were initiated in 1969. As it is clear, the 40 Martyrs church is a historical monument of culture with great significance. The church had murals, from the earlier period, but in the following years and especially during the Ottoman period, the church has suffered many and different destructions. Nevertheless, the very few pieces of murals that are rescued till nowadays provide important information for the technique and the pigments that were used on its wall paintings. In the present work, twelve series of samples from the wall paintings were studied in order to characterize the materials and the technique used for church iconography. The study was based on the micro-analytical techniques of the Fourier Transform Infrared micro-spectroscopy (μs-FTIR), the Optical Microscopy and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled to an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (EDS). In the FTIR spectra of all pigments the characteristic peaks of calcite were detected, confirming the use of fresco technique for the creation of murals. The combination of FTIR spectroscopy and SEM-EDS analysis, reveal the existence of lapis-lazuli for the blue color, green earth for the green color, cinnabar for the red color, calcite for the white color and carbon black for the black color. Moreover, in other chromatic layers

  14. EPR identification of irradiated Monascus purpureus red pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Ferdes, Mariana; Ferdes, Ovidiu S.

    2000-01-01

    Fresh red alimentary pigment extracted from Monascus purpureus fungus exhibits an intense EPR line consisting of a single, narrow line, attributed to a quinone radical. When irradiated with 7 MeV electrons or 60 Co γ-rays, the amplitude of this line increased with the absorbed dose following a saturation exponential dependency up to 10 kGy. During annealing treatment (isothermal heating at 100 deg. C) the irradiation centers decay exponentially with a half-life time of 2.30 min

  15. Emotion in Painting and Art Installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečni, Vladimir J

    2015-01-01

    Paintings are static 2-dimensional images with limited narrative means. On the basis of a critical analysis of the relevant laboratory scaling studies, museum studies, and neuroaesthetic work, the article reaches a negative conclusion about most paintings' ability to engage sufficiently with general viewers' associative-memory systems, so as to lead to identification and empathy, and induce fundamental psychobiological emotions. In contrast, designers of art installations can draw on subtle combinations of several classes of stimulus properties with psychological significance subsumable under the classical concept of the sublime (physical grandeur, rarity, an association with beauty and with biologically significant outcomes), so that some installations may induce the peak aesthetic emotional response, aesthetic awe--as defined in Aesthetic Trinity Theory (Konečni, 2005, 2011), along with the states of being moved and physiological thrills. The approach also involves an analytical skepticism about emotivism, defined as a culturological proclivity for unnecessary insertion of emotion into accounts of mental life and behavior, especially in the arts. Implications for the role of emotion theory in empirical aesthetics are examined.

  16. Process Waste Assessment - Paint Shop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Paint Shop, Building 913, Room 130. Special attention is given to waste streams generated by the spray painting process because it requires a number of steps for preparing, priming, and painting an object. Also, the spray paint booth covers the largest area in R-130. The largest and most costly waste stream to dispose of is open-quote Paint Shop wasteclose quotes -- a combination of paint cans, rags, sticks, filters, and paper containers. These items are compacted in 55-gallon drums and disposed of as solid hazardous waste. Recommendations are made for minimizing waste in the Paint Shop. Paint Shop personnel are very aware of the need to minimize hazardous wastes and are continuously looking for opportunities to do so

  17. Isolation and molecular identification of a UV-resistant strain of Dietzia maris and antioxidant activity of pigment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Zamanian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ability of radioresistant bacteria to survive high levels of UV radiation has been linked to their strong DNA repair systems and ability to produce primary and secondary metabolic products. The biosynthesis of pigments provides an opportunity for bacteria to live in radiation-rich environment. Recent radiation-responsive pigments are used commercially as food colorants, anticancer drugs, as well as antibiotics and for cosmetic purposes. Materials and methods: Soil sample of Omidiyeh city was collected during the spring of 2014 and UV-resistant strain was isolated after primary and secondary screening. Then it was identified by molecular methods (16S rRNA gene sequencing. Antioxidant activity of pigment was evaluated by 2,2 -diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH and the reducing power of pigments were analyzed by ferric chloride. Results: In this present study, new UV-resistant strain NM2 was isolated and by comparison of these 16S rRNA gene sequences to public database using the BLAST, the genus and species of the isolate was identified as Dietzia maris with 99% similarity. Extraction of pigment from isolated strain was carried out by methanol and acetone as solvents. The spectrum is characterized by maximum peak at 473 nm for pigment of NM2 strain. Antioxidant activity and the reducing ability of pigments increased by increasing their concentrations. NM2 strain pigment showed EC50 concentration of 3.30 mg/ml for DPPH free radical scavenging activity, and EC50 concentration of 28.46 µg/ml for reducing power. Discussion and conclusion: Isolation of natural resources of pigment is very important with high anti-oxidant activity. In the current study, pigment of UV-resistant bacteria demonstrated a strong antioxidant activity in vitro and pigment of these bacteria could play an important role in UV tolerance. Pigment of UV-resistant bacteria may be an appropriate source for antioxidative-related functional foods and the pharmaceutical

  18. Application of a portable equipment EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) in the monitoring of the restoration work of murals paints in the Church of Paroquia Imaculada Conceicao (Sao Paulo, SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appoloni, Carlos Roberto; Parreira, Paulo Sergio; Rizzo, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) of the Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada of the Universidade Estadual de Londrina in the analysis in situ of pigments in wall paintings, as well as in monitoring restoration processes

  19. Colour changes due to the fading of Prussian blue in Danish Golden Age paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Troels Folke; Buti, David; Vila, Anna

    2016-01-01

    written sources already a few decades after its first appearance on the market. It is therefore doubtful whether this awareness or the scepticism voiced in the literature was to any extent shared by 19th-century users of the pigment, or whether Danish suppliers of the period were in general concerned...... with the exact nature of their product. The recent technical examination has caused an art historical reappraisal of some of the works from the era. In a broader sense, the research, combining scientific analysis, archival, and art historical studies has led to the realization that paintings of the Danish Golden...

  20. A non invasive method to detect stratigraphy, thicknesses and pigment concentration of pictorial multilayers based on EDXRF and vis-RS: in situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonizzoni, L.; Caglio, S.; Galli, A.; Poldi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive XRF analysis (EDXRF) in association with visible reflectance spectroscopy (vis-RS), both achieved by portable instruments, can be successfully applied, in a wide range of cases, to investigate wood or canvas paintings in order to obtain some stratigraphic information with non-invasive techniques. The specific aim of this work is to use them as quantitative tools: EDXRF to reconstruct the thicknesses of the detected layers, vis-RS to report pigment concentration in the uppermost layer. We present here some in situ analyses of famous paintings by Andrea Mantegna and Giovanni Bellini, compared with stratigraphic optical microscopy observations on cross sections. Advantages and limits are pointed out. (orig.)

  1. The importance of tattoo pigment in sentinel lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soran, Atilla; Menekse, Ebru; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal; Tane, Kaori; Diego, Emilia; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Johnson, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    The presence of pigment in axillary lymph nodes (LN) secondary to migration of tattoo ink can imitate the appearance of a blue sentinel lymph node (SLN) on visual inspection, causing the operator to either miss the true SLN or excise more than is needed. We present patients with tattoos ipsilateral to an early stage breast cancer who underwent a SLN biopsy. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from medical records and clinicopathologic data was collected. A total of 52 LNs were retrieved from 15 patients for sentinel mapping and 29 of them had tattoo pigmentation on pathologic evaluation. Of those 29 SLNs, 2 of them (6.9%) were pigmented, but did not contain either blue dye or Tc-99m (pseudopigmented SLN). Two (3.8%) SLNs were positive for metastasis; both of these had either blue dye or Tc99m uptake, and 1 demonstrated tattoo pigment in the node. In this cohort of patients with ipsilateral tattoos, removed more LNs lead to unnecessary excision which may important for increasing the risk of arm morbidity from SLN biopsy. However, the presence of tattoo pigment did not interfere with understaging for axillary mapping and it did not effect of pathological identification of SLNs positivity.

  2. Microanalysis of organic pigments and glazes in polychrome works of art by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leona, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Scientific studies of works of art are usually limited by severe sampling restrictions. The identification of organic colorants, a class of compounds relevant for attribution and provenance studies, is further complicated by the low concentrations at which these compounds are used and by the interference of the protein-, gum-, or oil-binding media present in pigment and glaze samples. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) was successfully used to identify natural organic colorants in archaeological objects, polychrome sculptures, and paintings from samples smaller than 25 microm in diameter. The key factors in achieving the necessary sensitivity were a highly active stabilized silver colloid, obtained by the reproducible microwave-supported reduction of silver sulfate with glucose and sodium citrate, and a non-extractive hydrolysis sample treatment procedure that maximizes dye adsorption on the colloid. Among the examples presented are the earliest so far found occurrence of madder lake (in a 4,000 years old Egyptian object dating to the Middle Kingdom period), and the earliest known occurrence in Europe of the South Asian dyestuff lac (in the Morgan Madonna, a 12th century polychrome sculpture from Auvergne, France).

  3. Identification of mixed-valence metal clusters in drier solutions for alkyd-based paints by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micciche, F.; Straten, van M.; Ming, W.; Oostveen, E.A.; Haveren, van J.; Linde, van der R.; Reedijk, J.

    2005-01-01

    The oxidative drying of alkyd paints has many similarities with the way lipids are oxidized in biological systems. Metal salts based on Co, Fe and Mn are added to accelerate the oxidative drying of conventional alkyd paints. Although the mechanism by which alkyd paints dry has been the subject of

  4. PY-GC-MS applied to the identification of synthetic resins in Brazilian painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redigolo, Marcelo M.; Amaral, Priscila O.; Leao, Claudio; Crepaldi, Caike; Munita, Casimiro S.; Bustillos, Oscar V.; Russo, Tatiana; Mendonca, Valeria de

    2015-01-01

    Works of art are appreciated for their material and immaterial value. Restoring objects of art is a delicate procedure, mostly due to the irreversibility of the interventions. Hence, it is recommended to study the chemical composition of the object to avoid errors. The premise for restoring or conserving these objects is their physical preservation, i.e., it is advisable to avoid sampling and, when necessary, samples must be minute. The analytical techniques that fulfill these requirements are limited. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a versatile technique due to its hyphenation possibilities. Recently, it has being employed in the identification of natural and synthetic resins in works of art. Electron ionization (EI) is a powerful method of molecular fragmentation employed in the detection of volatile organic compounds by mass spectrometry. In this work, two micrograms (μg) of sample from a Brazilian contemporary painting were analyzed by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) technique. A microfurnace-type pyrolyzer was coupled to a gas chromatograph, using a non-polar capillary column. The electron ionization was achieved applying 70 eV electron energy. This technique is suitable for the analysis of material from objects of art, being specific, accurate and requiring minimal sampling. The synthetic resin diallyl phthalate (DAP) was identified by the Py-GC/MS technique. (author)

  5. PY-GC-MS applied to the identification of synthetic resins in Brazilian painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redigolo, Marcelo M.; Amaral, Priscila O.; Leao, Claudio; Crepaldi, Caike; Munita, Casimiro S.; Bustillos, Oscar V., E-mail: marcelo.redigolo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Russo, Tatiana; Mendonca, Valeria de [Pinacoteca do Estado de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Works of art are appreciated for their material and immaterial value. Restoring objects of art is a delicate procedure, mostly due to the irreversibility of the interventions. Hence, it is recommended to study the chemical composition of the object to avoid errors. The premise for restoring or conserving these objects is their physical preservation, i.e., it is advisable to avoid sampling and, when necessary, samples must be minute. The analytical techniques that fulfill these requirements are limited. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a versatile technique due to its hyphenation possibilities. Recently, it has being employed in the identification of natural and synthetic resins in works of art. Electron ionization (EI) is a powerful method of molecular fragmentation employed in the detection of volatile organic compounds by mass spectrometry. In this work, two micrograms (μg) of sample from a Brazilian contemporary painting were analyzed by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) technique. A microfurnace-type pyrolyzer was coupled to a gas chromatograph, using a non-polar capillary column. The electron ionization was achieved applying 70 eV electron energy. This technique is suitable for the analysis of material from objects of art, being specific, accurate and requiring minimal sampling. The synthetic resin diallyl phthalate (DAP) was identified by the Py-GC/MS technique. (author)

  6. Evaluation of naturally occurring pigments of the North Bohemian lignite mining area; Bewertung von mineralischen Pigmentvorkommen des nordboehmischen Braunkohlenbeckens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buntenbach, Stephan [TriMin Consulting - Mineral Processing, Ammerthal (Germany); Botula, Jiri [VSB-Technical Univ. of Ostrava (Czech Republic). Mineral Processing Dept.; Leonhardt, Hana

    2010-11-15

    The research project ''Mineral Processing Methods for the Preparation of Naturally Occurring Pigments from Overburden of the Lignite Mines and from Shallow Clay Deposits of the North Bohemian Lignite Basin'', funded by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt DBU, was conducted as a collaboration between the AKW Apparate+Verfahren GmbH, Hirschau with the Technical University of Ostrava. Geological, mineralogical and mineral processing studies for the development of a suitable beneficiation method were carried out to investigate the possibilities of the industrial usage of beneficiated pigments of these deposits. It should be demonstrated, that the significant reserves of mineral pigments in the shallow deposits and also in the overburden of the lignite mines can be utilized ecologically and economically. Based on the results of geological prospecting work already carried out, the deposit Horenec was selected as the most important pigment deposits for the production of bolus and ochre earth. The newly carried out geological, mineralogical and chemical studies formed the basis for the following mineral processing test work and the test work for the usage of beneficiated products as colouring paint for plastic, fabric and other materials. (orig.)

  7. Phase and Chemical Composition Analysis on Neolithic Painted Ceramics Sherds Using Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Powder Diffraction (SRXPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Powder Diffraction studies were performed at the wiggler beamline 1711 of MAX II Synchrotron accelerator from Lund, Sweden, in the frame of EU FPV Access to Large Scale Facilities programme. Diffraction data were collected using radiation of wavelength 1.36 A, which was detected by a Brucker system with a Smart 1000 CCD detector. The main goal of our studies was to distinguish different clays and mineral pigments of various Neolithic pottery-producing centres on Romanian territory in relation with possible inter-regional trade route connections. As main results we can mention: - identification of black pigment composition from Cucuteni (Northern Moldavia), Ariusd (South-Eastern Transylvania) and Cris-Starcevo (Oltenia) type pottery (VI - IV Millennia B. Chr.) as a combination of jacobsite, bixbyite (Manganese oxides), magnetite and goethite (Iron oxides) originary from North Moldova mineral deposits of Iacobeni (150 km up on the river Bistritza from analyzed Cucuteni archaeological sites), and as a combination of pyrolusite, magnetite and hematite for Cris-Starcevo samples, probably from local clay (enriched in Mn-Fe oxides) - identification of white pigment composition as calcite (CaCO3) for Cris- Starcevo culture sites from Central Transylvania (from the local abundant chalk deposits) and as calcium silicates mixed with illite (K, H2))Al2[(H2O, OH)2]AlSi3O10 for Cucuteni culture sites - identification of read-brown pigment composition as various mixtures of hematite - goethite - magnetite, all of local provenance - identification of all examined sherds as having local provenance for the clay The main conclusion is that during Neolithic period, the pottery workshops, largely extended on Romanian territory, used local clays but traded black mineral pigments across the Carpathian mountains (Cucuteni and Ariusd areas are separated by these mountains by easily crossed by passes along small rivers)

  8. Multidirectional cross-species painting illuminates the history of karyotypic evolution in Perissodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Stanyon, Roscoe; Nesterenko, Anastasia I; Fu, Beiyuan; Perelman, Polina L; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Stone, Gary; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Houck, Marlys L; Robinson, Terence J; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Dobigny, Gauthier; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2008-01-01

    The order Perissodactyla, the group of odd-toed ungulates, includes three extant families: Equidae, Tapiridae, and Rhinocerotidae. The extremely rapid karyotypic diversification in perissodactyls has so far prevented the establishment of genome-wide homology maps between these three families by traditional cytogenetic approaches. Here we report the first genome-wide comparative chromosome maps of African rhinoceroses, four tapir species, four equine species, and humans. These maps were established by multidirectional chromosome painting, with paint probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Equus grevyi, Tapirus indicus, and Ceratotherium simum as well as painting probes from horse and human. The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), Baird's tapir (T. bairdii), mountain tapir (T. pinchaque), lowland tapir (T. terrestris), and onager (E. hemionus onager), were studied by cross-species chromosome painting for the first time. Our results, when integrated with previously published comparative chromosome maps of the other perissodactyl species, have enabled the reconstruction of perissodactyl, ceratomorph, and equid ancestral karyotypes, and the identification of the defining evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements along each lineage. Our results allow a more reliable estimate of the mode and tempo of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, revealing a striking switch between the slowly evolving ceratomorphs and extremely rapidly evolving equids.

  9. ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voras, Zachary E.; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Beebe, Thomas P. [University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Newark, DE (United States); University of Delaware, UD Surface Analysis Facility, Newark, DE (United States); DeGhetaldi, Kristin [University of Delaware, Department of Art Conservation, Newark, DE (United States); Winterthur-University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, Winterthur, DE (United States); Buckley, Barbara [The Barnes Foundation, Department of Conservation, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baade, Brian [University of Delaware, Department of Art Conservation, Newark, DE (United States); Mass, Jennifer L. [Winterthur Museum, Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory, Conservation Department, Winterthur, DE (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF-SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment-binder interactions. In this study, ToF-SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF-SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting's complex restoration history. ToF-SIMS's ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM-EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF-SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium, as well as

  10. ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voras, Zachary E; deGhetaldi, Kristin; Wiggins, Marcie B; Buckley, Barbara; Baade, Brian; Mass, Jennifer L; Beebe, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF-SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment-binder interactions. In this study, ToF-SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF-SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting's complex restoration history. ToF-SIMS's ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM-EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF-SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium, as well as

  11. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P.A.; Laird, J.S.; Casey, H.M.; Goodall, L.J.; Ryan, C.G.; Sloggett, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  12. Genetic and Virulent Difference Between Pigmented and Non-pigmented Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang; Yujuan Suo; Daofeng Zhang; Fangning Jin; Hang Zhao; Chunlei Shi

    2018-01-01

    Staphyloxanthin (STX), a golden carotenoid pigment produced by Staphylococcus aureus, is suggested to act as an important virulence factor due to its antioxidant properties. Restraining biosynthesis of STX was considered as an indicator of virulence decline in pigmented S. aureus isolates. However, it is not clear whether natural non-pigmented S. aureus isolates have less virulence than pigmented ones. In this study, it is aimed to compare the pigmented and non-pigmented S. aureus isolates to...

  13. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B.; Scherrer, Nadim C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14 C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14 C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  14. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron [ETH Zurich, Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B. [SIK-ISEA, Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Scherrer, Nadim C. [Bern University of Applied Sciences, HKB, Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. {sup 14}C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the {sup 14}C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  15. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Raman spectroscopic examination of uncovered and covered paint layers of a real painting. ► Deconvolution of Raman peaks of lead white. ► Comparison of results with energy-dispersive analysis and X-ray diffraction. - Abstract: In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM–EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  16. Portable X-ray Fluorescence and Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Studies of Cadmium Yellow Alteration in Paintings by Edward Munch and Henri matisse in Oslo, Copenhagen, and San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mass, Jennifer; Uffelman, Erich; Buckley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    -induced visible fluorescence, ultraviolet-induced infrared fluorescence, multispectral imaging, and X-ray fluorescence. Questions addressed included the following: Is the imaging method being tested comprehensive? Is it efficient at surveying an entire painting? Does it reveal the state of preservation...... and the Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen. They were also tested on Edvard Munch’s The Scream (ca. 1910?, Munch Museum, Oslo). It was found that ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence has the best ability to discriminate between altered and unaltered cadmium yellow paints (even before alteration is visible...... to the unaided eye), whereas multispectral imaging allows for the most efficient and comprehensive localization of the cadmium pigments in a work....

  17. [Simultaneous determination of 33 primary aromatic amines of free state in fine pigments by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zhengyin; Wang, Quanlin; Li, Hesheng; Zhang, Aizhi

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive analytical method based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 33 primary aromatic amines (PAAs) in fine pigments such as gouache paint, oil painting pigment and acrylic paint. The primary aromatic amines in samples were extracted with acetonitrile. Then the extract was concentrated by centrifugation and nitrogen blow, finally diluted to 2 mL with methanol-water (1:9, v/v) and filtered through 0. 22 im membrane before UPLC-MS/MS analysis. The analytes were separated on a BEH Phenyl column (100 mm x 2. 1 mm, 1. 7 1µm) with 0. 07% (v/v) formic acid in methanol-water as mobile phases in gradient elution. The PAAs were detected by UPLC-MS/MS under multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode and quantified by the internal standard method. The separation conditions, fragment voltages and collision energies were optimized. The impacts of extraction times, extraction solvents and concentration methods on recoveries were studied. The limits of detection and limits of quantitation for the 33 primary aromatic amines were 5-50 µg/kg and 15-150 µg/kg respectively. The mean recoveries of three different dye products at three spiked levels were 70. 1% - 115. 8%. The relative standard deviations were 2. 1% - 15%. The expenmental results indicated that the method is simple, rapid, sensitive, accurate and can meet the requirements for the determination.

  18. Technological Characterization of Wall Paintings from the A Mithraic Tomb Dated to 4th-5th Century AD, Gargaresc, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Salam, S.; Maniatis, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The excavations of Gargaresc started in 1965 and were one of the most important archaeological sites in Tripoli because it includes a period of about 500 years starting from the 1stc. AD was and continuing until the 5th century AD. The Mithraic tomb is one of the most important outlying monuments of Oea, 200 yards south of the western end of Gargaresc oasis, on the left of the Tripoli-Zuara road between kilometers 5 & 6. The tomb is cut in an outcrop of soft sandstone. The wall paintings found were symbolic to the religion of that period; which contained a mixture of older religions and Christian, and presented the interaction between the artistic and religious elements of that time. Several optical, chemical and mineralogical methods were applied to identify the materials, composition and technology of the plasters and mortars, as well as, the pigments used in the tomb. These are: -OP: Optical microscopy was used as the initial examination of polished cross-sections to identify the structure and microstratigraphy of the plasters and mortars as well as the painted layers. -MCT: Micro-chemical tests were used to identify the type of the plasters and mortars- calcium aluminium silicate and water-soluble salt to identify sulphates, chlorides, carbonates, nitrites and nitrates. -SM: Standard methods for chemical analysis to identify the quantitative and qualitative nature of the plasters and mortars and their mixture. -SEM & EDS: Analytical Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis system to examine the micrmorphology and determine the chemical composition of the plasters, pigments and the inclusions. -XRD: X-ray powder diffraction to identify the mineralogical composition of the plasters, mortars and pigments. On the bases of all the data obtained, it was possible to establish the nature of the plasters, mortars and their binder. The examination and analysis gave a full picture about the materials and the approximate ratio of amount of

  19. Anthocyanins: naturally occuring fruit pigments with functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela TURTURICĂ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin is a water-soluble pigment existing in plants, and has various health benefits to humans. As far as that goes, the number and location of the hydroxyl groups of the parent nucleus have significant effects on the anthocyanin activities. This review summarizes anthocyanin content in fruits, the importance of anthocyanin in relation to human health, some aspects of anthocyanin biochemistry and their bioavailability, the distribution in some fruits, the biosynthetic pathway, different extraction, separation and purification methods, and also identification methods. Beneficial effects of anthocyanin pigments are reported in the scientific literature and these compounds are nowadays recognized as potentially therapeutic. The lack of antioxidant defense mechanisms in humans is associated with the cardiovascular and coronary artery diseases, cancer and diabetes, besides others.

  20. Genetic and Virulent Difference Between Pigmented and Non-pigmented Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Suo, Yujuan; Zhang, Daofeng; Jin, Fangning; Zhao, Hang; Shi, Chunlei

    2018-01-01

    Staphyloxanthin (STX), a golden carotenoid pigment produced by Staphylococcus aureus , is suggested to act as an important virulence factor due to its antioxidant properties. Restraining biosynthesis of STX was considered as an indicator of virulence decline in pigmented S. aureus isolates. However, it is not clear whether natural non-pigmented S. aureus isolates have less virulence than pigmented ones. In this study, it is aimed to compare the pigmented and non-pigmented S. aureus isolates to clarify the genetic and virulent differences between the two groups. Here, 132 S. aureus isolates were divided into two phenotype groups depending on the absorbance (OD 450 ) of the extracted carotenoids. Then, all isolates were subjected to spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and then the detection of presence of 30 virulence factors and the gene integrity of crtN and crtM . Furthermore, 24 typical S. aureus isolates and 4 S. argenteus strains were selected for the murine infection assay of in vivo virulence, in which the histological observation and enumeration of CFUs were carried out. These isolates were distributed in 26 sequence types (STs) and 49 spa types. The pigmented isolates were scattered in 25 STs, while the non-pigmented isolates were more centralized, which mainly belonged to ST20 (59%) and ST25 (13%). Among the 54 non-pigmented isolates, about 20% carried intact crtN and crtM genes. The in vivo assay suggested that comparing with pigmented S. aureus , non-pigmented S. aureus and S. argenteus strains did not show a reduced virulence in murine sepsis models. Therefore, it suggested that there were no significant genetic and virulent differences between pigmented and non-pigmented S. aureus .

  1. Evaluation of Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 activities concentrations and radium equivalent index in several Brazilian economic wall paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Leandro M.; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The titanium dioxide used as the white pigment in paints is produced from the processing of ilmenite minerals. As monazite, the main ilmenite radioactive contaminant, contains 1 to 20% thorium dioxide and also some uranium traces, so, eventually, wall paints can contain radioactivity. Activity concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were determined in 15 Brazilian economic wall paints samples, by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The activities concentrations in the studied samples ranged from 1.3 ± 0.2 Bq/kg to 23.4 ± 0.7 Bq/kg for 226 Ra; from 2.5 ± 0.4 Bq/kg to 45.8 ± 1.5 Bq/kg for 232 Th and from 5.8 ± 2.1 Bq/kg to 157 ± 22 Bq/kg for 40 K. The radium equivalent index, calculated from the 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations, varied from 1.30 Bq/kg up to 95.9 Bq/kg, below the value of 370 Bq/kg recommended by OECD for a safety use in residential building applications. (author)

  2. Self Cleaning Paint: Introduction of Photocatalytic Particles into a Paint System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Sverrir Grimur

    The current industrial PhD work was aimed at synthesising a photocatalytic composite material which could be used to give organic wood paint films self-cleaning and anti-microbial properties. The current PhD work was done in collaboration between Dyrup A/S and Technical University of Denmark...... consists of an introduction to relevant concepts and literature followed by results, presented as research papers, and a patent application. Four research papers are introduced as individual chapters. Chapter 4 discusses the synthesis and optimisation of anatase TiO2 coated microspheres, chapter 5......-cleaning coatings containing TiO2 coated microspheres. The results show that introducing a photocatalyst into an organic paint system as a coating on inert carrier particles results in durable and weather stable paint films. The paint films exhibit selfcleaning properties and are able to resist the attack of micro...

  3. Localization of proteins in paint cross-sections by scanning electrochemical microscopy as an alternative immunochemical detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Prati, Silvia [Microchemistry and Microscopy Art Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Bologna, Via Guaccimanni 42, Ravenna 48121 (Italy); Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Mazzeo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.mazzeo@unibo.it [Microchemistry and Microscopy Art Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Bologna, Via Guaccimanni 42, Ravenna 48121 (Italy); Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Zangheri, Martina; Roda, Aldo; Bardini, Luca; Valenti, Giovanni; Rapino, Stefania [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy); Marcaccio, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.marcaccio@unibo.it [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi, Bologna 2 40126 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Advanced immuno-electrochemical detection of proteins in paint samples by SECM. • Analysis performed directly on cross-section with high spatial resolution. • Identification of HRP catalytic activity for a selective location of analyte. • Satisfactory results were obtained for aged real samples. • The way forward for an extensive application of SECM in conservation science is shown. - Abstract: The qualitative identification of proteinaceous substances, as well as their location within a complex paint stratigraphy, is one of the most challenging issues in the characterization of painting materials. Nevertheless, information on paint components represent a crucial task for studies concerning both the ancient painting techniques adopted and the state of conservation, being fundamental investigations for the selection of appropriate conservation actions. The present research was aimed at developing a new detection approach for the immunochemical localization of ovalbumin in paint cross-sections based on the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The immunochemical analyses were performed using an anti-ovalbumin primary antibody and a secondary antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). SECM measurements were performed in feedback mode using benzoquinone (BQ)/hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) redox couple. In presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), HRP catalyzes the re-oxidation of H{sub 2}Q to BQ and the increment of BQ concentration in correspondence of the target protein was detected by SECM through the electrochemical reduction of the regenerated BQ at the microelectrode. Indeed, the localization of ovalbumin was possible thanks to a clear discrimination of SECM currents, achieved by the comparison of the measurements recorded before and after H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, based on the HRP on/off approach. The method was evaluated both on samples from standard mocks-up and on a historical sample, collected from a

  4. Complementary standoff chemical imaging to map and identify artist materials in an early Italian Renaissance panel painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Kathryn A; Conover, Damon M; Glinsman, Lisha Deming; Delaney, John K

    2014-12-08

    Two imaging modalities based on molecular and elemental spectroscopy were used to characterize a painting by Cosimo Tura. Visible-to-near-infrared (400-1680 nm) reflectance imaging spectroscopy (RIS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging spectroscopy were employed to identify pigments and determine their spatial distribution with higher confidence than from either technique alone. For example, Mary's red robe was modeled through the distribution of an insect-derived red lake (RIS map) and lead white (XRF lead map), rather than a layer of red lake on vermilion. The RIS image cube was also used to isolate the preparatory design by mapping the reflectance spectra associated with it. In conjunction with results from an earlier RIS study (1650-2500 nm) to map and identify the binding media, a more thorough understanding was gained of the materials and techniques used in the painting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Genetic and Virulent Difference Between Pigmented and Non-pigmented Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphyloxanthin (STX, a golden carotenoid pigment produced by Staphylococcus aureus, is suggested to act as an important virulence factor due to its antioxidant properties. Restraining biosynthesis of STX was considered as an indicator of virulence decline in pigmented S. aureus isolates. However, it is not clear whether natural non-pigmented S. aureus isolates have less virulence than pigmented ones. In this study, it is aimed to compare the pigmented and non-pigmented S. aureus isolates to clarify the genetic and virulent differences between the two groups. Here, 132 S. aureus isolates were divided into two phenotype groups depending on the absorbance (OD450 of the extracted carotenoids. Then, all isolates were subjected to spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, and then the detection of presence of 30 virulence factors and the gene integrity of crtN and crtM. Furthermore, 24 typical S. aureus isolates and 4 S. argenteus strains were selected for the murine infection assay of in vivo virulence, in which the histological observation and enumeration of CFUs were carried out. These isolates were distributed in 26 sequence types (STs and 49 spa types. The pigmented isolates were scattered in 25 STs, while the non-pigmented isolates were more centralized, which mainly belonged to ST20 (59% and ST25 (13%. Among the 54 non-pigmented isolates, about 20% carried intact crtN and crtM genes. The in vivo assay suggested that comparing with pigmented S. aureus, non-pigmented S. aureus and S. argenteus strains did not show a reduced virulence in murine sepsis models. Therefore, it suggested that there were no significant genetic and virulent differences between pigmented and non-pigmented S. aureus.

  6. Annular and central heavy pigment deposition on the posterior lens capsule in the pigment dispersion syndrome: pigment deposition on the posterior lens capsule in the pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Burak; Türkçüoğlu, Peykan; Deniz, Nurettin; Catak, Onur

    2008-12-01

    To report annular and central heavy pigment deposition on the posterior lens capsule in a case of pigment dispersion syndrome. Case report. A 36-year-old female with bilateral pigment dispersion syndrome presented with progressive decrease in visual acuity in the right eye over the past 1-2 years. Clinical examination revealed the typical findings of pigment dispersion syndrome including bilateral Krunkenberg spindles, iris transillumination defects, and dense trabecular meshwork pigmentation. Remarkably, annular and central dense pigmentation of the posterior lens capsule was noted in the right eye. Annular pigment deposition on the posterior lens capsule may be a rare finding associated with pigment dispersion syndrome. Such a finding suggests that there may be aqueous flow into the retrolental space in some patients with this condition. The way of central pigmentation is the entrance of aqueous to Berger's space. In our case, it is probable that spontaneous detachment of the anterior hyaloid membrane aided this entrance.

  7. Selectively strippable paint schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R.; Thumm, D.; Blackford, Roger W.

    1993-03-01

    In order to meet the requirements of more environmentally acceptable paint stripping processes many different removal methods are under evaluation. These new processes can be divided into mechanical and chemical methods. ICI has developed a paint scheme with intermediate coat and fluid resistant polyurethane topcoat which can be stripped chemically in a short period of time with methylene chloride free and phenol free paint strippers.

  8. Painting for protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepto, G.G.C.

    1981-01-01

    Despite the use of special alloys, paint is still the most economical and practical method of protecting steel. Chlorinated rubber resin based paint systems are shown to be satisfactory in areas requiring decontamination as well as for outside exposed areas of nuclear power plants. (author)

  9. Bright light: microspectrofluorimetry for the characterization of lake pigments and dyes in works of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Maria J; Claro, Ana

    2010-06-15

    Color is an important component in the perception of beauty and in an artist's original intent when creating a work. Better conservation of our cultural heritage requires detailed knowledge of artwork materials and the complex evolution they have endured over time. Organic dyes have been used from ancient times, and their characterization is a challenge that has been successfully addressed over the past few years by the development of advanced techniques, such as microspectrofluorimetry. In this Account, we describe the application of microspectrofluorimetry to the study of medieval illuminations, paint cross sections, millenary textiles, and wall paintings. In our research into color in medieval Portuguese illuminations, we chose to emphasize the importance of the experimental design and the use of microspectrofluorimetry in the context of other analytical techniques, such as microFTIR, microRaman, and micro-X-ray fluorescence (microXRF). Within this framework, we were able to unveil the full complexity of a medieval colorant and to address issues not yet explored, such as the influence of Arab, Jewish, and Christian cultures on the production and underlying technology of Portuguese illuminations. The analysis of individual pigment particles or aggregates (by excitation with an 8 mum diameter spot) in paint cross sections from works by Vincent van Gogh and Lucien Pissarro highlights the technique's advantage of high spatial resolution. Its high spectral resolution proved to be useful not only for better characterizing the dyes used to color Andean textiles but also for detecting mixtures of relevant chromophores; the emission signals for the reds in Paracas and Nasca textiles were shown to be due to the presence of purpurin and pseudopurpurin. Finally, the complexity of the study of yellow dyes and the importance of accurate historical reproductions is addressed in a study of Asian organic colorants on historic Chinese wall paintings. Microspectrofluorimetry

  10. Influence of ns-laser wavelength in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for discrimination of painting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xueshi; Syvilay, Delphine; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Texier, Annick; Martinez, Loic; Serfaty, Stéphane; Martos-Levif, Dominique; Detalle, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    The influence of ns-laser wavelength to discriminate ancient painting techniques such as are fresco, casein, animal glue, egg yolk and oil was investigated in this work. This study was carried out with a single shot laser on samples covered by a layer made of a mixture of the cinnabar pigment and different binders. Three wavelengths based on Nd: YAG laser were investigated (1064, 532 and 266 nm). The plasma is controlled at the same electron temperature after an adjustment of pulse energy for these three wavelengths on a fresco sample without organic binder. This approach allows to eliminate the effects of laser pulse energy and the material laser absorption. Afterwards, the emission spectra were compared to separate different techniques. The organic binding media has been separated based on the relative emission intensity of the present CN or C2 rovibrational emissions. In order to test the capability of separating or identifying, the chemometric approach (PCA) was applied to the different matrix. The different solutions in term of wavelength range to optimise the identification was investigated. We focused on the evaluation for the laser wavelength to insure a better separation. The different capacity was interpreted by differentiating the binders by the altered interaction mechanisms between the laser photon and the binders. Also, the electron temperature in the plasma was estimated, which provided the evidences to our findings.

  11. Virtuous colours for Mary. Identification of lapis lazuli, smalt and cochineal in the Andean colonial image of Our Lady of Copacabana (Bolivia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasini, Eugenia P.; Marte, Fernando; Careaga, Valeria P.; Landa, Carlos Rúa; Siracusano, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The image of Our Lady of Copacabana, a gilded polychrome sculpture carved in maguey wood in 1583, is one of the most important devotions in the Americas. In former research, we have identified the use of gypsum, Armenian bole, cerussite and atacamite in its polychromy. In this study, a red sample taken from the Virgin's tunic and a blue sample extracted from the cloak have been analysed with the aim to identify both pigments and offer insights into the painting technique. Analysis by micro-Raman spectroscopy complemented with scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography allowed the identification of carmine lake in the red sample. Analysis by micro-Raman spectroscopy of the surface of the blue sample and its cross section showed the presence of smalt—the blue-glass pigment—over a cerussite layer, bathed by a very thin ultramarine layer—from a probable native origin—following a pictorial tradition that would last even until the eighteenth century. This is the first time that lapis lazuli has been scientifically identified in a Spanish American colonial painted layer. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology’. PMID:27799431

  12. Elemental labeling for the identification of proteinaceous-binding media in art works by ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crotti, S.; Granzotto, C.; Cairns, W. R.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the history of art, artists have used many different organic compounds to dissolve pigments and apply them onto a support to obtain a paint layer. Proteins were used with success from the Middle Ages up to the Renaissance, and the traditional protein sources were animal parts (skins, tendons...

  13. Order-fractal transitions in abstract paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, E.M. de la, E-mail: elsama79@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cervantes, F. [Department of Applied Physics, CINVESTAV-IPN, Carr. Antigua a Progreso km.6, Cordemex, C.P.97310, Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Calleja, J. de la [Department of Informatics, Universidad Politécnica de Puebla, 72640 (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we determined the degree of order for 22 Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch fractal dimension. Based on the maximum value of each multi-fractal spectrum, the artworks were classified according to the year in which they were painted. It has been reported that Pollock’s paintings are fractal and that this feature was more evident in his later works. However, our results show that the fractal dimension of these paintings ranges among values close to two. We characterize this behavior as a fractal-order transition. Based on the study of disorder-order transition in physical systems, we interpreted the fractal-order transition via the dark paint strokes in Pollock’s paintings as structured lines that follow a power law measured by the fractal dimension. We determined self-similarity in specific paintings, thereby demonstrating an important dependence on the scale of observations. We also characterized the fractal spectrum for the painting entitled Teri’s Find. We obtained similar spectra for Teri’s Find and Number 5, thereby suggesting that the fractal dimension cannot be rejected completely as a quantitative parameter for authenticating these artworks. -- Highlights: •We determined the degree of order in Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch dimension. •We detected a fractal-order transition from Pollock’s paintings between 1947 and 1951. •We suggest that Jackson Pollock could have painted Teri’s Find.

  14. Nondestructive multispectral reflectoscopy between 800 and 1900 nm: An instrument for the investigation of the stratigraphy in paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, G; Salpistis, Chr; Sergiadis, G; Chryssoulakis, Y

    2007-06-01

    In the present work, a powerful tool for the investigation of paintings is presented. This permits the tuneable multispectral real time imaging between 200 and 5000 nm and the simultaneous multispectral acquisition of spectroscopic data from the same region. We propose the term infrared reflectoscopy for tuneable infrared imaging in paintings (Chryssonlakis and Chassery, The Application of Physicochemical Methods of Analysis and Image Processing Techniques to Painted Works of Art, Erasmus Project ICP-88-006-6, Athens, June, 1989) for a technique that is effective especially when the spectroscopic data acquisition is performed between 800 and 1900 nm. Elements such as underdrawings, old damage that is not visible to the naked eye, later interventions or overpaintings, hidden signatures, nonvisible inscriptions, and authenticity features can thus be detected with the overlying paint layers becoming successively "transparent" due to the deep infrared penetration. The spectroscopic data are collected from each point of the studied area with a 5 nm step through grey level measurement, after adequate infrared reflectance (%R) and curve calibration. The detection limits of the infrared detector as well as the power distribution of the radiation coming out through the micrometer slit assembly of the monochromator in use are also taken into account. Inorganic pigments can thus be identified and their physicochemical properties directly compared to the corresponding infrared images at each wavelength within the optimum region. In order to check its effectiveness, this method was applied on an experimental portable icon of a known stratigraphy.

  15. Accelerated bridge paint test program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    The accelerated bridge paint (AB-Paint) program evaluated a new Sherwin-Williams two-coat, : fast-curing paint system. The system is comprised of an organic zinc-rich primer (SW Corothane I : Galvapac One-Pack Zinc-Rich Primer B65 G11) and a polyurea...

  16. X-ray fluorescence in Member States (Italy): Portable EDXRF in a multi-technique approach for the analyses of large paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridolfi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) with its portable capability, generally characterized by a small Xray tube and a Si-PIN or Si-drift detector, is particularly useful to analyze works of art. The main aspect that characterizes the EDXRF technique is its non-invasive character. This characteristic that makes the technique so powerful and appealing is on the other hand the main source of uncertainty in XRF measurements on Cultural Heritage. This problem is even more evident when we analyze paintings because of their intrinsic stratigraphic essence. As a matter of fact a painting is made of several layers: the support, which can be mainly of wood, canvas, paper; the preparation layer, mainly gypsums, white lead or ochre; pigment layers and at the end the protective varnish layer. The penetrating power of X rays allows that most of the times the information of all the layers reaches the detector. Most of the information that is in the spectrum arrives from deep layers of which we have no clue. In order to better understand this concept, let us use the equation of A. Markowicz. in which the various uncertainties that influence the analyses with portable EDXRF are reported. Let us adjust this equation for non invasive portable EDXRF analysis. The second, the third and the fourth term do not exist, for obvious reasons. Only the first and the last term influence the total uncertainty of an EDXRF analysis. The ways to reduce the influence of the fifth term is known by any scientist: good stability of the system, long measuring time, correct standard samples, good energy resolution etc. But what about the first term when we are executing a non invasive analysis? An example that shows the influence of the sample representation in the increasing of the uncertainty of a XRF analysis is the case in which we are asked to determine the original pigments used in a painting. If we have no clue of where restoration areas are dislocated on the painting, the probability of

  17. Structuralist readings: Painting vs. picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinkov-Pavlović Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to point to two fundamentally different strategies of painting practice, that is, to two subsystems of painting: picture and painting. This differentiation can be made within the framework of semiotic and semiological analyses which have developed in theory under the influence of structuralism. The first part of the paper offers a basic insight into the linguistic foundation of structuralistic concept, and then sets a thesis about the possibility of analogue reconceptualisation of semiotics/semiology of painting through Julia Kristeva's semiotics and Roland Barthes' semiology. In addition, it points to the concrete concepts of structural analysis which have accentuated the opposition picture-painting with the examples of art practice concurrent to the development of structuralism. However, what is revealed is that various structuralist readings are significantly subjective to unstable relationship between the basic elements in the pictorial object, that is, in the work of painting.

  18. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  19. Identification of the neural correlates of cyclothymic temperament using an esthetic judgment for paintings task in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Yoshinori; Terao, Takeshi; Hatano, Koji; Kodama, Kensuke; Kohno, Kentaro; Makino, Mayu; Hoaki, Nobuhiko; Araki, Yasuo; Izumi, Toshihiko; Shimomura, Tsuyoshi; Fujiki, Minoru; Kochiyama, Takanori

    2014-12-01

    There is a well-known association between artistic creativity and cyclothymic temperament but the neural correlates of cyclothymic temperament have not yet been fully identified. Recently, we showed that the left lingual gyrus and bilateral cuneus may be associated with esthetic judgment of representational paintings, we therefore sought to investigate brain activity during esthetic judgment of paintings in relation to measures of cyclothymic temperament. Regions of interest (ROI) were set at the left lingual gyrus and bilateral cuneus using automated anatomical labeling, and percent signal changes of the ROIs were measured by marsbar toolbox. The associations between percent signal changes of the ROIs during esthetic judgments of paintings and cyclothymic temperament scores were investigated by Pearson׳s coefficient. Moreover, the associations were further analyzed using multiple regression analysis whereby cyclothymic temperament scores were a dependent factor and percent signal changes of the 3 ROIs and the other 4 temperament scores were independent factors. There was a significantly negative association of cyclothymic temperament scores with the percent signal changes of the left lingual gyrus during esthetic judgments of paintings, but not with those of bilateral cuneus. Even after adjustment using multiple regression analysis, this finding remained unchanged. The number of subjects was relatively small and the task was limited to appreciation of paintings. The present findings suggest that cyclothymic temperament may be associated with the left lingual gyrus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  1. [Application of stereoscopy on edible birds nest identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie-Ru; Zhou, Hua; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2006-03-01

    To study the feasibility of using stereoscopy in identification on Edible Bird's Nest (EBN). Characteristics of white EBN pieces, red EBN, white fungus pieces and EBN painted with colloid were observed under stereoscopy. EBN pieces could be distinguished from white fungus pieces under stereoscope. The former is semitransparent and has more fine cracks; the latter is opaque and without fine cracks. EBN painted with colloid can be distinguished under stereoscopy too. The characteristics include: (1) the surface lines were not clear; (2) feathers were plastered on the surface. Stereoscopy can be used in identification of EBN, especially in general investigation of commercials.

  2. Copper storage in the liver of the wild mute swan (Cygnus olor). Its possible relation to pollution of harbor waters by antifouling paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, J J

    1983-12-01

    Postmortem examination of three wild mute swans (Cygnus olor) from a harbor area disclosed an unusual black discoloration of the liver. Chemical, histochemical, and microscopic studies, along with electron-probe microanalysis, showed that cytoplasmic pigment granules in the liver cells contained a copper-protein complex. Similar findings have been reported in Danish and English studies on large numbers of wild mute swans. Two control mute swans from The Bronx Zoo had negligible amounts of hepatic copper. The striking difference between the wild and the captive swans in hepatic copper content suggests that the copper in the wild swans was of environmental origin, most likely from copper-rich antifouling paint used extensively in the marine industry. Flakes of this paint may be ingested by swans searching for food in the sediment of harbor waters.

  3. Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence analysis of pigments on medieval and Renaissance Italian manuscript cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Lucia; Clark, Robin J H; Hark, Richard R

    2010-03-30

    Italian medieval and Renaissance manuscript cuttings and miniatures from the Victoria and Albert Museum were analyzed by Raman microscopy to compile a database of pigments used in different periods and different Italian regions. The palette identified in most manuscripts and cuttings was found to include lead white, gypsum, azurite, lazurite, indigo, malachite, vermilion, red lead, lead tin yellow (I), goethite, carbon, and iron gall ink. A few of the miniatures, such as the historiated capital "M" painted by Gerolamo da Cremona and the Petrarca manuscript by Bartolomeo Sanvito, are of exceptional quality and were analyzed extensively; some contained unusual materials. The widespread usage of iron oxides such as goethite and hematite as minor components of mixtures with azurite is particularly notable. The use of a needle-shaped form of iron gall ink as a pigment rather than a writing material was established by both Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the Madonna and Child by Franco de' Russi.

  4. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  5. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm 2 to 1 mJ/cm 2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  6. Methylisothiazolinone and benzisothiazolinone are widely used in paint: a multicentre study of paints from five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Lundov, Michael; Bossi, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    were found in paints from all five countries. Paints purchased in Denmark and Sweden contained especially high concentrations of BIT. CONCLUSION: The use of MI across European countries is extensive. In view of the ongoing epidemic of MI contact allergy, an evaluation of the safety of MI in paints......BACKGROUND: In view of the current epidemic of contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone (MI), it is important to clarify the extent of use of MI and related isothiazolinones in paints currently available for the consumer and worker in Europe. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the use and concentrations...... of MI, methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI) and benzisothiazolinone (BIT) in paints on the European retail market. METHODS: Wall paints (n = 71) were randomly purchased in retail outlets in five European countries. The paints were quantitatively analysed for their contents of MI, MCI and BIT by high...

  7. Chromatographic analysis of natural pigments L. and quercus infectoria oliv: produced from datisca cannabina plants and their antimicrobial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveoglu, O.; Muhammed, A.; Fouad, A.; Torgan, E.; Karadag, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, natural pigments from the hemp (Datisca cannabina L.) and dyer's oak ). 12H/sub 2/O (alum) mordant. A (Quercus infectoria Oliv.) dye plants were prepared by using KAl(SO/sub 4)/sub 2/ reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD) method was used in the identification of dyes in the natural pigments. The dye extractions from the natural pigments were carried out with 37% HCl/MeOH/H/sub 2/O (2:1:1 v/v/v) mixture. Also, antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of plants and pigments were investigated. (author)

  8. Non-destructive in situ study of “Mad Meg” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, Lien, E-mail: lien.vandevoorde@ugent.be [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Pevenage, Jolien [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Raman Spectroscopy Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); De Langhe, Kaat [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Archaeometry Research Group, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Archaeometry Research Group, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Martens, Maximiliaan P.J. [Ghent University, Department of Art, Music and Theatre Sciences, Blandijnberg 2, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    “Mad Meg”, a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO{sub 2} + 15% K{sub 2}O + 10% CoO + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel. - Highlights: • In situ, non-destructive investigation of a famous painting by Pieter Bruegel. • Use of a new, commercial available, portable XRF/XRD instrumentation. • Multi-methodological approach: make also use of a mobile Raman spectrometer. • Used pigments and different preparation layers of the painting are characterized. • The verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses are performed.

  9. Non-destructive in situ study of “Mad Meg” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Van Pevenage, Jolien; De Langhe, Kaat; De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vandenabeele, Peter; Martens, Maximiliaan P.J.

    2014-01-01

    “Mad Meg”, a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO 2 + 15% K 2 O + 10% CoO + 5% Al 2 O 3 ) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel. - Highlights: • In situ, non-destructive investigation of a famous painting by Pieter Bruegel. • Use of a new, commercial available, portable XRF/XRD instrumentation. • Multi-methodological approach: make also use of a mobile Raman spectrometer. • Used pigments and different preparation layers of the painting are characterized. • The verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses are performed

  10. Historical origins of Petrykivsky decorative painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Harkava

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Petrykivsky decorative painting is a part of Ukrainian folk art. Domestic science of folk art has originated and has been developing primarily as a study of archaeological antiquities and artistic monuments of the past. Scientific papers, which comprehended the process of folk art development, began to appear in the late nineteenth century, Archaeological Congresses became the impetus for their appearance. Being a representative of the decorative painting, Petrikivsky decorative painting is rooted by its murals to Tripoli. It was created as a peasant domestic drawing. Inexhaustible diversity of local variants of Petrikivsky decorative painting, its evolutionary change, the individual characteristics of paintings of hundreds of famous Ukrainian artists do not even allow comparing it to any other European counterparts, each of which is characterized only by some individual techniques. Petrikivsky decorative painting got the significant boost in its distribution and development when it «came down» from walls to paper. Paper pictures - malyovky - were stucked to walls following the traditional rules of domestic interior’s decoration. Petrikivsky decorative painting got the official status in 1913, when E. Evenbah, by the initiative of D.I. Yavornytsky, gathered the collection of Petrikivsky decorative painting’s malyovkas and organized the exhibition in St. Petersburg. Motives of painting are rooted into the local flora and fauna and into the historical tradition. However, Petrikivsky decorative painting is not a direct reflection of natural motifs. World, created in paintings, is the product of the imagination of folk artist, it is the stylization of local flowers, fruits and birds. First names of Masters of Petrikivsky decorative painting, which appeared in historical sources, were T. Pata, N. Bilokin, I. Pavlenko. Their official recognition happened in 1930 after their participation in the first republican exhibition, which was later shown

  11. Radiation safety in radioluminous paint workshop handling tritium activated paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, P.K.; Venkateswaran, T.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the safety features related to a workshop when tritium activated luminous paint is handled by workmen. Salient features of the workshop and the methods employed for monitoring the radiation levels are briefly outlined and results are discussed. The importance of proper ventilation of the workplace and precautions to be taken in the storage of painted articles are highlighted. (author). 1 table, 3 figs

  12. Experimental study of canvas characterization for paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Bruno; Dooms, Ann; Munteanu, Adrian; Cornelis, Jan; Schelkens, Peter

    2010-02-01

    The work described here fits in the context of a larger project on the objective and relevant characterization of paintings and painting canvas through the analysis of multimodal digital images. We captured, amongst others, X-ray images of different canvas types, characterized by a variety of textures and weave patterns (fine and rougher texture; single thread and multiple threads per weave), including raw canvas as well as canvas processed with different primers. In this paper, we study how to characterize the canvas by extracting global features such as average thread width, average distance between successive threads (i.e. thread density) and the spatial distribution of primers. These features are then used to construct a generic model of the canvas structure. Secondly, we investigate whether we can identify different pieces of canvas coming from the same bolt. This is an important element for dating, authentication and identification of restorations. Both the global characteristics mentioned earlier and some local properties (such as deviations from the average pattern model) are used to compare the "fingerprint" of different pieces of cloth coming from the same or different bolts.

  13. A definitive analytical spectroscopic study of Indian yellow, an ancient pigment used for dating purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Dalva L A; Edwards, Howell G M; Careaga, Valeria; Walt, Nicholas; Maier, Marta S

    2017-02-01

    The Raman spectrum of tartrazine has been mistakenly reported as being that of Indian yellow in the literature, which has serious consequences for the identification of this pigment in art works regarding their authentication. Unlike tartrazine, Indian yellow (a natural mixture of the magnesium and calcium salts of euxanthic acid) exhibits in its Raman spectrum a strong fluorescent background when visible excitation is used, however, excitation in the near infrared (1064nm) permitted the observation of the Raman bands from the raw pigment with the main features placed at 1346, 1368, 1425, 1441 and 1626cm -1 . Indian yellow identification was assured by 1 H and 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance characterization and the complete assignment of the proton and carbon resonances was accomplished using heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC), heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC), nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and 1 H- 1 H correlation spectroscopy (COSY). Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzes were also conducted on a genuine sample of this historical pigment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dense pigmentation of the posterior lens capsule associated with the pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Danny Y; Volpicelli, Mark; Singh, Kuldev

    2003-12-01

    To report an unusual case of pigment dispersion syndrome associated with unilateral dense pigmentation of the posterior lens capsule. Case report. A 59-year-old male with bilateral pigment dispersion syndrome presented with progressive decrease in visual acuity in the left eye over the past 10 to 20 years. Clinical examination revealed the typical findings of pigment dispersion syndrome including the presence of bilateral Krunkenberg spindles, iris transillumination defects, and heavy trabecular meshwork pigmentation. Of note, there was remarkably dense pigmentation of the posterior lens capsule in the eye with decreased visual acuity. Pigmentation of the posterior lens capsule may be a rare finding associated with pigment dispersion syndrome. Such a finding suggests that there may be aqueous flow into the retrolental space in some patients with this condition. The optimal treatment of this unusual condition remains undetermined.

  15. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, P. V.; Roy, Rajdeep; Gauns, Mangesh; Shenoy, D. M.; Rao, V. D.; Mochemadkar, S.

    2011-12-01

    An unusual phytoplankton bloom dominated by unidentified green coloured spherical algal cells (˜5μm diameter) and dinoflagellates ( Heterocapsa, Scripsiella and Gymnodinium) was encountered along the coast of Goa, India during 27 and 29 January, 2005. Pigment analysis was carried out using both fluorometric and HPLC methods. Seawater samples collected from various depths within the intense bloom area showed high concentrations of Chl a (up to 106 mg m - 3) associated with low bacterial production (0.31 to 0.52 mg C m - 3 h - 1) and mesozooplankton biomass (0.03 ml m - 3). Pigment analyses of the seawater samples were done using HPLC detected marker pigments corresponding to prasinophytes, dinoflagellates and diatoms. Chlorophyll b (36-56%) followed by peridinin (15-30%), prasinoxanthin (11-17%) and fucoxanthin (7-15%) were the major diagnostic pigments while pigments of cryptophytes and cyanobacteria including alloxanthin and zeaxanthin formed <10%. Although microscopic analysis indicated a decline in the bloom, pheaophytin concentrations in the water column measured by both techniques were very low, presumably due to fast recycling and/or settling rate. The unique composition of the bloom and its probable causes are discussed in this paper.

  16. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM-EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  17. Accompanying of parameters of color, gloss and hardness on polymeric films coated with pigmented inks cured by different radiation doses of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves Bardi, Marcelo Augusto; Brocardo Machado, Luci Diva

    2012-01-01

    In the search for alternatives to traditional paint systems solvent-based, the curing process of polymer coatings by ultraviolet light (UV) has been widely studied and discussed, especially because of their high content of solids and null emission of VOC. In UV-curing technology, organic solvents are replaced by reactive diluents, such as monomers. This paper aims to investigate variations on color, gloss and hardness of print inks cured by different UV radiation doses. The ratio pigment/clear coating was kept constant. The clear coating presented higher average values for König hardness than pigmented ones, indicating that UV-light absorption has been reduced by the presence of pigments. Besides, they have indicated a slight variation in function of cure degree for the studied radiation doses range. The gloss loss related to UV light exposition allows inferring that some degradation occurred at the surface of print ink films. - Highlights: ► Color, gloss and hardness are directly influenced by the different pigments. ► Clear coating analysis indicates reduction on UV-light absorption. ► Color and gloss indices indicated aeration in function of cure degree.

  18. Synthesis of fly ash based core-shell composites for use as functional pigment in paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash is a combustion residue, mainly composed of silica, alumina and iron oxides. It is produced by the power industries in very large amounts and usually disposed in landfills, which have represented an environmental problem in recent years1. The need to generate a market for fly ash consumption is the main reason why alternative applications have been studied. It has been applied as an additive in construction materials like cement and pavements2. The present work describes the synthesis of Flyash-Titania core-shell particles by precipitation technique using Titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP) which can be used for variety of applications such as NIR reflecting materials for cool coatings, Photocatalysis etc. In this work, Fly ash is used in core and Nano -TiO2 is coated as shell on it. Surfactants are used to improve the adhesion of Nano Titania shell on fly ash core. Effect on adhesion of TiO2 on Fly ash is studied by using different types of surfactant. The preparation of core shells was carried out in absence of surfactant as well as using anionic and non-ionic surfactants. The percentage of surfactant was varied to study the effect of amount of surfactant on the uniformity and size of particles in the shell using Kubelka-Munk transformed reflectance spectra. The morphology of core shell structures was studied using SEM technique. Use of anionic surfactant results in more uniform coating with reduced particle size of the shell material. The composite particles prepared by using anionic surfactant are having good pigment properties and also shows good reflectance in Near Infrared region and hence can be used as a pigment in cool coatings.

  19. Study of laser - matter interaction applied to the decontamination of paints; Etude de l'interaction laser - matiere appliquee a la decontamination de peintures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brygo, F

    2005-12-15

    In nuclear industry, the paint layer on the walls must be removed during dismantling or maintenance operation. Laser ablation of the paint layer allows to reduce the generated waste volume, compared to the current techniques. Paints consist of a polymeric base in which fillers and pigments are included. The energy deposition of the laser beam in this scattering medium is studied using a multiple scattering model, and measurements of reflection / transmission of beam through thin layers. The paint ablation is studied with several Nd: YAG lasers and a TEA-CO{sub 2} laser, allowing to modify the fluence, the wavelength, the pulse duration, the repetition rate and the number of shots. Optical benches were carried out, and the parametric tests allow to define the optimal ablation parameters, in term of ablation efficiency. Ablation at high repetition rate is studied using an optical pyrometer and a specifically developed thermal model. Measurements and modelling highlight the heat accumulation that appears at high repetition rate. This accumulation allows to reduce the ablation threshold fluence and to increase the ablation efficiency. Analyses of the interaction and ablation regimes are proposed on the basis of the experimental results and models, and allow to optimise the decontamination process. (author)

  20. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations. 35.1320 Section 35.1320 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT...

  1. 75 FR 6383 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting, and Pre-Renovation Education Activities in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ..., Repair and Painting, and Pre- Renovation Education Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied....C. 2682(c)(3), and a lead-based paint pre-renovation education program in accordance with section... TSCA, and a lead-based paint pre-renovation education program in accordance with section 406(b) of TSCA...

  2. Preference for and discrimination of paintings by mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Watanabe

    Full Text Available I measured preference for paintings (Renoir vs. Picasso or Kandinsky vs. Mondrian in mice. In general mice did not display a painting preference except for two mice: one preferred Renoir to Picasso, and the other preferred Kandinsky to Mondrian. Thereafter, I examined discrimination of paintings with new mice. When exposure to paintings of one artist was associated with an injection of morphine (3.0 mg/kg, mice displayed conditioned preference for those paintings, showing discrimination of paintings by Renoir from those by Picasso, and paintings by Kandinsky from those by Mondrian after the conditioning. They also exhibited generalization of the preference to novel paintings of the artists. After conditioning with morphine for a set of paintings consisting of two artists, mice showed discrimination between two sets of paintings also from the two artists but not in association with morphine. These results suggest that mice can discriminate not only between an artist's style but also among paintings of the same artist. When mice were trained to discriminate a pair of paintings by Kandinsky and Renoir in an operant chamber equipped with a touch screen, they showed transfer of the discrimination to new pairs of the artists, but did not show transfer of discrimination of paintings by other artists, suggesting generalization.

  3. PAINT SUPPLIES AND LOCATION: EXAMINING ICI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available How important is location to an international retailer? Not just any retailer but the second largest paint retailer in the world. Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI was a British chemical company and was at one stage the largest manufacturer in Britain. Formed from the merger of several leading British chemical companies in 1926, ICI makes paints and speciality products, including food ingredients, speciality polymers, electronic materials, fragrances and flavourings. ICI paints purchased the Cleveland Ohiobased Glidden Coatings & Resins (Glidden Paint Company in 1986 for USD$580 million. The addition of Glidden to ICI's North American operations more than doubled that subsidiary's annual sales to $3 billion and increased ICI's corporate presence in the United States dramatically. A decline in paint and solvent consumption during the 2000 decade slowed the average growth of the paint industry to about 2% annually. Rauch Associates, the leading US paint analyst firm, predicted near-term growth to slow even further to 1.2% per annum. Through the 1990’s and early 2000’s Glidden paint was sold only through Glidden-badged paint stores and smaller retailers under licence, developing a strong identifiable brand and reputation. How were potential Glidden retail paint store locations chosen across America to enable and support this market growth? This paper investigates the real process that was developed and applied to construct a national network of retail outlets across the United States. It also highlights the change in direction that occurred at ICI paints culminating in its eventual acquisition by AkzoNobel in 2008 who immediately sold parts of ICI to Henkel, and integrated ICI's remaining operations within its existing organisation. This sale and the associated corporate restructure caused considerable change in marketing directions allowing for the first time the selling of Glidden paint products to mass market centres

  4. Evaluation of the capacity of Raman Microscopy in the mineralogical and physico-chemical characterization of archaeological material: corroded metals, stained-glass and pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard-Abouchacra, Michel

    2001-01-01

    This study is based on the evaluation of the capacity of non-destructive physico-chemical analysis by Raman Microscopy in three artistic and archaeological domains: metal corrosion, stained-glass and Prehistoric pigments. The study presents different levels of results depending on the field of application. In relation to Prehistoric pigments the results show clearly the capacity of distinguishing in black pigments, manganese oxide from amorphous carbon, or, the facility of identification of hematite in red pigments. Concerning the study of the corrosion products of metals, RM is indubitably an ideal technique for the identification and differentiation of the diverse alteration products observed on archaeological metallic material (sulphates, chlorides, oxides...). Finally, in the case of stained-glass, the positive results obtained in the study of the glass itself or in the study of the superficial coloration is counterbalanced by the complexity of identification of glass coloration due to metallic colloid particles, or by the fluorescent problem particularly important in this last application. However, the global result is clearly optimistic and demonstrate the utility of such a non-destructive technique for archaeologists, restorers or conservators. (author) [fr

  5. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques applied to the noninvasive investigation of mural paintings: a feasibility study carried out on a wall painting by Beato Angelico in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucci, Costanza; Picollo, Marcello; Chiarantini, Leandro; Sereni, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays hyperspectral imaging is a well-established methodology for the non-invasive diagnostics of polychrome surfaces, and is increasingly utilized in museums and conservation laboratories for documentation purposes and in support of restoration procedures. However, so far the applications of hyperspectral imaging have been mainly limited to easel paintings or paper-based artifacts. Indeed, specifically designed hyperspectral imagers, are usually used for applications in museum context. These devices work at short-distances from the targets and cover limited size surfaces. Instead, almost still unexplored remain the applications of hyperspectral imaging to the investigations of frescoes and large size mural paintings. For this type of artworks a remote sensing approach, based on sensors capable of acquiring hyperspectral data from distances of the order of tens of meters, is needed. This paper illustrates an application of hyperspectral remote sensing to an important wall-painting by Beato Angelico, located in the San Marco Museum in Florence. Measurements were carried out using a re-adapted version of the Galileo Avionica Multisensor Hyperspectral System (SIM-GA), an avionic hyperspectral imager originally designed for applications from mobile platforms. This system operates in the 400-2500 nm range with over 700 channels, thus guaranteeing acquisition of high resolution hyperspectral data exploitable for materials identification and mapping. In the present application, the SIM-GA device was mounted on a static scanning platform for ground-based applications. The preliminary results obtained on the Angelico's wall-painting are discussed, with highlights on the main technical issues addressed to optimize the SIM-GA system for new applications on cultural assets.

  6. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  7. 40 CFR 63.11607 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., pigments, solvents, and/or other additives. Paints and allied products manufacturing means the production... on the substrate, such as thinners, paint removers, brush cleaners, and mold release agents; (2) The..., pigments, and solvents used in the production of paints and coatings; and (4) Activities by end users of...

  8. Microstructural characterization of material used as supporter in pre hispanic paints; Caracterizacion microestructural de material utilizado como soporte en pinturas prehispanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva V, Y. [FIME-UANL, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Zorrilla, C.; Canetas, J.; Hernandez, R.; Aguilar F, M.; Arenas A, J. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, G. [INAH, 04000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work is to show the characterization of pre hispanic paintings mainly of the materials that support the pigments. The samples come from three different archaeological sites, Palenque-Chiapas (two specimens), Teotihuacan-Estado de Mexico (one specimen) and Mitla-Oaxaca (one specimen); Mayan, Teotihuacan and Mixtec-Zapotec culture respectively. The samples were analyzed by Sem, EDS, Tem, XRD and IR. The results show calcite as common phase for all the samples, however exist other phases identified depending on the site as dolomite, ankerite, calcium silicon chloride, etc. The origin of the red color of the analyzed pigments were cinnabar (HgS) by a sample of Palenque and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by the other specimen, this last crystalline phase also present in the Mitla and Teotihuacan samples. By IR were identified some organic compounds in all the samples, but not copal. (Author)

  9. In situ non-invasive EDXRF analysis to reconstruct stratigraphy and thickness of Renaissance pictorial multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonizzoni, L.; Poldi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Galli, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a few examples showing how energy dispersive XRF analysis (EDXRF) coupled with visible reflectance spectroscopy (vis-RS) can be successfully applied for the investigation of wood or canvas paintings by performing stratigraphic analyses with non-invasive techniques. The specific aim is to reconstruct layers and their thicknesses. The method has been tested in the laboratory on paint layers similar to traditional Renaissance ones. In situ analyses of a famous wood painting by Andrea Mantegna - 'Madonna col bambino e un coro di cherubini', Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan - were also carried out. While illustrating the results concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of layer stratigraphy, advantages and limitation of this method are pointed out. (authors)

  10. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  11. The colors of paintings and viewers' preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Linhares, João M M; Montagner, Cristina; João, Catarina A R; Amano, Kinjiro; Alfaro, Catarina; Bailão, Ana

    2017-01-01

    One hypothesis to explain the aesthetics of paintings is that it depends on the extent to which they mimic natural image statistics. In fact, paintings and natural scenes share several statistical image regularities but the colors of paintings seem generally more biased towards red than natural scenes. Is the particular option for colors in each painting, even if less naturalistic, critical for perceived beauty? Here we show that it is. In the experiments, 50 naïve observers, unfamiliar with the 10 paintings tested, could rotate the color gamut of the paintings and select the one producing the best subjective impression. The distributions of angles obtained are described by normal distributions with maxima deviating, on average, only 7 degrees from the original gamut orientation and full width at half maximum just above the threshold to perceive a chromatic change in the paintings. Crucially, for data pooled across observers and abstract paintings the maximum of the distribution was at zero degrees, i.e., the same as the original. This demonstrates that artists know what chromatic compositions match viewers' preferences and that the option for less naturalistic colors does not constrain the aesthetic value of paintings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoscale investigation of the degradation mechanism of a historical chrome yellow paint by quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping of chromium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Haiyan; Tian, He; Verbeeck, Jo; Monico, Letizia; Janssens, Koen; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2013-10-18

    Getting the picture: The investigation of 100 year old chrome yellow paint by transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy has led to the identification of four types of core-shell particles. This nanoscale investigation has allowed a mechanism to be proposed for the darkening of some bright yellow colors in Van Gogh's paintings (e.g. in Falling leaves (Les Alyscamps), 1888). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structuralist readings: Painting vs. picture

    OpenAIRE

    Marinkov-Pavlović Lidija

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to point to two fundamentally different strategies of painting practice, that is, to two subsystems of painting: picture and painting. This differentiation can be made within the framework of semiotic and semiological analyses which have developed in theory under the influence of structuralism. The first part of the paper offers a basic insight into the linguistic foundation of structuralistic concept, and then sets a thesis about the possibility of analogue reconceptu...

  14. Lead content in household paints in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhay; Gottesfeld, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Lead and its compounds are used in paints not only to impart colour but also to make it durable, corrosion resistant and to improve drying. Adverse health impacts of lead especially on children have led countries to restrict or ban its use in paints. While U.S. and other developed countries instituted measures to limit the use of lead in paints, some developing countries including India have failed to regulate their lead content. The present study was undertaken to determine the levels of lead in new latex (water-based) and enamel paints (oil-based) intended for residential use in India. A total of 69 paint samples (38 latex and 31 enamel samples) from six of the most popular brands were analysed for lead concentrations. While all latex paint samples contained low levels of lead, (i.e., well below 600 ppm as regulated by United States' Consumer Products Safety Commission) the enamel paint samples of all but one brand contained significant concentrations of lead, ranging up to 140,000 ppm. In fact 84% of the enamel paints tested exceeded 600 ppm whereas only 38 % of all samples (including latex and enamel types) exceeded this regulatory level

  15. Ecological-friendly pigments from fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Teixeira, Maria F S; De Conti, Roseli; Esposito, Elisa

    2002-01-01

    The dyestuff industry is suffering from the increases in costs of feedstock and energy for dye synthesis, and they are under increasing pressure to minimize the damage to the environment. The industries are continuously looking for cheaper, more environmentally friendly routes to existing dyes. The aim of this minireview is to discuss the most important advances in the fungal pigment area and its interest in biotechnological applications. Characteristic pigments are produced by a wide variety of fungi and the chemical composition of natural dyes are described. These pigments exhibit several biological activities besides cytotoxicity. The synthetic pigments authorized by the EC and in USA and the natural pigments available in the world market are discussed. The obstacle to the exploitation of new natural pigments sources is the food legislation, requesting costly toxicological research, manufacturing costs, and acceptance by consumers. The dislike for novel ingredients is likely to be the biggest impediment for expansion of the pigment list in the near future. If the necessary toxicological testing and the comparison with accepted pigments are made, the fungal pigments, could be acceptable by the current consumer. The potentiality of pigment production in Brazil is possible due to tremendous Amazonian region biodiversity.

  16. Effect of analytical proton beam irradiation on lead-white pigments, characterized by EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Gonzalez, Victor; Vezin, Hervé; Touati, Nadia; Calligaro, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Analytical techniques using proton beams with energy in the MeV range are commonly used to study archeological artefact and artistic objects. However ion beams can induce alteration of fragile materials, which is notably the case of easel paintings, limiting the use of these techniques. We used continuous wave EPR and pulse EPR spectroscopy to reveal the effect of 3 MeV proton irradiation on lead carbonates, which were extensively employed as white pigments from the antiquity to the 20th century. Two kinds of paramagnetic centers were identified in cerussite (PbCO3): the first one is CO3- radicals formed by hole trapping by CO32- ions, and the second one is NO32- radical resulting from electron trapping by NO3- impurities. Hydrocerussite (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2) is the most darkened material under proton beam, however it exhibits no NO32- radicals and 20 times less CO3- radicals than cerussite. Consequently these paramagnetic centers are not directly responsible for the darkening of lead-white pigments. We proposed that their higher instability in hydrocerussite might be at the origin of the formation of color centers in this material.

  17. Preparation of water paint by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo

    1984-01-01

    The development of coatings which do not require any organic solvent have been the social needs. The emulsion made by radiation method is considered to meet possibly this requirement, but it has not been utilized well in the application to water paint. In this review, the investigation concerning the synthesis of water paint raw material by radiation is summarized. In the introduction, radiation curing, water paint and radiation emulsion polymerization are outlined, in the section of γ-ray emulsion polymerization, clean emulsion, cross-linked polymer particles and low temperature polymerization are described, and in the section of paint characteristics of radiation-induced emulsion-polymerized emulsion, the synthesis of thermosetting emulsion, the relation between the method of polymerization and the properties of emulsion, the performance of coating film, and self-hardening emulsion are explained. In the following section of skin-core double layer structured particle emulsion, skin-core double layer structured particles, optimal monomer composition, optimal polymerization process, the manufacturing test with a pilot plant, the performance of the paint, the durability of skin-core double layer structured particle coating film and low temperature curing water paint are described, and in the section of synthesis of emulsion by utilization of electron beam, electron beam emulsion polymerization and the synthesis of water paint by electron beam graft polymerization are described. (Yoshitake, I.)

  18. Denotative and connotative meanings of paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the relationships between judgments of paintings denotative and connotative meanings was investigated. Denotative domain was defined as motif (represented object, e.g. portrait, landscape etc. and message (information carried by paintings, e.g. celebration of patriotism. Connotative domain was defined as subjective experience, i.e. affective or metaphoric impression produced by painting (e.g. feeling of pleasure, impression of dynamics, and so on. In preliminary study the list of 39 motifs was specified empirically. The four dimensions of pictorial message were taken from the previous study (Marković, 2006: Subjectivism, Ideology, Decoration and Constructivism vs. Realism. The four dimensions of paintings subjective experience were taken from the previous study as well (Radonjić and Marković, 2005: Regularity, Attraction, Arousal and Relaxation. In Experiment 1 subjects were asked to associate 39 motifs with 18 paintings. In Experiment 2 subjects were asked to judge 24 paintings on four dimensions of pictorial message. Results form Experiment 1 have shown that dimensions of paintings subjective experience were significantly correlated with only five motifs (e.g. everyday life was negatively correlated with Arousal, battle was negatively correlated with Relaxation, and so on. Results from Experiment 2 have shown that Subjectivism and Constructivism are negatively correlated with Regularity, and positively correlated with Arousal. Decoration is negatively correlated with Arousal and positively with Attraction and Relaxation.

  19. Análise de pinturas rupestres do Abrigo do Janelão (Minas Gerais por microscopia raman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Lúcia A. de Faria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock art paintings from Abrigo do Janelão (Minas Gerais, Brazil were non-destructively investigated by Raman Microscopy, aiming at the identification of materials used, their interaction and degradation. This technique is particularly tailored for heterogeneous samples and allows unequivocal identification of the substances present in the investigated sample. Pigments, were identified together with products of microbiological degradation; no binders were detected. White pigment was identified as calcite (CaCO3, whereas charcoal was used as black, goethite (α-FeOOH as yellow and hematite (α-Fe2O3 as red. Whewellite (CaC2O4.H2O and weddelite (CaC2O4.2H2O were detected and their origin was assigned to degradation products from microbiological activity.

  20. Investigating the effect of artists’ paint formulation on degradation rates of TiO2‑based oil paints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, B.A.; van den Berg, K. J.; Smout, M.; Dekker, N; Kooyman, P.J.; Dik, J.

    2018-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of artists’ paint formulation on degradation rates of TiO2-based oil paints. Titanium white oil paint exists in a multitude of different recipes, and the effect of the formulation on photocatalytic binder
    degradation kinetics is unknown. These formulations

  1. LSST Painting Risk Evaluation Memo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Justin E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-10

    The optics subsystem is required to paint the edges of optics black where possible. Due to the risks in applying the paint LSST requests a review of the impact of removing this requirement for the filters and L3.

  2. Molecular identification of black-pigmented bacteria from subgingival samples of cats suffering from periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Salcedo, L; Laguna, E; Sánchez, M C; Marín, M J; O'Connor, A; González, I; Sanz, M; Herrera, D

    2015-04-01

    To characterise the black-pigmented bacterial species found in the subgingival samples of cats with periodontal disease using molecular-based microbiological techniques. Sixty-five subgingival samples obtained from 50 cats with periodontal disease were analysed by polymerase chain reaction amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Among the 65 subgingival samples, eight phylogenetic profiles were obtained, of which the most prevalent species were: Porphyromonas gulae (40%), P. gingivalis/P. gulae (36 · 9%), P. gulae/Porphyromonas sp. UQD 406 (9 · 2%), Odoribacter denticanis (6 · 2%), P. gulae/Porphyromonas sp. UQD 348 (1 · 5%) and P. circumdentaria (1 · 5%). When compared with the species resulting from biochemical diagnosis, the identification of P. gulae was congruent in 70% of the cases, while colonies identified as P. intermedia-like corresponded in 80% of cases to P. gulae. The use of molecular-based microbiological diagnostic techniques resulted in a predominance of Porphyromonas spp. in the subgingival plaque of cats suffering from periodontal disease. Further characterisation of these bacteria identified P. gulae, O. denticanis and P. circumdentaria. The more frequently detected phylogenetic profiles corresponded to P. gingivalis and P. gulae. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Internal contamination by tritium caused by radioluminescent paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamiak-Ziemba, J.; Doniec, J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal contamination investigations covered 23 persons using radioluminescence paints containing tritium, assembling devices painted with those paints, and those having no contact with active paints but working next to the painting room. Determined were concentrations of tritium excreted with urine, air contamination at workplaces, contamination of workplace areas and hand skin. At the time covered by the investigations, the mean annual equivalent doses for those using tritium paints were reduced from 14-20 mSv to about 5 mSv. In those working next to the painting room they were reduced from 5.8-15 to 0.23 mSv. The exposure of those assembling the devices does not exceed 1 mSv. It was demonstrated that the main cause of the tritium exposure level was air contamination in working rooms.

  4. UV-B affects the immune system and promotes nuclear abnormalities in pigmented and non-pigmented bullfrog tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Fanali, Lara Zácari; De Oliveira, Classius

    2018-03-01

    Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation is a stressor of the immune system and causes DNA damage. Leukocytes can change in response to environmental changes in anurans, making them an important biomarker of stressful situations. The initial barrier against UV in ectothermic animals is melanin-containing cells in skin and in their internal organs. Here, we tested the effects of UV exposure on immune cells and DNA integrity in pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles of Lithobates catesbeianus. We used an inflammation model with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli to test synergic effects of UV and LPS. We tested the following hypotheses: 1) DNA damage caused by UV will be more pronounced in non-pigmented than in pigmented animals; 2) LPS increases leukocytes in both pigmented and non-pigmented animals by systemic inflammation; 3) The combined LPS and UV exposure will decrease the number of leukocytes. We found that the frequency of immune cells differed between pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles. UV exposure increased mast cells and DNA damage in erythrocytes in both pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles, while leukocytes decreased after UV exposure. Non-pigmented tadpoles experienced DNA damage and a lower lymphocyte count earlier than pigmented tadpoles. UV altered immune cells likely as a consequence of local and systemic inflammation. These alterations were less severe in pigmented than in non-pigmented animals. UV and LPS increased internal melanin in pigmented tadpoles, which were correlated with DNA damage and leukocytes. Here, we described for the first time the effects of UV and LPS in immune cells of pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles. In addition, we demonstrated that internal melanin in tadpoles help in these defenses, since leukocyte responses were faster in non-pigmented animals, supporting the hypothesis that melanin is involved in the initial innate immune response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiolytic formation of organic iodides from organic compounds released from ripolin paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, S.; Evans, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of a serious nuclear reactor accident is governed to a large extent by the possible release of airborne organic iodides to the environment. This research examines the identification and behavior of organic iodides formed in the containment due to the release of organic compounds from Ripolin paint, into the aqueous phase, following a nuclear reactor accident. A bench scale apparatus installed in the irradiation chamber of a Gammacell was used to analyze the formation of organic iodides. Iodo-organics, transferred to the gas phase above irradiated aqueous samples, were analyzed using a Thermal Desorption method coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Detailed studies of the identity of the organic compounds released and the organic iodides formed were conducted. The effects of parameters such as irradiation dose were also examined. All the organic iodides formed, under radiolytic conditions, were identified as iodo-alkanes. The organic compounds that were released from the Ripolin paint, such as methyl isobutyl ketone, were found to decompose, by a series of reactions, to produce the organic iodides. The precursor organic compounds and the organic iodides formed were observed to consist of the same alkyl group. These results indicate that organic compounds released from surface paints directly influence the formation of radiolytic organic iodide. (author)

  6. Imaging Multispettrale low-cost con filtri interferenziali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cosentino

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Multispectral imaging systems are used in art examination in order to mapand identify pigments and binders as well as retouches. A monochromaticcamera (CCD or InGaAs is combined with an appropriate wavelength selectionsystem, simple as a set of interferential filters or powerful but expensive asliquid-crystal tunable filters. A variable number of spectral images of a sceneare then acquired and stacked into a reflectance imaging cube to be used toreconstruct reflectance spectra from each of their pixel.This work presents an affordable and simple multispectral imaging systemcomposed of a monochromatic CCD camera and a set of only 12 interferentialfilters. The system was tested on a mock-up painting realized with traditionaland modern pigments and also on a late 1800 authentic oil painting. Thissystem is of particular interest for the cultural heritage sector because of itshardware simplicity, the acquisition speed as well as its lightweight and smalldimensions. It must be pointed out that since its small number of filters, thissystem has limited analytical capacity and it must be used only for the preliminary mapping and identification of the pigments.

  7. Particle size and kind of mica in synthesis of nontoxic bronze and gold pearlescent pigments based on nanoencapsulated hematite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hosseini-Zori

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-encapsulated iron oxide in Zirconium oxide-coated mica pigments are thermally stable,innocuous to human health, non-combustible, and they do not conduct electricity. They could beapplied in several industries such as thermoplastics, cosmetics, food packaging, children toys, paints,automobiles coating, security purposes, and banknotes. Nowadays, they are highly desirable inceramic decoration. In the present study, intensively dark gold to bronze colored mica clay pigments,which were based on mica flakes covered with a layer of nano-iron oxide-Zirconium oxide particles,were prepared by homogeneous precipitation of iron nitrate and Zirconium chloride ammonia in thepresence of mica flakes in two kinds of ore clay-based phlogopite and muscovite minerals. The finalcolor was obtained by thermal annealing of precipitates at a temperature of 800◦C. The pigments werecharacterized by X-Ray Diffraction, Particle size analysis, Scanning electron microscopy,Transmission electron microscopy, X-Ray fluorescence, and Simultaneous thermal analysis. Resultsindicate that nano-encapsulated iron oxide in zirconia particles have been formed on mica flakes andkinds of clay-mica can be related to obtained shade from dark gold to bronze pearl. Higher particlesize of mica flakes about phlogopite type of mica introduced pearl effects with higher L* changes indifferent angles. Muscovite performed higher hue and better pearl effect than phlogopite.

  8. Neural correlates of viewing paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vartanian, Oshin; Skov, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Many studies involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have exposed participants to paintings under varying task demands. To isolate neural systems that are activated reliably across fMRI studies in response to viewing paintings regardless of variation in task demands, a quantitative...

  9. New biocides for antifouling paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazziotti, Isabella; Massanisso, Paolo; Cremisini, Carlo; Chiavarini, Salvatore; Fantini, Michele; Morabito, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The antifouling paints are used for protecting the hulls of the boasts from the undesirable accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on artificial surfaces (marine biological fouling). These paints constitute a potential risk for the marine environment, because of the presence in their formulation, among the other potentially toxic components, of organic compounds acting as biocide. The environmental problems associated with the use of the organotin compounds as biocides in the antifouling paints, have lead to the international ban of these compounds. In the article the new antifouling paints coming up the national and international market are shortly introduced and discussed, with particular attention respect to the new organic compounds used as biocides. In Italy quite a few marine monitoring campaigns have been carried out for organotin compounds, on the contrary there is a lack of data regarding the presence of other biocides [it

  10. The drama of illumination: artist's approaches to the creation of HDR in paintings and prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2010-02-01

    For many centuries artists have considered and depicted illumination in art, from the effect of sunlight on objects at different times of the day, of shadows and highlights as cast by the moon, through indirect light as that through an open window or the artificial light of the candle or firelight. The presentation will consider artists who were fascinated by the phenomena of natural and artificial illumination and how they were able to render the natural world as a form of dynamic range through pigment. Artists have been long aware of the psychological aspects of the juxtaposition of colour in exploiting the optical qualities and arranging visual effects in painting and prints. Artists in the 16th century were attempting to develop an extended dynamic range through multi-colour, wood-block printing. Artists working at the height of naturalist realism in the 17th through the 19th century were fascinated by the illusory nature of light on objects. The presentation will also consider the interpretation of dynamic range through the medium of mezzotint, possibly the most subtle of printing methods, which was used by printers to copy paintings, and to create highly original works of art containing a dynamic range of tones.

  11. Mural Painting as Inclusive Art Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kong

    2010-01-01

    Traditional art education, like other academic disciplines, emphasizes competitiveness and individualism. Through a mural painting curriculum, learners participate in mural art and history appreciation, are active in mural theme or content construction, and engage in hands-on mural design and painting processes. When mural paintings are produced…

  12. Texton-based analysis of paintings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Maaten, L.J.P.; Postma, E.O.

    2010-01-01

    The visual examination of paintings is traditionally performed by skilled art historians using their eyes. Recent advances in intelligent systems may support art historians in determining the authenticity or date of creation of paintings. In this paper, we propose a technique for the examination of

  13. Carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium requires Ca2+ and calcineurin

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Adam S; Garc?a, Dana M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Inside bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) retinal pigment epithelial cells, pigment granules move in response to extracellular signals. During the process of aggregation, pigment motility is directed toward the cell nucleus; in dispersion, pigment is directed away from the nucleus and into long apical processes. A number of different chemicals have been found to initiate dispersion, and carbachol (an acetylcholine analog) is one example. Previous research indicates that the ca...

  14. Raman microscopy: The identification of lapis lazuli on medieval pottery fragments from the south of Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robin J. H.; Curri, M. Lucia; Laganara, Caterina

    1997-04-01

    The technique of Raman microscopy has been used to investigate the pigments used in the glazes of fragments of medieval items of pottery dating back to the second half of the 13th century, which were found buried beneath a church in the abandoned village of Castel Fiorentino, near Foggia, in Southern Italy. The research has led to the first identification of lapis lazuli in a blue pigment pottery glaze; the identification was confirmed for six other shards from the same site. The brown—black pigment in these shards could not be identified.

  15. Large-scale quantitative analysis of painting arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-12-11

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images - the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances.

  16. Examination of lead concentrations in new decorative enamel paints in four countries with different histories of activity in lead paint regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C. Scott; Kumar, Abhay; Mohapatra, Piyush; Rajankar, Prashant; Nycz, Zuleica; Hambartsumyan, Amalia; Astanina, Lydia; Roda, Sandy; Lind, Caroline; Menrath, William; Peng, Hongying

    2014-01-01

    Paints with high lead concentrations (ppm) continue to be sold around the world in many developing countries and those with economies in transition representing a major preventable environmental health hazard that is being increased as the economies expand and paint consumption is increasing. Prior lead paint testing had been performed in Brazil and India and these countries were selected to examine the impact of a new regulatory limit in Brazil and the impact of efforts of non-governmental organizations and others to stop the use of lead compounds in manufacturing paints. Armenia and Kazakhstan, in Central Asia, were selected because no information on lead concentration in those regions was available, no regulatory activities were evident and non-governmental organizations in the IPEN network were available to participate. Another objective of this research was to evaluate the lead loading (µg/cm 2 ) limit determined by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) for areas on toys that are too small to obtain a sample of sufficient size for laboratory analysis. The lead concentrations in more than three-fourths of the paints from Armenia and Kazakhstan exceeded 90 ppm, the limit in the United States, and 600 ppm, the limit in Brazil. The percentages were about one-half as high in Brazil and India. The average concentration in paints purchased in Armenia, 25,000 ppm, is among the highest that has been previously reported, that in Kazakhstan, 15,700 ppm, and India, 16,600, about median. The average concentration in Brazil, 5600 ppm, is among the lowest observed. Paints in Brazil that contained an average of 36,000 ppm before the regulatory limit became effective were below detection (<9 ppm) in samples collected in the current study. The lack of any apparent public monitoring of paint lead content as part of regulatory enforcement makes it difficult to determine whether the regulation was a major factor contributing to the decline in lead use in these paints. Using data from the

  17. Molecular evidence confirms the taxonomic separation of Lutzomyia tihuiliensis from Lutzomyia pia (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the usefulness of pleural pigmentation patterns in species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Doria, Alveiro; Bejarano, Eduar Elías; Sierra, Diana; Vélez, Iván Darío

    2008-07-01

    The phlebotomine sand flies Lutzomyia pia (Fairchild & Hertig 1961) and Lutzomyia tihuiliensis Le Pont, Torrez-Espejo & Dujardin 1997 (Diptera: Psychodidae) belong to the pia series of the Lu. verrucarum species group, which includes several species that bite humans in Andean foci of leishmaniasis. The females of these two species exhibit isometry and isomorphism in anatomical structures of the head and terminalia commonly used in taxonomic identification of sand flies. They can only be differentiated based on subtle differences in the pigmentation of the pleura. In Lu. tihuiliensis, this is restricted to the basal portions of the katepimeron and katepisternum, whereas in Lu. pia both structures are totally pigmented. Taking into account the subtle morphological differences between these species, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the specific taxonomic status of Lu. tihuiliensis with respect to Lu. pia. A 475-bp portion of the mitochondrial genome was sequenced, composed of the 3' end of the cytochrome b gene, intergenic spacer 1, the transfer RNA gene for serine, intergenic spacer 2, and the 3' end of the gene NAD dehydrogenase 1. Genetic analysis confirms that Lu. tihuiliensis and Lu. pia constitute two distinct species and this is supported by four strong lines of evidence, i.e., the paired genetic distances, size differences and amino acid composition of the cytochrome b protein, presence and absence of intergenic spacer one and divergence observed in the sequence of the transfer RNA gene for serine. It also confirms the validity of the pleural pigmentation pattern as a species diagnostic character and the importance of performing a detailed examination of this character during morphological determination of phlebotomine sand flies in the series pia.

  18. Multi-technique investigation of Roman decorated plasters from Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crupi, Vincenza; Galli, Giuliana; La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico; Malagodi, Marco; Pezzino, Antonino; Ricca, Michela; Rossi, Barbara; Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-technique non-invasive approach using portable instrumentation is proposed. • Due to the use of different techniques, pigments of same color were distinguished. • The experimental results shed light on the used painting methodologies. • The experimental results provided useful information for restoration processes. • This work is the first study of coloring matter used in Villa dei Quintili. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated by the joint use of portable instrumentations, namely a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser and a portable Raman spectrometer, the painted surface of plasters withdrawn from different areas of an important Roman monumental complex, known as Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy), dated back to the first half of the 2nd century a.C. XRF and Raman measurements contributed to the identification of the pigments through the elemental and molecular composition, respectively. In particular, the multi-technique non-invasive approach proved to be crucial for distinguishing two different reddish pigments. In order to confirm and integrate XRF and Raman results, two micro-destructive laboratory methods, namely optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), were also employed on the same samples. All the experimental results shed light on the material characterizing the painted surface layer and the painting methodologies, providing in principle useful information for proper restoration processes. It is worth underlining that this experimental investigation takes part of a recent multidisciplinary study performed on this impressive archaeological site, aimed to characterize for the first time the monumental complex from an archaeometric point of view

  19. Multi-technique investigation of Roman decorated plasters from Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crupi, Vincenza, E-mail: vcrupi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Galli, Giuliana [Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma, Villa dei Quintili, via Appia Nuova 1092, 00197 Roma (Italy); La Russa, Mauro Francesco [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Malagodi, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Pavia, Via Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Pezzino, Antonino [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali—Sezione di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy); Ricca, Michela [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); Rossi, Barbara [Elettra – Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 km 163.5, Area Science 70 Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A multi-technique non-invasive approach using portable instrumentation is proposed. • Due to the use of different techniques, pigments of same color were distinguished. • The experimental results shed light on the used painting methodologies. • The experimental results provided useful information for restoration processes. • This work is the first study of coloring matter used in Villa dei Quintili. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated by the joint use of portable instrumentations, namely a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser and a portable Raman spectrometer, the painted surface of plasters withdrawn from different areas of an important Roman monumental complex, known as Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy), dated back to the first half of the 2nd century a.C. XRF and Raman measurements contributed to the identification of the pigments through the elemental and molecular composition, respectively. In particular, the multi-technique non-invasive approach proved to be crucial for distinguishing two different reddish pigments. In order to confirm and integrate XRF and Raman results, two micro-destructive laboratory methods, namely optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), were also employed on the same samples. All the experimental results shed light on the material characterizing the painted surface layer and the painting methodologies, providing in principle useful information for proper restoration processes. It is worth underlining that this experimental investigation takes part of a recent multidisciplinary study performed on this impressive archaeological site, aimed to characterize for the first time the monumental complex from an archaeometric point of view.

  20. Long anterior zonules and pigment dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroi, Sayoko E; Lark, Kurt K; Sieving, Paul A; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Katz, Gregory J; Ritch, Robert

    2003-12-01

    To describe pigment dispersion associated with long anterior zonules. Multicenter observational case series. Fifteen patients, seven of whom were treated for glaucoma or ocular hypertension, were identified with long anterior zonules and pigment dispersion. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on one anterior capsule specimen. All patients had anterior zonules that inserted centrally on the lens capsule. Signs of pigment dispersion included corneal endothelial pigmentation, loss of the pupillary ruff, and variable trabecular meshwork pigmentation. Ultrasound biomicroscopy verified the lack of posterior iris insertion and concavity. There was no exfoliation material. Transmission electron microscopy showed zonular lamellae with adherent pigment granules, and no exfoliation material. Long anterior zonules inserted onto the central lens capsule may cause mechanical disruption of the pigment epithelium at the pupillary ruff and central iris leading to pigment dispersion.

  1. Fingerprinting of egg and oil binders in painted artworks by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of lipid oxidation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, C D; van der Werf, I D; Palmisano, F; Sabbatini, L

    2011-06-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based approach was applied for the detection of various lipid classes, such as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and phospholipids (PLs), and their oxidation by-products in extracts of small (50-100 μg) samples obtained from painted artworks. Ageing of test specimens under various conditions, including the presence of different pigments, was preliminarily investigated. During ageing, the TAGs and PLs content decreased, whereas the amount of diglycerides, short-chain oxidative products arising from TAGs and PLs, and oxidized TAGs and PLs components increased. The examination of a series of model paint samples gave a clear indication that specific ions produced by oxidative cleavage of PLs and/or TAGs may be used as markers for egg and drying oil-based binders. Their elemental composition and hypothetical structure are also tentatively proposed. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of egg and oil binders can be easily and unambiguously ascertained through the simultaneous occurrence of the relevant specific markers. The potential of the proposed approach was demonstrated for the first time by the analysis of real samples from a polyptych of Bartolomeo Vivarini (fifteenth century) and a "French school" canvas painting (seventeenth century).

  2. Painting Reproductions on Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Iranowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Paintings in museums might occasionally be replaced by a photoprint mimicking the original. This article is an investigation of what constitutes a good reproduction of an artwork (oil painting that is meant to be displayed. The article discusses what the usefulness of reproductions depends on, applying the Valuation Studies approach, which means the primary concern is with the practice of valuing itself. In other words, the study focuses on how museum experts evaluate reproduc-tions of oil paintings. The article analyses three cases of displaying digitally prin-ted copies of Edvard Munch's oil paintings between 2013 and 2015 in the Munch Museum and in the National Gallery in Oslo. The study is based on a series of semi-structured interviews with the experts, working at and for the museums, that were involved in producing and exhibiting of the photoprints: curators, con-servators, museum educators, and external manufacturers. The interviews were grouped into five clusters, which I have chosen to call registers of valuing following Frank Heuts and Annemarie Mol (2013. The described valuation practices have to do with delivering experiences to the public, obtaining mimetic resemblance, solving ethical aspects, exhibitions' budget, and last but not least, with the time perspective.

  3. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  4. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kuczynska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  5. Accompanying of parameters of color, brightness and hardness on polymeric films coated with pigmented inks cured by different radiation doses of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardi, M.A.G.; Machado, L.D.B.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In the search for alternatives to traditional paint systems containing solvents, the curing process of polymer coatings by ultraviolet (UV) light has been widely studied and discussed, specially because of their high content of solids and null emission of VOCs. Radiation curing is defined as the conversion of a reactive liquid into a solid through polymerization and crosslinking reactions between the species, promoted by the interaction of the chemical system with the incident ionizing radiation. The appearance of the coated object (e.g., color, gloss) is a complex function of the light incident on the object, the optical scattering characteristic of the material, and human perception. Pigments are very fine powders being nearly insoluble in binders and solvents, but provide color and the ability to hide the underlying surface. In this context, this paper aims to investigate variations on color, brightness and hardness of UV-cured pigmented coatings by different doses. When it comes to irradiation exposition, the incorporation of pigments can preferentially cause its reflection or absorption of the incident radiation. Reflection usually occurs at the pigment surface within the resin so that the radiation has to pass through the top layers twice. Some degradation can, therefore, occur at the surface, and this is why materials frequently lose gloss on exposure.

  6. Paint Scaler. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The Paint Scaler can collect paint samples quickly and efficiently for lab analysis. The Rotary Hammer Drill is a 24-V battery operated, 3/4-in. rotary hammer drill. When used with an optional chipping adapter, the Bosch Rotary Hammer Drill can be used to perform chipping and chiseling tasks such as paint removal from either concrete or metal surfaces. It is ultra-compact, lightweight with an ergonomic balanced grip. The battery operation gives the operator more flexibility during sampling activities

  7. Application of gas chromatography, mass spectrometry analysis to the study of works of art. Paint media identification in polychrome multi-material sculptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, A.; Vizzari, M. [Parma Univ., Parma (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Generale ed Inorganica, Chimica Analitica, Chimica Fisica; Cremonesi, P. [Chemist and Conservator, Cornegliano Laudense, Lodi (Italy); Palla, G. [Parma Univ., Parma (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Organica e Industriale

    2001-12-01

    A new gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric procedure for characterizing both drying oil and proteinaceous binders in samples of painted artworks has been developed. Furthermore, a new analytical procedure for analysis of polysaccharide materials through identification of the monosaccharide constituents is proposed. The methods have been applied to characterize binding media of the different layers of the polychrome surface in the multi-material sculptures from the sanctuary of 'S. Maria delle Grazie in Mantova', Italy. It was found that animal glue was the main binder in the priming layer of all statues, whereas more complex mixtures were used in the paint layers. Generally, a drying oil was present, most often linseed oil alone or in combination with other organic binders. [Italian] Si propone una nuova procedura analitica, mediante gascromatografia/spettrometria di massa, rivolta alla caratterizzazione di oli siccativi e leganti proteici presenti in un unico campione di materiale pittorico derivante da un'opera d'arte. Si descrive, inoltre, un nuovo metodo gascromatografico per l'analisi di materiale polisaccaridico, mediante l'identificazione dei suoi componenti. I metodi analitici sono stati impiegati per la caratterizzazione del legante pittorico dei differenti strati costituenti la policromia di sculture polimateriche conservate presso il Santuario di Santa Maria delle Grazie in Mantova. E' stato riscontrato che per tutte le statue, il legante principale degli strati di preparazione del colore era colla animale, mentre , si e' osservato, inoltre, che gli strati pittorici hanno previsto, per la loro stesura, l'impiego di miscele complesse di sostanze organiche. Principalmente e' stata riscontrata la presenza di olio di lino, impiegato sia come unico legante sia in combinazione con altri.

  8. Examination of lead concentrations in new decorative enamel paints in four countries with different histories of activity in lead paint regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. Scott, E-mail: clarkcs@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati (United States); International POPS Elimination Network (IPEN), San Francisco (United States); Kumar, Abhay; Mohapatra, Piyush; Rajankar, Prashant [Toxics Link, New Delhi (India); Nycz, Zuleica [APROMAC Environmental Protection Association and Toxisphera Environmental Health Association, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Hambartsumyan, Amalia [Greenwomen, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Astanina, Lydia [Khazer Ecological and Cultural Non-Governmental Organization, Yerevan (Armenia); Roda, Sandy; Lind, Caroline; Menrath, William; Peng, Hongying [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Paints with high lead concentrations (ppm) continue to be sold around the world in many developing countries and those with economies in transition representing a major preventable environmental health hazard that is being increased as the economies expand and paint consumption is increasing. Prior lead paint testing had been performed in Brazil and India and these countries were selected to examine the impact of a new regulatory limit in Brazil and the impact of efforts of non-governmental organizations and others to stop the use of lead compounds in manufacturing paints. Armenia and Kazakhstan, in Central Asia, were selected because no information on lead concentration in those regions was available, no regulatory activities were evident and non-governmental organizations in the IPEN network were available to participate. Another objective of this research was to evaluate the lead loading (µg/cm{sup 2}) limit determined by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) for areas on toys that are too small to obtain a sample of sufficient size for laboratory analysis. The lead concentrations in more than three-fourths of the paints from Armenia and Kazakhstan exceeded 90 ppm, the limit in the United States, and 600 ppm, the limit in Brazil. The percentages were about one-half as high in Brazil and India. The average concentration in paints purchased in Armenia, 25,000 ppm, is among the highest that has been previously reported, that in Kazakhstan, 15,700 ppm, and India, 16,600, about median. The average concentration in Brazil, 5600 ppm, is among the lowest observed. Paints in Brazil that contained an average of 36,000 ppm before the regulatory limit became effective were below detection (<9 ppm) in samples collected in the current study. The lack of any apparent public monitoring of paint lead content as part of regulatory enforcement makes it difficult to determine whether the regulation was a major factor contributing to the decline in lead use in these paints. Using data from the

  9. Sanding dust from nanoparticle-containing paints: Physical characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, I K; Jensen, K A; Schneider, T

    2009-01-01

    Increasing use of nanoparticles in different industrial applications has raised a new potential health risk to the workers as well as to the consumers. This study investigates the particle size distributions of sanding dust released from paints produced with and without engineered nanoparticles. Dust emissions from sanding painted plates were found to consist of five size modes; three modes under 1 μm and two modes around 1 and 2 μm. We observed that the sander was the only source of particles smaller than 50 nm and they dominated the number concentration spectra. Mass and surface area spectra were dominated by the 1 and 2 μm modes. Addition of nanoparticles caused only minor changes in the geometric mean diameters of the particle modes generated during sanding of two paints doped with 17 nm TiO2 and 95 nm Carbon Black nanoparticles as compared to the size modes generated during sanding a conventional reference paint. However, the number concentrations in the different size modes varied considerably in between the two NP-doped paints and the reference paint. Therefore, from a physical point of view, there may be a difference in the exposure risk during sanding surfaces covered with nanoparticle-based paints as compared to sanding conventional paints.

  10. Nanoparticles Ni electroplating and black paint for solar collector applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. El Nady

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanoparticles layer of bright nickel base was deposited on copper substrates using electrodeposition technique before spraying the paint. IR reflectance of the paint was found to be around 0.4 without bright nickel layer and the reflectance increased to 0.6 at a Ni layer thickness of 750 nm. The efficiency of the constructed solar collectors using black paint and black paint combined with bright nickel was found to be better than black paint individually. After aging tests under high temperature, Bright nickel improved the stability of the absorber paint. The collector optical gain FR(τα was lowered by 24.7% for the commercial paint and lowered by 19.3% for the commercial paint combined with bright nickel. The overall heat loss FR(UL was increased by 3.3% for the commercial paint and increased by 2.7% for the commercial paint combined with bright nickel after the temperature aging test.