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Sample records for pain therapy joint

  1. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (pknee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  2. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  3. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanelderen, P.; Szadek, K.M.; Cohen, S.P.; Witte, J.; Lataster, A.; Patijn, J.; Mekhail, N.; van Kleef, M.; van Zundert, J.

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower

  4. Can therapy dogs improve pain and satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Carl M; Dong, Yan; Thornhill, Thomas S; Wright, John; Ready, John; Brick, Gregory W; Dyer, George

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals to augment traditional medical therapies was reported as early as the 9th century but to our knowledge has not been studied in an orthopaedic patient population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of animal-assisted therapy using therapy dogs in the postoperative recovery of patients after THA and TKA. We asked: (1) Do therapy dogs have an effect on patients' perception of pain after total joint arthroplasty as measured by the VAS? (3) Do therapy dogs have an effect on patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay after total joint arthroplasty as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)? A randomized controlled trial of 72 patients undergoing primary unilateral THA or TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized to a 15-minute visitation with a therapy dog before physical therapy or standard postoperative physical therapy regimens. Both groups had similar demographic characteristics. Reduction in pain was assessed using the VAS after each physical therapy session, beginning on postoperative Day 1 and continuing for three consecutive sessions. To ascertain patient satisfaction, the proportion of patients selecting top-category ratings in each subsection of the HCAHPS was compared. Patients in the treatment group had lower VAS scores after each physical therapy session with a final VAS score difference of 2.4 units (animal-assisted therapy VAS, 1.7; SD, 0.97 [95% CI, 1.4-2.0] versus control VAS, 4.1; SD, 0.97 [95% CI, 3.8-4.4], pphysical therapy session. Patients in the treatment group had a higher proportion of top-box HCAHPS scores in the following fields: nursing communication (33 of 36, 92% [95% CI, 78%-98%] versus 69%, 25 of 36 [95% CI, 52%-84%], p=0.035; risk ratio, 1.3 [95% CI of risk ratio, 1.0-1.7]; risk difference, 23% [95% CI of risk difference, 5%-40%]), pain management (34 of 36, 94% [95% CI, 81%-99%], versus 26 of 36, 72% [95% CI, 55%-86%], p=0.024; risk ratio, 1.3 [95

  5. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000610.htm Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe ...

  6. Suprascapular block in the therapy of chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint: Suprascapular block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palibrk Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint is a very common pathology in modern human population. The etiology of chronic pain is often unknown, although the trauma, degenerative diseases, inflammation, tumors and neurological disease appear as common etiologic factors. Patients with this pain had a significantly reduced quality of life.1,2 Method: During the two years, twelve patients diagnosed painful shoulder syndrome. Eleven of the twelve patients involved in the study had started physical therapy. Under the physical treatment pain intensity decreased, but not completely. Hand had reduced mobility. We applied a suprascapular block. We used 1 ml (7 mg betamethasone. Results: Suprascapular block was applied to the eleven patients in physical therapy. After three days of application, the pain was significantly reduced, by 50% in seven patients. Mobility of the hand was greatly improved. In three of the remaining four patients the block was repeated after one month. The pain was significantly smaller after that. Physical therapy is done all the time. Conclusion: The treatment of chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint is multidisciplinary. In some cases, the use of corticosteroids suprascapular block is very useful.

  7. Long-term follow-up in sacroiliac joint pain patients treated with radiofrequency ablative therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sacroiliac joint (SIJ pain is responsible for up to 40% of all cases of lumbar back pain. Objective Report the long-term efficacy of radiofrequency denervation for sacroiliac joint pain at six, twelve and eighteen months.Method Third-two adults’ patients with sacroiliac join pain diagnosis were included for a prospective study. Primary outcome measure was pain intensity on the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS. Secondary outcome measure was Patient Global Impression of Change Scale (PGIC.Results Short-term pain relief was observed, with the mean NRS pain score decreasing from 7.7 ± 1.8 at baseline to 2.8 ± 1.2 at one month and to 3.1 ± 1.9 at six months post-procedure (p < 0.001. Long-term pain relief was sustained at twelve and eighteen months post-procedure, with NRS pain remaining at 3.4 ± 2.1 and 4.0 ± 2.7, respectively.Conclusion Radiofrequency denervation of the SIJ can significantly reduce pain in selected patients with sacroiliac syndrome.

  8. Yoga Therapy in Children with Cystic Fibrosis Decreases Immediate Anxiety and Joint Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher McNamara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine whether yoga might alleviate symptoms of pain, sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depression in children with cystic fibrosis (CF. CF is the most common genetic, life-limiting chronic disease among Caucasian populations. It primarily affects the lungs but also many other secretory organs and consequently leads to significant morbidities. Research has shown that children with CF have significantly increased depression, anxiety, and pain compared to their healthy counterparts. Subjects participated in six one-on-one sessions over a 10-week period with a certified instructor who designed each yoga practice based on a preestablished list of 30 yoga asanas. Questionnaires evaluating pain, sleep disturbance, sustained anxiety, immediate anxiety, and depression were administered. Differences between premeasures and postmeasures were evaluated using a two-sided test. Twenty subjects were assessed (12 females/8 males, median age of 11 (7–20 years. Mean immediate anxiety scores decreased (before session to after session 29 to 23.6, respectively, p<0.001. Joint pain improved (3.25 to 3.65, p=0.028. CFQ-R emotion subscale improved from 79.2 to 85 (p=0.073, and the respiratory subscale improved from 66.7 to 79.2 (p=0.076. Other results were less notable. We conclude that yoga may reduce immediate anxiety and joint pain in patients with CF.

  9. Low-level laser therapy of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Levon V.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the given research is the comparison of efficiency of conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee joints and therapy with additional application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) under dynamic control of clinical picture, rheovasographic, electromyographic examinations, and parameters of peroxide lipid oxidation. The investigation was made on 143 patients with OA of hip and knee joints. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: basic group included 91 patients, receiving conventional therapy with a course of LLLT, control group included 52 patients, receiving conventional treatment only. Transcutaneous ((lambda) equals 890 nm, output peak power 5 W, frequency 80 - 3000 Hz) and intravenous ((lambda) equals 633 nm, output 2 mW in the vein) laser irradiation were used for LLLT. Studied showed, that clinical efficiency of LLLT in the complex with conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes at the patients with OA is connected with attenuation of pain syndrome, normalization of parameters of myofascial syndrome, normalization of the vascular tension and parameters of rheographic curves, as well as with activation of antioxidant protection system.

  10. [The impact of the spa therapy on reduction of the perception of pain intensity in patients with degenerative joints and disc disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuciel-Lewandowska, Jadwiga; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative joints and disc disease is accompanied by chronic pain which is the main symptom of the disease. Medical spa therapy has the task of providing comprehensive treatment embracing diseases of limbs as well as other systems and the essential role of medical treatment, in particular spa therapy, is pain relief. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the spa treatment on the level of pain perception in patients with degenerative joints and disc disease. The observation embraced 120 people with degenerative joints and disc disease treated in the spa. The study included a comprehensive therapy conducted over a 21-day stays at the spa Przerzeczyn-Zdrój with the application of selected physical treatments, physiotherapy and the use of therapeutic natural resources: peloid mud and healing radon-sulphide water. Moreover, there was psychological counseling and health education conducted. The study also included observation of 21 persons from the control group. However, the patients in the control group did not benefit from balneotherapy, psychological care and education. There was a standard VAS scale for pain and non-standard questionnaire of pain assessment constructed for the study purposes. The assessment of pain using the VAS scale and questionnaire of pain assessment both in the study group and the control group were performed before and after the treatment. The results were analyzed statistically, there was Statistica program in Polish version used. In the analysis of the obtained results there were two tests scheduled: the sign test, the Wilcoxon test and descriptive statistics. As a result of the spa therapy and treatments administered on an outpatient basis there was reduction of pain intensity observed. 1. Spa therapy and outpatient treatment reduce the level of pain in patients with degenerative joints and disc disease. 2. The reduction of pain level was more effective in case of therapy conducted in the spa.

  11. Water-cooled radiofrequency neuroablation for sacroiliac joint dysfunctional pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Binay Kumar; Dey, Samarjit; Biswas, Saumya; Mohan, Varinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint dysfunction is a common source of chronic low-back pain. Recent evidences from different parts of the world suggest that cooled radiofrequency (RF) neuroablation of sacral nerves supplying SI joints has superior pain alleviating properties than available existing treatment options for SI joint dysfunctional pain. A 35-year-old male had intractable bilateral SI joint pain (numeric rating scale [NRS] - 9/10) with poor treatment response to intra-articular steroid therapy. Bilateral water cooled = RF was applied for neuroablation of nerves supplying both SI joints. Postprocedure pain intensity was 5/10 and after 7 days it was 2/10. On 18 th -month follow-up, he is pain free except for mild pain (NRS 2/10) on occasional extreme twisting of the back. This case attempts to highlight that sacral neuroablation based on cooled RF technique can be a long lasting remedial option for chronic SI joint pain unresponsive to conventional treatment.

  12. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  13. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Sykhorychko; Т.G. Kovalenko; М.А. Sykhorychko

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  14. Pain in the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological changes that develop in the hip joints (HJ have different origins and mechanisms of development, but their main manifestation is pain. The nature of this pain cannot be well established on frequent occasions. The English-language medical literature currently classifies such disorders as greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS. Its major signs are chronic pain and local palpatory tenderness in the outer part of HJ. The development of GTPS may be associated with inflammation of the synovial bursae situated in the greater tronchanter, as well as with tendinitis, myorrhexis, iliotibial band syndrome, and other local changes in the adjacent tissues or with systemic diseases. So GTPS may be characterized as regional pain syndrome that frequently mimics pain induced by different diseases, including myofascial pain syndrome, osteoarthrosis, spinal diseases, etc.

  15. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  16. Manual therapy for plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Yosefa; Shashua, Anat; Kalichman, Leonid

    2018-03-01

    Manual therapy employed in the treatment of plantar heel pain includes joint or soft tissue mobilizations. Efficacy of these methods is still under debate. To determine whether manual therapy, consisting of deep massage, myofascial release or joint mobilization is effective in treating plantar heel pain. A critical review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. PubMed, PEDro, and Google Scholar databases were searched for keywords relating to plantar heel pain, joint, and soft tissue mobilizations. There were no search limitations or language restrictions. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were searched. The PEDro score was used to assess the quality of the reviewed papers. A total of six relevant RCTs were found: two examined the effectiveness of joint mobilization on plantar heel pain and four the effectiveness of soft tissue techniques. Five studies showed a positive short-term effect after manual therapy treatment, mostly soft tissue mobilizations, with or without stretching exercises for patients with plantar heel pain, compared to other treatments. One study observed that adding joint mobilization to the treatment of plantar heel pain was not effective. The quality of all studies was moderate to high. According to reviewed moderate and high-quality RCTs, soft tissue mobilization is an effective modality for treating plantar heel pain. Outcomes of joint mobilizations are controversial. Further studies are needed to evaluate the short and long-term effect of different soft tissue mobilization techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Water-cooled radiofrequency neuroablation for sacroiliac joint dysfunctional pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binay Kumar Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacroiliac (SI joint dysfunction is a common source of chronic low-back pain. Recent evidences from different parts of the world suggest that cooled radiofrequency (RF neuroablation of sacral nerves supplying SI joints has superior pain alleviating properties than available existing treatment options for SI joint dysfunctional pain. A 35-year-old male had intractable bilateral SI joint pain (numeric rating scale [NRS] - 9/10 with poor treatment response to intra-articular steroid therapy. Bilateral water cooled = RF was applied for neuroablation of nerves supplying both SI joints. Postprocedure pain intensity was 5/10 and after 7 days it was 2/10. On 18th-month follow-up, he is pain free except for mild pain (NRS 2/10 on occasional extreme twisting of the back. This case attempts to highlight that sacral neuroablation based on cooled RF technique can be a long lasting remedial option for chronic SI joint pain unresponsive to conventional treatment.

  18. Diagnosing patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Krogsgaard, M R; Lorenzen, T

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the interobserver agreement of commonly used clinical tests and diagnoses in patients with shoulder pain, and the accuracy of these tests and ultrasonographic findings in comparison with arthroscopic findings. METHODS: Eighty six patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain...

  19. Vitamin K, osteoarthritis, and joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of joint pain and lower extremity disability in older adults and there is no known cure. Vitamin K has been implicated on osteoarthritis because vitamin K dependent proteins are present in joint tissues, such as cartilage and bone. In order to function, vitamin K ...

  20. New aspects of radionuclide therapy of bone and joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Whereas in developing countries P-32 is widely used for radionuclide therapy of painful bone metastases, in Europe three radionuclides or radiopharmaceutical agents are available for pain palliation: Sr-89, Sm-153-EDTMP, and Re-186-HEDP. Radionuclide therapy for pain palliation is indicated for bone pain due to metastatic malignancy that has involved multiple skeletal sites and has evoked an osteoblastic response on bone scintigraphy. Response rates of about 70-80% in patients with breast or prostate cancer is reported in the literature, less in metastatic lesions of other primary malignancies. Sm-153-EDTMP may also be used for curative treatment of primary bone tumours or their metastases. Radiosynovectomy as therapeutic procedure or rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory joint diseases, persistent synovial perfusion, and other joint diseases is widely used. Using Y-90 for the knee joint, Re-186 for middle sized joints, and Er-169 for small joints an improvement of symptoms may be observed in about 70-80%. (author)

  1. Utility of bone SPECT in temporomandibular joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Hunn; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Jung Whee; Chung, Soo Kyo; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain results from many etiologic factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of Bone SPECT in patients with TM joint pain. The subjects were 34 patients with TM joint pain. All patients underwent plain radiography, planar bone scan, and Bone SPECT. The intensity of radioisotope uptake at TM joint was graded into three; no increased uptake above the background activity as grade 0, uptake similar to occipital bone as grade I, and uptake similar to maxillary sinus as grade II. Clinical findings and therapeutic methods were reviewed. Twenty-seven patients (80%) out of 34 patients with TM joint pain had increased uptake in bone SPECT. Twenty-one (78%) out of 27 patients had increased uptake in the mandibular condyle and remaining six patients (22%) had uptake in the mandibular and maxillary arch, which proved to be dental problem. Seven patients (21%) out of 34 were grade as 0, four (12%) were grade I, 23 (68%) were grade. II. Four patients with grade I had clicking sound and symptoms which were subsided with medication in all cases. Among 23 patients with grade II, 7 patients had clicking sound and 14 patients underwent medication and decompression therapy. With Planar bone scan, 11 cases (32%) had increased uptake in TM joint area. Plain radiography revealed narrowing, distension, erosion and limitation of TM joint in 16 cases (47%). Bone SPECT can be valuable for screening and managing the patients with TM joint pain. Patients with grade II needed intensive treatment such as joint aspiration. However degree of the radioisotope uptake did not well correlated with clinical symptoms

  2. The Temporomandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, John E.

    1988-01-01

    When a patient complains of headache, neckache, or earache and these are associated with noisy temporomandibular joint function, restricted opening or increased pain when chewing, a temporomandibular joint or masticatory muscle disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because signs and symptoms of these disorders are common in all age groups. This article indicates the more common etiological contributions, that is, microtrauma, repeated microtrauma, muscle hyperactivity, ...

  3. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivani, Giorgio; Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; Krane, Elliot; Veyckemans, Francis; Polaner, David M; Van de Velde, Marc; Neal, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Some topics in the clinical management of regional anesthesia in children remain controversial. To evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a joint committee practice advisory on pediatric regional anesthesia (PRA). Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA comprised the joint committee practice advisory on PRA. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Experts selected controversial topics in PRA. The performance of PRA under general anesthesia or deep sedation is associated with acceptable safety and should be viewed as the standard of care (Evidence B2 and Evidence B3). Because of the difficulty interpreting a negative test dose, the use of test dosing should remain discretionary (Evidence B4). The use of either air-loss of resistance or saline-loss of resistance techniques is supported by expert opinion, but the literature supporting one technique over the other is sparse and controversial; when used appropriately, each technique may be safely used in children. There are no current evidence-based data that the use of RA increases the risk for acute compartment syndrome or delays its diagnosis in children. High-level evidence is not yet available for the topics evaluated, and most recommendations are based on Evidence B studies. The ESRA/ASRA recommendations intend to provide guidance for the safe practice of regional anesthesia in children.

  4. Joint hypermobility syndrome and related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Sahin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypermobility is defined as an abnormally increased range of motion of a joint resulting from the excessive laxity of the soft tissues. This paper is focused on this commonly forgotten cause of several morbidities. The etiology of hypermobility is not very well known. One decade ago, joint hypermobility syndrome was considered as a benign condition, but now it is recognized as a significant contributor to chronic musculoskeletal pain, besides impacting on other organs. Patients with joint hypermobility syndrome often have diffuse, chronic complaints that are inconsistent with the musculoskeletal system. Chronic pain may cause loss of proprioception and so increased sensitivity to microtrauma, premature osteoarthritis de- velopment, soft tissue problems, psychosocial disorders, and neurophysiological deficiencies. Osteoarthritis, pes planus, mechanical low back pain, and soft tissue rheumatisms are frequent musculoskeletal findings as well as subluxations, thoracic outlet syndrome, rectal and uterine prolapses, hernias, and stress incontinence. Joint hypermobility syndrome's treatment is not easy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not usually effective or adequate. Proprioceptive and strengthening exercises have been reported to have supportive and therapeutic effects, but we have limited data on this issue. Joint hypermobility syndrome must be accepted as a multisystem connective tissue disorder rather than just joint laxities. As a result; clinicians must be aware of complexities of connective tissue disorders and comorbidities. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(2.000: 105-112

  5. Acupuncture Therapy on Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Nai-nian; HUANG Ming-juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome, an commonly and frequently encountered disease, is characterized by motor dysfunction of mandibular joint and snapping articular surface as major complaints, and then tinnitus, facial pain and occasional headache, most patients got limited mouth open and pain inside the joints or masseter muscle. The authors of this article have treated 68cases of TMJ syndrome since 2001.

  6. Prolotherapy: A new hope for temporomandibular joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of orofacial pain is the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD, a collective term used to describe a group of medical disorders causing temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain and dysfunction. As the causes of TMD are varied and run the gamut from mechanical issues, such as disc degeneration and dislocation or erosion of the fibrocartilaginous surfaces of the condyle, fossa, and articular eminence, the treatment approaches for the chronic TMJ case are also quite varied. As surgery is considered a last resort for TMD, it is common for sufferers to seek out alternatives and one of the alternative treatments is ′Prolotherapy,′ which is also known as Regenerative Injection Therapy. This article provides an overview of this new alternative therapy.

  7. Calcific shoulder joint periarthritis. Disappearance of calcifications after laser therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussetti, P; Moroso, P; Palazzo, C

    1986-01-01

    The authors report their results in the laser therapy of 30 calcific joint periarthritis. In two out of the ten radiographed cases, at the end of therapy, the complete disappearance of calcifications has been shown and in one case a decrease in calcification volume has been demonstrated. In the follow up after 6 months, 80% of clinically checked patients had no painful relapse.

  8. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  9. Inversion Therapy: Can It Relieve Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inversion therapy: Can it relieve back pain? Does inversion therapy relieve back pain? Is it safe? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Inversion therapy doesn't provide lasting relief from back ...

  10. [Conservative therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenski, U C; Best, N; Bocker, B

    2008-03-01

    Cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint reflect the problem that great force is transmitted and balanced out over a relatively small surface area. As a pathophysiological factor, cartilage-bone contusions play a significant role in the development of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint. Physiotherapeutic procedures belong to the standard procedures of conservative therapy. The use and selection of the type of therapy is based on empirical considerations and experience and investigations on effectiveness of particular therapies are relatively rare. At present a symptom-oriented therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint seems to be the most sensible approach. It can be assumed that it makes sense that the symptomatic treatment of cartilage defects or initial stages of arthritis also includes the subsequent symptoms of pain, irritated condition and limited function. This leads to starting points for physiotherapy with respect to pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, avoidance of pressure points, improvement of diffusion and pressure release. In addition to the differential physiotherapeutic findings, the determination of a curative, preventive or rehabilitative procedure is especially important. In physical therapy special importance is placed on a scheduled serial application corresponding to the findings, employing the necessary methods, such as physiotherapy, sport therapy, medical mechanics, manual therapy, massage, electrotherapy and warmth therapy. From this the findings-related therapy is proposed as a practical therapy concept: locomotive apparatus pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, improvement of diffusion and decongestion therapy. Therapy options have been selected base on the current literature and are summarised in tabular form. The art of symptomatic therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint does not lie in the multitude of sometimes speculative procedures, but in the targeted selection

  11. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsif...

  12. MR imaging - guided corticosteroid-infiltration of the sacroiliac joints: pain therapy of sacroiliitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis; Magnetresonanzgesteuerte Kortikosteroid-Infiltration der Sakroiliakalgelenke: Schmerztherapie der Sakroiliitis bei Patienten mit Spondylitis ankylosans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, J.; Koenig, C.W.; Clasen, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Pereira, P.L. [Radiologische Klinik, Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Guenaydin, I.; Koetter, I. [Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Rheumaambulanz, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Kastler, B. [Univ. de Franche Comte, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and specific properties of MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the sacroiliac (SI) joints in the treatment of therapy-refractory sacroiliitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Materials and Methods: In this study, 26 patients were prospectively included. Inclusion criteria were AS with therapy refractory acute sacroiliitis and inflammatory back pain {>=} 6 months. The intervention was performed using an open low-field MR-scanner. Inflammatory back pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Success of the therapy was defined as an absolute reduction of the VAS score {<=} 5, a relative reduction of the VAS score {>=} 35% and persisting improvement {>=} 2 months. The grade of sacroiliitis was documented using high-field MR imaging. Variables were compared using McNemar test and Wilcoxon test. The mean remission time was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier analysis. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The intervention was technically successfully performed in all patients. Following MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the SI joints, the VAS score improved from 8 (5-10) points to 4.5 (0-8) points(-44%) in all patients (n=26), which was statistically significant (p<0.001). Of 26 patients, 22 (85%) fulfilled the predefined criteria for successful therapy. This group had a statistically significant (p<0.01) improvement of the VAS score from 8 (6-10) to 3 (0-5) (-63%). Improvement was seen after 7 (1-30) days. There was a marked reduction of the subchondral bone marrow edema (-38%). The mean remission time was 12 (4-18) months. Conclusion: MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the SI joints proved to be an effective therapy of inflammatory back pain in patients with therapy refractory AS. With the ability of multiplanar imaging, precise localization of the bone marrow edema and the lack of ionizing radiation, interventional MR imaging currently represents the

  13. Alternative Drugs in Pain Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Various treatment modalities of acute and chronic pain have been an area of interest of medicine and investigators for centuries. There are two major classes of drugs that are used to control pain: opioid and non-opioid analgesics. They could be used in the case of monotherapy or combination therapy in pain management. However, these agents are not accepted as ideal drugs in clinical approaches against pain because of their serious side effects such as development of tolerance and addiction, renal failure and gastrointestinal bleeding. As a consequent, developing new forms of pain relievers that are more safe and effective without any other side effects has became the main goal of researchers. In recent studies, it has been shown that conotoxin therapies are not addictive, and have tolerable indexes unlike opioids. In addition, conotoxins side effects are much milder and easier to manage than those of opioids. In this regard, it has been emphasized that biotoxins such as conotoxins obtained from marine creatures can be better choices in pain management for future prospects.

  14. 半导体激光治疗颞下颌关节滑膜炎的疗效评价%Efficacy of low-power laser therapy in treatment of painful arthrosynovitis of temporomandibular joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周薇娜; 杜一飞; 张静露

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨半导体激光疗法对颞下颌关节滑膜炎的临床疗效,为滑膜炎的治疗提供依据。方法选择确诊为颞下颌关节滑膜炎的患者60名,随机分成3组:激光治疗组、超短波治疗组、热敷组。采用疼痛直观模拟标尺(VAS)对治疗前后进行评分,并记录相应分值,测量最大张口度和最大前伸位移,进行治疗前后及组间比较。结果3种治疗方法均能够有效缓解颞下颌关节滑膜炎引起的关节区疼痛症状,改善张开口度。激光治疗组与超短波治疗组疗效均优于热敷治疗组,但前两组之间未见明显统计学差异。结论半导体激光治疗能够明显缓解颞下颌关节滑膜炎引起的关节的疼痛症状,并可以改善张口度,是一种可靠的临床无创治疗方法。%Objective To evaluate the effect of low-power laser therapy in treatment of painful arthrosynovitis of temporomandibular joint.Methods 60 patients with arthrosynovitis of temporomandibular joint were randomized into three groups:low-power laser thera-py,ultrashort wave and fomentation therapy.Scores of pain visual analog scale,the maximum of mandible open and protrusive position were recorded and analyzed.Results Pain of all patients was relieved after treatment in three groups.The effects of low-power laser,ul-trashort wave therapies were better than that of fomentation therapy.Conclusion Low-power laser therapy is a reliable clinical treat-ment for painful arthrosynovitis of temporomandibular joint.

  15. Painful glenohumeral joint instability in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, F.; Dragoni, S.; Giombini, A.

    1991-01-01

    Instability of the glenohumeral joints is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain and disability in athletes using repetitive arm movements in elevation and external rotation. A series of 29 athletes with persistent shoulder discomfort for transient subluxation was evaluated with plain radiography and tomography in right axillary projection. The purpose was to detect abnormalities in the osseous glenoid rim. Twenty-six patients (89.6% of all cases studied) had various degrees of skeletal damage, including 18 fractures (69.2%) of the anterior rim, 2 (7.6%) of the posterior rim, and 6 cases (23.07%) of local degenerative changes; 3 cases were negative for skeletal damages. The results of this study demontrate conventional radiography to be useful in the diagnostic assessment of shoulder pain in athletes, where similar problems must be promptly detected and not ignored

  16. Arthroscopic management of painful first metatarsophalangeal joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthroscopy of the great toe MTP joint has been practiced with favourable outcomes. A range of indications have been described ranging from synovitis to osteochondral defects. The purpose of the present study was to describe our technique and to assess the functional outcome following arthroscopic management of Hallux MTP disorders using AOFAS scoring system. Methods: We describe the technique of Hallux MTP joint arthroscopy in twenty patients. Indications included hallux rigidus with osteophytes, chondromalacia, OCDs, loose bodies, arthrofibrosis, synovitis, tophaceous gout arthritis and intra-articular fractures of MTP joint. All patients had been evaluated clinically and radiologically with record of their AOFAS scores pre-operatively. At a minimum follow-up of two years the clinical assessment was carried out with AOFAS scores. Results: The mean pre-operative and post-operative AOFAS score were 47 (range 10-78 and 97 (87 -100 respectively. The patient with intra-articular fracture had an excellent outcome following arthroscopic reduction of the fracture. Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of painful hallucial MTP joint is a specialized technique, which if performed for the right indications, gives a favourable outcome with minimal complications.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiano, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  18. Lumbar facet syndrome - Lumbar facet joint injection and low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Jimenez Hakim, Enrique; Rodriguez, Jose Maria; Hakim Daccach, Fernando; Quinonez, German; Rodriguez Munera, Andres

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective study lo evaluate the effectiveness of injection therapy in the lumbar zygapophysial joints with anesthetics and steroids in patients with persisting low back pain and lumbar facer syndrome. Thirty-seven patients with low back pain who reported immediate relief of their pain after controlled blocks into the facet joints between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the fifth lumbar and first sacral vertebrae were evaluated. Outcome was evaluated using the visual analog pain scales. All outcome measures were repeated at eight days and six weeks alter controlled injection. At six-week follow-up examination 83,7% of thirty-seven patients experienced a good response to controlled blocks of the lumbar zygaphyseal (facet) joints. Good result is the pain relief of 50% or more. Fifteen patients experienced a good response with pain relief of eight points or more in the VAS

  19. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes” are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1 rehabilitation; (2 integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3 psychology; and (4 normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  20. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J.; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes”) are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy. PMID:27973405

  1. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A

    2016-12-10

    Primary pain disorders (formerly "functional pain syndromes") are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition "chronic-on-acute pain." We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  2. Evaluation of Pain Syndromes, Headache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswell, Bruce B; Sheikh, Jason

    2018-02-01

    After a thorough review of the history and presentation of a child's facial pain, a targeted head and neck examination is critical to the appropriate diagnosis of facial pain and temporomandibular joint disorders. It is critical to distinguish between the structural (trauma, degenerative disease, and tumor) and nonstructural (neurogenic, myogenic, and psychological) causes of pain, which will allow for incorporation of appropriate strategies of medical, psychological, dental, and surgical therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sacroiliac joint pain: burden of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher D

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Cher,1 David Polly,2 Sigurd Berven31SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USAObjectives: The sacroiliac joint (SIJ is an important and significant cause of low back pain. We sought to quantify the burden of disease attributable to the SIJ.Methods: The authors compared EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D and Short Form (SF-36-based health state utility values derived from the preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic SIJ pain participating in two prospective clinical trials of minimally invasive SIJ fusion versus patients participating in a nationally representative USA cross-sectional survey (National Health Measurement Study [NHMS]. Comparative analyses controlled for age, sex, and oversampling in NHMS. A utility percentile for each SIJ subject was calculated using NHMS as a reference cohort. Finally, SIJ health state utilities were compared with utilities for common medical conditions that were published in a national utility registry.Results: SIJ patients (number [n]=198 had mean SF-6D and EQ-5D utility scores of 0.51 and 0.44, respectively. Values were significantly depressed (0.28 points for the SF-6D utility score and 0.43 points for EQ-5D; both P<0.0001 compared to NHMS controls. SIJ patients were in the lowest deciles for utility compared to the NHMS controls. The SIJ utility values were worse than those of many common, major medical conditions, and similar to those of other common preoperative orthopedic conditions.Conclusion: Patients with SIJ pain presenting for minimally invasive surgical care have marked impairment in quality of life that is worse than in many chronic health conditions, and this is similar to other orthopedic conditions that are commonly treated surgically. SIJ utility values are in the lowest two deciles when compared to control populations

  4. Multiple Nonspecific Sites of Joint Pain Outside the Knees Develop in Persons With Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T; Niu, Jingbo; Quinn, Emily K; Neogi, Tuhina; Lewis, Cara L; Lewis, Cora E; Frey Law, Laura; McCulloch, Chuck; Nevitt, Michael; LaValley, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Many persons with knee pain have joint pain outside the knee, but despite the impact and high frequency of this pain, its distribution and causes have not been studied. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis of those studying gait abnormalities who have suggested that knee pain causes pain in adjacent joints but that pain adaptation strategies are highly individualized. We studied persons ages 50-79 years with or at high risk of knee osteoarthritis who were recruited from 2 community-based cohorts, the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study and the Osteoarthritis Initiative, and we followed them up for 5-7 years. We excluded those with knee pain at baseline and compared those who had developed knee pain at the first follow-up examination (the index visit) with those who had not. We examined pain on most days at joint regions outside the knee in examinations after the index visit. Logistic regression analyses examined the risk of joint-specific pain adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and symptoms of depression, and we performed sensitivity analyses excluding those with widespread pain. In the combined cohorts, 693 persons had knee pain at the index visit and 2,793 did not. A total of 79.6% of those with bilateral knee pain and 63.8% of those with unilateral knee pain had pain during follow-up in a joint region outside the knee, compared with 49.9% of those without knee pain. There was an increased risk of pain at most extremity joint sites, without a predilection for specific sites. Results were unchanged when those with widespread pain were excluded. Persons with chronic knee pain are at increased risk of pain in multiple joints in no specific pattern. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  6. Sacroiliac joint pain: burden of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel; Polly, David; Berven, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an important and significant cause of low back pain. We sought to quantify the burden of disease attributable to the SIJ. Methods The authors compared EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D) and Short Form (SF)-36-based health state utility values derived from the preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic SIJ pain participating in two prospective clinical trials of minimally invasive SIJ fusion versus patients participating in a nationally representative USA cross-sectional survey (National Health Measurement Study [NHMS]). Comparative analyses controlled for age, sex, and oversampling in NHMS. A utility percentile for each SIJ subject was calculated using NHMS as a reference cohort. Finally, SIJ health state utilities were compared with utilities for common medical conditions that were published in a national utility registry. Results SIJ patients (number [n]=198) had mean SF-6D and EQ-5D utility scores of 0.51 and 0.44, respectively. Values were significantly depressed (0.28 points for the SF-6D utility score and 0.43 points for EQ-5D; both P<0.0001) compared to NHMS controls. SIJ patients were in the lowest deciles for utility compared to the NHMS controls. The SIJ utility values were worse than those of many common, major medical conditions, and similar to those of other common preoperative orthopedic conditions. Conclusion Patients with SIJ pain presenting for minimally invasive surgical care have marked impairment in quality of life that is worse than in many chronic health conditions, and this is similar to other orthopedic conditions that are commonly treated surgically. SIJ utility values are in the lowest two deciles when compared to control populations. PMID:24748825

  7. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-05-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain.

  8. Effect of integrated yoga therapy on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of integrated yoga on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of knees. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty participants with OA knees (35-80 years were randomly assigned to yoga or control group. Both groups had transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment followed by intervention (40 min for two weeks with follow up for three months. The integrated yoga consisted of yogic loosening and strengthening practices, asanas, relaxation, pranayama and meditation. The control group had physiotherapy exercises. Assessments were done on 15 th (post 1 and 90 th day (post 2. Results: Resting pain (numerical rating scale reduced better (P<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test in yoga group (post 1=33.6% and post 2=71.8% than control group (post 1=13.4% and post 2=37.5%. Morning stiffness decreased more (P<0.001 in yoga (post 1=68.6% and post 2=98.1% than control group (post 1=38.6% and post 2=71.6%. State anxiety (STAI-1 reduced (P<0.001 by 35.5% (post 1 and 58.4% (post 2 in the yoga group and 15.6% (post 1 and 38.8% (post 2 in the control group; trait anxiety (STAI 2 reduced (P<0.001 better (post 1=34.6% and post 2=57.10% in yoga than control group (post 1=14.12% and post 2=34.73%. Systolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001 better in yoga group (post 1=−7.93% and post 2=−15.7% than the control group (post 1=−1.8% and post 2=−3.8%. Diastolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001 better in yoga group (post 1=−7.6% and post 2=−16.4% than the control group (post 1=−2.1% and post 2=−5.0%. Pulse rate reduced (P<0.001 better in yoga group (post 1=−8.41% and post 2=−12.4% than the control group (post 1=−5.1% and post 2=−7.1%. Conclusion: Integrated approach of yoga therapy is better than physiotherapy exercises as an adjunct to transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment in reducing pain, morning stiffness, state and trait anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate in patients

  9. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000415.htm Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help many people deal with chronic ...

  11. Acupuncture Reduces Breast Cancer Joint Pain | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the largest, most rigorous study of its kind, acupuncture was found to significantly reduce the debilitating joint pain experienced by tens of thousands of women each year while being treated for early stage breast cancer with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). |

  12. Drug Reduces Cancer Treatment-Related Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a clinical trial demonstrating that duloxetine (Cymbalta®) may reduce joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors in women being treated for early-stage breast cancer.

  13. Joint pain epidemiology and analgesic usage in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samison, Luc Hervé; Randriatsarafara, Fidiniaina Mamy; Ralandison, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of joint pains and document analgesics usage in an African context. Patients suffering from joint pain were recruited from nine sites located in Antananarivo, Madagascar, including 6 hospital services and 3 clinics. Doctors collected information on the etiology and characteristics of the patients' pain. Analgesics prescribed by these doctors were also documented. In total, 400 patients were enrolled in the study (52.5% women, mean age of 42.34 years ± 17.7 [4-86]). Pain of mechanical type was found in 260 participants, 65%; 95% CI [60.1% to 69.6%] and inflammatory type pains in 128 cases 32%; 95% CI [27.5% to 36.9%]. Mixed pains were found in 12 patients (3%). The median duration of pain prior to the consultation was 6.5 days. The average pain intensity was 57.9 ± 19.9 mm of a total of 100 mm maximum on a visual analogue scale, VAS. The etiologies of mechanical type pains were dominated by fracture, common low back pain and tendonitis. Arthrosis was the dominant cause of inflammatory type pain, followed by rheumatoid arthritis and gout. NSAIDs (74.5%) were the most frequently prescribed analgesics followed by paracetamol (49.5%), weak opioids (23%) and corticosteroids (12.25%). Two-thirds of medical prescriptions (65.3%) were of combined analgesics. These findings demonstrated that mechanical type pains were the main reason for consultations for joint pain in these situations in Antananarivo, Madagascar. The most frequently prescribed pain-relieving medications were NSAIDs, paracetamol, weak opioids and corticosteroids. This descriptive study may be a useful starting point for further epidemiological studies of pain in the African context.

  14. Evaluation of serum cytokines in cats with and without degenerative joint disease and associated pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E; Messenger, Kristen M; Thomson, Andrea E; Griffith, Emily H; Aldrich, Lauren A; Vaden, Shelly; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease is common in cats, with signs of pain frequently found on orthopedic examination and radiographs often showing evidence of disease. However, understanding of the pathophysiology of degenerative joint disease and associated pain remains limited. Several cytokines have been identified as having a role in pain in humans, but this has not been investigated in cats. The present study was performed to use a multiplex platform to evaluate the concentration of 19 cytokines and chemokines in serum samples obtained from cats with and without degenerative joint disease and associated pain. Samples from a total of 186 cats were analyzed, with cats representing a range of severity on radiographic and orthopedic evaluations and categorized by degenerative joint disease scores and pain scores. Results showed that cats with higher radiographic degenerative joint disease scores have higher serum concentrations of IL-4 and IL-8, while cats with higher orthopedic exam pain scores have higher concentrations of IL-8, IL-2, and TNF-α; increased concentration of IL-8 in degenerative joint disease and pain may be confounded by the association with age. Discriminant analysis was unable to identify one or more cytokines that distinguish between groups of cats classified based on degenerative joint disease score category or pain score category. Finally, cluster analysis driven by analyte concentrations shows separation of groups of cats, but features defining the groups remain unknown. Further studies are warranted to investigate any changes in cytokine concentrations in response to analgesic therapies, and further evaluate the elevations in cytokine concentrations found here, particularly focused on studies of local cytokines present in synovial fluid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of the sacroiliac joint in patients with leg pain : A randomized-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.H.; Woudenberg, N.P.; de Bont, J.; van Eijs, F.; Verwer, K.; Jenniskens, H.; den Oudsten, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) may be a cause of sciatica. The aim of this study was to assess which treatment is successful for SIJ-related back and leg pain. Methods Using a single-blinded randomised trial, we assessed the short-term therapeutic efficacy of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and

  16. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.; Bohnen, A. M.; Verhaar, J. A.; Prins, A.; Ginai-Karamat, A. Z.; Laméris, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general practitioner for radiological investigation, underwent a

  17. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A. Prins (Ad); J.S. Lameris; A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. METHODS: Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general

  18. Short-term outcome of fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy of lumber facet cyst-induced radicular pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Jong Seo; Kim, Eu Sang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To determine the short-term effect of fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy of lumbar facet cyst-induced radicular pain. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy due to lumbar synovial cysts, who were treated with fluoroscopically guided injection, were retrospectively evaluated. All plain radiographic images and MR images before the therapy were reviewed. Five patients underwent only the facet joint injection, whereas twelve patients underwent the facet joint injection with perineural injection therapy. The clinical course of pain was evaluated on the first follow-up after therapy. Effective pain relief was achieved in 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients. Among 12 patients who underwent facet joint injection with perineural injection, 9 patients (75%) had an effective pain relief. Of 5 patients, 2 (40%) patients only took the facet joint injection and had an effective pain relief. Fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy shows a good short-term effect in patients with symptomatic lumbar facet joint synovial cysts.

  19. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management.

  20. Interventional therapy for neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is a common clinical refractory pain for which there are limited methods to treat. In this article, based on typical diseases, such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, trigeminal neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, lower back pain with radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS, phantom pain, the general treatment principle and method for NP are expatiated. Interventional methods for NP, including intraspinal block, radiofrequeney rhizotomy of trigeminal neuralgia, selective nerve root block, spinal cord stimulation (SCS and motor cortex stimulation (MCS are introduced, especially their indications, complications and matters needing attention.

  1. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic...

  2. Experimental quadriceps muscle pain impairs knee joint control during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a cardinal symptom in musculoskeletal diseases involving the knee joint, and aberrant movement patterns and motor control strategies are often present in these patients. However, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms linking pain to movement and motor control are unclear. To investigate...... the functional significance of muscle pain on knee joint control during walking, three-dimensional gait analyses were performed before, during, and after experimentally induced muscle pain by means of intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline (5.8%) into vastus medialis (VM) muscle of 20 healthy subjects....... Isotonic saline (0.9%) was used as control. Surface electromyography (EMG) recordings of VM, vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris, and semitendinosus muscles were synchronized with the gait analyses. During experimental muscle pain, the loading response phase peak knee extensor moments were attenuated...

  3. Temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder-type pain and comorbid pains in a national US sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesh, Octavia; Adams, Sally H; Gansky, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    To compare prevalences of self-reported comorbid headache, neck, back, and joint pains in respondents with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD)-type pain in the 2000-2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and to analyze these self-reported pains by gender and age for Non-Hispanic (NH) Whites (Caucasians), Hispanics, and NH Blacks (African Americans). Data from the 2000-2005 NHIS included information on gender, age, race, ethnicity, education, different common types of pain (specifically TMJMD-type, severe headache/migraine, neck, and low back pains), changes in health status, and health care utilization. Estimates and test statistics (ie, Pearson correlations, regressions, and logistic models) were conducted using SAS survey analysis and SUDAAN software that take into account the complex sample design. A total of 189,977 people (52% female and 48% males, 73% NH Whites, 12% Hispanic, 11% NH Blacks, and 4% "Other") were included. A total of 4.6% reported TMJMD-type pain, and only 0.77% overall reported it without any comorbid headache/migraine, neck, or low back pains; also 59% of the TMJMD-type pain (n = 8,964) reported ⋝ two comorbid pains. Females reported more comorbid pain than males (odds ratio [OR] = 1.41, P neck pain, 64% low back pain, and 62% joint pain. Differences in gender and race by age patterns were detected. For females, headache/migraine pain with TMJMD-type pain peaked around age 40 and decreased thereafter regardless of race/ethnicity. Neck pain continued to increase up to about age 60, with a higher prevalence for Hispanic women at younger ages, and more pronounced in males, being the highest in the non-Whites. Low back pain was higher in Black and Hispanic females across the age span, and higher among non-White males after age 60. Joint pain demonstrated similar patterns by race/ethnicity, with higher rates for Black females, and increased with age regardless of gender. TMJMD-type pain was most often associated with

  4. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome and Exercise Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Linschoten (Robbart)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPatellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) can be considered as a clinical entity evolving during adolescence and young adult age.Though the complaints may be self-limiting and follow a benign course there are claims that exercise therapy may be beneficial for patients with patellofemoral pain

  5. Intraarticular Pulsed Radiofrequency to Treat Refractory Lumbar Facet Joint Pain in Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Cheol; Cho, Yun-Woo; Ahn, Da Hyun; Do, Kyung Hee

    2018-04-01

    Many treatment techniques have been used for refractory lumbar facet joint pain; however, their efficacy has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory lumbar facet joint pain in patients with low back pain. Twenty patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain were recruited, and each patient was treated via intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency. The treatment effects were measured with a numerical rating scale, and the technical accuracy of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment was evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Any adverse events or complications also were checked. We performed intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment at 48 levels of the lumbar facet joints in 20 patients (5 men and 15 women; mean age, 64.50 ± 10.65 years) with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Pain scores were significantly reduced at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment (P radiofrequency results in all 20 patients, without any serious adverse effects. Treatment using intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency is an alternative to other techniques in patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A new technique to treat facet joint pain with pulsed radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schianchi, Pietro Martino

    2015-02-01

    Facet joint pain affects 5% to 15% of the population with low back pain and the prevalence increases with age due to progression of arthritis. While conservative treatments are often unsuccessful, the scientific evidence on minimally invasive therapies such as intra-articular steroid infiltration and continuous and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the medial branches is contradictory. Since PRF has recently been reported to successfully treat joint pain, a new application of this method is proposed for facetogenic lumbar pain via an intra-articular subcapsular approach. Here we reported two cases with successful treatment. A 71-year-old patient presented because of persisting pain in the left gluteal region radiating to the lateral thigh and calf when standing. Anti-inflammatory drugs produced only short-lasting insufficient relief. A 52-year-old employee was admitted in June 2012 because of axial lower lumbar pain with intermittent diffuse radiation to the right lower extremity that worsened during walking and lying down despite receiving analgesics and physiotherapy. A new approach to treat lumbar facet joint pain with PRF is simple to perform and without serious complications. In view of the good long-lasting results obtained with the two reported cases, randomized control trials are necessary to validate this new approach.

  7. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  8. [Pain therapy in pediatric oncology: pain experience, drugs and pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    Paediatric cancer patients often experience fear and pain from the disease but also in connection with the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The treatment of pain is a priority for all patients, especially for critically ill children because of their vulnerability and limited understanding. The experience of pain is always subjective and depends on the age, the pain experience and the environment.In contrast to adults, it is often difficult to detect character of pain, pain intensity and pain localization in very young patients. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are performed in analgosedation for a given drug scheme by a pediatrician experienced in intensive care.In addition, a local anesthetic for an access system/lumbar punctures in the form of EMLA® patch is to be carried out. A rapid and effective treatment of pain and appropriate analgesia can prevent patients from being traumatized.For severe pain, malignancy- or chemotherapy-induced (eg. mucositis WHO grade 3 and 4) initial use of strong opiates is recommended instead of climbing the WHO ladder. For strong opiates, there is no maximum dose, as long as a dose increase leads to clinically observable increase in analgesia, without severe side effects. Patient-controlled analgesia with morphine as continuous subcutaneous or intravenous infusions and the possibility of a bolus injection is suited for children aged 6 years. A measurement of O2-saturation is essential during this infusion. Prophylactic approaches also must be used consistently in regard to the acute side effect of opiate treatment. Good experience, we have also made a non-drug therapy, e.g. personnel/physical affection, cuddling, massage, etc.The choice of analgesia depends on the nature and cause of pain. In neuropathic pain or phantom pain coanalgetics should be used to effectively treat pain in young patients. Different analgesic treatment approaches of the appropriate indications and adverse effects are presented. A

  9. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  10. Costovertebral joint dysfunction: another misdiagnosed cause of atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, J. F.; Jolliet, P.; Junod, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of atypical chest pain frequently leads to invasive procedures. However, this painful symptomatology can sometimes be of benign origin and respond to simple therapeutic manoeuvres. A number of musculoskeletal conditions such as costovertebral joint dysfunctions should be carefully considered. We report five cases in which patient discomfort and high costs could have been avoided if awareness of these conditions had led to a correct diagnosis upon initial physical examination. PMID:1448407

  11. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, T

    2006-01-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis....... Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes....

  12. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R.W.; Jacob, A.L.; Steinbrich, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed

  13. Pressure Pain Threshold as a Predictor of Acute Postoperative Pain Following Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghverdian, Brandon A; Wright, David J; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-10-26

    Acute pain in the postoperative period after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has a significant effect on early rehabilitation, hospital length of stay, and the development of chronic pain. Consequently, efforts have been made to predict the occurrence of postoperative pain using preoperative and intraoperative factors. In this study, we tested the usefulness of preoperative pressure pain threshold (PPT) values in the prediction of three outcomes for patients who underwent TJA: visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. Using a digital pressure algometer, we measured the preoperative PPT in 41 patients expected to undergo TJA at three different body sites: the first web space of the hand, the operative joint, and the contralateral joint. We correlated each PPT separately with postoperative visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. No significant correlation was found between preoperative PPT and the three postoperative outcomes. This finding held true when patients were subdivided by surgery type (total knee arthroplasty vs. total hip arthroplasty). There was no significant difference in PPT between the three body testing sites. This study failed to prove the usefulness of PPT in the prediction of acute postoperative pain, pain medication consumption, and length of stay. The pressure algometer has previously found a place in the assessment of pain in a variety of clinical settings, but its utility has not yet been demonstrated in patients undergoing TJA.

  14. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  15. Long-Term Reduction of Sacroiliac Joint Pain With Peripheral Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guentchev, Marin; Preuss, Christian; Rink, Rainer; Peter, Levente; Sailer, Martin H M; Tuettenberg, Jochen

    2017-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that 86% of the patients treated with peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) for therapy-refractory sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain were satisfied with the result after 1 year of treatment. To investigate the long-term (up to 4 years) response rate of this novel treatment. Sixteen consecutive patients with therapy-refractory SIJ pain were treated with PNS and followed for 4 years in 3 patients, 3 years in 6 patients, and 2 years in 1 patient. Quality of life, pain, and patient satisfaction were assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and International Patient Satisfaction Index. Patients reported a pain reduction from 8.8 to 1.6 (VAS) at 1 year ( P < .001), and 13 of 14 patients (92.9%) rated the therapy as effective (International Patient Satisfaction Index score ≤ 2). At 2 years, average pain score was 1.9 ( P < .001), and 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) considered the treatment a success. At 3 years, 8 of 9 patients (88.9%) were satisfied with the treatment results, reporting an average VAS of 2.0 ( P < .005). At 4 years, 2 of 3 patients were satisfied with the treatment results. We have shown for the first time that PNS is a successful long-term therapy for SIJ pain. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  16. Magneto-therapy of human joint cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof; Miszczak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The topic of the present paper concerns the human joint cartilage therapy performed by the magnetic induction field. There is proved the thesis that the applied magnetic field for concrete cartilage illness should depend on the proper relative and concrete values of applied magnetic induction, intensity as well the time of treatment duration. Additionally, very important are frequencies and amplitudes of magnetic field as well as magnetic permeability of the synovial fluid. The research methods used in this paper include: magnetic induction field produced by a new Polish and German magneto electronic devices for the therapy of human joint cartilage diseases, stationary and movable magnetic applicators, magnetic bandage, ferrofluid injections, author's experience gained in Germany research institutes and practical results after measurements and information from patients. The results of this paper concern concrete parameters of time dependent electro-magnetic field administration during the joint cartilage therapy duration and additionally concern the corollaries which are implied from reading values gained on the magnetic induction devices. The main conclusions obtained in this paper are as follows: Time dependent magnetic induction field increases the dynamic viscosity of movable synovial fluid and decreases symptoms of cartilage illness for concrete intensity of magnetic field and concrete field line architecture. The ferrofluid therapy and phospholipids bilayer simultaneously with the administrated external electromagnetic field, increases the dynamic viscosity of movable synovial fluid.

  17. Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key En español Send us your comments ... type of arthritis. It’s far more common than rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on ...

  18. Treatment Effects of Maxillary Flat Occlusal Splints for Painful Clicking of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wen Chang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Existing therapies for symptoms related to painful clicking of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ have rarely met with complete success and predicting prognosis remains difficult. Few studies have reported the efficacy of maxillary flat occlusal splints (MFOSs for the treatment of painful clicking of the TMJ, and few studies have evaluated the predisposing factors that influence the clinical outcomes of MFOSs. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment efficacy of MFOSs for painful clicking of the TMJ, and to determine the factors influencing TMJ therapy with MFOSs. We conducted a retrospective study of 109 patients suffering from unilateral clicking concurrent with preauricular area pain for at least 2 months between 2004 and 2008. Seventy-five patients were treated with an MFOS, while 34 patients did not receive MFOS therapy. Clicking score, pain-free maximal mouth opening, pain score, duration of the clicking sounds, age and bruxism were recorded during treatment and involved into the reviews. The degree of joint clicking was determined by a stethoscope placed in the anterolateral area of the external auditory canal and was divided into four grades. Data were analyzed using a Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t test. Results showed statistically significant differences in treatment outcomes between the MFOS-treated and control groups in clicking index, maximal mouth opening, pain and complete remission rates of symptoms within 1 year. Furthermore, for patients treated with MFOS, there were statistically significant differences in the clinical outcomes between those with a high clicking index and those with a low index before treatment. Factors significantly correlated with successful outcomes of MFOS included nocturnal bruxism, patient age and duration of clicking. MFOSs can be used to treat patients with painful clicking of the TMJ and related symptoms. The severity of clicking, bruxism, age and duration of

  19. Technical Note: Treatment of Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Peripheral Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guentchev, Marin; Preuss, Christian; Rink, Rainer; Peter, Levente; Wocker, Ernst-Ludwig; Tuettenberg, Jochen

    2015-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain affects older adults with a prevalence of up to 20% among patients with chronic low back pain. While pain medication, joint blocks and denervation procedures achieve pain relief in most patients, some cases fail to improve. Our goal was to determine the effectiveness of SIJ peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with severe conservative therapy-refractory SIJ pain. Here we present 12 patients with severe conservative therapy-refractory pain receiving an SIJ peripheral nerve stimulation. Patient satisfaction, pain, and quality of life were evaluated by means of the International Patient Satisfaction Index (IPSI), visual analog scale (VAS), and Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI) using standard questionnaires. For stimulation we placed an eight-pole peripheral nerve electrode parallel to the SIJ. Two weeks postoperatively, our patients reported an average ODI reduction from 57% to 32% and VAS from 9 to 2.1. IPSI was 1.1. After six months, the therapy was rated as effective in seven out of eight patients reporting at that period. The average ODI was low at 34% (p = 0.0006), while the VAS index rose to 3.8 (p < 0.0001) and IPSI to 1.9. Twelve months after stimulation, six out of seven patients considered their treatment a success with an average ODI of 21% (p < 0.0005), VAS 1.7 (p < 0.0001), and IPSI 1.3. We conclude that SIJ stimulation is a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of intractable SIJ pain. Further studies are required to determine the precise target group and long-term effect of this novel treatment method. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. A New Radiofrequency Ablation Procedure to Treat Sacroiliac Joint Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianguo; Chen, See Loong; Zimmerman, Nicole; Dalton, Jarrod E; LaSalle, Garret; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain may arise from disorders of the sacroiliac joint in up to 30% of patients. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the nerves innervating the sacroiliac joint has been shown to be a safe and efficacious strategy. We aimed to develop a new RFA technique to relieve low back pain secondary to sacroiliac joint disorders. Methodology development with validation through prospective observational non-randomized trial (PONRT). Academic multidisciplinary health care system, Ohio, USA. We devised a guide-block to facilitate accurate placement of multiple electrodes to simultaneously ablate the L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of the S1, S2, and S3 dorsal rami. This was achieved by bipolar radiofrequency ablation (b-RFA) to create a strip lesion from the lateral border of the base of the sacral superior articular process (L5-S1 facet joint) to the lateral border of the S3 sacral foramen. We applied this technique in 31 consecutive patients and compared the operating time, x-ray exposure time and dose, and clinical outcomes with patients (n = 62) who have been treated with the cooled radiofrequency technique. Patients' level of pain relief was reported as 80% pain relief at one, 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. The relationship between RFA technique and duration of pain relief was evaluated using interval-censored multivariable Cox regression. The new technique allowed reduction of operating time by more than 50%, x-ray exposure time and dose by more than 80%, and cost by more than $1,000 per case. The percent of patients who achieved > 50% pain reduction was significantly higher in the b-RFA group at 3, 6, and 12 months follow-up, compared to the cooled radiofrequency group. No complications were observed in either group. Although the major confounding factors were taken into account in the analysis, use of historical controls does not balance observed and unobserved potential confounding variables between groups so that the reported results are potentially

  1. Inter-rater reliability of diagnostic criteria for sacroiliac joint-, disc- and facet joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Cornelis W J; Groeneweg, Johannes G; Stronks, Dirk L; Huygen, Frank J P M

    2017-01-01

    Several diagnostic criteria sets are described in the literature to identify low back pain subtypes, but very little is known about the inter-rater reliability of these criteria. We conducted a study to determine the reliability of diagnostic tests that point towards SI joint-, disc- or facet joint pain. Inter-rater reliability study alongside three randomized clinical trials. Multidisciplinary pain center of general hospital. Patients aged 18 or more with medical history and physical examination suggestive of sacroiliac joint-, disc- and facet joint pain on lumbar level. Making use of nowadays most common used diagnostic criteria, a physical examination is taken independently by three physicians (two pain physicians and one orthopedic surgeon). Inter-rater reliability (Kappa (κ) measure of agreement) and significance (p) between raters are presented. Strengths of agreement, indicated with κ values above 0,20, are presented in order of agreement. One hundred patients were included. None of the parameters from the physical investigation had κ values of more than 0.21 (fair) in all pairs of raters. Between two raters (C and D), there was an almost perfect agreement on three parameters, more specifically ``Abnormal sensory and motor examination, hyperactive or diminished reflexes'', ``Sitting exam shows no reflex, motor or sensory signs in the legs'' and ``Straight leg raising (Laségue) negative between 30 and 70 degrees of flexion''. The ``Drop test positive'' parameters had moderate strength of agreement between raters A and D and fair strength between raters A and B. The ``Digital interspinous pressure test positive'' had moderate strength of agreement between raters C and D and fair strength of agreement between raters A and B as well as raters B and C. Three other parameters had a fair strength of agreement between two raters, all other parameters had a slight or poor strength of agreement. Inter-rater reliability, confidence intervals and significance of

  2. Are manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture effective for the management of patients with whiplash-associated disorders or neck pain and associated disorders? An update of the Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders by the OPTIMa collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jessica J; Shearer, Heather M; Mior, Silvano; Jacobs, Craig; Côté, Pierre; Randhawa, Kristi; Yu, Hainan; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Sutton, Deborah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J; Ameis, Arthur; Ammendolia, Carlo; Brison, Robert; Nordin, Margareta; Stupar, Maja; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2016-12-01

    In 2008, the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force) found limited evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture for the management of whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) or neck pain and associated disorders (NAD). This review aimed to update the findings of the Neck Pain Task Force, which examined the effectiveness of manual therapies, passive physical modalities, and acupuncture for the management of WAD or NAD. This is a systematic review and best evidence synthesis. The sample includes randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies comparing manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture with other interventions, placebo or sham, or no intervention. The outcome measures were self-rated or functional recovery, pain intensity, health-related quality of life, psychological outcomes, or adverse events. We systematically searched five databases from 2000 to 2014. Random pairs of independent reviewers critically appraised eligible studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Studies with a low risk of bias were stratified by the intervention's stage of development (exploratory vs. evaluation) and synthesized following best evidence synthesis principles. Funding was provided by the Ministry of Finance. We screened 8,551 citations, and 38 studies were relevant and 22 had a low risk of bias. Evidence from seven exploratory studies suggests that (1) for recent but not persistent NAD grades I-II, thoracic manipulation offers short-term benefits; (2) for persistent NAD grades I-II, technical parameters of cervical mobilization (eg, direction or site of manual contact) do not impact outcomes, whereas one session of cervical manipulation is similar to Kinesio Taping; and (3) for NAD grades I-II, strain-counterstrain treatment is no better than placebo. Evidence from 15 evaluation studies

  3. Is cannabis an effective treatment for joint pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard J; Miller, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis has been used to treat pain for thousands of years. However, since the early part of the 20th century, laws restricting cannabis use have limited its evaluation using modern scientific criteria. Over the last decade, the situation has started to change because of the increased availability of cannabis in the United States for either medical or recreational purposes, making it important to provide the public with accurate information as to the effectiveness of the drug for joint pain among other indications. The major psychotropic component of cannabis is Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), one of some 120 naturally occurring phytocannabinoids. Cannabidiol (CBD) is another molecule found in herbal cannabis in large amounts. Although CBD does not produce psychotropic effects, it has been shown to produce a variety of pharmacological effects. Hence, the overall effects of herbal cannabis represent the collective activity of THC, CBD and a number of minor components. The action of THC is mediated by two major G-protein coupled receptors, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2, and recent work has suggested that other targets may also exist. Arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids are the normal physiological activators of the two cannabinoid receptors. Natural phytocannabinoids and synthetic derivatives have produced clear activity in a variety of models of joint pain in animals. These effects are the result of both inhibition of pain pathway signalling (mostly CB1) and anti-inflammatory effects (mostly CB2). There are also numerous anecdotal reports of the effectiveness of smoking cannabis for joint pain. Indeed, it is the largest medical request for the use of the drug. However, these reports generally do not extend to regulated clinical trials for rheumatic diseases. Nevertheless, the preclinical and human data that do exist indicate that the use of cannabis should be taken seriously as a potential treatment of joint pain.

  4. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  5. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain.

  6. The value of SPECT bone scans in diagnosis of patients with zygapophseal joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiajia; Liang Yu; Li Biao; Zhu Chengmo; Chen Gang; Wang Chao; Tian Weijia; Qu Liumin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Bone scintigraphy with SPECT of the lumbar spine allows identification of lesions not seen with planar imaging, in patients with chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of SPECT bone scans in diagnosis of patients with zygapophyseal joint pain. Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients in Ruijin hospital from July 2006 to March 2007 with low back pain were en- rolled. All patients underwent bone scintigraphy with SPECT. According to the results of SPECT, patients with isotope-uptake joints received injections at the levels where abnormalities were identified on the scan. Patients with negative scans received other treatment (conservative treatment or surgery) but not facet joint injection. Clinical records were collected at 1-, 3-, and 6-month in SPECT-positive group after their initial treatment. And the SPECT-negative group were followed up at 6-month after therapy. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 10.0. Patients with SPECT-positive and -negative results were performed with the grouped t-test. Visual analog scales (VAS) were with the paired t-test used in patients with positive scans at before and after treatment. Results: Fifteen cases had facetal uptake of isotope on SPECT bone scans. After facet joint injection, 85.7% patients (12/14, 1 patient was excluded for operation) had improvement in pain score at 1-month, 78.6% (11/14) at 3-month, and 50.0% (7/14) at 6-month. Of 20 negative cases, 3 were treated by surgery and 17 by conservative treatment. All 20 cases were followed up for 6 months and 70.0% (14/20) had long time pain relief. Conclusion: SPECT bone scans are helpful to identify patients with low back pain who would benefit from facet joint injections. (authors)

  7. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2008-07-16

    The effectiveness of injection therapy for low-back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent and dosage generally found in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) points to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low-back pain. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January 1999 to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet or local sites for subacute or chronic low-back pain were included. Studies which compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy or Ozone therapy with other treatments, were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Two review authors independently assessed the quality of the trials. If study data were clinically and statistically too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis, we used a best evidence synthesis to summarize the results. The evidence was classified into five levels (strong, moderate, limited, conflicting or no evidence), taking into account the methodological quality of the studies. 18 trials (1179 participants) were included in this updated review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender- and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics and a variety of

  8. Radiofrequency denervation of the hip joint for pain management: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Radhakrishna, Mohan; Etheridge, Paul; Besemann, Markus; Finlayson, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with severe pain and functional limitations as a result of left hip osteoarthritis. He had failed multiple treatments while waiting for a hip arthroplasty, including physical therapy, medications, and various intra-articular injections. Thermal radiofrequency lesioning of the obturator and femoral articular branches to the hip joint was offered in the interim. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe an inferior-lateral approach for lesioning the obturator branch, the clinical application of successive lesions to increase denervation area, and outcomes in a patient receiving a second treatment with previously good results. To discuss relevant and technical factors for this specific case, we reviewed previous literature on hip joint radiofrequency and critically evaluated previous anatomic studies in the context of radiofrequency. The first treatment provided significant benefit for a period of 6 months. A second treatment was employed providing only mild to moderate benefit until his joint replacement surgery 4 months later. Literature review revealed studies of low quality secondary to small sample sizes, patient selection methodology, inclusion of patients with heterogenous etiologies for pain, variable needle placement techniques, and lack of measurement of functional outcomes. Case report and low quality studies in existing literature. Hip joint radiofrequency denervation is a promising avenue for adjunctive treatment of hip pain. Further cadaveric studies are required to clarify a multitude of technical parameters. Once these are well defined, future clinical studies should consider pain, functional, and economic outcomes in their design.

  9. Management of chronic ankle pain using joint mobilization and ASTYM® treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, Emily J; Mathers, Jessie

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of ankle sprains predominately focuses on the acute management of this condition; less emphasis is placed on the treatment of ankle sprains in the chronic phase of recovery. Manual therapy, in the form of joint mobilization and manipulation, has been shown to be effective in the management of this condition, but the combination of joint mobilization and manipulation in tandem with ASTYM® treatment has not been explored. The purpose of this case report is to chronicle the management of a patient with chronic ankle pain who was treated with manual therapy including manipulation and ASTYM treatment. As a result of a fall down stairs 6 months previously, the patient sustained a severe ankle sprain. The soft tissue damage was accompanied by bony disruptions which warranted the patient spending 3 weeks in a walking boot. At the initial evaluation, the patient reported difficulty with descending stairs reciprocally and not being able to run more than 4 minutes on the treadmill before the pain escalated to the level that she had to stop running. After five sessions of therapy consisting of joint mobilization, manipulation and ASTYM, the patient was able to descend stairs and run 40 minutes without pain.

  10. [Arthroscopic therapy of ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhibin; Mi, Kun; Wei, Renzhi; Liu, Wu; Wang, Bin

    2011-07-01

    To study the operative procedure and the effectiveness of arthroscopic therapy for ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation. Between March 2008 and April 2010, 38 patients with ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation were treated. Among them, there were 28 males and 10 females with an average age of 28 years (range, 18 to 42 years). The time from internal fixation to admission was 12-16 months (mean, 13.8 months). There were pressing pain in anterolateral and anterior ankle. The dorsal extension ranged from -20 to -5 degrees (mean, -10.6 degrees), and the palmar flexion was 30-40 degrees (mean, 35.5 degrees). The total score was 48.32 +/- 9.24 and the pain score was 7.26 +/- 1.22 before operation according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. The X-ray films showed osteophyte formation in anterior tibia and talus; MRI showed cartilage injury in 22 cases. Arthroscopic intervention included removing osteophytes, debriding fabric scars and synovial membrane tissues, and removing osteochondral fragments. Arthroscopic microfracture technique was used in 22 patients with cartilage injury. All incisions healed primarily. Thirty-eight cases were followed up 10-26 months (mean, 16 months). At last follow-up, 26 patients had normal range of motion (ROM); the dorsal extension was 15-25 degrees (mean, 19.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40.7 degrees). Eight patients had mild limited ROM; the dorsal extension was 5-15 degrees (mean, 7.2 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 39.5 degrees). Four patients had mild limited ROM and pain in posterior portion of the ankle after a long walking (3-4 hours); the dorsal extension was 0-5 degrees (mean, 2.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-40 degrees (mean, 37.5 degrees). The total score was 89.45 +/- 9.55 and the pain score was 1.42 +/- 1.26 after

  11. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy joint committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sites, Brian D; Chan, Vincent W; Neal, Joseph M

    2010-01-01

    associated with UGRA,3. A training practice pathway for postgraduate anesthesiologists, and4. A residency-based training pathway.In both the residency and postgraduate pathways, training, competency, and proficiency requirements include both didactic and experiential components. The Joint Committee...

  12. Recent advances in acute pain management: understanding the mechanisms of acute pain, the prescription of opioids, and the role of multimodal pain therapy [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Wardhan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss advances in acute pain management, including the recent report of the joint American Pain Society and American Academy of Pain Medicine task force on the classification of acute pain, the role of psychosocial factors, multimodal pain management, new non-opioid therapy, and the effect of the “opioid epidemic”. In this regard, we propose that a fundamental principle in acute pain management is identifying patients who are most at risk and providing an “opioid free anesthesia and postoperative analgesia”. This can be achieved by using a multimodal approach that includes regional anesthesia and minimizing the dose and the duration of opioid prescription. This allows prescribing medications that work through different mechanisms. We shall also look at the recent pharmacologic and treatment advances made in acute pain and regional anesthesia.

  13. [Shoulder joint pain of rotator cuff injury treated with electroacupuncture and Mulligan's mobilization: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanwu; Wang, Chongmin; Chen, Huade; Ye, Xinmiao

    2018-01-12

    To verify the clinical therapeutic effects on shoulder joint pain of rotator cuff injury treated with electroacupuncture (EA) and Mulligan's mobilization. A total of 120 patients of shoulder joint pain of rotator cuff injury were randomized into an EA group, a rehabilitation group and a combined therapy group, 40 cases in each one. In the EA group, EA was applied to Jianzhen (SI 9), Jianliao (TE 14), Jianyu (LI 15), Tianzong (SI 11), Jianqian (extra) and Binao (LI 14) in the affected side. Of these acupoints, Jianliao (TE 14) and Jianyu (LI 15), Jianzhen (SI 9) and Tianzong (SI 11) were stimulated with Han 's electric apparatus. In the rehabilitation group, Mulligan's mobilization was used, including scapular mobilization, static joint mobilization and dynamic joint mobilization. In the combined therapy group, EA was used in combination with Mulligan mobilization. The treatment was given once a day in each group, 5 sessions a week, totally for 6 weeks. The pain intensity of shoulder joint (VAS), the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating scale (UCLA) and the range of motion (ROM) of shoulder joint were evaluated before and 6 weeks after treatment separately. The adverse reactions were recorded in each group. VAS scores were all reduced, UCLA scores increased and ROM improved after treatment as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the three groups (all P joint pain of rotator cuff injury, better than the simple application of either EA or Mulligan's mobilization.

  14. Pain, music creativity and music therapy in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, C C

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the music therapy literature yields numerous reports to support the role of music in the alleviation of pain in palliative care. Four theoretical perspectives that support why many patients report reduced pain sensation after music therapy include: the psychological relationship between music and pain; the psychophysiological theory; spinal mechanisms involved in pain modulation; and the role of endorphins. Considerations significant to the use of music in pain relief include how music, used inappropriately, can aggravate pain sensation. Case studies, which include the use of creative music therapy techniques, point to the efficacy of music therapy in alleviating the pain experiences of both palliative care patients and their significant others.

  15. Patient expectations predict greater pain relief with joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Davey, John Roderick; Mahomed, Nizar

    2009-08-01

    We examined the relationship between patient expectations of total joint arthroplasty and functional outcomes. We surveyed 1799 patients undergoing primary hip or knee arthroplasty for demographic data and Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scores at baseline, 3 months, and 1 year of follow-up. Patient expectations were determined with 3 survey questions. The patients with the greatest expectations of surgery were younger, male, and had a lower body mass index. Linear regression modeling showed that a greater expectation of pain relief with surgery independently predicted greater reported pain relief at 1 year of follow-up, adjusted for all relevant covariates (P relief after joint arthroplasty is an important predictor of outcomes at 1 year.

  16. Hyaluronic acid intra-articular injection and exercise therapy: effects on pain and disability in subjects affected by lower limb joints osteoarthritis. A systematic review by the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Frizziero, Antonio; Rovere, Giancarlo; Vittadini, Filippo; Uliano, Domenico; LA Bruna, Silvano; Gatto, Renato; Nava, Claudia; Leggero, Vittorio; Masiero, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    It is debated whether intra-articular viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) can lead to improvements in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing physical and rehabilitative interventions. To assess the effects of intra-articular viscosupplementation on disability in subjects with OA undergoing physical and rehabilitative interventions. Information on pain and quality of life were also collected. The databases of PubMed, Medline, EMbase and CINAHL were searched for English language full-text randomized controlled trials comparing intra-articular viscosupplementation alone or associated with physical and rehabilitative interventions to viscosupplementation alone, shame treatment, waiting lists, and any type of rehabilitative interventions. Methodological quality of each study was assessed by using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale. A total of 115 references were retrieved, and 8 studies were selected. Three trials compared HA injection and physical therapy in knee OA, with disability and pain improvements in all studies, and between-group differences in favor of physical therapy in two studies; two trials compared HA injection and home exercises in knee OA, with improvements in pain, disability and quality of life in all studies, without between-group differences; two trials compared HA injection plus physical therapy agents and exercises to exercises plus physical therapy agents in knee OA, with improvements in disability and pain in both studies, and between-group differences in favor of the inclusion HA in one study; one trial compared HA injection and home exercises in ankle OA, with improvements in disability and pain in both arms without between-group differences. Physical therapy agents seemed to have greater effects than intra-articular viscosupplementation on disability and pain. In the other cases both intra-articular viscosupplementation and physical and rehabilitative interventions seemed to be equally effective in improving

  17. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy joint committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sites, Brian D; Chan, Vincent W; Neal, Joseph M

    2010-01-01

    to members and institutions the scope of practice, the teaching curriculum, and the options for implementing the medical practice of UGRA.This document specifically defines the following:1. 10 common tasks used when performing an ultrasound-guided nerve block,2. The core competencies and skill sets...... associated with UGRA,3. A training practice pathway for postgraduate anesthesiologists, and4. A residency-based training pathway.In both the residency and postgraduate pathways, training, competency, and proficiency requirements include both didactic and experiential components. The Joint Committee...

  18. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma as a differential diagnosis of diffuse mono-articular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvien, Tim; Zustin, Jozef; Mussawy, Haider; Schmidt, Tobias; Pogoda, Pia; Ueblacker, Peter

    2016-11-04

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the frequency of intra-articular osteoid osteoma (iaOO) in a large study cohort and to demonstrate its clinical relevance as an important differential diagnosis of non-specific mono-articular joint pain. We searched the registry for bone tumours of the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf for osteoid osteomas in the last 42 years. Herein, we present three selected iaOO which were detected in the three major weight-bearing joints. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed for initial diagnosis. Out of a total of 367 osteoid osteomas, 19 (5.2 %) tumours were localized intra-articularly. In all three presented tumours, a history of severe mono-articular pain was reported; however, the mean time to correct diagnosis was delayed to 20.7 months. Clearly, the nidus seen in CT and MRI images in combination with inconsistent salicylate-responsive nocturnal pain led to the diagnosis of iaOO. Rarely, osteoid osteoma can occur in an intra-articular location. In cases of diffuse mono-articular pain, iaOO should be considered both in large and smaller joints to avoid delays in diagnosis and therapy of this benign bone tumour.

  19. Pain in the neck and shoulder joint in a rheumatologist's practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases accompanied by pain in the neck and shoulder joint are rather numerous, frequently result in permanent functional failure, and are encountered in a considerable number of patients followed up by rheumatologists, neurologists, orthopedics, and therapists. The frequency of these impairments may vary from 7 to 47% according to the characteristics of the study population and used definition. The list of nosological entities to be excluded in the differential diagnosis includes diseases caused by lesions in the cervical spinal area, its muscles, ligaments, and tendons, neurological changes, systemic inflammatory diseases, myofascial pain syndrome, as well as diseases that can induce referred pain in the neck and shoulder joint (pneumonia, coronary heart disease, gastroduodenal ulcer disease. To follow a sparing regimen plays a large role in the treatment of soft tissue diseases in the shoulder joint. The use of analgesics, primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as nimesulide (nayz, is an important component of therapy. The drug has been successfully used for back pain, osteoarthrosis, and extraarticular soft tissue diseases. The local administration of glucocorticoids is worth consideration if a reduced load on the affected area and the use of NSAIDs produce no desirable effect.

  20. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Ernst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.) [de

  1. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes; Interventionell radiologische Therapie benigner lumbaler Schmerzsyndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huegli, R.W.; Jacob, A.L.; Steinbrich, W. [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-03-15

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed.

  2. Leg symptoms associated with sacroiliac joint disorder and related pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Eiichi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Kurosawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Kyoko

    2017-06-01

    The symptoms of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) disorders are usually detected in the buttock and groin, and occasionally referred to the thigh and leg. However, lumbar disorders also cause symptoms in these same body regions. The presence of a characteristic, symptomatic pattern in the legs would be useful for diagnosing SIJ disorders. This study aimed to identify specific leg symptoms in patients with SIJ pain originating from the posterior sacroiliac ligament and determine the rate of occurrence of these symptoms. The source population consisted of 365 consecutive patients from February 2005 to December 2007. One hundred patients were diagnosed with SIJ pain by a periarticular SIJ injection (42 males and 58 females, average age 46 years, age range, 18-75 years). A leg symptom map was made by subtracting the symptoms after a periarticular SIJ injection from the initial symptoms, and evaluating the rate of each individual symptom by area. Ninety-four patients reported pain at or around the posterior-superior iliac spine (PSIS). Leg symptoms comprised pain and a numbness/tingling sensation; ≥60% of the patients had these symptoms. Pain was mainly detected in the back, buttock, groin, and thigh areas, while numbness/tingling was mainly detected in the lateral to posterior thigh and back of the calf. Leg symptoms associated with SIJ pain originating from the posterior sacroiliac ligament include both pain and numbness, which do not usually correspond to the dermatome. These leg symptoms in addition to pain around the PSIS may indicate SIJ disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pulsed Radiofrequency Application for the Treatment of Pain Secondary to Sacroiliac Joint Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Yu Ri; Lee, Na Rea; Kwon, Young Suk; Jang, Ji Su; Lim, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain can result from degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Patients with metastatic bone pain who do not respond to conventional treatment may need more aggressive neuroinvasive approaches. Recently, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation has emerged as a promising treatment alternative for refractory cases of SI joint pain. Nevertheless, there is no report on the treatment of pain arising from SI joint metastases with PRF. We are reporting about a 63-yea...

  4. Percutaneous radio frequency ablation for relief of pain in a patient of hip joint avascular necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Kasliwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Avascular osteonecrosis (AVN of the femoral head is one of the most common skeletal complications of kidney transplantation. Patients with hip joint avascular necrosis usually undergo joint arthroplasty. However, if a patient is unfit for surgery due to some comorbidities, hip joint articular branches denervation can be done to control pain and improve functional life. There is a large variation in the contribution as well in the position of the articular branches to hip joint by obturator, femoral, and sciatic nerves. Several authors have proposed percutaneous radio frequency denervation of the hip joint to eliminate pain.In our case, the patient was having an intractable hip joint pain which was not responding to conservative drug therapy as well physiotherapy. In our patient, hip arthroplasty was contraindicated because of the high risk of infection and anticoagulants. After diagnostic block, the pain in his groin and hip disappeared immediately. The patient noted a decrease in pain (Visual Analog Scale, VAS 9-10 to 1-2 and an improvement in the ability to walk. Then we performed percutaneous radio frequency ablation of the articular branches of the obturator nerve and the femoral nerve. Nerve blocks were performed via a combined approach using fluoroscopy and nerve stimulation to identify the obturator nerve. Because optimal coagulation requires electrodes to lie parallel to the nerves, a perpendicular approach probably produced only a minimal lesion. A perpendicular approach is likely to puncture femoral vessels. Vessel puncture can be avoided if an oblique pass is used. The patient had improved ability to ambulate and the patient can carry out his daily routine activites at home without much pain and can sleep comfortably. There were no complications like motor deficit, neuritis, bleeding, or infection. Our case report gives few impressions. First, it shows that if radio contrast agent (omnipaque dye use is restricted or contraindicated, a

  5. Groin pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction and lumbar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Daisuke; Murakami, Eiichi; Aizawa, Toshimi

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of groin pain in patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction, lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS), and lumbar disc herniation (LDH) who did not have hip disorders, and evaluated the clinical features that distinguished SIJ dysfunction from LSS and LDH. We evaluated 127 patients (57 men, 70 women, average age 55 years) with SIJ dysfunction, 146 (98 men, 48 women, average age 71 years) with LSS, and 124 (83 men, 41 women, average age 50 years) with LDH. The following data were retrospectively collected from the patients' medical charts: (1) the prevalence of groin pain for each pathology; (2) corresponding spinal level of LSS and LDH in the patients with groin pain; (3) the pain areas in the buttocks and back; pain increase while in positions such as sitting, lying supine, and side-lying; an SIJ shear test; and four tender points composed of the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS), long posterior sacroiliac ligament (LPSL), sacrotuberous ligament (STL), and iliac muscle. Fifty-nine (46.5%) patients with SIJ dysfunction, 10 (6.8%) with LSS, and 10 (8.1%) with LDH reported groin pain. Of the 10 patients with LSS, five presented with cauda equina symptoms, two had stenosis of L2-L3, and three had stenosis below L3-L4. The other five presented with radiculopathy: the corresponding nerve root was L2, L3, and L4 in one patient each, and L5 in two. Of the 10 patients with LDH, eight presented with radiculopathy: the corresponding nerve root was L2 and L4 in three patients each, and L5 in two. Two patients presented with L4-L5 discogenic pain without radiculopathy. In patients with groin pain, pain provoked by the SIJ shear test and the tenderness of the PSIS and LPSL were significant physical signs that differentiated SIJ dysfunction from LSS and LDH. (Fisher's exact test, P<0.05) CONCLUSION: The prevalence of groin pain in patients with SIJ dysfunction was higher than in those with LSS or LDH. When patients who do not have hip disorders

  6. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  7. Sacroiliac joint pain as an important element of psoriatic arthritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Skorupska, Elżbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2013-04-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the coexistence of arthritis with psoriasis of the skin and nails. The sacroiliac joints were observed in 34-78% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Due to such a high prevalence of SIJ dysfunction, understanding pathophysiology of pain and the associated pain pattern becomes a very important aspect of PsA diagnosis. As far as the etiology of SI joint dysfunction is concerned, it has not been disambiguated yet. Among the main causative factors, injuries and strains of the structures surrounding the joint are noted. Joint pathology usually manifests itself by pain occurring within the area of the joint. The causes of pain may be divided into two categories: intra-articular and extra-articular. Pain caused by the SI joint may be nociceptive or neural in nature, whereas the pain pattern characteristic of the joint correlates with its innervation and is consistent with S2 dorsal rami.

  8. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  9. Pulsed Radiofrequency Application for the Treatment of Pain Secondary to Sacroiliac Joint Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yu Ri; Lee, Na Rea; Kwon, Young Suk; Jang, Ji Su; Lim, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain can result from degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Patients with metastatic bone pain who do not respond to conventional treatment may need more aggressive neuroinvasive approaches. Recently, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation has emerged as a promising treatment alternative for refractory cases of SI joint pain. Nevertheless, there is no report on the treatment of pain arising from SI joint metastases with PRF. We are reporting about a 63-year-old woman suffering from buttock pain due to breast cancer metastases in the SI joint. We treated this patient with PRF neuromodulation of the L4-S3 primary dorsal rami and lateral branches using a rotating curved needle technique. The patient tolerated the procedures well, without any complications. She experienced about 70% reduction in pain, and pain relief was sustained for 10 months. This result suggests that PRF neuromodulation is a safe, effective treatment for pain from SI joint metastases.

  10. Psychoneuroimmunological disorders and temporomandibular joint pain: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology characterizes a disease entity that combines psychological components, central nervous system regulation, and immunology, to explain the etiological complexity of a disease. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs include a heterogeneous group of painful conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, muscles of mastication, and the adjacent anatomic structures. This review focuses on the psychoneuroimmunological diseases and disorders that mimic the symptoms of TMDs. The differentiation of these disorders is of great significance to the oral physician - differentiating and diagnosing the cause of TMJ pain and treating it effectively to benefit the patient.The literature for this review was taken from Medline/PubMed, other indexed journals, standard text books, and online material.

  11. Exercise therapy for chronic nonspecific low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Verhagen, Arianne P; Ostelo, Raymond W; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W

    Exercise therapy is the most widely used type of conservative treatment for low back pain. Systematic reviews have shown that exercise therapy is effective for chronic but not for acute low back pain. During the past 5 years, many additional trials have been published on chronic low back pain. This

  12. The sterno-clavicular joint: anatomy, biomechanic, clinical features and aspects of manual therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sterno-clavicular joint covers one remarkable importance in the complex of the shoulder girdle. This review investigates the anatomy, biomechanics, main affections and involvement of this joint in the pathological processes of the shoulder girdle in its complex. Moreover, it focuses on the opportunities offered from the conservative treatment, using in particular the manual therapy. Active and passive, as well as against isometric resistance movements, are discussed. In particular, the passive mobilization is demonstrated effective in the restoration of joint mobility. The sterno- clavicular joint is not structured in order to complete great work loads and has the tendency to become hypermotile or unstable, if subordinate to overload works, becoming painful. In this case, the techniques of passive mobilization and of modulation of the pain turn out effective.

  13. [Cinematography, a new diagnostic procedure in evaluation of the injured painful wrist joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, K D; Wuttge-Hannig, A; Hannig, C

    1990-01-01

    By the X-ray Cineradiografie we are able to examine and to judge the dynamic of the wrist bones by 50 pictures/sec. in comparison to one another and also depending on their ligaments. We did an investigation of 170 patients with painful wrist. With the method we were able to make up a clear diagnosis and to propose the therapy. I.e.: If consecutive shortening of the radius after distal radius fracture resulting ingruency of the wrist joint is relevant, or a scaphoid pseudarthrosis is fixed elastically, or a scaphoic dissociation is effective. The variations were shown in comparison to normal circumstances.

  14. Indium-granulocyte scanning in the painful prosthetic joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pring, D.J.; Henderson, R.G.; Keshavarzian, A.; Rivett, A.G.; Krausz, T.; Coombs, R.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The value of indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning to determine the presence of infection was assessed in 50 prosthetic joints (41 of which were painful) in 40 patients. Granulocytes were obtained from the patients' blood and labeled in plasma with indium 111 tropolonate. Abnormal accumulation of indium 111 in the region of the prosthesis was noted. Proven infection occurred in 11 prostheses, and all of the infections were detected by indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning. Nineteen were not infected (including nine asymptomatic controls) and only two produced false-positive scans. This represents a specificity of 89.5%, sensitivity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 93.2%. These results compare favorably with plain radiography. There was no radiologic evidence of infection in three of the infected prostheses, and 10 of the noninfected prostheses had some radiologic features that suggested sepsis. We conclude that indium-granulocyte scanning can reliably detect or exclude infection in painful prosthetic joints and should prove useful in clinical management

  15. Factors related to pain during routine photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Nielsen, J S; Lophaven, S

    2011-01-01

    between pain-reducing intervention and diagnosis, pre-treatment, gender or age was found. CONCLUSIONS: Pain-reducing intervention was required in 44% of the PDT treatments. Intervention was particularly required when treating lesions in areas suited for PDT therapy for cosmetic reasons such as the scalp......BACKGROUND: Pain may be a limiting factor in the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The consequences of the pain i.e. the resources spent on pain-intervention during routine PDT therapy are poorly described. OBJECTIVES: To describe the consequences of pain during PDT by describing the use of pain......-reducing interventions in routine use. We studied the frequency as well as level of pain-reducing intervention. METHODS: Descriptive data from PDT treated patients. The level of pain-reducing intervention was graded 0, no intervention; +, cold water spray and ++, pause or nerve block. RESULTS: Data from 983 PDT...

  16. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states.

  17. Diskitis, Osteomyelitis, Spinal Epidural Abscess, Meningitis, and Endocarditis Following Sacroiliac Joint Injection for the Treatment of Low-Back Pain in a Patient on Therapy for Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Geeta; Flaherty, John P; Benzon, Honorio T

    Sacroiliac joint injections are frequently performed procedures in the management of acute and chronic low-back pain, including patients with various immunocompromised states. Infectious complications following these procedures along with other spinal injections are rarely reported, but the true incidence is unknown. The purpose of this report is to highlight the devastating neurologic sequela that can occur, and to discuss potential future management strategies. We present a patient who developed diskitis, osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis, and endocarditis from Staphylococcus aureus, all of which developed shortly after a sacroiliac joint injection. The patient was on treatment for hepatitis C virus, and the resulting immunocompromised state likely contributed to the outcome. Immunocompromised patients should be identified prior to treatment, and the small possibility of devastating complications should be thoughtfully weighed against the potential benefit of the procedure. Conservative management should be maximized initially, and if a procedure is done, strict asepsis must be maintained. Prophylaxis for S. aureus should be considered for immunocompromised patients undergoing interventional spine procedures.

  18. Ankylosing spondylitis in an athlete with chronic sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Cass, Nathan; Siegel, Courtney

    2014-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease in which inflammation of joints, most often in the axial skeleton, can lead to reactive fibrosis and eventual joint fusion with associated immobility and kyphosis. The disease often involves extra-articular features, such as uveitis and aortic regurgitation, as well as associated inflammatory conditions of the intestines. Its etiology is unknown. Ankylosing spondylitis most commonly presents in young males (15-30 years old) as persistent low back pain and stiffness that is worse in the morning and at night and improves with activity. The authors report the case of a young male athlete whose symptoms were initially incorrectly diagnosed as sacroiliac joint instability and dysfunction and later as a sacroiliac stress fracture before further workup revealed a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. The patient was prescribed oral indomethacin daily by the attending rheumatologist and started on a slow progression of return to running, jumping, and weight lifting. Within 4 weeks of beginning this treatment, the patient had complete cessation of pain with the medication. At follow-up 1 year after graduation from his university, the patient was nearly symptom free and working in a non-heavy labor job. The purpose of this case report is to remind sports medicine physicians of the prevalence of rheumatologic diseases in general and ankylosing spondylitis in particular and of the various ways in which spondyloarthropathies may present in athletes. Increased suspicion may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment, potentially reducing illness severity and duration and improving the performance of athletes with this condition. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Health technology assessment of magnet therapy for relieving pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Eftekharizadeh, Fereshteh; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Nejati, Mina; Doaee, Shila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnet therapy has been used increasingly as a new method to alleviate pain. Magnetic products are marketed with claims of effectiveness for reducing pain of various origins. However, there are inconsistent results from a limited number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the analgesic efficacy of magnet therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of magnet therapy on reliving various types of pain. Methods: A systematic search of two main medical databases (Cochrane Library and Ovid Medline) was conducted from 1946 to May 2014. Only English systematic reviews that compared magnet therapy with other conventional treatments in patients with local pain in terms of pain relieving measures were included. The results of the included studies were thematically synthesized. Results: Eight studies were included. Magnet therapy could be used to alleviate pain of various origins including pain in various organs, arthritis, myofascial muscle pain, lower limb muscle cramps, carpal tunnel syndrome and pelvic pain. Results showed that the effectiveness of magnetic therapy was only approved in muscle pains, but its effectiveness in other indications and its application as a complementary treatment have not been established. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that magnet therapy could not be an effective treatment for relieving different types of pain. Our results highlighted the need for further investigations to be done in order to support any recommendations about this technology.

  20. Sacroiliac joint pain: Prospective, randomised, experimental and comparative study of thermal radiofrequency with sacroiliac joint block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas Martínez, L; Orduña Valls, J; Paramés Mosquera, E; Lamelas Rodríguez, L; Rojas Gil, S; Domínguez García, M

    2016-05-01

    To compare the analgesic effects between the blockade and bipolar thermal radiofrequency in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain. Prospective, randomised and experimental study conducted on 60 patients selected in the two hospitals over a period of nine months, who had intense sacroiliac joint pain (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]>6) that lasted more than 3 months. Patients were randomised into three groups (n=20): Group A (two intra-articular sacroiliac injections of local anaesthetic/corticosteroid guided by ultrasound in 7 days). Group B: conventional bipolar radiofrequency "palisade". Target points were the lateral branch nerves of S1, S2, and S3, distance needles 1cm. Group C: modified bipolar radiofrequency "palisade" (needle distance >1cm). Patients were evaluated at one month, three months, and one year. Demographic data, VAS reduction, and side effects of the techniques were assessed. One month after the treatment, pain reduction was >50% in the three groups PDolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Unexplained lower abdominal pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man presented with chronic lower back pain and unexplained lower abdominal pain. Both patients had groin tenderness at the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine. The results of radiographical and physical examinations suggested sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Sacroiliac joint injection relieved their symptoms, including groin tenderness. In our experience, groin tenderness is highly specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We speculate that spasm of the iliac muscle can cause groin pain and tenderness. Groin pain and a history of unexplained abdominal pain, with lower back pain, are symptoms that suggest sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Additionally, compression of the iliac muscle is a simple and useful maneuver; therefore, it can be used as a screening test for sacroiliac joint dysfunction, alongside other provocation tests.

  2. Mirror therapy: A potential intervention for pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla G. Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Summary The consequences of chronic pain and associated disabilities to the patient and to the health care system are well known. Medication is often the first treatment of choice for chronic pain, although side effects and high costs restrict long-term use. Inexpensive, safe and easy to self-administer non-pharmacological therapies, such as mirror therapy, are recommended as adjuncts to pain treatment. The purpose of this review is to describe the principles of use of mirror therapy so it can be incorporated into a health care delivery. The physiological rationale of mirror therapy for the management of pain and the evidence of clinical efficacy based on recent systematic reviews are also discussed. Mirror therapy, whereby a mirror is placed in a position so that the patient can view a reflection of a body part, has been used to treat phantom limb pain, complex regional pain syndrome, neuropathy and low back pain. Research evidence suggests that a course of treatment (four weeks of mirror therapy may reduce chronic pain. Contraindications and side effects are few. The mechanism of action of mirror therapy remains uncertain, with reintegration of motor and sensory systems, restored body image and control over fear-avoidance likely to influence outcome. The evidence for clinical efficacy of mirror therapy is encouraging, but not yet definitive. Nevertheless, mirror therapy is inexpensive, safe and easy for the patient to self-administer.

  3. Topical herbal remedies for treatment of joint pain according to Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint pain is one of the most common complaints with many possible causes.Some medicines used for joint pain relief such as NSAIDs have substantial and frequent side effects. Topical route possibly reduces adverse reactions by maximizing local delivery and minimizing systemic toxicity. Throughout history, plants have been the most important sources of medicines for human health and Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM is well known for its extensive use of herbal medicines to treat diseases accompanied with joint pain for centuries. In the present study, the plants used topically for relieving joint pain in ITM were searched. Moreover, their pharmacological effectiveness in modern medicine was reviewed. The terms “Waja mafasil” (joint pain, “Waja-ol-mafasil” (joint pain, “Irq-on-nasa” (sciatica, “Waja-ol-warik” (coxalgia, ‘Waja-ol-zahr” (back pain, “Waja-ol-rakbah” (knee pain and “Niqris” (gout were searched in three important Iranian traditional books including “Canon”, “Al-Hawi” and “Tohfat al-mu’minin” and topical preparations introduced as “Tela” and “Zemad” were selected. The scientific literatures were searched for their effectiveness related to the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Thirty five plants were selected on the basis of their topical use to relief joint pain. Among these plants, 22 species have been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.

  4. Clinical Incidence of Sacroiliac Joint Arthritis and Pain after Sacropelvic Fixation for Spinal Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainoh, Takeshi; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Arai, Gen; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine has been reported with an improved fusion rate and clinical results. On the other hand, there is a potential for clinical problems related to iliac fixation, including late sacroiliac joint arthritis and pain. Materials and Methods Twenty patients were evaluated. Degenerative scoliosis was diagnosed in 7 patients, failed back syndrome in 6 patients, destructive spondyloarthropathy in 4 patients, and Charcot spine in 3 patients. All patients underwent posterolateral fusion surgery incorporating lumbar, S1 and iliac screws. We evaluated the pain scores, bone union, and degeneration of sacroiliac joints by X-ray imaging and computed tomography before and 3 years after surgery. For evaluation of low back and buttock pain from sacroiliac joints 3 years after surgery, lidocaine was administered in order to examine pain relief thereafter. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. All patients showed bone union at final follow-up. Degeneration of sacroiliac joints was not seen in the 20 patients 3 years after surgery. Patients showed slight low back and buttock pain 3 years after surgery. However, not all patients showed relief of the low back and buttock pain after injection of lidocaine into the sacroiliac joint, indicating that their pain did not originate from sacroiliac joints. Conclusion The fusion rate and clinical results were excellent. Also, degeneration and pain from sacroiliac joints were not seen within 3 years after surgery. We recommend sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine. PMID:22318832

  5. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J.; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient

  6. Meta-analysis: exercise therapy for nonspecific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayden, J.A.; van Tulder, M.; Malmivaara, A.V.; Koes, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise therapy is widely used as an intervention in low back pain. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise therapy in adult nonspecific acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain versus no treatment and other conservative treatments. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, EMBASE,

  7. Cooled radiofrequency denervation for treatment of sacroiliac joint pain: two-year results from 20 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kok-Yuen; Hadi, Mohamed Abdul; Pasutharnchat, Koravee; Tan, Kian-Hian

    2013-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint pain is a common cause of chronic low back pain. Different techniques for radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint have been used to treat this condition. However, results have been inconsistent because the variable sensory supply to the sacroiliac joint is difficult to disrupt completely using conventional radiofrequency. Cooled radiofrequency is a novel technique that uses internally cooled radiofrequency probes to enlarge lesion size, thereby increasing the chance of completely denervating the sacroiliac joint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cooled radiofrequency denervation using the SInergy™ cooled radiofrequency system for sacroiliac joint pain. Methods The charts of 20 patients with chronic sacroiliac joint pain who had undergone denervation using the SInergy™ cooled radiofrequency system were reviewed at two years following the procedure. Outcome measures included the Numeric Rating Scale for pain intensity, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Global Perceived Effect for patient satisfaction. Results Fifteen of 20 patients showed a significant reduction in pain (a decrease of at least three points on the Numeric Rating Scale). Mean Numeric Rating Scale for pain decreased from 7.4 ± 1.4 to 3.1 ± 2.5, mean Patient Global Impression of Change was “improved” (1.4 ± 1.5), and Global Perceived Effect was reported to be positive in 16 patients at two years following the procedure. Conclusion Cooled radiofrequency denervation showed long-term efficacy for up to two years in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain. PMID:23869175

  8. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain...... intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe...... the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold...

  9. Isolated Facet Joint Fracture as a Cause of Chronic Low Back Pain and Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Teasell

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of facet joint fracture following a rear-end motor vehicle accident who presented with chronic low back pain and sciatica is outlined. Diagnosis was made with 99Tc nuclear bone scan and was confirmed on computed tomographic scan after diagnosis with regular radiographs had failed. Facetectomy relieved pain but led to symptoms related to asymmetric load on the opposite facet joint. Symptoms were substantially relieved with a facet joint deinnervation procedure. Facet joint fracture was felt to occur as a consequence of compression forces on the facet joint at the time of impact.

  10. Acute Postoperative Pain Therapy: Current State . Patient Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lončarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Persoli-Gudelj, Marijana; Šimić-Korać, Nataša; Blažanin, Božidar; Žunić, Josip; Korać, Želimir

    2006-01-01

    In effective control of acute postoperative pain, it is essential to respect the principles of multimodal balanced analgesia, and to apply them within organized units for the management of acute postoperative pain (acute pain service). The aim of the study was to find out patient expectations and experience in the intensity of acute postoperative pain, and the efficiency of therapy they received. Between October 11, 2002 and December 14, 2002, 103 patients having undergone elective operative ...

  11. Pain from intra-articular NGF or joint injury in the rat requires contributions from peptidergic joint afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Jeffrey V; Weisshaar, Christine L; Pall, Parul S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-09-14

    Non-physiological stretch of the cervical facet joint's capsular ligament induces persistent behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability via an intra-articular NGF-dependent mechanism. Although that ligament is innervated by nociceptors, it is unknown if a subpopulation is exclusively responsible for the behavioral and spinal neuronal responses to intra-articular NGF and/or facet joint injury. This study ablated joint afferents using the neurotoxin saporin targeted to neurons involved in either peptidergic ([Sar(9),Met (O2)(11)]-substance P-saporin (SSP-Sap)) or non-peptidergic (isolectin B4-saporin (IB4-Sap)) signaling to investigate the contributions of those neuronal populations to facet-mediated pain. SSP-Sap, but not IB4-Sap, injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints 14 days prior to an intra- articular NGF injection prevents NGF-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in the forepaws. Similarly, only SSP- Sap prevents the increase in mechanical forepaw stimulation- induced firing of spinal neurons after intra-articular NGF. In addition, intra-articular SSP-Sap prevents both behavioral hypersensitivity and upregulation of NGF in the dorsal root ganglion after a facet joint distraction that normally induces pain. These findings collectively suggest that disruption of peptidergic signaling within the joint may be a potential treatment for facet pain, as well as other painful joint conditions associated with elevated NGF, such as osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Won; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Chi-Bok

    2018-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to identify the immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 32 patients with degenerative arthritis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group that underwent taping therapy and the control group that underwent regular treatment (16 patients per group). In the experimental group, therapeutic tape was wrapped all around the knee joint. Pain and depression were measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. [Results] The intra-group comparison showed significant differences in VAS and BDI for the experimental group. The intergroup comparison showed that the differences in VAS and BDI within the experimental group appeared significant relative to the control group. [Conclusion] It was observed that taping therapy showed an immediate effect in decreasing knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis.

  13. Surgical versus injection treatment for injection-confirmed chronic sacroiliac joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, William Ryan; Lawrence, Brandon D.; Raich, Annie L.; Skelly, Andrea C.; Brodke, Darrel S.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Study rationale: Chronic sacroiliac joint pain (CSJP) is a common clinical entity with highly controversial treatment options. A recent systematic review compared surgery with denervation, but the current systematic review compares outcomes of surgical intervention with therapeutic injection for the treatment of CSJP and serves as the next step for evaluating current evidence on the comparative effectiveness of treatments for non-traumatic sacroiliac joint pain. Objective or clinical question: In adult patients with injection-confirmed CSJP, does surgical treatment lead to better outcomes and fewer complications than injection therapy? Methods: A systematic review of the English-language literature was undertaken for articles published between 1970 and June 2012. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies evaluating surgery or injection treatment for injection-confirmed CSJP. Studies involving traumatic onset or non-injection–confirmed CSJP were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the level of evidence quality using the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: We identified twelve articles (seven surgical and five injection treatment) meeting our inclusion criteria. Regardless of the type of treatment, most studies reported over 40% improvement in pain as measured by Visual Analog Scale or Numeric rating Scale score. Regardless of the type of treatment, most studies reported over 20% improvement in functionality. Most complications were reported in the surgical studies. Conclusion: Surgical fusion and therapeutic injections can likely provide pain relief, improve quality of life, and improve work status. The comparative effectiveness of these interventions cannot be evaluated with the current literature. PMID:23526911

  14. The Treatment of Joint Pain with Intra-articular Pulsed Radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schianchi, Pietro M; Sluijter, Menno E; Balogh, Susan E

    2013-09-01

    The intra-articular (IA) application of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) for pain in small and large joints represents a recent development that has proven to be effective in many cases. We performed a retrospective study of 89 such procedures in 57 consecutive patients with chronic articular pain. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effectiveness of intraarticular PRF in a group of 57 consecutive patients with chronic joint pain. Patients with intractable joint pain for more than 6 months were treated with IA PRF 40-45V for 10-15 min in small joints and 60V for 15 min in large joints using fluoroscopic confirmation of correct needle position. A total of 28 shoulders, 40 knees, 10 trapezio-metacarpal, and 11 first metatarso-phalangeal joints were treated. Results were evaluated at 1, 2, and 5 months. The procedure was repeated after 1 month in 10 patients with initial suboptimal results. Success was defined as a reduction of pain score by at least 50%. All groups showed significant reductions in pain scores at all three follow-up visits. Success rates were higher in small joints (90% and 82%, respectively) than large ones (64% and 60%, respectively). Interestingly, IA PRF was successful in 6 out of 10 patients who had undergone previous surgery, including 3 with prosthetic joint replacement and in 6 of the 10 repeated procedures. There were no significant adverse effects or complications. IA PRF induced significant pain relief of long duration in a majority of our patients with joint pain. The exact mechanism is unclear, but may be related to the exposure of immune cells to low-strength RF fields, inducing an anti-inflammatory effect. The success rate appears to be highest in small joints. We recommend additional research including control groups to further investigate and clarify this method; our data suggest that it may represent a useful modality in the treatment of arthrogenic pain.

  15. Joint awareness after total knee arthroplasty is affected by pain and quadriceps strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Y; Wada, O; Nakakita, S; Mizuno, K

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of patient-reported outcomes to provide a more patient-centered view on treatment. Forgetting the artificial joint can be regarded as the goal in joint arthroplasty. The goals of the study were to describe changes in joint awareness in the artificial joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to determine which factors among pain, knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and functional ability affect joint awareness after TKA. Patients undergoing TKA demonstrate changes in joint awareness and joint awareness is associated with pain, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. This prospective cohort study comprised 63 individuals undergoing TKA, evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Outcomes included joint awareness assessed using the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS), pain score, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. Fifty-eight individuals completed all postoperative assessments. All measures except for knee extension ROM improved from 1 to 6 months. However, there were no differences in any measures from 6 to 12 months. FJS was affected most greatly by pain at 1 month and by quadriceps strength at 6 and 12 months. Patients following TKA demonstrate improvements in joint awareness and function within 6 months after surgery, but reach a plateau from 6 to 12 months. Quadriceps strength could contribute to this plateau of joint awareness. Prospective cohort study, IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiofrequency Denervation Improves Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Thoracic Zygapophyseal Joint Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambraeus, Johan; Hambraeus, Kjerstin S; Persson, Jan

    2018-05-01

    To describe a practical approach for the diagnosis and treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain and to present preliminary clinical data on the effects of this treatment approach on health-related quality of life. An observational study. Specialist outpatient pain clinic in northern Sweden. Patients with long-term thoracic pain. We describe a method of radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints. We compared health-related quality of life between patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joints and patients who underwent radiofrequency denervation for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. Treatment according to the Spine Intervention Society Guidelines was performed on the lumbar region in 178 patients and in the cervical region in 55 patients. Another 82 patients were treated in the thoracic region with our proposed technique. A survival plot of improvements in health-related quality of life revealed that all three treatments were effective in 65% or more of patients. The improvement in health-related quality of life was maintained for 12 or more months after treatment in 47% to 51% of patients. Our results suggest that radiofrequency denervation of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain is as effective as radiofrequency denervation, the standard treatment, for lumbar and cervical zygapophyseal joint pain. If these results can be confirmed by other centers, radiofrequency denervation is likely to become more widely available for the treatment of thoracic zygapophyseal joint pain.

  17. Meta-analysis: exercise therapy for nonspecific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jill A; van Tulder, Maurits W; Malmivaara, Antti V; Koes, Bart W

    2005-05-03

    Exercise therapy is widely used as an intervention in low back pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise therapy in adult nonspecific acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain versus no treatment and other conservative treatments. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases to October 2004; citation searches and bibliographic reviews of previous systematic reviews. Randomized, controlled trials evaluating exercise therapy for adult nonspecific low back pain and measuring pain, function, return to work or absenteeism, and global improvement outcomes. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data on study characteristics, quality, and outcomes at short-, intermediate-, and long-term follow-up. 61 randomized, controlled trials (6390 participants) met inclusion criteria: acute (11 trials), subacute (6 trials), and chronic (43 trials) low back pain (1 trial was unclear). Evidence suggests that exercise therapy is effective in chronic back pain relative to comparisons at all follow-up periods. Pooled mean improvement (of 100 points) was 7.3 points (95% CI, 3.7 to 10.9 points) for pain and 2.5 points (CI, 1.0 to 3.9 points) for function at earliest follow-up. In studies investigating patients (people seeking care for back pain), mean improvement was 13.3 points (CI, 5.5 to 21.1 points) for pain and 6.9 points (CI, 2.2 to 11.7 points) for function, compared with studies where some participants had been recruited from a general population (for example, with advertisements). Some evidence suggests effectiveness of a graded-activity exercise program in subacute low back pain in occupational settings, although the evidence for other types of exercise therapy in other populations is inconsistent. In acute low back pain, exercise therapy and other programs were equally effective (pain, 0.03 point [CI, -1.3 to 1.4 points]). Limitations of the literature, including low-quality studies with heterogeneous outcome measures inconsistent

  18. Are Pain-Related Fears Mediators for Reducing Disability and Pain in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1? An Explorative Analysis on Pain Exposure Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J.; Staal, J. Bart; van Dongen, Robert T. M.; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Klomp, Frank P.; van de Meent, Henk; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pain-related fears are mediators for reducing disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 when treating with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Design An explorative secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Participants Fifty-six patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Interventions The experimental group received Pain Exposure Physical Therapy in a maximum of five treatment sessions; the control group received conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Outcome measures Levels of disability, pain, and pain-related fears (fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and kinesiophobia) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. Results The experimental group had a significantly larger decrease in disability of 7.77 points (95% CI 1.09 to 14.45) and in pain of 1.83 points (95% CI 0.44 to 3.23) over nine months than the control group. The potential mediators pain-related fears decreased significantly in both groups, but there were no significant differences between groups, which indicated that there was no mediation. Conclusion The reduction of pain-related fears was comparable in both groups. We found no indication that pain-related fears mediate the larger reduction of disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy compared to conventional treatment. Trial registration International Clinical Trials Registry NCT00817128 PMID:25919011

  19. The influence of cadence and shoes on patellofemoral joint kinetics in runners with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Jason; Hall, Michelle; Fox, Aaron; Saunders, Natalie; Shipsides, Tristan; Vicenzino, Bill

    2018-06-01

    To determine the effect of a combination of a minimalist shoe and increased cadence on measures of patellofemoral joint loading during running in individuals with patellofemoral pain. Within-participant repeated measures with four conditions presented in random order: (1) control shoe at preferred cadence; (2) control shoe with +10% cadence; (3) minimalist shoe at preferred cadence; (4) minimalist shoe with +10% cadence. Fifteen recreational runners with patellofemoral pain ran on an instrumented treadmill while three-dimensional motion capture data were acquired. Peak patellofemoral joint stress, joint reaction force, knee extensor moment and knee joint angle during the stance phase of running were calculated. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the control condition (1) to the three experimental conditions (2-4). Running in a minimalist shoe at an increased cadence reduced patellofemoral stress and joint reaction force on average by approximately 29% (ppatellofemoral joint stress by 15% and joint reaction force by 17% (ppatellofemoral joint stress and joint reaction force by 16% and 19% (ppatellofemoral pain, running in a minimalist shoe at an increased cadence had the greatest reduction in patellofemoral joint loading compared to a control shoe at preferred cadence. This may be an effective intervention to modulate biomechanical factors related to patellofemoral pain. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between age, gender, and body mass index, and lumbar facet joint pain

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    Arman Taheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar facet joint pain accounts for 5-15% of the cases of chronic, axial low back pain. Most commonly, facetogenic pain is the result of repetitive stress and/or cumulative low level trauma, leading to inflammation and stretching of the joint capsule. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive study 76 patients who were diagnosed, after a diagnostic block, as having lumbar facet joint pain were evaluated by their age, sex, and body mass index (BMI. Data were collected according to a checklist and entered to SPSS version 16. Results: The mean age of the participants was 48.53 years; the participants included 44 women and 32 men. Lumbar facet joint pain was more frequent in the age range of 40-55 years. With respect to BMI, lumbar facet joint pain was most frequently seen in patients with BMI of 24.5-29.5 kg/m 2 (40.8%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, the chances of developing lumbar facet joint pain is more in women who are between 40 years and 55 years of age and whose BMI is 24.5-29.5 kg/m 2 .

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Tilburt, Jon C; Sood, Amit; Li, Guang-Xi; Wang, Shi-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pain afflflicts over 50 million people in the US, with 30.7% US adults suffering with chronic pain. Despite advances in therapies, many patients will continue to deal with ongoing symptoms that are not fully addressed by the best conventional medicine has to offer them. The patients frequently turn to therapies outside the usual purview of conventional medicine (herbs, acupuncture, meditation, etc.) called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Academic and governmental groups are also starting to incorporate CAM recommendations into chronic pain management strategies. Thus, for any physician who care for patients with chronic pain, having some familiarity with these therapies-including risks and benefits-will be key to helping guide patients in making evidence-based, well informed decisions about whether or not to use such therapies. On the other hand, if a CAM therapy has evidence of both safety and efficacy then not making it available to a patient who is suffering does not meet the need of the patient. We summarize the current evidence of a wide variety of CAM modalities that have potential for helping patients with chronic pain in this article. The triad of chronic pain symptoms, ready access to information on the internet, and growing patient empowerment suggest that CAM therapies will remain a consistent part of the healthcare of patients dealing with chronic pain.

  2. Physical Therapy in the Treatment of Central Pain Mechanisms for Female Sexual Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandyken, Carolyn; Hilton, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of female sexual pain requires an interdisciplinary approach. Physical therapists trained in pelvic health conditions are well positioned to be active members of an interdisciplinary team addressing the assessment and treatment of female sexual pain. Changes within physical therapy practice in the last ten years have resulted in significant utilization of pelvic floor muscle relaxation and manual therapy techniques to address a variety of pelvic pain conditions, including female sexual pain. However, sexual pain is a complex issue giving credence to the necessity of addressing all of the drivers of the pain experience- biological, psychological and social. This review aims to reconcile current pain science with a plan for integrating a biopsychosocial approach into the evaluation and subsequent treatment for female sexual pain for physical therapists. A literature review of the important components of skilled physical therapy interventions is presented including the physical examination, pain biology education, cognitive behavioral influences in treatment design, motivational interviewing as an adjunct to empathetic practice, and the integration of non-threatening movement and mindfulness into treatment. A single case study is used to demonstrate the biopsychosocial framework utilized in this approach. Appropriate measures for assessing psychosocial factors are readily available and inform a reasoned approach for physical therapy design that addresses both peripheral and central pain mechanisms. Decades of research support the integration of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of complex pain, including female sexual pain. It is reasonable for physical therapists to utilize evidence based strategies such as CBT, pain biology education, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), yoga and imagery based exercises to address the biopsychosocial components of female sexual pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine

  3. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ambrosio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control. We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p<0.05. However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p<0.05 already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term.

  4. Nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Atlas, Steven J; Stanos, Steven P; Rosenquist, Richard W

    2009-05-01

    Systematic review. To systematically assess benefits and harms of nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back and radicular pain. Although use of certain interventional therapies is common or increasing, there is also uncertainty or controversy about their efficacy. Electronic database searches on Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases were conducted through July 2008 to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of local injections, botulinum toxin injection, prolotherapy, epidural steroid injection, facet joint injection, therapeutic medial branch block, sacroiliac joint injection, intradiscal steroid injection, chemonucleolysis, radiofrequency denervation, intradiscal electrothermal therapy, percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermocoagulation, Coblation nucleoplasty, and spinal cord stimulation. All relevant studies were methodologically assessed by 2 independent reviewers using criteria developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group (for trials) and by Oxman (for systematic reviews). A qualitative synthesis of results was performed using methods adapted from the US Preventive Services Task Force. For sciatica or prolapsed lumbar disc with radiculopathy, we found good evidence that chemonucleolysis is moderately superior to placebo injection but inferior to surgery, and fair evidence that epidural steroid injection is moderately effective for short-term (but not long-term) symptom relief. We found fair evidence that spinal cord stimulation is moderately effective for failed back surgery syndrome with persistent radiculopathy, though device-related complications are common. We found good or fair evidence that prolotherapy, facet joint injection, intradiscal steroid injection, and percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermocoagulation are not effective. Insufficient evidence exists to reliably evaluate other interventional therapies. Few nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back pain have been shown to be effective in

  5. Pain-related psychological issues in hand therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Tokiko; Pelletier, René; Bourbonnais, Daniel; Harris, Patrick; Choinière, Manon

    Literature review. Pain is a subjective experience that results from the modulation of nociception conveyed to the brain via the nervous system. Perception of pain takes place when potential or actual noxious stimuli are appraised as threats of injury. This appraisal is influenced by one's cognitions and emotions based on her/his pain-related experiences, which are processed in the forebrain and limbic areas of the brain. Unarguably, patients' psychological factors such as cognitions (eg, pain catastrophizing), emotions (eg, depression), and pain-related behaviors (eg, avoidance) can influence perceived pain intensity, disability, and treatment outcomes. Therefore, hand therapists should address the patient pain experience using a biopsychosocial approach. However, in hand therapy, a biomedical perspective predominates in pain management by focusing solely on tissue healing. This review aims to raise awareness among hand therapists of the impact of pain-related psychological factors. This literature review allowed to describe (1) how the neurophysiological mechanisms of pain can be influenced by various psychological factors, (2) several evidence-based interventions that can be integrated into hand therapy to address these psychological issues, and (3) some approaches of psychotherapy for patients with maladaptive pain experiences. Restoration of sensory and motor functions as well as alleviating pain is at the core of hand therapy. Numerous psychological factors including patients' beliefs, cognitions, and emotions alter their pain experience and may impact on their outcomes. Decoding the biopsychosocial components of the patients' pain is thus essential for hand therapists. Copyright © 2018 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

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    Safoora Sahebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD. These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intubation procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods. Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results. Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion. Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ.

  7. Effect of Lengthy Root Canal Therapy Sessions on Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Safoora; Moazami, Fariborz; Afsa, Masoomeh; Nabavi Zade, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Trauma is one of the major factors associated with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). These disorders result from macro-trauma or micro-trauma. Macro-trauma might be iatrogenic; for example, from intuba-tion procedures, third molar extraction procedures, and lengthy dental appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lengthy root canal therapy (more than 2 hours) on TMJ and its supporting structures. Materials and methods Eighty patients whose root canal therapy session lasted more than 2 hours were examined for the status of TMJ and masticatory muscles. After one week the second part of the examination was carried out for TMJ problems and pain and tenderness levels of masticatory muscles. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon statistical test. Results Women showed more pain compared to men. There was a significant increase in pain in the external acoustic meatus examination one week after root canal therapy. Patients who were treated for their posterior teeth suffered more pain than those who were treated for the anteriors and premolars. Other aspects of the examination were not affected significantly by lengthy root canal therapy. Conclusion Lengthy dental treatments can harm TMJ and masticatory muscles and wide opening of the mouth during such appointments can worsen the situation. Therefore, it is wise to break the appointment into shorter intervals and let the patients rest during treatment to close their mouth to prevent iatrogenic damage to TMJ. PMID:22991607

  8. Referred pain location depends on the affected section of the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Daisuke; Murakami, Eiichi; Aizawa, Toshimi

    2015-03-01

    Pain referred from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) may originate in the joint's posterior ligamentous region. The site of referred pain may depend on which SIJ section is affected. This study aimed to determine the exact origin of pain referred from four SIJ sections. The study included 50 patients with SIJ dysfunction, confirmed by more than 70 % pain relief after periarticular injection of local anesthetic into the SIJ. The posterior SIJ was divided into four sections-upper, middle, lower, and other (cranial portion of the ilium outside the SIJ)-designated sections 1, 2, 3, and 0, respectively. We then inserted a needle into the periarticular SIJ under fluoroscopy. After the patient identified the area(s) in which the needle insertion produced referred pain, we injected a mixture of 2 % lidocaine and contrast medium into the corresponding SIJ section. Referred pain from SIJ section 0 was mainly located in the upper buttock along the iliac crest; pain from section 1, around the posterosuperior iliac spine; pain from section 2, in the middle buttock area; pain from section 3, in the lower buttock. In all, 22 (44.0 %) patients complained of groin pain, which was slightly relieved by lidocaine injection into SIJ sections 1 and 0. Dysfunctional upper sections of the SIJ are associated with pain in the upper buttock and lower sections with pain in the lower buttock. Groin pain might be referred from the upper SIJ sections.

  9. Technological innovations in implants used for pain therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Andrew; Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind; Rezai, Ali

    2014-10-01

    The field of pain management has experienced tremendous growth in implantable therapies secondary to the innovations of bioengineers, implanters, and industry. Every aspect of neuromodulation is amenable to innovation from implanting devices to anchors, electrodes, programming, and even patient programmers. Patients with previously refractory neuropathic pain syndromes have new and effective pain management strategies that are a direct result of innovations in implantable devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Maitland manual therapy on the treatment of pain syndromes of the cervical spine

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    Ireneusz Dzierżek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of Maitland's manual therapy on selected motor function parameters in cervical spine pain syndromes. Material and Methods: 30 subjects were enrolled, in the age from 27 to 66, including 15 men and 15 women with chronic functional cervical spine syndrome who had a 10-day physiotherapy cycle that did not produce the expected results. The study included: pain assessment in the Dziak scale, measurements of mobility of the cervical spine and shoulder joints, functional evaluation by Hautanta, De`Klein, Jackson, and palpation of muscle irritation. Results: A comparison of average pain scores before and after therapy indicated that the pain level after treatment decreased (p 0.05. There has been a decrease in positive clinical trials and muscle irritation after therapy. Conclusions: Maitland manual therapy is effective in the treatment of cervical spine pain syndromes. The technique results in a significant increase in the mobility of the cervical spine as well as an improvement in the functional state of the cervical segment without affecting the mobility of the shoulder ridge. There was a decrease in palpate tenderness of the soft tissue studied.

  11. Animal-assisted therapy at an outpatient pain management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits to an outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. The design of this study is open-label. Setting.  This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult chronic pain outpatient clinic. The subjects of this study include outpatients, adults accompanying outpatients to their appointments, and clinic staff. Intervention.  Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Two hundred ninety-five therapy dog visits (235 with patients, 34 family/friends, and 26 staff) and 96 waiting room surveys (83 from patients, 6 family/friends, and 7 staff) were completed over a 2-month study period. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control, with clinically meaningful pain relief (decrease ≥2 points) in 23% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Significant improvements were likewise seen after therapy dog visits for family/friends and staff. Therapy dog visits in an outpatient setting can provide significant reduction in pain and emotional distress for chronic pain patients. Therapy dog visits can also significantly improve emotional distress and feelings of well-being in family and friends accompanying patients to appointments and clinic staff. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain. [Subject] A 36-year-old female complained of pain in the sacroiliac joints. [Methods] The subject performed individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles for nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint for 3 weeks. Pain-provocation tests and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were evaluated before and after the exercises. [Results] After performing the individual strengthening exercises for the erector spinae, rectus abdominis, and biceps femoris muscles for 3 weeks, the subject displayed no pain in the pain provocation tests, and the VAS score was 2/10. [Conclusion] The individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles of the sacroiliac joint performed in the present study appear to be effective for sedentary workers with sacroiliac joint pain.

  13. Radiofrequency therapy in back pain and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS

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    Norina Bergamin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous radiofrequency procedures are frequently used in the management of chronic pain. Continuous radiofrequency (CRF has been established as a safe and effective treatment for pain originating from facet and sacroiliac joints by way of co-agulation of their nerve supply. Different methods have been proposed to account for the complex nerve supply of the sacroiliac joint. Due to its neurodestructive property, CRF was limited to the treatment of neuropathic pain. When applied to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG for spinal pain or to the sympathetic ganglia in treatment of CRPS, heat related side effects have been reported. With the development of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF, a less destructive alternative to CRF became available, that is more suitable to treat neuropathic pain. PRF was adopted in the treatment of several pain conditions with different success. The results with PRF adjacent to the DRG are promising, whereas for facet and sacroiliac joint pain PRF could not yet be proven equally effective as CRF. As for PRF in CRPS there is almost no evidence available. The potential of PRF seems to lie in those areas where CRF is of limited value. Con-versely, it is questionable if PRF will ever be equally effective in indications, where CRF is already well established. Despite its active use in clinical practice, PRF is not validated yet nor is its mode of action. The literature in both cases is accumulating but further studies are urgently needed.

  14. A meniscus causing painful snapping of the elbow joint: MR imaging with arthroscopic and histologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guo-Shu; Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Lee, Chian-Her [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Lee, Herng-Sheng [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-12-01

    Snapping of the elbow joint can cause pain. We report a case of painful snapping elbow produced by an interposed meniscus in the radiohumeral joint in a 20-year-old man. The MR arthrogram demonstrated a meniscus-like tissue interposed between the radial head and humeral capitellum. The MR-arthrographic findings were well correlated with surgical findings. The location and appearance of the meniscus-like tissue was similar to that of meniscus in the knee joint. Histologic findings of the excised meniscus-like tissue showed a typical presentation of fibrocartilage. A meniscus may exist in the elbow joint and can be a rare cause of painful snapping elbow. MR arthrography is helpful for identifying the snapping tissue in the elbow joint. (orig.)

  15. A Multidisciplinary Approach in the Treatment of Tempromandibular Joint Pain Associated with Qat Chewing

    OpenAIRE

    Shariff, Mansoor; Al-Moaleem, Mohammed M.; Al-Ahmari, Nasser M.

    2013-01-01

    Pain of the tempro-mandibular joint (TMJ) has a direct bearing to missing teeth and excessive physical activity. Consumption of qat requires chewing on the leaves to extract their juice for long hours. A 65-year-old male Yemeni patient, a Qat chewer, reported to the university dental hospital at King Khalid University complaining of pain in left temporomandibular joint with missing mandibular anterior teeth. A multidisciplinary approach for the overall treatment of the patient was decided. In...

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy in reduction of orofacial pain

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    Đorđević Igor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with craniomandibular disorders suffer from hypertonic, fatigued and painful masticatory muscles. This condition can lead to limitation of mandibular jaw movements. All of these symptoms and signs are included in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS has been used for treatment of these patients. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TENS therapy on chronic pain reduction in patients with the muscular dysfunction symptom. Methods. In order to evaluate the effect of TENS therapy before and after the treatment, Craniomandibular Index (Helkimo was used. Pain intensity was measured by VAS. Patients had TENS treatment over two-week period. BURST TENS modality was used. Current intensity was individually adjusted. Results. Two patients did not respond to TENS therapy. Complete pain reduction was recorded in 8 patients, while pain reduction was not significantly different after TENS therapy in 10 patients. Conclusion. TENS therapy was confirmed as therapeutic procedure in orofacial muscle relaxation and pain reduction.

  17. Treatment strategy for sacroiliac joint-related pain at or around the posterior superior iliac spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Eiichi; Kurosawa, Daisuke; Aizawa, Toshimi

    2018-02-01

    Pain at or around the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) is characteristic of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) -related pain. This pain can be treated by either a peri- or intra-articular injection into the joint, with the former being much easier to perform. We investigated whether peri- or intra-articular injections were more frequently effective in patients with SIJ-related pain, and aimed to create an efficient treatment strategy for SIJ-related pain at or around the PSIS. Prospective case-control study. We evaluated 85 patients with pain at or around the posterior superior iliac spine as indicated by the one finger test. First, we performed a peri-articular sacroiliac joint injection. If it was ineffective, an intra-articular injection was later given. Groin pain, sitting pain, sacroiliac joint shear test results, and posterior superior iliac spine and sacro-tuberous ligament tenderness were also compared between patients for whom a peri- or intra-articular injection was effective. Seventy-two (85%) of 85 patients had an effective injection. Out of these 72 patients, 58 (81%) had a positive peri-articular injection and 14 (19%) had a positive intra-articular injection. Four items, excluding tenderness of the sacro-tuberous ligament had no significant difference between these two injection types. To treat sacroiliac joint-related pain at or around the posterior superior iliac spine, a peri-articular injection should be performed first, and only if it is not effective should an intra-articular injection be administered. Using this strategy, we expect that most patients with sacroiliac joint-related pain will be efficiently diagnosed and treated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Efficacy of Neural Therapy and Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun; Atalay, Ali; Akkaya, Nuray

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at least 3 months duration. Group 1 (n=27), physical therapy (PT, hotpack, ultrasound, TENS 15 sessions), group 2 (n=33), neural therapy (NT, 1:1 mixture of 20 mg/mL...

  19. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to as...

  20. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  1. Exercise despite pain – breast cancer patient experiences of muscle and joint pain during adjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent participation in an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina; Rørth, M; Ejlertsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related pain is a well-known side effect in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy. However, limited knowledge exists describing whether exercise exacerbates existing pain. Aim of the research was to explore muscle and joint pain experienced by women with breast cancer receiving...... intervention comprised supervised training: high-intensity cardiovascular, heavy resistance and relaxation, massage and body-awareness (9 h weekly, 6 weeks). The analysis revealed five categories: Abrupt pain - a predominant side effect, cogitated pain management, the adapted training, non......-immediate exacerbation of pain and summarised into the essence of chemotherapy related muscle and joint pain in exercise breast cancer patients; exercise despite pain. Findings indicate that the patients' perception of sudden onset of chemotherapy-related muscle and joint pain was not aggravated by training. Pain...

  2. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundt Marlon P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%, headaches (9.9%, and knee pain (6.5%; the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248, chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162, acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69, yoga (6.1%, n = 55, herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62, and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54. CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8% and prolotherapy (87.7%, whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  3. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-05-16

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  4. The association between inflammatory back pain characteristics and MRI findings in the spine and sacroiliac joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, Bodil; Jurik, Anne G; Jensen, Tue S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between MRI findings at the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) and vertebral endplates and pain characteristics assumed to be indicative of axial inflammation. METHODS: Patients aged 18-40 years with persistent low back pain referred to an outpatient spine clinic...

  5. Diagnostic validity of criteria for sacroiliac joint pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szadek, K.M.; van der Wurff, P.; van Tulder, M.W.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Perez, R.S.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic literature review was conducted to determine the diagnostic validity of the criteria for sacroiliac (SI) joint pain as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Databases were searched up to September 2007. Quality of the studies was assessed using a

  6. Diagnostic Validity of Criteria for Sacroiliac Joint Pain : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szadek, Karolina M.; van der Wurff, Peter; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Zuurmond, Wouter W.; Perez, Roberto S. G. M.

    A systematic literature review was conducted to determine the diagnostic validity of the criteria for sacroiliac (SI) joint pain as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Databases were searched up to September 2007. Quality of the studies was assessed using a

  7. Mobility of the pelvic joints in pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, Jan M A; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Stam, H

    2009-01-01

    About 45% of all pregnant women and 25% of all women postpartum suffer from pelvic girdle pain and/or low back pain (PLPP). It has been suggested that increased motion of the three joints in the pelvic ring is one of the causes of PLPP. However, in spite of the availability of high technology the

  8. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  9. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Pain Form of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pihut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a functional disorder concerned with the abnormal functioning of the muscles of the stomatognathic system and temporomandibular joints involved in the dynamic movements of the jaw and surrounding structures. The aim of the study was to compare the level of C-reactive protein in patients with pain and painless forms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study group consisted of 72 patients who reported to the prosthetic treatment because of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The study group included 36 patients with pain form of dysfunction, and the control group included 36 patients with painless form of disorder. Each patient underwent specialized examination of functional disorders in order to diagnose the type of dysfunction and was commissioned to carry out a study of the blood test concerned with evaluation of the C-reactive protein (CRP level in the same analytical laboratory. The results of the investigation were subjected to statistical analysis. The research obtained approval from the Ethics Committee of the Jagiellonian University (KBET/125/L/2013. Level of Evidence for primary research was established as type V. Results. The mean values of C-reactive protein levels in both groups were in the normal range and did not differ statistically significantly, which indicates the fact that the pain form of the temporomandibular joint disorders is not associated with inflammation of the soft tissues of the joint. Conclusion. Painful form of the temporomandibular joint dysfunctions is not connected with the inflammation of joints.

  10. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  11. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; De Graeff, Alexander; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Pomp, Jacqueline; Van Vulpen, Marco; Leer, Jan Willem H; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Van Der Linden, Yvette M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within

  12. Preoperative Pain Neuroscience Education Combined With Knee Joint Mobilization for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Enrique; Dueñas, Lirios; Falla, Deborah; Baert, Isabel; Meeus, Mira; Sánchez-Frutos, José; Nijs, Jo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to first compare the effects of a preoperative treatment combining pain neuroscience education (PNE) with knee joint mobilization versus biomedical education with knee joint mobilization on central sensitization (CS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis, both before and after surgery. Second, we wanted to compare the effects of both interventions on knee pain, disability, and psychosocial variables. Forty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis were allocated to receive 4 sessions of either PNE combined with knee joint mobilization or biomedical education with knee joint mobilization before surgery. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and quantitative sensory testing was performed at baseline, after treatment and at a 1 month follow-up (all before surgery), and at 3 months after surgery. Significant and clinically relevant differences before and after surgery were found after treatments for both knee pain and disability, and some measures of CS (ie, widespread hyperalgesia, CS inventory), with no significant between-group differences. Other indicators of CS (ie, conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) did not change over time following either treatment, and in some occasions the observed changes were not in the expected direction. Patients receiving PNE with knee joint mobilization achieved greater improvements in psychosocial variables (pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia) both before and after surgery. Preoperative PNE combined with knee joint mobilization did not produce any additional benefits over time for knee pain and disability, and CS measures compared with biomedical education with knee joint mobilization. Superior effects in the PNE with knee joint mobilization group were only observed for psychosocial variables related to pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia.

  13. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted of ten oncology patients with chronic pain. Rresults: There was a reduction in vital signs and in intensity of pain in ten patients of the sample; after the music sessions, the patients reported a sensation of relief of pain, relaxation, and a belief in the power of music as a supplementary therapy. Cconclusions: Music showed an influence in reducing vital signs and pain intensity, and the patients perceived a reduction of pain and anxiety, and began to believe in music as a form of therapy.

  14. Acupuncture Therapy in a Group Setting for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Nielsen, Arya; Kohrherr, Corinne; Schmid, Tracy; Waltermaurer, Eve; Perez, Elidania; Merrell, Woodson

    2018-02-01

    This project was designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of acupuncture therapy given in a group setting for chronic pain. Nonrandomized, repeated measures quasi-experimental trial. Care was delivered in a primary care clinic waiting area after clinic hours. Included were primary care patients (≥18 years old) with chronic pain of the neck, back, shoulder, or osteoarthritis of any site of at least three months' duration. Subjects received eight weekly acupuncture therapy sessions in a group setting. Acupuncture therapy included a combination of palpation, acupuncture needling, Tui na, Gua sha, and auricular treatment. Baseline pain levels were established in a two- to four-week run-in; assessment of the intervention impact on pain intensity, mood, and functional status were made at the end of the treatment period (eight weeks) and 16 weeks after completion of intervention (24 weeks). Of the total 113 participants recruited for the trial, 96 completed the 24-week protocol. We found a statistically and clinically significant decrease in pain severity, pain interference, and depression in our study population. There were no serious adverse events. Acupuncture therapy offered in the group setting was effective in reducing pain severity, pain interference, and depression in patients with chronic neck, back, or shoulder pain or osteoarthritis. Benefit persisted through the 24-week measure despite no additional treatment. This finding has potentially important implications for improving access to effective acupuncture treatment for patients with limited financial resources. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy on orofacial pain: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Zokaee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a therapeutic approach to treat orofacial pain using a 600–1000 nm laser with a <500 mW power. The efficacy of LLLT is due to the chemical reactions causing an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect on the affected regions. The aim of this study is to review the effects of low-level laser application on orofacial pain in the English articles released since 2017. Our search keywords were 'low-level laser therapy, temporomandibular disease (TMD, mucositis and orofacial pain'. The most relevant papers were clinical trial, review and meta-analysis articles. 26 out of 243 searched articles were selected from PubMed, Google Scholar and Science Direct and reviewed. Most of the studies reported the positive role of LLLT on orofacial pain relief regardless of their variable procedures; however, the exact mechanism of action still remains unclear. Some studies indicated that LLLT has significantly reduced pain, reduceamount of clicking and both masseter and temporal muscles activityin TMD. As an overall result, it is concluded that LLLT can be served as a therapeutic method for myofascial pain, mucositis and temporomandibular joint disorders and this is due to its analgesic features.

  16. Quantitative investigation of ligament strains during physical tests for sacroiliac joint pain using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Yao, Zhidong; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man

    2014-06-01

    It may be assumed that the stability is affected when some ligaments are injured or loosened, and this joint instability causes sacroiliac joint pain. Several physical examinations have been used to diagnose sacroiliac pain and to isolate the source of the pain. However, more quantitative and objective information may be necessary to identify unstable or injured ligaments during these tests due to the lack of understanding of the quantitative relationship between the physical tests and the biomechanical parameters that may be related to pains in the sacroiliac joint and the surrounding ligaments. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the sacroiliac joint was developed and the biomechanical conditions for six typical physical tests such as the compression test, distraction test, sacral apex pressure test, thigh thrust test, Patrick's test, and Gaenslen's test were modelled. The sacroiliac joint contact pressure and ligament strain were investigated for each test. The values of contact pressure and the combination of most highly strained ligaments differed markedly among the tests. Therefore, these findings in combination with the physical tests would be helpful to identify the pain source and to understand the pain mechanism. Moreover, the technology provided in this study might be a useful tool to evaluate the physical tests, to improve the present test protocols, or to develop a new physical test protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Image-guided lumbar facet joint infiltration in nonradicular low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Arti; Chaturvedi, Sunil; Sivasankar, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of facet joint infiltrations for pain relief in 44 selected patients with chronic nonradicular low back pain (LBP). Forty-four patients with chronic LBP of more than 3 months' duration were selected for facet joint infiltration. The majority (n = 24) had facetal pain with no evidence of significant facetal arthropathy on imaging. Fifteen patients had radiological evidence of facetal arthropathy, one had a facet joint synovial cyst, three were post–lumbar surgery patients, and two patients had spondylolysis. Facet joint injections were carried out under fluoroscopic guidance in 39 patients and under CT guidance in 5 cases. Pain relief was assessed using the visual analog scale at 1 h post-procedure and, thereafter, at 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks. A total of 141 facet joints were infiltrated in 44 patients over a 2-year period. There was significant pain relief in 81.8% patients 1 h after the procedure, in 86.3% after 1 week, in 93.3% after 4 weeks, in 85.7% after 12 weeks, and in 62.5% after 24 weeks. No major complications were encountered. Facet nerve block was found to be a simple, minimally invasive, and safe procedure. With meticulous patient selection, we achieved long-term success rates of over 60%. We conclude that this method represents an important alternative treatment for nonradicular back pain

  18. Therapies for Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. There is moderate evidence that the drugs oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, and lacosamide likely do not help treat ... at first, opioids can have less of an effect over time. There is moderate evidence that the ...

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in management of severe dry socket pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellateef, Abdelamajeed; Elrefai, Jamil; AlJadid, Omar; Alabbadi, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    To assess the role and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of pain resulting from dry socket. From January 2006 to May 2007, 25 patients who had been diagnosed by the oral surgeon in the Dental Department of Princess Haya Hospital, Aqaba, Jordan with dry socket with severe intolerable pain, untreated with the classical treatments, were treated with HBOT. Fifteen patients (60%) were treated in a single HBOT session after which an almost complete resolution of pain took place, 7 patients (28%) were treated in 2 sessions and 3 patients (12%) needed 3 HBOT sessions to cure the pain. This preliminary study to assess the role of HBOT in the treatment of dry socket pain showed a great reduction of pain intensity of dry socket following administration of HBOT. (author)

  20. Pain palliation therapy of bone metastases: palliative or curative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    2007-01-01

    In Germany the incidence of breast cancer is about 85 and of prostate cancer about 50 new patients per 100.000 inhabitants/year. In about 80% of prostate cancer patients and 75% of breast cancer patients bone metastases are observed in autopsy. Most of these patients develop severe pain syndrome from bone metastases reducing quality of life during life time. Therapy of these patients should aim at adding life to the years not years to their life. The knowledge of metastatic cell biology, of cell-cell interaction and of tumor-cell, tumor cell-skeleton interaction may modify the therapeutic procedure. Already in 1940/41, Pecher treated a patient suffering from painful prostate cancer bone metastases administering 296 MBq 89 Strontium chloride. About 10 years later, Friedell introduced 32 Phosphorus for treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Today in Europe 3 radionuclides are approved for pain palliation therapy as shown in Table.1. Indication: - pain palliation therapy of bone metastases from prostate cancer ( 89 Sr and 186 Re); - pain palliation of all osteoblastic metastases independent from primary tumors ( 153 Sm). Contraindications: - pregnant and lactating females - myelosuppression ( 3 granulocytes; 3 platelets); - impaired renal function (urea >12 mmol/l; creatinine > 150 mmol/l) - incontinence; - acute or chronic spinal cord compression and/or brain metastases causing neurological symptoms; - disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The recommended activities per treatment are: 89 Sr 150 MBq, 186 Re 1.295 MBq, and 153 Sm 37 MBq/kg BW. Shortly (6-8 weeks) prior to radionuclide therapy for pain palliation no high dose chemotherapy or large field radiation therapy should be performed. Stopping unlabelled bisphosphonate therapy prior to pain palliation therapy is not necessary. This radionuclide therapy may be repeated several time, the interval between tracer administration depends on blood cell count rate. The recommended intervals are for 89 Sr

  1. Influence of manual therapy on functional mobility after joint injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, Rachel L; Snider, Eric J; Sargentini, Neil J; Worthington, Bart D; Singh, Vineet K; Pazdernik, Vanessa K; Johnson, Jane C; Degenhardt, Brian F

    2013-10-01

    Animal models can be used to investigate manual therapy mechanisms, but testing manipulation in animal models is problematic because animals cannot directly report their pain. To develop a rat model of inflammatory joint injury to test the efficacy of manual therapy in reducing nociception and restoring function. The authors induced acute inflammatory joint injury in rats by injecting carrageenan into the ankle and then measured voluntary running wheel activity in treated and untreated rats. Treatments included manual therapy applied to the ankle and knee of the injured limb and several analgesic medications (eg, morphine, ketorolac, prednisone). Intra-articular injection of carrageenan to the ankle produced significant swelling (diameter of the ankle increased by 64% after injection; P=.004) and a robust reduction in voluntary running wheel activity (running distance reduced by 91% compared with controls; Pmanual therapy nor analgesic medications increased running wheel activity relative to untreated rats. Voluntary running wheel activity appears to be an appropriate functional measure to evaluate the impact of an acute inflammatory joint injury. However, efforts to treat the injury did not restore running relative to untreated rats.

  2. Sacro-iliac joint arthrography in low back pain: feasibility of MRI guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, Risto; Klemola, Rauli; Karppinen, Jaro; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Tervonen, Osmo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the feasibility of MR-guidance in sacro-iliac joint arthrography in patients whose low back pain is suspected to arise from the sacro-iliac joint (SIJ). Methods and patients: Twenty patients with low back pain underwent MR-guided sacro-iliac joint arthrography. Needles made from titanium (size 20 G, MDTech, USA) were used. For image guidance a 0.23T open-configuration C arm magnet (Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, USA) with special interventional hardware and software package (I-Path 200, Marconi Medical Systems) containing an MR compatible in-room console, large-screen (36'') display, optical navigator and accompanying software with dedicated sequences was used. No other image guidance modalities were used. Results: MR-guided SIJ arthrography was successfully performed in all twenty patients without complications. The optimal imaging sequence both for preoperative and intraoperative images was 3D-Gradient Echo sequence. The dispersal of the injected saline and anaesthetic could be determined inside the joint in all cases with heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence. In the present study, 60% of the patients had significant reduction of pain after sacro-iliac joint arthrography and sacro-iliac joint was considered to be the source of patients low back pain in these patients. Conclusion: The present study shows that MR guidance with open configuration low field scanner is an accurate guiding method for sacro-iliac joint arthrography

  3. Comparison of the Efficacy of Dry Needling and High-Power Pain Threshold Ultrasound Therapy with Clinical Status and Sonoelastography in Myofascial Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridici, Rifat; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Bozdogan, Erol; Sen Dokumaci, Dilek; Kilicaslan, Nihat; Boyaci, Nurefsan

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic efficacy of high-power pain threshold (HPPT) ultrasound therapy applied to the trigger points and dry needling (DN) in myofascial pain syndrome. Sixty-one patients were randomly assigned to an HPPT (n = 30) and dry needling (n = 31) groups. The primary outcome measures were the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), both at 1 week and 4 weeks after treatment. The secondary outcome measures were the number of painful trigger points, range of the tragus-acromioclavicular joint, the Short Form-36, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and sonoelastographic tests after a 1-week treatment. More improvement was seen in anxiety in the HPPT group (P 0.05). A decrease in tissue stiffness was only seen in the HPPT group (P pain syndrome. Although a significant decrease was shown in tissue stiffness with HPPT, neither of these treatments had an apparent superiority.

  4. Effect of Footwear on Joint Pain and Function in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy; Luna, Sarah

    Lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition among older adults; given the risks of surgical and pharmaceutical interventions, conservative, lower-cost management options such as footwear warrant further investigation. This systematic review investigated the effects of footwear, including shoe inserts, in reducing lower extremity joint pain and improving gait, mobility, and quality of life in older adults with OA. The CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, RECAL, and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for publications from January 1990 to September 2014, using the terms "footwear," "shoes," "gait," "pain," and "older adult." Participants who were 50 years or older and those who had OA in at least one lower extremity joint narrowed the results. Outcomes of interest included measures of pain, comfort, function, gait, or quality of life. Exclusion criteria applied to participants with rheumatoid arthritis, amputation, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, use of modified footwear or custom orthotics, purely biomechanical studies, and outcomes of balance or falls only. Single-case studies, qualitative narrative descriptions, and expert opinions were also excluded. The initial search resulted in a total of 417 citations. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria. Two randomized controlled trials and 3 quasiexperimental studies reported lateral wedge insoles may have at least some pain-relieving effects and improved functional mobility in older adults at 4 weeks to 2 years' follow-up, particularly when used with subtalar and ankle strapping. Three randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes reported that lateral wedges provided no knee pain relief compared with flat insoles. Hardness of shoe soles did not significantly affect joint comfort in the foot in a quasiexperimental study. A quasiexperimental designed study investigating shock-absorbing insoles showed reduction in knee joint pain with 1 month of wear. Finally, a cross-sectional prognostic study indicated

  5. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  6. Relief from Back Pain Through Postural Adjustment: a Controlled Clinical Trial of the Immediate Effects of Muscular Chains Therapy (MCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Jose L

    2014-09-01

    Back pain can be one of the most common health problems, causing suffering, disabilities, and financial losses. Postural models for pain treatment state that poor posture alters the joint position and causes pain, such as back pain. Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) is a technique that is used to treat posture pathologies, among others. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of a single session of Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) on complaints of undiagnosed musculoskeletal spinal pain. Physical therapy clinic of the University of Center-West (Guarapuava, Brazil). 100 subjects, aged between 20 and 39 years, with complaints of spinal musculoskeletal pain. Randomized controlled trial. The participants were randomly assigned by a non-care provider into two groups: The MCT Group that received Muscular Chain Treatment and the Control Group that received a placebo treatment of 15 minutes turned off ultrasound therapy. All volunteers were assessed before and after treatment using an analog pain scale. A score of 0 indicated no pain and 10 was the maximum degree of pain on the scale. Degree of pain measured by analog scale. The chi-square goodness of fit test was used to compare gender distribution among groups displayed a p value = .25. Subject age had differences analyzed using the unpaired t test (p = .44). Pain assessment for treatment and placebo control groups was analyzed using a paired t test and unpaired t test. The paired t test was used for intragroup before/after treatment comparison (MCT p = .00001; Control Group p = .0001). The unpaired t test was used for comparing the difference of the pain level before and after treatment between groups (p = .0001). A priori statistical significance was set a p = .05. It is possible to conclude that one MCT session is an effective treatment of undiagnosed spinal musculoskeletal pain.

  7. Complementary and alternative therapies for back pain II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Andrea D; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Gross, Anita; Van Tulder, Maurits; Santaguida, Lina; Cherkin, Dan; Gagnier, Joel; Ammendolia, Carlo; Ansari, Mohammed T; Ostermann, Thomas; Dryden, Trish; Doucette, Steve; Skidmore, Becky; Daniel, Raymond; Tsouros, Sophia; Weeks, Laura; Galipeau, James

    2010-10-01

    Back and neck pain are important health problems with serious societal and economic implications. Conventional treatments have been shown to have limited benefit in improving patient outcomes. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies offer additional options in the management of low back and neck pain. Many trials evaluating CAM therapies have poor quality and inconsistent results. To systematically review the efficacy, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and harms of acupuncture, spinal manipulation, mobilization, and massage techniques in management of back, neck, and/or thoracic pain. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and EMBASE were searched up to 2010; unpublished literature and reference lists of relevant articles were also searched. study selection: All records were screened by two independent reviewers. Primary reports of comparative efficacy, effectiveness, harms, and/or economic evaluations from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the CAM therapies in adults (age ≥ 18 years) with back, neck, or thoracic pain were eligible. Non-randomized controlled trials and observational studies (case-control, cohort, cross-sectional) comparing harms were also included. Reviews, case reports, editorials, commentaries or letters were excluded. Two independent reviewers using a predefined form extracted data on study, participants, treatments, and outcome characteristics. 265 RCTs and 5 non-RCTs were included. Acupuncture for chronic nonspecific low back pain was associated with significantly lower pain intensity than placebo but only immediately post-treatment (VAS: -0.59, 95 percent CI: -0.93, -0.25). However, acupuncture was not different from placebo in post-treatment disability, pain medication intake, or global improvement in chronic nonspecific low back pain. Acupuncture did not differ from sham-acupuncture in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain immediately after treatment (VAS: 0.24, 95 percent CI: -1

  8. [Transfer managment of postoperative acute pain therapy to outpatient aftercare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, C; Lefering, R; Althaus, A; Simanski, C; Neugebauer, E

    2014-10-01

    The significance of postoperative pain management for patients in the hospital is well known and has been a focus of research for several years. The ambulatory care after hospital discharge, however, is not well investigated. A prospective observational study was therefore conducted to study the transfer management from in-hospital patients to ambulatory care. A patient questionnaire was developed and patients were asked to fill it out at different time points after the operation: during the time in the hospital, then at 2 weeks and 6 months after hospital discharge. In addition, the responsible family doctor was approached and interviewed. The main focus of the questionnaire was the measurement of post-surgical pain (numeric rating scale NRS), patient satisfaction (Cologne patient questionnaire), and quality of life (SF 12). Of a total of 128 patients 72.9% described moderate to severe pain after the orthopaedic operations in the hospital. 90.8% of the patients had pain directly after discharge from the hospital; in 67.4% of the cases pain was ≥3 and in 23.4% of the cases pain was ≥6. Six months after discharge pain was significant in 29.4% of the patients, 60.8% of the patients were satisfied with the transfer to the home setting. 16% were not satisfied at all and 23.2% were neutral. Important factors for dissatisfaction with the transfer management were, according to stepwise logistic regeression analysis, sex (female patients), young age, a poor bodily constitution at the hospital and thereafter, and the pain management in the hospital and after discharge. The study shows the significance of the acute pain therapy not only during the hospital stay but also after discharge. There are very few data on pain therapy after discharge from the hospital. Based on the significance of the chronification of acute pain it is of the utmost importance to close this gap. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Palliative surgery for acetabular metastasis with pathological central dislocation of the hip joint after radiation therapy. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Manabu; Takada, Jun; Oebisu, Naoto; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Susumu; Takami, Masatsugu

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery for bone metastases is mainly a palliative treatment. Pathological central dislocation of the hip joint secondary to osteonecrosis of acetabular metastasis after radiation therapy brings severe suffering to cancer patients. We performed minimally invasive palliative surgery for an elderly woman, and excellent pain relief was achieved. An 80-year-old female suffering from right hip pain was referred to our hospital. She had undergone surgery for lung cancer 5 years previously and her right acetabulum was subsequently affected by metastasis. With the aim of controlling the metastasis, radiation therapy was performed. Two years later, pathological central dislocation of the hip joint occurred with sudden onset of severe pain, and she was unable to maintain a sitting position and became bedridden. After she was referred to our hospital, we created an intentional pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for palliation. After the surgery, excellent pain relief and remarkably improved mobility were achieved during her limited remaining lifetime. In this report, we introduce a novel method of producing a pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for pathological dislocation. This procedure is a minimally invasive treatment and an alternative option for palliative surgery for pathological dislocation of the hip joint due to osteonecrosis after radiation therapy. (author)

  10. Effect of specialty care on the low-level laser therapy for the patients with temporomandibular joint pain%低强度激光治疗颞下颌关节疼痛的临床专科护理∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶莺; 张燕平; 刘然; 张静露

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨颞下颌关节专科护理用于低强度激光治疗颞下颌关节疼痛治疗的效果。方法将144例颞下颌关节疼痛患者随机分为激光治疗专科护理组、单纯激光治疗组、单纯专科护理组和对照组。激光治疗专科护理组在治疗过程中采用低强度镓铝砷半导体激光治疗辅以颞下颌关节专科护理,单纯激光治疗组仅使用低强度镓铝砷半导体激光进行治疗,单纯专科护理组采用模拟激光照射并进行个性化专科护理,对照组仅采用模拟激光进行安慰照射。治疗周期为10 d。结果激光治疗专科护理组治疗前后开口度(t=8.770,P<0.001)和前伸运动度(t=6.306,P<0.001)明显增大,开口偏斜减小(t=4.233,P<0.001),疼痛减轻(t=12.084,P<0.001);单纯激光治疗组颞下颌关节疼痛减轻,差异有统计学意义(t=4.702,P<0.001),但下颌前伸运动改善不明显(t=1.784,P=0.083);单纯护理组颞下颌关节疼痛减轻(t=6.136,P<0.001)。结论颞下颌关节专科护理能够提高镓铝砷半导体激光对颞下颌关节病治疗的效果。%Objective To evaluate the clinical effect of temporomandibular joint ( TMJ) specialty care on the low-level Ga-Al-As laser therapy for the patients with TMJ pain in a random and double-blind research design. Methods A total of 144 patients were randomly divided into four groups. Patients in Group 1 received laser therapy combined with specialty care. Group 2 accepted simple laser therapy only. Group 3 had specialty care and sham laser as placebo and controlled group received sham laser as without specialty care. All the patients treated for 10 days. Results Compared with the other three groups, Laser treatment combined with specialty care group showed significant better improvement on mandib-ular function ( P<0. 001) and pain intensity ( P<0. 001) after treatment. Simple laser treatment can also relief pain in-tensity ( P<0. 001) and increase the vertical movement ( P<0. 001

  11. Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion, Radiofrequency Denervation, and Conservative Management for Sacroiliac Joint Pain: 6-Year Comparative Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Sáiz-Sapena, Nieves; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Verdú-López, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain is an under-recognized condition. Substantial information supports the safety and effectiveness of SIJ fusion (SIJF). Long-term follow-up after SIJF has not been reported. To determine responses to conservative management (CM), SIJ denervation, and SIJF in patients with SIJ pain unresponsive to CM. Retrospective study with long-term (up to 6 yr) follow-up of 137 patients with SIJ pain seen in an outpatient neurosurgery clinic who received either CM (n = 63), sacroiliac denervation (n = 47), or minimally invasive SIJF (n = 27). At each routine clinic visit, patients completed pain scores and Oswestry Disability Index. Additional data were extracted from medical charts. Patients treated with continued CM had no long-term improvement in pain (mean worsening of 1 point) or disability (mean Oswestry Disability Index worsened by 4-6 points), increased their use of opioids, and had poor long-term work status. SIJF patients had large improvements in SIJ pain (mean 6 points), large improvements in disability (mean 25 points), a decrease in opioid use, and good final work status. Sacroiliac denervation patients had intermediate responses (0-1 and 1-2 points, respectively). In patients with SIJ pain unresponsive to CM, SIJF resulted in excellent long-term clinical responses, with low opioid use and better work status compared to other treatments. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  12. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akın; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorshıd, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, SeokJoo; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kwansub

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a conservative physical therapy group (n=10) and an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (n=10). Both groups received general conservative physical therapy, and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy was additionally treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy after receiving conservative physical therapy. Both groups were treated three times a week over a four-week period. The visual analogue scale was used to evaluate pain in the knee joints of the subjects, and the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to evaluate the function of the subjects. [Results] The comparison of the visual analogue scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores within each group before and after the treatment showed statistically significant declines in scores in both the conservative physical therapy group and extracorporeal shock wave therapy group. A group comparison after the treatment showed statistically significant differences in these scores in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group and the conservative physical therapy group. [Conclusion] extracorporeal shock wave therapy may be a useful nonsurgical intervention for reducing the pain of patients with degenerative knee arthritis and improving these patients' function.

  15. Knowledge of Housewives Regarding Non Steroid Anti Inflammatory Drug Use on Joint Pain in Hegarmanah Village Jatinangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Mulyono Gondopurwanto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint pain is frequently found in daily life activities. The prevalence of joint pain increases within the age. One of the medicine used for joint pain is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID. In connection with inappropriate usage and their side effects, this study aimed to seek the extent ofhousewives’ knowledge on the use of NSAID for joint pain in Hegarmanah village, Jatinangor subdistrict. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in October 2013 to the housewives resided in Hegarmanah village, Jatinangor subdistrict, West Java. Questionaire sheet was distributed to each of 110 housewives that had been stratifiedly with randomized sample. The questionaire contained identity, age, education level, and knowledge of NSAID in related to joint pain. Results: Based on the data collected, 73 subjects had adequate level of the knowledge and 37 subjects were in a poor level of the knowledge. The proportion of respondents who knew that joint pain was the pain occurs in the joint was 99.1%, the proportion of respondents who knew that the pain relieving drugs are called NSAID group was 40.9%, the proportion of respondents who knew that NSAID had a side-effect was 73.6%, and the proportion of respondents who knew that the side-effect of NSAID is abdominal pain was 61.8%. Conclusions: Most of the housewives in Hegarmanah Subdistrict have adequate knowledge in the use ofNSAID for joint pain relief.

  16. Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy for Hand and Arm Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranceanu, Ana-Maria; Safren, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychological treatment that emphasizes the interrelation among thoughts, behaviors, feelings, and sensations. CBT has been proved effective not only for treatment of psychological illness but also for teaching adaptive coping strategies in the context of chronic illnesses, including chronic pain. The present article provides general information on CBT, specific information on CBT for pain, as well as guidelines and strategies for using CBT for hand and arm pain patients, as part of multidisciplinary care models. PMID:21051204

  17. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob A; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. The effectiveness of injection therapy for low back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent, and dosage, generally found in RCTs, point to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases up to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch, and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet, or local sites for subacute or chronic low back pain were included. Studies that compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy, or ozone therapy with other treatments were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Eighteen trials (1179 participants) were included in this review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender-and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics, and a variety of other drugs. The methodologic quality of the trials was limited with 10 of 18 trials rated as having a high methodologic quality. Statistical pooling was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Overall, the results indicated that there is no strong evidence for or against the use of any type of injection therapy. There is insufficient evidence to

  18. Comparing the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Hypnosis Therapy Pain Self-Efficacy and Pain Severity in Girls with Primary Dysmenorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    F Farshbaf Manei Sefat; A Abolghasemi; U Barahmand; N Hajloo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Background & aim: Menstruation as an important issue in adolescence and menstrual pain is a common problem in adolescents. Regarding the relationship between pain severity and  pain self-efficacy, this study aimed to investigate and compare the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis therapy on pain and pain self-efficacy in girls with primary dysmenorrhea.   Methods: The method of research is Quasi experimental and research design is pretes...

  19. Chronic vulvar pain from a physical therapy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee

    2010-01-01

    When assessing women with chronic vulvar pain, women's health physical therapists search for comorbid mechanical components (including musculoskeletal, fascial, and visceral) and other disorders that may contribute to or be caused by chronic vulvar pain (CVP). Pelvic floor hypertonicity is a key perpetuating factor for CVP. Comprehensive physical therapy evaluation and suggested physical therapy interventions are described. Anatomy of the pelvis, common evaluative findings, and specifics for pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation are presented. Normalization of pelvic floor muscle function contributes to the reduction of CVP. Successful treatment includes the identification and treatment of co-existing physical abnormalities throughout the trunk and pelvis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating peripheral knee joint cartilage. © 2013

  1. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  2. Use of electroanalgesia and laser therapies as alternatives to opioids for acute and chronic pain management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F. White

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of opioid analgesics for postoperative pain management has contributed to the global opioid epidemic. It was recently reported that prescription opioid analgesic use often continued after major joint replacement surgery even though patients were no longer experiencing joint pain. The use of epidural local analgesia for perioperative pain management was not found to be protective against persistent opioid use in a large cohort of opioid-naïve patients undergoing abdominal surgery. In a retrospective study involving over 390,000 outpatients more than 66 years of age who underwent minor ambulatory surgery procedures, patients receiving a prescription opioid analgesic within 7 days of discharge were 44% more likely to continue using opioids 1 year after surgery. In a review of 11 million patients undergoing elective surgery from 2002 to 2011, both opioid overdoses and opioid dependence were found to be increasing over time. Opioid-dependent surgical patients were more likely to experience postoperative pulmonary complications, require longer hospital stays, and increase costs to the health-care system. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emphasized the importance of finding alternatives to opioid medication for treating pain. In the new clinical practice guidelines for back pain, the authors endorsed the use of non-pharmacologic therapies. However, one of the more widely used non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain (namely radiofrequency ablation therapy was recently reported to have no clinical benefit. Therefore, this clinical commentary will review evidence in the peer-reviewed literature supporting the use of electroanalgesia and laser therapies for treating acute pain, cervical (neck pain, low back pain, persistent post-surgical pain after spine surgery (“failed back syndrome”, major joint replacements, and abdominal surgery as well as other common chronic pain syndromes (for example, myofascial pain, peripheral

  3. A multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of tempromandibular joint pain associated with qat chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Mansoor; Al-Moaleem, Mohammed M; Al-Ahmari, Nasser M

    2013-01-01

    Pain of the tempro-mandibular joint (TMJ) has a direct bearing to missing teeth and excessive physical activity. Consumption of qat requires chewing on the leaves to extract their juice for long hours. A 65-year-old male Yemeni patient, a Qat chewer, reported to the university dental hospital at King Khalid University complaining of pain in left temporomandibular joint with missing mandibular anterior teeth. A multidisciplinary approach for the overall treatment of the patient was decided. Initial treatment was the relief of patient's pain with the help of a night guard. This was followed by a fabrication of anterior FPD. The case was under maintenance and follow-up protocol for a period of 8 months with no complaint of pain discomfort.

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach in the Treatment of Tempromandibular Joint Pain Associated with Qat Chewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Shariff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain of the tempro-mandibular joint (TMJ has a direct bearing to missing teeth and excessive physical activity. Consumption of qat requires chewing on the leaves to extract their juice for long hours. A 65-year-old male Yemeni patient, a Qat chewer, reported to the university dental hospital at King Khalid University complaining of pain in left temporomandibular joint with missing mandibular anterior teeth. A multidisciplinary approach for the overall treatment of the patient was decided. Initial treatment was the relief of patient’s pain with the help of a night guard. This was followed by a fabrication of anterior FPD. The case was under maintenance and follow-up protocol for a period of 8 months with no complaint of pain discomfort.

  5. EFFICACY OF ADDUCTOR PULL BACK EXERCISE ON PAIN AND FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY FOR SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Kumar .N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD is a common problem that causes pain and disability. Adductor pull back exercise is widely used for treating sacroiliac joint dysfunction. No yet research has been directly examined the efficacy of adductor pull back exercise for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The purpose of the study to find the efficacy of adductor pull back exercise on pain and functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Methods: An experimental study design, 40 subjects with unilateral Sacroiliac joint dysfunction were randomized into two groups: study group (n=20, and control group (n=20. Subjects in study group received adductor pull back exercise along with conventional exercise and Subjects in control group received conventional exercise. The duration of treatment was given for two weeks, three times a day, total six days per week. Outcome measures such as pain was measured using Visual analog scale (VAS, and functional disability was measured using Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire (ODI before and after 2 weeks of the treatment in both the groups. Results: When means were analyzed using Independent ‘t’ test as a parametric and Mann Whitney U test as a non-parametric test, there is a statistically significant improvements in means of VAS, and ODI within the groups. When means were compared using Independent ‘t’ and Mann Whitney U test, there is a significant difference in post-means of VAS and ODI between the groups. Conclusion: The present study concludes that the 2 weeks of adductor pull back exercise along with conventional exercise found statistically and clinically significant effect on improving pain, functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Adductors pull back exercise along with conventional exercise techniques shown to have greater percentage of improvement in improving pain and functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

  6. Joint space narrowing, body mass index, and knee pain: the ROAD study (OAC1839R1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, S; Akune, T; En-Yo, Y; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Yoshida, H; Ishibashi, H; Tokimura, F; Yamamoto, S; Tanaka, S; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Oka, H; Yoshimura, N

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the association of joint space narrowing with knee pain in Japanese men and women using a large-scale population-based cohort of the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study. This study examined the association between minimum joint space width (mJSW) in the medial compartment and pain at the knee. mJSW was measured in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee using a knee osteoarthritis (OA) computer-aided diagnosis system. From the 3040 participants in the ROAD study, the present study analyzed 2733 participants who completed the radiographic examinations and questionnaires regarding knee pain (975 men and 1758 women; mean age, 69.9 ± 11.2 years). Subjects with lateral knee OA were excluded. After adjustment for age and Body mass index (BMI), medial mJSW, as well as medial mJSW/lateral mJSW, was significantly associated with knee pain. Sex and BMI affected the association of medial mJSW with knee pain. The threshold of medial mJSW was approximately 3 mm in men and 2 mm in women, while that of medial mJSW/lateral mJSW was approximately 60% in both men and women. BMI was found to have a distinct effect on the association of mJSW with pain. The present cross-sectional study using a large-scale population from the ROAD study showed that joint space narrowing had a significant association with knee pain. The thresholds of joint space narrowing for knee pain were also established. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Knee joint pain potentially due to bone alterations in a knee osteoarthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient's knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.

  8. A randomized controlled trial of intra-articular prolotherapy versus steroid injection for sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Jeong, Cheol Won; Kim, Chang Mo; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2010-12-01

    Controversy exists regarding the efficacy of ligament prolotherapy in alleviating sacroiliac joint pain. The inconsistent success rates reported in previous studies may be attributed to variability in patient selection and techniques between studies. It was hypothesized that intra-articular prolotherapy for patients with a positive response to diagnostic block may mitigate the drawbacks of ligament prolotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of intra-articular prolotherapy in relieving sacroiliac joint pain, compared with intra-articular steroid injection. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The study was conducted at an outpatient pain medicine clinic at Chonnam National University Hospital in Gwang-ju, Korea. The study included patients with sacroiliac joint pain, confirmed by ≥50% improvement in response to local anesthetic block, lasting 3 months or longer, and who failed medical treatment. The treatment involved intra-articular dextrose water prolotherapy or triamcinolone acetonide injection using fluoroscopic guidance, with a biweekly schedule and maximum of three injections. Pain and disability scores were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks, and monthly after completion of treatment. The numbers of recruited patients were 23 and 25 for the prolotherapy and steroid groups, respectively. The pain and disability scores were significantly improved from baseline in both groups at the 2-week follow-up, with no significant difference between them. The cumulative incidence of ≥50% pain relief at 15 months was 58.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37.9%-79.5%) in the prolotherapy group and 10.2% (95% CI 6.7%-27.1%) in the steroid group, as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis; there was a statistically significant difference between the groups (log-rank p prolotherapy provided significant relief of sacroiliac joint pain, and its effects lasted longer than those of steroid injections. Further studies

  9. Gait analysis and weight bearing in pre-clinical joint pain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ängeby Möller, Kristina; Svärd, Heta; Suominen, Anni; Immonen, Jarmo; Holappa, Johanna; Stenfors, Carina

    2018-04-15

    There is a need for better joint pain treatment, but development of new medication has not been successful. Pre-clinical models with readouts that better reflect the clinical situation are needed. In patients with joint pain, pain at rest and pain at walking are two major complaints. We describe a new way of calculating results from gait analysis using the CatWalk™ setup. Rats with monoarthritis induced by injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) intra-articularly into the ankle joint of one hind limb were used to assess gait and dynamic weight bearing. The results show that dynamic weight bearing was markedly reduced for the injected paw. Gait parameters such as amount of normal step sequences, walking speed and duration of step placement were also affected. Treatment with naproxen (an NSAID commonly used for inflammatory pain) attenuated the CFA-induced effects. Pregabalin, which is used for neuropathic pain, had no effect. Reduced dynamic weight bearing during locomotion, assessed and calculated in the way we present here, showed a dose-dependent and lasting normalization after naproxen treatment. In contrast, static weight bearing while standing (Incapacitance tester) showed a significant effect for a limited time only. Mechanical sensitivity (von Frey Optihairs) was completely normalized by naproxen, and the window for testing pharmacological effect disappeared. Objective and reproducible effects, with an endpoint showing face validity compared to pain while walking in patients with joint pain, are achieved by a new way of calculating dynamic weight bearing in monoarthritic rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spinal Manipulative Therapy Specific Changes In Pain Sensitivity In Individuals With Low Back Pain (NCT01168999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E; George, Steven Z; Horn, Maggie E; Price, Donald D; Staud, Roland; Robinson, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Spinal Manipulative Therapy (SMT) is effective for some individuals experiencing low back pain (LBP); however, the mechanisms are not established regarding the role of placebo. SMT is associated with changes in pain sensitivity suggesting related altered central nervous system response or processing of afferent nociceptive input. Placebo is also associated with changes in pain sensitivity and the efficacy of SMT for changes in pain sensitivity beyond placebo has not been adequately considered. We randomly assigned 110 participants with LBP to receive SMT, placebo SMT, placebo SMT with the instructional set, “The manual therapy technique you will receive has been shown to significantly reduce low back pain in some people”, or no intervention. Participants receiving the SMT and placebo SMT received their assigned intervention 6 times over two weeks. Pain sensitivity was assessed prior to and immediately following the assigned intervention during the first session. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and following two weeks of participation in the study. Immediate attenuation of suprathreshold heat response was greatest following SMT (p= 0.05, partial η2= 0.07). Group dependent differences were not observed for changes in pain intensity and disability at two week. Participant satisfaction was greatest following the enhanced placebo SMT. PMID:24361109

  11. Physical therapy for chronic scrotal content pain with associated pelvic floor pain on digital rectal exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M Ryan; Dugan, Sheila A; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic scrotal content pain (CSCP) is a common condition that can be challenging to manage definitively. A cohort of patients with CSCP have referred pain from myofascial abnormalities of the pelvic floor and therefore require treatment modalities that specifically address the pelvic floor such as pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT). Retrospective chart review of all men with a pelvic floor component of CSCP presenting to our tertiary care medical center and undergoing PFPT from 2011-2014. Patients with CSCP and pain/tightness on pelvic floor evaluation with 360° digital rectal exam (DRE) were referred to a physiotherapist for PFPT. CSCP was defined as primary unilateral or bilateral pain of the testicle, epididymis and/or spermatic cord that was constant or intermittent, lasted greater than 3 months, and significantly interfered with daily activities. Long term follow up was conducted by office visit and physical therapy chart review. Thirty patients, mean age of 42 years (range 18-75), were followed for a median of 13 months (range 3-48). Median pre-PFPT pain score was 6/10 (range 2-10). After a mean of 12 PFPT sessions (IQR 6-16), pain improved in 50.0% of patients, median decrease in pain was 4.5/10 (range 1-10). Complete resolution of pain occurred in 13.3%, 44.0% had none to minor residual pain. Following PFPT, fewer subjects required pain medication compared with prior to PFPT (44.0% versus 73.3%, p = 0.03). For men with CSCP and a positive pelvic floor exam with DRE, we recommend a trial of PFPT as an effective and non-operative treatment modality.

  12. The use of joint mobilization to improve clinical outcomes in hand therapy: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Rick; O'Brien, Virginia H; Schwartz, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Systematic review. Joint mobilizations are used as an intervention for improving range of motion, decreasing pain and ultimately improving function in patients with a wide variety of upper extremity diagnoses. However, there are only a limited number of studies describing this treatment for conditions affecting the elbow, wrist, and hand. Furthermore, it is unclear as to the most effective joint mobilization technique utilized and the most beneficial functional outcomes gained. Examine the current evidence describing joint mobilizations for treatment of conditions of the elbow, wrist and hand, and offer informative practical clinical guidance. Twenty-two studies dated between 1980 and 2011 were included in the systematic review for analysis. The current evidence provides moderate support for the inclusion of joint mobilizations in the treatment of lateral epicondylalgia (LE). In particular, mobilization with movement as described by Mulligan is supported with evidence from nine randomized clinical trials as an effective technique for the treatment of pain. Other described techniques include those known as Kaltenborn, Cyriax physical therapy, and Maitland, but the evidence for these techniques is limited. There is also limited evidence for the joint mobilizations in the treatment of wrist and hand conditions. The current literature offers limited support for joint mobilizations of the wrist and hand, and moderate support for joint mobilizations of the elbow for LE. There is moderate support for mobilization with movement. . Copyright © 2013 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ignoring the sacroiliac joint in chronic low back pain is costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly DW

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available David W Polly,1,2 Daniel Cher3 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA Background: Increasing evidence supports minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ fusion as a safe and effective treatment for SIJ dysfunction. Failure to include the SIJ in the diagnostic evaluation of low back pain could result in unnecessary health care expenses. Design: Decision analytic cost model. Methods: A decision analytic model calculating 2-year direct health care costs in patients with chronic low back pain considering lumbar fusion surgery was used. Results: The strategy of including the SIJ in the preoperative diagnostic workup of chronic low back pain saves an expected US$3,100 per patient over 2 years. Cost savings were robust to reasonable ranges for costs and probabilities, such as the probability of diagnosis and the probability of successful surgical treatment. Conclusion: Including the SIJ as part of the diagnostic strategy in preoperative patients with chronic low back pain is likely to be cost saving in the short term. Keywords: chronic low back pain, lumbar fusion, sacroiliac joint pain, sacroiliac joint fusion, healthcare costs, decision modeling

  14. Differential diagnostics of different nosological forms of the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameneva L.A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to carry out differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of a temporal and temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome. Material and methods. On clinical base of orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU inspection of 244 patients with temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome was performed. Diagnostics was carried out according to the special card of inspection which was developed on orthopedic odontology chair of SamSMU and included subjective, objective and special methods of research. As a result of research it is taped: 71 — an occlusal-articulation dysfunctional syndrome, 44 — a neuromuscular dysfunctional syndrome, 76 patients have a hardly set dislocation of intra joint disk and 53 — a habitual dislocation and a subluxation of a temporomandibular joint. We used Yu.A. Petrosov's classification as it displays most precisely the processes happening at pathology of the intra joint relations. Conclusion: On the basis of the obtained data the table of differential diagnostics of various nosological forms of temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has been made.

  15. A clinical trial comparing Lanconone® with ibuprofen for rapid relief in acute joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girandola, Robert N; Srivastava, Shalini; Loullis, Costas C

    2016-04-06

    To study the effect of Lanconone® (1000 mg) on acute pain on exertion as compared to the standard of care, Ibuprofen (400 mg). The study recruited 72 subjects diagnosed with mild to moderate knee joint pain on exertion. Subjects with Pain Visual Analogue Scale of more than 40 mm were included. Uphill walking was provided as the stressor using Naughton's protocol on a treadmill. The subjects walked for 10 minutes continuously followed by a rest period and baseline pain score for index knee joint was recorded. Subjects were administered a single dose of Lanconone® (1000 mg)/Ibuprofen (400 mg). Thereafter the same stressor was provided at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours, subsequently, pain scores were recorded on a visual analogue scale. Double stopwatch method was used to evaluate the onset of pain relief and time taken to meaningful pain relief. Both Lanconone® and Ibuprofen showed the first perceived pain relief at 65.31 ± 35.57 mins as compared to 60.82 ± 32.56 mins respectively. The mean time taken to experience meaningful pain relief in Lanconone® group was 196.59 ± 70.85 mins compared to 167.13 ± 71.41 mins amongst Ibuprofen group. The meaningful pain relief continued for 6 hours. The current study successfully demonstrated rapid pain-relieving potential of Lanconone® which was comparable to Ibuprofen. No adverse event related to the interventions was reported in the study. Clinical trials.gov NCT02417506 . 21 January 2015.

  16. Audit of conservative management of chronic low back pain in a secondary care setting--part I: facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Robin; Dias, Richard

    2004-12-01

    The work of a chronic back pain service in secondary care in the West Midlands is reported. The service offers acupuncture, spinal injection procedures, osteopathy and a range of other interventions for patients whose back pain has not responded to conservative management. This section of the report focuses on injection procedures for lumbar facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain, which have been shown to be the cause of chronic low back pain in 16-40% and 13-19% of patients respectively. Diagnosis relies on the use of intra-articular or sensory nerve block injections with local anaesthetic. Possible treatments following diagnosis include intra-articular corticosteroid, radiofrequency denervation (for facet joint pain) or ligament prolotherapy injections (for sacroiliac joint pain). The results of several hospital audits are reported. At six month follow up, 50% of 38 patients undergoing radiofrequency denervation following diagnostic blocks for facet joint pain had improved by more than 50%, compared to 29% of 34 patients treated with intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Sixty three per cent of 19 patients undergoing prolotherapy following diagnostic block injection for sacroiliac joint pain had improved at six months, compared to 33% of 33 who had intra-articular corticosteroid. Both radiofrequency denervation and sacroiliac prolotherapy showed good long-term outcomes at one year.

  17. Case Report: A man on antiretroviral therapy with painful thighs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 54 year old man presented with increasing pain in both thighs for three months during a follow up visit at the antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic of Queen Elizabeth. Central Hospital. He was first seen at the same clinic three years and eight months before the current presentation, when he started. ART with ...

  18. Complementary and alternative therapies for back pain II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, Andrea D.; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Gross, Anita; Van Tulder, Maurits; Santaguida, Lina; Cherkin, Dan; Gagnier, Joel J.; Ammendolia, Carlo; Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ostermann, Thomas; Dryden, Trish; Doucette, Steve; Skidmore, Becky; Daniel, Raymond; Tsouros, Sophia; Weeks, Laura; Galipeau, James

    2010-01-01

    Back and neck pain are important health problems with serious societal and economic implications. Conventional treatments have been shown to have limited benefit in improving patient outcomes. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies offer additional options in the management of low

  19. The prevalence of lumbar facet joint edema in patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Klaus M.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried; Nemec, Stefan; Peloschek, Philipp; Weber, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to assess the prevalence of lumbar facet joint edema in patients with low back pain. Lumbar spine MR examinations (1.5 T) of 145 consecutive patients (87 women, 58 men; mean age 52.8, range 17-94 years) were retrospectively evaluated with regard to the presence of facet joint edema. The MR protocol included sagittal short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), T1- and T2-weighted as well as transverse T2-weighted images. In 9 patients follow-up MR examinations were performed and results were compared with pain. The agreement between the change in intensity of facet joint edema and the change in intensity of pain was assessed using kappa statistics and Kendall's tau coefficient. In 21 of the 145 patients (14%) edema was found at the facet joints: in 52.4% at L4/5, in 19.0% at L5/S1, in 14.3% at L4/5 and L5/S1, in 9.5% at L3/4 and L4/5, and in 4.8% at L3/4. The agreement between the change in pain score and intensity of edema within the follow-up group was ''almost perfect'' (kappa = 0.81). Kendall's tau coefficient was 0.91, indicating high agreement. Sagittal STIR images detect facet joint edema in 14% of patients with low back pain. This fact may be useful for planning treatment including facet joint injections. (orig.)

  20. An adult case of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis treated with splint therapy and the subsequent orthodontic occlusal reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanefi Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report treatment for a 19-year-old female patient with severe osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The patient had severe open bite with a Class II molar relationship. She had limited mouth opening and pain. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that she had anterior disc displacement without reduction. By splint therapy, limited mouth opening and pain was eliminated, but an anterior open bite developed after the treatment. By orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship.

  1. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal muscle exercises and iliopsoas, hamstring and quadriceps stretching exercises two times a day for 14 days. The physical therapy group was given hot pack+therapeutic ultrasound+ interferential current for 10 days additionally. Degree of the low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS, range of joint motion was evaluated with hand finger floor distance (HFFD and Modified Schober test, functional status was evaluated with Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale and quality of life was evaluated with Short form-36 (SF-36 before and a month after the treatments. Results: In both groups (exercise group: average age 59 years, 21 females, 2 males; physical therapy group: average age 60 years, 20 females, 3 males pain intensity and HFFD decreased and Modified Schober increased, functionality recovered, pain and physical functions of SF-36 improved after the treatments. SF-36-physical role difficulty also improved in the exercise group. Decrease in pain, increase in HFFD andimproving of the functional status were all significantly more in the physical therapy group. There were no difference between the groups in terms of Modified Schober measurement and changes of the quality of life. Conclusions: Exercises and exercise+physical therapy are both effective in chronic low back pain. Successful results can be taken by addition of the physical therapy in patients who do not benefit sufficiently from exercise therapy. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 73-8

  2. Association between composites of selected motion palpation and pain provocation tests for sacroiliac joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanifar, Manijeh; Karimi, Noureddin; Arab, Amir Massoud

    2017-04-01

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) has been implicated as a potential source of low back and buttock pain. Several types of motion palpation and pain provocation tests are used to evaluate SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between motion palpation and pain provocation tests in assessment of SIJ problems. This study is Descriptive Correlation. 50 patients between the ages of 20 and 65 participated. Four motion palpation tests (Sitting flexion, Standing flexion, Prone knee flexion, Gillet test) and three pain provocation tests (FABER, Posterior shear, Resisted abduction test) were examined. Chi-square analysis was used to assess the relationship between results of the individuals and composites of these two groups of tests. No significant relationship was found between these two groups of tests. It seems that motion palpation tests assess SIJ dysfunction and provocative tests assessed SIJ pain which do not appear to be related. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Clinical Study on the cases of The Pain Shock Patients after Korean Bee-Venom Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-seon

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:There has been no known report on the pain shock after administering Korean bee-venom therapy. Three accounts of pain shock were observed at the Sangji university affiliated Oriental medicine clinic from July 2001 through September 2001. This thesis will inform clinical progression and cautions on administering Korean bee-venom therapy. Method:We were able to witness different patterns of pain shock during the treatment of degenerative knee joint, progressive oral paralysis, and A.L.S. In order to reduce heat toxicity of the bee venom, needling points were first massaged with the ice for 10 minutes before injecting 0.1~0.2cc of the bee venom. Points of injection were ST36, LI11, LI4 and others. Pain shock occurred after injecting on inner xi-an, outer xi-an and LI4. The phenomena associated with pain shock was recorded in chronological order and local changes were examined. Result Through examining 3 patients with the pain shock, we managed to observe clinical progression, duration, and time linked changes on specific regions. We also managed to determine sensitive needling points for the pain shock. Conclusion:Following results were obtained from 3 patients with the pain shock caused by Korean bee-venom therapy from July 2001 to September 2001. 1. Either positive or negative responses were shown after the pain shock. For case 1, extreme pain was accompanied with muscular convulsion and tremble, ocular hyperemia, delirium, stiffening of extremities, and hyper ventilation which all suggest positive responses. For case 2 and 3, extreme pain was accompanied with facial sweating, asthenia of extremities, pallor face, dizziness, weak voice, and sleepiness which are the signs of negative responses. 2. The time required to recover to stable state took nearly an hour (including sleeping time and there was no side effect. 3. Precautions required to prevent the pain shock includes full concentration from the practitioner, accurate point

  4. Evidence-Based Diagnosis and Treatment of the Painful Sacroiliac Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslett, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain refers to the pain arising from the SIJ joint structures. SIJ dysfunction generally refers to aberrant position or movement of SIJ structures that may or may not result in pain. This paper aims to clarify the difference between these clinical concepts and present current available evidence regarding diagnosis and treatment of SIJ disorders. Tests for SIJ dysfunction generally have poor inter-examiner reliability. A reference standard for SIJ dysfunction is not readily available, so validity of the tests for this disorder is unknown. Tests that stress the SIJ in order to provoke familiar pain have acceptable inter-examiner reliability and have clinically useful validity against an acceptable reference standard. It is unknown if provocation tests can reliably identify extra-articular SIJ sources of pain. Three or more positive pain provocation SIJ tests have sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 78%, respectively. Specificity of three or more positive tests increases to 87% in patients whose symptoms cannot be made to move towards the spinal midline, i.e., centralize. In chronic back pain populations, patients who have three or more positive provocation SIJ tests and whose symptoms cannot be made to centralize have a probability of having SIJ pain of 77%, and in pregnant populations with back pain, a probability of 89%. This combination of test findings could be used in research to evaluate the efficacy of specific treatments for SIJ pain. Treatments most likely to be effective are specific lumbopelvic stabilization training and injections of corticosteroid into the intra-articular space. PMID:19119403

  5. The prognostic value of asymmetric laxity of the sacroiliac joints in pregnancy-related pelvic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, L.; Buyruk, H.M.; Guler-Uysal, F.; Lotgering, F.K.; Snijders, C.J.; Stam, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognostic value of asymmetric laxity of the sacroiliac joints during pregnancy on pregnancy-related pelvic pain postpartum. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In a previous study, we observed a significant relation between asymmetric

  6. Normalized patellofemoral joint reaction force is greater in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Lucas T; Sheehan, Frances T; Jackson, Jennifer N

    2017-07-26

    Patellofemoral pain is a disabling, highly prevalent pathology. Altered patellofemoral contact forces are theorized to contribute to this pain. Musculoskeletal modeling has been employed to better understand the etiology of patellofemoral pain. Currently, there are no data on the effective quadriceps moment arm for individuals with patellofemoral pain, forcing researchers to apply normative values when modeling such individuals. In addition, the ratio of patellofemoral reaction force to quadriceps force is often used as a surrogate for patellofemoral joint contact force, ignoring the fact that the quadriceps efficiency can vary with pathology and intervention. Thus, the purposes of this study were to: (1) quantify the effective quadriceps moment arm in individuals with patellofemoral pain and compare this value to a control cohort and (2) develop a novel methodology for quantifying the normalized patellofemoral joint reaction force in vivo during dynamic activities. Dynamic MR data were captured as subjects with patellofemoral pain (30F/3M) cyclically flexed their knee from 10° to 40°. Data for control subjects (29F/9M) were taken from a previous study. The moment arm data acquired across a large cohort of individuals with patellofemoral pain should help advance musculoskeletal modeling. The primary finding of this study was an increased mean normalized patellofemoral reaction force of 14.9% (maximum values at a knee angle of 10°) in individuals with patellofemoral pain. Understanding changes in the normalized patellofemoral reaction force with pathology may lead to improvements in clinical decision making, and consequently treatments, by providing a more direct measure of altered patellofemoral joint forces. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  8. ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISION OF CERVICAL JOINT POSITION SENSE IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NECK PAIN vs NORMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberoi Mugdha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The abundance of mechanoreceptors in the cervical spine and their central and reflex afferent connections to the vestibular, visual and postural control system suggests that the cervical proprioceptive information provides important somatosensory information influencing postural stability, head orientation and eye movement control. Disturbances to the afferent input from the cervical region is thought to underlie symptoms of dizziness, unsteadiness, visual disturbances and signs of altered postural stability, cervical proprioception and head and eye movement control in people with chronic neck pain. This study aimed to assess and compare cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain vs normals. Methods: Total 60 subjects, divided into two groups chronic neck pain group (n=30 (12 males and 18 females with mean age of 40.7 years and control group (n=30 with age and gender matched normal individuals were assessed for baseline data and demographic variables. Head repositioning accuracy test was used to assess cervical joint position sense in degrees. Results: The difference in the head repositioning error values were found to be extremely significant (p<0.0001 for all the neck movements for subjects with chronic neck pain as compared to normals. Conclusion: Cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain is found to be altered as compared to age and gender matched normals.

  9. Hemiplegic shoulder pain: implications for occupational therapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Paula E; Spaulding, Sandi J; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2004-02-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is common after stroke causing hemiplegia. It adversely affects the recovery of arm function and independence in activities of daily living. Subluxation, abnormal tone and limited range of motion or capsular constrictions have been reported as potential causes. Other factors such as rotator cuff tears, brachial plexus injury, shoulder-hand syndrome and other pre-existing pathological conditions may also be associated with hemiplegic shoulder pain. The etiology remains unclear, but hemiplegic shoulder pain may result from a combination of the above factors. This literature review examines the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain and discusses the implications for occupational therapy treatment. Occupational therapy interventions include proper positioning, facilitation of movement through purposeful therapeutic activities, increasing passive range of motion, implementation of external supports and treatment of shoulder-hand syndrome. Understanding the processes involved will assist with effective assessment, treatment and prevention of hemiplegic shoulder pain. This will facilitate clients' participation in rehabilitation programs and move them towards attainment of optimal function.

  10. Spinal interleukin-10 therapy to treat peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Erin D; Penzkover, Kathryn R; Soderquist, Ryan G; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2012-01-01

      Current research indicates that chronic peripheral neuropathic pain includes a role for glia and the actions of proinflammatory factors. This review briefly discusses the glial and cytokine responses that occur following peripheral nerve damage in support of utilizing anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) therapy to suppress chronic peripheral neuropathic pain. SPINAL NONVIRAL INTERLEUKIN-10 GENE THERAPY:  IL-10 is one of the most powerful endogenous counter-regulators of proinflammatory cytokine function that acts in the nervous system. Subarachnoid (intrathecal) spinal injection of the gene encoding IL-10 delivered by nonviral vectors has several advantages over virally mediated gene transfer methods and leads to profound pain relief in several animal models. NONVIRAL GENE DELIVERY:  Lastly, data are reviewed that nonviral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) encapsulated by a biologically safe copolymer, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), thought to protect DNA, leads to significantly improved therapeutic gene transfer in animal models, which additionally and significantly extends pain relief.   The impact of these early studies exploring anti-inflammatory genes emphasizes the exceptional therapeutic potential of new biocompatible intrathecal nonviral gene delivery approaches such as PLGA microparticles. Ultimately, ongoing expression of therapeutic genes is a viable option to treat chronic neuropathic pain in the clinic. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. Analysis of pain and painless symptoms in temporomandibular joints dysfunction in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Małgorzata; Pihut, Małgorzata; Kulesa-Mrowiecka, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increase in the number of patients reporting for treatment of pain due to musculoskeletal joint, associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Therefore, studies were undertaken, aimed at analyzing the symptoms of the dysfunction, because of which patients come to the prosthetic treatment. Aim of the thesis: The aim of the study was a retrospective analysis of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction reported by patients diagnosed with this problem. The research material was a retrospective medical records of 120 patients, aged 19 to 45 years who have taken prosthetic treatment due to temporomandibular joint dysfunction in the Consulting Room in Prosthetics Department in Kraków, from June 2015 to December 2016. During the test patients, in addition to interviewing a physician, completed a personal survey in their own study. The material has been divided into I group of patients who reported pain form of dysfunction and II group, who had no symptoms of pain within the stomatognatic system. The analysis covered type of symptoms, the share of local factors (para-functions) and systemic, as well as the time a er which the patients reported for the treatment of functional disorders since the appearance of the first symptoms. Analysis of the research material showed that the main reason for reporting patients was pain in one or both temporal joints of significant intensity (5 to 8 in VAS scale,) accompanied by acoustic symptoms. A large group of questioners reported problems with the range of jaw movement and head and face pain, as well as subjective symptoms from the auditory, sight, neck, neck and shoulder areas.

  12. Management of pain secondary to temporomandibular joint syndrome with peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Baena, Mariano; Aldaya-Valverde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint syndrome, or Costen syndrome, is a clinically diagnosed disorder whose most common symptoms include joint pain and clicking, difficulty opening the mouth, and temporomandibular joint discomfort. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve, a collateral branch of the mandibular nerve (the V3 branch of the trigeminal nerve). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of permanent peripheral nerve stimulation to relieve TMJ pain. This case series is a prospective study. Pain Unit of a regional universitary hospital. The study included 6 female patients with temporomandibular pain lasting from 2 to 8 years that did not respond to intraarticular local anesthetic and corticoid injections. After a positive diagnostic block test, the patients were implanted with quadripolar or octapolar leads in the affected preauricular region for a 2-week stimulation test phase, after which the leads were connected to a permanent implanted pulse generator. Results of the visual analog scale, SF-12 Health Survey, Brief Pain Inventory, and drug intake were recorded at baseline and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the permanent implant. Five out of 6 patients experienced pain relief exceeding 80% (average 72%) and received a permanent implant. The SF-12 Health Survey results were very positive for all specific questions, especially items concerning the physical component. Patients reported returning to normal physical activity and rest at night. Four patients discontinued their analgesic medication and 1 patient reduced their gabapentin dose by 50%. Sample size; impossibility of placebo control. Patients affected with TMJ syndrome who do not respond to conservative treatments may find a solution in peripheral nerve stimulation, a simple technique with a relatively low level of complications.

  13. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  14. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  15. The cognitive impact of chronic low back pain: Positive effect of multidisciplinary pain therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Akbar, Michael; Neubauer, Eva; Gantz, Simone; Flor, Herta; Hug, Andreas; Wang, Haili

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about the affected cognitive problems in chronic low back pain patients. For this patient cohort research mostly focused on memory of pain, rather than cognitive difficulties related to pain. Chronic pain may be associated with specific (yet undefined) cognitive deficits that affect everyday behaviour. We set out to compare the cognitive function of patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) in the course of multidisciplinary pain treatments before and after therapy. Thirty-three patients with cLBP and 25 healthy controls between 20 and 70 years were recruited into the study. The inclusion criteria for patients were: (1) a history of at least 12 weeks of chronic myofascial low back pain without radicular pain sensation before enrolment; (2) grade II and higher chronicity according to von Korff; (3) no opioid medication. The patients recruited had a mean pain duration of 7.13±7.16 years and reported a mean pain intensity of 6.62±2.04 (visual analogue score, VAS). Their mean back function according to the Funktionsfragebogen Hannover (FFbH, a questionnaire comparable with the Health Assessment Questionnaire) was 52.39±20.23%. At three time points (before therapy, 3 weeks and 6 months after therapy) the study subjects were assessed prospectively with a battery of visual memory tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). These included choice reaction time (CRT), pattern recognition memory (PRM) and spatial span (SSP). In parallel, the Trail-Making Test (TMT-A, TMT-B) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) were used to evaluate intelligence and cognitive flexibility. At the beginning of MDPT (T1), it took patients with cLBP significantly longer than HC to complete TMT-A (38.29±19.99s vs 30.25±14.19s, p=0.047) and TMT-B (72.10±26.98s vs 55.99±22.14s, p=0.034). There were no significant differences between patients and HC in CRT, PRM and SSP. Three weeks (T2) and 6 months (T3) after MDPT, TMT

  16. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Broeckx

    Full Text Available Degenerative joint disease (DJD is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1 PRP; 2 MSCs; 3 MSCs and PRP; or 4 chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1, 12 weeks (T2, 6 months (T3 and 12 months (T4 post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment.

  17. Therapy-related longitudinal brain perfusion changes in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisstanner, Christian; Mordasini, Livio; Thalmann, George N; Verma, Rajeev K; Rummel, Christian; Federspiel, Andrea; Kessler, Thomas M; Wiest, Roland

    2017-08-03

    The imaging method most frequently employed to identify brain areas involved in neuronal processing of nociception and brain pain perception is blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Arterial spin labelling (ASL), in contrast, offers advantages when slow varying changes in brain function are investigated. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a disorder of, mostly, young males that leads to altered pain perceptions in structures related to the pelvis. We aimed to investigate the potential of ASL to monitor longitudinal cranial blood flow (CBF) changes in patients with CPPS. In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind single centre trial, we investigated treatment effects in CPPS after 12 weeks in patients that underwent sono-electro-magnetic therapy vs placebo. We investigated changes of CBF related to treatment outcome using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL)-MRI. We observed CBF downregulation in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex and upregulation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in responders. Nonresponders presented with CBF upregulation in the hippocampus. In patients with a history of CPPS of less than 12 months, there were significant correlations between longitudinal CBF changes and the Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain subscore within the joint clusters anterior cingulate cortex and left anterior prefrontal cortex in responders, and the right hippocampus in nonresponders. We demonstrated therapy-related and stimulus-free longitudinal CBF changes in core areas of the pain matrix using ASL. ASL may act as a complementary noninvasive method to functional MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography, especially in the longitudinal assessment of pain response in clinical trials.

  18. Low intensity laser therapy and functional orthopedics contribution in pain and temporo mandibular dysfunction treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lollato, Renata Fronzaglia

    2003-01-01

    Temporo Mandibular Dysfunction (TMD) is a term used to describe disorders which involve temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated structures, isolatedly or not, whose most frequent symptoms pain. Its etiology involve controversies, and among risk factors is Class 11 malocclusion. A lot of techniques are used for TMD treatment, and the most recent are Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Functional Orthopedics (FO). The aim of this study was to evaluate pain and buccal mobility in subjects with Class II malocclusion and TMD symptoms, treated with LILT and FO associated or not. Eighteen subjects were selected and divided in three groups. Group 1 was treated with LILT, λ = 780 nm, 70 mW, 15 J/cm 2 per point, in six sessions during two weeks. The application was in three points around the TMJ and in masticatory muscles: masseter, temporalis, sternomastoid and trapezius, on both sides when there was pain. Palpation was made before and five minutes after application and subjects answered a questionnaire with a score for pain evaluation. Group 2 received functional orthopedics aparatology Planas Indirect Composed Plates, and was evaluated once a week during two weeks, after palpation and following the same score as group 1. Group 3 received both therapies at the same time, and the first application coincided with the aparatology installation. The evaluation followed the parameters of group 1. The results were statically analyzed , and in general form did not show significant differences. There was remission of pain symptoms in ali of the groups, and group 3 showed more rapidly results. This fact leaded us to a conclusion that the association of the LILT with FO was the best treatment for the pain symptoms remission in TMD. (author)

  19. Comparison of muscle and joint pressure-pain thresholds in patients with complex regional pain syndrome and upper limb pain of other origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainka, Tina; Bischoff, Florian S; Baron, Ralf; Krumova, Elena K; Nicolas, Volkmar; Pennekamp, Werner; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vollert, Jan; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Pain localized in the deep tissues occurs frequently in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, hyperalgesia to blunt pressure over muscles is common in CRPS, but it often appears in limb pain of other origin as well. Considering that 3-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) reveals periarticular enhanced bone metabolism in CRPS, joint-associated hyperalgesia to blunt pressure might be a more specific finding than hyperalgesia over muscles. In 34 patients with upper limb pain (18 CRPS, 16 non-CRPS; diagnosed in accordance to the Budapest criteria) and in 18 healthy controls, pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the thenar (PPTThenar), the metacarpophalangeal (PPTMCP), and the proximal interphalangeal (PPTPIP) joints using a pressure algometer (Somedic, Sweden). Beforehand, all patients had received TPBS for diagnostic purposes independently of the study. Region-of-interest (ROI) ratios (mineralization phase) for the MCP and PIP, excluding fracture sites, were correlated with the PPT. In CRPS, all ROI ratios were significantly increased and all PPT of the affected hand were decreased compared to non-CRPS (PPTThenar: 243±150kPa vs 358±197kPa, PPTMCP: 80±67kPa vs 159±93kPa, PPTPIP: 80±56kPa vs 184±110kPa; PPain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of ozone therapy in maintaining the articular function and in relieving the pain for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Ciobotaru

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ozone Therapy is thought to be a non-pharmacological therapy, which makes use of oxygen and ozone, It is based on the ozone characteristics, such as the antibacterial and antimycotic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory, of systemic modulation of homeostasy and of the optimization of the way the organs and systems function, but also of tissue bionourishing. Some of the beneficial effects of the ozone are: the enhancement of the oxygen supply in the tissues affected by inflammation and pain, the increase of the blood stream and the removal of the metabolic waste in the joints affected, the obstruction of the substances which maintain the inflammation and pain, an immunomodulatory action upon the whole body, the stimulation of the health improving mechanisms in the body, a mio-relaxing action and thus, a better joint mobility and a better body system functioning

  1. Effect of music therapy on pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ji; Chen, Shaoqin; Lin, Suyong; Han, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on the pain behaviors and survival of rats with bone cancer pain and analyze the mediating mechanism of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway. Male Wistar rats aged 5-8 weeks and weighing 160-200 g were collected. The rat models of colorectal cancer bone cancer pain was successfully established. Animals were divided into experimental and control group, each with 10 rats. The animals in the observation group were given Mozart K448 sonata, sound intensity of 60 db, played the sonata once every 1 hr in the daytime, stopped playing during the night, and this cycle was kept for 2 weeks. On the other hand, rats in the control group were kept under the same environment without music. Animals in the experimental group consumed more feed and gained significant weight in comparison to the control group. The tumor volume of the experimental group was significantly smaller than that of the control group (pMusic therapy may improve the pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain, which might be related with low expression of p38á and p38β in the MAPK signal transduction pathway.

  2. Comparison of efficacy of neural therapy and physical therapy in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun; Atalay, Ali; Akkaya, Nuray

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at least 3 months duration. Group 1 (n=27), physical therapy (PT, hotpack, ultrasound, TENS 15 sessions), group 2 (n=33), neural therapy (NT, 1:1 mixture of 20 mg/mL Lidocaine HCl (Jetokain simplex®) and saline for 5 sessions. For pain, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), for disability Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), for quality-of-life Nottingham-Health-Profile (NHP), for depression, and anxiety, Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale (HADS) were used before and after the treatment. Mean age was 47.3±11.32 years, symptom time was 13.78±11.98 months. There were no differences for demographic variables between groups. Significant improvements were detected for VAS, RMDQ, NHP-Pain, NHP-Physical activity, HADS for both of two groups after treatment. In addition to these findings, significant improvements were found for NHP-Energy, NHP-Social isolation in NT group. The differences of pre- and post-treatment values of parameters were evaluated for each group. Although there were no differences for VAS, NHP-sleep, NHP-Emotional reaction, HADS between groups, RMDQ, NHP-Pain, NHP-Physical activity, NHP-Social isolation were higher in NT than PT before treatment, the improvements for these parameters were better in NT than PT. In conclusion both of NT and PT are effective on pain, function, quality of life, anxiety, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain.

  3. Generalized joint hypermobility in childhood is a possible risk for the development of joint pain in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohrbeck-Nøhr, Oline; Kristensen, Jens; Boyle, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    . The aims for this study were to investigate the association between GJH and development of joint pain and to investigate the current GJH status and physical function in Danish adolescents.MethodsThis was a longitudinal cohort study nested within the Copenhagen Hypermobility Cohort. All children (n¿=¿301......) were examined for the exposure, GJH, using the Beighton test at baseline at either 8 or 10 years of age and then re-examined when they reached 14 years of age. The children were categorized into two groups based on their number of positive Beighton tests using different cut points (i.e. GJH4 defined...... as either¿Children...

  4. Exercise tolerance in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal pain in joint hypermobility and joint hypomobility syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; van Bergen, Monique; Henneken, Thamar; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in a pediatric health care practice, but exercise tolerance has never been described in detail in these children. Our objectives for this study were to evaluate the maximal exercise capacity, including peak heart rate and oxygen consumption, of children

  5. POSSIBILITIES OF LOCAL THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chugunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common pain syndromes caused by musculoarticular pathology. Analgesics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, myorelaxants, and non-drug therapies are used to treat patients with LBP. The sufficient efficiency of this type of therapy is strongly supported by the results of clinical trials; its fundamentals have been embodied in a number of regional and international guidelines for the management of patients with LBP. Alongside the sufficient efficacy of NSAIDs, their use, their long-term use in particular, is associated with a wide range of adverse reactions. The increased efficiency of treatment in patients with LBP is frequently achieved by the application of topical dosage forms. Whether the new Russian drug Nanoplast forte may be used to treat patients with LBP is considered.

  6. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location in the subjects with PTSD was the left lateral pterygoid site in 88%, and in subjects of the control group the right lateral pterygoid site in 28.26% of cases. The most painful location in the PTSD group was the left lateral pterygoid site in 72%, and in the control group the left posterior digastric in 4.35% of cases. 58% of the subjects with PTSD had TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location of TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  8. Self-perceived care needs in older adults with joint pain and comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Lotte A H; Hoogendijk, Emiel O; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Smalbrugge, Martin; Leone, Stephanie S; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; Dekker, Joost

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore self-perceived care needs and determinants of identified needs in older adults with joint pain and comorbidity. This is a cross-sectional study using baseline data from a cohort study of older adults in the Netherlands (≥65 years) with joint pain and comorbidity (n = 407). We used the Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE) to assess self-perceived care needs. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between needs and sociodemographic factors (age, gender, partner status and educational level), physical factors (pain intensity, comorbidity, frailty and physical functioning) and psychosocial factors (anxiety, depression and social support). Older adults with joint pain and comorbidity reported on average 4.0 care needs out of 13 CANE items, of which 0.3 were unmet. High levels of environmental and physical needs were reported, such as needs with regard to physical illness (91%), household (61%) and mobility/falls (53%). However, most of these needs were met. Only few people reported psychosocial needs, but a large proportion of these needs was unmet, especially regarding company (66.7%) and daytime activities (37%). Psychosocial needs were more often present in frail participants (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.25-4.61), and those with less perceived social support (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08) and more depressive symptoms (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.07-1.26). Unmet needs are mainly present in the psychosocial domain. Specific attention targeted at these unmet needs may improve psychosocial well-being of older adults with joint pain and comorbidity.

  9. The role of sacroiliac joint dysfunction in the genesis of low back pain: the obvious is not always right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weksler, Natan; Velan, Gad J; Semionov, Michael; Gurevitch, Boris; Klein, Moti; Rozentsveig, Vsevolod; Rudich, Tzvia

    2007-12-01

    It is a common practice to the link low back pain with protruding disc even when neurological signs are absent. Because pain caused by sacroiliac joint dysfunction can mimic discogenic or radicular low back pain, we assumed that the diagnosis of sacroiliac joint dysfunction is frequently overlooked. To assess the incidence of sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with low back pain and positive disc findings on CT scan or MRI, but without claudication or objective neurological deficits. Fifty patients with low back pain and disc herniation, without claudication or neurological abnormalities such as decreased motor strength, sensory alterations or sphincter incontinence and with positive pain provocation tests for sacroiliac joint dysfunction were submitted to fluoroscopic diagnostic sacroiliac joint infiltration. The mean baseline VAS pain score was 7.8 +/- 1.77 (range 5-10). Thirty minutes after infiltration, the mean VAS score was 1.3 +/- 1.76 (median 0.000E+00 with an average deviation from median = 1.30) (P = 0.0002). Forty-six patients had a VAS score ranging from 0 to 3, 8 weeks after the fluoroscopic guided infiltration. There were no serious complications after treatment. An unanticipated motor block that required hospitalization was seen in four patients, lasting from 12 to 36 h. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction should be considered strongly in the differential diagnosis of low back pain in this group of patients.

  10. Movement of the sacroiliac joint during the Active Straight Leg Raise test in patients with long-lasting severe sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibsgård, Thomas J; Röhrl, Stephan M; Røise, Olav; Sturesson, Bengt; Stuge, Britt

    2017-08-01

    The Active Straight Leg Raise is a functional test used in the assessment of pelvic girdle pain, and has shown to have good validity, reliability and responsiveness. The Active Straight Leg Raise is considered to examine the patients' ability to transfer load through the pelvis. It has been hypothesized that patients with pelvic girdle pain lack the ability to stabilize the pelvic girdle, probably due to instability or increased movement of the sacroiliac joint. This study examines the movement of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise in patients with pelvic girdle pain. Tantalum markers were inserted in the dorsal sacrum and ilium of 12 patients with long-lasting pelvic girdle pain scheduled for sacroiliac joint fusion surgery. Two to three weeks later movement of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise was measured with radiostereometric analysis. Small movements were detected. There was larger movement of the sacroiliac joint of the rested leg's sacroiliac joint compared to the lifted leg's side. A mean backward rotation of 0.8° and inward tilt of 0.3° were seen in the rested leg's sacroiliac joint. The movements of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise are small. There was a small backward rotation of the innominate bone relative to sacrum on the rested leg's side. Our findings contradict an earlier understanding that a forward rotation of the lifted leg's innominate occur while performing the Active Straight Leg Raise. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Management of chronic ankle pain using joint mobilization and ASTYM® treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Slaven, Emily J; Mathers, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of ankle sprains predominately focuses on the acute management of this condition; less emphasis is placed on the treatment of ankle sprains in the chronic phase of recovery. Manual therapy, in the form of joint mobilization and manipulation, has been shown to be effective in the management of this condition, but the combination of joint mobilization and manipulation in tandem with ASTYM® treatment has not been explored. The purpose of this case report is to chronicle the management ...

  12. The effect of manual therapy and exercise in patients with chronic low back pain: Double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, Ozlem; Demirel, Aynur; Oz, Müzeyyen; Tamer, Seval

    2017-11-06

    To determine the effects of spinal stabilization exercises (SSE) and manual therapy methods on pain, function and quality of life (QoL) levels in individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of one-hundred thirteen patients diagnosed as CLBP were enrolled to the study. The patients allocated into Spinal Stabilization group (SG) and manual therapy group (MG), randomly. While SSE performed in SG, soft tissue mobilizations, muscle-energy techniques, joint mobilizations and manipulations were performed in MG. While the severity of pain was assessed with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) assessments were performed to evaluate the functional status and QoL, respectively. All assessments were repeated before and after the treatment. Intragroup analyses both treatments were effective in terms of sub parameters of pain, function and life quality (p< 0.05). Inter group analyses, there was more reduction in pain and improvement in functional status in favor of MG (p< 0.05). This study showed that SSE and manual therapy methods have the same effects on QoL, while the manual treatment is more effective on the pain and functional parameters in particular.

  13. Joint position sense error in people with neck pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J; Ischebeck, B K; Voogt, L P; van der Geest, J N; Janssen, M; Frens, M A; Kleinrensink, G J

    2015-12-01

    Several studies in recent decades have examined the relationship between proprioceptive deficits and neck pain. However, there is no uniform conclusion on the relationship between the two. Clinically, proprioception is evaluated using the Joint Position Sense Error (JPSE), which reflects a person's ability to accurately return his head to a predefined target after a cervical movement. We focused to differentiate between JPSE in people with neck pain compared to healthy controls. Systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. Our data sources were Embase, Medline OvidSP, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, CINAHL and Pubmed Publisher. To be included, studies had to compare JPSE of the neck (O) in people with neck pain (P) with JPSE of the neck in healthy controls (C). Fourteen studies were included. Four studies reported that participants with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher JPSE than healthy controls. Of the eight studies involving people with non-traumatic neck pain, four reported significant differences between the groups. The JPSE did not vary between neck-pain groups. Current literature shows the JPSE to be a relevant measure when it is used correctly. All studies which calculated the JPSE over at least six trials showed a significantly increased JPSE in the neck pain group. This strongly suggests that 'number of repetitions' is a major element in correctly performing the JPSE test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorders and neck pain in musicians: a sytematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennatan Ferreira dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The instrumental practice for a long time, the high performance level, the strict technique and the specific shape of each musical instrument can take musicians to overcome their physiological limits, giving a high prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries. Objective: Investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular joint disorder and neck pain in musicians. Methods: Between August and September 2015 were reviewed five databases: LILACS, SciELO, Medline / PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. The articles were read and evaluated by the criteria of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE, items, that obtained a percentage above of 50 percent, were considered in the analysis of this work. Results: 15 articles attended the inclusion criteria. Among all musicians the prevalence of TMJ pain ranged from 10 - 81% and the prevalence of neck pain ranged from 29 - 80%. Conclusion: In this study was observed that the musicians showed both, temporomandibular joint disorders and neck pain, watching a high prevalence especially in violinists and the horn players. In the risk factors identified in the literature for the emergence of painful symptoms in musicians, stand out the biomechanical factors involved in maintaining anti-physiologic postures.

  15. [Sacroiliac joint dysfunction presented with acute low back pain: three case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Shuji; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Sugawara, Atsushi; Kim, Kyongsong; Shimoda, Yusuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2010-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) can cause low back pain when its joint capsule and ligamentous tissue are damaged. We report our experience in treating three SIJ dysfunction patients presenting with acute low back pain (a 38 year-old male, a 24 year-old male, and a 32 year-old female). SIJ dysfunction was diagnosed using the one-finger test, the modified Newton test, and SIJ injection. In all three patients, lumbar MRI demonstrated slightly degenerated lumbar lesions (lumbar canal stenosis, lumbar disc hernia). Two patients had paresthesia or pain in the leg and all three patients showed iliac muscle tenderness in the groin, which was thought to be a referred symptom because of improvement after SIJ injection. The two male patients returned to work and the problems have not recurred. Although our female patient resumed daily life as a housewife, her condition recurred at intervals of 2-3 months and she required regular SIJ injections. The prevalence of SIJ dysfunction of low back pain is about 10%, so it should be considered as a differential diagnosis when treating low back pain and designing treatment for lumbar spinal disorders.

  16. Single strip lesions radiofrequency denervation for treatment of sacroiliac joint pain: two years' results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Martina; Barbieri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint pain can be managed by intra-articular injections or radiofrequency of its innervation. Single strip lesions radiofrequency denervation is a new system. The objective of this study was to present one of the first utilizations of this innovative technique. 60 patients who met the diagnostic criteria for sacroiliac joint syndrome were enrolled in the study. In total, 102 single strip lesions radiofrequency denervations were performed. Pain intensity was measured with the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire and the Oswestry Disability Index whose scores were assessed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure. 91.8 % of the 102 radiofrequency treatments resulted in a reduction of more than 50% pain intensity relief at 1 month, 81.6% at 3 months and 59.16% at 6 months. In 35.7% of cases, the relief was continuative up to 1 year. No relief was observed in 12.24% of cases. The ODI scores improved significantly 1 month after the procedure, compared with the baseline scores. The ODI scores after 6 months improved very clearly compared with the baseline scores and with the 3-month scores. Single strip lesions radiofrequency denervation using the Simplicity III probe is a potential modality for intermediate term relief for patients with sacroiliac pain.

  17. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  18. Clinical examination and physical assessment of hip joint-related pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Evidence-based clinical examination and assessment of the athlete with hip joint related pain is complex. It requires a systematic approach to properly differentially diagnose competing potential causes of athletic pain generation. An approach with an initial broad focus (and hence use...... of highly sensitive tests/measures) that then is followed by utilizing more specific tests/measures to pare down this imprecise differential diagnosis list is suggested. Physical assessment measures are then suggested to discern impairments, activity and participation restrictions for athletes with hip...

  19. Anatomical study of the articular branches innervated the hip and knee joint with reference to mechanism of referral pain in hip joint disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Junya; Manabe, Yoshitaka; Oyamada, Joichi; Kataoka, Hideki; Nakano, Jiro; Saiki, Kazunobu; Okamoto, Keishi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Okita, Minoru

    2018-03-25

    Referred pain in the anterior knee joint is the most common symptom in hip disease patients. The development of referred pain is considered to be related to dichotomizing peripheral sensory fibers. However, no gross anatomical findings identify any dichotomizing fibers innervating both the hip and knee joints. We dissected the femoral and obturator nerves in human cadavers to investigate the distribution of the articular branches in the hip and knee joints. Fourteen embalmed left lower limbs from 14 Japanese adult cadavers (five from females, nine from males, average age 73.8 ± 14.1 years) were observed macroscopically. The articular branches of the femoral and obturator nerves were dissected at the anterior margin of the groin toward the thigh region. After dissections of the articular nerves of the hip joints, the femoral and obturator nerves were exposed from proximally to distally to identify the articular nerves of the knee joints. The branching pattern of the articular branches in the hip and knee joints was recorded. In six of 14 limbs (42.9%), the femoral nerve supplied articular branches to the anteromedial aspect of both the hip and knee joints. These articular branches were derived from the same bundle of femoral nerve. These gross anatomical findings suggested that dichotomizing peripheral sensory fibers innervate the hip and knee joints and these could relate to the referred pain confirmed in the anterior knee joints of patients with hip disease. Clin. Anat., 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dentists' knowledge of occlusal splint therapy for bruxism and temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candirli, C; Korkmaz, Y T; Celikoglu, M; Altintas, S H; Coskun, U; Memis, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dentist's approaches to the use of splint therapy for myofascial pain, bruxism, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and to assessment of treatment modalities. A 12-item questionnaire was developed to determine dentists' knowledge of TMJ disorders and approaches for occlusal splint treatments. The researchers spoke with each dentist included in the study at his/her clinic or by telephone to assess their immediate knowledge and approach to the TMJ disorders. Chi-squared test was performed to analyze the values. The confidence interval was set as 95%. A total of 370 dentists working in Turkey were participated in this study. The most common splint application reason for occlusal splint treatment was bruxism (77.8%) while TMJ pain was very rare (%1.4). The use of hard splint ratios for 0-5 years of professional experience was 57.0%, 42.4.0%, and 26.8% for the experience of 5-15 years and over 15 years groups, respectively (P < 0.001). While the dentists' with sufficient knowledge soft splint application rates were 11.6%, hard splint application rates were 43.4% for the dentists with sufficient knowledge. Occlusion adjustment rate of dentists who practice in all three groups was under 16.0%. The knowledge of the dentists about TMJ disorders and occlusal splint therapy were found to be insufficient. Their knowledge decreased with increasing experience.

  1. Physical therapy management of low back pain has changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Jolanda Jozina; Swinkels, Ilse Catharina Sophia; de Bakker, Dinny; Dekker, Joost; van den Ende, Cornelia Helena Maria

    2007-03-01

    Since the 1990s, new insights in the physical therapy management of low back pain have been described in guidelines. Furthermore, insurance companies introduced a volume policy to control the costs for physical therapy. This study aims to establish if developments in knowledge and health policy since the 1990s have resulted in changes in the physical therapy management of patients with low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. Data from 3148 patients, referred because of LBP, were selected from the databases of two registration studies (1989-1992 and 2002-2003) of patients treated by physical therapists. Descriptive statistics were used to compare patient characteristics. A multi-level regression analysis was carried out to determine a change in the number of treatment sessions adjusting for patient and disease characteristics, and to control for different levels (patient and physical therapist). A small decline in the number of treatment sessions was observed. In 2002, exercise therapy was the most frequently applied intervention, while massage and physical modalities were the interventions of first choice in the early 1990s. Our results suggest that since 1990 the management of patients with LBP by physical therapists in the Netherlands has changed. Both quality management by the profession and volume policy by government and insurance companies seem to have been instrumental in bringing about a decline in the number of treatment visits and an increase in the use of evidence-based interventions.

  2. Acute neck pain caused by arthritis of atlanto-axial joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Abe, Eiji; Konno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Hideaki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed 27 cases in which the patient complained of acute neck pain. We had performed arthrocentesis of the atlanto-axial joint in every case. An aspirate was obtained in 16 of the cases, and calcium pryophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals were demonstrated in 10 of them. The patients' scores on the visual analogue scale decreased 30 minutes after aspiration of the crystals (p<0.001). CT demonstrated calcification of the transverse ligament in 22 cases, calcification anterior to the body of C2 in 2 cases, and no calcification in 3 cases. The results in these patients suggest that acute neck pain in some elderly patients is related to arthritis of the atlanto-axial joint. (author)

  3. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Holm, S.S.; Lund, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2......) to investigate the relationship between minimal JSW and self reported hip pain of the cohort. METHODS: (1) Cadaver pelves and proximal femora of one male and one female donor were mounted in holding devices permitting independent rotation (total arc of 42 degrees), and inclination/reclination (total arc of 24...... degrees). At each 3 degrees increment an anteroposterior radiograph was recorded. Measurements of JSW were performed. (2) Self reported recurrent pain in or around the hip joint during 12 months prior to baseline examinations, and minimum JSW in pelvic radiographs of the cohort were registered...

  4. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  5. Shoulder pain in primary care: diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests for non-traumatic acromioclavicular joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite numerous methodological flaws in previous study designs and the lack of validation in primary care populations, clinical tests for identifying acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) pain are widely utilised without concern for such issues. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of traditional ACJ tests and to compare their accuracy with other clinical examination features for identifying a predominant ACJ pain source in a primary care cohort. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain were recruited prospectively from primary health care clinics. Following a standardised clinical examination and diagnostic injection into the subacromial bursa, all participants received a fluoroscopically guided diagnostic block of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride (XylocaineTM) into the ACJ. Diagnostic accuracy statistics including sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) were calculated for traditional ACJ tests (Active Compression/O’Brien’s test, cross-body adduction, localised ACJ tenderness and Hawkins-Kennedy test), and for individual and combinations of clinical examination variables that were associated with a positive anaesthetic response (PAR) (P≤0.05) defined as 80% or more reduction in post-injection pain intensity during provocative clinical tests. Results Twenty two of 153 participants (14%) reported an 80% PAR. None of the traditional ACJ tests were associated with an 80% PAR (P0.05). Five clinical examination variables (repetitive mechanism of pain onset, no referred pain below the elbow, thickened or swollen ACJ, no symptom provocation during passive glenohumeral abduction and external rotation) were associated with an 80% PAR (P<0.05) and demonstrated an ability to accurately discriminate between an PAR and NAR (AUC 0.791; 95% CI 0.702, 0.880; P<0.001). Less than two positive clinical features resulted in 96% sensitivity (95% CI 0.78, 0.99) and a LR- 0.09 (95% CI 0.02, 0

  6. Pelvic Belt Effects on Health Outcomes and Functional Parameters of Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Möbius, Robert; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Klima, Stefan; Lange, Justin S.; Soisson, Odette; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a common source of low back pain. However, clinical and functional signs and symptoms correlating with SIJ pain are widely unknown. Pelvic belts are routinely applied to treat SIJ pain but without sound evidence of their pain-relieving effects. This case-control study compares clinical and functional data of SIJ patients and healthy control subjects and evaluates belt effects on SIJ pain. Methods 17 SIJ patients and 17 healthy controls were included in this prospective study. The short-form 36 survey and the numerical rating scale were used to characterize health-related quality of life in patients in a six-week follow-up and the pain-reducing effects of pelvic belts. Electromyography data were obtained from the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris and medial vastus. Alterations of muscle activity, variability and gait patterns were compared in patients and controls along with the belts’ effects in a dynamic setting when walking. Results Significant improvements were observed in the short-form 36 survey of the SIJ patients, especially in the physical health subscores. Minor declines were also observed in the numerical rating scale on pain. Belt-related changes of muscle activity and variability were similar in patients and controls with one exception: the rectus femoris activity decreased significantly in patients with belt application when walking. Further belt effects include improved cadence and gait velocity in patients and controls. Conclusions Pelvic belts improve health-related quality of life and are potentially attributed to decreased SIJ-related pain. Belt effects include decreased rectus femoris activity in patients and improved postural steadiness during locomotion. Pelvic belts may therefore be considered as a cost-effective and low-risk treatment of SIJ pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02027038 PMID:26305790

  7. A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Proctor, Julian W.; Slack, Robert; Marlowe, Ursula; Ashby, Karlotta R.; Schenken, Larry L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Daily pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.

  8. Benefits of Massage-Myofascial Release Therapy on Pain, Anxiety, Quality of Sleep, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Adelaida María Castro-Sánchez; Guillermo A. Matarán-Peñarrocha; José Granero-Molina; Gabriel Aguilera-Manrique; José Manuel Quesada-Rubio; Carmen Moreno-Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome characterized by generalized pain, joint rigidity, intense fatigue, sleep alterations, headache, spastic colon, craniomandibular dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether massage-myofascial release therapy can improve pain, anxiety, quality of sleep, depression, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-four fibromyalgia patients were ...

  9. The burden of chronic pain after major head and neck tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study highlighted the high burden of chronic pain after therapy for major head and neck tumors. We identified demographic and clinical factors that are associated with the presence of chronic pain. Further studies are required to better understand the risk factors to implement strategies to prevent, alleviate, and treat chronic pain associated with major head and neck tumor therapies.

  10. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  11. The effect of body awareness therapy and aerobic exercises on pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of body awareness therapy and aerobic exercises on pain and quality of life in the patients with tension type headache. ... Pain severity of the individuals was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and pain diary, disability with ache; by Pain Disability Index (PDI) and Headache Impact Tests (HIT) and quality of ...

  12. Nontraumatic Testicular Pain due to Sacroiliac-Joint Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E; Middleton, Steve

    2016-08-01

    To discuss the case of a 49-year-old man who presented to the sports medicine staff with pelvic pain of 10 years' duration consistent with pudendal neuralgia. Testicular pain in men is often provoked by direct trauma or may indicate an oncologic process. Epididymitis, athletic pubalgia, testicular tumor, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, lumbar radiculopathy. The patient responded positively to treatment and rehabilitation to restore normal mechanics to the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex. Several flare-ups since the initial treatment have been of short duration (dysfunction in males can be a challenge for the sports medicine professional. A vigilant and unassuming approach to male pelvic pain is warranted, particularly by health care providers in diverse practice settings.

  13. High resolution ultrasonography in ankle joint pain: Where does it stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah Hatem Shalaby

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ankle is frequently injured in trauma, overuse syndrome and inflammatory processes. Different imaging modalities assess the ankle, including plain radiography, computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and ultrasonography (US. Purpose: Our objective is to assess the role of high resolution US as a valuable tool in the depiction of causes of ankle joint pain. Patients and methods: The study included 28 patients presented with ankle pain ranging in age from 17 to 60 years. They were examined by US and findings were correlated with MRI. Results: US was capable to detect various lesions (synovitis, arthritis, plantar fasciitis, tendon and ligamentous lesions. It had a sensitivity of 95.4%, a specificity of 83.3% and an overall accuracy of 92.8%. US had a limited value in detection of avascular necrosis (AVN, bone marrow oedema and fractures. Conclusion: US can be used as a first step diagnostic tool in cases of ankle pain. MRI should be spared to cases with negative or equivocal US findings. Keywords: High resolution ultrasound, Ankle joint pain, Tendons, Ligaments, Synovitis, Arthritis

  14. The Comparison of Effectiveness between Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiating pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Tae-ho; Hwang Hee-sang; Chang So-young; Cha Jung-ho; Jung Ki-hoon; Lee Eun-young; Roh Jeongdu

    2007-01-01

    Objective : The aim of this study is to investigate if Sweet Bee Venom therapy has the equal effect in comparison with Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiation pain. Methods : Clinical studies were done 24 patients who were treated low back pain with radiation pain to Dept. of Acupuncture & Moxibusition, of Oriental Medicine Se-Myung University from April 1, 2007 to September 30, 2007. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups ; Bee Venom treated group(Group A, n=10), Sweet B...

  15. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  16. Etoricoxib improves osteoarthritis pain relief, joint function, and quality of life in the extreme elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Nan Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Etoricoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, with a lower risk of gastrointestinal toxicity compared to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. We evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of etoricoxib in extremely elderly patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA. A prospective, single-center, single-arm study was conducted, enrolling 19 extremely elderly men with OA (mean age 85.9, range 79-96 years, who responded inadequately to NSAIDs or other analgesics. Patients were switched to etoricoxib, 60 mg once daily for 4 weeks, without prior medication washout. Data were recorded before and after etoricoxib treatment. The primary endpoint was improvement in pain, assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC after the 4-week treatment. Other endpoints included the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF, Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM, Short Form 36 (SF36, and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D. Safety and tolerability were assessed by collecting adverse events data. Pain and disability scores measured by WOMAC index were lower after treatment (pain, p ≤ 0.001; disability, p = 0.020. BPI-SF showed a significant improvement in joint function when walking and performing normal work (walking, p = 0.021; normal work, p = 0.030. SF36 scores improved for 7 out of 11 items after etoricoxib treatment (#1, p = 0.032; #4, p = 0.026; #5, p = 0.017; #6, p = 0.008; #7, p = 0.009; #8, p = 0.013; and #10, p = 0.038. EQ-5D showed a significant improvement in visual analogue scale scores (p = 0.036. TSQM results demonstrated a higher patient perception of overall satisfaction. No adverse events were reported. Pain relief, joint function, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction improved significantly in elderly patients with OA after etoricoxib administration.

  17. Trajectory of phantom limb pain relief using mirror therapy: Retrospective analysis of two studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Sarah C; Curran, Sean; Chan, Annie W Y; Finn, Sacha B; Baker, Chris I; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2017-04-01

    Research indicates that mirror therapy reduces phantom limb pain (PLP). Objectives were to determine when mirror therapy works in those who respond to treatment, the relevance of baseline PLP to when pain relief occurs, and what pain symptoms respond to mirror therapy. Data from two independent cohorts with unilateral lower limb amputation were analyzed for this study (n=33). Mirror therapy consisted of 15-min sessions in which amputees performed synchronous movements of the phantom and intact legs/feet. PLP was measured using a visual analogue scale and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. The severity of PLP at the beginning of treatment predicted when pain relief occurred. Those with low baseline PLP experienced a reduction (ppain relief by session 14 of treatment, and those with high baseline PLP experienced pain relief by session 21 of treatment. Mirror therapy reduced throbbing, shooting, stabbing, sharp, cramping, aching, tender, splitting, tiring/exhausting, and punishing-cruel pain symptoms. The degree of PLP at baseline predicts when mirror therapy relieves pain. This article indicates that the degree of baseline PLP affects when mirror therapy relieves pain: relief occurs by session 7 in patients with low PLP but by session 21 in patients with high PLP. Clinicians should anticipate slower pain relief in patients who begin treatment with high levels of pain. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers:NCT00623818 and NCT00662415. Copyright © 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteoprotegerin reduces the development of pain behaviour and joint pathology in a model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Ashraf, Sadaf; Xu, Luting; Burston, James J; Menhinick, Matthew R; Poulter, Caroline L; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2014-08-01

    Increased subchondral bone turnover may contribute to pain in osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the analgesic potential of a modified version of osteoprotegerin (osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc)) in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) model of OA pain. Male Sprague Dawley rats (140-260 g) were treated with either OPG-Fc (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) between days 1 and 27 (pre-emptive treatment) or days 21 and 27 (therapeutic treatment) after an intra-articular injection of MIA (1 mg/50 µl) or saline. A separate cohort of rats received the bisphosphonate zoledronate (100 µg/kg, subcutaneously) between days 1 and 25 post-MIA injection. Incapacitance testing and von Frey (1-15 g) hind paw withdrawal thresholds were used to assess pain behaviour. At the end of the study, rats were killed and the knee joints and spinal cord removed for analysis. Immunohistochemical studies using Iba-1 and GFAP quantified levels of activation of spinal microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Joint sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or Safranin-O fast green and scored for matrix proteoglycan and overall joint morphology. The numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were quantified. N=10 rats/group. Pre-emptive treatment with OPG-Fc significantly attenuated the development of MIA-induced changes in weightbearing, but not allodynia. OPG-Fc decreased osteoclast number, inhibited the formation of osteophytes and improved structural pathology within the joint similarly to the decrease seen after pretreatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Therapeutic treatment with OPG-Fc decreased pain behaviour, but did not improve pathology in rats with established joint damage. Our data suggest that early targeting of osteoclasts may reduce pain associated with OA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Joint pain and Doppler-detectable bubbles in altitude (Hypobaric) decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    The observation that altitude decompression sickness (DCS) is associated with pain in the lower extremities is not new, although it is not a consistent finding. DCS in divers is generally in the upper body, an effect often attributed to non-loading of the body while immersed. In caisson workers, DCS is reported more in the lower extremities. Surprisingly, many researchers do not mention the location of DCS joint pain, apparently considering it to be random. This is not the case for the tissue ratios encountered in studying decompression associated with simulated EVA. In NASA/JSC tests, altitude DCS generally presented first in either the ankle, knee, or hip (83 percent = 73/88). There was a definite statistical relation between the maximum Spencer precordial Doppler Grade and the incidence of DCS in the extremity, although this is not meant to imply a casual relation between circulating gas bubbles and joint pain. The risk of DCS with Grade 4 was considerably higher than that of Grades 0 to 3. The DCS risk was independent of the 'tissue ratio.' There was a predominance of lower extremity DCS even when exercise was performed with the upper body. The reason for these locations we hypothesize to be attributed to the formation of tissue gas micronuclei from kinetic and tensile forces (stress-assisted nucleation) and are the result of the individuals ambulating in a 1g environment. Additionally, since these showers of Doppler bubbles can persist for hours, it is difficult to imagine that they are emanating solely from tendons and ligaments, the supposed site of joint pain. This follows from Henry's law linking the volume of joint tissue (the solvent) and the solubility coefficient of inert gas; there is volumetrically insufficient connective tissue to produce the prolonged release of gas bubbles. If gas bubbles are spawned and released from connective tissue, their volume is increased by those from muscle tissue. Therefore, the nexus between Doppler-detectable gas

  20. Factors associated with primary care prescription of opioids for joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D J; Bedson, J; Blagojevic-Burwell, M; Jordan, K P; van der Windt, D

    2013-02-01

    Opioids are commonly prescribed in primary care and can offer pain relief but may also have adverse effects. Little is known about the characteristics of people likely to receive an opioid prescription in primary care. The aim is to identify what factors are associated with primary care prescribing of high-strength analgesics in a community sample of older people with joint pain. A prospective two-stage postal survey completed at baseline and 3-year follow-up in a population aged 50 and over registered with eight general practitioner (GP) practices in North Staffordshire (North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project cohorts) linked with data from medical records. Participants were selected who reported joint pain in one or more joints at baseline. Outcome measures were the number of prescriptions for high-strength pain medication (opioids) in the following 3 years. Socio-demographic and health status factors associated with prescription were assessed using a zero-inflated Poisson model. 873 (19%) people were prescribed opioids (out of 4652 providing complete data) ranging from 1 to 76 prescriptions over 3 years. Baseline factors significantly associated with increased rates of prescription were younger age group [65-74 group: incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.26 (1.18-1.35)], male gender [IRR = 1.17 (1.12-1.23)], severe joint pain [IRR = 1.19 (1.12-1.26)] poor physical function [IRR = 0.99 (0.99-0.99)] and lower frequency of alcohol consumption [once/twice a year: IRR = 1.13 (1.06-1.21), never: IRR = 1.14 (1.06-1.22)]. Restricting the analysis to those without prior prescriptions for strong opioids showed similar results. Poor physical function and participation restrictions were strongly associated with prescriptions of stronger opioids in addition to several socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Given the uncertainties over the effectiveness and risks of opioid use, future research could investigate decision making of GPs, exploring reasons for prescribing them.

  1. [Delegation of medical activities in acute pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Moroder, A; Biermann, E; Petzke, F; Ehlers, A P F; Bitter, H; Pogatzki-Zahn, E

    2018-01-01

    Acute pain management is an interprofessional and interdisciplinary task and requires a good and trustful cooperation between stakeholders. Despite provisions in Germany according to which medical treatment can only be rendered by a formally qualified physician ("Arztvorbehalt"), a physician does not have to carry out every medical activity in person. Under certain conditions, some medical activities can be delegated to medical auxiliary personnel but they need to be (1) instructed, (2) supervised and (3) checked by the physician himself; however, medical history, diagnostic assessment and evaluation, indications, therapy planning (e.g. selection, dosage), therapeutic decisions (e. g. modification or termination of therapy) and obtaining informed consent cannot be delegated. With respect to drug therapy, monitoring of the therapy remains the personal responsibility of the physician, while the actual application of medication can be delegated. From a legal perspective, the current practice needs to be stressed about what is within the mandatory requirements and what is not when medical activities are delegated to non-medical staff. The use of standards of care improves treatment quality but like any medical treatment it must be based on the physician's individual assessment and indications for each patient and requires personal contact between physician and patient. Delegation on the ward and in acute pain therapy requires the authorization of the delegator to give instructions in the respective setting. The transfer of non-delegable duties to non-medical personnel is regarded as medical malpractice.

  2. Analgesic effects of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nijs; Dr. L.P. Voogt; F. Struyf; M. Meeys; D. Meuffels; J. de Vries

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current evidence shows that manual therapy elicits analgesic effect in different populations (healthy, pain inflicted and patients with musculoskeletal pain) when carried out at the spinal column, although the clinical significance of these effects remains unclear. Also the analgesic

  3. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Alexithymia and Pain Self-Efficacy of Patients with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saedi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is one of the most common reasons for visit to primary medical centers. Evidences show that cognitive-behavioral therapy is the effective therapy in chronic pains. The present study evaluates the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on alexithymia and pains self-efficacy of patients with chronic pain. For this purpose, in a quasi-experimental plan and pre-test and post-test kind with control group, 45 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who visited to the therapeutic-sanitary centers in Ahwaz city were selected by using the available sampling method and they were assigned randomly in two experimental and control groups. Groups were tested in terms of alexithymia and self-effectiveness of pain at first. Then behavioral-cognitive training was presented in the time of 8 sessions of 90 minutes to the group and after ending the training program and three month consistency period, both groups were tested in terms of alexithymia and self-efficacy of pain. analyzing data by multivariate covariance method showed that the behavioral-cognitive therapy has been effective on alexithymia and pain intensity of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and these effects remain on patients in the high amount in the consistency stage, too. According to the results, behavioral-cognitive therapy causes to increasing the self-efficacy of pain and reducing the alexithymia and harmful effects of pain to the least level by changing nonefficiency behaviors, correction of adverse cognitions and destructive emotions related to pain.

  4. Yoga, Physical Therapy, or Education for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Robert B; Lemaster, Chelsey; Delitto, Anthony; Sherman, Karen J; Herman, Patricia M; Sadikova, Ekaterina; Stevans, Joel; Keosaian, Julia E; Cerrada, Christian J; Femia, Alexandra L; Roseen, Eric J; Gardiner, Paula; Gergen Barnett, Katherine; Faulkner, Carol; Weinberg, Janice

    2017-07-18

    Yoga is effective for mild to moderate chronic low back pain (cLBP), but its comparative effectiveness with physical therapy (PT) is unknown. Moreover, little is known about yoga's effectiveness in underserved patients with more severe functional disability and pain. To determine whether yoga is noninferior to PT for cLBP. 12-week, single-blind, 3-group randomized noninferiority trial and subsequent 40-week maintenance phase. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01343927). Academic safety-net hospital and 7 affiliated community health centers. 320 predominantly low-income, racially diverse adults with nonspecific cLBP. Participants received 12 weekly yoga classes, 15 PT visits, or an educational book and newsletters. The maintenance phase compared yoga drop-in classes versus home practice and PT booster sessions versus home practice. Primary outcomes were back-related function, measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and pain, measured by an 11-point scale, at 12 weeks. Prespecified noninferiority margins were 1.5 (RMDQ) and 1.0 (pain). Secondary outcomes included pain medication use, global improvement, satisfaction with intervention, and health-related quality of life. One-sided 95% lower confidence limits were 0.83 (RMDQ) and 0.97 (pain), demonstrating noninferiority of yoga to PT. However, yoga was not superior to education for either outcome. Yoga and PT were similar for most secondary outcomes. Yoga and PT participants were 21 and 22 percentage points less likely, respectively, than education participants to use pain medication at 12 weeks. Improvements in yoga and PT groups were maintained at 1 year with no differences between maintenance strategies. Frequency of adverse events, mostly mild self-limited joint and back pain, did not differ between the yoga and PT groups. Participants were not blinded to treatment assignment. The PT group had disproportionate loss to follow-up. A manualized yoga program for nonspecific cLBP was noninferior to PT for

  5. An ultrasonographic study of metatarsophalangeal joint pain: synovitis, structural pathology and their relationship to symptoms and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Helen I; Redmond, Anthony; Wakefield, Richard J; Freeston, Jane; Grainger, Andrew J; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2011-12-01

    Pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) is common, though the link between pathology and symptoms is poorly understood. To examine the relationship between pain, function and ultrasound (US)-detected pathology in the first MTPJ. 33 subjects with first MTPJ pain and 20 asymptomatic controls completed questionnaires about pain and function, then underwent clinical examination, US examination and objective assessment of function using a motion tracking system. Low-level grey scale synovitis and osteophytes were common in patients and controls. Osteophytes were more prevalent in symptomatic first MTPJ [24/33 (73%) vs. 7/20 (35%), p=0.007], and greater osteophyte numbers were weakly associated with higher levels of pain [increase in pain VAS per osteophyte (95% CI)=13.78mm (0.12mm-27.43mm), p=0.048]. A power Doppler (PD) signal was present in a fifth of painful first MTPJs and absent in controls. A PD signal was associated with osteophytes and joint space narrowing but was not independently related to target joint pain. For all first MTPJs, osteophytes and the presence of a PD signal was associated with worse patient-reported function. US features did not predict objective function. Osteophytes, representing subchondral bone remodelling, were associated with the presence of first MTPJ pain and, together with more severe (PD) synovitis, also contributed to poorer function. Detailed imaging of bone may provide more information on peripheral pain associations.

  6. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy for cervical zygapophyseal joint mediated neck pain: A retrospective review of outcomes in forty-four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Patricia; Das, Basabjit; McCrory, Connail

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) rhizotomy of the medial branches of the dorsal rami from the spinal nerves is the standard treatment for cervical zygapophyseal joint mediated pain. There is a paucity of data regarding the longevity of analgesia following this procedure. To determine the duration of complete pain relief, analgesic consumption and any adverse events following percutaneous cervical RF rhizotomy. Retrospective chart review of patients who had undergone percutaneous cervical RF rhizotomy for zygapophyseal joint mediated neck pain. Patient reviews were undertaken by the pain consultant at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year following the procedure. Where follow-up was incomplete, the patient was assumed only to have had pain relief until their last review where complete pain relief had been documented. Analgesic consumption and any adverse events were recorded. The data was analysed using Microsoft Excel®. At 12 months 63.64% of patients were pain free. Median duration of complete pain relief was 52 weeks. Patients who experienced pain relief had ceased using prescription analgesia by their 6 week review. There were no repeat cervical RF rhizotomies, procedure related infections or unplanned hospital admissions. Percutaneous cervical RF rhizotomy is an effective treatment for cervical zygapophyseal joint mediated neck pain.

  7. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475. When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P<0.01 of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging zygapophyseal joint space changes (gapping) in low back pain patients following spinal manipulation and side-posture positioning: a randomized controlled mechanisms trial with blinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gregory D; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Cantu, Joe A; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; Pocius, Judith D; Gregerson, Douglas; Fergus, Michael; McKinnis, Ray; Grieve, Thomas J

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify lumbar zygapophyseal (Z) joint space separation (gapping) in low back pain (LBP) subjects after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) or side-posture positioning (SPP). This was a controlled mechanisms trial with randomization and blinding. Acute LBP subjects (N = 112; four n = 28 magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] protocol groups) had 2 MRI appointments (initial enrollment and after 2 weeks of chiropractic treatment, receiving 2 MRI scans of the L4/L5 and L5/S1 Z joints at each MRI appointment. After the first MRI scan of each appointment, subjects were randomized (initial enrollment appointment) or assigned (after 2 weeks of chiropractic treatment appointment) into SPP (nonmanipulation), SMT (manipulation), or control MRI protocol groups. After SPP or SMT, a second MRI was taken. The central anterior-posterior joint space was measured. Difference between most painful side anterior-posterior measurements taken postintervention and preintervention was the Z joint "gapping difference." Gapping differences were compared (analysis of variance) among protocol groups. Secondary measures of pain (visual analog scale, verbal numeric pain rating scale) and function (Bournemouth questionnaire) were assessed. Gapping differences were significant at the first (adjusted, P = .009; SPP, 0.66 ± 0.48 mm; SMT, 0.23 ± 0.86; control, 0.18 ± 0.71) and second (adjusted, P = .0005; SPP, 0.65 ± 0.92 mm; SMT, 0.89 ± 0.71; control, 0.35 ± 0.32) MRI appointments. Verbal numeric pain rating scale differences were significant at first MRI appointment (P = .04) with SMT showing the greatest improvement. Visual analog scale and Bournemouth questionnaire improved after 2 weeks of care in all groups (both P posture positioning showed greatest gapping at baseline. After 2 weeks, SMT resulted in greatest gapping. Side-posture positioning appeared to have additive therapeutic benefit to SMT. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences

  9. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical examination, laboratory tests and choose appropriate

  10. Automated discovery of safety and efficacy concerns for joint & muscle pain relief treatments from online reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Z; Gruss, Richard; Abrahams, Alan S

    2017-04-01

    Product issues can cost companies millions in lawsuits and have devastating effects on a firm's sales, image and goodwill, especially in the era of social media. The ability for a system to detect the presence of safety and efficacy (S&E) concerns early on could not only protect consumers from injuries due to safety hazards, but could also mitigate financial damage to the manufacturer. Prior studies in the field of automated defect discovery have found industry-specific techniques appropriate to the automotive, consumer electronics, home appliance, and toy industries, but have not investigated pain relief medicines and medical devices. In this study, we focus specifically on automated discovery of S&E concerns in over-the-counter (OTC) joint and muscle pain relief remedies and devices. We select a dataset of over 32,000 records for three categories of Joint & Muscle Pain Relief treatments from Amazon's online product reviews, and train "smoke word" dictionaries which we use to score holdout reviews, for the presence of safety and efficacy issues. We also score using conventional sentiment analysis techniques. Compared to traditional sentiment analysis techniques, we found that smoke term dictionaries were better suited to detect product concerns from online consumer reviews, and significantly outperformed the sentiment analysis techniques in uncovering both efficacy and safety concerns, across all product subcategories. Our research can be applied to the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry in order to detect safety and efficacy concerns, reducing risks that consumers face using these products. These findings can be highly beneficial to improving quality assurance and management in joint and muscle pain relief. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluoroscopy-guided Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Low Back Pain in a Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P U; Rose, R E; Wade, N A

    2015-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as 'brittle bone disease', is a genetic connective tissue disease. It is characterized by bone fragility and osteopenia (low bone density). In this case, a 57-year old female presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with left low back pain rated 6/10 on the numeric rating scale (NRS). Clinically, the patient had sacroiliac joint mediated pain although X-rays did not show the sacroiliac joint changes. Fluoroscopy-guided left sacroiliac joint steroid injection was done. Numeric rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire were used to evaluate outcome. This was completed at baseline, one week follow-up and at eight weeks post fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection. Numeric rating scale improved from 6/10 before the procedure to 0/10 post procedure, and ODI questionnaire score improved from a moderate disability score of 40% to a minimal disability score of 13%. Up to eight weeks, the NRS was 0/10 and ODI remained at minimal disability of 15%. Fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint injection is a known diagnostic and treatment method for sacroiliac joint mediated pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case published on the use of fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection in the treatment of sacroiliac joint mediated low back pain in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  12. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: to examine the comparative efficacy and tolerability of the Nanoplast forte therapeutic patch as compared with placebo patch with patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee joint (KJ in conditions of a prospective randomized multi-centered study approved by the local ethics committee.Materials and methods.120 patients with OA of the KJ of the I to III radiographic stages according to Kellgren and Lаwrence take part in the study, 2 groups with 60 patients each compared in major clinical parameters. The primary efficacy criterion was relieving of pain in the target KJ (WOMAC index, section A by ≥ 50 % as compared to the initial level. Assessment of B and C section of the WOMAC index in dynamics was performed in the course of the study. Visual and analogous scale (in mm was used for general assessment separately by the patient and the doctor; daily assessment of pain intensity was performed by the patient. The total efficiency of the Nanoplast forte patch was studied on the 14th day separately by the doctor and the patient in accordance with the following grades: significant improvement; improvement; no effect; aggravation. The need for intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs was determined during the study as follows: daily dose, dose reduction or elimination of NSAIDs was determined due to the decrease in the intensity of pain. The patch was applied onto the target joint one a day at 12 o’clock (from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.. Tolerability of the Nanoplast forte patch and the placebo patch was assessed in accordance with the frequency and manifestation of local and / or systemic undesired effects (from 1 to 3 points. The frequency of achievement of 50 % of pain decreasing (WOMAC index, section A was evidently higher in the group of active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group (38.2 as compared to 16.7 %, respectively; p = 0.013; Fisher exact criterion. Intensity of pain during walking was

  13. NEW DIRECTION IN LOCAL THERAPY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Tsvetkova,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: to examine the comparative efficacy and tolerability of the Nanoplast forte therapeutic patch as compared with placebo patch with patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee joint (KJ in conditions of a prospective randomized multi-centered study approved by the local ethics committee.Materials and methods.120 patients with OA of the KJ of the I to III radiographic stages according to Kellgren and Lаwrence take part in the study, 2 groups with 60 patients each compared in major clinical parameters. The primary efficacy criterion was relieving of pain in the target KJ (WOMAC index, section A by ≥ 50 % as compared to the initial level. Assessment of B and C section of the WOMAC index in dynamics was performed in the course of the study. Visual and analogous scale (in mm was used for general assessment separately by the patient and the doctor; daily assessment of pain intensity was performed by the patient. The total efficiency of the Nanoplast forte patch was studied on the 14th day separately by the doctor and the patient in accordance with the following grades: significant improvement; improvement; no effect; aggravation. The need for intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs was determined during the study as follows: daily dose, dose reduction or elimination of NSAIDs was determined due to the decrease in the intensity of pain. The patch was applied onto the target joint one a day at 12 o’clock (from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.. Tolerability of the Nanoplast forte patch and the placebo patch was assessed in accordance with the frequency and manifestation of local and / or systemic undesired effects (from 1 to 3 points. The frequency of achievement of 50 % of pain decreasing (WOMAC index, section A was evidently higher in the group of active Nanoplast forte patch than in the placebo group (38.2 as compared to 16.7 %, respectively; p = 0.013; Fisher exact criterion. Intensity of pain during walking was

  14. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis and Therapy of Bone and Joint Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    1999-01-01

    Concerning bone and joint diseases therapy of rheumatic synovitis (radiosynoviorthesis) was introduced in 1952 before clinically relevant diagnostic procedures were developed. Radionuclides of Sr and later on 99mTc phosphonates then started the wide use of bone scintigraphy since > 30 years. The diagnostic methods have an excellent sensitivity for detection of local abnormalities of bone metabolism, the specificity of such studies, however, is low. Modifications of the technique (3-phase-bone-scintigraphy, pinhole collimators, ROI-technique), increasing knowledge of pathological scan patterns and introduction of other radionuclide studies (67Ga, 201Tl, inflammation scans with 99mTc-leukocytes or 99mTc-HIG) as well as 18FDG-PET have increased the specificity significantly in recent years and improvements of imaging systems (SPECT) also increased the accuracy of diagnostic methods in diseases of bone and joints. Therapy of such diseases has made considerable progress: inflamed, swollen joints can effectively be treated with 90Y-, 186Re, 169Er-colloids or with 165Dy-particles by radiosynoviorthesis. Severe pain due to disseminated bone metastases of cancer or polyarthritis can be controlled by radionuclide therapy with 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re- or 188Re-HEDP and possibly 117mSn-DTPA with an acceptable risk of myelodepression. Possibilities, technical details and limitations of radionuclide applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes must be considered if optimal benefit for individual patients should be achieved. Overall Nuclear Medicine can become an essential element in management of bone and joint diseases. The relationship of Nuclear Medicine to bone and joint pathology is peculiar: In 1952 treatment of rheumatic synovitis by radiosynoviorthesis with 198Au Colloid was started by Fellinger and Schmid before diagnostic approaches to bone pathology existed. Bone scintigraphy was introduced only in 1961 using 85Sr but obviously the unfavourable radiation

  15. Prevalence of myofascial chronic pelvic pain and the effectiveness of pelvic floor physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Patterson, Betsy; Mahajan, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and the outcome of transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain caused by myofascial pelvic pain in a tertiary care facility. A retrospective chart review was performed on all women who presented to our facility between January 2005 and December 2007. Those diagnosed with myofascial pelvic pain and referred for transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy over this 3-year period were evaluated. Participants with an initial pain score of > or = 4, myofascial pelvic pain on examination, and who attended 2 or more physician visits were included in the analysis. Patient physical examination findings, symptoms, and verbal pain ratings were reviewed. In all, 146 (13.2%) of 1,106 initially screened patients were diagnosed with myofascial pain. Seventy-five (51%) of the 146 patients who were referred for physical therapy were included, and 75% had an initial pain score of > or = 7. Pain scores significantly improved proportional to the number of physical therapy visits completed, with 63% of patients reporting significant pain improvement. Transvaginal physical therapy is an effective treatment for chronic pelvic pain resulting from myofascial pelvic pain.

  16. Radiofrequency neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of lumbar zygapophysial joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Ihl; Han, Young Min

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of chronic low back pain due to lumbar zygapophysial joint dysfunction. Thirteen patients who had unremitting chronic low back pain for more than 6 months and whose VAS scores were over 7 were selected on the basis of double comparative nerve blocks. The patients consist of three males and 10 females, and their nean age was 67 years. Sensory stimulation was performed to detect the 'pathologic branches' that were responsible for pain generation. RF neurotomy was performed using a lesion generator at 80 C for 90 seconds. The postoperative outcome was classified, depending on the degree of pain reduction, as excellent (≥ 75%), good (50-75%), and poor (<50%). Follow-up evaluation was performed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. The mean number of medial branches was 6.2. Eleven patients had bilateral disease and two had unilateral disease. Sensory stimulation was positive in all patients with a mean amplitude of 4.5V (range: 0.15-6 V). The L5 dorsal ramus was the most frequently involved segment, and this was followed by L4, L3 and L2. The number of lesionings for each medial branch was 3.7. The surgical outcome was graded as excellent (53%), good (23%), and poor (24%) after 6 months of follow-up. Transient backaches were noticed in two patients; however, complications were not observed. Recurrences were not demonstrated during the follow-up period. We conclude that RF neurotomy of the medial branches is an efficient method to substantially alleviate the chronic low back pain caused by zygapophysial joint dysfunction

  17. Radiofrequency neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of lumbar zygapophysial joint pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon [Bong-Sang Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Ihl [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Min [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    We wanted to investigate the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of chronic low back pain due to lumbar zygapophysial joint dysfunction. Thirteen patients who had unremitting chronic low back pain for more than 6 months and whose VAS scores were over 7 were selected on the basis of double comparative nerve blocks. The patients consist of three males and 10 females, and their nean age was 67 years. Sensory stimulation was performed to detect the 'pathologic branches' that were responsible for pain generation. RF neurotomy was performed using a lesion generator at 80 C for 90 seconds. The postoperative outcome was classified, depending on the degree of pain reduction, as excellent ({>=} 75%), good (50-75%), and poor (<50%). Follow-up evaluation was performed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. The mean number of medial branches was 6.2. Eleven patients had bilateral disease and two had unilateral disease. Sensory stimulation was positive in all patients with a mean amplitude of 4.5V (range: 0.15-6 V). The L5 dorsal ramus was the most frequently involved segment, and this was followed by L4, L3 and L2. The number of lesionings for each medial branch was 3.7. The surgical outcome was graded as excellent (53%), good (23%), and poor (24%) after 6 months of follow-up. Transient backaches were noticed in two patients; however, complications were not observed. Recurrences were not demonstrated during the follow-up period. We conclude that RF neurotomy of the medial branches is an efficient method to substantially alleviate the chronic low back pain caused by zygapophysial joint dysfunction.

  18. Does manual therapy improve pain and function in patients with plantar fasciitis? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John J; Corbett, Revay; Donner, Chris; Hertel, Jay

    2018-05-01

    To assess if manual therapy (MT) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis (PF) patients improves pain and function more effectively than other interventions. A systematic review of all randomized control trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of MT in the treatment of human patients with PF, plantar fasciosis, and heel pain published in English on PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases was conducted. Research quality was appraised utilizing the PEDro scale. Cohen's d effect sizes (ES) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated between treatment groups. Seven RCTs were selected that employed MT as a primary independent variable and pain and function as dependent variables. Inclusion of MT in treatment yielded greater improvement in function (6 of 7 studies, CI that did not cross zero in 14 of 25 variables, ES = 0.5-21.5) and algometry (3 of 3 studies, CI that did not cross zero in 9 of 10 variables, ES = 0.7-3.0) from 4 weeks to 6 months when compared to interventions such as stretching, strengthening, or modalities. Though pain improved with the inclusion of MT, ES calculations favored MT in only 2 of 6 studies (3 of 13 variables) and was otherwise equivalent in effectiveness to comparison interventions. MT is clearly associated with improved function and may be associated with pain reduction in PF patients. It is recommended that clinicians consider use of both joint and soft tissue mobilization techniques in conjunction with stretching and strengthening when treating patients with PF. Treatment, level 1a.

  19. Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Christian, Mathew; Cooper, Juliette; Leiter, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of a 12-week lower body positive pressure (LBPP)-supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee joint pain, function, and thigh muscle strength in overweight patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community-based, multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients aged between 55 and 75 years, with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m and mild-to-moderate knee OA. Twelve-week LBPP-supported low-load treadmill walking regimen. Acute knee joint pain (visual analog scale) during full weight bearing treadmill walking, chronic knee pain, and joint function [Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire] during normal activities of daily living, and thigh muscle strength (isokinetic testing). Appropriate methods of statistical analysis were used to compare data from baseline and follow-up evaluation. Participants reported significant improvements in knee joint pain and function and demonstrated significant increases in thigh muscle strength about the degenerative knee. Participants also experienced significant reductions in acute knee pain during full weight bearing treadmill walking and required dramatically less LBPP support to walk pain free on the treadmill. Data suggest that an LBPP-supported low-load exercise regimen can be used to significantly diminish knee pain, enhance joint function, and increase thigh muscle strength, while safely promoting pain-free walking exercise in overweight patients with knee OA. These findings have important implications for the development of nonoperative treatment strategies that can be used in the management of joint symptoms associated with progressive knee OA in at-risk patient populations. This research suggests that LBPP-supported low-load walking is a safe user-friendly mode of exercise that can be successfully used in the management of day-to-day joint symptoms associated with knee OA, helping to improve the

  20. Dissecting the contribution of knee joint NGF to spinal nociceptive sensitization in a model of OA pain in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, D R; Nwosu, L; Walsh, D A; Chapman, V

    2015-06-01

    Although analgesic approaches targeting nerve growth factor (NGF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) pain remain of clinical interest, neurophysiological mechanisms by which NGF contribute to OA pain remain unclear. We investigated the impact of local elevation of knee joint NGF on knee joint, vs remote (hindpaw), evoked responses of spinal neurones in a rodent model of OA pain. In vivo spinal electrophysiology was carried out in anaesthetised rats with established pain behaviour and joint pathology following intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), vs injection of saline. Neuronal responses to knee joint extension and flexion, mechanical punctate stimulation of the peripheral receptive fields over the knee and at a remote site (ipsilateral hind paw) were studied before, and following, intra-articular injection of NGF (10 μg/50 μl) or saline. MIA-injected rats exhibited significant local (knee joint) and remote (lowered hindpaw withdrawal thresholds) changes in pain behaviour, and joint pathology. Intra-articular injection of NGF significantly (P knee extension-evoked firing of spinal neurones and the size of the peripheral receptive fields of spinal neurones (100% increase) over the knee joint in MIA rats, compared to controls. Intra-articular NGF injection did not significantly alter responses of spinal neurones following noxious stimulation of the ipsilateral hind paw in MIA-injected rats. The facilitatory effects of intra-articular injection of NGF on spinal neurones receiving input from the knee joint provide a mechanistic basis for NGF mediated augmentation of OA knee pain, however additional mechanisms may contribute to the spread of pain to remote sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparing Knee Joint Position Sense in Patellofemoral Pain and Healthy Futsal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Kooroshfar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioception, or joint position sense, probably plays an important role in joint function. A number of studies have shown that proper joint position sense can decrease the risk of injuries in sports. It is not very clear how patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS can affect athletes joint position sense (JPS. Regarding the importance of proper joint position sense for movement performance and injury prevention in athletes, the aim of this study was to evaluate knee JPS in athletes with PFPS and compare it with asymptomatic individuals under non-weight bearing (sitting conditions. Methods: The study design was comparative in which 15 patients and 15 healthy athletes participated. JPS was evaluated by active and passive replication of knee angles for 30, 45 and 60° of knee flexion target angle while visual cues were eliminated. Each test was repeated three times. By subtracting the test angle from the replicated angle, the absolute error was calculated as a dependent variable. T-statistical test was used to compare data between two groups and P value of 0.05 was considered as the level of statistical significance. Results: No significant difference (P<0.05 in active (A and passive (P knee JPS was found between two groups for three (30°, p-value (A =0.79, P=0.68, 45°, P value (A=0.12, P=0.54 and 60°, P value (A=0.74, P=0.71 target angles. Conclusion: According to results, both groups had the same JPS ability, it seems PFPS does not affect the knee JPS at least in athlete cases. It would be possible that deficiency of JPS compensated for the physical activity or on the other hand, maybe pain intensity was not high enough to interfere with JPS accuracy. According to our results, PFPS doesn’t reduce IPS but further investigation is needed to disclose if other factors such as skill

  2. Integrative Care Therapies and Physiological and Pain-related Outcomes in Hospitalized Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Hathaway, Elizabeth E.; Luberto, Christina M.; Bogenschutz, Lois H.; Geiss, Sue; Wasson, Rachel S.; Cotton, Sian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain management is a frequent problem in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Few studies examining effects of integrative care therapies on pain-related outcomes in neonates have included physiological outcomes or investigated the use of such therapies in a practice-based setting. Objective: The purpose of this practice-based retrospective study was to examine the associations between integrative care therapies, particularly massage and healing touch, and pain-related outcome...

  3. Association of Beta-Blocker Use With Less Prevalent Joint Pain and Lower Opioid Requirement in People With Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Ana M; Abhishek, Abhishek; Muir, Kenneth; Zhang, Weiya; Maciewicz, Rose A; Doherty, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Recent findings suggest that β-adrenergic blockers have antinociceptive properties. The aim of this study was to compare levels of large-joint pain between those taking adrenergic blockers and those taking other antihypertensive medications. Data from the Genetics of Osteoarthritis and Lifestyle (GOAL) study, a secondary-care cohort of osteoarthritis (OA) patients, were used. Joint pain was assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain scores in 873 individuals with symptomatic hip and/or knee OA and hypertension, who were taking ≥1 prescription antihypertensive medications. The association between adrenergic blocker prescription and at least moderate joint pain (WOMAC score anxiety, and depression. The use of β-adrenergic blockers was associated with lower WOMAC pain scores and with a lower prevalence of joint pain after adjustment for demographic variables and comorbidity (adjusted odds ratio [OR adj ] for pain 0.68 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.51, 0.92]; P blockers (OR adj for pain 0.94 [95% CI 0.55, 1.58]) or with any other class of antihypertensive medications. Prescription of beta-blockers was also associated negatively with opioid use (OR adj for opioids 0.73 [95% CI 0.54, 0.98]; P beta-blockers is associated with less joint pain and a lower use of opioids and other analgesics in individuals with symptomatic large-joint OA. This observation needs to be confirmed by other studies. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Adipose Derived Stromal Cell (ADSC) Injections for Pain Management of Osteoarthritis in the Human Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Peter B; Paulseth, Stephen G

    2016-02-01

    This safety and feasibility study used autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular cells (the stromal vascular fraction [SVF] of adipose tissue), to treat 8 osteoarthritic knees in 6 patients of grade I to III (K-L scale) with initial pain of 4 or greater on a 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The primary objective of the study was evaluation of the safety of intra-articular injection of SVF. The secondary objective was to assess initial feasibility for reduction of pain in osteoarthritic knees. Adipose-derived SVF cells were obtained through enzymatic disaggregation of lipoaspirate, resuspension in 3 mL of Lactated Ringer's Solution, and injection directly into the intra-articular space of the knee, with a mean of 14.1 million viable, nucleated SVF cells per knee. Metrics included monitoring of adverse events and preoperative to postoperative changes in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the VAS pain scale, range of motion (ROM), timed up-and-go (TUG), and MRI. No infections, acute pain flares, or other adverse events were reported. At 3-months postoperative, there was a statistically significant improvement in WOMAC and VAS scores (P knee pain. Autologous SVF was shown to be safe and to present a new potential therapy for reduction of pain for osteoarthritis of the knee. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 4: Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Incidence of tempero-mandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome in rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M B; Rao, C B

    1981-08-01

    The incidence and clinical course of the tempero-mandibular joint dysfunction syndrome was studied among 1187 subjects over the age of 16, who attended the rural dental consultations held at various places in the State of Karnataka, India. The study revealed an incidence of 20.3%. Contracy to earlier reports, the incidence was higher in males than in females and more married females were affected than unmarried. Clicking appeared to be the predominant symptom in all age groups. The incidence of pain increased with age. Of all patients 43.75% were not aware of a clicking joint; 53.7% persons with clicking and 14% with pain were not disturbed by their symptoms. The findings of the study failed to establish any relationship between unilateral missing teeth and the occurrence of the pain dysfunction syndrome (PDS). The chewing habits (betel leaf, tobacco, betel nut) which are prevalent in India appeared to have no effect on the incidence of PDS. It is suggested that more epidemiological studies should be carried out in different parts of the world with varying social, political and economic systems to enable better understanding of the global incidence of PDS.

  6. MR-guided facet joint injection therapy using an open 1.0-T MRI system: an outcome study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Hartwig, Tony; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided facet joint injection therapy using a 1.0-T open MRI. One hundred and sixty-six facet joint blocks in 45 patients with lower back pain were performed under MR fluoroscopic guidance using a proton-density-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence. An in-room monitor, wireless MR-mouse for operator-controlled multiplanar navigation, a flexible surface coil and MR-compatible 20-G needle were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated by questionnaire before intervention and after 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months using a numerical visual analogue scale (VAS). All facet joint blocks were considered technically successful with distribution of the injectant within and/or around the targeted facet joint. No major complications occurred. The final outcome analysis included 38 patients. An immediate effect was reported by 63 % of the patients. A positive mid-/long-term effect was seen in 13 patients (34 %) after 6 months and in 9 patients (24 %) after 12 months. Mean VAS was reduced from 7.1 ± 1.7 (baseline) to 3.5 ± 2.2, 4.1 ± 3.0, 3.8 ± 2.9 and 4.6 ± 2.9 at 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01). MR-guided facet joint injection therapy of the lumbosacral spine is accurate, safe and efficient in the symptomatic treatment of lower back pain. (orig.)

  7. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Ostelo, Raymond W.J.G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical

  8. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 1: Sternoclavicular, Acromioclavicular, and Scapulothoracic Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joint motion between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Differences in scapulothoracic kinematics are associated with shoulder pain. Several studies have measured these differences using surface sensors, but the results of this technique may be affected by skin-motion artifact. Furthermore, previous studies have not included the simultaneous measurement of sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint motion. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus of 12 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic individuals for direct, bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Angular positions for the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joints were measured during shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups were found for sternoclavicular and scapulothoracic joint positions. Symptomatic individuals consistently demonstrated less sternoclavicular posterior rotation, regardless of angle, phase, or plane of shoulder motion. Symptomatic individuals also demonstrated less scapulothoracic upward rotation at 30° and 60° of humerothoracic elevation during shoulder abduction and scapular plane abduction. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that differences in shoulder complex kinematics exist between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. However, the magnitude of these differences was small, and the resulting clinical implications are not yet fully understood. The biomechanical coupling of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints requires further research to better understand scapulothoracic movement deviations and to improve manual therapy and exercise-based physical therapy interventions. PMID:25103135

  9. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  10. Static magnetic therapy does not decrease pain or opioid requirements: a randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Carr, Daniel B; Sarquis, Tony; Miranda, Nelcy; Garcia, Ricardo J; Zarate, Camilo

    2007-02-01

    A growing multibillion dollar industry markets magnetic necklaces, bracelets, bands, insoles, back braces, mattresses, etc., for pain relief, although there is little evidence for their efficacy. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic therapy on pain intensity and opioid requirements in patients with postoperative pain. We designed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. One-hundred-sixty-five patients older than 12 yr of age were randomized to magnetic (n = 81) or sham therapy (n = 84) upon reporting moderate-to-severe pain in the postanesthesia care unit. Devices were placed over the surgical incision and left in place for 2 h. Patients rated their pain intensity on a 0-10 scale every 10 min and received incremental doses of morphine until pain intensity was Magnetic therapy lacks efficacy in controlling acute postoperative pain intensity levels or opioid requirements and should not be recommended for pain relief in this setting.

  11. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of low back pain with facet joint injections and nerve root blocks under computed tomography guidance. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia; Wojcik, Andrew; Shaju, Antony

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the performance of facet joint and nerve root infiltrations under computed tomography guidance for the management of low back pain and to investigate the complications and patient tolerance. The study was board-certified and informed consent was obtained from all patients. In 1 year, 86 consecutive patients (47 male, 39 female, age range 47-87 years, mean age 63) with low back pain for more than 2 years were included. All patients were clinically examined and had cross-sectional imaging performed before the procedure. Fifty-five facet joint infiltrations and 31 nerve blocks were performed under computed tomography guidance. All patients completed two valid pain questionnaires before and 3 months after the procedures. At the same time, they were clinically examined by the referring Orthopaedic Surgeon. The pain response was assessed by comparing the scores of the questionnaires. The improvement in clinical examination findings was assessed as well. In patients who underwent facet joint infiltrations, long-term pain improvement was achieved in 79% and in those with nerve blocks in 85%. Immediate pain relief was demonstrated in 83% of patients with nerve infiltrations. No complications were observed. All procedures were very well tolerated by patients. Facet joint and nerve infiltrations under computed tomography guidance constitute an accurate and safe method that could be used to relieve low back pain and minimize the risk of disability. (orig.)

  13. Central sensitization as the mechanism underlying pain in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, G; Celletti, C; Baron, R; Castori, M; Di Franco, M; La Cesa, S; Leone, C; Pepe, A; Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Camerota, F

    2016-09-01

    Patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) commonly suffer from pain. How this hereditary connective tissue disorder causes pain remains unclear although previous studies suggested it shares similar mechanisms with neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. In this prospective study seeking information on the mechanisms underlying pain in patients with JHS/EDS-HT, we enrolled 27 consecutive patients with this connective tissue disorder. Patients underwent a detailed clinical examination, including the neuropathic pain questionnaire DN4 and the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool. As quantitative sensory testing methods, we included thermal-pain perceptive thresholds and the wind-up ratio and recorded a standard nerve conduction study to assess non-nociceptive fibres and laser-evoked potentials, assessing nociceptive fibres. Clinical examination and diagnostic tests disclosed no somatosensory nervous system damage. Conversely, most patients suffered from widespread pain, the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool elicited positive findings, and quantitative sensory testing showed lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and an increased wind-up ratio. While the lack of somatosensory nervous system damage is incompatible with neuropathic pain as the mechanism underlying pain in JHS/EDS-HT, the lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and increased wind-up ratio imply that pain in JHS/EDS-HT might arise through central sensitization. Hence, this connective tissue disorder and fibromyalgia share similar pain mechanisms. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: In patients with JHS/EDS-HT, the persistent nociceptive input due to joint abnormalities probably triggers central sensitization in the dorsal horn neurons and causes widespread pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  14. Motivational and behavioural models of change: A longitudinal analysis of change among men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, J; Richardson, C; Morris, J; Robinson, G; Schofield, M B

    2017-09-01

    Motivational and behavioural models of adjustment to chronic pain make different predictions about change processes, which can be tested in longitudinal analyses. We examined changes in motivation, coping and acceptance among 78 men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain. Using cross-lagged regression analyses of changes from baseline to 6 months as predictors of changes from 6 to 12 months, with supplementary structural equation modelling, we tested two models in which motivational changes influence behavioural changes, and one in which behavioural changes influence motivational changes. Changes in motivation to self-manage pain influenced later changes in pain coping, consistent with the motivational model of pain self-management, and also influenced later changes in activity engagement, the behavioural component of pain acceptance. Changes in activity engagement influenced later changes in pain willingness, consistent with the behavioural model of pain acceptance. Based on the findings, a combined model of changes in pain self-management and acceptance is proposed, which could guide combined interventions based on theories of motivation, coping and acceptance in chronic pain. This study adds longitudinal evidence about sequential change processes; a test of the motivational model of pain self-management; and tests of behavioural versus motivational models of pain acceptance. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  15. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rejano, J. J.; Chillón-Martínez, R.; Gómez-Benítez, M. A.; De-La-Casa-Almeida, M.

    2018-01-01

    Background There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n = 27) was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p < 0.05) in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2), in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p = 0.024) in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914. PMID:29681973

  16. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bellido-Fernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods. A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n=27 was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results. Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p<0.05 in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2, in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p=0.024 in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion. Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914.

  17. [Sacroiliac joint dysfunction with groin pain after an operation for lumbar spinal disorder. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yusuke; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Motegi, Hiroaki; Imai, Tetsuaki; Matsumoto, Ryouji; Isobe, Masanori; Kim, Kyongsong; Sugawara, Atsushi

    2010-11-01

    A 75-year-old male presented with groin pain after an operation to treat lumbar spondylolisthesis (L5). Groin tenderness was localized to the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). Radiographical and physical examination raised the suspicion of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction. Injection of a painkiller into the SIJ relieved symptoms, including groin tenderness. Symptoms improved gradually, and finally disappeared after five SIJ injections. Groin pain has been reported as a referred symptom of SIJ dysfunction in 9.3-23% of patients. Prior to the patient undergoing surgery to treat lumbar spondylolisthesis, SIJ dysfunction had not been noted on physical examination. Long periods spent in the abnormal posture due to lumbar spondylolisthesis induced SIJ stress. After the operation, an improvement in daily activity actually increased stress on the SIJ, resulting in SIJ dysfunction. Certain pathologies, including SIJ dysfunction, should be considered as residual symptoms after operations for lumbar spinal diseases.

  18. Management of patients with refractory angina: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pain Society joint guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillion, Michael; Arthur, Heather M; Cook, Allison; Carroll, Sandra L; Victor, J Charles; L'allier, Philippe L; Jolicoeur, E Marc; Svorkdal, Nelson; Niznick, Joel; Teoh, Kevin; Cosman, Tammy; Sessle, Barry; Watt-Watson, Judy; Clark, Alexander; Taenzer, Paul; Coyte, Peter; Malysh, Louise; Galte, Carol; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    Refractory angina (RFA) is a debilitating disease characterized by cardiac pain resistant to conventional treatments for coronary artery disease including nitrates, calcium-channel and β-adrenoceptor blockade, vasculoprotective agents, percutaneous coronary interventions, and coronary artery bypass grafting. The mortality rate of patients living with RFA is not known but is thought to be in the range of approximately 3%. These individuals suffer severely impaired health-related quality of life with recurrent and sustained pain, poor general health status, psychological distress, impaired role functioning, and activity restriction. Effective care for RFA sufferers in Canada is critically underdeveloped. These guidelines are predicated upon a 2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Position Statement which identified that underlying the problem of RFA management is the lack of a formalized, coordinated, interprofessional strategy between the cardiovascular and pain science/clinical communities. The guidelines are therefore a joint initiative of the CCS and the Canadian Pain Society (CPS) and make practice recommendations about treatment options for RFA that are based on the best available evidence. Concluding summary recommendations are also made, giving direction to future clinical practice and research on RFA management in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to treating musculoarticular dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint with obvious pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shakhmetova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the efficiency of an integrated approach to treating craniomandibular dysfunction, by changing the biomechanical tempomandibular joint (TMJ movement pattern via botulinum toxin type A injection into the masticatory muscles.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 20 patients aged 18-45 years with clinical signs of muscular-articular dysfunction of the TMJ. Before and after treatment, all the patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ and masticatory muscles, as well as ultrasonography and surface electromyography (EMG of the masticatory muscles.Results. There was a significant reduction in pain syndrome, an improvement in the relationship of intra-articular TMJ elements, and a change in the structure of the masticatory muscles. The EMG indices were near-normal. Four-six months after treatment, the majority of patients showed an increase in the amplitude of mouth opening (95%, reductions in resting pain (85% and in the frequency of TMJ clicking (90%.Conclusion. The management of patients with severe chronic pain syndrome in the presence of muscular-articular dysfunction of the TMJ requires the participation of an orthodontist to correct malocclusion and a neurologist to treat local myofascial pain syndrome. 

  20. Psychological therapies for sickle cell disease and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anie, Kofi A; Green, John

    2015-05-08

    Sickle cell disease comprises a group of genetic blood disorders. It occurs when the sickle haemoglobin gene is inherited from both parents. The effects of the condition are: varying degrees of anaemia which, if severe, can reduce mobility; a tendency for small blood capillaries to become blocked causing pain in muscle and bone commonly known as 'crises'; damage to major organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys, and lungs; and increased vulnerability to severe infections. There are both medical and non-medical complications, and treatment is usually symptomatic and palliative in nature. Psychological interventions for individuals with sickle cell disease might complement current medical treatment, and studies of their efficacy have yielded encouraging results. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To examine the evidence that psychological interventions improve the ability of people with sickle cell disease to cope with their condition. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and the Internet, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 17 February 2015. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing psychological interventions with no (psychological) intervention in people with sickle cell disease. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Twelve studies were identified in the searches and seven of these were eligible for inclusion in the review. Five studies, involving 260 participants, provided data for analysis. One study showed that cognitive behaviour therapy significantly reduced the affective component of pain (feelings about pain), mean difference -0.99 (95% confidence interval -1.62 to -0.36), but

  1. Blood-induced joint damage: novel targets for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meegeren, M.E.R.

    2012-01-01

    -induced joint damage can occur due to a trauma but also during surgery when blood leaks into the joint cavity. Besides that, it is one of the major causes of morbidity amongst haemophilia patients. The aims of this thesis were to further unravel the pathogenesis of blood-induced joint damage and to

  2. Cervical joint position sense in neck pain. Immediate effects of muscle vibration versus mental training interventions: a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinert, K; Preiss, S; Huber, M; Taube, W

    2015-12-01

    Impaired cervical joint position sense is a feature of chronic neck pain and is commonly argued to rely on abnormal cervical input. If true, muscle vibration, altering afferent input, but not mental interventions, should have an effect on head repositioning acuity and neck pain perception. The aim of the present study was to determine the short-term effects of neck muscle vibration, motor imagery, and action observation on cervical joint position sense and pressure pain threshold in people with chronic neck pain. Forty-five blinded participants with neck pain received concealed allocation and were randomized in three treatment groups. A blinded assessor performed pre- and post-test measurement. Patients were recruited from secondary outpatient clinics in the southwest of Germany. Chronic, non specific neck pain patients without arm pain were recruited for this study. A single intervention session of 5 minutes was delivered to each blinded participant. Patients were either allocated to one of the following three interventions: (1) neck muscle vibration; (2) motor imagery; (3) action observation. Primary outcomes were cervical joint position sense acuity and pressure pain threshold. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to evaluate differences between groups and subjects. Repositioning acuity displayed significant time effects for vibration, motor imagery, and action observation (all Ppain threshold demonstrated a time*group effect (P=0.042) as only vibration significantly increased pressure pain threshold (P=0.01). Although motor imagery and action observation did not modulate proprioceptive, afferent input, they nevertheless improved cervical joint position sense acuity. This indicates that, against the common opinion, changes in proprioceptive input are not prerequisite to improve joint repositioning performance. However, the short-term applications of these cognitive treatments had no effect on pressure pain thresholds, whereas vibration reduced pressure pain

  3. Influence of chronic neck pain on cervical joint position error (JPE): Comparison between young and elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmari, Khalid A; Reddy, Ravi Shankar; Silvian, Paul; Ahmad, Irshad; Nagaraj, Venkat; Mahtab, Mohammad

    2017-11-06

    Evaluation of cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain has gained importance in recent times. Different authors have established increased joint position error (JPE) in subjects with acute neck pain. However, there is a paucity of studies to establish the influence of chronic neck pain on cervical JPE. The objective of the study was to understand the influence of chronic neck pain on cervical JPE, and to examine the differences in cervical JPE between young and elderly subjects with chronic neck pain. Forty-two chronic neck pain patients (mean age 47.4) were compared for cervical JPE with 42 age-matched healthy subjects (mean age 47.8), using a digital inclinometer. The cervical JPE were measured in flexion, extension, and rotation in right and left movement directions. The comparison of JPE showed significantly larger errors in subjects with chronic neck pain when compared to healthy subjects (ppain revealed no significant differences (P> 0.05) in cervical JPE. Cervical joint position sense is impaired in subjects with chronic neck pain.

  4. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of articular cartilage in painful knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digish Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the role of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with atraumatic knee pain. Background and Objectives: Knee pain is one of the most common problems faced by people from time immemorial. There is a wide range of disease ranging from traumatic to degenerative causing knee pain in which articular cartilage is involved. Over the past 15 years, MRI has become the premier, first-line imaging study that should be performed in the evaluation of the painful knee in particular in tears of menisci, cruciate and collateral ligaments, osteochondral abnormalities (chondromalacia, osteoarthritis and osteochondral defects, synovial cysts and bone bruises. MRI, by virtue of its superior soft-tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation and multiplanar capabilities, is superior to more conventional techniques for the evaluation of articular cartilage. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 150 patients in the Department of Radio-diagnosis, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pimpri, Pune over a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013. Patients having fracture or dislocations of the knee joint were also excluded from the study. Detailed clinical history, physical and systemic examination findings of all patients were noted in addition to the laboratory investigations. All patients were subjected to radiograph of knee anterior-posterior and lateral view. MRI was performed with Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto machine. Results: In our study of 150 patients with knee pain, articular cartilage defect was found in 90 patients (60%. Out of 90 patients with articular cartilage defect, 30 patients (20% had full thickness cartilage defects. Subchondral marrow edema was seen beneath 30 patients (20% with articular cartilage defects. 32 patients (21.1% had a complex or macerated meniscal tear. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear was found in seven

  5. Complementary Therapies for Pain Among Individuals Receiving Hemodialysis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, Savannah; Gross, Cynthia R; Huff, Edwin D; Hooke, Mary Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for individuals undergoing hemodialysis and can lead to decreased quality of life when ineffectively managed. Pain is often reported as burdensome; thus, nurses must learn effective, nonpharmacological adjuncts to help care for symptomatic patients. The purpose of this review was to identify non-pharmacologic complementary therapies and evaluate their effectiveness in minimizing pain among individuals undergoing hemodialysis. Multiple complementary interventions were identified, and several reduced pain, but evidence is qualified by limitations in study methods. Complementary therapies have the potential to reduce pain among individuals undergoing hemodialysis; however, more research is needed. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  6. Healthy and maladaptive dependency and its relationship to pain management and perceptions in physical therapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K; Hoban, Patrick; Boys, Ashley; Rosen, Alexandra

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the association among healthy and maladaptive aspects of interpersonal dependency and the management of pain in physical therapy outpatients. Ninety-eight patients were administered the Relationship Profile Test, West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results indicated that Destructive Overdependence was positively associated with an increased number of office visits, pain interference in one's daily life, pain severity, affective distress, and receiving positive partner responses. Dysfunctional Detachment was associated with affective distress, pain interference in one's daily life, and rumination about pain. Healthy Dependency was only associated with receiving distracting responses from others. Believing that a spouse/partner is supportive and caring about one's pain partially mediated the relationship between overdependency and pain interfering in one's life. These results support the clinical utility of assessing interpersonal dependency for its relationship to managing one's pain and health care utilization.

  7. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at α=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients.

  8. Disclusion time reduction therapy in treating occluso-muscular pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prafulla Thumati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disclusion time reduction (DTR is an objective treatment protocol using T-Scan III (digital analysis of occlusion and electromyography for treating occlusally activated orofacial pains. Chronic occluso-muscle disorder is a myogenous subset of temporomandibular disorder symptoms. These muscular symptoms are induced within hyperactive masticatory muscles due to prolonged disclusion time, occlusal interferences, and occlusal surface friction that occur during mandibular excursive movements. This case report describes a patient treated by DTR therapy, whereby measured pretreatment prolonged disclusion time was reduced to short disclusion time using the immediate complete anterior guidance development enameloplasty, guided by T-Scan occlusal contact time and force analysis synchronized with electromyographic recordings of four masticatory muscles.

  9. Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Exercise for Seniors with Chronic Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiers, Michele; Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni

    2014-01-01

    Neck pain, common among the elderly population, has considerable implications on health and quality of life. Evidence supports the use of spinal manipulative therapy and exercise to treat neck pain; however, no studies to date have evaluated the effectiveness of these therapies specifically in se...... in seniors....

  10. The role of molecular pain biomarkers in temporomandibular joint internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernberg, M

    2017-06-01

    There is evidence that low-grade inflammation may be responsible for pain and development of degenerative changes in temporomandibular joint internal derangement. This article reviews the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind TMJ internal derangements. A non-systematic search was carried out in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library for studies regarding pathophysiological mechanisms behind internal derangements focusing on pain-mediating inflammatory and cartilage-degrading molecules. Recent data suggest that release of cytokines may be the key event for pain and cartilage destruction in TMJ internal derangements. Cytokines promote the release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and due to hypoxia, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is released. This activates chondrocytes to produce MMPs and reduce their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) as well as the recruitment of osteoclasts, ultimately leading to cartilage and bone resorption. Also, proteoglycans have an important role in this process. Several cytokines, MMPs, TIMPs and VEGF have been identified in higher concentrations in the TMJ synovial fluid of patients with painful internal derangements and shown to be associated with the degree of degeneration. Other molecules that show elevated levels include hyaluronic acid synthase, disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTs), aggrecan, fibromodulin, biglycan and lumican. Taken together, more or less pronounced inflammation of TMJ structures with release of cytokines, MMPs and other molecular markers that interact in a complex manner may be responsible for tissue degeneration in internal derangements. As internal derangements may be symptom-free, the degree of inflammation, but also other mechanisms, may be important for pain development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Immediate Effects of Conventional Physical Therapy on the Knee Joint Load in Subjects with Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis; A Preliminary Single Blinded Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fattahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjects with knee osteoarthritis typically have higher knee adduction moment. Current research efforts are mainly focused on therapeutic procedures that potentially may modify disease progression. This preliminary study was designed as a single blind (examiner randomized control trial to investigate the impact of conventional physical therapy on pain, and knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Twelve participants diagnosed with moderate knee OA were randomly assigned into control and intervention groups. Three-dimensional knee kinematic and kinetic data were recorded during the gait before and after 10 sessions of conventional physical therapy. In addition, pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale and pain subscale of KOOS questionnaire. The control group did not receive any intervention during the same period. Gait parameters were analyzed within and between groups using nonparametric tests. Results: There was a significant difference between groups in baseline KOOS-pain Score and ML knee force (P=0.048 and P=0.01. Immediately after ten sessions of physical therapy the initial (first peak of knee adduction moment was significantly (P=0.03 lower than that of the control group while the first and second peak of knee AP velocity were significantly (P=0.02, P=0.01 respectively higher. In the intervention group, the second peaks of vertical and anteroposterior (AP knee forces were strongly correlated with the pretest KOOS-pain Score (r=0.99 and r=0.98, P<0.001. Therefore a multivariate general linear model was adopted with adjustment to baseline KOOS-pain. By this adjustment, 51% alleviation of VAS pain score and 81% decrement of first peak of knee adduction moment in comparison to control group was statistically significant (P=0.02, P=0.03 respectively. Conclusion: It seems that ten sessions of conventional physical therapy may modify knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee

  12. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Possible uses of Occupational Therapy in patients with painful shoulder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pukovcová, Klára

    2016-01-01

    This following thesis is focused on painful shoulder syndrome and possible treatments through occupational therapy. It serves as a summary of possible occupational therapy interventions for patients with painful shoulder syndrome. The main aim was to create a treatment method that occupational therapist can provide as part of a multidisciplinary team. The theoretical part includes anatomy and insights into kinesiology, causes, symptoms, testing and treatment options for painful shoulder syndr...

  14. Efficacy of Antibiotic Suppressive Therapy in Patients with a Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Nijman, Jasperina M; Kampinga, Greetje A; van Assen, Sander; Jutte, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: For chronic prosthetic joint infections (PJI), complete removal of the infected prosthesis is necessary in order to cure the infection. Unfortunately, a subgroup of patients is not able to undergo a revision surgery due to high surgical risk. Alternatively, these patients can be treated with antibiotic suppressive therapy (AST) to suppress the infection. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of AST. Methods: We retrospectively collected data (period 2009-2015) from patients with a PJI (of hip, knee or shoulder) who were treated with AST at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. AST was defined as antibiotic treatment for PJI that was started after the usual 3 months of antibiotic treatment. The time of follow-up was defined from the time point AST was started. Treatment was considered as failed, when the patient still experienced joint pain, when surgical intervention (debridement, removal, arthrodesis or amputation) was needed to control the infection and/or when death occurred due to the infection. Results: We included 21 patients with a median age of 67 years (range 21 - 88) and with a median follow-up of 21 months (range 3 - 81). Coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) (n=6), S. aureus (n=6) and polymicrobial flora (n=4) were the most frequently found causative pathogens. Most patients with CNS and S. aureus were treated with minocycline (67%) and clindamycin (83%) as AST, respectively. Overall, treatment was successful in 67% of patients. Failure was due to persistent joint pain (n=1), surgical intervention because of an uncontrolled infection (n=3), and death due the infection (n=3). We observed a treatment success of 90% in patients with a 'standard' prosthesis (n=11), compared to only 50% in patients with a tumor-prosthesis (n=10). Also, treatment was successful in 83% of patients with a CNS as causative microorganism for the infection, compared to 50% in patients with a S. aureus . Patients who failed on AST had a

  15. Review of cancer pain management in patients receiving maintenance methadone therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, Dominic

    2011-05-01

    Methadone is commonly used in the treatment of heroin addiction. Patients with a history of opioid misuse or on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with cancer often have difficult to manage pain. We studied 12 patients referred to the palliative care service with cancer pain who were on MMT. All had difficult to control pain, and a third required 5 or more analgesic agents. Two patients had documented \\'\\'drug-seeking\\'\\' behavior. Methadone was used subcutaneously as an analgesic agent in 1 patient. We explore why patients on MMT have difficult to manage pain, the optimal management of their pain, and the increasing role of methadone as an analgesic agent in cancer pain.

  16. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff, Paulien G., E-mail: p.g.westhoff@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graeff, Alexander de [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pomp, Jacqueline [Department of Radiotherapy, Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Delft (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leer, Jan Willem H. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Linden, Yvette M. van der [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study were used. These patients, irradiated for painful bone metastases, rated pain, QoL, and overall health at baseline and weekly afterward for 12 weeks. Using generalized estimating equations analysis, the course of QoL was studied, adjusted for primary tumor. To identify predictive variables, proportional hazard analyses were performed, taking into account death as a competing risk, and C-statistics were calculated for discriminative value. Results: In total, 722 patients (76%) responded to radiation therapy. During follow-up, responders had a better QoL in all domains compared with nonresponders. Patients with breast or prostate cancer had a better QoL than patients with lung cancer. In multivariate analysis, baseline predictors for a pain response were breast or prostate cancer as primary tumor, younger age, good performance status, absence of visceral metastases, and using opioids. The discriminative ability of the model was low (C-statistic: 0.56). Conclusions: Responding patients show a better QoL after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases than nonresponders. Our model did not have enough discriminative power to predict which patients are likely to respond to radiation therapy. Therefore, radiation therapy should be offered to all patients with painful bone metastases, aiming to decrease pain and improve QoL.

  17. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; Graeff, Alexander de; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Pomp, Jacqueline; Vulpen, Marco van; Leer, Jan Willem H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Linden, Yvette M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study were used. These patients, irradiated for painful bone metastases, rated pain, QoL, and overall health at baseline and weekly afterward for 12 weeks. Using generalized estimating equations analysis, the course of QoL was studied, adjusted for primary tumor. To identify predictive variables, proportional hazard analyses were performed, taking into account death as a competing risk, and C-statistics were calculated for discriminative value. Results: In total, 722 patients (76%) responded to radiation therapy. During follow-up, responders had a better QoL in all domains compared with nonresponders. Patients with breast or prostate cancer had a better QoL than patients with lung cancer. In multivariate analysis, baseline predictors for a pain response were breast or prostate cancer as primary tumor, younger age, good performance status, absence of visceral metastases, and using opioids. The discriminative ability of the model was low (C-statistic: 0.56). Conclusions: Responding patients show a better QoL after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases than nonresponders. Our model did not have enough discriminative power to predict which patients are likely to respond to radiation therapy. Therefore, radiation therapy should be offered to all patients with painful bone metastases, aiming to decrease pain and improve QoL.

  18. Efficacy of Massage Therapy on Pain and Dysfunction in Patients with Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To systematically evaluate the evidence of whether massage therapy (MT is effective for neck pain. Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified through searches of 5 English and Chinese databases (to December 2012. The search terms included neck pain, neck disorders, cervical vertebrae, massage, manual therapy, Tuina, and random. In addition, we performed hand searches at the library of Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed the methodological quality of RCTs by PEDro scale. And the meta-analyses of improvements on pain and neck-related function were conducted. Results. Fifteen RCTs met inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that MT experienced better immediate effects on pain relief compared with inactive therapies (n=153; standardised mean difference (SMD, 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.09 to 2.50; P=0.03 and traditional Chinese medicine (n=125; SMD, 0.73; 95% CI 0.13 to 1.33; P=0.02. There was no valid evidence of MT on improving dysfunction. With regard to follow-up effects, there was not enough evidence of MT for neck pain. Conclusions. This systematic review found moderate evidence of MT on improving pain in patients with neck pain compared with inactive therapies and limited evidence compared with traditional Chinese medicine. There were no valid lines of evidence of MT on improving dysfunction. High quality RCTs are urgently needed to confirm these results and continue to compare MT with other active therapies for neck pain.

  19. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  20. The Effect of Life Review Group Therapy on Elderly With Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Alizadehfard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Chronic pain is a common problem in the elderly. The prevalence of pain indicates that among the Iranian older population who are living in nursing homes, at any specific time, at least 72.8% experience pain. Research designed as a structured review of one’s life is helpful, even is therapeutic in elderly. The aim of life review therapy increases life satisfaction, improves self-esteem, and helps elderly to cope with crises, losses, life transitions and providing acceptance of their life`s realities in coping and resolving their own past conflicts. Methods & Materials: Via this descriptive, case-control research, forty residents with persistent pain of 4 nursing homes in Tehran were selected. All subjects were asked to give their own demographic details and pain status following the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Randomly they got allocated into two groups. First group, conducting the complete life review therapy guide and the second one as control group. During the therapy time, patients reconstruct their life story and examine both positive and negative experiences, with the therapist as a coach. Effects of life review therapy on such elderly were examined via pain questionnaire after therapy periods and were compared with basic levels. Results: The results showed a significant difference between two groups.Reduction in pain questionnaire scores in first group compare with control group were significant. Conclusion: The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the utility of applying life review therapy for elderly with chronic pain

  1. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, U.Sh.; Burde, K.N.; Naikmasur, V.G.; Sattur, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes). Interobserver and intra observer variability was assessed with one-way Anoka statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the inter examiner reliability for Og and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intra examiner reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Elys cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital

  2. 99m technetium-MDP bone scintigraphy in evaluation of painful joint prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, D.; Jaukovic, M.; Jaukovic, Lj.; Ajdinovic, B.

    2004-01-01

    In addition of clinical evaluation and x-ray radiography, the diagnosis of a loose joint prosthesis is often made by nuclear medicine imaging techniques. Differentiation between loosening and infected prosthesis is important for better treatment of those patients. Aim: The aim of this study was to reevaluate the scintigraphic patterns in patients with painful hip of knee arthroplasty. Material and Method: From 1996. to 2003. forty patients aged 49-78 years were referred for evaluation of possible loosening/infection joint prosthesis: 36 pts with 39 total/ partial hip prosthesis, 1 pt with knee prosthesis and 3 pts with history of previously extracted hip prosthesis due to infection. Whole body acquisition had been performed with a single head gamma camera three hours after the injection of 740 MBq 99m Tc-MDP. Scans were classified as: positive for loosening if abnormal uptake was shown at the tip of the prosthesis; positive for infection if diffuse abnormal uptake was shown around the implant; negative and indeterminate scans. Scintigraphic findings were compared to clinical follow up, histology or cultures. Results: Positive findings were found in 17 bone scans strongly suggesting loosening in 10 cases, infection of prosthesis in 4 cases and both loosening/infection in 3 cases. Bone scintigraphy was normal in 11pts. Scans of three pts with previously extracted hip prosthesis and scheduled for reimplatation, showed inhomogeneously and mildly increased uptake in femur. Most of scans classified as indeterminate (n=12) showed slightly increased tracer uptake in region of acetabular roof, greater or lesser tho chanter, suggesting bone remodeling due to the presence of implant, rather than loosening. Conclusion: 99m Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy had a significant role in assessing the painful joint prosthesis. Complementary diagnostic procedures should be considered in indeterminate scintiscans. (authors)

  3. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwala Shivarama Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was assessed with one-way ANOVA statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the interexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intraexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Ely’s cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital.

  4. Safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion in women with persistent post-partum posterior pelvic girdle pain: 12-month outcomes from a prospective, multi-center trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Robyn; Cher, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum posterior pelvic girdle pain (PPGP) affects nearly 20 % of women who experience back pain in the peripartum period. The sacroiliac joint is a source of this pain in 75 % of women with persistent PPGP. A subset of women will fail to obtain acceptable pain relief from the current array of non-surgical treatment options. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive sacroiliac (SI) joint fusion in women with chronic SI joint dysfunction whose pain began in the peri-partum period whose symptoms were recalcitrant to non-surgical management. A sub-group analysis of subjects with sacroiliac joint disruption and/or degenerative sacroiliitis enrolled in a prospective, multi-center trial of SI joint fusion was performed. Subjects with PPGP were identified and compared with women without PPGP and with men. Of 172 enrolled subjects, 52 were male, 100 were females without PPGP and 20 females had PPGP. PPGP subjects were significantly younger (43.3 years, vs. 52.8 for females without PPGP and 50.5 for men, p = 0.002). There were no differences in any other demographic or baseline clinical measure. Women with PPGP experienced a significant improvement in pain (-51 mm on VAS), function (-20.6 pts on ODI) and quality of life (SF-36 PCS +10.4, MCS +7.2, EQ-5D +0.31) at 12 months after surgery. These improvements were characteristic of the overall study results; no difference was detected between sub-groups. The sacroiliac joint can be a source of pain in women with persistent PPGP and should be investigated as a pain generator. In this study, women with carefully diagnosed chronic SI joint pain from PPGP recalcitrant to conservative therapies experienced clinically beneficially improvements in pain, disability and quality of life after minimally invasive SI joint fusion using a series of triangular porous plasma spray coated implants.

  5. Are joint and soft tissue injections painful? Results of a national French cross-sectional study of procedural pain in rheumatological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poncet Coralie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint, spinal and soft tissue injections are commonly performed by rheumatologists in their daily practice. Contrary to other procedures, e.g. performed in pediatric care, little is known about the frequency, the intensity and the management of procedural pain observed in osteo-articular injections in daily practice. Methods This observational, prospective, national study was carried out among a French national representative database of primary rheumatologists to evaluate the prevalence and intensity of pain caused by intra-and peri-articular injections, synovial fluid aspirations, soft tissue injections, and spinal injections. For each physician, data were collected over 1 month, for up to 40 consecutive patients (>18-years-old for whom a synovial fluid aspiration, an intra or peri-articular injection or a spinal injection were carried out during consultations. Statistical analysis was carried out in order to compare patients who had suffered from pain whilst undergoing the procedure to those who had not. Explanatory analyses were conducted by stepwise logistic regression with the characteristics of the patients to explain the existence of pain. Results Data were analysed for 8446 patients (64% female, mean age 62 ± 14 years recruited by 240 physicians. The predominant sites injected were the knee (45.5% and spine (19.1%. Over 80% of patients experienced procedural pain which was most common in the small joints (42% and spine (32% Pain was severe in 5.3% of patients, moderate in 26.6%, mild in 49.8%, and absent in 18.3%. Pain was significantly more intense in patients with severe pain linked to their underlying pathology and for procedures performed in small joints. Preventative or post-procedure analgesia was rarely given, only to 5.7% and 36.3% of patients, respectively. Preventative analgesia was more frequently prescribed in patients with more severe procedural pain. Conclusion Most patients undergoing intra-or peri

  6. No exacerbation of knee joint pain and effusion following preoperative progressive resistance training in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. OBJECTIVE: To examine if preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would 1......) exacerbate pain and knee effusion, 2) allow a progressively increased training load throughout the training period that would subsequently increase muscle strength. DESIGN: Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University Hospital and a Regional Hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty patients...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after each training session, knee joint pain rated on an 11-point scale, effusion assessed by measuring the knee joint circumference, and training load were recorded. The first and last training session were initiated by 1RM testing of unilateral leg press, knee extension...

  7. Lumbar Radiofrequency Rhizotomy in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Increases the Diagnosis of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction in Subsequent Follow-Up Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Chronic back pain is often a result of coexisting pathologies; secondary causes of pain can become more apparent sources of pain once the primary pathology has been addressed. The objective of our study was to determine if there is an increase in diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint pain following a Lumbar Rhizotomy. A list of patients who underwent Lumbar Radiofrequency during a 6-month period in our clinic was generated. Records from subsequent clinic visits were reviewed to determine if a new diagnosis of SI joint pathology was made. In patients who underwent a recent Lumbar Rhizotomy procedure to treat facetogenic pain, the prevalence of Sacroiliac joint pain increased to 70%. We infer that there is a significant increase in the diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint syndrome following a Lumbar Rhizotomy, potentially due to unmasking of a preexisting condition. In patients presenting with persistent back pain after Lumbar Rhizotomy, the clinician must have a high degree of suspicion for latent Sacroiliac joint pain prior to attributing the pain to block failure. It would be prudent to use >80% relief of pain after a diagnostic medial branch block as a diagnostic criterion for facetogenic pain rather than the currently accepted >50% in order to minimize unmasking of preexisting subclinical pain from the SI joint. PMID:28255260

  8. Lumbar Radiofrequency Rhizotomy in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Increases the Diagnosis of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction in Subsequent Follow-Up Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Kumar Rimmalapudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic back pain is often a result of coexisting pathologies; secondary causes of pain can become more apparent sources of pain once the primary pathology has been addressed. The objective of our study was to determine if there is an increase in diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint pain following a Lumbar Rhizotomy. A list of patients who underwent Lumbar Radiofrequency during a 6-month period in our clinic was generated. Records from subsequent clinic visits were reviewed to determine if a new diagnosis of SI joint pathology was made. In patients who underwent a recent Lumbar Rhizotomy procedure to treat facetogenic pain, the prevalence of Sacroiliac joint pain increased to 70%. We infer that there is a significant increase in the diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint syndrome following a Lumbar Rhizotomy, potentially due to unmasking of a preexisting condition. In patients presenting with persistent back pain after Lumbar Rhizotomy, the clinician must have a high degree of suspicion for latent Sacroiliac joint pain prior to attributing the pain to block failure. It would be prudent to use >80% relief of pain after a diagnostic medial branch block as a diagnostic criterion for facetogenic pain rather than the currently accepted >50% in order to minimize unmasking of preexisting subclinical pain from the SI joint.

  9. Lumbar Radiofrequency Rhizotomy in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Increases the Diagnosis of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction in Subsequent Follow-Up Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmalapudi, Varun Kumar; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Chronic back pain is often a result of coexisting pathologies; secondary causes of pain can become more apparent sources of pain once the primary pathology has been addressed. The objective of our study was to determine if there is an increase in diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint pain following a Lumbar Rhizotomy. A list of patients who underwent Lumbar Radiofrequency during a 6-month period in our clinic was generated. Records from subsequent clinic visits were reviewed to determine if a new diagnosis of SI joint pathology was made. In patients who underwent a recent Lumbar Rhizotomy procedure to treat facetogenic pain, the prevalence of Sacroiliac joint pain increased to 70%. We infer that there is a significant increase in the diagnosis of Sacroiliac joint syndrome following a Lumbar Rhizotomy, potentially due to unmasking of a preexisting condition. In patients presenting with persistent back pain after Lumbar Rhizotomy, the clinician must have a high degree of suspicion for latent Sacroiliac joint pain prior to attributing the pain to block failure. It would be prudent to use >80% relief of pain after a diagnostic medial branch block as a diagnostic criterion for facetogenic pain rather than the currently accepted >50% in order to minimize unmasking of preexisting subclinical pain from the SI joint.

  10. [The psychosomatics of chronic back pain. Classification, aetiology and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, P

    2004-05-01

    An overview is given on the current classification, description and treatment of chronic pain with causally relevant psychological factors. It is based on the "practice guidelines on somatoform disorders" and on a thematically related meta-analysis. The classificatory problems, especially of the demarcation of somatoform and other chronic pain, are presented. Additional descriptive dimensions of the relevant psychosocial factors are: pain description, other organically unexplained pain- and non-pain-symptoms, anxiety and depression, disease conviction and illness behaviour, personality and childhood abuse. A modified psychotherapy for (somatoform) chronic pain is outlined. Finally, this aetiologically oriented psychosomatic-psychiatric approach is compared to psychological coping models for chronic pain.

  11. The influence of music and music therapy on pain-induced neuronal oscillations measured by magnetencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Metzner, Susanne; Rohlffs, Fiona; Lorenz, Jürgen; Engel, Andreas K

    2013-04-01

    Modern forms of music therapy are clinically established for various therapeutic or rehabilitative goals, especially in the treatment of chronic pain. However, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms that underlie pain modulation by music. Therefore, we attempted to characterize the effects of music therapy on pain perception by comparing the effects of 2 different therapeutic concepts, referred to as receptive and entrainment methods, on cortical activity recorded by magnetencephalography in combination with laser heat pain. Listening to preferred music within the receptive method yielded a significant reduction of pain ratings associated with a significant power reduction of delta-band activity in the cingulate gyrus, which suggests that participants displaced their focus of attention away from the pain stimulus. On the other hand, listening to self-composed "pain music" and "healing music" within the entrainment method exerted major effects on gamma-band activity in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. Pain music, in contrast to healing music, increased pain ratings in parallel with an increase in gamma-band activity in somatosensory brain structures. In conclusion, our data suggest that the 2 music therapy approaches operationalized in this study seem to modulate pain perception through at least 2 different mechanisms, involving changes of activity in the delta and gamma bands at different stages of the pain processing system. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychological factors addressed in cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric functional abdominal pain: Which are most important to target?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; de Haan, Else; Derkx, H. H. F.; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric functional abdominal pain leaves room for improvement. We studied which factors addressed in cognitive behaviour therapy relate most strongly to the physical and psychological functioning of children with functional abdominal pain and

  13. Changes in patellofemoral pain resulting from repetitive impact landings are associated with the magnitude and rate of patellofemoral joint loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Lee T; James, C Roger; Yang, Hyung Suk; Sizer, Phillip S; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sawyer, Steven F; Powers, Christopher M

    2018-03-01

    Although a relationship between elevated patellofemoral forces and pain has been proposed, it is unknown which joint loading variable (magnitude, rate) is best associated with pain changes. The purpose of this study was to examine associations among patellofemoral joint loading variables and changes in patellofemoral pain across repeated single limb landings. Thirty-one females (age: 23.5(2.8) year; height: 166.8(5.8) cm; mass: 59.6(8.1) kg) with PFP performed 5 landing trials from 0.25 m. The dependent variable was rate of change in pain obtained from self-reported pain scores following each trial. Independent variables included 5-trial averages of peak, time-integral, and average and maximum development rates of the patellofemoral joint reaction force obtained using a previously described model. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate individual associations between rate of change in pain and each independent variable (α = 0.05). Stepwise linear multiple regression (α enter  = 0.05; α exit  = 0.10) was used to identify the best predictor of rate of change in pain. Subjects reported an average increase of 0.38 pain points with each landing trial. Although, rate of change in pain was positively correlated with peak force (r = 0.44, p = 0.01), and average (r = 0.41, p = 0.02) and maximum force development rates (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), only the peak force entered the predictive model explaining 19% of variance in rate of change in pain (r 2  = 0.19, p = 0.01). Peak patellofemoral joint reaction force was the best predictor of the rate of change in pain following repetitive singe limb landings. The current study supports the theory that patellofemoral joint loading contributes to changes in patellofemoral pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebioğlu, Ayda; Gürol, Ayşe; Yildirim, Zuhal Keskin; Büyükavci, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer and its treatment are stressful and reduce the quality of life in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer. We conducted a controlled pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study at a paediatric oncology unit in Turkey. Twenty-five children were enrolled in this study. Their pain and anxiety were determined using a visual analogue scale. When the pretest and posttest pain and anxiety levels of the groups were compared, no statistically significant difference was found (P > 0.05). It was determined that pain and anxiety levels in the experimental group decreased significantly. This study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness in children of massage in reducing pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Pain and Self-reported Function in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Brian J; Kietrys, David M; Parrott, J Scott

    2018-05-01

    Study Design Systematic literature review with meta-analysis. Background Management of patellofemoral pain (PFP) may include the utilization of manual therapy (MT) techniques to the patellofemoral joint, surrounding soft tissues, and/or lumbopelvic region. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of MT, used alone or as an adjunct intervention, compared to standard treatment or sham for reducing pain and improving self-reported function in individuals with PFP. Methods An electronic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL databases for studies investigating MT for individuals with PFP. Studies published through August 2017 that compared MT (local or remote to the knee), used alone or in combination with other interventions, to control or sham interventions were included. Patient-reported pain and functional outcomes were collected and synthesized. Trials were assessed via the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool, and a meta-analysis of the evidence was performed. Results Nine studies were included in the review, 5 of which were rated as having a low risk of bias. The use of MT, applied to the local knee structure, was associated with favorable short-term changes in self-reported function and pain in individuals with PFP, when compared to a comparison (control or sham) intervention. However, the changes were clinically meaningful only for pain (defined as a 2-cm or 2-point improvement on a visual analog scale or numeric pain-rating scale). The evidence regarding lumbopelvic manipulation was inconclusive for pain improvement in individuals with PFP, based on 3 studies. Conclusion The data from this review cautiously suggest that MT may be helpful in the short term for decreasing pain in patients with PFP. Several studies integrated MT into a comprehensive treatment program. Changes in self-reported function with the inclusion of MT were shown to be significant, but not clinically meaningful. The

  16. [Multimodal pain therapy - implementation of process management - an attempt to consider management approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Marion; Kramp, Melanie

    2012-07-01

    The combination of medical and economical proceedings allows new perspectives in the illustration of medical workflows. Considering structural and developmental aspects multimodal therapy programs show similarities with typical subjects of economic process systems. By pointing out the strategic appearance of the multimodal pain therapy concept multimodal approaches can be described to some extent by using management approaches. E. g., an economic process landscape can be used to represent procedures of a multimodal pain therapy program. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Pulsed Dose Radiofrequency Before Ablation of Medial Branch of the Lumbar Dorsal Ramus for Zygapophyseal Joint Pain Reduces Post-procedural Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanious, David; Gage, Emmanuel; Koning, Jonathon; Sarhan, Mazin; Chaiban, Gassan; Almualim, Mohammed; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential side effects with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) includes painful cutaneous dysesthesias and increased pain due to neuritis or neurogenic inflammation. This pain may require the prescription of opioids or non-opioid analgesics to control post-procedural pain and discomfort. The goal of this study is to compare post-procedural pain scores and post-procedural oral analgesic use in patients receiving continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation versus patients receiving pulsed dose radiofrequency immediately followed by continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation for zygopophaseal joint disease. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Patients who met all the inclusion criteria and were not subject to any of the exclusion criteria were required to have two positive diagnostic medial branch blocks prior to undergoing randomization, intervention, and analysis. University hospital. Eligible patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either receive thermal radiofrequency ablation alone (standard group) or pulsed dose radiofrequency (PDRF) immediately followed by thermal radiofrequency ablation (investigational group), all of which were performed by a single Board Certified Pain Medicine physician. Post-procedural pain levels between the two groups were assessed using the numerical pain Scale (NPS), and patients were contacted by phone on post-procedural days 1 and 2 in the morning and afternoon regarding the amount of oral analgesic medications used in the first 48 hours following the procedure. Patients who received pulsed dose radiofrequency followed by continuous radiofrequency neurotomy reported statistically significantly lower post-procedural pain scores in the first 24 hours compared to patients who received thermal radiofrequency neurotomy alone. These patients also used less oral analgesic medication in the post-procedural period. These interventions were carried out by one board accredited pain physician at one

  18. Exercise therapy after ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections in patients with subacromial pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Rosager, Sara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) accounts for around 50 % of all cases of shoulder pain. The most commonly used treatments are glucocorticosteroid (steroid) injections and exercise therapy; however, despite treatment SAPS patients often experience relapse of their symptoms. Therefore...... the clinical effect of combining steroid and exercise therapy is highly relevant to clarify. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate if exercise therapy added to steroid injection in patients with SAPS will improve the effect of the injection therapy on shoulder pain. METHODS......: In this two-arm randomized trial running over 26 weeks, patients with unilateral shoulder pain (> 4 weeks) and thickened subacromial bursa (> 2 mm on US) were included. At baseline all participants received two steroid injections into the painful shoulder with an interval of one week. Subsequently they were...

  19. The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Erik J; Schaap, Laura A; Herbolsheimer, Florian; Dennison, Elaine M; Maggi, Stefania; Pedersen, Nancy L; Castell, Maria Victoria; Denkinger, Michael D; Edwards, Mark H; Limongi, Federica; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Siviero, Paola; Queipo, Rocio; Peter, Richard; van der Pas, Suzan; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether daily weather conditions, 3-day average weather conditions, and changes in weather conditions influence joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis (OA) in 6 European countries. Data from the population-based European Project on OSteoArthritis were used. The American College of Rheumatology classification criteria were used to diagnose OA in older people (65-85 yrs). After the baseline interview, at 6 months, and after the 12-18 months followup interview, joint pain was assessed using 2-week pain calendars. Daily values for temperature, precipitation, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, and wind speed were obtained from local weather stations. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the pain-weather associations, adjusted for several confounders. The study included 810 participants with OA in the knee, hand, and/or hip. After adjustment, there were significant associations of joint pain with daily average humidity (B = 0.004, p weather conditions. Changes in weather variables between 2 consecutive days were not significantly associated with reported joint pain. The associations between pain and daily average weather conditions suggest that a causal relationship exist between joint pain and weather variables, but the associations between day-to-day weather changes and pain do not confirm causation. Knowledge about the relationship between joint pain in OA and weather may help individuals with OA, physicians, and therapists to better understand and manage fluctuations in pain.

  20. Image-guided pain therapy. Sympathicolysis; Bildgestuetzte Schmerztherapie. Sympathikolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbelko, M.; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Institut fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Therapie, Berlin (Germany); Gutberlet, M.; Grothoff, M. [Universitaet Leipzig - Herzzentrum, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In the autonomic nerve system most sympathetic neurons synapse peripherally in the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk. A reduction in sympathicotonia by partial elimination of these ganglia is a therapeutic approach that has been used for more than 100 years. In the early 1920s the first attempts at percutaneous sympathicolysis (SL) were carried out. Nowadays, minimally invasive image-guided SL has become an integral part of interventional radiology. Established indications for SL are hyperhidrosis, critical limb ischemia and the complex regional pain syndrome. The standard imaging guidance modality in SL is computed tomography (CT) which allows the exact placement of the puncture needle in the target area under visualization of the surrounding structures. Ethanol is normally used for chemical lysis, which predominantly eliminates the unmyelinated autonomic axons. In order to visualize the distribution of the ethanol during application, iodine-containing contrast medium is added. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) controls sweat secretion via the efferent neurons; therefore, effective therapy of idiopathic palmar, axillary and plantar hyperhidrosis can be achieved when SL is performed at the corresponding level of the sympathetic trunk. Furthermore, due to the vasomotor innervation of most blood vessels, by reduction of the sympathicotonus an atony of the smooth muscles and therefore vasodilatation occurs, which is used as a palliative therapeutic option in patients with critical limb ischemia. By elimination of the afferent sensory fibers this also results in pain relief. This principle is also used in the SL therapy of the complex regional pain syndrome. After the introduction of CT guidance, major complications have become rare events. In addition to the usual risks of percutaneous interventions there are, however, a number of specific complications, such as syncope caused by irritation of cardiac sympathetic nerves in thoracic SL and ureteral injury in lumbar

  1. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Knee Joint Effusion Synovitis and Knee Pain in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Han, Weiyu; Cao, Yuelong; Halliday, Andrew; Blizzard, Leigh; Pan, Faming; Antony, Benny; Cicuttini, Flavia; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    To describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between knee regional effusion synovitis and knee pain in older adults. Data from a population-based random sample (n = 880, mean age 62 yrs, 50% women) were used. Baseline knee joint effusion synovitis was graded (0-3) using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the suprapatellar pouch, central portion, posterior femoral recess, and subpopliteal recess. Effusion synovitis of the whole joint was defined as a score of ≥ 2 in any subregion. Other knee structural (including cartilage, bone marrow, and menisci) lesions were assessed by MRI at baseline. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire at baseline and 2.6 years later. Multivariable analyses were performed after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and other structural lesions. The prevalence of effusion synovitis was 67%. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis was significantly and independently associated with increased total and nonweight-bearing knee pain in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses (for an increase in total knee pain of ≥ 5, RR 1.26 per grade, 95% CI 1.04-1.52), and increased weight-bearing knee pain in longitudinal analysis only. Effusion synovitis in posterior femoral recess and central portion were independently associated with increases in nonweight-bearing pain (RR 1.63 per grade, 95% CI 1.32-2.01 and RR 1.29 per grade, 95% CI 1.01-1.65, respectively) in longitudinal analyses only. Knee joint effusion synovitis has independent associations with knee pain in older adults. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis is associated with nonweight-bearing and weight-bearing knee pain, while posterior femoral recess and central portion effusion synovitis are only associated with nonweight-bearing pain.

  2. Evaluation of Kinesiophobia and Its Correlations with Pain and Fatigue in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type a. k. a. joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT is a hereditary musculoskeletal disorder associating generalized joint hypermobility with chronic pain. Anecdotal reports suggest a prominent role for kinesiophobia in disease manifestations, but no study has systematically addressed this point. Objective. To investigate the impact of kinesiophobia and its relationship with pain, fatigue, and quality of life in JHS/EDS-HT. Design. Cross-sectional study. Subjects/Patients. 42 patients (40 female and 2 male with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosis following standardized diagnostic criteria were selected. Methods. Disease features were analyzed by means of specific questionnaires and scales evaluating kinesiophobia, pain, fatigue, and quality of life. The relationships among variables were investigated using the Spearman bivariate analysis. Results. Kinesiophobia resulted predominantly in the patients’ sample. The values of kinesiophobia did not correlate with intensity of pain, quality of life, and (or the single component of fatigue. A strong correlation was discovered between kinesiophobia and general severity of fatigue. Conclusions. In JHS/EDS-HT, the onset of pain-avoiding strategies is related to the presence of pain but not to its intensity. The clear-cut correlation between kinesiophobia and severity of fatigue suggests a direct link between musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. In JHS/EDS-HT, the underlying mechanism is likely to be facilitated by primary disease characteristics, including hypotonia.

  3. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, E.J.; van der Pas, S.; Schaap, L.A.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Zambon, S.; Peter, R.; Pedersen, N.L.; Dennison, E.M.; Denkinger, M.; Castell, M.V; Siviero, P.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Edwards, M.H.; Otero, A.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six

  4. [Therapeutic effect observation of chronic knee joint pain assisted with the central-square needling technique of the thumb-tack needles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Qi, Si; Liu, Mengyue; Zhao, Yu; Li, Ning

    2017-10-12

    To compare the differences in the clinical therapeutic effects on chronic knee joint pain between the combination of the central-square needling technique of thumb-tack needles with the routine therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and tuina and the routine therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and tuina . One hundred and twenty patients of chronic knee joint pain were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 60 cases in each one. In the control group, the routine therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and tuina was adopted. In the observation group, at the end of treatment with the routine therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and tuina , the subcutaneous embedding therapy was followed with four thumb-tack needles at the sites 1 to 1.5 cm above, below and bilateral to the main point ( ashi point) separately, and the needles were retained for 24 h to 48 h. The treatment was given once every two days, three times a week, totally 6 times in two weeks; and the follow-up visit was done for 3 months in patients of the two groups. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score before and after each treatment, Lequesne index score before treatment and at the end of follow-up and the case numbers of proactive use of painkillers or receiving acupuncture treatment in the follow-up stage were compared and observed in the patients of the two groups. The VAS score was reduced gradually after treatment in the patients of the two groups. The differences were significant statistically after the second treatment as compared with those before the treatment in the two groups (all P 0.05). In the follow-up stage, there were 0 case in the observation group and 9 cases in the control group in terms of proactive use of painkillers ( P 0.05). The acupuncture scheme in assistance with the central-square needling technique of thumb-tack needles obviously relieves chronic knee joint pain, much better sustains the analgesic effects of acupuncture and improves patient compliance.

  5. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment.

  6. [Interdisciplinary pain assessment in the hospital setting : Merely a door-opener to multimodal pain therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, E; Mothes-Lasch, M; Lutz, J F

    2017-12-01

    Chronic pain is characterized by a complex interaction of somatic, mental and social factors. Assessing these factors in patients with chronic pain is vital during the diagnostic work-up and when making a structured treatment plan. Interdisciplinary pain assessment (ISA) is the most promising method to deal with these challenges. This article presents our experience in performing pain assessments in the hospital setting and also illustrates the characteristic features of chronic pain patients undergoing such assessments. This study reviews and evaluates patient data from 2704 ISAs performed at the Interdisciplinary Pain Centre of the Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany, between 2008 and 2015. The majority of our ISA patients are severely handicapped and show distinct signs of chronic disease. A large proportion of patients is either unable to work or receiving benefits (invalidity pension or retirement pension). In addition, patients reported long disease durations and high emotional distress. Treatment recommendations were based on the patients' individual clinical presentations and examination results. More than half of the patients required multimodal pain management, while adjustments or therapeutic withdrawal of pain medications, in particular of opioids, were indicated in many patients. Our study shows that ISA enables fast, high-quality diagnostic assessments of chronic pain while taking the biopsychosocial model of pain in particular into account. In addition, ISA is not biased with regard to outcome results and recommends the further treatment that appears best for the individual patient. ISA leads not only to inpatient treatment, but also to treatment in other therapeutic settings and, as such, is not merely a door-opener to multimodal pain therapy.

  7. MR-guided pain therapy: principles and clinical applications; MR-gesteuerte Schmerztherapie: Prinzipien und klinische Applikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, J.; Pereira, P.L. [Diagnostische Radiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    X-ray fluoroscopy and computed tomography are frequently used to perform percutaneous interventions in pain therapy. The development of MR-compatible therapy needles now allows these interventions to be performed under MR imaging guidance. MR-guided interventions may be performed using most clinical MR scanners; however, systems with an open configuration are advantageous. Multiplanar pre- and intra-procedural MR imaging provides the interventionalist with essential information, such as evaluation of anatomy and pathology, as well as the planning of the procedure and monitoring of fluid distribution without the use of contrast agents. With the use of non-ionizing radiation, interventional MR imaging is especially suited for the treatment of children and young adults as well as for serial injection therapy. For spinal MR interventions, passive needle visualization is an easily achievable and reliable method. The resulting needle artifact is influenced by several factors such as the alloy of the needle, the strength of the static magnetic field, the sequence type, the spatial orientation of the therapy needle as well as the echo time and may further be optimized during the intervention by alteration of the last three factors. Fast acquisition techniques and image processing allow for continuous, near real-time MR imaging (so-called MR fluoroscopy) and interactive needle navigations, comparable to X-ray fluoroscopy and CT fluoroscopy. The purpose of this review is to illustrate and discuss general concepts of interventional MR imaging. A spectrum of interventional MR imaging procedures in spinal pain therapy is described and illustrated, including procedures such as lumbar facet joint injections, sacroiliac joint injections, lumbar spinal nerve root infiltrations and drug delivery to the lumbar sympathetic chain. (orig.)

  8. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  9. Air acupuncture therapy combined with manipulation on 90 cases of acute sprain and bruising of ankle joint%气针加手法治疗急性踝关节扭挫伤90例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永红; 李斌

    2003-01-01

    @@ BACKGROUND: Air acupuncture therapy is to make use of time and space stimuli of air in acupoint and promote blood circulation to remove blood stasis, relieve swelling and pain through interstitial osmosis and absorption. Manipulation to acute sprain and bruising of ankle joint can achieve anatomic reduction as soon as possible, clear incarceration of synovium, promote circulation of qi and relieve pain and increase blood circulation of affected tissue.

  10. A clinical perspective on a pain neuroscience education approach to manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Nijs, Jo; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience education (PNE) in physical therapy. There is growing evidence for the efficacy of PNE to decrease pain, disability, fear-avoidance, pain catastrophization, limited movement, and health care utilization in people struggling with pain. PNE teaches people in pain more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience including processes such as central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, allodynia, inhibition, facilitation, neuroplasticity and more. PNE's neurobiological model often finds itself at odds with traditional biomedical models used in physical therapy. Traditional biomedical models, focusing on anatomy, pathoanatomy, and biomechanics have been shown to have limited efficacy in helping people understand their pain, especially chronic pain, and may in fact even increase a person's pain experience by increasing fear-avoidance and pain catastrophization. An area of physical therapy where the biomedical model is used a lot is manual therapy. This contrast between PNE and manual therapy has seemingly polarized followers from each approach to see PNE as a 'hands-off' approach even having clinicians categorize patients as either in need of receiving PNE (with no hands-on), or hands-on with no PNE. In this paper, we explore the notion of PNE and manual therapy co-existing. PNE research has shown to have immediate effects of various clinical signs and symptoms associated with central sensitization. Using a model of sensitization (innocuous, noxious, and allodynia), we argue that PNE can be used in a manual therapy model, especially treating someone where the nervous system has become increasingly hypervigilant. Level of Evidence : VII.

  11. Osteoarthritis: the genesis of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kai; Robbins, Sarah R; McDougall, Jason J

    2018-05-01

    OA is a painful joint disease that predominantly affects the elderly. Pain is the primary symptom of OA, and it can present as either intermittent or constant. OA pain mechanisms are complex and have only recently been determined. Both peripheral and central processes are involved in creating the OA pain experience, making targeted therapy problematic. Nociceptive, inflammatory and neuropathic pains are all known to occur in OA, but to varying degrees in a patient- and time-specific manner. A better understanding of these multifactorial components of OA pain will lead to the development of more effective and safer pain treatments.

  12. Effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hiroki; Demura, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women. The subjects were 144 elderly women (62-94 years old; mean age 76.2±6.0 years; ±S.D.) who were divided into the following groups: 81 persons without knee-pain (no knee-pain group), 39 persons with the subjective pain in right or left knee (single knee-pain group), and 24 persons with the subjective pain in both knees (double knee-pain group). The subjects took a knee extension strength test and a 12 m maximum effort walk test. Knee extension strength, stance time, swing time, stride length, step length and swing speed were selected as parameters. A significant laterality was found in knee extension strength only in the one knee-pain group. The laterality of gait parameters was not found in all groups. In conclusion, elderly women who can perform daily living activity independently, even though having subjective pain in either knee or laterality in knee extension strength exertion show little laterality of gait during short distance walking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Knee arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased following moderate pressure massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2015-11-01

    The literature on massage therapy effects on knee pain suggests that pain was reduced based on self-report, but little is known about range of motion (ROM) effects. Medical School staff and faculty who had knee arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure massage therapy or a waitlist control group (24 per group). Self-reports included the WOMAC (pain, stiffness and function) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. ROM and ROM-related pain were assessed before and after the last sessions. The massage group showed an immediate post-massage increase in ROM and a decrease in ROM-associated pain. On the last versus the first day of the study, the massage group showed greater increases in ROM and decreases in ROM-related pain as well as less self-reported pain and sleep disturbances than the waitlist control group. These data highlight the effectiveness of moderate pressure massage therapy for increasing ROM and lessening ROM-related pain and long-term pain and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The diagnostic value of three sacroiliac joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, B; Jurik, A G; Jensen, R K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to investigate the diagnostic value of three sacroiliac (SI) joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stratified by gender. METHOD: Patients without clinical signs of nerve root compression were...

  15. Exploring the aggregation of four functional measures in a population of older adults with joint pain and comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, L.A.H.; Leone, S.S.; Smalbrugge, M.; Knol, D.L.; van der Horst, H.E.; Dekker, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In clinical settings, it is important for health care providers to measure different aspects of functioning in older adults with joint pain and comorbidity. Besides the use of distinct measures, it could also be attractive to have one general measure of functioning that incorporates

  16. Proximal fibular osteotomy: a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Lei; Lv, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Duan, Zhiqing; Wu, Wenjin; Zhang, Bin; Wei, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    Objective To explore the effects of proximal fibular osteotomy as a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of medial joint space and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods From January 2015 to May 2015, 47 patients who underwent proximal fibular osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthritis were retrospectively followed up. Preoperative and postoperative weight-bearing and whole lower extremity radiographs were obtained to analyse the alignment of the lower extremity and ratio of the knee joint space (medial/lateral compartment). Knee pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and knee ambulation activities were evaluated using the American Knee Society score preoperatively and postoperatively. Results Medial pain relief was observed in almost all patients after proximal fibular osteotomy. Most patients exhibited improved walking postoperatively. Weight-bearing lower extremity radiographs showed an average increase in the postoperative medial knee joint space. Additionally, obvious correction of alignment was observed in the whole lower extremity radiographs in 8 of 47 patients. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that proximal fibular osteotomy effectively relieves pain and improves joint function in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis at a mean of 13.38 months postoperatively.

  17. Horticultural therapy for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verra, M L; Verra, Martin L; Angst, Felix; Beck, Trudi; Lehmann, Susanne; Brioschi, Roberto; Schneiter, Renata; Aeschlimann, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Therapists can use horticultural therapy as an adjuvant therapy in a non threatening context, with the intent of bringing about positive effects in physical health, mental health, and social interaction. Very few experimental studies exist that test its clinical effectiveness. To determine whether the addition of horticultural therapy to a pain-management program improved physical function, mental health, and ability to cope with pain. The research team designed a prospective, nonrandomized, controlled cohort study, enrolling all patients consecutively referred to the Zurzach Interdisciplinary Pain Program (ZISP) who met the studys criteria. The team divided them into two cohorts based on when medical professionals referred them: before (control group) or after (intervention group) introduction of a horticultural therapy program. The setting was the rehabilitation clinic (RehaClinic) in Bad Zurzach, Switzerland. Seventy-nine patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (fibromyalgia or chronic, nonspecific back pain) participated in the study. The research team compared a 4-week, inpatient, interdisciplinary pain-management program with horticultural therapy (intervention, n = 37) with a pain-management program without horticultural therapy (control, n = 42). The horticultural therapy program consisted of seven sessions of group therapy, each of 1-hour duration. The research team assessed the outcome using the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ ), and two functional performance tests. The team tested participants on entry to and discharge from the 4-week pain-management program. Between-group differences in sociodemographic and outcome variables were not significant on participants entry to the pain-management program. On discharge, the research team measured small to moderate outcome effects (effect size [ES

  18. Radionuclide imaging of the painful joint replacement: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)]. E-mail: palestro@lij.edu

    2002-09-01

    Differentiating aseptic loosening from infection as the cause of prosthetic joint failure is difficult because both entities are similar, clinically and histopathologically. Aseptic loosening frequently result from an immune reaction to the prosthesis. There is inflammation with an influx of histiocytes, giant cells, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Pro inflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes are secreted, causing osteolysis and loosening. These same events occur in infection except that neutrophils, rarely present in aseptic loosening, area invariably present in infection. Clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory tests, X-rays and joint aspiration are insensitive, nonspecific or both. Artifacts produced by the metallic hardware hamper cross-sectional imaging modalities. Radionuclide imaging is not affected by the presence of metallic hardware and is very useful for evaluating the painful prosthesis. Bone scintigraphy, with and accuracy of 50%-70% is a useful screening test, since a normal study effectively excludes a prosthetic complication. Adding gallium-67, a nonspecific inflammation-imaging agent, improves the accuracy of bone scintigraphy to 70%-80%. The accuracy of combined leukocyte/marrow imaging, 90%, is the highest among available radionuclide studies. Its success is due to the fact that leukocytes imaging is most sensitive for detecting neutrophil mediated inflammations. Inflammatory conditions that are neutrophil-poor, even though large numbers of other leukocytes may be present, (such as the aseptically loosened joint prosthesis) go undetected. The success of leukocyte/marrow imaging is tempered by the limitations of in vitro labeling. In vivo labeling has been investigated and a murine monoclonal anti-granulocyte antibody appears promising. Some investigations have focused on F-18 FDG imaging, although specificity is a concern with this agent. (author)

  19. Radionuclide imaging of the painful joint replacement: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestro, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    Differentiating aseptic loosening from infection as the cause of prosthetic joint failure is difficult because both entities are similar, clinically and histopathologically. Aseptic loosening frequently result from an immune reaction to the prosthesis. There is inflammation with an influx of histiocytes, giant cells, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Pro inflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes are secreted, causing osteolysis and loosening. These same events occur in infection except that neutrophils, rarely present in aseptic loosening, area invariably present in infection. Clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory tests, X-rays and joint aspiration are insensitive, nonspecific or both. Artifacts produced by the metallic hardware hamper cross-sectional imaging modalities. Radionuclide imaging is not affected by the presence of metallic hardware and is very useful for evaluating the painful prosthesis. Bone scintigraphy, with and accuracy of 50%-70% is a useful screening test, since a normal study effectively excludes a prosthetic complication. Adding gallium-67, a nonspecific inflammation-imaging agent, improves the accuracy of bone scintigraphy to 70%-80%. The accuracy of combined leukocyte/marrow imaging, 90%, is the highest among available radionuclide studies. Its success is due to the fact that leukocytes imaging is most sensitive for detecting neutrophil mediated inflammations. Inflammatory conditions that are neutrophil-poor, even though large numbers of other leukocytes may be present, (such as the aseptically loosened joint prosthesis) go undetected. The success of leukocyte/marrow imaging is tempered by the limitations of in vitro labeling. In vivo labeling has been investigated and a murine monoclonal anti-granulocyte antibody appears promising. Some investigations have focused on F-18 FDG imaging, although specificity is a concern with this agent. (author)

  20. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Massimo; Montella, Silvana; Salici, Fabiana; Valente, Adriana; Marchesini, Maurizio; Compagnone, Christian; Baciarello, Marco; Manferdini, Maria Elena; Fanelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach. PMID:27408698

  1. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Allegri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  2. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Allegri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for the anesthesiologist and pain practitioner: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Anna; Soong, Stephen Neal; Fishman, David; García, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies that anesthesiologists and pain management practitioners commonly encounter along with recommendations for evaluation and implementation. A literature search of PubMed was performed using the comprehensive MeSH term, "Complementary Therapies OR Dietary Supplements", and a search was conducted of the various licensing organizations and books published on the topics of CAM and integrative medicine. In North America, the most commonly encountered CAM therapies include 1) manipulation and procedural therapies; 2) herbs, nutritional supplements (nutraceuticals), and dietary therapies; and 3) mind-body and energy therapies. Controversy exists regarding many of these therapies, particularly those with a higher risk of harm, such as chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, and nutraceutical use. Several well-conducted studies were analyzed to show how research in CAM can control for placebo responses. Practical considerations are provided for patients and practitioners interested in pursuing or already employing CAM in perioperative and chronic pain management settings. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies in general may provide a useful adjunct in the management of chronic pain. Nevertheless, many patients are not aware of the risks and benefits of individual therapies. In the perioperative setting, the most concerning CAM therapy is the use of herbs and other supplements that may produce physiologic and metabolic derangements and may interact with prescription medications. Resources exist to aid pain specialists, anesthesiologists, and patients in the evidence-based utilization of CAM therapies.

  4. [Acute pain therapy in German hospitals as competitive factor. Do competition, ownership and case severity influence the practice of acute pain therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Hinz, J; Meißner, W; Stamer, U; Bauer, M; Petzke, F

    2015-07-01

    Due to the implementation of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, the competitive pressure on German hospitals increased. In this context it has been shown that acute pain management offers economic benefits for hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the competitive situation, the ownership and the economic resources required on structures and processes for acute pain management. A standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management was mailed to the 885 directors of German departments of anesthesiology listed as members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin). For most hospitals a strong regional competition existed; however, this parameter affected neither the implementation of structures nor the recommended treatment processes for pain therapy. In contrast, a clear preference for hospitals in private ownership to use the benchmarking tool QUIPS (quality improvement in postoperative pain therapy) was found. These hospitals also presented information on coping with the management of pain in the corporate clinic mission statement more often and published information about the quality of acute pain management in the quality reports more frequently. No differences were found between hospitals with different forms of ownership in the implementation of acute pain services, quality circles, expert standard pain management and the implementation of recommended processes. Hospitals with a higher case mix index (CMI) had a certified acute pain management more often. The corporate mission statement of these hospitals also contained information on how to cope with pain, presentation of the quality of pain management in the quality report, implementation of quality circles and the implementation of the expert standard pain management more frequently. There were no differences in the frequency of using the benchmarking

  5. Ankle and subtalar synovitis in a ball-and-socket ankle joint causing posterolateral painful coarse crepitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with bilateral ball-and-socket ankles reported left medial heel pain. Her left heel had gone into a varus position on tiptoeing, and a painful clunk had occurred when returning to normal standing. The clunk persisted after physiotherapy and treatment with an orthosis. Subtalar arthroscopy and peroneal tendoscopy showed mild diffuse synovitis of the ankle joint, especially over the posterior capsule, and a patch of inflamed and fibrotic synovium at the posterolateral corner of the subtalar joint. The clunk subsided immediately after arthroscopic synovectomy and had not recurred during 5 years of follow-up. We found no other reported cases of ankle and subtalar synovitis occurring in patients with a ball-and-socket ankle joint. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10. Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student′s t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003. No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356. There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034. The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of

  7. Pain and Opioid use Outcomes Following Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion with Decortication and Bone Grafting: The Evolusion Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araghi, Ali; Woodruff, Robert; Colle, Kyle; Boone, Christopher; Ingham, Lisa; Tomeh, Antoine; Fielding, Louis C

    2017-01-01

    This report documents six-month results of the first 50 patients treated in a prospective, multi-center study of a minimally invasive (MI) sacroiliac (SI) joint fusion system. This cohort includes 50 patients who had MI SI joint fusion surgery and completed 6 month follow-up. Average age at baseline was 61.5, 58% were female, and SI joint-related pain duration was ≥2yrs in 54.0% of patients. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) SI joint pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), quality of life and opioid use were assessed preoperatively and at 6 months. At 6 months, mean VAS pain demonstrated a significant reduction from 76.2 at baseline to 35.1 (54% reduction, p<0.0001), with 72% of patients attaining the minimal clinically important difference (MCID, ≥20 point improvement). Mean ODI improved from 55.5 to 35.3 at 6 months (p < 0.001), with 56% of patients achieving the MCID (≥15 point improvement). Prior to surgery 33/50 (66%) of patients were taking opioids, but by 6 months the number of patients taking opioids had decreased by 55% to 15/50 (30%). Few procedural complications were reported. Two procedure-related events required hospitalization: a revision procedure (2%) for nerve impingement and one case of ongoing low back pain. Analysis of patients treated with MI SI joint fusion using the SImmetry System demonstrated that the procedure can be performed safely and results in significant improvements in pain, disability, and opioid use at 6 months. Longer term follow-up in this study will determine whether these improvements are durable, as well as the associated radiographic fusion rates.

  8. A systematic review of the relationship between subchondral bone features, pain and structural pathology in peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Andrew J; Campbell, T Mark; Hopkinson, Devan; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Bowes, Mike A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-08-25

    Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009.

  9. Efficacy of Manual Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain Due to Lumbar Spondylosis. A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this work was to compare the efficacy of Maitland mobilization and conventional physical therapy on pain response, range of motion (ROM and functional ability in patients with chronic low back pain due to lumbar spondylosis. Methods: A total sample of 30 subjects (40–70 years of age with complaints of slow insidious onset of low back pain (LBP, with or without radiation not less than three months duration and decrease ROM were randomly assigned to: group-I, Maitland mobilization and lumbar stabilization exercises; group-II conventional physical therapy (traction, strengthening, stretching exercises. and outcomes were assessed for dependent variables. Results: There is statically a significant difference between pre and post measurement readings with time (p = 0.00 and between groups (p < 0.05 with respect to pain and function, but, with respect to ROM readings, showed statistical significance with time (p = 0.00 and no significance between groups (p > 0.05, indicating manual therapy group-I is improving faster and better than conventional physical therapy group-II. Conclusion: Our results showed that manual therapy interventions are more effective in managing low back pain, and function and range of motion of the lumbar spine than conventional physical therapy treatment.

  10. Intra-articular nerve growth factor regulates development, but not maintenance, of injury-induced facet joint pain & spinal neuronal hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, J V; Kartha, S; Winkelstein, B A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the current study is to define whether intra-articular nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to osteoarthritic pain, is necessary and sufficient for the development or maintenance of injury-induced facet joint pain and its concomitant spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Male Holtzman rats underwent painful cervical facet joint distraction (FJD) or sham procedures. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed in the forepaws, and NGF expression was quantified in the C6/C7 facet joint. An anti-NGF antibody was administered intra-articularly in additional rats immediately or 1 day following facet distraction or sham procedures to block intra-articular NGF and test its contribution to initiation and/or maintenance of facet joint pain and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. NGF was injected into the bilateral C6/C7 facet joints in separate rats to determine if NGF alone is sufficient to induce these behavioral and neuronal responses. NGF expression increases in the cervical facet joint in association with behavioral sensitivity after that joint's mechanical injury. Intra-articular application of anti-NGF immediately after a joint distraction prevents the development of both injury-induced pain and hyperexcitability of spinal neurons. Yet, intra-articular anti-NGF applied after pain has developed does not attenuate either behavioral or neuronal hyperexcitability. Intra-articular NGF administered to the facet in naïve rats also induces behavioral hypersensitivity and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability. Findings demonstrate that NGF in the facet joint contributes to the development of injury-induced joint pain. Localized blocking of NGF signaling in the joint may provide potential treatment for joint pain. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of attentional bias modification and cognitive behavioral therapy on the reduction of pain intensity in patients with chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Babai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of Attentional Bias Modification (ABM and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT on the reduction of pain intensityin patients with chronic pain. This study was a quasiexperimental pretest-posttest design with control group. All patients who referred to physiotherapy clinics for pain during 2015 were participated in the study. They completed the Brief Pain Inventory-short form (BPI-SF for assessing severity of pain. Attentional bias was evaluated using computerized Dot-Probe task. The patients with chronic pain were screened by diagnostic criteria of DSM-V; neurologic diagnosis, and interview. 36 people were selected and randomly divided to three groups computer-based ABM, CBT, and control (12 cases in each group. Group A was trained in 8 sessions-each 15 minutes with the modified computerized Dot-Probe task for attentional bias modification. Group B was trained in 11 sessions-each 45 minutes with CBT program of Turk and Ferry for the chronic pain treatment. And Placebo program was administered for group C in which they completed 8 classic DotProbe sessions. In the end, for the posttest (T2 the participants were tested to identify the changes in biased attention to the emotional stimuli using classing Dot-Probe tasks, and BPI questionnaire to evaluate the changes of severity of pain. Data were analyzed using one-way variance analysis(ANOVA. On the BPI-SF, CBT more reduced the pain intensitythan computer-based ABM.In addition ABM treatment is more effective in reduction of attentional bias.Both of treatments are effective but CBT is more effective than ABM in reduction of pain intensity.

  12. Discussion: DMARDs and biologic therapies in the management of inflammatory joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Austin; Lisse, Jeffrey; Rizzo, Warren; Albani, Salvatore

    2009-05-01

    Therapy for inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, includes various conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). These therapeutic agents are termed DMARDs because they have the potential to reduce or prevent joint damage and preserve joint integrity and function. Conventional DMARDs are used as monotherapy or in combination and include methotrexate, leflunomide, azathioprine, ciclosporin, hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, gold and minocycline. Biologic response modifiers, which are based on proteins made by living cells, are newer agents available for the treatment of various inflammatory joint diseases. Biologic therapies now approved for use in inflammatory joint diseases are TNF inhibitors, T-cell modulators and B-cell depleters. They have all been shown to have clinical efficacy and are able to retard structural damage. However, all current immune-modulating therapies also have potential side effects, and the decision to use a particular agent for treatment should be based on a thorough discussion of the benefits and risks with the patient. Newer biologic response modifiers and other immunologic therapies are currently being developed for the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases and are discussed in this review.

  13. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [de

  14. A literature review about effectiveness of massage therapy for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Salima; Merchant, Samima; Lalani, Sharifa

    2013-11-01

    This literature review explores the effectiveness of massage therapy to reduce cancer pain. As part of the review, systematic literature search was carried out on various electronic databases and specialised journals. Included are 19 research-based articles and 8 review articles. The review suggests that cancer has become a common health problem in the world and most of the cancer patients are going through intense and unbearable pain. Studies have reported that most of the cancer patients' pain reduced with therapeutic massage. Seventy-three per cent of cancer patients use massage therapy in the USA. Few studies are available in the context of the developing world related to massage therapy and we could not find any study in the Pakistani context. There is a need to conduct an interventional study about the effectiveness of massage therapy to control cancer pain in developing countries such as Pakistan.

  15. EXERCISE THERAPY ON UNSTABLE SUPPORT AND HYDROKINETIC THERAPY IN THE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A comparative analysis of the efficiency of different procedures of exercise therapy is carried out: hydrokinesitherapy and therapeutic gymnastics with the use of exercise on an unstable support (stabiloplatform depending on the sex of patients.Materials and methods. Under our observation there were 72 patients undergoing rehabilitation on the basis of SBOH CC No. 201 DHM Zelenograd, an equal number of women and men and 36 people with back pain of vertebrogenic genesis. All patients repeatedly received standard medical therapy, physiotherapy (magnetotherapy, laser therapy and a massage therapist. At the end of the physiotherapy treatment was assigned a set of physical therapy: group 1 included men and women, 36 — classes on stabiloplatform, a course of 10 treatments; Group 2 consisted of men and women, 36 — hydrokinesitherapy in the pool, a course of 10 treatments. The effectiveness of therapy was assessed: on a scale (VAS, mm, Schober’s test, test Tomiura test Ott summary index of health status (Oswestry questionnaire.Results. The intensity of the pain syndrome according to the VAS score in the compared groups before the rehabilitation did not differ (on average 5.8 in men and 6.15 in women, after the completion of the course of treatment it statistically significantly decreased in both groups. Significantly, the best indicators were determined in the group of men when practicing on the stable platform (1.4 vs. 3.8 in women, and in women with physical therapy in the pool (1.6 vs. 2.9 in men. Effectiveness of changes in the test values of the mobility assessment of different parts of the spine, depending on the method of rehabilitation performed: men were more efficiently restored on the stabiloblatform, women in the pool classes. The indicators of the Tomayer test (inclination forward significantly changed in both groups: in men on the stabiloplatform from 28.3 ± 0.05 to 13.8 ± 0.1 (p <0.05; for those engaged in the basin from

  16. Yoga Therapy for Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Ockeloen, Lize E.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Benninga, Marc A.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare effects of 10 weeks of yoga therapy (YT) and standard medical care (SMC) on abdominal pain and quality of life (QoL) in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Sixty-nine patients, ages 8 to 18 years, with

  17. Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain (PATH-Pain): A Psychosocial Intervention for Older Adults with Chronic Pain and Negative Emotions in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Dimitris N; Ravdin, Lisa D; Stern, Amy; Bolier, Ruth; Kenien, Cara; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults, contributes to activity restriction and social isolation, disrupts family and interpersonal relationships, and poses a significant economic burden to society. Negative emotions such as sadness, anxiety, helplessness, and hopelessness are associated with chronic pain and contribute to poor quality of life, impaired interpersonal and social functioning, and increased disability. Psychosocial interventions for older adults with chronic pain have been historically developed for, and are almost exclusively delivered to, cognitively intact patients. Therefore, many older adults with chronic pain and comorbid cognitive deficits have limited treatment options. Our multidisciplinary team developed Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain in Primary Care (PATH-Pain), a psychosocial intervention for older adults with chronic pain, negative emotions, and a wide range of cognitive functioning, including mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. In the current article, we describe the principles underlying PATH-Pain, review the steps taken to adapt the original PATH protocol, outline the treatment process, and present a case illustrating its potential value.

  18. Botox combined with myofascial release physical therapy as a treatment for myofascial pelvic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lauren; Wyman, Allison; Mora, Nelsi; Miladinovic, Branko; Bassaly, Renee; Hoyte, Lennox

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the effects of combined onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) injections and myofascial release physical therapy on myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) by comparing pre- and posttreatment average pelvic pain scores, trigger points, and patient self-reported pelvic pain. Secondary outcomes were to examine posttreatment complications and determine demographic differences between patients with/without an improvement in pain. Materials and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective case series on women over 18 years with MFPP who received Botox and physical therapy between July 2006 and November 2014. Presence of trigger points and pelvic pain scores were determined by digital palpation of the iliococcygeus, puborectalis, obturator internus, and rectus muscles. Average pelvic pain scores (0–10) reflected an average of the scores obtained from palpation of each muscle. Self-reported improvement in pain was recorded as yes/no. Results Fifty women met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Posttreatment, patients had lower average pelvic pain scores (3.7±4.0 vs. 6.4±1.8, p=0.005), and fewer trigger points (44% vs. 100%, pphysical therapy under anesthesia can be effective in treating women with chronic pelvic pain secondary to MFPP. PMID:28261683

  19. Case Study: The Use of Massage Therapy to Relieve Chronic Low-Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Laura

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of massage on chronic low-back pain in a patient with four different diagnoses: osteoarthritis, scoliosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. The patient's goal was to cut down on the amount of pain medication he takes. A 63-year-old man with chronic back pain received four massages across a twenty-day period. Progress was recorded using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale, as he self-reported on levels of pain and interference with his activities of daily living. Improvement was noted in 9 out of 10 measurements of self-reported pain and activities of daily living, with the only exception being his ability to lift heavy objects, which remained unchanged. The most dramatic differences were improvements in his ability to walk, and in the changing degrees of pain. The client also self-reported being able to decrease his pain medication and the ability to ride his bicycle for the first time in years. Massage therapy is a promising treatment for chronic low-back pain for patients who may have multiple pathologies, any one of which could be responsible for the condition. Further study is encouraged to determine the efficacy of massage therapy as a readily accessible, lower-cost alternative to more invasive therapies and as an adjunct to regular medical care, when appropriate.

  20. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFNS Panel on Neuropathic Pain, Vienna; Cruccu, Giorgio; Aziz, T. Z.

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacological relief of neuropathic pain is often insufficient. Electrical neurostimulation is efficacious in chronic neuropathic pain and other neurological diseases. European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) launched a Task Force to evaluate the evidence for these techniques...... and to produce relevant recommendations. We searched the literature from 1968 to 2006, looking for neurostimulation in neuropathic pain conditions, and classified the trials according to the EFNS scheme of evidence for therapeutic interventions. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is efficacious in failed back surgery...

  1. Effect of postoperative pain therapy on surgical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    MAJERIĆ KOGLER, VIŠNJA; BANDIĆ, DANIJELA; KOGLER, JANA; BEKAVAC MIŠAK, VILKA; SAKAN, SANJA

    2009-01-01

    Although efficient treatment of post-surgical pain is considered to be a pre-condition for a normal course of the post-surgical period, epidemiological and clinical research show that a significant number of patients still suffer intense pain after major surgery. Intense nociceptive somatic and visceral post-surgical pain has in the last ten years been considered the most important development of endocrine and neurohumoral disorders in the immediate post-surgical period, (the vital organ f...

  2. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Mammucari, M; Maggiori, E; Lazzari, M; Natoli, S

    2016-01-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with anot...

  3. The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, K.J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Dongen, R.T.M.; Klomp, F.P.; Samwel, H.; van der Wilt, G.J.; Adang, E.M.M.; Groenewoud, H.; van de Meent, H.; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is a new treatment option for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. It has been evaluated in retrospective as well as in prospective studies and proven to be safe and possibly effective. This indicates that Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is

  4. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  5. Mirror box therapy added to cognitive behavioural therapy in three chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I patients : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tichelaar, Y. I. G. Vladimir; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Keizer, Doeke; van Wilgen, C. Paul

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I is a disorder of the extremities with disability and pain as the most prominent features. This paper describes the results of cognitive behavioural therapy combined with mirror box therapy in three patients with chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I.

  6. Cancer pain management by radiotherapists: a survey of radiation therapy oncology group physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleeland, Charles S.; Janjan, Nora A.; Scott, Charles B.; Seiferheld, Wendy F.; Curran, Walter J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) physicians were surveyed to determine their approach to and attitudes toward cancer pain management. Methods and Materials: Physicians completed a questionnaire assessing their estimates of the magnitude of pain as a specific problem for cancer patients, their perceptions of the adequacy of pain management, and their report of how they manage pain in their own practice setting. Results: Eighty-three percent believed the majority of cancer patients with pain were undermedicated. Forty percent reported that pain relief in their own practice setting was poor or fair. Assessing a case scenario, 23% would wait until the patient's prognosis was 6 months or less before starting maximal analgesia. Adjuvants and prophylactic side effect management were underutilized in the treatment plan. Barriers to pain management included poor pain assessment (77%), patient reluctance to report pain (60%), patient reluctance to take analgesics (72%), and staff reluctance to prescribe opioids (41%). Conclusions: Physicians' perceptions of barriers to cancer pain management remain quite stable over time, and physicians continue to report inadequate pain treatment education. Future educational efforts should target radiation oncologists as an important resource for the treatment of cancer pain

  7. [Correlation analysis of bone marrow edema degree and serum inflammatory factors change with knee joint pain symptoms in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songiun; An, Rongze; Wang, Zhaojie; Kuang, Lipeng; Tan, Weiyuan; Fang, Cunxun

    2014-05-01

    To explore the correlation between the degree of bone marrow edema (BME) and the content change of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) and the knee pain symptoms in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint. Thirty patients (30 knees) of bone contusion around the knee joint were chosen as the trial group between October 2009 and April 2012. According to visual analogue scale (VAS), 30 patients were divided into mild group (10 cases), moderate group (10 cases), and severe group (10 cases); according to MRI morphological changes, the patients were divided into type I group (12 cases), type II group (11 cases), and type III group (7 cases). Ten patients (10 knees) with soft tissue injury of the knee were chosen as control group. No significant difference was found (P > 0.05) in gender, age, causes, side, and admission time after injury between 2 groups. The serum contents of MMP-3 and TNF-alpha were detected and statistically analysed between different degrees of pain groups and between different degrees of BME groups. Correlation was analysed between BME and inflammatory factor changes and VAS score. The MMP-3 and TNF-alpha contents in trial group [(29.580 +/- 6.870) (microg/L and (23.750 +/- 7.096) ng/L] were significantly higher than those in control group [(8.219 +/- 1.355) microg/L and (6.485 +/- 1.168) ng/L] (t = 9.686, P = 0.000; t = 7.596, P =0.000). The MMP-3 and TNF-alpha contents in patients with different degrees of pain and BME were significantly higher than those in patients of control group (P pain (P 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that TNF-alpha content was significantly correlated with VAS score (P = 0.000). Knee pain symptoms are not related to the degree of BME in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint. Inflammatory factor TNF-alpha content is the main influence factor of knee joint pain symptoms.

  8. Mechanism-based classification of pain for physical therapy management in palliative care: A clinical commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification-based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms.

  9. Association of chest pain and risk of cardiovascular disease with coronary atherosclerosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eRollefstad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The relation between chest pain and coronary atherosclerosis (CA in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD has not been explored previously. Our aim was to evaluate the associations of the presence of chest pain and the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD by use of several CVD risk algorithms, with multi-detector computer tomography (MDCT coronary angiography verified CA. Methods: Detailed information concerning chest pain and CVD risk factors was obtained in 335 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS. In addition, 119 of these patients underwent MDCT coronary angiography.Results: Thirty-one percent of the patients (104/335 reported chest pain. Only 6 patients (1.8% had atypical angina pectoris (pricking pain at rest. In 69 patients without chest pain, two thirds had CA, while in those who reported chest pain (n=50, CA was present in 48.0%. In a logistic regression analysis, chest pain was not associated with CA (dependent variable (p=0.43. About 30% (Nagelkerke R2 of CA was explained by any of the CVD risk calculators: SCORE, Framingham Risk Score or Reynolds Risk Score.Conclusion: The presence of chest pain was surprisingly infrequently reported in patients with IJD who were referred for a CVD risk evaluation. However, when present, chest pain was weakly associated with CA, in contrast to the predicted CVD risk by several risk calculators which was highly associated with the presence of CA. These findings suggest that clinicians treating patients with IJD should be alert of coronary atherosclerotic disease also in absence of chest pain symptoms.

  10. Spinal cord stimulation therapy for localized central pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the pathophysiology of localized central pain and the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation. There were 10 cases; 7 males and 3 females from 24 to 77 years old. Pain was caused by peripheral nerve injury in one case, spinal cord injury in two cases and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (thalamic pain) in 7 cases. All cases were treated by epidural spinal cord stimulation and followed from 0.8 to 8.8 years. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in one case of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury and in 4 cases of CVD. Moderate pain control was achieved in 2 cases of CVD. In one each case of spinal cord injury and of CVD, pain control was ineffective. In cases with thalamic pain, we studied the correlation between the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation and the clinical features, MRI, fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) findings before operation. MRI revealed a small to moderate sized lesion on the thalamus or putamen in each case. PET also showed decreased accumulation of FDG on the affected thalamus. In all cases without one fair responder to spinal cord stimulation, we could recognize definite SEP originating in the sensory cortex ipsilateral side to the CVD lesion during contralateral median or posterior tibial nerve stimulation. In the good responders, we could recognize SEP originating in the sensory cortex of the lesion side with less delayed latency or decreased amplitude than in the moderate responders. In this group, test stimulation with low voltage on the spinal cord evoked a sensory effect (paresthesia) over the painful part of the body. Spinal cord stimulation proved to be an effective treatment for localized central pain. In cases with localized central pain after CVD, we could expect to ameliorate the intractable pain in those cases in which SEP or spinal cord test stimulation revealed that the thalamo-cortical system was preserved. (author)

  11. Paradoxical effects of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist GW405833 on rat osteoarthritic knee joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelert, N; Zhang, C; Mogg, A J; Broad, L M; Hepburn, D L; Nisenbaum, E S; Johnson, M P; McDougall, J J

    2010-11-01

    The present study examined whether local administration of the cannabinoid-2 (CB(2)) receptor agonist GW405833 could modulate joint nociception in control rat knee joints and in an animal model of osteoarthritis (OA). OA was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodo-acetate with a recovery period of 14 days. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of CB(2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid channel-1 (TRPV1) receptors in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and synovial membrane of sham- and sodium mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-treated animals. Electrophysiological recordings were made from knee joint primary afferents in response to rotation of the joint both before and following close intra-arterial injection of different doses of GW405833. The effect of intra-articular GW405833 on joint pain perception was determined by hindlimb incapacitance. An in vitro neuronal release assay was used to see if GW405833 caused release of an inflammatory neuropeptide (calcitonin gene-related peptide - CGRP). CB(2) and TRPV1 receptors were co-localized in DRG neurons and synoviocytes in both sham- and MIA-treated animals. Local application of the GW405833 significantly reduced joint afferent firing rate by up to 31% in control knees. In OA knee joints, however, GW405833 had a pronounced sensitising effect on joint mechanoreceptors. Co-administration of GW405833 with the CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630 or pre-administration of the TRPV1 ion channel antagonist SB366791 attenuated the sensitising effect of GW405833. In the pain studies, intra-articular injection of GW405833 into OA knees augmented hindlimb incapacitance, but had no effect on pain behaviour in saline-injected control joints. GW405833 evoked increased CGRP release via a TRPV1 channel-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that GW405833 reduces the mechanosensitivity of afferent nerve fibres in control joints but causes nociceptive responses in OA joints. The observed

  12. [Case-control study on shoulder pain caused by hook palte for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-guo; Cai, Xiao-bing; Wang, Xiao-min; Zhu, Yong-gan; Pan, He-yong

    2015-06-01

    To explore causes of shoulder pain and propose prevention measures in treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2005 to January 2013, 86 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) were treated with hook plate fixation, and were divided into two groups. Bsaed on recovery of shoulder function mostly, the patients who suffered from rest pain, motion pain were named as shoulder pain group, while the patients without pain were named as painless group. In shoulder pain group, there were 21 cases including 15 males and and 6 females ranging the age from 22 to 62 years old with an average of (40.6±11.2) years old. There were 8 cases were on the left side and 13 cases were on the right side. In painless group, there were 65 cases including 36 males and and 29 females ranging the age from 19 to 65 years old with an average of (40.0±11.3) years old. There were 33 cases were on the left side and 32 cases were on the right side. The time from injury to operation ranged from 3 h to 8 d with an average of 34.6 h. Shoulder function of all patients were normal before injuried. Postoperative pain, activity of daily living (ADL), range of motion, deltoid muscle strength were compared. Anteflexion,rear protraction, abduction and upthrow of shoulder joint were also compared. Postoperative complications between two groups were observed and compared. All patients were followed up from 12 to 48 months with an average of 18.5 months. Constant-Murley score were used to evaluate clinical efficacy at the least following up, and 13 cases got an excellent results, 5 moderate, 2 good and 1 poor in shoulder pain group ; while 61 cases were obtained excellent results, 3 moderate and 1 good in painless group. There were significantly differences between two groups in Constant-Murley score and activity of shoulder joint (Pacromioclavicular arthritis. Chosing individual clavicular hook plate, fulfilling anatomic reset, paying attention to the repair of articular

  13. [Functional therapy in treatment of fractures and joint injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherne, H; Wippermann, B

    1990-01-01

    Full and timely restoration of the function of an injured segment of the locomotor system is the treatment goal for all fractures and joint injuries. Functional aspects therefore have to be considered, when operative or conservative forms of treatment are chosen for a particular injury. We define a treatment as purely functional if the involved limb is either not immobilized at all or whenever the immobilization is incomplete and for a limited time only. At least partial function of the involved segment is therefore restored during the treatment. Purely functional treatment ist most applicable for stable fractures. Stable can be defined as the property of biological tissues to withstand physiological loads. Many joint injuries such as AC separation, ankle ligament rupture, Achilles tendon rupture, and isolated rupture of the medial collateral ligaments of the knee can also be treated functionally.

  14. Occlusal Therapy in the Management of Chronic Orofacial Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, Francis M.

    1984-01-01

    Review of the literature indicates that most routine orofacial dysfunctions are characterized by deep pain. Various disorders of the masticatory systems, particularly musculoskeletal conditions, are thought to be triggered by occlusal disharmonies. The pain component develops following a pattern of bruxism, muscle hyperactivity, fatigue and spasm. Treatment for most disorders has been to modify the occlusion, although the rational for doing so appears questionable.

  15. Personalized Pain Therapy : Is the answer in the genes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Matić (Maja)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe experience of pain is very subjective and multidimensional, displaying substantial variability between individuals even when exposed to an identical pain-evoking stimulus. Differences in gender, age, ethnicity and anxiety level are among the known factors that contribute to this

  16. A New Sacroiliac Joint Injection Technique and Its Short-Term Effect on Chronic Sacroiliac Region Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kyung Hee; Ahn, Sang Ho; Jones, Rodney; Jang, Sung Ho; Son, Su Min; Lee, Dong Gyu; Cho, Hee Kyung; Choi, Gyu Sik; Cho, Yun-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injections have been used to provide short-term relief of SIJ pain. In this study, the authors investigated a new technique using a superior approach. Twenty four patients with chronic SI joint paint were recruited. Each patient was treated with a single SIJ intra-articular injection plus a periarticular injection of local anesthetic and corticosteroid in one procedure. Technical accuracy of the intra-articular procedure was determined by having 2 independent observers review and rate the quality of arthrograms obtained. Treatment effects were evaluated using a numerical rating scale, the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and global perceived effect (GPE). Both independent observers agreed that satisfactory arthrograms were obtained in all patients. Pain scores and disability were significantly reduced at 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment. Nineteen patients (79%) reported satisfaction with treatment. No serious adverse effects were encountered. The superior approach consistently achieves good access to the SI joint, and achieves outcomes that are compatible with those of other techniques. The superior approach constitutes an alternative to other techniques for injections into the SI joint. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFNS Panel on Neuropathic Pain, Vienna; Cruccu, Giorgio; Aziz, T. Z.

    2007-01-01

    and to produce relevant recommendations. We searched the literature from 1968 to 2006, looking for neurostimulation in neuropathic pain conditions, and classified the trials according to the EFNS scheme of evidence for therapeutic interventions. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is efficacious in failed back surgery......Pharmacological relief of neuropathic pain is often insufficient. Electrical neurostimulation is efficacious in chronic neuropathic pain and other neurological diseases. European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) launched a Task Force to evaluate the evidence for these techniques......TMS) has transient efficacy in central and peripheral neuropathic pains (level B). Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is efficacious in central post-stroke and facial pain (level C). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) should only be performed in experienced centres. Evidence for implanted peripheral stimulations...

  18. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Massimo; Maggiori, Enrica; Lazzari, Marzia; Natoli, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with another tool for the treatment of local pain. However, it is important to provide patients with full details of the pros and cons of this approach and obtain informed patient consent.

  19. Psychometric properties including reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Majeed pelvic score in patients with chronic sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajada, Stefan; Mohanty, Khitish

    2016-06-01

    The Majeed scoring system is a disease-specific outcome measure that was originally designed to assess pelvic injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Majeed scoring system for chronic sacroiliac joint pain. Internal consistency, content validity, criterion validity, construct validity and responsiveness to change was assessed prospectively for the Majeed scoring system in a cohort of 60 patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain. This diagnosis was confirmed with CT-guided sacroiliac joint anaesthetic block. The overall Majeed score showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.63). Similarly, it showed acceptable floor (0 %) and ceiling (0 %) effects. On the other hand, the domains of pain, work, sitting and sexual intercourse had high (>30 %) floor effects. Significant correlation with the physical component of the Short Form-36 (p = 0.005) and Oswestry disability index (p ≤ 0.001) was found indicating acceptable criterion validity. The overall Majeed score showed acceptable construct validity with all five developed hypotheses showing significance (p ≤ 0.05). The overall Majeed score showed acceptable responsiveness to change with a large (≥0.80) effect size and standardized response mean. Overall the Majeed scoring system demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties for outcome assessment in chronic sacroiliac joint pain. Thus, its use in this condition is adequate. However, some domains demonstrated suboptimal performance indicating that improvement might be achieved with the development of an outcome measure specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction and degeneration.

  20. Reduction of pain sensitivity after somatosensory therapy in adults with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada eRiquelme

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP. Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=17 or the control group (n=20. The intervention group received a somatosensory therapy including 4 types of exercises (touch, proprioception, vibration, and stereognosis. All participants were asked to continue their standardized motor therapy during the study period. Several somatosensory (pain and touch thresholds, stereognosis, propioception, texture recognition and motor parameters (fine motor skills were assessed before, immediately after and three months after the therapy (follow-up. Results. Participants of the intervention group showed a significant reduction on pain sensitivity after treatment and at follow-up after three months, whereas participants in the control group displayed increasing pain sensitivity over time. No improvements were found on touch sensitivity, proprioception, texture recognition or fine motor skills. Conclusions. Data suggest the possibility that somatosensory therapy was effective in eliciting changes in central somatosensory processing. This hypothesis may have implications for future neuromodulatory treatment of pain complaints in children and adults with cerebral palsy.

  1. Antidepressant therapy in complex treatment of painful diabetic polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Grigor'evna Turbina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Comparative efficiency and safety analysis of antidepressant agents from different pharmacological classes (pipofezine and venlafaxinein combination with carbamazepine for treatment of neuropathic pain (NP in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DP. Materials and methods. We examined 21 male and 27 female patients with painful DP (mean age 54.3?14.2 years; mean duration ofdiabetes mellitus (DM 8.9?5.1 years; mean duration of DP - 3.8?2.1 years. DP was diagnosed clinically and by electromyographymethod. Pain syndrome was assessed with DN4 questionnaire, visual analogue scale (VAS and McGill Pain Questionnaire. Psycho-vegetative status was evaluated by Spielberger test with reactive and personal anxiety (RA and PA assessment and Beck depressioninventory. All patients received symptomatic pharmacotherapy with anticonvulsant and antidepressant agent. First group (DP-1included 23 patients on carbamazepin and pipofezine. Second group (DP-2 included 25 patients on carbamazepin and venlafaxine. Results. Following treatment, pain syndrome was completely compensated in 8.7% of patients from DP-1 group and 12.5% from DP-2.Decrease in pain intensity?50% from initial level was achieved in 73.9% (DP-1 and 75% (DP-2 of cases. Mean pain intensityaccording to VAS reduced from 5.2?2.1 points to 2.3?1.4 points (DP-1 and from 5.8?2.3 points (DP-2 with equal statistical significance(p

  2. Clinical Study of the Effects of Juglandis Semen Pharmacopuncture Therapy on Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Na Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juglandis Semen Pharmaco-puncture Therapy on Shoulder Pain. Methods & Results: Clinical studies on shoulder pain were carried out on 34 patients who were treated at Department of Acupuncture & Moxibusition, Samse Oriental Medical Hospital from June to October, 2009. Patients were divided into two groups, i.e.Sample group(Group A and Control group(Group B. Group B were treated by body acupuncture and cupping therapies while Group A were added juglandis semen pharmacopuncture therapy to therapies of Group A. All patients of both groups were treated three times a week for three weeks. In order to evaluate pain degree, we apply Shoulder Pain and Disability Index(SPADI, Visual Analogue Scale(VAS and the tool developed by Japan’s Industrial Hygienics Society and modified by Korean Doctor. Evaluations were done after first week, second week and third week during period of treatment. Results: Both groups showed significant pain decreasing tendencies. But Group A showed more efficiency comparing to Group B. Conclusions: According to the above-mentioned results, it seems that Juglandis Semen pharmacopuncture therapy could be applied as the effective method for reducing shoulder pain.

  3. The Effects of Dry Cupping Therapy on the Shoulder Pain and Fatigue of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Sohn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research was done to identify the effects of dry cupping therapy on the shoulder pain and fatigue of nurses. Methods: The research design was time series design. The participants were 27 nurses with shoulder pain at P University Hospital in Busan metropolitan city from July 6, 2009 to August 3, 2009. The dry cupping therapy was done 4 times, twice a week for 2 weeks. Before intervention, the severity and frequency of pain and fatigue were measured three times at one week intervals, and then those were measured after one week and two weeks of experimental treatment. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t-test and repeated measure ANOVA with the SPSS program. Results: There were statistically significant difference in severity and frequency of shoulder pain,and fatigue after dry cupping therapy. Dry cupping therapy was effective for the management of shoulder pain and fatigue among nurses in this study. Conclusion: Therefore dry cupping therapy can be considered an effective nursing intervention that relieves shoulder pain and fatigue of nurses.

  4. The effects of massage therapy on pain management in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-03-17

    Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona-a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 - 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t(52) = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient's ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation, sleep, emotions, recovery, and finally, the healing process.

  5. Occlusal stabilization splint therapy in orofacial pain and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwinska-Nastalska, E; Rolski, D; Szczyrek, P

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest an association between orofacial pain, accompanying temporomandibular disorders of myogenous origin, and headache, especially its tension-type. The occlusal appliance therapy is one of the options for the treatment of orofacial pain due to masticatory muscles tenderness. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of occlusal stabilization splint therapy in myofascial pain and tension-type headache in patients with sleep-disordered breathing. Forty three such patients were enrolled into the study group. The patients were treated with stabilization occlusal splint of vertical thickness at vertical jaw separation, established individually for each patient using a cephalometric analysis. The intensity of orofacial pain (numeric rating scale) and headache (analog rating scale), frequency of headache (%), and jaw qualitative function were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 6 months. Medians of headache and orofacial pain intensity were reduced after 6 months of treatment compared with baseline: 6.0 vs. 2.0 (p Pain decreased below 3 score points in 61.8 % of the patients with headache (p = 0.23) and in 85.3 % of patients with orofacial pain (p orofacial pain was observed 81.4 % of patients after using occlusal stabilization splint for 6 months. We conclude that occlusal stabilization splint was effective in reducing painful symptoms of temporomandibular disorders of myogenous origin, a frequent feature of sleep disordered breathing.

  6. Massage Therapy for Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jun Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy (MT for neck and shoulder pain. Methods. Seven English and Chinese databases were searched until December 2011 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of MT for neck and shoulder pain. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed based on PEDro scale. The meta-analyses of MT for neck and shoulder pain were performed. Results. Twelve high-quality studies were included. In immediate effects, the meta-analyses showed significant effects of MT for neck pain (standardised mean difference, SMD, 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.01 to 2.57; P<0.00001 and shoulder pain (SMD, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.55 to 2.45; P=0.002 versus inactive therapies. And MT showed short-term effects for shoulder pain (SMD, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.53 to 2.49; P=0.003. But MT did not show better effects for neck pain (SMD, 0.13; 95% CI, −0.38 to 0.63; P=0.63 or shoulder pain (SMD, 0.88; 95% CI, −0.74 to 2.51; P=0.29 than active therapies. In addition, functional status of the shoulder was not significantly affected by MT. Conclusion. MT may provide immediate effects for neck and shoulder pain. However, MT does not show better effects on pain than other active therapies. No evidence suggests that MT is effective in functional status.

  7. Exercise therapy for treatment of non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, J A; van Tulder, M W; Malmivaara, A; Koes, B W

    2005-07-20

    Exercise therapy is widely used as an intervention in low-back pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise therapy in adult non-specific acute, subacute and chronic low-back pain versus no treatment and other conservative treatments. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 3, 2004), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL databases to October 2004; citation searches and bibliographic reviews of previous systematic reviews. Randomized controlled trials evaluating exercise therapy for adult non-specific low-back pain and measuring pain, function, return-to-work/absenteeism, and/or global improvement outcomes. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data on study characteristics, quality, and outcomes at short, intermediate, and long-term follow-up. Sixty-one randomized controlled trials (6390 participants) met inclusion criteria: acute (11), subacute (6) and chronic (43) low-back pain (1 unclear). Evidence was found of effectiveness in chronic populations relative to comparisons at all follow-up periods; pooled mean improvement was 7.3 points (95% CI, 3.7 to 10.9) for pain (out of 100), 2.5 points (1.0 to 3.9) for function (out of 100) at earliest follow-up. In studies investigating patients (i.e. presenting to healthcare providers) mean improvement was 13.3 points (5.5 to 21.1) for pain, 6.9 (2.2 to 11.7) for function, representing significantly greater improvement over studies where participants included those recruited from a general population (e.g. with advertisements). There is some evidence of effectiveness of graded-activity exercise program in subacute low-back pain in occupational settings, though the evidence for other types of exercise therapy in other populations is inconsistent. There was evidence of equal effectiveness relative to comparisons in acute populations [pain: 0.03 points (95% CI, -1.3 to 1.4)]. This review largely reflects limitations of the literature, including low quality studies with heterogeneous

  8. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Andreas; Aicher, Bernhard; Fiebich, Bernd L; Haag, Gunther

    2011-03-31

    Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect.As an example the fixed-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic options, enable the completeness

  9. Combined analgesics in (headache pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiebich Bernd L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix" are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, paracetamol (acetaminophen and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden

  10. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic

  11. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  12. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  13. Which patellofemoral joint imaging features are associated with patellofemoral pain? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, B T; Redmond, A C; Smith, T O; Penny, F; Conaghan, P G

    2016-02-01

    To review the association between patellofemoral joint (PFJ) imaging features and patellofemoral pain (PFP). A systematic review of the literature from AMED, CiNAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PEDro, EMBASE and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to September 2014. Studies were eligible if they used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) or X-ray (XR) to compare PFJ features between a PFP group and an asymptomatic control group in people patellofemoral contact area. Limited evidence was found to support the association of other imaging features with PFP. A sensitivity analysis showed an increase in the SMD for patella bisect offset at 0° knee flexion (1.91; 95% CI: 1.31, 2.52) and patella tilt at 0° knee flexion (0.99; 95% CI: 0.47, 1.52) under full weight bearing. Certain PFJ imaging features were associated with PFP. Future interventional strategies may be targeted at these features. CRD 42014009503. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. EVALUATING THE TARGET, EFFECT, ACTION INTERACTION (TEA MODEL OF SPINAL MANIPULATION THERAPY ON SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Salman Bashir

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In physical therapy, usually the effects of treatment on any condition will be evaluated based on the mode of action on the target tissue. Some treatments will have direct and indirect effects. Due to indirect effects, there may be changes in other tissues or systems in and around the target tissue. The interaction between target, effect, and action was studied under TEA model. In sacroiliac joint dysfunction, Muscle Energy Technique (MET and Spinal Manipulation Therapy (SMT were proved as useful treatment approaches but one is targeted on muscles (MET the other targets on joint (SMT. The indirect effects of both the approaches can’t be neglected. This study focused on evaluating indirect effects of SMT. Methods: A pilot study was conducted to see the effect of Spinal Manipulation Therapy on muscles (Transverse Abdominus, Internal Oblique when applied in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. 44 subjects diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction were recruited in the study. Resting thickness was measured by ultrasound before and after Spinal Manipulation Therapy. SPSS version 17 was used for statistical analysis. Paired t-test compared pre and post test results. Results: After conducting Pilot study revealed that Pre resting thickness of Transverse Abdominus and Internal Oblique is (3.5±0.10 and (5.47± 0.15 Post resting Thickness of TrA (Transverse Abdominus and Internal Oblique (IO is (3.90±0.12 and (7.63±0.80 Results are significant as P-Value 0.000 that is <0.05. Conclusion: Here is concluded that SMT is a useful method to treat muscles through its direct action is on the Sacroiliac joint in Sacroiliac joint dysfunction. So we can use it for treating muscles by applying on joints (Indirect method.

  15. Multiple Impulse Therapy in the Assessment of Paraspinal Muscle Tone in Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładaj, Robert; Topol, Mirosław

    2016-11-30

    Back pain is quite common in contemporary society, whose expectations of an effective analgesic therapy in conservative treatment lead to a necessity of searching for new diagnostic and therapeutic methods in physiotherapy. Out of the numerous physical therapy methods, Multiple Impulse Therapy (MIT) deserves special consideration. This paper aims to present and analyse the outcomes of MIT concerning paraspinal muscle tone and pain intensity in patients with low back pain. The study enrolled 117 patients (50 women and 67 men; average age of 45.3 yrs) with lumbar conditions confirmed by imaging studies. The participants received five MIT sessions within 14 days. Moreover, both before and after the therapy all the patients underwent bilateral assessment of the paraspinal muscle tone by surface electromyography (sEMG) with the NoraxonMyoTrace 400 system and an interactive head of the PulStarFRAS device. A VAS was used for evaluation of pain severity. The analysis of significance of differences between scores before and after treatment showed that all the parameters changed significantly (MIT: 11.11 Ibf before and 8.89 Ibf after the therapy; VAS: 6.04 before and 3.38 afterwards; sEMG: 9.29uV before and 7.51uV afterwards). 1. Multiple Impulse Therapy (MIT) is an effective and non-invasive method of back pain treatment. 2. MIT significantly reduces paraspinal muscle tone, as confirmed by sEMG results, and shows a strong analgesic effect.

  16. Effect of corticosteroid therapy in acute pain edema caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and skin lesions caused by herpes zoster, and to develop some pertinent therapeutic guidelines. Methods: A total of 48 ... antiviral, pain-relieving and nerve nutrition. They were ... nerve dysfunction as well as Ramsay-Hunt syndrome (facial.

  17. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  18. A joint research protocol for music therapy in dementia care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf

    2011-01-01

    Agitation is a major challenge within institutions of care for the elderly. The effect of music therapy on agitation and quality of live is investigated in a practice-relevant research combined with a Randomized Controlled Trial and multicentre research. The research protocol is developed...... in dialogue with practicing music therapists....

  19. Massage Therapy in Patients With Cancer Pain: A Review on Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cancer-related pain (CRP and its treatments are common and the scariest problems that patients with cancer fear and negatively affect their quality of life. Despite medical intervention, the pain of cancer still remains a clinical problem. Thus, the use of complementary medicine methods such as massage therapy is essential to control pain in the patients. Methodology It was a review type study limited to national and international studies from 1995 to 2015. Searching processes were completed by electronic databases and search engines. Finally, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as the elimination of duplicate studies, nine articles were selected for final review among which five were clinical trials and four were review or meta-analysis articles. Results In all five clinical trials, massage therapy reduced pain of patients with cancer, which reflects the positive effects of massage therapy in adult patients with cancer. In addition, although various methods of massage therapy were employed, with short-term and long-term periods, it still had a positive impact. Meanwhile, four review or meta-analysis studies while different in the year of study, inclusion and exclusion criteria, manifested that the results of massage therapy was an effective non-pharmacological pain control in patients with cancer. Conclusions Finally, it can be concluded that massage therapy is an effective non-pharmacological way to control pain in adult patients with cancer. Furthermore, studies in Iran on the effects of massage therapy on pain in patients with cancer are limited and much more research is needed in this area.

  20. [Acupuncture combined with magnetic therapy for treatment of temple-jaw joint dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Wen

    2009-04-01

    To compare clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture combined with magnetic therapy and simple magnetic therapy on temple-jaw joint dysfunction. Eighty-two cases were randomly divided into an observation group (n = 52) and a control group (n = 30). The observation group was treated with acupuncture at Xiaguan (ST 7), Jiache (ST 6), Hegu (LI 4), etc. and AL-2 low frequency electromagnetic comprehensive treatment instrument; the control group was treated with AL-2 low frequency electromagnetic comprehensive treatment instrument. The cured and markedly effective rate of 90.4% in the observation group was significantly better than 66.7% in the control group (P magnetic therapy is significantly better than that of the simple magnetic therapy on temple-jaw joint dysfunction.

  1. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  2. A prospective study of pelvic floor physical therapy: pain and psychosexual outcomes in provoked vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Chamberlain, Susan

    2009-07-01

    Research suggests that increased tension in the pelvic floor muscles of women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD, the most common form of chronic vulvar pain) may play an important role in maintaining and exacerbating their pain. However, no prospective studies of pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) for PVD have been carried out. This study prospectively examined the effectiveness of a PFPT intervention in treating the pain and sexual and psychological components of PVD, and determined predictors of greater treatment success. Thirteen women with PVD completed eight sessions of PFPT. Participants were assessed at pre- and post-treatment via gynecological examinations, vestibular pain threshold testing, structured interviews, and standardized questionnaires. A 3-month follow-up interview assessed any further changes. Outcome measures included: vestibular pain thresholds, gynecological examination and intercourse pain ratings, sexual function and intercourse frequency, mental health, negative pain cognitions, and success rates. Following treatment, participants had significantly higher vestibular pain thresholds and significantly lower pain ratings during the gynecological examination. Participants reported significant reductions in pain intensity during intercourse and were able to engage in significantly more pain-free activities. Although overall sexual function significantly improved, various components of sexual function and frequency of intercourse did not. Participants' mental health did not significantly improve; however, pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety significantly decreased. The treatment was considered to be successful for 10 of the 13 participants, and predictors of greater treatment success included greater reductions in helplessness and a longer period of time in treatment. Results provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of PFPT in treating the pain of PVD, as well as some of the sexual and cognitive correlates of PVD. The

  3. Root Canal Therapy Reduces Multiple Dimensions of Pain: A National Dental PBRN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alan S.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Rabinowitz, Ira; Reams, Gregory J.; Smith, James A.; Torres, Anibal V.; Harris, D. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial orthograde root canal therapy (RCT) is used to treat dentoalveolar pathosis. The affect RCT has on pain intensity has been frequently reported, but the affect on other dimensions of pain has not. Also, the lack of large prospective studies involving diverse groups of patients and practitioners that are not involved in data collection suggest that there are multiple opportunities for bias to be introduced when this data is systematically aggregated. Method This prospective observational study assessed pain intensity, duration, and its interference with daily activities among RCT patients. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists, 16 endodontists) in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients requiring RCT. Patient reported data were collected before, immediately following, and one week after treatment using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Results Enrollment of 708 patients was completed over 6 months with 655 patients (93%) providing one-week follow-up data. Prior to treatment, patients reported a mean (±standard deviation) worst pain intensity of 5.3±3.8 (0-10 scale), 50% had “severe” pain (≥7), and mean days in pain and days pain interfered with activities were 3.6±2.7 and 0.5±1.2, respectively. Following treatment, patients reported a mean worst pain intensity of 3.0±3.2, 19% had “severe” pain, and mean days in pain and days with pain interference were 2.1±2.4 and 0.4±1.1, respectively. All changes were statistically significant (ppain, significantly reducing pain intensity, duration, and related interference. Further research is needed to reduce the proportion of patients reporting “severe” post-operative pain. PMID:25190605

  4. Association between increase in vertical ground reaction force loading rate and pain level in women with patellofemoral pain after a patellofemoral joint loading protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Waiteman, Marina Cabral; de Oliveira Silva, Danilo; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis

    2018-04-11

    The etiology of patellofemoral pain (PFP) is thought to be the result of increased patellofemoral joint (PFJ) load and aberrant lower extremity mechanics, including altered vertical ground reaction forces (VGRF). However, few studies have investigated the association between an increase in pain and VGRF loading rates in the context of PFP. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of PFJ loading on pain and VGRF loading rate, and to see if there is a link between modification of both pain and VGRF loading rate during stair negotiation. Thirty-four women with PFP underwent VGRF analysis during stair negotiation under two conditions: with (condition 2) and without (condition 1) being previously submitted to a PFJ loading protocol in order to or not to exacerbate their knee pain, respectively. The VGRF loading rates were significantly higher in condition 2 (Mean ± standard deviation (SD)=4.0±0.6N/s) compared to condition 1 (Mean±SD=3.6±0.5N/s) during stair ascent and during stair descent (Mean±SD: condition 1=6.3±1.1N/s; condition 2=7.0±1.4N/s). In addition, VGRF loading rates were higher during stair descent compared to stair ascent in both conditions. There were significant correlations between the increase in pain and VGRF loading rate during both tasks. There seemed to be an important relation between the increase in pain and VGRF loading rates in women with PFP. Based on these findings, interventions aimed at reducing VGRF loading rates are important in the context of PFP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical Therapists’ Use of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Older Adults With Chronic Pain: A Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, Katherine; Henderson, Charles R; Papaleontiou, Maria; Olkhovskaya, Yelena; Wigglesworth, Janet; Reid, MC

    2009-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence supports the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for patients with chronic pain. Objective: This study determined whether physical therapists incorporate CBT techniques (eg, relaxation, activity pacing) when treating older patients with chronic pain, ascertained their interest in and barriers to using CBT, and identified participant-related factors associated with interest in CBT. Design: This cross-sectional study used a telephone survey. Methods: One hundred fifty-two members of the Geriatrics and Orthopaedics sections of the American Physical Therapy Association completed the survey. Associations between participant-related factors and interest in CBT were assessed in statistical general linear models. Results: Commonly used CBT interventions included activity pacing and pleasurable activity scheduling, frequently used by 81% and 30% of the respondents, respectively. Non-CBT treatments included exercises focusing on joint stability (94%) and mobility (94%), and strengthening and stretching programs (91%). Respondents’ overall interest in CBT techniques was 12.70 (SD=3.4, scale range=5–20). Barriers to use of CBT included lack of knowledge of and skill in the techniques, reimbursement concerns, and time constraints. Practice type and the interaction of percentage of patients with pain and educational degree of the physical therapist were independently associated with provider interest in CBT in a general linear model that also included 6 other variables specified a priori. Limitations: Data are based on self-report without regard to treatment emphasis. Conclusions: Although only a minority of physical therapists reported use of some CBT techniques when treating older patients with chronic pain, their interest in incorporating these techniques into practice is substantial. Concerns with their skill