WorldWideScience

Sample records for pain patients study

  1. Pain in neurosurgically treated patients: A prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Klimek (Markus); J.F. Ubben (Johannes); J. Ammann (Jan); K. Borner (Katy); J. Klein (Jan); S.J.C. Verbrugge (Serge)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractObject. This is the first observational study to compare perioperative pain character and intensity in patients undergoing different types of elective neurosurgical procedures. Methods. A structured questionnaire was used to inquire about pain intensity, character, and management during

  2. Pain, power and patience - A narrative study of general practitioners' relations with chronic pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hemborg Kristiansson, Mia; Brorsson, Annika; Wachtler, Caroline; Troein, Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic pain patients are common in general practice. In this study "chronic pain" is defined as diffuse musculoskeletal pain not due to inflammatory diseases or cancer. Effective patient-physician relations improve treatment results. The relationship between doctors and chronic pain patients is often dysfunctional. Consultation training for physicians and medical students can improve the professional ability to build effective relations, but this demands a thorough unders...

  3. Neuropathic pain and use of PainDETECT in patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffin, Jarno; Hankama, Tiina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Hannonen, Pekka; Haanpää, Maija

    2013-02-14

    Fibromyalgia has a plethorae of symptoms, which can be confusing and even misleading. Accurate evaluation is necessary when patients with fibromyalgia are treated. Different types of instruments are available for the clinicians to supplement evaluation. Our objective was to study the applicability of the PainDETECT instrument to screen neuropathic pain in patients with fibromyalgia. 158 patients with primary fibromyalgia underwent a neurological examination including bedside sensory testing. They also fulfilled four questionnaires: PainDETECT, Beck depression inventory IA (BDI IA), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and a self-made questionnaire regarding present pain and pain relieving methods of the patients. The results of the clinical evaluation and questionnaires were then compared. Clinically verified neuropathic pain was diagnosed in 53/158 [34% (95% Cl: 26 to 41)] patients. The ROC curve achieved a maximum Youden´s index at score of 17 when sensitivity was 0.79 (95% Cl: 0.66 to 0.89) and specificity 0.53 (95% Cl: 0.43 to 0.63). The PainDETECT total score (OR: 1.14 95% Cl: 1.06 to 1.22), FM as the worst current pain (OR: 0.31; 95% 0.16 to 0.62), body mass index (BMI) (OR: 1.05; 95% Cl: 1.00 to 1.11) and the intensity of current pain (OR: 1.20; 95% Cl: 1.01 to 1.41) were significantly associated with the presence of neuropathic pain in univariate analyses. This study highlights the importance of thorough clinical examination. The Neuropathic pain screening tool PainDETECT is not as useful in patients with fibromyalgia as in patients with uncompromised central pain control.

  4. Neuropathic pain and use of PainDETECT in patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauffin Jarno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Fibromyalgia has a plethorae of symptoms, which can be confusing and even misleading. Accurate evaluation is necessary when patients with fibromyalgia are treated. Different types of instruments are available for the clinicians to supplement evaluation. Our objective was to study the applicability of the PainDETECT instrument to screen neuropathic pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods 158 patients with primary fibromyalgia underwent a neurological examination including bedside sensory testing. They also fulfilled four questionnaires: PainDETECT, Beck depression inventory IA (BDI IA, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ and a self-made questionnaire regarding present pain and pain relieving methods of the patients. The results of the clinical evaluation and questionnaires were then compared. Results Clinically verified neuropathic pain was diagnosed in 53/158 [34% (95% Cl: 26 to 41] patients. The ROC curve achieved a maximum Youden´s index at score of 17 when sensitivity was 0.79 (95% Cl: 0.66 to 0.89 and specificity 0.53 (95% Cl: 0.43 to 0.63. The PainDETECT total score (OR: 1.14 95% Cl: 1.06 to 1.22, FM as the worst current pain (OR: 0.31; 95% 0.16 to 0.62, body mass index (BMI (OR: 1.05; 95% Cl: 1.00 to 1.11 and the intensity of current pain (OR: 1.20; 95% Cl: 1.01 to 1.41 were significantly associated with the presence of neuropathic pain in univariate analyses. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of thorough clinical examination. The Neuropathic pain screening tool PainDETECT is not as useful in patients with fibromyalgia as in patients with uncompromised central pain control.

  5. A Study on the Correlation between Pain and Pain Anxiety during Wound Care in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mazlom

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Wound care in burn patients is associated with severe anxiety that is characterized by feeling of fear and prediction of burn dressing pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between pain and pain anxiety in burn patients. Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 60 eligible patients hospitalized in men’s and women’s burn wards of Mashhad Imam Reza Hospital, were selected using available sampling. Pain anxiety and pain severity were measured using self-report pain anxiety questionnaire and visual analog scale, respectively, before and after burn dressing during three weeks (once a week. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test. Results: In this study, there was a significant linear correlation between pain and pain anxiety in the first week (r=0.512, p<0.001, but there was no significant linear correlation between these variables in the second (r=0.079, p=0.547 and third (r=0.167, p=0.203 weeks. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, assessment and treatment of pain anxiety are essential elements of pain care and management in burn patients.            

  6. Postoperative patients' perspectives on rating pain : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J.F.M.; Vervoort, Sigrid; van Wijck, Albert J.M.; Kalkman, CJ; Schuurmans, Marieke

    Background: In postoperative pain treatment patients are asked to rate their pain experience on a single uni-dimensional pain scale. Such pain scores are also used as indicator to assess the quality of pain treatment. However, patients may differ in how they interpret the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)

  7. Neuropathic pain and use of PainDETECT in patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Gauffin, Jarno; Hankama, Tiina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Hannonen, Pekka; Haanp??, Maija

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Backround Fibromyalgia has a plethorae of symptoms, which can be confusing and even misleading. Accurate evaluation is necessary when patients with fibromyalgia are treated. Different types of instruments are available for the clinicians to supplement evaluation. Our objective was to study the applicability of the PainDETECT instrument to screen neuropathic pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods 158 patients with primary fibromyalgia underwent a neurological examination includin...

  8. Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number...... of episodes was 3/day. Forty-four percent patients reported incident-type pain, 39% spontaneous-type pain, and 17% a combination of these pains. The median duration was 60 min, and the median time to peak intensity was 15 min. Three percent patients reported "mild" pain, 37% "moderate" pain, and 60% "severe......" pain. Ninety percent patients stated that the pain interfered with their daily activities. All patients were using opioids as rescue medication (mainly oral morphine/oxycodone), whilst 28% patients were using non-opioids, and 50% patients were using non-pharmacological interventions. Only 55% patients...

  9. Pain Experience in Hemophilia Patients: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambod, Masoume; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Khair, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pain, as a crucial subsequence of joint hemorrhages in hemophilia patients, is chronic, debilitating, and distracting. This study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences of hemophilia patients in their lives. Methods: This qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on fourteen hemophilia patients who had been referred to a hemophilia center affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The study question was “what is the meaning of pain in hemophilia patients’ lives? The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and field notes through purposeful sampling. Then, thematic analysis with van Manen’s six-step methodological framework was used. MAX.QDA qualitative software package, 2010, was used to analyze the data. Results: The three main themes that emerged in this study were “alteration in physical health”, “engagement in psychological problems”, and “impairment in social relationships”. Alteration in physical health consisted of three subthemes, namely “impairment of physical function”, “change in body physics”, and “disturbance in sleep quality”. In addition, two subthemes including “nostalgia of pain in adults with hemophilia” and “psychological distress” emerged from engagement in psychological problems. Finally, “loss of social activity” and “change in relationships” were related to impairment in social relationships. Conclusion: The present study highlighted alteration in physical health, engagement in psychological problems, and impairment in social relationship as a result of pain in hemophilia patients. Thus, healthcare providers and family members have to pay special attention to these problems. Besides, providing complementary therapy interventions is suggested for reducing these issues. PMID:27713894

  10. Pain Experience in Hemophilia Patients: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Rambod

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain, as a crucial subsequence of joint hemorrhages in hemophilia patients, is chronic, debilitating, and distracting. This study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences of hemophilia patients in their lives. Methods: This qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on fourteen hemophilia patients who had been referred to a hemophiliacenter affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The study question was “what is the meaning of pain in hemophilia patients’ lives? The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and field notes through purposeful sampling. Then, thematic analysis with van Manen’s six-step methodological framework was used. MAX.QDA qualitative software package, 2010, was used to analyze the data. Results: The three main themes that emerged in this study were “alteration in physical health”, “engagement in psychological problems”, and “impairment in social relationships”. Alteration in physical health consisted of three subthemes, namely “impairment of physical function”, “change in body physics”, and “disturbance in sleep quality”. In addition, two subthemes including “nostalgia of pain in adults with hemophilia” and “psychological distress” emerged from engagement in psychological problems. Finally, “loss of social activity” and “change in relationships” were related to impairment in social relationships. Conclusion: The present study highlighted alteration in physical health, engagement in psychological problems, and impairment in social relationship as a result of pain in hemophilia patients. Thus, healthcare providers and family members have to pay special attention to these problems. Besides, providing complementary therapy interventions is suggested for reducing these issues.

  11. Pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ozgul; Unsar, Serap; Yacan, Lale; Pelin, Meryem; Kurt, Seda; Erdogan, Bülent

    2018-04-01

    Uncontrolled pain, especially in patients with advanced cancer, affects quality of life negatively and causes negative physical and psychological conditions. The aim of this study was to explore the pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer and how they manage with pain, and to present a view of pain management approaches of nurses from the perspectives of the patients. This was a qualitative descriptive study of sixteen hospitalized patients with advanced cancer. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with patients. Data were analysed by Colaizzi's phenomenological method. This study found that patients with advanced cancer who had pain experienced anxiety, helplessness, hopelessness and many restrictions in daily life as well as inability to manage with pain. Most of the patients with advanced cancer were not satisfied with their nursing care with regard to pain management. The themes that emerged were pain perception and experiences, effects of pain on daily life, pain management and management strategies and the patients' perspectives about nursing approaches to pain. This study demonstrated the difficulties of patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain in their daily lives, yet lack pain management strategies. Furthermore, nurses' caring approaches to patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain was found inadequate. Oncology nurses should provide educational interventions in order to enhance knowledge and skills about pain assessment and non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies used in pain management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Can a single pain rating replace a multiple pain rating in third molar surgery studies? Analysis of 220 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.J.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Skorpil, N.E.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the comparison of multiple and single pain ratings in patients after surgical removal of the third molar. Correlation and agreement analysis were performed between the average pain intensity measured three times a day over a period of 7 days and one single pain rating

  13. Characteristics of highly impaired children with severe chronic pain: a 5-year retrospective study on 2249 pediatric pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernikow Boris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of pain as a recurrent symptom in children is known to be high, but little is known about children with high impairment from chronic pain seeking specialized treatment. The purpose of this study was the precise description of children with high impairment from chronic pain referred to the German Paediatric Pain Centre over a 5-year period. Methods Demographic variables, pain characteristics and psychometric measures were assessed at the first evaluation. Subgroup analysis for sex, age and pain location was conducted and multivariate logistic regression applied to identify parameters associated with extremely high impairment. Results The retrospective study consisted of 2249 children assessed at the first evaluation. Tension type headache (48%, migraine (43% and functional abdominal pain (11% were the most common diagnoses with a high rate of co-occurrence; 18% had some form of musculoskeletal pain disease. Irrespective of pain location, chronic pain disorder with somatic and psychological factors was diagnosed frequently (43%. 55% of the children suffered from more than one distinct pain diagnosis. Clinically significant depression and general anxiety scores were expressed by 24% and 19% of the patients, respectively. Girls over the age of 13 were more likely to seek tertiary treatment compared to boys. Nearly half of children suffered from daily or constant pain with a mean pain value of 6/10. Extremely high pain-related impairment, operationalized as a comprehensive measure of pain duration, frequency, intensity, pain-related school absence and disability, was associated with older age, multiple locations of pain, increased depression and prior hospital stays. 43% of the children taking analgesics had no indication for pharmacological treatment. Conclusion Children with chronic pain are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge as they often have two or more different pain diagnoses, are prone to misuse of

  14. Virtual visual reminiscing pain stimulation of allodynia patients activates cortical representation of pain and emotions. fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Ushida, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Shinichirou; Tania, Toshikazu; Zinchuk, V.; Morio, Kazuo; Sasaki, Toshikazu

    2004-01-01

    It is widely known that sensation of the pain is derived from sensory-discriminative factor and emotional factor. Especially in chronic pain, emotional factors and psychosocial backgrounds are more likely to contribute for the patients' discomfort. The aim of this study is to investigate how emotional factor of pain participates in intractable pain. We employed functional MRI (fMRI) to compare the brain activations occurring in the orthopaedic neuropathic pain patients with allodynia and normal individuals in response to the visual virtual painful experience. During fMRI scanning, a video demonstrating an actual tactile stimulation of the palm and its imitation were shown to participants. In contrast to normal individuals, allodynia patients also displayed activation of the areas reflecting emotions: frontal lobe and anterior cingulate. These findings suggest that brain have important role in the development and maintaining of peripheral originated chronic painful condition. (author)

  15. Smoking behavior and motivation to quit among chronic pain patients initiating multidisciplinary pain treatment: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrod, Marina; Gironda, Ronald J; Clark, Michael E; White, Kristi E; Simmons, Vani N; Sutton, Steven K; Brandon, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess smoking characteristics and cessation motivation prior to and after initiation of multidisciplinary chronic pain treatment. A secondary aim was to identify predictors of cessation motivation among smokers initiating treatment for chronic pain. We used a prospective, nonrandomized, repeated measures design. The study was conducted in a multidisciplinary specialty pain treatment program at a veterans hospital. Smokers (N = 90) referred to a multidisciplinary pain program for the treatment of chronic pain. Patients completed questionnaires assessing pain-related and smoking-related factors prior to (baseline) and 8 weeks post (follow-up) specialty pain treatment initiation. Primary outcome measures were the Contemplation Ladder and the Stages of Change (SOC) algorithm. At baseline, patients reported moderate levels of cessation motivation, and 69% were in the contemplation stage or higher on the SOC. Motivation to quit smoking was higher at follow-up compared with baseline on both continuous, t(89) = 2.11, P motivation (e.g., pain intensity) were subsumed by more general predictors (e.g., nicotine dependence). Patients in this sample were more motivated to quit smoking a few weeks after, as compared with before initiating specialty pain treatment. Future research into pain-specific predictors of cessation motivation is warranted to inform the development of interventions that address pain patients' unique needs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Visuospatial and verbal memory in chronic pain patients: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hillevi; Montgomery, William; Melin, Bo; Lundberg, Ulf

    2006-09-01

    Cognitive bias, such as selective memory for pain-related information, is frequently observed in chronic pain patients and is assessed mostly using verbal material. Beside word lists, the current study used photographs of people presenting pain behaviors to assess memory bias in chronic pain patients. Chronic pain patients were hypothesized to show better recall of pain-related words and pictures as compared to pain-free controls. Twenty-eight female chronic neck patients and 28 pain-free female controls completed two computerized pictorial memory games and two word recall tasks. Patients and controls performed equally well in the neutral pictorial memory game. In the pain-related game, patients performed significantly worse than controls. No significant differences were found in the word recall task. The result is discussed in terms of cognitive avoidance.

  17. Cytokine and neuropeptide levels are associated with pain relief in patients with chronically painful total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Knutson, Keith L

    2017-01-14

    There are few studies with an assessment of the levels of cytokines or neuropeptides as correlates of pain and pain relief in patients with painful joint diseases. Our objective was to assess whether improvements from baseline to 2-months in serum cytokine, chemokine and substance P levels were associated with clinically meaningful pain relief at 2-months post-injection in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Using data from randomized trial of 60 TKAs, we assessed the association of change in cytokine/chemokine/Substance P levels with primary study outcome, clinically important improvement in Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale at 2-months post-injection using Student's t-tests and Spearman's correlation coefficient (non-parametric). Patients were categorized as pain responders (20-point reduction or more on 0-100 WOMAC pain) vs. pain non-responders. Sensitivity analysis used 0-10 daytime pain numeric rating scale (NRS) instead of WOMAC pain subscale. In a pilot study, compared to non-responders (n = 23) on WOMAC pain scale at 2-months, pain responders (n = 12) had significantly greater increase in serum levels of IL-7, IL-10, IL-12, eotaxin, interferon gamma and TNF-α from baseline to 2-months post-injection (p coefficients ranging -0.37 to -0.51: IL-2, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-16, IL-12p, GCSF, IFN gamma, IP-10, MCP, MIP1b, TNF-α and VEGF (n = 35). Sensitivity analysis showed that substance P decreased significantly more from baseline to 2-months in the pain responders (0.54 ± 0.53; n = 10) than in the pain non-responders (0.48 ± 1.18; n = 9; p = 0.023) and that this change in serum substance P correlated significantly with change in daytime NRS pain, correlation coefficient was 0.53 (p = 0.021; n = 19). Findings should be interpreted with caution, since cytokine analyses were performed for a sub-group of the entire trial population. Serum cytokine, chemokine and Substance

  18. Does weather affect daily pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Vicky; Maher, Chris G; Steffens, Daniel; Li, Qiang; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various weather parameters on pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain (LBP). We performed a secondary analysis using data from the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of acute LBP. Data on 1604 patients with LBP were included in the analysis. Weather parameters (precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure) were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Pain intensity was assessed daily on a 0-10 numerical pain rating scale over a 2-week period. A generalised estimating equation analysis was used to examine the relationship between daily pain intensity levels and weather in three different time epochs (current day, previous day, and change between previous and current days). A second model was adjusted for important back pain prognostic factors. The analysis did not show any association between weather and pain intensity levels in patients with acute LBP in each of the time epochs. There was no change in strength of association after the model was adjusted for prognostic factors. Contrary to common belief, the results demonstrated that the weather parameters of precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure did not influence the intensity of pain reported by patients during an episode of acute LBP.

  19. Can cancer patients assess the influence of pain on functions? A randomised, controlled study of the pain interference items in the Brief Pain Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaasa Stein

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI is recommended as a pain measurement tool by the Expert Working Group of the European Association of Palliative Care. The BPI is designed to assess both pain severity and interference with functions caused by pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate if pain interference items are influenced by other factors than pain. Methods We asked adult cancer patients to complete the original and a revised BPI on two study days. In the original version of the BPI the patients were asked how, during the last 24 hours, pain has interfered with functions. In the revised BPI this question was changed to how, during the last 24 hours, these functions are affected in general. Heath related quality of life was assessed at both study days applying the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Results Forty-eight of the 55 included patients completed both assessments. The BPI pain intensities scores and the health related quality of life scores were similar at the two study days. Except for mood this study observed no significant distinctions between the patients' BPI interference items scores in the original (pain influence on function and the revised BPI (function in general. Seventeen patients reported higher influence from pain on functions than the total influence on function from all causes. Conclusion We observed similar scores in the original BPI interference scores (pain influence on function compared with the revised BPI interference scores (decreased function in general. This finding might imply that the BPI interference scale measures are partly responded to as more of a global interference measure.

  20. Subgroups of musculoskeletal pain patients and their psychobiological patterns – The LOGIN study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardt Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain conditions of the musculoskeletal system are very common and have tremendous socioeconomic impact. Despite its high prevalence, musculoskeletal pain remains poorly understood and predominantly non-specifically and insufficiently treated. The group of chronic musculoskeletal pain patients is supposed to be heterogeneous, due to a multitude of mechanisms involved in chronic pain. Psychological variables, psychophysiological processes, and neuroendocrine alterations are expected to be involved. Thus far, studies on musculoskeletal pain have predominantly focused on the general aspects of pain processing, thus neglecting the heterogeneity of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Consequently, there is a need for studies that comprise a multitude of mechanisms that are potentially involved in the chronicity and spread of pain. This need might foster research and facilitate a better pathophysiological understanding of the condition, thereby promoting the development of specific mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain. Therefore, the objectives of this study are as follows: 1 identify and describe subgroups of patients with musculoskeletal pain with regard to clinical manifestations (including mental co-morbidity and 2 investigate whether distinct sensory profiles or 3 distinct plasma levels of pain-related parameters due to different underlying mechanisms can be distinguished in various subgroups of pain patients. Methods/Design We will examine a population-based chronic pain sample (n = 100, a clinical tertiary care sample (n = 100 and pain-free patients with depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and pain-free healthy controls (each n = 30, respectively. The samples will be pain localisation matched by sex and age to the population-based sample. Patients will undergo physical examination and thorough assessments of mental co-morbidity (including psychological trauma, perceptual and central sensitisation

  1. Subgroups of musculoskeletal pain patients and their psychobiological patterns - the LOGIN study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Hartmann, Mechthild; Tesarz, Jonas; Janke, Susanne; Leisner, Sabine; Seidler, Günter; Eich, Wolfgang

    2012-08-03

    Pain conditions of the musculoskeletal system are very common and have tremendous socioeconomic impact. Despite its high prevalence, musculoskeletal pain remains poorly understood and predominantly non-specifically and insufficiently treated.The group of chronic musculoskeletal pain patients is supposed to be heterogeneous, due to a multitude of mechanisms involved in chronic pain. Psychological variables, psychophysiological processes, and neuroendocrine alterations are expected to be involved. Thus far, studies on musculoskeletal pain have predominantly focused on the general aspects of pain processing, thus neglecting the heterogeneity of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Consequently, there is a need for studies that comprise a multitude of mechanisms that are potentially involved in the chronicity and spread of pain. This need might foster research and facilitate a better pathophysiological understanding of the condition, thereby promoting the development of specific mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain. Therefore, the objectives of this study are as follows: 1) identify and describe subgroups of patients with musculoskeletal pain with regard to clinical manifestations (including mental co-morbidity) and 2) investigate whether distinct sensory profiles or 3) distinct plasma levels of pain-related parameters due to different underlying mechanisms can be distinguished in various subgroups of pain patients. We will examine a population-based chronic pain sample (n = 100), a clinical tertiary care sample (n = 100) and pain-free patients with depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and pain-free healthy controls (each n = 30, respectively). The samples will be pain localisation matched by sex and age to the population-based sample. Patients will undergo physical examination and thorough assessments of mental co-morbidity (including psychological trauma), perceptual and central sensitisation (quantitative sensory testing), descending

  2. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10. Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student′s t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003. No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356. There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034. The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of

  3. Pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C Ervin; Stockstill, John W; Stanley, William D; Wu, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Pain-related worry is distinct from, but related to, pain catastrophizing (PC) and anxiety. Worry and its relationship with other variables have been studied in people with chronic pain but not in people with chronic orofacial pain. The authors explored the prevalence of trait, general and pain-related worry and the association of worry with higher pain levels and other variables. The authors assessed people who had a diagnosis of chronic orofacial pain by using nonpain-related trait worry, state anxiety, trait anxiety, PC and pain measures. The participants' answers to an open-ended question about what they were most worried about led to the identification of worry domains, including worry about pain. The authors found that worrying about pain was related significantly to worst and least pain levels, pain interference and pain duration, as well as moderated trait worry in predicting pain interference. Although trait worry was not correlated directly with pain, when moderated by PC, it made substantial contributions in predicting pain interference. Participants with chronic orofacial pain reported experiencing substantial levels of trait worry, anxiety, PC and worry about pain that related to pain ratings directly and indirectly. Clinicians should assess pain-related worry in patients with chronic orofacial pain to understand the effects of worry on pain and functioning. Clinicians could treat these patients more effectively by helping them reduce their levels of pain-related worry and focusing on improved coping.

  4. Expert clinical reasoning and pain assessment in mechanically ventilated patients: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Anne; Thevoz, Anne-Laure; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2015-02-01

    Pain assessment in mechanically ventilated patients is challenging, because nurses need to decode pain behaviour, interpret pain scores, and make appropriate decisions. This clinical reasoning process is inherent to advanced nursing practice, but is poorly understood. A better understanding of this process could contribute to improved pain assessment and management. This study aimed to describe the indicators that influence expert nurses' clinical reasoning when assessing pain in critically ill nonverbal patients. This descriptive observational study was conducted in the adult intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral hospital in Western Switzerland. A purposive sample of expert nurses, caring for nonverbal ventilated patients who received sedation and analgesia, were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected in "real life" using recorded think-aloud combined with direct non-participant observation and brief interviews. Data were analysed using deductive and inductive content analyses using a theoretical framework related to clinical reasoning and pain. Seven expert nurses with an average of 7.85 (±3.1) years of critical care experience participated in the study. The patients had respiratory distress (n=2), cardiac arrest (n=2), sub-arachnoid bleeding (n=1), and multi-trauma (n=2). A total of 1344 quotes in five categories were identified. Patients' physiological stability was the principal indicator for making decision in relation to pain management. Results also showed that it is a permanent challenge for nurses to discriminate situations requiring sedation from situations requiring analgesia. Expert nurses mainly used working knowledge and patterns to anticipate and prevent pain. Patient's clinical condition is important for making decision about pain in critically ill nonverbal patients. The concept of pain cannot be assessed in isolation and its assessment should take the patient's clinical stability and sedation into account. Further

  5. Examination of pain experiences of cancer patients in western Turkey: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Yildirim, Yasemin; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Uslu, Ruçhan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the individual experience of living with cancer pain. This qualitative study was performed by using a phenomenological research design. In-depth and open interviews with participants were conducted to collect the data and a qualitative Colaizzi method of analysis was performed. Following the analysis of the data, the expressions made by the cancer patients during the interviews were grouped under 5 themes. Consistent with the questionnaire format, 5 themes and 19 subthemes of responses were determined describing the pain of the cancer patients. The results of our study have demonstrated that cancer patients go through negative physical, psychological, and social experiences due to the pain they suffered.

  6. Neck motion, motor control, pain and disability: A longitudinal study of associations in neck pain patients in physiotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisingset, Ingebrigt; Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Woodhouse, Astrid; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with several alterations in neck motion and motor control, but most of the findings are based on cross-sectional studies. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between changes in neck motion and motor control, and changes in neck pain and disability in physiotherapy patients during a course of treatment. Prospective cohort study. Subjects with non-specific neck pain (n = 71) participated in this study. Neck flexibility, joint position error (JPE), head steadiness, trajectory movement control and postural sway were recorded before commencement of physiotherapy (baseline), at 2 weeks, and at 2 months. Numerical Rating Scale and Neck Disability Index were used to measure neck pain and disability at the day of testing. To analyze within subjects effects in neck motion and motor control, neck pain, and disability over time we used fixed effects linear regression analysis. Changes in neck motion and motor control occurred primarily within 2 weeks. Reduction in neck pain was associated with increased cervical range of motion in flexion-/extension and increased postural sway when standing with eyes open. Decreased neck disability was associated with some variables for neck flexibility and trajectory movement control. Cervical range of motion in flexion-/extension was the only variable associated with changes in both neck pain and neck disability. This study shows that few of the variables for neck motion and motor control were associated with changes neck pain and disability over a course of 2 months with physiotherapy treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The psychometric properties of the PABS-PT in neck pain patients: a validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaers, J.H.; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Peters, R.; Koes, B.W.; Verhagen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to assess the reliability and validity of the Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapists (PABS-PT) in neck pain patients. Three research goals were formulated. (1): to reexamine the factor structure of the PABS-PT, (2) to assess the test-retest reliability of

  8. Percutaneous Nerve Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients due to Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopsky, D.J.; Ettema, F.W.L.; van der Leeden, M.; Dekker, J.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and

  9. CLINICAL-EVALUATION OF PAIN TREATMENT WITH ELECTROSTIMULATION - A STUDY OF TENS IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT PAIN SYNDROMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEYLER, WJ; DEJONGSTE, MJL; ROLF, CAM

    Objective: We evaluated the clinical efficacy and the unwanted side effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in a consecutive group of patients with intractable pain due to different pain syndromes. Methods: Two hundred eleven patients with different pain syndromes, coded

  10. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  11. Intensive short-term vasodilation effect in the pain area of sciatica patients--case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-09-09

    Varied and complicated etiology of low back pain radiating distally to the extremities is still causing disagreement and controversy around the issue of its diagnosis and treatment. Most clinicians believe that the source of that pain is generally radicular. While some of them postulate the clinical significance of the sacroiliac joint syndrome, others demonstrate that almost one in five people with back pain experience symptoms indicative of the neuropathic pain component. To date, neuropathic involvement has not been completely understood, and different mechanisms are thought to play an important role. It has been established that muscle pain (myofascial pain) e.g. active trigger points from the gluteus minimus, can mimic pain similar to sciatica, especially in the chronic stage. This paper describes patients presenting with radicular sciatica (case one and two) and sciatica-like symptoms (case three). For the first time, intensive short-term vasodilation in the pain area following needle infiltration of the gluteus minimus trigger point was recorded. Three Caucasian, European women suffering from radicular sciatica (case one and two) and sciatica-like symptoms (case three) at the age of 57, 49 and 47 respectively underwent infrared camera observation during needle infiltration of the gluteus minimus trigger point. The patients were diagnosed by a neurologist; they underwent magnetic resonance imaging, electromyography, neurography and blood test analysis. Apart from that, the patients were diagnosed by a clinician specializing in myofascial pain diagnosis. In the examined cases, trigger points-related short-term vasodilation was recorded. Confirmation of these findings in a controlled, blinded study would indicate the existence of a link between the pain of sciatica patients (radicular or sciatica-like pain) and the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Further studies on a bigger group of patients are still needed.

  12. Seeking empowerment to comfort patients in severe pain: a grounded theory study of the nurse's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatyer, Susan; Williams, Anne M; Michael, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Hospital patients experience significant pain, which can delay healing and increase the risk of developing chronic pain. Nurses are affected by patients' ongoing pain and may cope with consequent anxiety and helplessness by distancing themselves from such patients. Understanding nurses' responses to patients in severe pain will inform strategies to support their coping, their patients and, ultimately, their retention in the nursing workforce. The aim of the study was to develop a substantive theory explaining the hospital nurse's perspective of caring for patients in severe pain. The study used grounded theory method. Data were collected on four acute care wards in a 610 bed Australian hospital. The sample included 33 nurse participants and 11 patient participants. Selection criteria for nurse participants were those who worked in the four study wards, cared for patients who experienced severe pain, and consented to be included. Selection criteria for patient participants were those who self-reported pain at intensity of seven or more on a scale of 0-10, were aged 18 years or older, could speak and read English, and consented to be included. Theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using semi-structured interviews with nurses and participant observation, including structured observations of nurses who cared for patients in pain. Data were analysed using constant comparison method. Nurse participants encountered a basic psychosocial problem of feelings of disempowerment when their patients experienced persisting severe pain. In response, they used a basic psychosocial process of seeking empowerment to provide comfort in order to resolve distress and exhaustion associated with disempowerment. This coping process comprised three stages: building connections; finding alternative ways to comfort; and quelling emotional turmoil. The substantive theory proposed a link between the stress of nurses' disempowerment and a coping response that provides direction to

  13. Patient expectations of treatment for back pain - A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Jos; Sengers, Marie-José; Riemens, Linda; Haafkens, Joke

    2004-01-01

    Study Design. A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies. Objectives. To summarize evidence from studies among patients with low back pain on their expectations and satisfaction with treatment as part of practice guideline development. Summary of Background Data. Patients are often

  14. Prevalence of pain and relative diagnostic performance of screening tools for neuropathic pain in cancer patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, C; Sánchez-Martínez, N; Ballesteros, A; Blanco, T; Collazo, A; González, F; Villoria, J

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain can be overlooked in cancer patients. The advent of screening tools can help in recognizing it. However, little is known about their relative diagnostic performance and factors that affect it. This study evaluated the prevalence of neuropathic pain using several diagnostic strategies in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patients attending the Oncology Unit of the investigators' site to continue their chemotherapy schedule were systematically screened for this cross-sectional study. Before starting chemotherapy drugs, pain specialists made a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain (either disease related, treatment related or comorbid) and medical oncologists administered three validated screening tools. Their relative diagnostic performance and the impact of some pain features on it were analysed using multivariate statistical methods. From a total of 358 patients, 194 (54.2%) suffered from pain and 73 (20.4%) had a clinical diagnosis of pure neuropathic or mixed pain. Among the screening tools, the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) was more specific (93.4%), although less sensitive (68.1%) than the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 Questions (DN4) (sensitivity: 87.5%, specificity: 88.4%). Interestingly, the specificities of these two instruments did not differ in patients with mild pain, while the DN4 remained to be more sensitive than the LANSS regardless of pain severity. Neuropathic pain is common in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The DN4 might be of great help for the early detection of patients at risk because of incipient chemotherapy-related neuropathies and the LANSS to rule out neuropathic pain in patients with complex pain conditions. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  15. Hypnosis can reduce pain in hospitalized older patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardigo, Sheila; Herrmann, François R; Moret, Véronique; Déramé, Laurence; Giannelli, Sandra; Gold, Gabriel; Pautex, Sophie

    2016-01-15

    Chronic pain is a common and serious health problem in older patients. Treatment often includes non pharmacological approaches despite a relatively modest evidence base in this population. Hypnosis has been used in younger adults with positive results. The main objective of this study was to measure the feasibility and efficacy of hypnosis (including self hypnosis) in the management of chronic pain in older hospitalized patients. A single center randomized controlled trial using a two arm parallel group design (hypnosis versus massage). Inclusion criteria were chronic pain for more than 3 months with impact on daily life activities, intensity of > 4; adapted analgesic treatment; no cognitive impairment. Brief pain inventory was completed. Fifty-three patients were included (mean age: 80.6 ± 8.2--14 men; 26 hypnosis; 27 massage. Pain intensity decreased significantly in both groups after each session. Average pain measured by the brief pain index sustained a greater decrease in the hypnosis group compared to the massage group during the hospitalisation. This was confirmed by the measure of intensity of the pain before each session that decreased only in the hypnosis group over time (P = 0.008). Depression scores improved significantly over the time only in the hypnosis group (P = 0.049). There was no effect in either group 3 months post hospitals discharge. Hypnosis represents a safe and valuable tool in chronic pain management of hospitalized older patients. In hospital interventions did not provide long term post discharge relief. ISRCTN15615614; registered 2/1/2015.

  16. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeberg BT

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Berit T Valeberg,1 Lise H Høvik,2 Kari H Gjeilo3–6 1Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, 2Clinic of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, 3Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, 4Department of Cardiology, 5National Competence Centre for Complex Symptom Disorders, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, 6Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background and purpose: This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ, and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods: The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery. The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results: A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001. The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03. Interpretation: This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings. Keywords

  17. Horticultural therapy for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verra, M L; Verra, Martin L; Angst, Felix; Beck, Trudi; Lehmann, Susanne; Brioschi, Roberto; Schneiter, Renata; Aeschlimann, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Therapists can use horticultural therapy as an adjuvant therapy in a non threatening context, with the intent of bringing about positive effects in physical health, mental health, and social interaction. Very few experimental studies exist that test its clinical effectiveness. To determine whether the addition of horticultural therapy to a pain-management program improved physical function, mental health, and ability to cope with pain. The research team designed a prospective, nonrandomized, controlled cohort study, enrolling all patients consecutively referred to the Zurzach Interdisciplinary Pain Program (ZISP) who met the studys criteria. The team divided them into two cohorts based on when medical professionals referred them: before (control group) or after (intervention group) introduction of a horticultural therapy program. The setting was the rehabilitation clinic (RehaClinic) in Bad Zurzach, Switzerland. Seventy-nine patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (fibromyalgia or chronic, nonspecific back pain) participated in the study. The research team compared a 4-week, inpatient, interdisciplinary pain-management program with horticultural therapy (intervention, n = 37) with a pain-management program without horticultural therapy (control, n = 42). The horticultural therapy program consisted of seven sessions of group therapy, each of 1-hour duration. The research team assessed the outcome using the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ ), and two functional performance tests. The team tested participants on entry to and discharge from the 4-week pain-management program. Between-group differences in sociodemographic and outcome variables were not significant on participants entry to the pain-management program. On discharge, the research team measured small to moderate outcome effects (effect size [ES

  18. Nurses' Experiences of Patients with Substance-Use Disorder in Pain: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Georgina; Briggs, Emma; Chumbley, Gillian

    2015-10-01

    Patients with substance-use disorder and pain are at risk of having their pain underestimated and undertreated. Unrelieved pain can exacerbate characteristics that are believed to be 'drug-seeking' and in turn, perceived drug-seeking behavior can contribute to a patient being stigmatized and labeled 'difficult'. Previous literature has indicated that negative attitudes towards patients with substance-use disorder may affect their pain management but little is known about the specific barriers. This study explored nurses' experiences of working with patients with substance-use disorder in pain, providing an in-depth insight into their perspective. Descriptive phenomenology was employed as a framework for conducting semi-structured interviews to reveal the experiences of registered nurses. A convenience sample of registered nurses from a variety of clinical backgrounds were recruited and interviewed. This rich data was analyzed according to Giorgi's five-stage approach. Participants described feelings of powerlessness and frustration due to patient non-compliance, discrepancies in patient management amongst team members and external pressures effecting pain management. Participants described characteristics believed to be common, including psychosocial factors such as complex social backgrounds or mental health issues. Nurses' education and support needs were identified. Stereotyping and stigmatism were found to potentially still exist, yet there was also a general awareness of some specific clinical issues such as opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Further emphasis is required on interprofessional education and communication to improve patient management, alongside an appreciation of patient's rights facilitated by a concordance model of care. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Colorectal surgery patients' pain status, activities, satisfaction, and beliefs about pain and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carolyn; Constance, Kristel; Bédard, Denise; Purden, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    This study describes surgical colorectal cancer patients' pain levels, recovery activities, beliefs and expectations about pain, and satisfaction with pain management. A convenience sample of 50 adult inpatients who underwent colorectal surgery for cancer participated. Patients were administered the modified American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire on postoperative day 2 and asked to report on their status in the preceding 24 hours. Patients reported low current (mean 1.70) and average (mean 2.96) pain scores but had higher scores and greater variation for worst pain (mean 5.48). Worst pain occurred mainly while turning in bed or mobilizing, and 25% of patients experienced their worst pain at rest. Overall, patients expected to have pain after surgery and were very satisfied with pain management. Patients with worst pain scores >7 reported interference with recovery activities, mainly general activity (mean 5.67) and walking ability (mean 5.15). These patients were likely to believe that "people can get addicted to pain medication easily" (mean 3.39 out of 5) and that "pain medication should be saved for cases where pain gets worse" (mean 3.20 out of 5). These beliefs could deter patients from seeking pain relief and may need to be identified and addressed along with expectations about pain in the preoperative nursing assessment. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  1. Association of Strength Measurement with Rotator Cuff Tear in Patients with Shoulder Pain: The ROW Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Earle; Higgins, Laurence D.; Dong, Yan; Collins, Jamie E.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Seitz, Amee L.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examines the association between strength measurements and supraspinatus tear in patients with shoulder pain. This study characterized determinants of abduction strength among patients with tears. Design Two-hundred and eight patients with shoulder pain (69 with and 110 without tear) were recruited. Strength was tested using hand-held dynamometer. Supraspinatus tears were diagnosed by combination of clinical assessment and blinded MRI review. Associations of supraspinatus tear with patient characteristics and strength measurements (abduction, internal rotation and external rotation) were assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results Patients with supraspinatus tear had decreased abduction strength (p=0.02) and decreased external rotation strength (ptear laterality, and BMI, decreased abduction strength (OR= 1.18 per kg, 95% C.I.=1.06–1.32) and decreased external rotation strength (OR=1.29 per kg, 95% C.I.=1.14–1.48) were associated with supraspinatus tear. In patients with tear, age ≥60 years, female sex, and VAS pain score were significantly associated with decreased abduction strength but tear size, fatty infiltration, and atrophy were not. Conclusions Decreased abduction and external rotation strength were associated with supraspinatus tear in patients with shoulder pain. In this cohort, the abduction strength of patients with tears, was influenced by demographic factors but not tear characteristics. PMID:26098921

  2. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, Achim; Greimel, Felix; Auer, Patrick; Zeman, Florian; Göttermann, Antje; Grifka, Joachim; Meissner, Winfried; von Kunow, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking. All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project "Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management" (QUIPS). A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward. From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0) on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2). Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0), whereas patient satisfaction significantly increased (mean 9.8, ±0.4; p benchmarking a standardized pain management concept. But regular benchmarking, implementation of feedback mechanisms, and staff education made the pain management concept even more successful. Multidisciplinary teamwork and flexibility in adapting processes seem to be highly important for successful pain management.

  3. The dynamics of the pain system is intact in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Klokker, Louise; Ellegaard, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-12-29

    Background and aims Despite the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) it remains one of the most frequent knee disorders without a cure. Pain and disability are prominent clinical features of knee OA. Knee OA pain is typically localized but can also be referred to the thigh or lower leg. Widespread hyperalgesia has been found in knee OA patients. In addition, patients with hyperalgesia in the OA knee joint show increased pain summation scores upon repetitive stimulation of the OA knee suggesting the involvement of facilitated central mechanisms in knee OA. The dynamics of the pain system (i.e., the adaptive responses to pain) has been widely studied, but mainly from experiments on healthy subjects, whereas less is known about the dynamics of the pain system in chronic pain patients, where the pain system has been activated for a long time. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the nociceptive system quantitatively in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients before and after induction of experimental knee pain. Methods Ten knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients participated in this randomized crossover trial. Each subject was tested on two days separated by 1 week. The most affected knee was exposed to experimental pain or control, in a randomized sequence, by injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad and a control injection of isotonic saline. Pain areas were assessed by drawings on anatomical maps. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the knee, thigh, lower leg, and arm were assessed before, during, and after the experimental pain and control conditions. Likewise, temporal summation of pressure pain on the knee, thigh and lower leg muscles was assessed. Results Experimental knee pain decreased the PPTs at the knee (P system in individuals with knee OA can be affected even after many years of nociceptive input. This study indicates that the adaptability in the pain system is intact in patients with knee OA, which opens for opportunities to

  4. How do patients with cancer pain view community pharmacy services? An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Zoe; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Ziegler, Lucy; Bennett, Michael I

    2018-02-26

    Pain experienced by many patients with advanced cancer is often not well controlled and community pharmacists are potentially well placed to provide support. The study objective was to explore the views and experiences of patients with advanced cancer about community pharmacies, their services and attitudes towards having a community pharmacist pain medicines consultation. Purposive sampling of GP clinical information systems was used to recruit patients with advanced cancer, living in the community and receiving opioid analgesics in one area of England, UK between January 2015 and July 2016. Thirteen patients had a semi-structured interview which was audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed deductively and inductively using Framework analysis and incorporating new themes as they emerged. The framework comprised Pain management, Experiences and expectations, Access to care and Communication. All patients reported using one regular community pharmacy citing convenience, service and staff friendliness as influential factors. The idea of a community pharmacy medicines consultation was acceptable to most patients. The idea of telephone consultations was positively received but electronic media such as Skype was not feasible or acceptable for most. Patients perceived a hierarchy of health professionals with specialist palliative care nurses at the top (due to their combined knowledge of their condition and medicines) followed by GPs then pharmacists. Patients receiving specialist palliative care described pain that was better controlled than those who were not. They thought medicines consultations with a pharmacist could be useful for patients before referral for palliative care. There is a need for pain medicines support for patients with advanced cancer, and unmet need appears greater for those not under the care of specialist services. Medicines consultations, in principle, are acceptable to patients both in person and by telephone, and the latter

  5. Multidimensional features of pain in patients with chronic neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianna Resende de Jesus-Moraleida

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic neck pain is associated with significant health costs and loss of productivity at work. Objective: to assess pain and disability in individuals with chronic neck pain. Methods: 31 volunteers with chronic neck pain, mean age 29, 65 years, were assessed using the McGill Pain Questionnaire in Brazilian version (Br-MPQ and Neck Disability Index (NDI. The Br-MPQ analysis was performed based on the numerical values associated with the words selected to describe the experience of pain (Pain Rating Index - PRI, and present pain intensity (PPI. NDI was used to evaluate the influence of neck pain in performance of everyday tasks. Finally, we investigated the association between PPI and NDI. Results: PRI revealed that the most significant dimension was the sensory pain (70%, and the number of chosen words was 10 (2,62 out of 20 words. Mean PPI value was 1,23 (0,76 in five points; 40% of participants described pain intensity as moderate. NDI score was 9,77 (3,34, indicating mild disability. There was a positive association between disability and pain intensity (r = 0,36; p =0,046. Pain intensity and duration of pain were not associated. Conclusions: Findings of this study identified important information related to neck pain experienced by patients when suffering from chronic neck pain, moreover, the association between disability and pain intensity reinforces the importance of complementary investigation of these aspects to optimize function in them.

  6. Provider and patient perspectives on opioids and alternative treatments for managing chronic pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Lauren S; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; DeBar, Lynn L; Elder, Charles; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Current literature describes the limits and pitfalls of using opioid pharmacotherapy for chronic pain and the importance of identifying alternatives. The objective of this study was to identify the practical issues patients and providers face when accessing alternatives to opioids, and how multiple parties view these issues. Qualitative data were gathered to evaluate the outcomes of acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) services for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) using structured interview guides among patients with CMP (n = 90) and primary care providers (PCPs) (n = 25) purposively sampled from a managed care health care system as well as from contracted community A/C providers (n = 14). Focus groups and interviews were conducted patients with CMP with varying histories of A/C use. Plan PCPs and contracted A/C providers took part in individual interviews. All participants were asked about their experiences managing chronic pain and experience with and/or attitudes about A/C treatment. Audio recordings were transcribed and thematically coded. A summarized version of the focus group/interview guides is included in the Additional file 1. We identified four themes around opioid use: (1) attitudes toward use of opioids to manage chronic pain; (2) the limited alternative options for chronic pain management; (3) the potential of A/C care as a tool to help manage pain; and (4) the complex system around chronic pain management. Despite widespread dissatisfaction with opioid medications for pain management, many practical barriers challenged access to other options. Most of the participants' perceived A/C care as helpful for short term pain relief. We identified that problems with timing, expectations, and plan coverage limited A/C care potential for pain relief treatment. These results suggest that education about realistic expectations for chronic pain management and therapy options, as well as making A/C care more easily accessible, might lead to more

  7. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction.

  8. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benditz A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Achim Benditz,1 Felix Greimel,1 Patrick Auer,2 Florian Zeman,3 Antje Göttermann,4 Joachim Grifka,1 Winfried Meissner,4 Frederik von Kunow1 1Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Regensburg, 2Clinic for anesthesia, Asklepios Klinikum Bad Abbach, Bad Abbach, 3Centre for Clinical Studies, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany Background: The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking.Methods: All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA. Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project “Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management” (QUIPS. A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward.Results: From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0 on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2. Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0, whereas patient satisfaction

  9. Osteoporosis in patients with low back pain - a study with DEXA bone densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, R.; Momtaz, S.; Khan, ASM H.; Jehan, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoporosis has frequently been called the 'silent epidemic' because most patients do not present until they fracture or alternatively in some cases of spinal disease develop back pain, significant loss of height, or a kyphosis. In a longitudinal study of one year period a total of 96 patients were evaluated for bone densitometric measurements. Among them 48 patients (40 F, 8 M) complained of persistent low back pain. The age group was 35-80 years (Mean 59 years). They were referred for their first Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) studies. None of the patients received estrogen, biphosphonates or steroid therapy. Bone density of the hip and lumbar spine were measured. The T- score, which measures the difference between patient's BMD and young normal was computed and Z-score, were calculated. X-ray correlation was also done in most of the cases. Out of 48 patients, 18 (39.6%) showed osteoporosis, 16 (33.3%) showed osteopenia and 12 (25%) were normal. In the osteoporosis group, 14 were female and 4 were male. All were above 50 years of age except a 35 -year old man with Cushing's disease. This study demonstrates the importance of DEXA studies in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients suffering from low back pain. (author) 19 refs

  10. Effects of Pilates and yoga in patients with chronic neck pain: A sonographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naime Uluğ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies have shown the efficacy of conventional isometric, Pilates and yoga exercises. However, data on the effects and comparison of these specific exercises on the cervical muscle morphology are insufficient or lacking. Objective: To investigate the effects of different exercise treatments on neck muscles in patients with chronic neck pain. Design: A randomized study. Methods: Fifty-six patients with chronic neck pain were randomized into 3 groups as follows: Pilates group (n = 20, yoga group (n = 18 and isometric group (n = 18. Demographics and background information were recorded. The thickness and cross-sectional area of neck muscles were evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Cervical motions were measured with a goniometer. Pain severity was evaluated with the McGill Pain Scale, disability with the Neck Disability Index, quality of life with the Nottingham Health Profile, and emotional status with the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition to a conventional physio-therapy programme, 15 sessions of physical therapy, including hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, were provided to all patients. All groups performed the exercises for 6 weeks. The aforementioned assessments were performed before and 6 weeks after the treatment. Results: Although pain, disability, depression and quality of life improved similarly within all groups (all p < 0.05, muscle thickness values as regards the semispinalis capitis were increased only in the Pilates group (p = 0.022. Study limitations: The lack of complex (progressive resistive exercise treatment protocols, short treatment duration and partial supervision. Conclusion: All 3 types of exercise had favourable effects on pain and functional scores, but no differences were found among the groups, except for the Pilates group, in which the semispinalis capitis muscle increased in thickness.

  11. The Impact of a Cognitive Behavioral Pain Management Program on Sleep in Patients with Chronic Pain: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Catherine; Cunningham, Jennifer; Power, Camillus K; Horan, Sheila; Spencer, Orla; Fullen, Brona M

    2016-02-01

    To determine the impact of a cognitive behavioral pain management program on sleep in patients with chronic pain. Prospective nonrandomized controlled pilot study with evaluations at baseline and 12 weeks. Out-patient multidisciplinary cognitive behavioral pain management program in a university teaching hospital. Patients with chronic pain who fulfilled the criteria for participation in a cognitive behavioral pain management program. Patients assigned to the intervention group (n = 24) completed a 4 week cognitive behavioral pain management program, and were compared with a waiting list control group (n = 22). Assessments for both groups occurred at baseline and two months post cognitive behavioral pain management program. Outcome measures included self-report (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and objective (actigraphy) sleep measures, pain and quality of life measures. Both groups were comparable at baseline, and all had sleep disturbance. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index correlated with only two of the seven objective sleep measures (fragmentation index r = 0.34, P = 0.02, and sleep efficiency percentage r = -0.31, P = 0.04). There was a large treatment effect for cognitive behavioral pain management program group in mean number of wake bouts (d = 0.76), where a significant group*time interaction was also found (P = 0.016), showing that the CBT-PMP group improved significantly more than controls in this sleep variable. Patients attending a cognitive behavioral pain management program have high prevalence of sleep disturbance, and actigraphy technology was well tolerated by the patients. Preliminary analysis of the impact of a cognitive behavioral pain management program on sleep is promising, and warrants further investigation.

  12. The periodontal pain paradox: Difficulty on pain assesment in dental patients (The periodontal pain paradox hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In daily dental practice, the majority of patients’ main complaints are related to pain. Most patients assume that all pains inside the oral cavity originated from the tooth. One particular case is thermal sensitivity; sometimes patients were being able to point the site of pain, although there is neither visible caries nor secondary caries in dental radiograph. In this case, gingival recession and dentin hypersensitivity are first to be treated to eliminate the pain. If these treatments failed, pain may misdiagnose as pulpal inflammation and lead to unnecessary root canal treatment. Study in pain during periodontal instrumentation of plaque-related periodontitis revealed that the majority of patients feel pain and discomfort during probing and scaling. It seems obvious because an inflammation, either acute or chronic is related to a lowered pain threshold. However, in contrast, in this case report, patient suffered from chronic gingivitis and thermal sensitivity experienced a relative pain-free sensation during probing and scaling. Lowered pain threshold which accompanied by a blunted pain perception upon periodontal instrumentation is proposed to be termed as the periodontal pain paradox. The objective of this study is to reveal the possibility of certain factors in periodontal inflammation which may involved in the periodontal pain paradox hypothesis. Patient with thermal hypersensitivity who was conducted probing and scaling, after the relative pain-free instrumentation, thermal hypersensitivity rapidly disappeared. Based on the successful periodontal treatment, it is concluded that chronic gingivitis may modulate periodontal pain perception which termed as periodontal pain paradox

  13. Placebo effects of a sham opioid solution: a randomized controlled study in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Regine; Kothe, Ralph; Schmitz, Julia; Kamping, Sandra; Flor, Herta

    2017-10-01

    This study tested the experimental placebo effect in a group of chronic pain patients. Forty-eight patients having chronic back pain participated in a randomized clinical trial that tested the efficacy of a sham opioid solution (NaCl) compared with an alleged neutral, completely inactive solution (NaCl). We shaped the placebo effect by 2 interventions: verbal instruction and conditioning. The patients were either told that the "solution reduces pain and improves physical capacity" or the "solution is neutral, a placebo." Half of each group was additionally conditioned (coupling solution with reduced experimental pain), yielding 4 subgroups with 12 participants each. Outcome measures were as follows: the patients' clinical back pain ratings and acute pain ratings (both examined by numerical rating scale 0-10) and self-rated functional capacity (0%-100%; time required for the exercise). Expected pain relief before and after solution intake was also assessed. The inactive solution (NaCl), when presented as an effective treatment (sham "opioid" solution), induced placebo analgesia as evident in lower ratings of the patients' clinical back pain (F(3.12,144.21) = 25.05, P pain ratings (F(1.99,87.40) = 18.12, P pain expectations, and they were maintained in both sham opioid groups. The results suggest that it may be clinically useful to explicitly integrate placebo analgesia responses into pain management.

  14. Cerebral glucose metabolism change in patients with complex regional pain syndrome. A PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Satoe; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Nihashi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine abnormalities of the central nervous system in patients with chronic pain who were diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Brain activity was assessed using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. The data collected from 18 patients were compared with data obtained from 13 normal age-matched controls. Our results showed that glucose metabolism was bilaterally increased in the secondary somatosensory cortex, mid-anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) or posterior cingulated cortex (PCC) (or both), parietal cortex, posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and cerebellum as well as in the right posterior insula and right thalamus in our patients. In contrast, glucose metabolism was reduced contralaterally in the dorsal prefrontal cortex and primary motor cortex. Glucose metabolism was bilaterally elevated in the mid-ACC/PCC and the PPC, which correlated with pain duration. These data suggested that glucose metabolism in the brains of patients with CRPS changes dramatically at each location. In particular, glucose metabolism was increased in the areas concerned with somatosensory perception, possibly due to continuous painful stimulation. (author)

  15. Postamputation pain: studies on mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolajsen, Lone

    2012-10-01

    Amputation is followed by both painful and non-painful phantom phenomena in a large number of amputees. Non-painful phantom sensations rarely pose any clinical problem, but 60-80% of all amputees also experience painful sensations (i.e. phantom pain) located to the missing limb. The severity of phantom pain usually decreases with time, but severe pain persists in 5-10% of patients. Pain in the residual limb (i.e. stump pain) is another consequence of amputation. Both stump and phantom pain can be very difficult to treat. Treatment guidelines used for other neuropathic pain conditions are probably the best approximation, especially for the treatment of stump pain. The aim of the present doctoral thesis was to explore some of the mechanisms underlying pain after amputation. Ten studies were carried out (I-X). My PhD thesis from 1998 dealt with pain before the amputation and showed that preamputation pain increases the risk of phantom pain after amputation (I). A perioperative epidural blockade, however, did not reduce the incidence of pain or abnormal sensory phenomena after amputation (II, III). The importance of sensitization before amputation for the subsequent development of pain is supported by study IV, in which pressure pain thresholds obtained at the limb before amputation were inversely related to stump and phantom pain after 1 week. Afferent input from the periphery is likely to contribute to postamputation pain as sodium channels were upregulated in human neuromas (VI), although neuroma removal did not always alleviate phantom pain (V). Sensitization of neurons in the spinal cord also seems to be involved in pain after amputation as phantom pain was reduced by ketamine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist. Another NMDA-receptor antagonist, memantine, and gabapentin, a drug working by binding to the δ2α-subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, had no effect on phantom pain (VII-IX). Supraspinal factors are also important for pain after amputation as

  16. A qualitative study of patient and provider perspectives on using web-based pain coping skills training to treat persistent cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Christine; Vu, Maihan B; Lerner, Hannah; Bloom, Catherine; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Wood, William A; Basch, Ethan M; Voorhees, Peter M; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Keefe, Francis J

    2018-04-01

    Persistent pain is common and inadequately treated in cancer patients. Behavioral pain interventions are a recommended part of multimodal pain treatments, but they are underused in clinical care due to barriers such as a lack of the resources needed to deliver them in person and difficulties coordinating their use with clinical care. Pain coping skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based behavioral pain intervention traditionally delivered in person. Delivering this training via the web would increase access to it by addressing barriers that currently limit its use. We conducted a patient pilot study of an 8-week web-based PCST program to determine the acceptability of this approach to patients and the program features needed to meet their needs. Focus groups with healthcare providers identified strategies for coordinating the use of web-based PCST in clinical care. Participants included 7 adults with bone pain due to multiple myeloma or metastasized breast or prostate cancer and 12 healthcare providers (4 physicians and 8 advanced practice providers) who treat cancer-related bone pain. Patients completed web-based PCST at home and then took part in an in-depth qualitative interview. Providers attended focus groups led by a trained moderator. Qualitative analyses identified themes in the patient and provider data. Patients reported strongly favorable responses to web-based PCST and described emotional and physical benefits. They offered suggestions for adapting the approach to better fit their needs and to overcome barriers to completion. Focus groups indicated a need to familiarize healthcare providers with PCST and to address concerns about overburdening patients. Providers would recommend the program to patients they felt could benefit. They suggested applying a broad definition of cancer pain and having various types of providers help coordinate program its use with clinical care. Web-based PCST was acceptable to patients and providers. Our findings suggest

  17. A Serious Exergame for Patients Suffering from Chronic Musculoskeletal Back and Neck Pain: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Kosterink, Stephanie M; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Schönauer, Christian; Kaufmann, Hannes; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R

    2013-10-01

    Over recent years, the popularity of videogames has gone beyond youth and gamers and is slowly entering the field of professional healthcare. Exergames are an attractive alternative to physical therapy. The primary aim of this pilot study was to explore the user experience (usability, satisfaction, level of motivation, and game experience) of the patient with the "PlayMancer" exergame. The secondary aim was to explore the progression of the performed motor skills (walking velocity, overhead reach ability, and cervical range of motion) and the clinical changes (to physical condition, disability, and pain intensity) in a group of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain using an exergame for 4 weeks. In the European PlayMancer project, an exergame for physical rehabilitation of chronic pain patients was developed. This exergame is controlled by relevant motions of the patient's body captured by a motion suit and several infrared cameras. In three different integrated minigames, the patient can train the following motor skills: Walking velocity, overhead reaching, and neck mobility. Ten patients participated in this study and completed the 4 weeks of gaming. Patients rated the usability of the exergames as good (score of 78.5 [standard deviation 9.7; range, 60.0-97.5]) on the System Usability Scale, and the game motivated all patients to perform their exercises. Patients enjoyed playing and were pleased with both the game environment and the game play. Overall, the patients made a progression in the examined motor skills during the minigames over the 4 weeks of gaming. The "PlayMancer" exergame is a potential tool for achieving physical rehabilitation because it motivates patients to perform their exercises and as a result increases their motor skills and physical condition.

  18. An exploratory, large-scale study of pain and quality of life outcomes in cancer patients with moderate or severe pain, and variables predicting improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximiano, Constanza; López, Iker; Martín, Cristina; Zugazabeitia, Luis; Martí-Ciriquián, Juan L; Núñez, Miguel A; Contreras, Jorge; Herdman, Michael; Traseira, Susana; Provencio, Mariano

    2018-01-01

    There have been few large-scale, real world studies in Spain to assess change in pain and quality of life (QOL) outcomes in cancer patients with moderate to severe pain. This study aimed to assess changes on both outcomes after 3 months of usual care and to investigate factors associated with change in QoL. Large, multi-centre, observational study in patients with lung, head and neck, colorectal or breast cancer experiencing a first episode of moderate to severe pain while attending one of the participating centres. QoL was assessed using the EuroQol-5D questionnaire and pain using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Instruments were administered at baseline and after 3 months of follow up. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the impact of treatment factors, demographic and clinical variables, pain and other symptoms on QoL scores. 1711 patients were included for analysis. After 3 months of usual care, a significant improvement was observed in pain and QoL in all four cancer groups (pbreast cancer patients showed the largest gains. Poorer baseline performance status (ECOG) and the presence of anxiety/depression were associated with significantly poorer QOL outcomes. Improvements in BPI pain scores were associated with improved QoL. In the four cancer types studied, pain and QoL outcomes improved considerably after 3 months of usual care. Improvements in pain made a substantial contribution to QoL gains whilst the presence of anxiety and depression and poor baseline performance status significantly constrained improvement.

  19. GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up in patients with shoulder pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; Hesselmans, Nicolle J J M; Kemper, Anouk; Moser, Albine; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2014-06-01

    The diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain in general practice is complex. General practitioners' (GPs) guidelines advise a pragmatic diagnostic work-up in which additional imaging has a limited role. However, diagnostic ultrasounds are increasingly ordered by GPs, which seems to reflect complexity in management of shoulder pain. This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain. This study has a qualitative exploratory design with an inductive approach and was carried out in Dutch general practice. The study population consisted of 18 Dutch GPs who were sampled purposefully with a spread in clinical experience and ordering diagnostic ultrasound. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews and analysed following principles of the constant comparative method. Three main categories with subcategories emerged that captured the diagnostic work-up of shoulder pain: variety in diagnostic classifications [(non-)specific diagnosis and interdisciplinary differences], establishing strategies for diagnostic work-up (use of existing tools and motives to deviate from existing tools), and strategies dealing with diagnostic uncertainties (accepting diagnostic uncertainties, diagnostic imaging tests, and interdisciplinary consultation and referral). Despite the availability of evidence-based shoulder guidelines, GPs experience uncertainties during diagnostic work-up and apply different strategies when dealing with these uncertainties. At some point, GPs as well as patients seem to have a need for a specific diagnosis. Currently, there appears to be little agreement if, or in which phase of shoulder pain, diagnostic ultrasound is useful or indicated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A Study on the Effects of Patellar Taping on Pain, Quality of Life, and Radiographic Findings in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Banan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common cause of anterior knee pain in adults. Patellar taping is used to correct patellar position and rehabilitate patients with PFPS. However, the effectiveness and clinical efficiency of this technique in the treatment of these patients are not fully determined. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of knee taping on patellar alignment, quality of life, and pain in patients with PFPS. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 25 PFPS patients within the age range of 20-50 years. McConnell taping technique was applied for patients during four weeks. Before and immediately after the treatment, quality of life (via KOOS questionnaire, patellar alignment (via skyline radiography of the knee, and pain intensity were measured. FINDINGS: After four weeks, McConnell taping technique caused a decline in pain intensity from 50.13±21.60 to 26.67±10.14 mm in patients with PFPS (P=0.001. However, this technique had no positive effects on quality of life (score on KOOS questionnaire or patellar angle/position (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Based on the findings, independent use of McConnell taping technique is not sufficient for improving the quality of life in patients with PFPS or correcting the abnormal alignment of patella however, it can help reduce the induced pain.

  1. Electronic diary assessment of pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in chronic low back pain patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Peters, M.L.; Patijn, J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vlaeyen, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in daily life in patients with chronic low back pain. An experience sampling methodology was used in which electronic diary data were collected by means of palmtop computers from 40

  2. Osteoarthritis Patients' Experiences of Pharmacotherapy for Pain Management in Iran: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Behshid, Mozhgan; Irajpoor, Alireza; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Despite the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for pain management in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), personal biases in the selection, administration, and continuation of pharmacotherapy challenge the proper management of symptoms and the effectiveness of the therapy. This study was conducted to carry out an in-depth examination of the experiences of patients with OA about their use of pharmacotherapy for the OA pain management and the existing challenges. The present qualitative study was conducted on 17 patients with OA, 5 of their family members and 8 healthcare personnel using a conventional content analysis approach. Data were collected through 35 interviews, which were unstructured at first but became semi-structured later on. Data collection continued until data saturation and analyzed simultaneously. The criteria used to determine the rigor of the study included the credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability of the data. The analysis of the data revealed 3 main categories and 8 subcategories. The main categories including preference for non-pharmacological modalities, preference for symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SySADOAs) and preference for vitamins and minerals. Briefing the patients on the therapeutic goals, participating them in the clinical decision-making process, modifying drug administration patterns through prescribing the minimum effective dosage and substituting alternative therapies whenever possible, consistently monitoring the therapeutic responses and any unexpected complications and use of complementary treatments, makes up strategies that can help improve OA pain management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. kinesiotaping reduces pain and modulates sensory function in patients with focal dystonia: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosin, Elisa; Avanzino, Laura; Marchese, Roberta; Stramesi, Paola; Bilanci, Martina; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Pain is one of the most common and disabling "nonmotor" symptoms in patients with dystonia. No recent study evaluated the pharmacological or physical therapy approaches to specifically treat dystonic pain symptoms. To evaluate the effectiveness of KinesioTaping in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) and focal hand dystonia (FHD) on self-reported pain (primary objective) and on sensory functions (secondary objective). Twenty-five dystonic patients (14 with CD and 11 FHD) entered a randomized crossover pilot study. The patients were randomized to 14-day treatment with KinesioTaping or ShamTaping over neck (in CD) or forearm muscles (in FHD), and after a 30-day washout period, they received the other treatment. The were 3 visual analog scales (VASs) for usual pain, worst pain, and pain relief. Disease severity changes were evaluated by means of the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (CD) and the Writer's Cramp Rating Scale (FHD). Furthermore, to investigate possible KinesioTaping-induced effects on sensory functions, we evaluated the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. Treatment with KinesioTape induced a decrease in the subjective sensation of pain and a modification in the ability of sensory discrimination, whereas ShamTaping had no effect. A significant, positive correlation was found in both groups of patients between the improvement in the subjective sensation of pain and the reduction of somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values induced by KinesioTaping. These preliminary results suggest that KinesioTaping may be useful in treating pain in patients with dystonia.

  4. Drug abuse identification and pain management in dental patients: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fahmida; Frare, Robert W; Py Berrios, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Properly identifying patients with a history of drug abuse is the first step in providing effective dental care. Dental professionals need to be fully aware of the challenges associated with treating this population. In the current study, the authors analyzed the physical and oral manifestations of illicit drug abuse to aid in the identification of patients who abuse drugs and the pain management strategies needed to treat them. The authors also present a clinical case of a patient with unique skin lesions and discuss the typical clinical findings of drug abuse based on a literature review.

  5. Managing chronic orofacial pain: A qualitative study of patients', doctors', and dentists' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarah; Goldthorpe, Joanna; McElroy, Cheryl; King, Elizabeth; Javidi, Hanieh; Tickle, Martin; Aggarwal, Vishal R

    2015-11-01

    Persistent pain in the face, mouth, and jaws is a common presentation to dental and medical services. The aetiology remains unclear, but a growing evidence base recognizes the effectiveness of psychological rather than biomedical interventions. To understand how this approach might be implemented into clinical practice, knowledge is needed of patients' and clinicians' experience of chronic orofacial pain (COFP). The aim of this study was to explore the experience and understanding of COFP by patients and primary and secondary care medical and dental practitioners. Qualitative interview study. Audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 dentists, 11 general practitioners, and seven patients were thematically analysed. Clinicians and patients recognized the role that psychological factors could play in the development and maintenance of COFP, yet management and self-management strategies were largely limited to biomedical interventions. Achieving a diagnosis proved problematic but largely functional for both parties. GPs and dentists viewed COFP as a non-dental problem and felt inadequately equipped to manage the condition. GPs, unlike dentists, felt obligated to support patients using techniques for managing patients with other long-term conditions. Frustration at the current inadequacy of COFP management often led to conflict with (or disengagement from) the clinician-patient relationship. Current management of COFP is ineffective and unsatisfactory for patients and practitioners, which impacts on their relationship. Fundamental barriers to accessing and implementing psychological interventions for COFP arise from ineffective communication between physicians and patients, and between medical and dental practitioners. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? COFP is characterized by persistent pain in the face, mouth, or jaws that are not the result of organic disease or physical trauma. Patients with COFP present

  6. Effect of Upper-Extremity Strengthening Exercises on the Lumbar Strength, Disability and Pain of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Erdem; Akova, Bedrettin; Gür, Hakan; Sekir, Ufuk

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the impacts of a low back rehabilitation program accompanied with neck, shoulder and upper back exercises on pain, disability, and physical characteristics of patients with chronic low back pain. Twenty sedentary male patients with chronic low back pain participated in the study on a voluntary basis. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups: a conventional low back exercise group (CE) and a supported exercise group (SE; CE plus upper back, neck, and shoulder exercises). The Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ) was used to evaluate the disability status and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to identify the pain states of the patients. In addition, neck, lumbar and shoulder isokinetic and isometric strengths of the patients were evaluated. The CE group performed lumbar stretching, mobilization and stabilization exercises in addition to low-back and abdominal isometric and concentric strengthening exercises. The SE group performed static stretching and isotonic exercises for the neck, upper-back, and shoulder muscles, in addition to the exercises performed in CE group. The exercises were implemented 3 days a week for 6 weeks in both groups. Following the 6-week exercise periods in both groups, statistically significant (p disability. With respect to the levels of pain and disability, the improvements observed in the SE group was significantly (p disability in patients with chronic low back pain more prominently than conventional low back exercises.

  7. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  8. A retrospective study on the influence of nutritional status on pain management in cancer patients using the transdermal fentanyl patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Chiba, Takeshi; Tairabune, Tomohiko; Kimura, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Go; Takahashi, Katsuo; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether nutritional status influences pain intensity in cancer patients receiving a transdermal fentanyl patch (FP). This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status is associated with pain intensity and to evaluate the influence of changes in nutritional status on pain intensity in cancer patients receiving transdermal FP treatment. We included 92 patients receiving transdermal FP treatment for the first time with switching from oxycodone. The patients were classified into low- and normal-nutrition groups based on their nutritional status, which was assessed according to the Nutrition Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) parameters. The pain intensity of each patient was evaluated by a numeric rating scale (11-point scale from 0 to 10). NRS 2002 score and pain intensity were obtained on day 3 after the FP was applied to the skin. Pain intensities were significantly higher among patients in the low-nutrition group than among patients in the normal-nutrition group. NRS 2002 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the pain intensities. In 52 of 92 patients, who were evaluated using the NRS 2002 score and pain intensity on day 30 after FP application, the changes in NRS 2002 scores were significantly related to changes in pain intensities (odds ratio, 30.0; 95% confidence interval, 4.48-200.97; p=0.0005). These results suggest that an increase in the NRS 2002 score is a risk factor for an increase in pain intensity in cancer patients receiving FP treatment. Malnutrition may lead to poor pain management in cancer patients receiving FP treatment.

  9. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Puta, Christian; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain acti...

  10. The effects of therapeutic climbing in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbert, Kai; Weber, Michaela

    2011-05-15

    A randomized controlled study investigated the effects of therapeutic climbing in patients with chronic low back pain. Before and after 4 weeks of training, physical and mental well-being were measured by two questionnaires (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]; Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire for measuring back pain-related disability [FFbH-R]). Therapeutic climbing has been suggested to increase muscular strength and perceived physical and mental well-being. This study focused on the psychological effects of therapeutic climbing and compared it with standard exercise therapy. Therapeutic climbing has become increasingly popular in rehabilitation and its effects on muscular strengthening have been shown. Therapeutic climbing has also been suggested to yield psychological effects such as changes in attentional focus from pain to physical capabilities. To date, no controlled clinical trial has investigated these psychological effects and it is unclear whether therapeutic climbing is comparable or superior to other forms of exercise. Twenty-eight patients with chronic low back pain conducted either a therapeutic climbing or a standard exercise regime. Each program took 4 weeks, including four guided training sessions per week. Before and after the program, patients answered two questionnaires assessing their physical and mental well-being. For the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire for measuring back pain-related disability, there was no difference before versus after or between the treatments. For the SF-36, both treatments showed significant improvements in 3/8 subscales of the SF-36. In 2/8 subscales, only the participants of the therapeutic climbing improved and in 1/8 subscales the converse was true. Comparing both groups, significantly larger improvements were found after therapeutic climbing in two subscales of the SF-36: physical functioning and general health perception. The benefits of therapeutic climbing were comparable with those of

  11. Internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support for pain patients with emotional comorbidity: a replicated single case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Wurm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In pain patients, comorbid emotional problems have been linked to negative outcomes, including suboptimal treatment gains. Developing parsimonious and accessible treatment options is therefore important. The overarching aim of this study was to test an internet delivered therapist guided transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support. An adapted version of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatments of Emotional Disorders was used as an intervention for pain patients with residual pain problems and comorbid emotional problems after having received a multimodal pain rehabilitation. The study used a replicated AB single case experimental design (N = 5; 3 females. Outcome measures were depressive and general anxiety symptoms, pain intensity, pain coping problems, and diagnostic status. Feasibility measures (completion and compliance and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Scores on Nonoverlap of All Pairs (NAP indicate a decrease of anxiety for three participants and a decrease of depression for four participants. Decreases were small and did not always reach statistical significance. Also, Tau-U scores could only confirm a reliable trend for one participant. Two out of four patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders before treatment did no longer fulfill diagnostic criteria posttreatment. No improvements could be seen on pain problems. The treatment was feasible and patient satisfaction was high. Hence, while an internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support may be a feasible and accepted secondary intervention for pain patients with comorbid emotional problems, the effects are unclear. The gap between high patient satisfaction and small changes in symptomatology should be explored further.

  12. Effect of Upper-Extremity Strengthening Exercises on the Lumbar Strength, Disability and Pain of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Atalay, Bedrettin Akova, Hakan Gür, Ufuk Sekir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the impacts of a low back rehabilitation program accompanied with neck, shoulder and upper back exercises on pain, disability, and physical characteristics of patients with chronic low back pain. Twenty sedentary male patients with chronic low back pain participated in the study on a voluntary basis. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups: a conventional low back exercise group (CE and a supported exercise group (SE; CE plus upper back, neck, and shoulder exercises. The Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ was used to evaluate the disability status and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS was used to identify the pain states of the patients. In addition, neck, lumbar and shoulder isokinetic and isometric strengths of the patients were evaluated. The CE group performed lumbar stretching, mobilization and stabilization exercises in addition to low-back and abdominal isometric and concentric strengthening exercises. The SE group performed static stretching and isotonic exercises for the neck, upper-back, and shoulder muscles, in addition to the exercises performed in CE group. The exercises were implemented 3 days a week for 6 weeks in both groups. Following the 6-week exercise periods in both groups, statistically significant (p < 0.01 improvements were observed in the patients’ levels of pain and the scores of MODQ reflecting an easing of disability. With respect to the levels of pain and disability, the improvements observed in the SE group was significantly (p < 0.01 greater than the improvement observed in the CE group. Based on the findings of this study, we can conclude that a low back exercise program used in combination with neck, shoulder and upper back exercises reduces the level of pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain more prominently than conventional low back exercises.

  13. Patients with low back pain differ from those who also have leg pain or signs of nerve root involvement – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongsted Alice

    2012-11-01

    -sectional data also underlines that the heterogeneity of patients with LBP is more complex than that which can be explained by leg pain patterns alone. The implications of the observed differences also require investigation in longitudinal studies.

  14. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy to evaluate patients with chest pain (preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahfouz, M.; Elhaddad, S.; Elghoneimy, I.; Elmesidy, S.; Haggag, F.; Sbdou, S.; Dayem, K.A.; Ezzeldiy, H.

    1985-01-01

    201 Tl perfusion scintigraphy for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was carried out in 25 patients of mean age years, presenting with chest pain. Scintiscan were obtained at rest and after exercise and were compared with ECG studies at rest and after exercise. In all patients with previous myocardial infarctions, perfusion defects were present at rest, two of these patients showed abnormal stress scintigraphy consistent with a new ischemic response which was not detected by the stress ECG. In 3 out of the 8 patients with normal ECG, in 2 out of the 4 patients with response suggesting ischemia and in 4 out of the 7 patients with definite ECG proof of ischemia infarction was detected by 201 Tl. In all the previous, resting and exercise ECG failed to show evidence of infarction.1 fig.,2 tab

  15. Dose Titration of Pregabalin in Patients with Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Simulation Based on Observational Study Patients Enriched with Data from Randomized Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Joe; Edwards, Roger A; Manca, Luigi; Grugni, Roberto; Bonfanti, Gianluca; Emir, Birol; Whalen, Edward; Watt, Stephen; Parsons, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    Achieving a therapeutic response to pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN) requires adequate upward dose titration. Our goal was to identify relationships between titration and response to pregabalin in patients with pDPN. Data were integrated from nine randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials as well as one 6-week open-label observational study conducted by 5808 physicians (2642 patients with pDPN) in standard outpatient settings in Germany. These studies evaluated pregabalin for treatment of pDPN. Using these data, we examined "what if" scenarios using a microsimulation platform that integrates data from randomized and observational sources as well as autoregressive-moving-average with exogenous inputs models that predict pain outcomes, taking into account weekly changes in pain, sleep interference, dose, and other patient characteristics that were unchanging. Final pain levels were significantly different depending on dose changes (P titration regardless of baseline pain severity. Altogether, 78.5% of patients with pDPN had 0-1 dose change, and 15.2% had ≥ 2 dose changes. Simulation demonstrated that the 4.8% of inadequately titrated patients who did not improve/very much improve their pain levels would have benefited from ≥ 2 dose changes. Patient satisfaction with tolerability (range 90.3-96.2%) was similar, regardless of baseline pain severity, number of titrations, or extent of improvement, suggesting that tolerability did not influence treatment response patterns. Upward dose titration reduced pain in patients with pDPN who actually received it. Simulation also predicted pain reduction in an inadequately titrated nonresponder subgroup of patients had they actually received adequate titration. The decision not to uptitrate must have been driven by factors other than tolerability. Pfizer, Inc.

  16. Implementation fidelity of self-administered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic back pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallett, Edward J; Rentowl, Patricia; Johnson, Mark I; Watson, Paul J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief has not been reliably established. Inconclusive findings could be due to inadequate TENS delivery and inappropriate outcome assessment. Electronic monitoring devices were used to determine patient compliance with a TENS intervention and outcome assessment protocol, to record pain scores before, during, and after TENS, and measure electrical output settings. Patients with chronic back pain consented to use TENS daily for 2 weeks and to report pain scores before, during, and after 1-hour treatments. A ≥ 30% reduction in pain scores was used to classify participants as TENS responders. Electronic monitoring devices "TLOG" and "TSCORE" recorded time and duration of TENS use, electrical settings, and pain scores. Forty-two patients consented to participate. One of 35 (3%) patients adhered completely to the TENS use and pain score reporting protocol. Fourteen of 33 (42%) were TENS responders according to electronic pain score data. Analgesia onset occurred within 30 to 60 minutes for 13/14 (93%) responders. It was not possible to correlate TENS amplitude, frequency, or pulse width measurements with therapeutic response. Findings from TENS research studies depend on the timing of outcome assessment; pain should be recorded during stimulation. TENS device sophistication might be an issue and parameter restriction should be considered. Careful protocol design is required to improve adherence and monitoring is necessary to evaluate the validity of findings. This observational study provides objective evidence to support concerns about poor implementation fidelity in TENS research.

  17. Dysfunctional pain modulation in somatoform pain disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Stefanie; Stefanie, Klug; Anderer, Peter; Peter, Anderer; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda; Gerda, Saletu-Zyhlarz; Freidl, Marion; Marion, Freidl; Saletu, Bernd; Bernd, Saletu; Prause, Wolfgang; Wolfgang, Prause; Aigner, Martin; Martin, Aigner

    2011-06-01

    To date, pain perception is thought to be a creative process of modulation carried out by an interplay of pro- and anti-nociceptive mechanisms. Recent research demonstrates that pain experience constitutes the result of top-down processes represented in cortical descending pain modulation. Cortical, mainly medial and frontal areas, as well as subcortical structures such as the brain stem, medulla and thalamus seem to be key players in pain modulation. An imbalance of pro- and anti-nociceptive mechanisms are assumed to cause chronic pain disorders, which are associated with spontaneous pain perception without physiologic scaffolding or exaggerated cortical activation in response to pain exposure. In contrast to recent investigations, the aim of the present study was to elucidate cortical activation of somatoform pain disorder patients during baseline condition. Scalp EEG, quantitative Fourier-spectral analyses and LORETA were employed to compare patient group (N = 15) to age- and sex-matched controls (N = 15) at rest. SI, SII, ACC, SMA, PFC, PPC, insular, amygdale and hippocampus displayed significant spectral power reductions within the beta band range (12-30 Hz). These results suggest decreased cortical baseline arousal in somatoform pain disorder patients. We finally conclude that obtained results may point to an altered baseline activity, maybe characteristic for chronic somatoform pain disorder.

  18. [Challenges for home care services in the pain management of cancer patients : A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnass, I; Krutter, S; Nestler, N

    2018-03-21

    People with cancer are increasingly supported by home care services. Pain is a relevant symptom of these diseases and nurses of home care services are involved in the treatment. The German National Expert Standard "Pain management in nursing" includes evidence-based recommendations for the implementation of adequate pain management. Considering the given structural conditions of home care services, nurses describe both barriers and challenges with the implementation. By means of five guideline-based discussion groups, nurses of 14 home care services were questioned about the challenges they had experienced in pain management. The questioning focuses on the level of implementation of the recommendation for each aspect: pain assessment, pharmacological pain therapy, non-pharmacological pain therapy, pain-related side effects, information, training, and counseling in the care of people with cancer. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. On the one hand, the results illustrate a need for further knowledge and possibilities, e.g., for the assessment of pain as a multidimensional phenomenon and, on the other hand, that the conditions for continuous pain monitoring of cancer patients in home care services are limited. The need for short-term reconciliation with the treatment team and the practitioners proved to be more difficult than the cooperation with the palliative care network. Involvement of family members is important to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Beside knowledge and competencies regarding nursing care, structures and processes for interprofessional pain management need further development and research.

  19. Daily pilates exercise or inactivity for patients with low back pain: a clinical prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Fischetti, F; Maccagnano, G; Comes, R; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-02-01

    Studies have shown the effectiveness of a few weekly pilates sessions as helping to reduce lower back pain (LBP). However many patients fear that physical activity can actually make the pain and disability worse. We carried out this observational prospective clinical study to look at the effects that taking part in daily pilates has one on side and on the other the effects of LBP management without physical exercise. The volunteers who participated in this study were recruited from among some local cultural associations. Patients affected by LBP were evaluated. The subjects were 60 volunteers (27 males and 33 females) with a mean age of 51.2 years who had chronic low back pain (CLBP). They were allocated to pilates group (N.=30) or inactivity control group (N.=30). The pilates group performed one-hour lesson of pilates exercise, 5 lessons per week during the following 6 months. The inactivity group continued with their normal daily activities. The Roland-Morris Disability, the Oswestry, the SF-36 and the Spinal Functional Sort Questionaries of all subjects were measured at the baseline (T1) and at 6 months (T2). At T2 improvements were observed in the pilates group with increases in physical and social functioning, general health and vitality (Ppilates. Some authors underlined the possible risk of a lack of adherence to an exercise program at home. This study suggests that a daily pilates program is effective for the management of CLBP. On the other hand, the inactivity contributes to further worsening, inducing a vicious cycle in which pain and physical activity intolerance follow each other.

  20. Evaluation of the impact of the urinary symptoms on quality of life of patients with painful bladder syndrome/chronic pelvic pain and radiation cystitis: EURCIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapariz-González, M; Castro-Díaz, D; Mejía-Rendón, D

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary symptoms of Painful Bladder/Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis (PBCPPS) on the Quality of Life, and self-esteem of the patient. An observational, multicenter, epidemiological and cross-sectional study was performed on patients with Painful Bladder/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis. Data was recorded on severity of urinary symptoms and QoL impairment using the PUF Score. The patients evaluated the QoL deterioration grade through the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and the level of their anxiety and self-esteem with the Goldberg's Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. Post-hoc comparisons were performed between the results of the KHQ of this study and a sample of patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Results on RSES were analyzed with data from the general population and from patients with erectile dysfunction. A total of 530 cases, mostly female patients, who had been diagnosed with PBCPPS, were analyzed. High levels of deterioration in QoL were described: KHQ scores were significantly higher when compared with patients with UI (P<.01). Involvement of self-esteem was higher in patients with RC and men, who obtained scores similar to those of patients with erectile dysfunction. Patients with Painful Bladder Syndrome/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis present high levels of anxiety, and significant reductions in both quality of life and self-esteem. Especially for men, this affectation is similar to that caused by erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. TRPA1 polymorphisms in chronic and complete spinal cord injury patients with neuropathic pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Rodriguez, Sonia; Castillo Aguilar, Inmaculada; Cuesta Villa, Luis; Serrano Saenz de Tejada, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Pilot study. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TRPA1 gene are related to the etiology of chronic pain. The study is a pilot study with the primary objective of analyzing these SNPs in Spanish patients with chronic and complete spinal cord injury (SCI) and neuropathic pain (NPP). Asepeyo Hospital Department of Chronic and Complete SCI. Twelve patients with chronic and complete SCI and NPP, and 12 patients with chronic and complete SCI with no pain were reviewed. International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Classification (LANSS) and visual analog score (VAS) were chosen to classify pain syndrome. SNPs were identified by melting analysis after DNA amplification with real-time fluorescence PCR. There were differences in rs11988795 variant: GG homozygous ( p  = 0.01) and G allele ( p  = 0.001) were more frequent in SCI patients with no pain. There were differences in rs13255063 variant: TT homozygous were prevalent ( p  = 0.03) in patients with NPP. Until now this is the first study to show a description of TRPA1 SNPs in Spanish patients with chronic and complete SCI and NPP. These results suggest that GG genotype in rs11988795 variant and G allele could be protective factors against NPP. TT genotype in rs13255063 variant could be a risk factor for NPP. Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injuries may have genetic contributions.

  2. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation with bidirectional modulated sine waves in patients with chronic back pain: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Koki; Takahashi, Norio; Nishio, Yasuyuki; Koyanagi, Mika; Aida, Sumihisa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives.  Newly developed bidirectional modulated sine waves (BMW) might provide some derived benefit to patients with low back pain. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) with BMWs was tested. Materials and Methods.  Analgesic effects of BMWs and conventional bidirectional pulsed waves on chronic back pain in 28 patients were compared, and effects of repeated TENS using BMWs on chronic back pain were investigated in 21 patients by means of a randomized double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel-group method. Pain intensity was assessed using numerical rating scale (NRS). Results.  There was significant immediate reduction in NRS in patients receiving BMWs, and 60 min after treatment compared to sham TENS. Weekly repeated treatments using massage and TENS with BMWs for 5 weeks resulted in a decrease of NRS, but there were no significant differences between the TENS plus massage and sham TENS plus massage groups. Conclusions.  This study shows that TENS with BMWs significantly inhibits chronic back pain, and treatment effects are attained within a day. The results also suggest that there were no statistically significant long-term effects of TENS with BMW in the repeated treatment.

  3. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L.S.; Christiansen, P.; Raundahl, U.

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...... and serum cortisol did not increase at all in any of the groups. As a measure of parasympathetic neural activity, independent of sympathetic neural activity, the beat-to-beat variation of the heart rate was calculated. The functional patients had a significantly higher beat-to-beat variation expressed...... as the mean square successive differences of the R-R intervals (MSSD), indicating a higher basal parasympathetic neural activity (mean MSSD +/- SEM = 64 +/- 6 msec in the functional group, 46 +/- 6 msec in the healthy group, and 49 +/- 6 msec in the organic group; P = 0.03). A reduced sympathetic neural...

  4. Patient characteristics in low back pain subgroups based on an existing classification system. A descriptive cohort study in chiropractic practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eirikstoft, Heidi; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    reducible disc syndromes followed by facet joint pain, dysfunction and sacroiliac (SI)-joint pain. Classification was inconclusive in 5% of the patients. Differences in pain, activity limitation, and psychological factors were small across subgroups. Within 10 days, 82% were reported to belong to the same......Sub-grouping of low back pain (LBP) is believed to improve prediction of prognosis and treatment effects. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine whether chiropractic patients could be sub-grouped according to an existing pathoanatomically-based classification system, (2) to describe...... patient characteristics within each subgroup, and (3) to determine the proportion of patients in whom clinicians considered the classification to be unchanged after approximately 10 days. A cohort of 923 LBP patients was included during their first consultation. Patients completed an extensive...

  5. Implementing a benchmarking and feedback concept decreases postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A prospective study including 256 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, A; Drescher, J; Greimel, F; Zeman, F; Grifka, J; Meißner, W; Völlner, F

    2016-12-05

    Perioperative pain reduction, particularly during the first two days, is highly important for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Problems are not only caused by medical issues but by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent benchmarking. All patients included into the study had undergone total knee arthroplasty. Outcome parameters were analyzed by means of a questionnaire on the first postoperative day. A multidisciplinary team implemented a regular procedure of data analyzes and external benchmarking by participating in a nationwide quality improvement project. At the beginning of the study, our hospital ranked 16 th in terms of activity-related pain and 9 th in patient satisfaction among 47 anonymized hospitals participating in the benchmarking project. At the end of the study, we had improved to 1 st activity-related pain and to 2 nd in patient satisfaction. Although benchmarking started and finished with the same standardized pain management concept, results were initially pure. Beside pharmacological treatment, interdisciplinary teamwork and benchmarking with direct feedback mechanisms are also very important for decreasing postoperative pain and for increasing patient satisfaction after TKA.

  6. Experienced dilemmas of everyday life in chronic neuropathic pain patients--results from a critical incident study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensing, Gunnel K E; Sverker, Annette M; Leijon, Göran S

    2007-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is a disabling chronic condition with limited therapeutic options. Few studies have addressed patient's experience and strategies. The aim of this study was to explore dilemmas experienced in order to improve care and rehabilitation. An interview study with 39 patients suffering from neuropathic pain of different origin was performed. We used the critical incident technique to collect data. Questions on occasions when patients had been hindered by or reminded of their neuropathic pain were included, and the self-perceived consequences and management of such occasions. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed qualitatively. A broad range of experiences categorised into dilemmas, disturbances, consequences and managements from most parts of everyday life was identified. The dilemmas were 'housework', 'sitting', 'physical activity', 'personal hygiene', 'sleeping difficulties', 'hypersensitivity to external stimuli', 'social relationships', 'transportation' and 'leisure time'. Disturbances were 'failures', 'inabilities' and 'restrictions'. Consequences were 'increased pain', 'psychological reactions' and 'physical symptoms'. The majority of the patients used activity-oriented strategies to manage their pain such as alternative ways of performing the task, a cognitive approach or simply ignoring the pain. This is one of the first studies presenting detailed data on everyday dilemmas, disturbances and consequences of patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Such information is important in clinical settings to improve care and rehabilitation.

  7. Alexithymia and Depression Affect Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Pain: A Study on 205 Patients With Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Tesio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pain in fibromyalgia (FM is accompanied by a heterogeneous series of other symptoms, which strongly affect patients’ quality of life and interfere with social and work performance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of alexithymia on both the physical and the psychosocial components of the health-related quality of life (HRQoL of FM patients, controlling for the concomitant effects of depression, anxiety, and pain. In particular, given the strong interconnection between depression and alexithymia, the relationship between alexithymia and HRQoL as mediated by depressive symptoms was further investigated. Data were collected on a consecutive sample of 205 female patients with a main diagnosis of FM. The results showed that about 26% of the patients showed the presence of alexithymia, as assessed by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20. Clinically relevant levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms were present in 61 and 60% of the patients, respectively. The results of the hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that pain intensity (PI and depressive symptoms explained the 45% of the variance of the physical component of HRQoL (p < 0.001. Regarding the mental component of HRQoL, depressive and anxiety symptoms, alexithymia, and PI significantly explained 61% of the variance (p < 0.001. The mediation analyses confirmed that alexithymia had a direct effect on the mental component of HRQoL and showed a statistically significant indirect effect on both the physical and the mental components, through the mediation of depressive symptoms. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested the presence of both a direct and an indirect effect of alexithymia, in particular of the difficulty identifying feeling, on the HRQoL of patients with FM. Indeed, even though the concomitant presence of depressive symptoms is responsible of an indirect effect, alexithymia per se seems to directly contribute to worsen the impact that this

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF PROSTAGLANDIN E1 IN THE PAIN MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CRITICAL LIMB ISCHAEMIA- A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sajan Kurien

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Critical Limb Ischaemia (CLI was defined for the first time in 1982 by P. R. F. Bell as a manifestation of peripheral artery disease, which describes patient with typical chronic ischaemic rest pain or ischaemic skin ulcers or gangrene.1 This term of CLI should only be used in patients with chronic ischaemic disease defined as presence of recurring rest pain that persists for more than two weeks requiring regular analgesics and with ulceration or gangrene of the foot or toes. These criteria correspond to stage 3 and 4 of Fontaine’s classification of POVD. Observational studies have shown that one year after diagnosis of CLI, 25% of patients experience a major amputation, 25% had died and only 50% survived without requiring a major amputation, though some have rest pain, ulcer or gangrene persisting. The primary goals in treating CLI are to relieve claudication pain and rest pain, to heal the ulcer, to prevent amputation of limbs, to improve quality of life and to prolong survival. The aim of the study is to study the improvement of claudication pain, rest pain and improvement of the level of amputation in patients with diffuse peripheral arterial disease (CLI after administration of PGE1. MATERIALS AND METHODS From June 2013 to November 2014, a total of 45 patients having advanced CLI (Fontaine’s grade III and IV not suitable for angioplasty and stenting or bypass procedures received different courses of PGE1. 20 patients (44.44% received 6 full courses of PGE1,3 patients (6.66% received 5 courses, 5 patients (11.11% received 4 courses, 4 patients (8.8% received 3 courses, 4 patients (8.8% received 2 courses and 9 patients (20% received one course. PGE1 was administered through intravenous infusion (alprostadil 100mcg over 10 hours a day for 5 days in one month (1course. The reduction in claudication and rest pain, improvement in level of amputation and complications were assessed. RESULTS In all cases, there was reduction in pain

  9. Predictive ability of an early diagnostic guess in patients presenting with chest pain; a longitudinal descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Junod, Michel; Herzig, Lilli; Vaucher, Paul; Burnand, Bernard; Bischoff, Thomas; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2010-02-21

    The intuitive early diagnostic guess could play an important role in reaching a final diagnosis. However, no study to date has attempted to quantify the importance of general practitioners' (GPs) ability to correctly appraise the origin of chest pain within the first minutes of an encounter. The validation study was nested in a multicentre cohort study with a one year follow-up and included 626 successive patients who presented with chest pain and were attended by 58 GPs in Western Switzerland. The early diagnostic guess was assessed prior to a patient's history being taken by a GP and was then compared to a diagnosis of chest pain observed over the next year. Using summary measures clustered at the GP's level, the early diagnostic guess was confirmed by further investigation in 51.0% (CI 95%; 49.4% to 52.5%) of patients presenting with chest pain. The early diagnostic guess was more accurate in patients with a life threatening illness (65.4%; CI 95% 64.5% to 66.3%) and in patients who did not feel anxious (62.9%; CI 95% 62.5% to 63.3%). The predictive abilities of an early diagnostic guess were consistent among GPs. The GPs early diagnostic guess was correct in one out of two patients presenting with chest pain. The probability of a correct guess was higher in patients with a life-threatening illness and in patients not feeling anxious about their pain.

  10. Altered cerebral blood flow in chronic neck pain patients but not in whiplash patients: a 99mTc-HMPAO rCBF study

    OpenAIRE

    Sundström, Torbjörn; Guez, Michel; Hildingsson, Christer; Toolanen, Göran; Nyberg, Lars; Riklund, Katrine

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional study to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and chronic neck pain patients without previous history of trauma along with a healthy control group. Chronic neck pain is a common disorder and a history of cervical spine injury including whiplash trauma constitute a risk factor for persistent neck pain. The aetiology of the late whiplash syndrome is unknown with no specific diagnostic criteria based on imaging, physiologica...

  11. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients’ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (P<0.001), at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects. PMID:27934800

  12. Assessment of the clinical relevance of quantitative sensory testing with Von Frey monofilaments in patients with allodynia and neuropathic pain. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Keizer, D.; van Wijhe, M.; Post, W.J.; Uges, D.R.A.; Wierda, J.M.K.H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Allodynia is a common and disabling symptom in many patients with neuropathic pain. Whereas quantification of pain mostly depends on subjective pain reports, allodynia can also be measured objectively with quantitative sensory testing. In this pilot study, we investigated the clinical relevance of quantitative sensory testing with Von Frey monofilaments in patients with allodynia as a consequence of a neuropathic pain syndrome, by means of correlating subjective pain scores with p...

  13. Study of Frequency of Low Back Pain and Lumbar Disc Herniation in Patients of Hamadan MRI Center in 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jabbari

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain is one of the prevalent diseases of the world. In this research, with helping of MRI the incidence of disc herniation in patients of low back pain in our living area was studied. Survey of the specifications of disc herniation was carried out and data was compared with some performed studies in other parts of the world. In this study, for 600 patients referred to HAMEDAN MRI CENTER, who had complaint of low back pain, MRI study was performed. Then, MRI Images of the patients who had disc hernition, studied for number, form, severity and anatomic position of the herniated disc and family history of low back pain. 83.7% of the studied cases was pathologic and 16.3% was normal. Among the pathologic cases, 70.12% had disc herniation. The most common age group in both sex for disc herniotion was 30-50 years. Disc herniation in men was more common than women. The most common anatomic position of the herniated disc was L4- L5 disc, mostly was one herniated disc and centrolateral form. There was not any meaningful relation between family history of the low back pain and lumbar disc herniation. This study showed that lumbar disc herniation is one of the common causes of the low back pain in our living area and MRI is the choice imaging modality for diagnosis and survey of low back pain and disc herniation.

  14. Pain-related fear of (re-)injury in patients with low back pain: Estimation or measurement in manual therapy primary care practice? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostendorp, Rob A B; Elvers, Hans; Mikolajewska, Emilia; Laekeman, Marjan; Roussel, Nathalie; van der Zanden, Olaf; Nijs, Jo; Samwel, Han

    2017-11-06

    Manual physical therapists (MPTs) working in primary care get limited information about patient's courses of (chronic) low back pain (LBP). Identification of kinesiophobia is mostly based on clinical perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the scores with which manual physical therapists in a primary care setting identify kinesiophobia in patients with low back pain, and the patients' self-reported measures of kinesiophobia. The cross-sectional study comprised 104 patients with LBP and 17 MPTs. Patients first independently completed the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-17). The therapists, blinded to the TSK-scores, rated their perception of a patient's kinesiophobia using the Visual Analogue Scale-Estimation (VAS-est) and the accuracy of their ratings using the Visual Analogue Scale-Accuracy (VAS-ac). Kendall's tau b was used to determine the level of correlation between scores on the TSK-17 and the VAS-est.

  15. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Lauche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n=25 or waiting list control group (WL, n=25. TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR, pain related to movement (PM, quality of life (SF-36, Neck Disability Index (NDI, mechanical detection (MDT, vibration detection (MDT, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P<0.05 and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P<0.05. No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa; pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P<0.01. Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP.

  16. Neuropathic pain in Systemic Sclerosis patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Neves, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Santos-Faria, Daniela; Afonso, Carmo; Teixeira, Filipa

    2018-01-31

    To investigate if patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) show a higher prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP) in comparison with controls. To study the relationship between clinical variables of the disease and NP among SSc patients. 48 patients and 45 controls were included. Presence of NP was assessed applying the DN4 "Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions" questionnaire. Different clinical variables were also assessed in patients. Statistical analysis included parametric, nonparametric tests and multivariate logistic regression. NP was significantly higher in SSc patients (56.2% vs 13.3%, p<0.001). Mean Modified Rodnan Skin Score was independently associated with the presence of NP (p<0.05, OR 1.90). Peripheral nervous system involvement in SSc is not well studied and, as far as the authors are aware, this is the first study published evaluating NP in SSc patients and controls. These findings should raise the awareness of the clinician to recognize and address the presence of NP in these patients, especially in those with severe skin involvement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered cerebral blood flow in chronic neck pain patients but not in whiplash patients: a 99mTc-HMPAO rCBF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Torbjörn; Guez, Michel; Hildingsson, Christer; Toolanen, Göran; Nyberg, Lars; Riklund, Katrine

    2006-08-01

    A cross-sectional study to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and chronic neck pain patients without previous history of trauma along with a healthy control group. Chronic neck pain is a common disorder and a history of cervical spine injury including whiplash trauma constitute a risk factor for persistent neck pain. The aetiology of the late whiplash syndrome is unknown with no specific diagnostic criteria based on imaging, physiological, or psychological examination. Earlier studies indicate a parieto-occipital hypoperfusion but it is unclear if the hypoperfusion represents a response to chronic pain. The rCBF was monitored in 45 patients with chronic neck pain: 27 cases with chronic whiplash syndrome and 18 age and gender matched cases with non-traumatic chronic neck pain. The rCBF was estimated with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). The non-traumatic patients displayed rCBF changes in comparison with the whiplash group and the healthy control group. These changes included rCBF decreases in a right temporal region close to hippocampus, and increased rCBF in left insula. The whiplash group displayed no significant differences in rCBF in comparison with the healthy controls. The present study suggests different pain mechanisms in patients with chronic neck pain of non-traumatic origin compared to those with chronic neck pain due to a whiplash trauma.

  18. Experimental integrative muscular movement technique enhances cervical range of motion in patients with chronic neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohe, Benjamin G; Carter, Ronald; Thompson, William R; Duncan, Randall L; Cooper, Carlton R

    2015-04-01

    Neck pain presents a tremendous physical and financial burden. This study compared the efficacy of the complementary and alternative medical treatments of integrative muscular movement technique (IMMT) and Swedish massage on neck pain in women of occupation age, the largest demographic group with neck pain. A total of 38 women were assigned to IMMT (n=28) or Swedish massage (n=10) in a blinded manner. Both groups received eight 30-minute treatments over 4 weeks. Cervical range of motion (ROM) in flexion, extension, sidebending, and rotation was measured before and after treatment. Each patient's pain was assessed by using an analogue pain scale of 0-10. Compared with the Swedish massage group, patients receiving IMMT experienced a significant increase in ROM in cervical flexion (ppain for IMMT was -1.75 units compared with -0.3 units for Swedish massage (pcervical ROM in every movement measured compared with Swedish massage. Inclusion of the IMMT in a treatment regimen for chronic neck pain may lead to decreased pain and increased cervical ROM. These positive effects of the IMMT intervention may have a role in enhancing functional outcomes in patients with neck pain.

  19. Chronic pain patients can be classified into four groups: Clustering-based discriminant analysis of psychometric data from 4665 patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre (a SQRP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bäckryd

    Full Text Available To subgroup chronic pain patients using psychometric data and regress the variables most responsible for subgroup discrimination.Cross-sectional, registry-based study.Chronic pain patients assessed at a multidisciplinary pain centre between 2008 and 2015.Data from the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP were retrieved and analysed by principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering analysis, and partial least squares-discriminant analysis.Four subgroups were identified. Group 1 was characterized by low "psychological strain", the best relative situation concerning pain characteristics (intensity and spreading, the lowest frequency of fibromyalgia, as well as by a slightly older age. Group 2 was characterized by high "psychological strain" and by the most negative situation with respect to pain characteristics (intensity and spreading. Group 3 was characterized by high "social distress", the longest pain durations, and a statistically higher frequency of females. The frequency of three neuropathic pain conditions was generally lower in this group. Group 4 was characterized by high psychological strain, low "social distress", and high pain intensity.The identification of these four clusters of chronic pain patients could be useful for the development of personalized rehabilitation programs. For example, the identification of a subgroup characterized mainly by high perceived "social distress" raises the question of how to best design interventions for such patients. Differentiating between clinically important subgroups and comparing how these subgroups respond to interventions is arguably an important area for further research.

  20. [Self-hypnosis training for in-hospital chronic pain patients : A retrolective observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Peter C; Lindenberg, Nicole; Lassen, Christoph L; Graf, Bernhard M; Meier, Jens; Wiese, Christoph H

    2018-04-16

    Hypnosis is probably one of the oldest therapies known to man. In the last decades modern hypnosis has mainly been used by psychotherapists; however, hypnosis is becoming increasingly more important as a therapeutic method in medicine. Hypnosis can be used for a variety of medical indications. In the literature there is much evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis. The aim of the present investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in inpatient treatment of chronic pain patients and to present a self-hypnosis program, which can be easily integrated into pain therapy. From October 2012 to April 2013 all inpatient chronic pain patients were included (group 1: non-hypnosis group, group 2: hypnosis group). Concerning group 2 a standardized protocol for hypnotherapy was integrated in addition to the standardized pain management program. The main goal of hypnotherapy was to integrate a self-hypnosis training so that further implementation in a domestic setting could be guaranteed. By means of standardized test procedures, e. g. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Pain Disability Index (PDI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) and Numerical Rating Scales (NRS) for pain and general well-being, data were evaluated before and after the pain therapy. The prestandardized and poststandardized test procedures of 30 chronic pain patients were evaluated (17 patients without hypnosis, 13 patients with hypnosis). The main diagnosis according to ICD-10 was "chronic pain disorder" (F45.41) with a MPSS stage III in all patients. The PDI was significantly improved in the hypnosis group (p = 0.019). The other items all showed a trend towards improvement in the hypnosis group (exception GAD-7) but without statistical significance (p > 0.05). In a small patient collective, the present investigation was able to show that the integration of modern hypnotherapy into the treatment of chronic pain patients in an inpatient setting can be another

  1. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, P.M. ten; Vonkeman, H.E.; Voshaar, M.A.; Siemons, L.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laar, M.A.F.J. van de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. METHODS: Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid

  2. Pain and pain behavior in burning mouth syndrome: a pain diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssell, Heli; Teerijoki-Oksa, Tuija; Kotiranta, Ulla; Kantola, Rosita; Bäck, Marjaliina; Vuorjoki-Ranta, Tiina-Riitta; Siponen, Maria; Leino, Ari; Puukka, Pauli; Estlander, Ann-Mari

    2012-01-01

    To characterize pain related to primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in terms of intensity, interference, and distress caused by the pain, as well as factors influencing the pain across a period of 2 weeks, and to study the use of coping and management strategies on a daily basis. Fifty-two female patients with primary BMS completed a 2-week pain diary. Pain intensity, interference, distress, and mood on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS), as well as pain amplifying and alleviating factors, were recorded three times a day. The use of treatments (medication or other means) and coping strategies were recorded at the end of each day. Coefficient of variation, repeated measures analysis of variance, and correlative methods were used to assess the between- and within-subject variation, pain patterns, and associations between various pain scores. The overall mean pain intensity score of the 14 diary days was 3.1 (SD: 1.7); there was considerable variation in pain intensity between patients. Most patients experienced intermittent pain. On average, pain intensity increased from the morning to the evening. Intercorrelations between pain intensity, interference, distress, and mood were high, varying between rs = .75 and rs = .93 (P < .001). Pungent or hot food or beverages, stress, and tiredness were the most frequently mentioned pain-amplifying factors. The corresponding pain-alleviating factors were eating, sucking pastilles, drinking cold beverages, and relaxation. Thirty (58%) patients used pain medication and 35% reported using other means to alleviate their BMS pain. There was large variation in the use of coping strategies -between subjects. There were considerable differences in pain, in factors influencing the pain, and in pain behavior across BMS patients. This indicates that patient information and education as well as treatment of BMS pain should be individualized.

  3. [Pain in edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    In daily social life, orofacial pain is strongly associated with teeth. However, edentulousness is no lifetime guarantee of being pain-free in the orofacial region. Common oral pains in edentulous people are caused by denture misfits or occlusal errors, by alveolar ridge atrophy, by (sharp)

  4. Caregivers' attentional bias to pain : does it affect caregiver accuracy in detecting patient pain behaviors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Khatibi, Ali; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    Attentional bias to pain among family caregivers of patients with pain may enhance the detection of pain behaviors in patients. However, both relatively high and low levels of attentional bias may increase disagreement between patients and caregivers in reporting pain behaviors. This study aims to

  5. A Survey of Severity and Distribution of Musculoskeletal Pain in Multiple Sclerosis Patients; a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud ShayestehAzar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain, a common phenomenon in multiple sclerosis (MS patients, is associated with many symptoms and problems.  To investigation severity and distribution of musculoskeletal pain in MS patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 115 members of the Mazandaran MS Association with confirmed MS were randomly selected to participate in the study. The patients were asked to fill out Numerical Rating Score and Nodric questionnaires, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS ver. 16 software. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.43±5.86 years and 88 cases (76.5% were female. The mean disease duration was 26.34±24.32 months and 87.8% of the cases were experiencing pain at the time of study. The mean pain severity was 3.75±2.25 and worst pain experienced was 5.73±2.12. The most common pain sites were: the knees (55.7%, wrist (43.5%, and neck (41.7%. Women experience higher prevalence of shoulder, upper back, and ankle pain (P

  6. Non-specific chronic orofacial pain patients' experiences of everyday life situations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eva; Nilner, Maria; Petersson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a complex condition with consequences that affect daily living. The aim was to analyse nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients'experiences of everyday life situations, using a qualitative approach. Eleven women and 3 men (21 to 77years) were selected through a purposive sampling among chronic orofacial pain patients referred to the Faculty of Odontology's orofacial pain unit at Malmö University, Malmö Sweden. All selected subjects agreed to participate. Data were obtained via two thematic in-depth interviews with each subject. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim.Text dealing with the subjects' daily experiences was identified in all interviews and analysed using qualitative content analysis that focused on manifest content. In everyday life situations, the analysis of nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients' narrations exposed a fear of conflict, of personal weakness, and of the intangible; they also exposed self-blame and avoidance of fear-triggering situations. Eight of the 14 subjects did not spontaneously mention any situation in which they were content during daily living. When the patients spoke about everyday life experiences, the main finding was that unpleasant emotions dominated the subjects'experiences. In conclusion, the chronic orofacial pain condition cannot be understood as an isolated phenomenon; it must be considered in rela- tion to the person who is suffering from the condition.

  7. Success or failure of chronic pain rehabilitation: the importance of good interaction - a qualitative study under patients and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhof, B; Dekker, J H M; Sloots, M; Bartels, E A C; Dekker, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore which factors are associated with a successful treatment outcome in chronic pain patients and professionals participating in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program, with a specific focus on the patient-professional interaction. Patients (n = 16) and professionals (n = 10) were interviewed and/or observed. The transcribed interviews and observations were analyzed and themes were described. Patients with a positive treatment outcome came to a shared understanding of their pain with their professional, demonstrated new learned behavior and were able to continue their learning process at home. Patients with a negative treatment outcome did not reach a shared understanding of their pain with their professional, were not able to change their behavior and wanted more help to achieve this. Both patient groups experienced organizational barriers within the treatment process. Factors associated with a high quality of patient-professional interaction included the patient experience of being taken seriously, the involvement of the professional with the patient, a clear explanation of the pain, and an open interaction between patient and professional. This study provides insight into factors which were related to a positively or negatively experienced outcome of pain rehabilitation. A good match within the patient-professional interaction seems essential. IMPLICATIONS OF REHABILITATION: Within chronic pain rehabilitation good didactic skills and a client-centered attitude of the professional may be helpful in order to make the patient feel being taken seriously. An assessment of the patient's learning style might lead to a better fit of the patient education and training according to an individual's learning style. Relapse might be prevented by paying special attention to the integration of new behavior within important life areas as work and sports.

  8. A functional study of the esophagus in patients with non-cardiac chest pain and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Roberto; Inviati, Angela; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Di Paola, Valentina; Di Giovanni, Silvia; Scerrino, Gregorio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Bonventre, Sebastiano

    2015-03-01

    Nutcracker esophagus and non-specific motility disorders are the main causes of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), with gastroesophageal reflux in 60% of cases. Achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm are the most frequent anomalies described in patients with dysphagia. The goal of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter motor abnormalities in patients with dysphagia, NCCP, or both. This study is a retrospective analysis of 716 patients with NCCP and/or dysphagia tested between January 1994 and December 2010. 1023 functional studies were performed, 707 of which were esophageal manometries, 225 esophageal pH-meters, and 44 bilimetries. We divided the patients into three groups: group 1 was composed of patients affected with dysphagia, group 2 with NCCP and group 3 with NCCP and dysphagia. Manometric anomalies were detected in 84.4% of cases (p<0.001). The most frequent esophageal motility alteration was achalasia (36%). The lower esophageal sphincter was normal in 45.9% of patients (p<0.001). In all 3 groups, 80.9%, 98.8%, and 93.8, respectively, of patients showed normal upper esophageal sphincter (p=0.005). Our data differs from those of other studies because they were collected from and analyzed by a single tertiary level referral center by a single examiner. This could have eliminated the variability found in different hands and different experiences. The high percentage of symptomatic patients with non-pathologic esophageal motility pattern suggests an unclear origin of the disease, with possible neuromuscular involvement. As a result, these patients may need more-detailed diagnostic studies.

  9. Current management and prognostic factors in physiotherapy practice for patients with shoulder pain: design of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, Yasmaine H J M; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Thoomes-de Graaf, Marloes; Duijn, Edwin; Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; van den Borne, Maaike P J; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Tetteroo, Eric; Beumer, Annechien; van Broekhoven, Joost B; Heijmans, Marcel

    2013-02-11

    Shoulder pain is disabling and has a considerable socio-economic impact. Over 50% of patients presenting in primary care still have symptoms after 6 months; moreover, prognostic factors such as pain intensity, age, disability level and duration of complaints are associated with poor outcome. Most shoulder complaints in this group are categorized as non-specific. Musculoskeletal ultrasound might be a useful imaging method to detect subgroups of patients with subacromial disorders.This article describes the design of a prospective cohort study evaluating the influence of known prognostic and possible prognostic factors, such as findings from musculoskeletal ultrasound outcome and working alliance, on the recovery of shoulder pain. Also, to assess the usual physiotherapy care for shoulder pain and examine the inter-rater reliability of musculoskeletal ultrasound between radiologists and physiotherapists for patients with shoulder pain. A prospective cohort study including an inter-rater reliability study. Patients presenting in primary care physiotherapy practice with shoulder pain are enrolled. At baseline validated questionnaires are used to measure patient characteristics, disease-specific characteristics and social factors. Physical examination is performed according to the expertise of the physiotherapists. Follow-up measurements will be performed 6, 12 and 26 weeks after inclusion. Primary outcome measure is perceived recovery, measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Logistic regression analysis will be used to evaluate the association between prognostic factors and recovery. The ShoCoDiP (Shoulder Complaints and using Diagnostic ultrasound in Physiotherapy practice) cohort study will provide information on current management of patients with shoulder pain in primary care, provide data to develop a prediction model for shoulder pain in primary care and to evaluate whether musculoskeletal ultrasound can improve prognosis.

  10. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorida Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ. Methods: The present experimental study was conducted among 30 participants between the age of 21 to 55 years with chronic non-specific LBP. The participants were given a hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise. Pre-interventional and 3rd day Post-interventional outcome measurements were taken using VAS, FEV1 and FEV6 and MODQ. Results: The difference between pre-and post of VAS was statistically highly significant (p=0.0001. The p value of FEV6 and MODQ by paired t test was statistically significant with p value of 0.02 and 0.0007 respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is an immediate effect of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, FEV6 and functional ability in patients with chronic LBP.

  11. Rectal methadone in cancer patients with pain. A preliminary clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Zecca, E; Brunelli, C; Rizzio, E; Saita, L; Lodi, F; De Conno, F

    1995-10-01

    Cancer pain can be treated in most cases with oral analgesics. However, during their clinical history, 53% to 70% of patients will need alternative routes of opioid administration. The rectal administration of opioids is a simple alternative route for many patients. There are no data in the literature regarding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone. We evaluated the analgesia, tolerability and absorption profile of methadone hydrochloride in six opioid-naive cancer patients with pain. A blood sample was collected before administration of a single dose of drug (10 mg) and then again after fixed times. At these fixed times the patients were asked about pain, nausea and drowsiness by means of a visual analogue scale of 0-100 mm (VAS). Pain relief was statistically significant as early as 30 minutes and up to eight hours after methadone administration. None of the patients reported significant side effects. The pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone showed rapid and extensive distribution phases followed by a slow elimination phase. Rectal methadone can be considered an effective analgesic therapy for patients with cancer pain for whom oral and/or parenteral opioids are not indicated or available.

  12. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  13. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J; Andreasson, Daniel; Eriksson, Magnus; Hägglund, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases) concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Methods Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Results Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion), global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p < .05). Measurements did not demonstrate any general impaired postural balance, and varied substantially among participants in both groups. Conclusion In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance. Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are

  14. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J; Andreasson, Daniel; Eriksson, Magnus; Hägglund, Andreas

    2009-06-30

    Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases) concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion), global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p < .05). Measurements did not demonstrate any general impaired postural balance, and varied substantially among participants in both groups. In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance.Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are imperfect measures of functional

  15. Psychometric Study of the Pain Drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, Lisa H; Cox-Martin, Emily; Johnson, Carrie E; Dougherty, Patrick M; Yu, Jun; Feng, Lei; Cook, Christina; Novy, Diane M

    2017-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to (1) assess the extent to which interrater reliability of pain drawing location and dispersion scoring methods are similar across pain disciplines in a sample of patients with cancer treatment-induced neuropathic pain ( N = 56) and (2) investigate indicators of validity of the pain drawing in this unique sample. Patients undergoing cancer therapy completed the Brief Pain Inventory Body Map, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Intraclass correlation coefficients among medical and psychology professionals ranged from .93-.99. Correlations between pain drawing score and symptom burden severity ranged from .29-.39; correlations between pain drawing score and symptom burden interference ranged from .28-.34. Patients who endorsed pain in the hands and feet more often described their pain as electric, numb, and shooting than patients without pain in the hands and feet. They also endorsed significantly more descriptors of neuropathic pain. Results suggest a similar understanding among members of a multidisciplinary pain team as to the location and dispersion of pain as represented by patients' pain drawings. In addition, pain drawing scores were related to symptom burden severity and interference and descriptors of neuropathic pain in expected ways.

  16. Effectiveness of app-based relaxation for patients with chronic low back pain (Relaxback) and chronic neck pain (Relaxneck): study protocol for two randomized pragmatic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blödt, Susanne; Pach, Daniel; Roll, Stephanie; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-12-15

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are highly prevalent conditions resulting in high economic costs. Treatment guidelines recommend relaxation techniques, such as progressive muscle relaxation, as adjuvant therapies. Self-care interventions could have the potential to reduce costs in the health care system, but their effectiveness, especially in a usual care setting, is unclear. The aim of these two pragmatic randomized studies is to evaluate whether an additional app-delivered relaxation is more effective in the reduction of chronic LBP or NP than usual care alone. Each pragmatic randomized two-armed study aims to include a total of 220 patients aged 18 to 65 years with chronic (>12 weeks) LBP or NP and an average pain intensity of ≥ 4 on a numeric rating scale (NRS) in the 7 days before recruitment. The participants will be randomized into an intervention and a usual care group. The intervention group will be instructed to practice one of these 3 relaxation techniques on at least 5 days/week for 15 minutes/day over a period of 6 months starting on the day of randomization: autogenic training, mindfulness meditation, or guided imagery. Instructions and exercises will be provided using a smartphone app, baseline information will be collected using paper and pencil. Follow-up information (daily, weekly, and after 3 and 6 months) will be collected using electronic diaries and questionnaires included in the app. The primary outcome measure will be the mean LBP or NP intensity during the first 3 months of intervention based on daily pain intensity measurements on a NRS (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). The secondary outcome parameters will include the mean pain intensity during the first 6 months after randomization based on daily measurements, the mean pain intensity measured weekly as the average pain intensity of the previous 7 days over 3 and 6 months, pain acceptance, 'LBP- and NP-related' stress, sick leave days, pain medication

  17. Cervical flexor muscle training reduces pain, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with chronic neck pain by a clinically important amount: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Goris; Bobos, Pavlos; Billis, Evdokia; MacDermid, Joy C

    2018-03-14

    Neck pain is the fourth leading cause of disability in the United States and exerts an important socio-economic burden around the world. The aims of this study were to determine the effectiveness of deep and superficial flexor muscle training in addition to home-based exercises in reducing chronic neck pain and anxiety/depression levels. This was a prospective cohort study. Patients between 18 and 65 years old with chronic neck pain were eligible to participate if they had disability levels at least 5 out of 50 on the Neck Disability Index. Patients were divided into three groups: Group A received deep neck flexor and home-based exercises; Group B received superficial muscle and home-based exercises; and Group C received home-based exercises only. The Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), Neck Disability Index, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered at baseline and 7 weeks later. The highest improvements in pain intensity levels were observed in Group A with 4.75 (1.74) NPRS points, and the lowest were in Group C with 1.00 (1.10). The highest reductions in anxiety and depression levels were noted in Group A (2.80) and Group B (1.65), respectively. The highest improvements in pain intensity levels were observed among Groups A versus C with 2.80 (0.52) NPRS. The highest reductions in anxiety and depression levels were noted among Groups A versus C with 1.75 (1.10) points and Groups B versus C with 1.60 (0.90) points, respectively. Deep and superficial flexor muscle training along with home-based exercises is likely to reduce chronic neck pain and anxiety/depression levels by a clinically relevant amount. Future larger scaled randomized controlled trials are warranted to further support these findings. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Aggression, impulsivity, and suicide risk in benign chronic pain patients – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Margari,1 Marina Lorusso,2 Emilia Matera,3 Adriana Pastore,1 Giuseppina Zagaria,3 Francesco Bruno,4 Filomena Puntillo,4 Lucia Margari31Psychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University Hospital of Bari, Bari, Italy; 2Department of Mental Health ASL BAT, Barletta, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University Hospital of Bari, Bari Italy; 4Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplants, University Hospital of Bari, Bari, ItalyObjectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the role that psychopathological dimensions as overt aggression and impulsivity play in determining suicide risk in benign chronic pain patients (CPPs. Furthermore we investigated the possible protective/risk factors which promote these negative feelings, analyzing the relationship between CPPs and their caregivers.Methods: We enrolled a total of 208 patients, divided into CPPs and controls affected by internistic diseases. Assessment included collection of sociodemographic and healthcare data, pain characteristics, administration of visual analog scale (VAS, Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11 (BIS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, and a caregiver self-administered questionnaire. All variables were statistically analyzed.Results: A significant difference of VAS, MOAS-total/verbal/auto-aggression, HDRS-total/suicide mean scores between the groups were found. BIS mean score was higher in CPPs misusing analgesics. In CPPs a correlation between MOAS-total/verbal/auto-aggression with BIS mean score, MOAS with HDRS-suicide mean score and BIS with HDRS-suicide mean scores were found. The MOAS and BIS mean scores were significantly higher when caregivers were not supportive.Conclusion: In CPPs, aggression and impulsivity could increase the risk of suicide. Moreover

  19. Patient Experience, Pain, and Quality of Life after Lower Limb Angioplasty: A Multisite Prospective Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culverwell, A. D., E-mail: adamculverwell@doctors.net.uk [Leeds General Infirmary (United Kingdom); Tapping, C. R.; Ettles, D. F. [Hull Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Kessel, D. [Leeds General Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To explore the experience of patients undergoing endovascular lower limb angioplasty and evaluate the improvements in quality of life and disease-related symptoms after the procedure. Methods: Patients completed a questionnaire before treatment and three questionnaires after the procedure (immediately after the procedure, and again 4 weeks and 3 months later). Anxiety, patient understanding, procedure-related pain, and disease-related pain were assessed by a visual analog score (VAS). Complications, analgesic requirements, and satisfaction were recorded. Changes to quality of life were assessed by the validated SF36 questionnaire. Results: A total of 88 patients (41%) responded. Overall, disease-related pain decreased over 3 months after the procedure. Smokers had more pain both before and after the procedure (P < 0.05). Explanation was considered better if provided by radiologist (P < 0.05). Sixty-nine percent of patients found the procedures less painful (mean VAS 2.5) than they had anticipated (VAS 5.5). Fifty percent of patients experienced adverse effects related to their puncture site, but this was highest among patients who had undergone the procedure before and smokers. The greatest quality-of-life improvements were in emotional and general health. Higher levels of disease-related pain were associated with worse general, emotional, and physical health (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Lower limb angioplasty provides symptomatic and quality-of-life improvements. Implementation of simple measures could improve patient satisfaction-for example, treatment should be explained by the radiologist in advance. Routine prescription of analgesics with particular attention to smokers and those undergoing repeat interventions is suggested.

  20. Patient Experience, Pain, and Quality of Life after Lower Limb Angioplasty: A Multisite Prospective Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culverwell, A. D.; Tapping, C. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Kessel, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the experience of patients undergoing endovascular lower limb angioplasty and evaluate the improvements in quality of life and disease-related symptoms after the procedure. Methods: Patients completed a questionnaire before treatment and three questionnaires after the procedure (immediately after the procedure, and again 4 weeks and 3 months later). Anxiety, patient understanding, procedure-related pain, and disease-related pain were assessed by a visual analog score (VAS). Complications, analgesic requirements, and satisfaction were recorded. Changes to quality of life were assessed by the validated SF36 questionnaire. Results: A total of 88 patients (41%) responded. Overall, disease-related pain decreased over 3 months after the procedure. Smokers had more pain both before and after the procedure (P < 0.05). Explanation was considered better if provided by radiologist (P < 0.05). Sixty-nine percent of patients found the procedures less painful (mean VAS 2.5) than they had anticipated (VAS 5.5). Fifty percent of patients experienced adverse effects related to their puncture site, but this was highest among patients who had undergone the procedure before and smokers. The greatest quality-of-life improvements were in emotional and general health. Higher levels of disease-related pain were associated with worse general, emotional, and physical health (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Lower limb angioplasty provides symptomatic and quality-of-life improvements. Implementation of simple measures could improve patient satisfaction—for example, treatment should be explained by the radiologist in advance. Routine prescription of analgesics with particular attention to smokers and those undergoing repeat interventions is suggested.

  1. Cervical kinematics in patients with vestibular pathology vs. patients with neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Grace; Sarig-Bahat, Hilla; Williams, Katrina; Tyrrell, Ryan; Treleaven, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Research has consistently shown cervical kinematic impairments in subjects with persistent neck pain (NP). It could be reasoned that those with vestibular pathology (VP) may also have altered kinematics since vestibular stimulation via head movement can cause dizziness and visual disturbances. However, this has not been examined to date. This pilot study investigated changes in cervical kinematics between asymptomatic control, NP and VP subjects using a Virtual Reality (VR) system. It was hypothesised that there would be altered kinematics in VP subjects, which might be associated with dizziness and visual symptoms. Pilot cross sectional observational study. Twenty control, 14 VP and 20 NP subjects. Not applicable. Measures included questionnaires (neck disability index, pain on movement, dizziness and pain intensity, visual disturbances) and cervical kinematics (range, peak and mean velocity, smoothness, symmetry, and accuracy of cervical motion) using a virtual reality system. Results revealed significantly decreased mean velocity and symmetry of motion in both planes in those with NP but no differences in accuracy or range of motion. No significant differences were seen between VP subjects and asymptomatic controls. However, correlation analysis showed some moderate correlations between dizziness to selected kinematics in both the NP and the VP groups. These results support that cervical kinematics are altered in NP patients, with velocity most affected. There is potential for VP subjects to also have altered kinematics, especially those who experience dizziness. More research is required.

  2. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Puta, Christian; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-08-10

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients' current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation.

  3. Factors that affect functional capacity in patients with musculoskeletal pain : a Delphi study among scientists, clinicians, and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorna-Lakke, Sandra; Wittink, Harriët; Geertzen, Jan H; van der Schans, Cees; Reneman, Michiel F

    OBJECTIVE: To reach consensus on the most important biopsychosocial factors that influence functional capacity results in patients with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, arranged in the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. DESIGN: Three-round,

  4. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding Pain and Pain Management in Elderly Nursing Home Patients Applying an Interprofessional Learning Activity in Health Care Students: A Norwegian Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgård, Elin; Solgård, Hege; Johannessen, Karin; Wennevold, Katrine; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Pettersen, Gunn; Garcia, Beate

    2018-05-17

    Pain is common among elderly patients in nursing homes. However, pain assessment and treatment are inadequate. Interprofessional treatment is recommended, and consequently interprofessional education in pain management is necessary. This pilot project aimed to describe how two interprofessional groups of students approached pain management in two nursing home patients. We formed two teams comprising one student from the nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, and medical educations. Each team spent one day examining a patient with chronic pain at a nursing home and they developed pain management plans. We collected data through video recordings during teamwork before and after examining the patients and field notes during the patient examination. We analysed the video-recordings applying the seven-step model including 1) viewing the video data, 2) describing the video data, 3) identifying critical events, 4) transcribing, 5) coding, 6) constructing storyline and 7) composing a narrative. Field notes supplied the transcripts. Both teams succeeded in making a pain management plan for their patient. The common examination of the patient was crucial for the students' approaches to pain management and changed their pre-assumptions about the patients' pain. By sharing knowledge and reflecting together, the students reached a common consensus on suggestions for management of the patients' problems. Interprofessional collaboration fostered enthusiasm and a more holistic pain management approach. However,students' lack of knowledge limited their understanding of pain. Knowledge of pain management in nursing home patients and the practice of interprofessional cooperation should be included in pain curricula for health care professionals. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pain Intensity Moderates the Relationship Between Age and Pain Interference in Chronic Orofacial Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggero, Ian A; Geiger, Paul J; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Carlson, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Chronic pain is associated with increased interference in daily functioning that becomes more pronounced as pain intensity increases. Based on previous research showing that older adults maintain well-being in the face of pain as well as or better than their younger counterparts, the current study examined the interaction of age and pain intensity on interference in a sample of chronic orofacial pain patients. Data were obtained from the records of 508 chronic orofacial pain patients being seen for an initial evaluation from 2008 to 2012. Collected data included age (range: 18-78) and self-reported measures of pain intensity and pain interference. Bivariate correlations and regression models were used to assess for statistical interactions. Regression analyses revealed that pain intensity positively predicted pain interference (R(2) = .35, B = 10.40, SE = 0.62, t(507) = 16.70, p theories, including socioemotional selectivity theory, which posits that as people age, they become more motivated to maximize positive emotions and minimize negative ones. The results highlight the importance of studying the mechanisms older adults use to successfully cope with pain.

  7. The effectiveness of manual physical therapy interventions in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleher, Mindy; Crowe, Briana; Selhorst, Mitchell

    2017-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) assess the benefit of adding manual therapy (MT) to physical therapy care in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain; (2) assess the relative risk of adverse reactions when MT is used; and (3) report the types of MT used. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients treated in a hospital-based sports medicine clinic. The charts of 201 patients (mean age = 14.23 ± 2.15 years) met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Patients were grouped into those who received MT during their episode of care, and those who did not. Pain efficiency (change in pain/number of visits), number and type of adverse reactions, as well as frequency and type of manual therapy interventions used, were the outcomes of interest. The mean pain efficiency was significantly less if manual therapy was performed (MT = 0.60 [95% CI 0.47-0.72], no MT = 0.80 [95% CI 0.71-0.90] p  = 0.01). There was no significant difference between groups in risk of adverse reactions (MT = 5, no MT = 5). The number of visits was significantly different between groups (MT = 9.43 ± 3.9 sessions, and no MT = 7.6 ± 5.2 sessions). MT did not increase the risk of an adverse reaction in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain. While it appears to be a safe intervention, it did not improve pain efficiency or patient adherence. Future research should be performed to assess the effectiveness of MT, when performed by skilled therapists, in pediatric patients with hip pain in a controlled manner. Level of Evidence: 3b.

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity as predictor of costs in back pain patients undergoing disc surgery: a longitudinal observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnopka Alexander

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric comorbidity is common in back pain patients undergoing disc surgery and increases economic costs in many areas of health. The objective of this study was to analyse psychiatric comorbidity as predictor of direct and indirect costs in back pain patients undergoing disc surgery in a longitudinal study design. Methods A sample of 531 back pain patients was interviewed after an initial disc surgery (T0, 3 months (T1 and 15 months (T2 using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric comorbidity and a modified version of the Client Sociodemographic and Service Receipt Inventory to assess resource utilization and lost productivity for a 3-month period prior interview. Health care utilization was monetarily valued by unit costs and productivity by labour costs. Costs were analysed using random coefficient models and bootstrap techniques. Results Psychiatric comorbidity was associated with significantly (p  Conclusion Psychiatric comorbidity presents an important predictor of direct and indirect costs in back pain patients undergoing disc surgery, even if patients do not utilize mental health care. This effect seems to be stable over time. More attention should be given to psychiatric comorbidity and cost-effective treatments should be applied to treat psychiatric comorbidity in back pain patients undergoing disc surgery to reduce health care utilization and costs associated with psychiatric comorbidity.

  9. A comparative study of efficacy and safety of flupirtine versus piroxicam in postoperative pain in patients undergoing lower limb surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnaiyan S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sowmya Chinnaiyan,1 Narayana Sarala,1 Heddur Shanthappa Arun2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research, Kolar, Karnataka, India Background: Effective control of pain postoperatively is essential in providing enhanced patient care and a cost-effective hospital stay. Though many treatment modalities exist for postoperative pain management in orthopedic surgeries they are often accompanied by adverse effects. This study was carried out to assess the efficacy of flupirtine and piroxicam in postoperative pain reduction using visual analog scale (VAS score. Materials and methods: An open-label, parallel group, comparative study was conducted on patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgery, randomized into two groups of 38 patients each. They received either flupirtine 100 mg or piroxicam 20 mg 6 hours after surgery and then twice daily orally for 5 days. Pain was measured using VAS score, total pain relief score (TOTPAR24, and patient satisfaction score (PSS; the other scales used were behavioral pain assessment scale (BPAS and functional activity score (FAS. Rescue medication used was tramadol 100 mg intravenously. WHO causality scale was used for assessing adverse effects. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for assessment of various parameters. Results: A total of 76 patients with mean ± standard deviation age of 35.08±10.3 years were recruited; 34 in the flupirtine and 37 in the piroxicam groups completed the study. Patients in both groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Flupirtine and piroxicam reduced VAS score 48 hours postoperatively compared to baseline (p=0.006 and 0.001 and piroxicam produced significant reduction in pain at 8, 12, and 120 hours compared to flupirtine (p=0.028, 0.032, 0.021. TOTPAR24 and PSS at 24 hours were comparable between the treatments. BPAS scores at 24 hours were reduced

  10. Efficacy of acupuncture and electroacupuncture in patients with nonspecific low back pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comachio, Josielli; Oliveira Magalhães, Mauricio; Nogueira Burke, Thomaz; Vidal Ramos, Luiz Armando; Peixoto Leão Almeida, Gabriel; Silva, Ana Paula M C C; Ferreira de Meneses, Sarah Rúbia; Costa-Frutuoso, Jecilene Rosana; Santos Miotto Amorim, Cinthia; Pasqual Marques, Amélia

    2015-10-15

    Previous studies have shown that acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) are effective in the treatment of patients with low back pain. However, there is little evidence to support the use of one intervention over the other. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of acupuncture and electroacupuncture in the treatment of pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. The study design is a randomized controlled trial. Patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain of more than three months duration are recruited at Rehabilitation Center of Taboao da Serra - SP (Brazil). After examination, sixty-six patients will be randomized into one of two groups: acupuncture group (AG) (n = 33) and electroacupuncture group (EG) (n = 33). Interventions will last one hour, and will happen twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary clinical outcomes will be pain intensity as measured and functional disability. quality of pain, quality of life. perception of the overall effect, depressive state, flexibility and kinesiophobia. All the outcomes will be assessed will be assessed at baseline, at treatment end, and three months after treatment end. Significance level will be determined at the 5 % level. Results of this trial will help clarify the value of acupuncture and electroacupuncture as a treatment for chronic low back pain and if they are different. Results of this trial will help clarify the value of acupuncture needling and electroacupuncture stimulation of specific points on the body as a treatment for chronic low back pain. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02039037 . Register October 30, 2013.

  11. Practice and bias in intraoperative pain management: results of a cross-sectional patient study and a survey of anesthesiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward S

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte Guest,2 Ian Goodall,2 Carsten Bantel3,4 1Pain Service, Barts Health, St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, UK; 2Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Pain Management, Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany Background: Perioperative pain carries a considerable risk of becoming persistent; hence aggressive preventive approaches are advocated. Persistently high prevalence of postoperative pain, however, suggests anesthesiologists underuse these strategies. A prospective cross-sectional study of patients in the postanesthetic care unit (PACU and a survey of anesthesiologists were thus conducted to evaluate practice and uncover bias in intraoperative pain management. Methods: Notes of PACU patients were reviewed and information regarding surgical context, comorbidities, and analgesic administration was retrieved. Variables were analyzed for their predictive properties on pain and intraoperative analgesic management. Furthermore, clinical dose–effect estimates for intraoperative morphine were determined. Finally, anesthesiologists completed a questionnaire comprising statements regarding pain relating to surgical context and morphine administration. Results: Data of 200 patients and 55 anesthesiologists were analyzed. Prevalence of pain in PACU was 28% and was predicted by local anesthetic (LA and low-dose morphine administration. Additionally, when LA was used, little coanalgesics were employed. These results suggest a restrained approach by anesthesiologists toward intraoperative pain management. It is supported by their reluctance to administer more than 10 mg morphine, despite these individuals regarding this practice as insufficient. The hesitancy toward morphine also transpired

  12. Trajectories of Symptoms and Impairment for Pediatric Patients with Functional Abdominal Pain: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvaney, Shelagh; Lambert, E. Warren; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study characterizes trajectories of symptoms and impairment in pediatric patients with abdominal pain not associated with identifiable organic disease. Method: The Children's Somatization Inventory and the Functional Disability Inventory were administered four times over 5 years to 132 patients (6-18 years old) seen in…

  13. Development, Usability, and Efficacy of a Serious Game to Help Patients Learn About Pain Management After Surgery: An Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingadottir, Brynja; Blondal, Katrin; Thue, David; Zoega, Sigridur; Thylen, Ingela; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2017-05-10

    Postoperative pain is a persistent problem after surgery and can delay recovery and develop into chronic pain. Better patient education has been proposed to improve pain management of patients. Serious games have not been previously developed to help patients to learn how to manage their postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to describe the development of a computer-based game for surgical patients to learn about postoperative pain management and to evaluate the usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game. A computer game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. The usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires (AttrakDiff2, Postoperative Pain Management Game Survey, Patient Knowledge About Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire), semi-structured interviews, and direct observation in one session with 20 participants recruited from the general public via Facebook (mean age 48 [SD 14]; 11 women). Adjusted Barriers Questionnaire II and 3 questions on health literacy were used to collect background information. Theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence for the educational needs of patients about pain management, and principles of gamification were used to develop the computer game. Ease of use and usefulness received a median score between 2.00 (IQR 1.00) and 5.00 (IQR 2.00) (possible scores 0-5; IQR, interquartile range), and ease of use was further confirmed by observation. Participants expressed satisfaction with this novel method of learning, despite some technological challenges. The attributes of the game, measured with AttrakDiff2, received a median score above 0 in all dimensions; highest for attraction (median 1.43, IQR 0.93) followed by pragmatic quality (median 1.31, IQR 1.04), hedonic quality interaction (median 1.00, IQR 1.04), and hedonic quality stimulation (median 0.57, IQR 0.68). Knowledge of pain medication and pain management

  14. Resisting Prescribed Opioids: A Qualitative Study of Decision Making in Patients Taking Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Charlotte; Ledgerwood, Kay; Arnold, Carolyn; Hogg, Malcolm; Xue, Charlie; Zheng, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Opioids are increasingly prescribed for chronic noncancer pain across the developed world. Clinical guidelines for management of these patients focus on over-use. However, research into other types of long-term medication indicates that many patients minimize drug use whenever possible. To identify the varying influences on patients' decisions about their use of prescribed opioids and explore whether concepts of resistance and minimization of intake apply to these patients. A multiprofessional team performed a qualitative interview study using the constant-comparative method. Patient's decision making was explored in depth and with a thematic analysis utilizing a published "Model of medicine-taking." A purposive sample of 20 participants drawn from two pain clinics in Melbourne, Australia. The sample was biased toward patients interested in nonmedication pain management options. Patients' needs to obtain relief from severe pain, maintain function, and minimize side effects could lead to under-use as well as over-use of prescribed opioids. In keeping with the published Model of medicine-taking, resistance to taking opioids was a common and important influence on behavior. In the face of severe chronic pain, many participants used a variety of strategies to evaluate, avoid, reduce, self-regulate, and replace opioids. Furthermore, participants perceived a resistance to opioids within the system and among some healthcare professionals. This sometimes adversely affected their adherence. Both patients and doctors exhibit aspects of resistance to the use of prescribed opioids for chronic noncancer pain, suggesting that this shared concern could be the basis of a productive therapeutic alliance to improve communication and shared decision making. Clinical guidelines for opioids use for chronic noncancer pain focus on over-use. Our qualitative interview study found that many patients resisted and minimized the use of opioids. Using a published "Model of medicine-taking," we

  15. Procedural Pain in Palliative Care: Is It Breakthrough Pain? A Multicenter National Prospective Study to Assess Prevalence, Intensity, and Treatment of Procedure-related Pain in Patients With Advanced Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Caterina; Giannarelli, Diana; Casale, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of breakthrough pain (BTP) provoked by 6 common procedures in patients with advanced disease. A prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter, national study was performed in 23 palliative care units in Italy. Patients were recruited if they were undergoing one of the following procedures as part of normal care: turning, personal hygiene care, transfer from bed to chair, bladder catheterization, pressure ulcer care, and subcutaneous drug administration. The Numerical Rating Scale was used to measure pain intensity before, during, and after the procedure. One thousand seventy-nine eligible patients were enrolled: 49.7% were male and their mean age was 78.0±11.2 years. Of all patients, 20.9% had experienced a BTP episode within the 24 hours before recruitment. The overall prevalence of procedure-induced BTP was 11.8%, and the mean intensity score (Numeric Rating Scale) was 4.72±1.81. Notably, patients experienced a significant increase in pain intensity during all procedures (Ppatients (12.7%) received analgesics before undergoing any of the procedures, and almost none (1.7%) received analgesics during the procedures to alleviate acute pain. Our findings highlight that simple daily care procedures can lead to BTP among patients with advanced disease. Because such procedures are performed very often during palliative care, more individualized attention to procedural pain control is necessary. Additional research on procedural pain in patients with advanced disease should be encouraged to provide further evidence-based guidance on the use of the available medication for predictable pain flares.

  16. Pain control methods in use and perceived effectiveness by patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Karen; Caldwell, Karen; Forehand, Samantha; Davis, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the pain control methods in use by patients who have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a group of connective tissue disorders, and their perceived effectiveness. This descriptive study involved 1179 adults diagnosed with EDS who completed an anonymous on-line survey. The survey consisted of demographics information, the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pain-Behavior, PROMIS Pain-Interference, and Neuro QOL Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities scales, as well as a modified version of the Pain Management Strategies Survey. Respondents reported having to seek out confirmation of their EDS diagnosis with multiple healthcare providers, which implies the difficulty many people with EDS face when trying to gain access to appropriate treatment. Patients with EDS experience higher levels of pain interference and lower satisfaction with social roles and activities compared to national norms. Among the treatment modalities in this study, those perceived as most helpful for acute pain control were opioids, surgical interventions, splints and braces, avoidance of potentially dangerous activities and heat therapy. Chronic pain treatments rated as most helpful were opioids, splints or braces and surgical interventions. For methods used for both acute and chronic pain, those perceived as most helpful were opioids, massage therapies, splints or braces, heat therapy and avoiding potentially dangerous activities. EDS is a complex, multi-systemic condition that can be difficult to diagnose and poses challenges for healthcare practitioners who engage with EDS patients in holistic care. Improved healthcare provider knowledge of EDS is needed, and additional research on the co-occurring diagnoses with EDS may assist in comprehensive pain management for EDS patients. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a group of connective tissue disorders associated with defective production of collagen, which can dramatically

  17. Pain Correlates with Sleep Disturbances in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yun-Ting; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Ma, Li-Jing; Zhang, Hui-Jun; Wang, Yi; Li, Jie; Huang, Jun-Ying; Liu, Jun-Yi; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Both sleep disorders and pain decrease quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the relationship between objective sleep disturbances and pain in patients with PD. This study aimed to (1) examine the clinical characteristics of pain in PD patients and (2) explore the correlation between pain and sleep disturbances in PD patients. Parkinson's disease patients (N = 144) underwent extensive clinical evaluations of motor and nonmotor symptoms and characteristics of pain. Overnight video-polysomnography was also conducted. Clinical characteristics and sleep parameters were compared between PD patients with or without pain. Pain was reported by 75 patients (52.1%), with 49 (65.3%) reporting pain of at least moderate severity. PD patients with pain were older and had longer disease duration, more severe PD symptoms as assessed by Hoehn and Yahr stage and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and higher L-dopa equivalent daily dose compared with PD patients without pain. PD patients with pain also showed significantly decreased sleep efficiency (57.06% ± 15.84% vs. 73.80% ± 12.00%, P daily living, depressed mood, higher percentage of N1 sleep, and lower sleep efficiency were independent predictors of pain in patients with PD. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common type of pain in patients with PD. Disrupted sleep continuity, altered sleep architecture, depressed mood, and compromised activities of daily living may be associated with pain in patients with PD. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Osteopathic manipulative treatment results in sustained relief from spinal pain in older patients: A pilot crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannunzio A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment is commonly used to complement conventional treatment of back pain. The present study verified whether OMT, associated with training program, reduces spinal pain in older. A pilot randomized, double-blind crossover study was conducted at Sport Association of Milan, Italy. We recruited 19 subjects above 60 years old, with presence of SP for more than 3 weeks and with intensity score higher than 3 (NRS score. All patients underwent a multi-component group exercise program for older adults and were randomized in two groups: in the study group (SG OMT was added, while the control group (CG continued with the exercise only. After 6 weeks a crossover was applied to the 2 groups and OMT was added to CG, while SG continued with the exercise only. Self-reported measures: the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS was used at each time to evaluate treatment outcomes. At pre-crossover, SG had a significant improvement in pain perception (p<0.05, while CG had a not significate improvement in pain perception (p=0.33.At post-crossover, the SG remains relatively stable (p=0.37, while CG after OMT addition have a significant benefit on pain perception (p=0.001. At follow-up, pain improvement is sustained (p=0.32. OMT associated to exercise reduce spinal pain in older patients. Our study suggests that OMT associated to exercise leads to significant improvement on pain relief in patients with chronic SP in a short term and the exercise allows to maintain these improvements for several months

  19. Predictive ability of an early diagnostic guess in patients presenting with chest pain; a longitudinal descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intuitive early diagnostic guess could play an important role in reaching a final diagnosis. However, no study to date has attempted to quantify the importance of general practitioners' (GPs ability to correctly appraise the origin of chest pain within the first minutes of an encounter. Methods The validation study was nested in a multicentre cohort study with a one year follow-up and included 626 successive patients who presented with chest pain and were attended by 58 GPs in Western Switzerland. The early diagnostic guess was assessed prior to a patient's history being taken by a GP and was then compared to a diagnosis of chest pain observed over the next year. Results Using summary measures clustered at the GP's level, the early diagnostic guess was confirmed by further investigation in 51.0% (CI 95%; 49.4% to 52.5% of patients presenting with chest pain. The early diagnostic guess was more accurate in patients with a life threatening illness (65.4%; CI 95% 64.5% to 66.3% and in patients who did not feel anxious (62.9%; CI 95% 62.5% to 63.3%. The predictive abilities of an early diagnostic guess were consistent among GPs. Conclusions The GPs early diagnostic guess was correct in one out of two patients presenting with chest pain. The probability of a correct guess was higher in patients with a life-threatening illness and in patients not feeling anxious about their pain.

  20. The effects of patient-professional partnerships on the self-management and health outcomes for patients with chronic back pain: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Yu, Ge; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; José Closs, S

    2016-07-01

    Self-management may be a lifelong task for patients with chronic back pain. Research suggests that chronic pain self-management programmes have beneficial effects on patients' health outcome. Contemporary pain management theories and models also suggest that a good patient-professional partnership enhances patients' ability to self-manage their condition. (1) To investigate whether there is a reciprocal relationship between self-management of chronic back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQoL); (2) to examine the impact of a good patient-professional partnership on HRQoL, either directly, or indirectly via change in the ability to self-manage pain. This quasi-experimental study was designed to take place during routine service appointments and conducted in a community-based pain management service in the United Kingdom. A patient-professional partnership was established in which patients were actively involved in setting up goals and developing individualised care plans. Through this, health professionals undertook patients' health needs assessment, collaborated with patients to identify specific problems, provided written materials and delivered individualised exercise based on patients' life situation. Patients were recruited following initial consultation and followed up three months later. A total of 147 patients (65% female) with a mean age of 48 years (standard deviation (SD): 14 years) were enrolled in the study. Of these, 103 subjects completed the study. Patients were included if they were aged 18 and over, suffered from chronic back pain, had opted in to the clinic and had sufficient ability to read and understand English. Patients were excluded if they opted out this service after the initial assessment, suffered from malignant pain or required acute medical interventions for their pain relief. Self-reported measures of HRQoL, patient-professional partnerships and self-management ability were collected at baseline and three months later

  1. The experience of patients with fear-avoidance belief hospitalised for low back pain - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Dorte Barfred; Tegner, Heidi; Bendix, Tom

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Severe pain, anxiety, depression, and fear-avoidance belief (FAB) are widespread among patients hospitalised for acute low back pain (LBP). Research shows that these psychological factors impact negatively on rehabilitation. This study aimed to investigate and develop an understanding...... of pain in patients with fear avoidance belief hospitalised for LBP. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine patients selected by an FAB questionnaire: averaged FAB - physical activity score was 21 and FAB - work score was 30. All participants were recruited from a rheumatology ward...... metaphors and a need to be involved in the rehabilitation. During interviews, the participants did not indicate high FAB behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high scores, the FAB questionnaire might not be sufficient to detect FAB in patients hospitalised for acute LBP. It is important to include the deeper...

  2. Reflexology treatment for patients with lower limb amputations and phantom limb pain--an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christine Ann; Lido, Catherine

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the possibility of reflexology being used as a non-invasive form of phantom limb pain relief and of empowering patients to maintain any positive results with self-treatment. Prosthetic Services Centre, Herbert Street, Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England. A same-subject, experimental pilot study, recording the intensity of phantom limb pain in weekly pain diaries over a 30-week period, which was divided into five phases: phase 1 gave a baseline of pain, whilst phase 3 was a resting phase. Phases 2, 4 and 5 provided the reflexology interventions. Ten participants with unilateral lower limb amputations and phantom limb pain were selected from the database at the Prosthetic Centre. REFLEXOLOGY INTERVENTIONS: In phase 2, six weekly reflexology treatments were given, which consisted of: full foot reflexology to the remaining foot and full hand reflexology to the hand of the amputated side of the body. In phase 4, six weekly hand reflexology teaching sessions were carried out; patients copied on their own hands what the therapist did on hers. A hand reflexology booklet gave the sequence of the treatment and was used as a reference. In phase 5, the patients self-treated for 6 weeks at home, using the reference material. Over the 30-week period, there was an improvement in the perception of the presence and the intensity of the phantom limb pain, with a corresponding improvement in the duration of the pain and the affect on the person's lifestyle. The improvement was maintained when the clients self-treated. FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE: A follow-up questionnaire was carried out in 2007--12 months after the project had ended--to elicit whether the patients had suffered from phantom pain over the previous 12 months, whether they still had relief from phantom limb pain and whether they still self-treated. The project indicated that reflexology treatment, teaching and self-treatment were effective in eradicating or reducing the

  3. Patient's experience with comorbidity management in primary care: a qualitative study of comorbid pain and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, E Amy; Ramirez, Michelle L; Haltzman, Brittany; Fritz, Megan; Kozak, Andrea T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine perceptions of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity regarding their experience of comorbidity management in primary care settings. Chronic pain and obesity are common comorbidities frequently managed in primary care settings. Evidence suggests individuals with this comorbidity may be at risk for suboptimal clinical interactions; however, treatment experiences and preferences of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity have received little attention. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 primary care patients with mean body mass index=36.8 and comorbid persistent pain. The constant comparative method was used to analyze data. Participants discussed frustration with a perceived lack of information tailored to their needs and a desire for a personalized treatment experience. Participants found available medical approaches unsatisfying and sought a more holistic approach to management. Discussions also focused around the need for providers to initiate efforts at education and motivation enhancement and to show concern for and understanding of the unique difficulties associated with comorbidity. Findings suggest providers should engage in integrated communication regarding weight and pain, targeting this multimorbidity using methods aligned with priorities discussed by patients.

  4. How fast pain, numbness, and paresthesia resolves after lumbar nerve root decompression: a retrospective study of patient's self-reported computerized pain drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2014-04-15

    A single-center retrospective study. To compare the speed of recovery of different sensory symptoms, pain, numbness, and paresthesia, after lumbar nerve root decompression. Lumbar radiculopathy is characterized by different sensory symptoms like pain, numbness, and paresthesia, which may resolve at different rates after surgical decompression. Eighty-five cases with predominant lumbar radiculopathy treated surgically were reviewed. Oswestry Disability Index score, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey scores (Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary), and pain drawing at preoperative and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1-year follow-up were reviewed. Recovery rate between different sensory symptoms were compared in all patients, and between the short-term compression (paresthesia; 28 (32.9%) had all these 3 component of sensory symptoms. Mean pain score improved fastest (55.3% at 6 wk); further resolution until 1 year was slow and not significant compared with each previous visit. Both numbness and paresthesia scores showed a trend of faster recovery during the initial 6-week period (20.5% and 24%, respectively); paresthesia recovery reached a plateau at 3 months postoperatively, but numbness continued a slow recovery until 1-year follow-up. Both Oswestry Disability Index score and Physical Component Summary scores (54.02 ± 1.87 and 26.29 ± 0.93, respectively, at baseline) improved significantly compared with each previous visits at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, but further improvement was insignificant. Mental Component Summary showed a similar trend but smaller improvement. The short-term compression group had faster recovery of pain than the long-term compression group. In lumbar radiculopathy patients after surgical decompression, pain recovers fastest, in the first 6 weeks postoperatively, followed by paresthesia recovery that plateaus at 3 months postoperatively. Numbness recovers at a slower pace but continues until 1 year. 4.

  5. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Farahani, Zubin; Witt, Claudia M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n = 20) consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59). Patients' experiences differed according to the therapies' philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy.

  6. Implicit associations between pain and self-schema in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; De Houwer, Jan; Van Bockstaele, Bram; Van Damme, Stefaan; De Schryver, Maarten; Crombez, Geert

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pain often interferes with daily functioning, and may become a threat to an individual's sense of self. Despite the development of a recent theoretical account focussing upon the relationship between the presence of chronic pain and a person's self, research investigating this idea is limited. In the present study we aimed to (1) compare the strength of association between self- and pain schema in patients with chronic pain and healthy control subjects and (2) research whether the strength of association between self- and pain-schema is related to particular pain-related outcomes and individual differences of patients with chronic pain. Seventy-three patients with chronic pain (M(age) = 49.95; SD = 9.76) and 53 healthy volunteers (M(age) = 48.53; SD = 10.37) performed an Implicit Association Test (IAT) to assess the strength of association between pain- and self-schema. Patients with chronic pain also filled out self-report measures of pain severity, pain suffering, disability, depression, anxiety, acceptance, and helplessness. Results indicated that the pain- and self-schema were more strongly associated in patients with chronic pain than in healthy control subjects. Second, results indicated that, in patients with chronic pain, a stronger association between self- and pain-schema, as measured with the IAT, is related to a heightened level of pain severity, pain suffering, anxiety, and helplessness. Current findings give first support for the use of an IAT to investigate the strength of association between self- and pain-schema in patients with chronic pain and suggest that pain therapies may incorporate techniques that intervene on the level of self-pain enmeshment. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Distant Reiki On Pain, Anxiety and Fatigue in Oncology Patients in Turkey: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Melike; Can, Gulbeyaz; Kelam, Ayhan; Aydıner, Aydın

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue, stress and pain are common symptoms among cancer patients, affecting the quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of distant Reiki on pain, anxiety and fatigue in oncology patients. Participants in the control group received usual medical and nursing care during their stay. The intervention group received usual care plus five distant Reiki sessions, one each night for 30 min. A face to face interview was performed and patient personal and illness related characteristics were evaluated using the Patient Characteristics form. Pain, stress and fatigue were evaluated according to a numeric rating scale. The experimental group was predominantly composed of women (71.4%), married individuals (40%), and primary school graduates (40%). The control group was predominantly male (72.7%), married (60%), and primary school graduates (60%). The control group demonstrated greater levels of pain (p=0.002), stress (p=0.001) and fatigue (p=0.001). The Reiki group pain score (pReiki may decreasepain, anxiety and fatigue in oncology patients.

  8. Predictors of pain and physical function at 12-months in patients with ACL-reconstruction: A retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind Larsen, Michael; Nissen, Nis; Jensen, Carsten

    , anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction improves patient reported outcome. However, the intensity of pain is rarely used as indication for surgery in patients with anterior cruciate ligaments tear Results The degree of preoperative pain predicted postoperative improvements in both pain and physical......). Surprisingly, patients with near normal to abnormal preoperative knee instability did not improve the postoperative pain and physical function as much as patients with normal preoperative instability. Age, gender and knee pivot shift had no predictive value....

  9. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: Centre of Pressure (CoP) measurements were tested against pain, fear of pain, and physical function. Velocity, anterior-posterior displacement, and the Romberg Ratio obtained on a portable force platform were used as measures of postural stability. RESULTS: Baseline and 12-week follow-up results of 97....... CONCLUSION: This first study of concurrent and predictive validity of postural balance in LBP patients revealed no association between CoP measures and pain, fear of pain, and physical function....

  10. The Health Seeking Behaviors and Perceptions of Iranian Patient with Osteoarthritis about Pain Management: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Foolady, Marjaneh; Behshid, Mozhgan; Irajpoor, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Pain is the main reason for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) to visit health clinics. Health seeking behaviors indicate unmet patient needs and lack of understanding of OA pain patterns. This study aimed to describe the experiences of Iranian patients with OA and explore their health seeking behaviors and perceptions on pain management related to osteoarthritis. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, data was collected by interviewing 19 patients, 2 family members, and 5 health care providers from the in-patient and out-patient clinics, and physicians' offices. Data saturation was reached after 31 in-depth and semi-structured interviews (five second interviews). Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, using comparison, reflection and interpretation techniques. The criteria used to enhance rigor included credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Results: Two main categories and six subcategories emerged from data analysis. The first main category included "adapting to the reality" which had three subcategories: Facing OA pain, seeking health care, and accepting pain as a part of life. The second main category included "behavior fluctuation" with three subcategory of role conflict, responsibility for self-care and, adherence to prescribed treatment versus self-treatment. Conclusion: Care seeking behaviors for chronic pain sufferers are void of cultural, emotional, social and financial situation and patient expectations. Some misconceptions emerged about the health problem and its management, which may lead to negative attitudes toward treatment and therapists and finally lead to non-adherence to treatment. Patients need for education to enhance appropriate health care utilization.

  11. The Health Seeking Behaviors and Perceptions of Iranian Patient with Osteoarthritis about Pain Management: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain is the main reason for patients with osteoarthritis (OA to visit health clinics. Health seeking behaviors indicate unmet patient needs and lack of understanding of OA pain patterns. This study aimed to describe the experiences of Iranian patients with OA and explore their health seeking behaviors and perceptions on pain management related to osteoarthritis. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, data was collected by interviewing 19 patients, 2 family members, and 5 health care providers from the in-patient and out-patient clinics, and physicians’ offices. Data saturation was reached after 31 in-depth and semi-structured interviews (five second interviews. Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, using comparison, reflection and interpretation techniques. The criteria used to enhance rigor included credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Results: Two main categories and six subcategories emerged from data analysis. The first main category included "adapting to the reality" which had three subcategories: Facing OA pain, seeking health care, and accepting pain as a part of life. The second main category included "behavior fluctuation" with three subcategory of role conflict, responsibility for self-care and, adherence to prescribed treatment versus self-treatment. Conclusion: Care seeking behaviors for chronic pain sufferers are void of cultural, emotional, social and financial situation and patient expectations. Some misconceptions emerged about the health problem and its management, which may lead to negative attitudes toward treatment and therapists and finally lead to non-adherence to treatment. Patients need for education to enhance appropriate health care utilization.

  12. Mobile kidney pain provocation ultrasonography before surgery for symptomatic mobile kidney: A prospective study of 43 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnerlöv, Conny; Söderström, Minette; Öhberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mobile kidney pain provocation ultrasonography together with intravenous pyelography in supine and standing positions and a full medical history can confirm the diagnosis of the clinical condition of symptomatic mobile kidney and aid the selection of patients for surgical treatment. In a consecutive study, 43 patients with the clinical picture of symptomatic mobile kidney, a positive mobile kidney pain provocation ultrasonography and a renal descent of at least 2 lumbar vertebral heights on intravenous pyelography in the standing position, were operated on with nephropexy. Patients' pain relief after nephropexy was evaluated by clinical follow-up, a questionnaire and visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring. Reduction of pain after nephropexy was associated with a significant decrease in VAS scoring from a median of 8 (range 4-10) preoperatively to a median of 0 (range 0-7) postoperatively (p mobile kidney pain provocation ultrasonography and intravenous pyelography in supine and standing positions can verify the diagnosis of symptomatic mobile kidney and aid the selection of patients who will benefit from nephropexy.

  13. Prevalence of phantom limb pain, stump pain, and phantom limb sensation among the amputated cancer patients in India: A prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phantom limb pain (PLP and phantom limb sensation (PLS are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. Methods: The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP, and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. Results: The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  14. Patient's pain perception during mandibular molar extraction with articaine: a comparison study between infiltration and inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataineh, Anwar B; Alwarafi, Majid A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a local anesthetic agent comprising of 4 % articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline, administered through an infiltration technique prior to the extraction of mandibular permanent first molar teeth. The study adopted a split mouth approach and involved patients who needed simple extractions of permanent mandibular first molar teeth on both sides. A combination of buccal and lingual infiltrations was used on one side, while the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) technique, with a 1.8-ml cartridge of 4 % articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, was administered to the other. The patients' pain perception was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and verbal rating scale (VRS) after the injection, followed by extraction. As a part of the study, 104 teeth were extracted from mouths of 52 patients. The difference in pain perception was statistically insignificant (p > .05) regarding the local anesthetic injection between the two techniques. The difference in pain perception regarding the extraction between the two techniques was also statistically insignificant (p < .05). No difference in pain perception between the two techniques among the study population was noted. This indicates that the extraction of permanent mandibular first molar teeth is possible without the administration of an IANB with the use of 4 % articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The buccal and lingual infiltrations are slightly less painful than the conventional IANB technique.

  15. Effects of Reiki on Pain, Anxiety, and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Vitale, Anne; Brownell, Elise; Kryak, Elizabeth; Rand, William

    This blinded, controlled pilot study investigated the effects of Reiki on 46 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Of the 3 groups, Reiki, Sham Reiki, and Standard of Care, only the Reiki group showed significant reductions in pain, blood pressure, respiration rate, and state anxiety, which provides evidence for a full-scale clinical study.

  16. Why Neck Pain Patients Are Not Referred to Manual Therapy: A Qualitative Study among Dutch Primary Care Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikkers, Marije F; Westerman, Marjan J; Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of neck pain with manual therapy demonstrated to be more effective and cost-effective than general practitioner (GP) care or physiotherapy in a high quality RCT in the Netherlands in 2002. However, referral to manual therapy for neck pain is still relatively low. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators affecting the implementation of manual therapy in neck pain management in primary care. An explorative study was conducted comprising semi-structured interviews with GPs (n = 13), physiotherapists (n = 10), manual therapists (n = 7) and their patients with neck pain (n = 27), and three focus groups with additional stakeholders (n = 10-12 per group). A thematic analysis approach was used. Different barriers and facilitators for referral were found for patients, GPs and physiotherapists on the individual level, but also in the interaction between stakeholders and their context. Individual perceptions such as knowledge and beliefs about manual therapy for neck pain either impeded or facilitated referral. Fear for complications associated with cervical manipulation was an important barrier for patients as well as GPs. For GPs and physiotherapists it was important whether they perceived it was part of their professional role to refer for manual therapy. Existing relations formed referral behavior, and the trust in a particular practitioner was a recurrent theme among GPs and physiotherapist as well as patients. The contextual factor availability of manual therapy played a role for all stakeholders. Barriers and facilitators were found especially in individual perceptions on manual therapy for neck pain (e.g. knowledge and beliefs), the interaction between stakeholders (e.g. collaboration and trust) and the organizational context. Implementation strategies that focus on these different aspects seem to be likely to optimize referral rates and the use of manual therapy in primary care management of neck pain.

  17. Why Neck Pain Patients Are Not Referred to Manual Therapy: A Qualitative Study among Dutch Primary Care Stakeholders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije F Dikkers

    Full Text Available Treatment of neck pain with manual therapy demonstrated to be more effective and cost-effective than general practitioner (GP care or physiotherapy in a high quality RCT in the Netherlands in 2002. However, referral to manual therapy for neck pain is still relatively low. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators affecting the implementation of manual therapy in neck pain management in primary care.An explorative study was conducted comprising semi-structured interviews with GPs (n = 13, physiotherapists (n = 10, manual therapists (n = 7 and their patients with neck pain (n = 27, and three focus groups with additional stakeholders (n = 10-12 per group. A thematic analysis approach was used.Different barriers and facilitators for referral were found for patients, GPs and physiotherapists on the individual level, but also in the interaction between stakeholders and their context. Individual perceptions such as knowledge and beliefs about manual therapy for neck pain either impeded or facilitated referral. Fear for complications associated with cervical manipulation was an important barrier for patients as well as GPs. For GPs and physiotherapists it was important whether they perceived it was part of their professional role to refer for manual therapy. Existing relations formed referral behavior, and the trust in a particular practitioner was a recurrent theme among GPs and physiotherapist as well as patients. The contextual factor availability of manual therapy played a role for all stakeholders.Barriers and facilitators were found especially in individual perceptions on manual therapy for neck pain (e.g. knowledge and beliefs, the interaction between stakeholders (e.g. collaboration and trust and the organizational context. Implementation strategies that focus on these different aspects seem to be likely to optimize referral rates and the use of manual therapy in primary care management of neck pain.

  18. Effect of muscle strength and pain on hand function in patients with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between muscle strength (Jama), and pain (VAS) levels with hand function (DASH) in patients with trapeziometarcapal osteoarthritis. Cross-sectional study. Sample of 72 patients with osteoarthritis stage 2-3 (Eaton) and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited when they came to the Hand Surgery Unit. Grip strength, pinch, pain and hand function were measured, and correlation and regression coefficients between them were obtained. For function, the most significant model (R(2)=0.83) included pain and strength. But it is tip to tip pinch force which has a stronger relationship with DASH (Standardized B: -57) questionnaire. Pain also influenced strength measured with the dynamometer but it was tip to tip pinch force that was the most affected. Findings confirm that there is a significant correlation between function referred by the patient and variables that can be measured in the clinic such as grip strength and pinch. The correlation between pain intensity and function was also significant, but tip to tip pinch strength had the greatest impact on the function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Costs of moderate to severe chronic pain in primary care patients – a study of the ACCORD Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde L

    2014-07-01

    .Results: Patients (number =483 were, on average, 59 years old, mainly women (67.5%, and suffered from CNCP for a mean of 12 years at an average pain intensity of 6.5±1.9. The annual direct health care costs and productivity costs averaged CAD $9,565 (±$13,993 and CAD $7,072 (±$11,716, respectively. The use of complementary health care services accounted for almost 50% of the direct health care costs. The mean adjusted total direct health care costs (considering pain-related hospitalizations only and productivity costs increased with more pain disability: low disability, CAD $12,118; moderate, CAD $18,278; and severe, CAD $19,216; P=0.001.Conclusion: The economic burden of CNCP is substantial and increases with the level of pain disability, which suggests the need for and potential benefits of improving CNCP management through specific and adapted treatment plans targeting the impact of pain on daily functioning.Keywords: noncancer chronic pain, primary care, cohort study, direct health care costs, productivity costs, Brief Pain Inventory

  20. PAIN INTENSITY AND PAIN INTERFERENCE AMONG TRAUMA PATIENTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deya Prastika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of trauma has been high and has gained attention worldwide. The energy involved in trauma results in specific tissue damage. Such tissue damage generally leads to pain. The high pain intensity possibly is consequence of trauma due to transfer energy to the body from external force and absorbed in wide area. This pain affected patients’ physical and psychological function, in which well known as pain interference. Objective: The aim of this review is to describe the pain intensity and pain interference among trauma patients. Method: A systematic search of electronic databases (CINHAL, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Google scholar was conducted for quantitative and qualitative studies measuring pain intensity and pain interference. The search limited to hospitalized trauma patients in adult age. Results: The search revealed 678 studies. A total of 10 descriptive studies examined pain intensity and pain interference and met inclusion criteria. The pain intensity and pain interference was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Pain intensity of hospitalized trauma patients were moderate to severe. These including 6 studies in orthopedic trauma, one study in musculoskeletal, two in studies in combinational between orthopedic and musculoskeletal, and two studies in burn injury. Moreover, the patients also reported pain was relentless & unbearable. In accordance, data showed that pain interference was moderate to severe from six studies. These studies result in vary of functional interference. However, those studies examined pain interference on sleep, enjoyment of life, mood, relationship with other, walking, general activity, and walking. Conclusion: The evidence from 10 studies included in this review indicates that hospitalized trauma patients perceived moderate to severe pain intensity and pain interference. Further research is needed to better evaluate the pain of hospitalized trauma patients.

  1. Use and satisfaction with the Healthcare System of the chronic pain patients in Spain: results from a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Salazar, Alejandro; Fernández-Palacín, Fernando; Micó, Juan Antonio; Torres, Luis Miguel; Failde, Inmaculada

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the use of healthcare resources by chronic pain (CP) patients in Spain and their satisfaction with them. A nationwide, cross-sectional study was carried out on a representative sample of 1957 Spanish adults. A telephone survey was conducted with the aim of analyzing the prevalence of CP, the characteristics and consequences of pain, the use of healthcare resources and patients' satisfaction with them. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Of the 1957 subjects interviewed, 325 suffered CP. The mean duration of CP was 10 years (SD: 11.3) and 48.9% of the CP sufferers reported severe/unbearable pain. Moreover, about 30% felt sad/very sad or anxious/very anxious, 24.4% had been on sick leave, 12% had left/lost their jobs and 47.2% considered their pain affected their families. Likewise, 92.9% had consulted a healthcare professional due to their CP, on average 3.49 times (SD: 3.9), and 69.2% took medication. In addition, 67.3% and 63.8% were satisfied/very satisfied with the care and the healthcare information they received, respectively. Individuals who reported headache (OR = 0.34) and feeling sad (OR =0.38) were least satisfied with the care they received. In addition, CP sufferers who made greater use of consultations were those who had left/lost their jobs (β = 1.44), those who took medication (β = 1.67), those who considered their pain affected their families (β = 0.97) and those with a shorter duration of pain (β = -0.003). CP produces relevant demands on healthcare resources, conditioned by the consequences within the family and the effects on their employment. To achieve greater patient satisfaction, professionals need to pay particular attention to certain sites of pain and to patients' mental health.

  2. Assessment of the clinical relevance of quantitative sensory testing with Von Frey monofilaments in patients with allodynia and neuropathic pain. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, D.; van Wijhe, M.; Post, W.J.; Uges, D.R.A.; Wierda, J.M.K.H.

    Background: Allodynia is a common and disabling symptom in many patients with neuropathic pain. Whereas quantification of pain mostly depends on subjective pain reports, allodynia can also be measured objectively with quantitative sensory testing. In this pilot study, we investigated the clinical

  3. Comparison of MRI-defined back muscles volume between patients with ankylosing spondylitis and control patients with chronic back pain: age and spinopelvic alignment matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Doo Hee; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    To compare MRI-defined back muscle volume between AS patients and age, and spinopelvic alignment matched control patients with chronic back pain. 51 male patients with AS were enrolled. Age and spinopelvic alignment matched controls (male) were found among non-AS patients with chronic back pain. After matching procedure, fully matched controls were found in 31 of 51 AS patients (60.8%), who represent AS patients without deformity. However, matched controls were not found in 20 of 51 AS patients (39.2%), who represent AS patients with deformity. MRI parameters of back muscle (paraspinal muscle and psoas muscle) at L4/5 disc level including cross-sectional area (CSA) and fat-free cross-sectional area (FCSA) were compared between AS patients and matched controls. Covariates, including BMI, self-reported physical activity, and the presence of chronic disease, which can influence back muscle volume, were also investigated. There were no statistical differences in age, body mass index, score of back pain (NRS), and spinopelvic alignment, and physical activity between matched AS patients and control patients except for duration of back pain. All MRI parameters for paraspinal muscle volume in matched AS patients (without deformity) were significantly less than those of control patients, and significantly larger than those of non-matched AS patients (with deformity). Body size adjusted MRI parameters (relative CSA and relative FCSA) of paraspinal muscle showed strong correlations with lumbar lordosis and sacral slope. Such relationship between paraspinal muscle and spinopelvic parameters remained significant even after multivariate adjustment. AS patients without deformity already have decreased paraspinal muscle volume compared with age and spinopelvic alignment matched non-AS patients with chronic back pain. Such decrease in paraspinal muscle volume was significantly associated with kyphotic deformity of AS patients even after multivariate adjustment. Although the result

  4. Experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain in the ED or acute surgical ward --a qualitative comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED with an obse......The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED...... was that the ED included a multidisciplinary team with nurses, who mainly had interactions with the patients before surgical assessment. In all, it resulted in fragmentation of care and a patient experience of repetition. In ASW, focus was on assessment by a senior physician, only, and the nurses' interaction...... with the patients took place after surgical assessment. In all, patients experienced long waiting times. The study shows a need to define the roles of the professionals in units receiving patients with acute abdominal pain in order to fulfil the medical as well as the experienced needs of the acute patient....

  5. Effect of a kneeling chair on lumbar curvature in patients with low back pain and healthy controls: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaucher, M.; Isner-Horobeti, M.E.; Demattei, C.; Alonso, S.; Herisson, C.; Kouyoumdijan, P.; van Dieen, J.H.; Dupeyron, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The concept of an ideal sitting posture is often used in practice but lacks a basis in evidence. Objective: We designed a cross-sectional, comparative, matched study to determine the effects of chair and posture on lumbar curvature in 10 patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

  6. Experiences and attitudes about physical activity and exercise in patients with chronic pain: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Linn; Gerdle, Björn; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Andersson, Gerhard; Larsson, Britt

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with chronic pain experience physical activity and exercise (PA&E). This qualitative interview study included 16 women and two men suffering from chronic pain and referred to a multimodal pain rehabilitation program. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. One main theme emerged: "To overcome obstacles and to seize opportunities to be physically active despite chronic pain." This main theme was abstracted from five themes: "Valuing a life with physical activity," "Physical activity and exercise - before and after pain," "A struggle - difficulties and challenges," "The enabling of physical activity," and "In need of continuous and active support." Although these participants valued PA&E, they seldom achieved desirable levels, and performance of PA&E was undermined by difficulties and failure. The discrepancy between the intention to perform physical activity and the physical activity accomplished could be related to motivation, self-efficacy, and action control. The participants desired high-quality interaction with healthcare providers. The findings can be applied to chronic pain rehabilitation that uses PA&E as treatment.

  7. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  8. SPECT/CT versus MRI in patients with nonspecific pain of the hand and wrist - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Buerkert, Alexander; Schleich, Florian S.; Strobel, Klaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schuerch, Maja; Hug, Urs; Wartburg, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    Hand and wrist pain is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the complex anatomy of the involved small structures. The American College of Radiology recommends MRI as the study of choice in patients with chronic wrist pain if radiographs are negative. Lately, state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems have been introduced and may help in the diagnosis of this selected indication. This retrospective study included 21 patients with nonspecific pain of the hand/wrist. The diagnosis of nonspecific wrist pain was made by the referring hand surgeon based on patient history, clinical examination, plain radiography and clinical guidelines. All patients received planar early-phase imaging and late-phase SPECT/CT imaging as well as MRI. Lesions were divided into major (causative) and minor (not causative) pathologies according to clinical follow-up. Furthermore, oedema-like bone marrow changes seen on MRI were compared with focally increased tracer uptake seen on SPECT/CT images. MRI yielded a quite high sensitivity (0.86), but a low specificity (0.20). In contrast, SPECT/CT yielded a high specificity (1.00) and a low sensitivity (0.71). Oedema-like bone marrow changes were detected in 15 lesions in 11 patients. In ten lesions with bone marrow oedema on MRI, foci of elevated tracer uptake were detected on SPECT/CT. Overall, MRI was more sensitive, but SPECT/CT was more specific in the evaluation of causative pathologies. In this initial comparison, SPECT/CT showed higher specificity than MRI in the evaluation of causative pathologies in patients with nonspecific wrist pain. However, MRI was more sensitive. Thus, SPECT/CT was shown to be a useful problem-solving tool in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  9. Knee Pain in a Renal Transplant Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Knee Pain in a Renal Transplant Patient 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0 YES IZJNO FUNDING SOURCE: 8. DO... renal transplant patient with progressive posterior knee pain secondary to amyloidosis. Case: A 57 year-old black-male presented with 6 months of...idiopathic causes, for which he had received hemodialysis for 20 years followed by cadaveric renal transplant four years prior to development of the

  10. Characteristics of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Young; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, MinYoung; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2014-06-01

    To characterize neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) according to classification used in the study by Baron et al. (Baron classification), a classification of neuropathic pain based on the mechanism. To also compare the patterns of neuropathic pain in SCI patients with those in patients with other etiologies and to determine the differences in patterns of neuropathic pain between the etiologies. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. We used the Baron classification to investigate the characteristics of neuropathic pain in SCI. Sixty-one SCI patients with neuropathic pain (The Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs score ≥12) were enrolled in this study between November 2012 and August 2013, after excluding patients patients with visual analog scale (VAS) score patients, and patients with systemic disease or pain other than neuropathic pain. The most common pain characteristic was pricking pain followed by electrical pain and numbness. The mean VAS score of at-level neuropathic pain was 7.51 and that of below-level neuropathic pain was 6.83. All of the patients suffered from rest pain, but 18 (54.6%) patients with at-level neuropathic pain and 20 (50.0%) patients with below-level neuropathic pain suffered from evoked pain. There was no significant difference in between at-level and below-level neuropathic pains. The result was quite different from the characteristics of post-herpetic neuralgia, but it was similar to the characteristics of diabetic neuropathy as shown in the study by Baron et al., which means that sensory nerve deafferentation may be the most common pathophysiologic mechanism of neuropathic pain after SCI. Since in our study, we included short and discrete symptoms and signs based on diverse mechanisms, our results could be helpful for determining further evaluation and treatment.

  11. Experiences and attitudes about physical activity and exercise in patients with chronic pain: a qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson L

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Linn Karlsson,1 Björn Gerdle,1 Esa-Pekka Takala,2 Gerhard Andersson,3,4 Britt Larsson1 1Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Work-related Diseases, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; 3Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with chronic pain experience physical activity and exercise (PA&E.Method: This qualitative interview study included 16 women and two men suffering from chronic pain and referred to a multimodal pain rehabilitation program. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interviews.Results: One main theme emerged: “To overcome obstacles and to seize opportunities to be physically active despite chronic pain.” This main theme was abstracted from five themes: “Valuing a life with physical activity,” “Physical activity and exercise – before and after pain,” “A struggle – difficulties and challenges,” “The enabling of physical activity,” and “In need of continuous and active support.” Conclusion: Although these participants valued PA&E, they seldom achieved desirable levels, and performance of PA&E was undermined by difficulties and failure. The discrepancy between the intention to perform physical activity and the physical activity accomplished could be related to motivation, self-efficacy, and action control. The participants desired high-quality interaction with healthcare providers. The findings can be applied to chronic pain rehabilitation that uses PA&E as treatment. Keywords: chronic pain, experiences, physical activity, rehabilitation, qualitative content analysis

  12. Post-traumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in patients with injury-related chronic pain: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Åhman; Britt-Marie Stålnacke

    2008-01-01

    Sofia Åhman, Britt-Marie StålnackeDepartment of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SwedenAim: To investigate, in patients with injury-related chronic pain, pain intensity, levels of post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depressions.Methods: One hundred and sixty patients aged 17–62 years, admitted for assessment to the Pain Rehabilitation Clinic at the Umeå University Hospital, Umeå Sweden, for chronic pain caused b...

  13. A STUDY ON ADJUVANT HEAD CORING IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LONGITUDINAL PANCREATICOJEJUNOSTOMY AND ITS AID IN PAIN REDUCTION IN CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mohanty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The condition manifests as recurrent intractable abdominal pain. 1 This is the most important indication for surgical procedures. The pain is caused by increased pancreatic parenchymal and ductal pressure. Another cause is that chronic inflammation of the pancreas may lead to fibrosis of the peripancreatic capsule and perilobular parenchyma, which impairs local and regional blood flow, therefore causing pain through tissue ischaemia and acidosis. 2 This is the rationalisation behind adding the head coring to the decompression surgeries that had been classically in practice. METHODS This is a retrospective study. The study period spans over from January 2003 to December 2013, which is a 10-year period. Patients with intractable and non-relenting abdominal pain and a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis with evidence of fibrosis of head of pancreas in imaging studies were included. 35 patients were randomly allocated for Head coring and LPJ by lottery method. The patients were analysed for duration of surgery, hospital stay, operative/postoperative complications and assessment of postoperative pain relief. Pain relief was assessed as complete (No analgesic required, satisfactory (Tolerable pain with normal daily activities and unsatisfactory (Hospitalisation and hampered daily activities. RESULTS Alcohol consumption (65.71% was the main cause of pancreatitis in the study group, followed by gallstones (14.28% and idiopathic (20% cause. Head coring (120 minutes takes a median operative time of 30 minutes more when done adjuvant to LPJ (90 minutes. Incidence of complications were comparable in both the surgeries. The common complications of prolonged ileus and wound infection are in the percentage of 12.5% in only LPJ and 15.78% in adjuvant head coring surgeries. Pain relief was good when the complete and satisfactory groups were compared. But there is not much of difference in unsatisfactory group comparison. CONCLUSION A 30 minutes

  14. The feasibility of matching on a propensity score for acupuncture in a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Johnson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propensity scores are typically applied in retrospective cohort studies. We describe the feasibility of matching on a propensity score derived from a retrospective cohort and subsequently applied in a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain before the start of acupuncture or usual care treatment and enrollment in a comparative effectiveness study that required patient reported pain outcomes. Methods We assembled a retrospective cohort study using data from 2010 to develop a propensity score for acupuncture versus usual care based on electronic healthcare record and administrative data (e.g., pharmacy from an integrated health plan, Kaiser Permanente Northwest. The propensity score’s probabilities allowed us to match acupuncture-referred and non-referred patients prospectively in 2013-14 after a routine outpatient visit for pain. Among the matched patients, we collected patient-reported pain before treatment and during follow-up to assess the comparative effectiveness of acupuncture. We assessed balance in patient characteristics with the post-matching c-statistic and standardized differences. Results Based on the propensity score and other characteristics (e.g., patient-reported pain, we were able to match all 173 acupuncture-referred patients to 350 non-referred (usual care patients. We observed a residual imbalance (based on the standardized differences for some characteristics that contributed to the score; for example, age, -0.283, and the Charlson comorbidity score, -0.264, had the largest standardized differences. The overall balance of the propensity score appeared more favorable according to the post-matching c-statistic, 0.503. Conclusion The propensity score matching was feasible statistically and logistically and allowed approximate balance on patient characteristics, some of which will require adjustment in the comparative effectiveness regression model. By transporting propensity

  15. Pain management at the end of life: A comparative study of cancer, dementia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romem, Anat; Tom, Sarah E; Beauchene, Michelle; Babington, Lynn; Scharf, Steven M; Romem, Ayal

    2015-05-01

    Limited data exist concerning the unique pain characteristics of patients with non-cancer terminal diseases referred for inpatient hospice care. To define the unique pain characteristics of patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice setting with end-stage dementia or chronic obstructive lung disease (or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and to compare them to patients with end-stage cancer. Retrospective patient chart review. Demographic, physiological, pain parameters, and medication utilization data were extracted. Associations between pain characteristics, medication utilization, and admission diagnoses were assessed. Analyses included descriptive statistics. In total, 146 patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2012 with an underlying primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 51), dementia (n = 48), or cancer (n = 47). Pain was highly prevalent in all diagnostic groups, with cancer patients experiencing more severe pain on admission. Cancer patients received a significantly higher cumulative opioid dose compared with dementia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Pain control within 24 h of pain onset was achieved in less than half of all patient groups with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the least likely to achieve pain control. Despite the fact that pain is the most common complaint at the end of life, pain management may be suboptimal for some primary diagnoses. Admission diagnosis is the strongest predictor of pain control. Patient with cancer achieve the best pain control, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients are the least likely to have their pain adequately treated. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Siemons, Liseth; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring remission induction cohort study. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant predictors of achieving an absolute improvement of 30 mm or a relative improvement of 50% on a visual analogue scale for pain. At 6 months, 125 of 209 patients (59.8%) achieved an absolute PPSI and 130 patients (62.2%) achieved a relative PPSI in pain. Controlling for baseline pain, having symmetrical arthritis was the strongest independent predictor of achieving an absolute [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, P = 0.03] or relative (OR 3.44, P = 0.01) PPSI. Additionally, anti-CCP positivity (OR 2.04, P = 0.04) and having ≤12 tender joints (OR 0.29, P = 0.01) were predictive of achieving a relative PPSI. The total explained variance of baseline predictors was 30% for absolute and 18% for relative improvements, respectively. Symmetrical joint involvement, anti-CCP positivity and fewer tender joints at baseline are prognostic signs for achieving satisfactory improvement in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A Comparison of Expectations of Physicians and Patients with Chronic Pain for Pain Clinic Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpin, Pádraig; Imran, Ather; Harmon, Dominic

    2017-03-01

    The patient-physician encounter forms the cornerstone of every health service. However, optimal medical outcomes are often confounded by inadequate patient-physician communication. Chronic pain is estimated to affect over 25% of the population. Its effects are multifaceted with patients at increased risk of experiencing emotional and functional disturbances. Therefore, it is crucial to address all components of the patient's pain experience, including beliefs and expectations. It is our understanding that no other study to date has evaluated the expectations of physicians and compared them to those of patients for pain clinic visits. We sought to describe and compare expectations of chronic pain patients and their physicians during a clinic consultation. We performed a retrospective review on patients attending the pain clinic for the first time who were enrolled and completed a questionnaire asking their expectations for their clinic visit as well as outcomes that would satisfy and disappoint them. Pain physicians were also included. We compared physicians' to patients' responses and evaluated relationships between patient responses and age, gender, pain location, Pain Self-Efficacy, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. One hundred chronic pain patients and 10 pain physicians were surveyed. Patients' clinical expectations for visits focused primarily on some pain relief (34%), education on the cause of pain (24%), and a definitive diagnosis (18%). Physician's expectations included formulation and communication of a management plan (70%), patient assessment for cause of pain (50%), and the education of patients on the cause of pain (40%) as important aims. Pain relief would satisfy the majority of patients (74%) and physicians (70%). No improvement would cause greatest dissatisfaction for patients (52%), but causing more harm would be disappointing to physicians (50%). Gender, age, pain location, and sleep quality all

  18. Beyond the traditional definition of breakthrough pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Antonio; Gentili, Marta; Iorno, Vittorio; Mammucari, Massimo; Tufaro, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Marzia; Sabato, Alessandro Fabrizio

    2013-03-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) is traditionally defined as a transitory pain flare in opioid-treated patients with chronic background pain. This definition has, however, been challenged in recent years. This study aimed to analyze BTP prevalence in different pain conditions. This was a prospective, non-interventional, observational study conducted from June to September 2011 in two Italian pain treatment reference centres. Consecutive patients aged >18 years with oncological or non-oncological pain were eligible for this study; background pain was acute/ subacute (3 months). The characteristics of pain were evaluated by means of a structured interview by physicians, and patients were asked to complete a dedicated clinical study form. The following outcomes were assessed: chronic pain duration (in patients with chronic pain), BTP prevalence, and number and severity of daily BTP episodes. All outcomes were assessed in four populations of patients with: (a) chronic oncological pain; (b) chronic non-oncological pain; (c) non-chronic oncological pain; (d) non-chronic non-oncological pain. The correlation between BTP and gender was also investigated. Of 1,270 patients with chronic pain, 1,086 had non-oncological pain (85.5%). Most patients (68.6%) with non-oncological pain were female (P = 0.001). Pain duration was significantly longer in non-oncological pain versus oncological pain groups (P = 0.002). BTP prevalence was lower in non-oncological patients (P definition. BTP frequency and severity is similar in oncological and non-oncological pain.

  19. A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8-18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children's pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the 13 PRI subscales identified pain coping profiles in Sample 1 (n=311) that replicated in Sample 2 (n=388). Evidence was found of external validity and distinctiveness of the profiles. The findings support a typology of pain coping that reflects the quality of patients' pain mastery efforts and interpersonal relationships associated with pain coping. Results are discussed in relation to developmental processes, attachment styles, and treatment implications.

  20. Assessment of prevalence study of 40 variables related to painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles in patients referred to faculty of dentistry in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Mortazavi; Abbas Javadzadeh; Zahra Delavarian; Zare Mahmoodabadi

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles is one of the most important causes of pain in orofacial region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalency of 40 variables related to this disorder. Materials and Methods: A total 39 patients (32 females, 7 males) with painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles were studied. Patients were evaluated for prevalence of age, sex, job, marriage status, masticatory muscles tenderness, maximum mouth open...

  1. The effects of patient-professional partnerships on the self-management and health outcomes for patients with chronic back pain : a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yu; Yu, Ge; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kath; Closs, S. José

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-management may be a lifelong task for patients with chronic back pain. Research suggests that chronic pain self-management programmes have beneficial effects on patients? health outcome. Contemporary pain management theories and models also suggest that a good patient-professional partnership enhances patients? ability to self-manage their condition.

  2. Cortical sensorimotor processing of painful pressure in patients with chronic lower back pain – An optical neuroimaging study using fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Vrana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated sensorimotor processing of painful pressure stimulation on the lower back of patients with chronic lower back pain (CLBP by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS to measure changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation. The main objectives were whether patients with CLBP show different relative changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (O2Hb and HHb in the supplementary motor area (SMA and primary somatosensory cortex (S1 compared to healthy controls (HC. Twelve patients with CLBP (32 ± 6.1 years; range: 24 – 44 years; 9 women and twenty HCs (33.5 ± 10.7 years; range 22-61 years; 8 women participated in the study. Painful and non-painful pressure stimulation was exerted with a thumb grip perpendicularly to the spinous process of the lumbar spine. A force sensor was attached at the spinous process in order control for pressure forces. Tactile stimulation was realized by a one-finger brushing. Hemodynamic changes in the SMA and S1 were measured bilaterally using a multi-channel continuous wave fNIRS imaging system and a multi-distant probe array. Patients with CLBP showed significant stimulus-evoked hemodynamic responses in O2Hb only in the right S1, while the healthy controls exhibited significant O2Hb changes bilaterally in both, SMA and S1. However, the group comparisons revealed no significant different hemodynamic responses in O2Hb and HHb in the SMA and S1 after both pressure stimulations. This non-significant result might be driven by the high inter-subject variability of hemodynamic responses that has been observed within the patients group. In conclusion, we could not find different stimulus-evoked hemodynamic responses in patients with CLBP compared to HCs. This indicates that neither S1 nor the SMA show a specificity for CLBP during pressure stimulation on the lower back. However, the results point to a potential subgrouping regarding task-related cortical activity within the CLBP group; a

  3. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Reduce Unnecessary Ordering of Coagulation Studies for Patients with Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah S. Hinson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to reduce ordering of coagulation studies in the emergency department (ED that have no added value for patients presenting with chest pain. We hypothesized this could be achieved via implementation of a stopgap measure in the electronic medical record (EMR. Methods: We used a pre and post quasi-experimental study design to evaluate the impact of an EMRbased intervention on coagulation study ordering for patients with chest pain. A simple interactive prompt was incorporated into the EMR of our ED that required clinicians to indicate whether patients were on anticoagulation therapy prior to completion of orders for coagulation studies. Coagulation order frequency was measured via detailed review of randomly sampled encounters during two-month periods before and after intervention. We classified existing orders as clinically indicated or non-value added. Order frequencies were calculated as percentages, and we assessed differences between groups by chi-square analysis. Results: Pre-intervention, 73.8% (76/103 of patients with chest pain had coagulation studies ordered, of which 67.1% (51/76 were non-value added. Post-intervention, 38.5% (40/104 of patients with chest pain had coagulation studies ordered, of which 60% (24/40 were non-value added. There was an absolute reduction of 35.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.7%, 48.0% in the total ordering of coagulation studies and 26.4% (95% CI: 13.8%, 39.0% in non-value added order placement. Conclusion: Simple EMR-based interactive prompts can serve as effective deterrents to indiscriminate ordering of diagnostic studies. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(2267-269.

  4. Vapocoolant Spray vs Lidocaine/Prilocaine Cream for Reducing the Pain of Venipuncture in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study

    OpenAIRE

    ?elik, G?lperi; ?zbek, Orhan; Y?lmaz, M?mtaz; Duman, Ipek; ?zbek, Seda; Apiliogullari, Seza

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients undergoing hemodialysis are repeatedly exposed to stress and pain from approximately 300 punctures per year to their arteriovenous fistula. This study was designed to measure pain associated with venepuncture during AVF cannulation and to compare the effectiveness of ethyl chloride vapocoolant spray, topical eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) cream and placebo in controlling pain caused by venepuncture of arteriovenous fistula patients undergoing chronic hemodial...

  5. Do psychological states associate with pain and disability in chronic neck pain patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is one of the most usual neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions which can lead patients to chronic disability. Similarly to other pain conditions, the changed psychological status of these patients is believed to be associated with their pain condition and disability. However, the association between the psychological status of patients with idiopathic neck pain and their pain intensity and disability is minimally explored. This study was aimed at investigating the association between psychological states (anxiety, depression, kinesiophobia, catastrophizing) of patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain and self-reported pain and disability. Forty five patients with idiopathic chronic neck pain (more than 6 months, at least once a week) participated. Their psychological states were assessed by using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, Pain Catastrophizing scale and Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. Self-reported disability was recorded with the Neck Disability Index. Pain intensity was recorded by using a visual analog scale. Neck pain intensity was significantly correlated with anxiety (pneck pain is associated with their self-reported disability, whereas anxiety is also associated with their pain intensity. Anxiety and catastrophizing may be important predicting markers of patients' self-reported disability.

  6. Algometry with a clothes peg compared to an electronic pressure algometer: a randomized cross-sectional study in pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Egloff, Niklaus; Klingler, Nicole; von Känel, Roland; Cámara, Rafael JA; Curatolo, Michele; Wegmann, Barbara; Marti, Elizabeth; Ferrari, Marie-Louise Gander

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hypersensitivity of the central nervous system is widely present in pain patients and recognized as one of the determinants of chronic pain and disability. Electronic pressure algometry is often used to explore aspects of central hypersensitivity. We hypothesized that a simple pain provocation test with a clothes peg provides information on pain sensitivity that compares meaningfully to that obtained by a well-established electronic pressure algometer. "Clinically meaningf...

  7. Reports of chronic pain in childhood and adolescence among patients at a tertiary care pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Afton L; Hilliard, Paul E; Goesling, Jenna; Clauw, Daniel J; Harte, Steven E; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-11-01

    Although chronic pain in childhood can last into adulthood, few studies have evaluated the characteristics of adults with chronic pain who report childhood chronic pain. Thus, 1,045 new patients (mean age, 49.5 ± 15.4) at an academic tertiary care pain clinic were prospectively evaluated using validated self-report questionnaires. Patients also responded to questions about childhood pain. We found that almost 17% (n = 176) of adult chronic pain patients reported a history of chronic pain in childhood or adolescence, with close to 80% indicating that the pain in childhood continues today. Adults reporting childhood chronic pain were predominantly female (68%), commonly reported widespread pain (85%), and had almost 3 times the odds of meeting survey criteria for fibromyalgia (odds ratio [OR] = 2.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.04-4.23) than those denying childhood chronic pain. Similarly, those with childhood pain had twice the odds of having biological relatives with chronic pain (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.39-2.96) and almost 3 times the odds of having relatives with psychiatric illness (OR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.97-4.11). Lastly, compared to patients who did not report childhood chronic pain, those who did were more likely to use neuropathic descriptors for their pain (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.26-2.64), have slightly worse functional status (B = -2.12, t = -3.10, P = .002), and have increased anxiety (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.24-2.52). Our study revealed that 1 in 6 adult pain patients reported pain that dated back to childhood or adolescence. In such patients, evidence suggested that their pain was more likely to be widespread, neuropathic in nature, and accompanied by psychological comorbidities and decreased functional status. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A qualitative study of changes in expectations over time among patients with chronic low back pain seeking four CAM therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Emery R; Sherman, Karen J; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Hsu, Clarissa; Nichter, Mark; Turner, Judith A; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2015-02-05

    The relationship between patient expectations about a treatment and the treatment outcomes, particularly for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies, is not well understood. Using qualitative data from a larger study to develop a valid expectancy questionnaire for use with participants starting new CAM therapies, we examined how participants' expectations of treatment changed over the course of a therapy. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 64 participants initiating one of four CAM therapies (yoga, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage) for chronic low back pain. Participants just starting treatment were interviewed up to three times over a period of 3 months. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a qualitative mixed methods approach incorporating immersion/crystallization and matrix analysis for a decontexualization and recontextualization approach to understand changes in thematic emphasis over time. Pre-treatment expectations consisted of conjecture about whether or not the CAM therapy could relieve pain and improve participation in meaningful activities. Expectations tended to shift over the course of treatment to be more inclusive of broader lifestyle factors, the need for long-term pain management strategies and attention to long-term quality of life and wellness. Although a shift toward greater acceptance of chronic pain and the need for strategies to keep pain from flaring was observed across participants regardless of therapy, participants varied in their assessments of whether increased awareness of the need for ongoing self-care and maintenance strategies was considered a "positive outcome". Regardless of how participants evaluated the outcome of treatment, participants from all four therapies reported increased awareness, acceptance of the chronic nature of pain, and attention to the need to take responsibility for their own health. The shift in treatment expectations to greater acceptance of pain and

  9. Evaluation of the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Simone Aparecida Penimpedo; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; De Melo, Nivea Cristina; dos Santos, Douglas Meira; de Lassa, Roberta; de Mendonça, Fabiana Sarilho; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Amorim, César Ferreira; Gonzalez, Tabajara Oliveira; Fumagalli, Marco Antônio; de Gomes, Cid André Fidelis Paula; Politti, Fabiano

    2015-03-19

    Nonspecific neck pain can cause considerable suffering, possible disability and reductions in quality of life and productivity. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. A total of 12 patients with nonspecific neck pain and 12 healthy subjects will be enrolled in a randomized, single-blind crossover study. Each subject will receive two forms of treatment in random order: a single session of traditional acupuncture (acupoints: triple energizer 5, 'Wai-guan' and large intestine 11, 'Qu-chi') and sham acupuncture. To eliminate carry-over treatment effects, a one-week wash-out period will be respected between sessions. Surface electromyography will be used to determine motor control in the upper trapezius muscle before and after treatment. The outcome measures in the group with neck pain will be a numerical pain rating scale (range: 0 (no pain) to 10 (maximum pain)), documentation of the pain area on a body chart and cervical range of motion. Comparisons before and after acupuncture treatment will demonstrate whether acupoints affect the activity of the upper trapezius muscle, pain and cervical range of motion. The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. Data will be published after the study is completed. The study will support the practice of evidence-based physical therapy for individuals with nonspecific neck pain. This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT0984021 ) on 7 November 2013 ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01984021 ).

  10. Intranasal ketamine for the management of incidental pain during wound dressing in cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Page

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cancer wounds need regular dressing; else they develop infection, foul odor, and in extreme cases, maggots. Patients resist dressing due to the severe incidental pain during dressing. Intranasal ketamine was tried as an analgesic to reduce this incidental pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with wounds requiring regular dressing were selected; these patients had a basal pain score of 4/10 and incidental pain score of 7/10 during four consecutive dressings. Ketamine 0.5 mg/kg was administered transmucosally 10 min before dressing, and pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, and sedation were recorded for up to 2 h in six consecutive dressings. Results: Ketamine produced a significant reduction in incidental pain without any hemodynamic changes or sedation. Conclusion: Ketamine appears to be a safe and effective analgesic when used intranasally for incidental pain.

  11. Neuropathic Pain Experiences of Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chin-Ching; Lin, Hung-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Dar; Tsay, Shiow-Luan

    2017-11-09

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a common, severe problem that affects spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Only SCI patients truly understand the impact and extent of this type of pain. The aim of this study was to understand the NP experienced by SCI patients and the influence of this type of pain on their daily life. A qualitative design was used. An interview guide including a semistructured questionnaire and in-depth interviews was conducted with SCI patients with NP in a neurorehabilitation department at a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were collected using a purposive sampling method. Content analysis was performed on the interview data, which were obtained from 13 SCI patients with NP. Three themes and eight subthemes were identified that described the NP experience of the participants and the influence of NP on their daily life. The three themes included elusive pain (changing and individual pain sensations, erratically haunting threat, and phantom limb sensations), complicated feelings about pain (converting depression into an active attitude toward life, having feelings of anticipation and anxiety about future pain relief, and facing and experiencing pain), and renewed hope (bravely fighting pain and seeking pain relief methods). This study revealed three important themes of NP experienced by SCI patients, including elusive pain, complicated feelings about pain, and renewed hope. Nurses should understand the nature of NP, provide a thorough pain assessment, and design a proper pain management plan to care effectively for patients with NP.

  12. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  13. Comparison between neck pain disability and cervical range of motion in patients with episodic and chronic migraine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gabriela F; Chaves, Thais C; Gonçalves, Maria C; Florencio, Lidiane L; Braz, Carolina A; Dach, Fabíola; Fernández de Las Peñas, Cesar; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck pain-related disability and cervical range of motion (CROM) in patients with episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM) and to examine the correlation of both outcomes. This cross-sectional study consisted of 91 patients with EM and 34 with CM. Cervical range of motion was measured with the CROM device, and pain during the cervical movement was recorded. Self-reported disability related to neck pain was assessed with the Neck Disability Index. Patients with CM showed higher Neck Disability Index scores and more moderate and severe disability (P = .01). Severe disability as a result of neck pain was associated with 7.6-fold risk of developing CM (P = .003). No significant differences in CROM were identified between groups. Moderate negative correlations between CROM and disability were found for 4 motions within the CM group (-0.60 pain evoked during CROM in both groups (0.34 pain was highly prevalent in patients with migraine. Neck pain-related disability increased with increased frequency of the migraine attacks and was associated with the risk of migraine chronicity. The correlation between CROM and neck pain disability was more evident in patients with CM and in patients with pain during cervical movement. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic multi-segmental postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain compared to pain-free controls: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Michael A; Wirth, Brigitte; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bruin, Eling D

    2018-01-01

    Reduced postural control is thought to contribute to the development and persistence of chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP). It is therefore frequently assessed in affected patients and commonly reported as the average amount of postural sway while standing upright under a variety of sensory conditions. These averaged linear outcomes, such as mean centre of pressure (CP) displacement or mean CP surface areas, may not reflect the true postural status. Adding nonlinear outcomes and multi-segmental kinematic analysis has been reported to better reflect the complexity of postural control and may detect subtler postural differences. In this cross-sectional study, a combination of linear and nonlinear postural parameters were assessed in patients with CNLBP (n = 24, 24-75 years, 9 females) and compared to symptom-free controls (CG, n = 34, 22-67 years, 11 females). Primary outcome was postural control measured by variance of joint configurations (uncontrolled manifold index, UI), confidence ellipse surface areas (CEA) and approximate entropy (ApEn) of CP dispersion during the response phase of a perturbed postural control task on a swaying platform. Secondary outcomes were segment excursions and clinical outcome correlates for pain and function. Non-parametric tests for group comparison with P-adjustment for multiple comparisons were conducted. Principal component analysis was applied to identify patterns of segmental contribution in both groups. CNLBP and CG performed similarly with respect to the primary outcomes. Comparison of joint kinematics revealed significant differences of hip (P postural differences in CNLBP patients with low to moderate pain status.

  15. Implementing the Keele stratified care model for patients with low back pain: an observational impact study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Adrian; Nation, Andy; Durrell, Susie; Andronis, Lazaros; Rule, Ellen; McLeod, Hugh

    2017-02-03

    The Keele stratified care model for management of low back pain comprises use of the prognostic STarT Back Screening Tool to allocate patients into one of three risk-defined categories leading to associated risk-specific treatment pathways, such that high-risk patients receive enhanced treatment and more sessions than medium- and low-risk patients. The Keele model is associated with economic benefits and is being widely implemented. The objective was to assess the use of the stratified model following its introduction in an acute hospital physiotherapy department setting in Gloucestershire, England. Physiotherapists recorded data on 201 patients treated using the Keele model in two audits in 2013 and 2014. To assess whether implementation of the stratified model was associated with the anticipated range of treatment sessions, regression analysis of the audit data was used to determine whether high- or medium-risk patients received significantly more treatment sessions than low-risk patients. The analysis controlled for patient characteristics, year, physiotherapists' seniority and physiotherapist. To assess the physiotherapists' views on the usefulness of the stratified model, audit data on this were analysed using framework methods. To assess the potential economic consequences of introducing the stratified care model in Gloucestershire, published economic evaluation findings on back-related National Health Service (NHS) costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and societal productivity losses were applied to audit data on the proportion of patients by risk classification and estimates of local incidence. When the Keele model was implemented, patients received significantly more treatment sessions as the risk-rating increased, in line with the anticipated impact of targeted treatment pathways. Physiotherapists were largely positive about using the model. The potential annual impact of rolling out the model across Gloucestershire is a gain in approximately 30

  16. Hypoalgesia after exercise and the cold pressor test is reduced in chronic musculuskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In chronic pain patients, impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) have been reported. No studies have compared CPM and EIH in chronic musculoskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity (HPS) and low pain sensitivity (LPS). MATERIALS.......005). Pain tolerance increased after the cold pressor test and exercise in both groups (PCPM and EIH were partly impaired in chronic pain patients with high versus less pain sensitivity, suggesting that the CPM and EIH responses depend on the degree of pain sensitivity. This has clinical...

  17. Extensive Validation of the Pain Disability Index in 3 Groups of Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, Remko; Koke, Albere J. A.; Vroomen, C.A.J.; Stegeman, Patrick; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Coppes, Maarten H.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional study design was performed. Objective. To validate the pain disability index (PDI) extensively in 3 groups of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Summary of Background Data. The PDI is a widely used and studied instrument for disability related to various pain

  18. Multicenter phase II study of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Matsuura, Kazuto; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Homma, Akihiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Monden, Nobuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Ota, Yojiro; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Tahara, Makoto; Kato, Kengo; Asai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this multi-center phase II study was to clarify the clinical benefit of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients during chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods: Head and neck cancer patients who were to receive definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. The opioid-based pain control program consisted of a three-step ladder, with basic regimens of: Step 1: acetaminophen at 500–1000 mg three times a day. Step 2: fast-acting morphine at 5 mg three times a day before meals for a single day. Step 3: long-acting morphine administered around-the-clock, with a starting dosage of 20 mg/day and no upper limit set in principle. The primary endpoint of this study was compliance with radiotherapy. Results: A total of 101 patients from 10 institutions were registered between February 2008 and May 2009 and included in the analysis. The major combination chemotherapy regimen was cisplatin alone (76%). The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13% (13/101, 90% confidence interval: 9.9–16.5%). Median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg (range 0–150 mg). Conclusions: Use of a systematic pain control program may improve compliance with CRT.

  19. Effect of TENS on pain in relation to central sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckwée David

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central sensitization has recently been documented in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OAk. So far, the presence of central sensitization has not been considered as a confounding factor in studies assessing the pain inhibitory effect of tens on osteoarthritis of the knee. The purpose of this study is to explore the pain inhibitory effect of burst tens in OAk patients and to explore the prognostic value of central sensitization on the pain inhibitory effect of tens in OAk patients. Methods Patients with knee pain due to OAk will be recruited through advertisements in local media. Temporal summation, before and after a heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation, will be measured. In addition, pain on a numeric rating score, WOMAC subscores for pain and function and global perceived effect will be assessed. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups (tens, sham tens. Follow-up measurements will be scheduled after a period of 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Tens influences pain through the electrical stimulation of low-threshold A-beta cutaneous fibers. The responsiveness of central pain-signaling neurons of centrally sensitized OAk patients may be augmented to the input of these electrical stimuli. This would encompass an adverse therapy effect of tens. To increase treatment effectiveness it might be interesting to identify a subgroup of symptomatic OAk patients, i.e., non-sensitized patients, who are likely to benefit from burst tens. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390285

  20. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pregabalin in older patients with neuropathic pain: results from a pooled analysis of 11 clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlateva Gergana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older patients are typically underrepresented in clinical trials of medications for chronic pain. A post hoc analysis of multiple clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in older patients. Methods Data from 11 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with DPN or PHN were pooled. Efficacy outcomes included change in Daily Pain Rating Scale score, ≥30% and ≥50% responders, and endpoint pain score ≤3. Safety was based on adverse events (AEs. Primary efficacy was analyzed by analysis of covariance with terms for treatment, age category, protocol, baseline pain, and treatment-by-age category interaction. Results 2516 patients (white, n = 2344 [93.2%]; men, n = 1347 [53.5%]; PHN, n = 1003 [39.9%]; pregabalin, n = 1595 were included in the analysis. Patients were grouped by age: 18 to 64 years (n = 1236, 65 to 74 years (n = 766, and ≥75 years (n = 514. Baseline mean pain and sleep interference scores were comparable across treatment and age groups. Significant improvements in endpoint mean pain were observed for all pregabalin dosages versus placebo in all age groups (p ≤ 0.0009, except for the lowest dosage (150 mg/day in the youngest age group. Clinically meaningful pain relief, defined as ≥30% and ≥50% pain response, was observed in all age groups. The most common AEs were dizziness, somnolence, peripheral edema, asthenia, dry mouth, weight gain, and infections. The relative risks for these AEs increased with pregabalin dose, but did not appear related to older age or type of neuropathic pain. Conclusions Pregabalin (150-600 mg/day significantly reduced pain in older patients (age ≥65 years with neuropathic pain and improvements in pain were comparable to those observed in younger patients. Titration of pregabalin to the

  1. The effects of fatigue, pain, and depression on quality of life in ischemic stroke patients: The Bergen Stroke Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naess H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Halvor Naess,1 Lene Lunde,2 Jan Brogger11Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, 2Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Bergen, NorwayBackground: Many patients with cerebral infarction suffer from symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate these symptoms in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL on long-term follow-up.Materials and methods: All surviving stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway between February 2006 and November 2008 were sent a questionnaire, including a visual analog pain scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Barthel Index, and three measures of HRQoL – 15D, EuroQol, and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale – at least 6 months after stroke onset. Cox regression survival analysis, including EQ-5D, was performed by November 2009.Results: The questionnaire was returned by 328 patients. All three symptoms were reported by 10.1% of the patients, and 26% reported two symptoms. There was a significant association between worse HRQoL scores and an increasing number of cooccurring symptoms for all three HRQoL scores. Fatigue, depression, pain, functional state, and sleeping disorder on follow-up accounted for 58%–83% of the variability in HRQoL, depending on which HRQoL scale was used. Cox regression analysis showed that mortality was associated with a low EuroQol score (P = 0.016.Conclusion: Pain, fatigue, and depression were common symptoms among these stroke patients and, to a large extent, they determined the patients' HRQoL. Low HRQoL was associated with increased mortality.Keywords: cerebral infarction, symptoms, mortality

  2. The Role of Health Locus of Control in Evaluating Depression and Other Comorbidities in Patients with Chronic Pain Conditions, A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harry J; Anitescu, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is significantly influenced by behavioral, cognitive, and emotional factors. Few studies have investigated the health locus of control (HLC)-one's belief regarding where control over one's health lies-as it relates to patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between depression and health/pain locus of control (HLC) in adult patients with persistent pain. A series of questionnaires was administered to chronic pain patients, and these questionnaires were scored and analyzed. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on health locus of control (internal, chance, powerful-others), which were examined with respect to their depression scores using analysis of variance. A total of 131 patients completed the study: 33% belonged to the internal group, 39% in the chance group, and 28% in the powerful-others group. The 3 groups had depression scores of 40 (SD = 8), 47 (SD = 10), and 42 (SD = 8), respectively. We found significant difference in depressions scores between the chance group and the internal group (P locus of control are less depressed compared to patients with fatalistic views on their health/pain in the chance group. The chance dimension of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale was found to be a potential predictor of psychiatric comorbidities such as depression in the chronic pain patient population. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Measuring pain self-efficacy and health related quality of life among hemodialysis patients in Greece: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Theofilou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from end-stage kidney disease often complain about pain. It is also known that the presence of chronic pain greatly impacts upon patients’ quality of life (QOL and can play a crucial role in the co-morbidity of mental health symptoms such as depression and anxiety. The main aim of this study protocol is the investigation of pain self-efficacy, QOL as well as their relation in patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment. The final sample size will be around 70-80 patients. Each subject’s QOL and pain self-efficacy will be measured using the following instruments: i the Missoula-ITAS Quality of Life Index-15 and ii the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. QOL is expected to be related to pain self-efficacy scores. This probable association will be indicated performing regression as well as correlation analysis after controlling for gender, age, education and marital status.

  4. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychosocial factors and their predictive value in chiropractic patients with low back pain: a prospective inception cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breen Alan C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being able to estimate the likelihood of poor recovery from episodes of back pain is important for care. Studies of psychosocial factors in inception cohorts in general practice and occupational populations have begun to make inroads to these problems. However, no studies have yet investigated this in chiropractic patients. Methods A prospective inception cohort study of patients presenting to a UK chiropractic practice for new episodes of non-specific low back pain (LBP was conducted. Baseline questionnaires asked about age, gender, occupation, work status, duration of current episode, chronicity, aggravating features and bothersomeness using Deyo's 'Core Set'. Psychological factors (fear-avoidance beliefs, inevitability, anxiety/distress and coping, and co-morbidity were also assessed at baseline. Satisfaction with care, number of attendances and pain impact were determined at 6 weeks. Predictors of poor outcome were sought by the calculation of relative risk ratios. Results Most patients presented within 4 weeks of onset. Of 158 eligible and willing patients, 130 completed both baseline and 6-week follow-up questionnaires. Greatest improvements at 6 weeks were in interference with normal work (ES 1.12 and LBP bothersomeness (ES 1.37. Although most patients began with moderate-high back pain bothersomeness scores, few had high psychometric ones. Co-morbidity was a risk for high-moderate interference with normal work at 6 weeks (RR 2.37; 95% C.I. 1.15–4.74. An episode duration of >4 weeks was associated with moderate to high bothersomeness at 6 weeks (RR 2.07; 95% C.I. 1.19 – 3.38 and negative outlook (inevitability with moderate to high interference with normal work (RR 2.56; 95% C.I. 1.08 – 5.08. Conclusion Patients attending a private UK chiropractic clinic for new episodes of non-specific LBP exhibited few psychosocial predictors of poor outcome, unlike other patient populations that have been studied. Despite

  6. Effect of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40-65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (pisometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  7. Efficacy of psychological pain theory-based cognitive therapy in suicidal patients with major depressive disorder: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yingmin; Li, Huanhuan; Shi, Chuan; Lin, Yixuan; Zhou, Hanyu; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to explore the effects of psychological pain theory-based cognitive therapy (PPTBCT) on suicide among depressed patients, compared with a control group who received usual psychological care (UPC). The sample consisted of 32 depressed patients and 32 healthy control subjects. All participants completed the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI), Beck Depression Inventory, Three-Dimensional Psychological Pain Scale (TDPPS), and Problem Solving Inventory(PSI), and Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ). All measures differed significantly between depressed patients and healthy controls. Then clinical participants were assigned randomly to the PPTBCT (n=19) and control (n=13) groups. During the 8-week intervention, scores related to depression, suicidal ideation, psychological pain, and automatic thoughts were decreased in both groups at the post-intervention and 4-week follow-up time points, compared with pre-intervention scores. BSI scores remained low at follow up and did not differ significantly from post-intervention scores in the PPTBCT group, but were significantly higher at follow up than at post-intervention in the control group. PPTBCT may effectively reduce suicide risk in patients with major depressive disorder, although the effects of its application need to be confirmed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pain Modulation after Oromucosal Cannabinoid Spray (SATIVEX® in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Study with Quantitative Sensory Testing and Laser-Evoked Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Turri

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC/cannabidiol (CBD (nabiximols or Sativex® is an oromucosal spray formulation containing THC and CBD at an approximately 1:1 fixed ratio. Its administration for the treatment of pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS has been established. MS patients generally complain of different kinds of pain, including spasticity-related and neuropathic pain. In this study, we compared and evaluated pain modulation and thermal/pain threshold of MS patients before and after THC/CBD administration. Methods. 19 MS patients underwent clinical examination, numerical rating scale (NRS, quantitative sensory testing (QST, and laser-evoked potentials (LEPs before and after 1 month of therapy. Psychophysiological and neurophysiological data were compared to sex- and age-matched controls. Results. Patients reported a significant reduction in pain. We found statistically significant differences in LEP parameters between patients and controls but no significant change in LEP measures after THC/CBD therapy. Cold and heat detection thresholds were altered in patients but did not change after THC/CBD therapy. There was a significant increase in cold pain threshold by hand stimulation and a significant reduction in abnormal cold perception thresholds. Conclusions. Our results indicate that Sativex® therapy provides pain relief in MS patients and suggest that it might modulate peripheral cold-sensitive TRP channels.

  9. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9% patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6% experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31% did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2% experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2% suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered.

  10. Cognitive function in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; de Mattos Pimenta, C A; Braga, P E

    2012-01-01

    The paucity of studies regarding cognitive function in patients with chronic pain, and growing evidence regarding the cognitive effects of pain and opioids on cognitive function prompted us to assess cognition via neuropsychological measurement in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated...

  11. Pressure pain thresholds, clinical assessment, and differential diagnosis: reliability and validity in patients with myogenic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrbach, R; Gale, E N

    1989-11-01

    Four studies are presented testing the validity and reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and of examination parameters believed to be important in the clinical assessment of sites commonly used for such measures in patient samples. Forty-five patients with a myogenous temporomandibular disorder were examined clinically prior to PPT measures. Criteria for history and examination included functional aspects of the pain, tissue quality of the pain site, and the type of pain elicited from palpation. Control sites within the same muscle and in the contralateral muscle were also examined. PPTs were measured as an index of tenderness using a strain gauge algometer at these sites. The data from the 5 male subjects were excluded from subsequent analyses due to the higher PPT in the males and to their unequal distribution among the various factorial conditions. The first study demonstrated strong validity in PPT measures between patients (using pain sites replicating the patients' pain) and matched controls (n = 11). The PPT was not significantly different between the primary pain site (referred pain and non-referred pain collapsed) and the no-pain control site in the same muscle (n = 16). The PPT was significantly lower at the pain site compared to the no-pain control site in the contralateral muscle (n = 13). The second study indicated adequate reliability in patient samples of the PPT measures. In the third study, the PPT was significantly lower at sites producing referred pain on palpation compared to sites producing localized pain on palpation. The PPT findings from the control sites were inconsistent on this factor. The fourth study presented preliminary evidence that palpable bands and nodular areas in muscle were most commonly associated with muscle regions that produce pain; such muscle findings were not specific, however, for regions that produce pain. Further, the intraexaminer reliability in reassessing these pain sites qualitatively was only fair

  12. Patient directed self management of pain (PaDSMaP compared to treatment as usual following total knee replacement: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donell Simon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, 665 patients underwent total knee replacements (TKRs at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (NNUH, representing nearly 1% of the national total. Pain control following the operation can be poor, and this can cause poor mobilization and potential long-term adverse events. Although high levels of pain are not associated with patient dissatisfaction, brief periods of pain may lead to neuronal remodeling and sensitization. Patient controlled oral analgesia (PCOA may improve pain relief; however, the evidence to date has been inconclusive. Patient directed self management of pain (PaDSMaP is a single center randomized controlled trial, which aims to establish if patient self-medication improves, or is equivalent to, treatment as usual and to create an educational package to allow implementation elsewhere. Methods/design Patients eligible for a TKR will be recruited and randomized in the outpatient clinic. All patients will undergo their operations according to normal clinical practice but will be randomized into two groups. Once oral medication has commenced, one group will have pain relief administered by nursing staff in the usual way (treatment as usual; TAU, whilst the second group will self manage their pain medication (patient directed self management of pain; PaDSMaP. Those recruited for self-medication will undergo a training program to teach the use of oral analgesics according to the World Health Organization (WHO pain cascade and how to complete the study documentation. The primary endpoint of the trial is the visual analogue scale (VAS pain score at 3 days or discharge, whichever is sooner. The follow-up time is 6 weeks with a planned trial period of 3 years. The secondary objectives are satisfaction with the management of patient pain post-operatively whilst an inpatient after primary TKR; overall pain levels and pain on mobilization; satisfaction with pain management information

  13. Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Valencia,1 Rogelio A Coronado,2 Corey B Simon,3,4 Thomas W Wright,5 Michael W Moser,5 Kevin W Farmer,5 Steven Z George3,6,7 1Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 4Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville,FL, 5Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 6Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 7Brooks–PHHP Research Collaboration, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background: There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT treatment (number of sessions and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability. Patients and methods: A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance. Results: Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01. In

  14. Comparison of granisetron and metoclopramide in the treatment of pain and emesis in migraine patients: A randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Amiri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One of the irritating features of migraine is emesis that can compromise taking oral medications. We designed this study to compare the effectiveness of granisetron and metoclopramide in reducing pain and treating emesis in migraine patients. Methods: We included a total of 148 patients with migraine headache presenting to two referral hospitals in a prospective, double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We compared the effect of granisetron (2 mg intravenous with metoclopramide (10 mg intravenous. Pain intensity and emesis episodes were recorded before drug administration, one, two and four 4 h after drug administration. Results: Of the 148 patients, 47 were male and 101 were female. 75 patients received granisetron and 73 metoclopramide. Mean pain intensity before the administration of the medications was 7.67 ± 1.30 in granisetron group and 7.68 ± 1.13 in metoclopramide group with an insignificant difference. Mean pain intensity at one, two, and 4 h after drug administration was 3.20 ± 1.37, 2.39 ± 1.28, and 1.31 ± 0.52 in granisetron group and 5.04 ± 1.77, 4.1 ± 1.8, and 1.56 ± 0.68 in metoclopramide group (P = 0.03. Mean emesis episodes before drug administration were 1.85 ± 0.81 and 1.80 ± 0.77 in granisetron and metoclopramide groups, respectively. These episodes were 1.33 ± 0.66, 0.25 ± 0.49, and 0.04 ± 0.19 in granisetron group and 1.38 ± 0.73, 0.21 ± 0.47, and 0.41 ± 0.19 in metoclopramide group at one, two, and 4 h after the drug administration (P = 0.7. Conclusion: To came in conclusion, compared to metoclopramide, granisetron is a better choice in acute migraine ATTACK because it decreases the patients' pain as well as their emesis. Keywords: Migraine, Headache, Granisetron, Metoclopramide, Pain

  15. Pain and psychological well-being of older persons living in nursing homes: an exploratory study in planning patient-centred intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi; Leung, Rincy; Ho, Suki

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report on a study to examine the pain situation, the use of oral analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies and the psychological well-being of older patients living in nursing homes; the relationships between pain and psychological well-being were also explored. Pain is common among older adults world-wide, and tends to be under-treated. Indeed, the high prevalence of pain may further hinder the fulfilment of psychological needs in a Maslow hierarchy of needs model. It was a quantitative cross-sectional study; older adults from six nursing homes were invited to join the study in 2007-2009, with a response rate of 100%. Pain was measured using the Geriatric Pain Assessment, happiness using the Subjective Happiness Scale, life satisfaction using the Life Satisfaction Index - A Form, loneliness using the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale. A convenience sample of 302 older patients (213 females and 89 males aged from 60 to 101, mean age of 84·99) joined the study. The majority of them had experienced pain in the previous 3 months, with a pain intensity of 4·51 on a 10-point scale. Pain sites were mainly the knee, back, shoulder and musculoskeletal areas. Only 50% of them took oral analgesics, and 70% used non-pharmacological measures for pain relief. The pain group reported significantly more loneliness and depression when compared with their no-pain counterparts. As the number of older patients increases, so does the need for alternative accommodation; thus, pain management education is urgently needed for staff and nursing home residents. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Antibiotic treatment in patients with low-back pain associated with Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema): a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, HB; Manniche, C; Sørensen, JS

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effect of antibiotic treatment in a cohort of patients with low-back pain (LBP) and Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema) following a lumbar herniated disc. DESIGN: This was a prospective uncontrolled trial of 32 LBP patients who had Modic...... and LBP at 14 months follow-up (n = 37) were invited to participate in this subsequent antibiotic trial but five did not meet the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: 29 patients completed the treatment, as three patients dropped out due to severe diarrhoea. At the end of treatment and at long-term follow...... changes and were treated with Amoxicillin-clavulanate (500 mg/125 mg) 3 x day for 90 days. All patients had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that investigated active conservative treatment for a lumbar herniated disc (n = 166). All patients in that RCT who had Modic changes...

  17. Are you better? A multi-centre study of patient-defined recovery from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llewellyn, A; McCabe, CS; Hibberd, Y

    2018-01-01

    Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) symptoms can significantly differ between patients, fluctuate over time, disappear or persist. This leads to problems in defining recovery and in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Objectives: To define recovery from the patient...

  18. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-hua Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR. Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35 while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (<0.05, controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (<0.05, controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR.

  19. Differential diagnosis of a patient referred to physical therapy with neck pain: a case study of a patient with an atypical presentation of angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Jessie J

    2012-11-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute onset neck pain was referred to physical therapy by a neurosurgeon. The purpose of this case study is to examine the process of differential diagnosis in a patient with neck pain and to discuss common diagnostic errors that can occur in the outpatient setting. The patient had an 8-week history of neck pain, which was worse when running and lifting objects. He presented with imaging of the cervical spine demonstrating degenerative changes. During the examination, several differential diagnoses were considered. A thorough physical examination of the cervical spine and upper quarter failed to reproduce his symptoms. At that time, the physical therapist was suspicious that the origin of the patient's neck pain was non-mechanical in nature. Additional testing during the examination included having the patient exercise briefly on gym equipment; this reproduced his symptoms. After additional positional and postural changes did not alleviate the symptoms, he stopped exercising, and his pain ceased. The patient was referred back to his primary care physician who ordered cardiovascular testing including an electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. These tests revealed significant cardiac abnormalities including multi-vessel blockage of the coronary arteries and evidence of infarction. He underwent a coronary artery bypass graft 4 days later. To make an appropriate differential diagnosis, physical therapists must use a patient-centered model of clinical reasoning and meta-cognition and have an awareness of diagnostic errors such that they can be avoided. The goal of the physical therapy examination, including differential diagnosis, is to efficiently classify the patient for treatment or to direct patients to the proper healthcare provider, thereby minimizing and preventing mortality and morbidity.

  20. Analgesic and Sensory Effects of the Pecs Local Anesthetic Block in Patients with Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth G; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-02-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) develops in 15% to 25% of patients, sometimes years after surgery. Approximately 50% of PPBCS patients have neuropathic pain in the breast, which may be due to dysfunction of the pectoral nerves. The Pecs local anesthetic block proposes to block these nerves and has provided pain relief for patients undergoing breast cancer surgery, but has yet to be evaluated in patients with PPBCS. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of the Pecs block on summed pain intensity (SPI) and sensory function (through quantitative sensory testing [QST]) in eight patients with PPBCS. SPI and QST measurements were recorded before and 30 minutes after administration of the Pecs block (20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine). Pain intensity and sleep interference were measured daily before and after the block for 7 days. Patients experienced analgesia (P = 0.008) and reduced hypoesthesia areas to cold (P = 0.004) and warmth (P = 0.01) after 30 minutes. The reported pain relief (P = 0.02) and reduced sleep interference (P = 0.01) persisted for 7 days after the block. This pilot study suggests that the pectoral nerves play a role in the maintenance of pain in the breast area in PPBCS and begs for further research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Technology for Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia, the PCoA® Acute Device, for Hospitalized Patients with Postoperative Pain, in Pilot Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wirz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute postoperative pain delays recovery and increases morbidity and mortality. Traditional administration of postoperative analgesics by nurses is often inefficient. The present study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and usability of a novel, patient-controlled analgesic dispenser, the PCoA Acute. Methods. A controlled pilot study was conducted at three medical centers. Patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled into two groups, both taking oral analgesics: a control group (n=43, opioids dispensed by nurses, and a test group (n=27, opioids dispensed via the PCoA Acute. Pill intake data were recorded. Pain ratings at rest and during movement were surveyed. Results. No severe adverse events were recorded. Average pill intake time was reduced from 8 : 58 minutes in the control group to 1 : 17 minutes in the test group (P value < 0.05. The test group took 67% more pills than the control group, indicating enhanced compliance. Pain scores were significantly lower for patients in the test group (P value < 0.05. Over 90% of PCoA Acute users were satisfied with its use. Conclusions. The study confirmed that PCoA Acute is safe and effective. It is well accepted by patients and medical staff. Its use can optimize pain medication administration.

  2. Implementing a pain management nursing protocol for orthopaedic surgical patients: Results from a PAIN OUT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cui; Wang, Ling-Xiao; Li, Qi; Zaslansky, Ruth; Li, Li

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of introducing a standardised pain management nursing protocol in orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery. Postoperative pain is a common phenomenon but is still undertreated in hospitalised patients. Nurses' lack of sufficient knowledge and skills about pain management may be a contributing factor to poor outcomes. An interventional, separate sample pre- and post-test. A pain management nursing protocol was introduced and a handbook and training sessions regarding management of postsurgical pain were provided to the nurses on a Joint Orthopaedic ward at a university-affiliated general hospital in Guangzhou, China. Before and after the intervention, nurses' knowledge about pain management and attitudes were assessed, and perioperative management practices and pain-related patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Sixteen and 15 registered nurses, and 77 and 71 patients participated in the study before and after the intervention, respectively. Nurses' scores related to knowledge and skills increased significantly after the protocol was introduced but were still insufficient with regard to pharmacological-related items. The proportion of patients receiving a combined opioid and nonopioid increased after the intervention. Clinically significant changes were observed in some patient-reported outcomes, such as worst pain since surgery, percentage of time experiencing severe pain, and pain interference with activities out of bed. There were significant changes in nonpharmacological methods administered by nurses to patients or used by patients to relieve pain. Implementation of a pain management nursing protocol combined with education in one surgical ward was associated with nurses' increased knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, a change in some management practices, and improvement in a number of pain-related patient-reported outcomes. It was feasible to develop and implement a standardised pain management nursing protocol and use it in the

  3. Predictors of long-term pain and disability in patients with low back pain investigated by magnetic resonance imaging: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampson Madeleine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is possible that clinical outcome of low back pain (LBP differs according to the presence or absence of spinal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, in which case there could be value in using MRI findings to refine case definition of LBP in epidemiological research. We therefore conducted a longitudinal study to explore whether spinal abnormalities on MRI for LBP predict prognosis after 18 months. Methods A consecutive series of patients aged 20-64 years, who were investigated by MRI because of mechanical LBP (median duration of current episode 16.2 months, were identified from three radiology departments, and those who agreed completed self-administered questionnaires at baseline and after a mean follow-up period of 18.5 months (a mean of 22.2 months from MRI investigation. MRI scans were assessed blind to other clinical information, according to a standardised protocol. Associations of baseline MRI findings with pain and disability at follow-up, adjusted for treatment and for other potentially confounding variables, were assessed by Poisson regression and summarised by prevalence ratios (PRs with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Questionnaires were completed by 240 (74% of the patients who had agreed to be followed up. Among these 111 men and 129 women, 175 (73% reported LBP in the past four weeks, 89 (37% frequent LBP, and 72 (30% disabling LBP. In patients with initial disc degeneration there was an increased risk of frequent (PR 1.3, 95%CI 1.0-1.9 and disabling LBP (PR 1.7, 95%CI 1.1-2.5 at follow-up. No other associations were found between MRI abnormalities and subsequent outcome. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the MRI abnormalities examined are not major predictors of outcome in patients with LBP. They give no support to the use of MRI findings as a way of refining case definition for LBP in epidemiological research.

  4. Abnormal pain perception in patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory-Magne, F; Pellaprat, J; Harroch, E; Galitzsky, M; Rousseau, V; Pavy-Le Traon, A; Rascol, O; Gerdelat, A; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease or Multiple System Atrophy frequently experience painful sensations. The few studies investigating pain mechanisms in Multiple System Atrophy patients have reported contradictory results. In our study, we compared pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls and evaluated the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds. We assessed subjective and objective pain thresholds (using a thermotest and RIII reflex), and pain tolerance in OFF and ON conditions, clinical pain, motor and psychological evaluation. Pain was reported in 78.6% of Multiple System Atrophy patients and in 37.5% of Parkinson's disease patients. In the OFF condition, subjective and objective pain thresholds were significantly lower in Multiple System Atrophy patients than in healthy controls (43.8 °C ± 1.3 vs 45.7 °C ± 0.8; p = 0.0005 and 7.4 mA ± 3.8 vs 13.7 mA ± 2.8; p = 0.002, respectively). They were also significantly reduced in Multiple System Atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease patients. No significant difference was found in pain tolerance for the 3 groups and in the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients. In the ON condition, pain tolerance tended to be reduced in Multiple System Atrophy versus Parkinson's disease patients (p = 0.05). Multiple System Atrophy patients had an increase in pain perception compared to Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls. The l-DOPA effect was similar for pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients, but tended to worsen pain tolerance in Multiple System Atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Algometry with a clothes peg compared to an electronic pressure algometer: a randomized cross-sectional study in pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, Niklaus; Klingler, Nicole; von Känel, Roland; Cámara, Rafael J A; Curatolo, Michele; Wegmann, Barbara; Marti, Elizabeth; Ferrari, Marie-Louise Gander

    2011-07-25

    Hypersensitivity of the central nervous system is widely present in pain patients and recognized as one of the determinants of chronic pain and disability. Electronic pressure algometry is often used to explore aspects of central hypersensitivity. We hypothesized that a simple pain provocation test with a clothes peg provides information on pain sensitivity that compares meaningfully to that obtained by a well-established electronic pressure algometer. "Clinically meaningful" was defined as a medium (r = 0.3-0.5) or high (r > 0.5) correlation coefficient according to Cohen's conventions. We tested 157 in-patients with different pain types. A calibrated clothes peg was applied for 10 seconds and patients rated the pain intensity on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. Pressure pain detection threshold (PPdt) and pressure pain tolerance threshold (PPtt) were measured with a standard electronic algometer. Both methods were performed on both middle fingers and ear lobes. In a subgroup of 47 patients repeatability (test-retest reliability) was calculated. Clothes peg values correlated with PPdt values for finger testing with r = -0.54 and for earlobe testing with r = -0.55 (all p-values testing with r = -0.55 (p Test-retest reliability (repeatability) showed equally stable results for clothes peg algometry and the electronic algometer (all r-values > 0.89, all p-values pain sensitivity provided by a calibrated clothes peg and an established algometer correlate at a clinically meaningful level.

  6. Algometry with a clothes peg compared to an electronic pressure algometer: a randomized cross-sectional study in pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marti Elizabeth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypersensitivity of the central nervous system is widely present in pain patients and recognized as one of the determinants of chronic pain and disability. Electronic pressure algometry is often used to explore aspects of central hypersensitivity. We hypothesized that a simple pain provocation test with a clothes peg provides information on pain sensitivity that compares meaningfully to that obtained by a well-established electronic pressure algometer. "Clinically meaningful" was defined as a medium (r = 0.3-0.5 or high (r > 0.5 correlation coefficient according to Cohen's conventions. Methods We tested 157 in-patients with different pain types. A calibrated clothes peg was applied for 10 seconds and patients rated the pain intensity on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. Pressure pain detection threshold (PPdt and pressure pain tolerance threshold (PPtt were measured with a standard electronic algometer. Both methods were performed on both middle fingers and ear lobes. In a subgroup of 47 patients repeatability (test-retest reliability was calculated. Results Clothes peg values correlated with PPdt values for finger testing with r = -0.54 and for earlobe testing with r = -0.55 (all p-values 0.89, all p-values Conclusions Information on pain sensitivity provided by a calibrated clothes peg and an established algometer correlate at a clinically meaningful level.

  7. Differential pain modulation in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Lise; Bach, Flemming W; Rosenberg, Raben; Jensen, Troels S

    2017-12-29

    Background The definition of neuropathic pain has recently been changed by the International Association for the Study of Pain. This means that conditions such as fibromyalgia cannot, as sometimes discussed, be included in the neuropathic pain conditions. However, fibromyalgia and peripheral neuropathic pain share common clinical features such as spontaneous pain and hypersensitivity to external stimuli. Therefore, it is of interest to directly compare the conditions. Material and methods In this study we directly compared the pain modulation in neuropathic pain versus fibromyalgia by recording responses to a cold pressor test in 30 patients with peripheral neuropathic pain, 28 patients with fibromyalgia, and 26 pain-free age-and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients were asked to rate their spontaneous pain on a visual analog scale (VAS (0-100 mm) immediately before and immediately after the cold pressor test. Furthermore the duration (s) of extremity immersion in cold water was used as a measure of the pain tolerance threshold, and the perceived pain intensity at pain tolerance on the VAS was recorded on the extremity in the water after the cold pressor test. In addition, thermal (thermo tester) and mechanical stimuli (pressure algometer) were used to determine sensory detection, pain detection, and pain tolerance thresholds in different body parts. All sensory tests were done by the same examiner, in the same room, and with each subject in a supine position. The sequence of examinations was the following: (1) reaction time, (2) pressure thresholds, (3) thermal thresholds, and (4) cold pressor test. Reaction time was measured to ensure that psychomotoric inhibitions did not influence pain thresholds. Results Pain modulation induced by a cold pressor test reduced spontaneous pain by 40% on average in neuropathic pain patients, but increased spontaneous pain by 2.6% in fibromyalgia patients. This difference between fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain patients was

  8. The PREEMPT study - evaluating smartphone-assisted n-of-1 trials in patients with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Colin; Marois, Maria; Sim, Ida; Schmid, Christopher H; Wilsey, Barth; Ward, Deborah; Duan, Naihua; Hays, Ron D; Selsky, Joshua; Servadio, Joseph; Schwartz, Marc; Dsouza, Clyde; Dhammi, Navjot; Holt, Zachary; Baquero, Victor; MacDonald, Scott; Jerant, Anthony; Sprinkle, Ron; Kravitz, Richard L

    2015-02-27

    Chronic pain is prevalent, costly, and clinically vexatious. Clinicians typically use a trial-and-error approach to treatment selection. Repeated crossover trials in a single patient (n-of-1 trials) may provide greater therapeutic precision. N-of-1 trials are the most direct way to estimate individual treatment effects and are useful in comparing the effectiveness and toxicity of different analgesic regimens. The goal of the PREEMPT study is to test the 'Trialist' mobile health smartphone app, which has been developed to make n-of-1 trials easier to accomplish, and to provide patients and clinicians with tools for individualizing treatments for chronic pain. A randomized controlled trial is being conducted to test the feasibility and effectiveness of the Trialist app. A total of 244 participants will be randomized to either the Trialist app intervention group (122 patients) or a usual care control group (122 patients). Patients assigned to the Trialist app will work with their clinicians to set up an n-of-1 trial comparing two pain regimens, selected from a menu of flexible options. The Trialist app provides treatment reminders and collects data entered daily by the patient on pain levels and treatment side effects. Upon completion of the n-of-1 trial, patients review results with their clinicians and develop a long-term treatment plan. The primary study outcome (comparing Trialist to usual care patients) is pain-related interference with daily functioning at 26 weeks. Trialist will allow patients and clinicians to conduct personalized n-of-1 trials. In prior studies, n-of-1 trials have been shown to encourage greater patient involvement with care, which has in turn been associated with better health outcomes. mHealth technology implemented using smartphones may offer an efficient means of facilitating n-of-1 trials so that more patients can benefit from this approach. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02116621 , first registered 15 April 2014.

  9. Acute Postoperative Pain Therapy: Current State . Patient Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lončarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Persoli-Gudelj, Marijana; Šimić-Korać, Nataša; Blažanin, Božidar; Žunić, Josip; Korać, Želimir

    2006-01-01

    In effective control of acute postoperative pain, it is essential to respect the principles of multimodal balanced analgesia, and to apply them within organized units for the management of acute postoperative pain (acute pain service). The aim of the study was to find out patient expectations and experience in the intensity of acute postoperative pain, and the efficiency of therapy they received. Between October 11, 2002 and December 14, 2002, 103 patients having undergone elective operative ...

  10. Effects of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Pain Thresholds and Sensory Perceptions in Chronic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shihab U; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lucy; St Hillary, Kristin; Cohen, Abigail; Vo, Trang; Houghton, Mary; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been in clinical use for nearly four decades. In earliest observations, researchers found a significant increase in pain threshold during SCS therapy without changes associated with touch, position, and vibration sensation. Subsequent studies yielded diverse results regarding how SCS impacts pain and other sensory thresholds. This pilot study uses quantitative sensory testing (QST) to objectively quantify the impact of SCS on warm sensation, heat pain threshold, and heat pain tolerance. Nineteen subjects with an indwelling SCS device for chronic pain were subjected to QST with heat stimuli. QST was performed on an area of pain covered with SCS-induced paresthesia and an area without pain and without paresthesia, while the SCS was turned off and on. The temperature at which the patient detected warm sensation, heat pain, and maximal tolerable heat pain was used to define the thresholds. We found that all three parameters, the detection of warm sensation, heat pain threshold, and heat pain tolerance, were increased during the period when SCS was on compared with when it was off. This increase was observed in both painful and non-painful sites. The observed pain relief during SCS therapy seems to be related to its impact on increased sensory threshold as detected in this study. The increased sensory threshold on areas without pain and without the presence of SCS coverage may indicate a central (spinal and/or supra-spinal) influence from SCS. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F

    2011-01-01

    variability with opioid doses in a large population using a confirmatory validation population was warranted. We recruited 2294 adult European patients using a World Health Organization (WHO) step III opioid and analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes with a putative influence on opioid...

  12. Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt); Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kumar, Aswin [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India); Forges, Fabien [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Unit of Clinical Research, Innovation, and Pharmacology, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Tseng, Ling-Ming [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Ming-Feng [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chie, Wei-Chu [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bottomley, Andrew [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying

  13. Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Liang; Chow, Edward; Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying; Fairchild, Alysa; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo; Kumar, Aswin; Forges, Fabien; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chie, Wei-Chu; Bottomley, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying

  14. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in chronic pain patients in Singapore: a single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle G E; Win, Ma Thin; Khan, Shariq Ali

    2013-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Singapore for a variety of conditions has been reported to be high. However in Asian chronic pain patients, there is no data on their use of CAM and its perceived benefits. A cross-sectional survey of 210 patients was carried out in Pain Management Centre. Patients were interviewed directly on their use of CAM. The outcomes were prevalence of CAM use, the types of CAM used, the perceived efficacy and factors influencing its use. The prevalence of CAM users in chronic pain is 84%. The most common class of CAM is traditional Chinese medicine (68%) the subset of which, acupuncture, was most frequently utilised (49% of patients using CAM). In univariate analyses, ethnicity was significantly linked to CAM use but not gender, age, education level and income (P = 0.027). Specifically for neck pain, it was significant that patients were more likely to see a chiropractor, to use massage, to take take vitamins and ginseng to alleviate their symptoms. With upper limb pain, it was the use of Tui na, massage and seeing a TCM practitioner. For abdominal pain, it was the use of herbal medicines. The majority felt that CAM helped with their pain (72%) although less expressed satisfaction with CAM (64%). Reasons for using CAM included: having more control over their pain; fewer side effects; safety and lower costs compared to conventional medicine. The use of CAM in chronic pain patients is higher than the general population. Most felt that it improved their pain. As part of multimodal therapy, CAM may have a role in the management of chronic pain.

  15. A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda; Wiggers, John; O'Brien, Kate M; Wolfenden, Luke; Yoong, Serene; Campbell, Elizabeth; Robson, Emma; McAuley, James; Haskins, Robin; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M

    2016-02-11

    Low back pain is a highly prevalent condition with a significant global burden. Management of lifestyle factors such as overweight and obesity may improve low back pain patient outcomes. Currently there are no randomised controlled trials that have been conducted to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle behavioural interventions in managing low back pain. The aim of this trial is to determine if a telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention is effective in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain, compared to usual care. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted with patients waiting for an outpatient consultation with an orthopaedic surgeon at a public tertiary referral hospital within New South Wales, Australia for chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive a lifestyle behavioural intervention (intervention group) or continue with usual care (control group). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a clinical consultation followed by a 6-month telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention (10 individually tailored sessions over a 6-month period) and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Participants will be followed for 26 weeks and asked to undertake three self-reported questionnaires at baseline (pre-randomisation), week 6 and 26 post randomisation to collect primary and secondary outcome data. The study requires a sample of 80 participants per group to detect a 1.5 point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks post randomisation. The primary outcome, pain intensity, will be measured using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. The study will provide robust evidence regarding the effectiveness of a lifestyle behavioural intervention in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain and inform management of these patients. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY TO FIND OUT THE EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN CORE STABILIZATION VS MCKENZIE EXERCISES IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Dutta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance. Both male and female populations are affected; however, there is a tendency towards a higher incidence in male patients. Mechanical low back pain is associated with pain and clinical instability in lumbar motion segments. Exercises play an important part in the rehabilitation of low back pain. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness between Core stabilization vs McKenzie exercises in the treatment of patients with mechanical low back pain. Methods: 30 patients were selected between the age groups of 20 yrs to 50 yrs and having a past history of low back pain for one month. 15 patients were allotted to each group of experiment. Group I was given Core stabilization exercises and Group II with McKenzie exercises. Interferential therapy was a common treatment for both the groups. Evaluations of the subjects were done using the Revised Oswestry Disability Index and Dynamic Endurance tests. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant difference between both the groups (p<0.05 and proved that Core stabilization exercises is more effective than McKenzie exercises in mechanical low back pain. Conclusion: This study shows that core stabilization exercises possess a greater potential over McKenzie exercises in treating Mechanical Low back pain patients.

  17. A Clinical Study on the cases of The Pain Shock Patients after Korean Bee-Venom Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-seon

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:There has been no known report on the pain shock after administering Korean bee-venom therapy. Three accounts of pain shock were observed at the Sangji university affiliated Oriental medicine clinic from July 2001 through September 2001. This thesis will inform clinical progression and cautions on administering Korean bee-venom therapy. Method:We were able to witness different patterns of pain shock during the treatment of degenerative knee joint, progressive oral paralysis, and A.L.S. In order to reduce heat toxicity of the bee venom, needling points were first massaged with the ice for 10 minutes before injecting 0.1~0.2cc of the bee venom. Points of injection were ST36, LI11, LI4 and others. Pain shock occurred after injecting on inner xi-an, outer xi-an and LI4. The phenomena associated with pain shock was recorded in chronological order and local changes were examined. Result Through examining 3 patients with the pain shock, we managed to observe clinical progression, duration, and time linked changes on specific regions. We also managed to determine sensitive needling points for the pain shock. Conclusion:Following results were obtained from 3 patients with the pain shock caused by Korean bee-venom therapy from July 2001 to September 2001. 1. Either positive or negative responses were shown after the pain shock. For case 1, extreme pain was accompanied with muscular convulsion and tremble, ocular hyperemia, delirium, stiffening of extremities, and hyper ventilation which all suggest positive responses. For case 2 and 3, extreme pain was accompanied with facial sweating, asthenia of extremities, pallor face, dizziness, weak voice, and sleepiness which are the signs of negative responses. 2. The time required to recover to stable state took nearly an hour (including sleeping time and there was no side effect. 3. Precautions required to prevent the pain shock includes full concentration from the practitioner, accurate point

  18. Ethics of research for patients in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisel, David B

    2017-04-01

    This review describes advances in rising and continuing ethical issues in research in patients in pain. Although some of the issues focus directly on pain research, such as research in neonatal pain management, others focus on widespread ethical issues that are relevant to pain research, such as scientific misconduct, deception, placebo use and genomics. Scientific misconduct is more widespread than realized and requires greater awareness of the markers of misconduct like irreproducibility. More education about what qualifies as misconduct, such as consent violations, plagiarism and inappropriate patient recruitment along with data falsification needs to be implemented. Wayward researchers may attend a rehabilitation conference to improve their practices. Studies in neonatal pain management do not require comparing an intervention with the inadequate analgesia of a placebo; comparing with a standard approach is sufficient. Deception of research patients may be acceptable under narrow circumstances. The legitimacy of using broad informed consent for biobanking and genomic studies are being challenged as changes to the Common Rule are being considered. Increasing complexity and the desire to further medical knowledge complicates research methods and informed consent. The ethical issues surrounding these and offshoot areas will continue to develop.

  19. Cancer Pain Management Education Rectifies Patients' Misconceptions of Cancer Pain, Reduces Pain, and Improves Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Ju Seo, Jeong; Uk Park, Keon; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, JinShil

    2018-03-26

    More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients' misconceptions regarding cancer pain. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects' reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N = 13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients' misconceptions about analgesic use.

  20. [Vibration-assisted music therapy reduces pain and promotes relaxation of para- and tetraplegic patients. A pilot study of psychiatric and physical effects of simultaneous acoustic and somatosensory music stimulation as pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariauzouls, C; Michel, D; Schiftan, Y

    1999-11-01

    Pain is a well known phenomenon in posttraumatic spinal cord injuries. Nearly 10% of the patients develop most severe, invalidizing, as a rule neurogenic pain conditions that are hardly accessible to conventional therapies. A pilot study was therefore conducted with 10 paraplegics and tetraplegics suffering chronic pain, investigating how vibration supported music therapy with the Musica Medica method affected pain experience, tension/relaxation and well-being. In addition to subjective experience, we measured physiological parameters (finger tip skin temperature, electrodermal activity, heart rate, respiration frequency) during the therapy sessions. All patients had a high acceptance of the method which throughout the group had brought about an increase in relaxation and well-being as well as a decrease of pain experience. The autonomic nervous system variables correlated with relaxation and in addition pointed to an activating impact of the therapy chosen.

  1. Conditioned pain modulation in patients with nonspecific chronic back pain with chronic local pain, chronic widespread pain, and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Eich, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Tesarz, Jonas

    2017-03-01

    Findings considering conditioned pain modulation (CPM) in chronic back pain (CBP) are contradictory. This might be because many patients with CBP report pain in further areas of the body, and altered CPM might influence spatial extent of pain rather than CBP per se. Therefore, we compared CPM in patients with CBP with different pain extent. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), for whom CPM impairment is reported most consistently, were measured for comparison. Based on clinical evaluation and pain drawings, patients were categorized into chronic local back pain (CLP; n = 53), chronic widespread back pain (CWP; n = 32), and FMS (n = 92). Conditioned pain modulation was measured by the difference in pressure pain threshold (test stimuli) at the lower back before and after tonic heat pain (conditioning stimulus). We also measured psychosocial variables. Pressure pain threshold was significantly increased in CLP patients after tonic heat pain (P pain modulation in CLP was significantly higher than that in CWP and FMS (P painful areas (0-10) were associated with lower CPM (r = 0.346, P = 0.001) in CBP but not in FMS (r = -0.013, P = 0.903). Anxiety and depression were more pronounced in FMS than in CLP or CWP (P values pain inhibition seem to be more indicated the higher the pain extent.

  2. Comparative Study of the Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol in Relieving of Postoperative Pain after General Anesthesia in Nephrectomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna; Gondi, Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravenous paracetamol and tramadol in relieving of postoperative pain after general anesthesia for nephrectomy in prospective donor patients for kidney transplantation. A randomized study was conducted on 100 adult patients scheduled for nephrectomy aged from 35 to 55 years of both sexes and divided into two groups and were administered intravenous paracetamol and tramadol for postoperative pain relief and assessed with visual analog scale score and variations in vital parameters to assess extent of pain relief. After statistical interpretation of collected data, the observations were extrapolated. There was a statistically significant difference in the pain intensity scores obtained between the paracetamol and tramadol groups. On the basis of the present study, it is concluded that tramadol due to its lesser onset of action time was superior to paracetamol in providing acute postoperative pain relief.

  3. Clinical effectiveness and safety of OROS® hydromorphone in break-through cancer pain treatment: a multicenter, prospective, open-label study in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Min Kyoung; Hyun, Myung Soo; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Keon Uk; Song, Hong Suk; Lee, Sun Ah; Lee, Won Sik; Bae, Sung Hwa; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Cho, Yoon Young

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of OROS® hydromorphone in reducing breakthrough pain (BTP) medication frequency in Korean patients with chronic cancer pain. Multicenter, prospective, open-label, phase IV study. Patients with chronic malignant pain using immediate-release oxycodone more than two times per day for BTP. Patients were stabilized on their ongoing drug for 3 days immediately before baseline measurements (day 0). Medication was changed to OROS® hydromorphone at a dose equianalgesic to oxycodone using a 2.5:1 controlled-release oxycodone to hydromorphone hydrochloride conversion ratio; the patients were observed for 7 days. Dose was titrated, if required, and the patients were observed for another 7 days. Effectiveness and safety parameters were measured at baseline, day 7, and day 14. BTP medication frequency on days 7 and 14, compared to baseline. Of the 141 patients screened, 114 received study drug and 98 completed the study. Compared to day 0, daily BTP medication frequency on day 14 decreased from 2.93 to 2.00 (p > 0.0001), daily BTP frequency decreased from 3.67 to 2.44 (p > 0.0001), and end-of-dose pain frequency decreased by 44 percent. Pain was controlled adequately during daytime and night-time. Pain intensity decreased by 11 percent as assessed using the Korean Brief Pain Inventory and by 17 percent as assessed using the numerical rating scale. About 61.2 percent patients and 60.2 percent physicians were satisfied with the treatment. Common adverse events, which occurred in 91.2 percent patients, were constipation, somnolence, and dizziness. Once-daily OROS® hydromorphone is efficient in the reduction of cancer pain-related BTP episodes, including end-of-dose pain.

  4. Insecure attachment style and cumulative traumatic life events in patients with somatoform pain disorder: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacak, Yeliz; Morawa, Eva; Tuffner, Daniela; Erim, Yesim

    2017-12-01

    Current models assume somatoform pain disorder (SPD) to be the result of a complex interaction between bio- and psychosocial factors, but the etiology is still not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of attachment style and the frequency of traumatic life events, especially childhood adversities, in patients with SPD compared to healthy controls. We compared 65 patients with SPD (confirmed by Structured Clinical Interview, SCID-I) to 65 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The following questionnaires were employed: Relationship Scale Questionnaire (RSQ), Essen Trauma Inventory (ETI), Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15). A logistic regression analysis was used to identify the association between SPD and psychological factors. Insecure attachment was significantly more prevalent (60%) in patients with SPD compared to healthy subjects (14%; pcumulative traumatic events emphasize their importance as risk factors of SPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Occurrence of myofascial pain in patients with possible carpal tunnel syndrome - a single-blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qerama, Erisela; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    There exits some similarity between symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and myofascial pain related to trigger points (TPs) in the infraspinatus muscle.......There exits some similarity between symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and myofascial pain related to trigger points (TPs) in the infraspinatus muscle....

  6. Randomized controlled pilot study of an educational video plus telecare for the early outpatient management of musculoskeletal pain among older emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Hollowell, Allison G; Burke, Gary F; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Dayaa, Joseph A; Quigley, Benjamin R; Bush, Montika; Weinberger, Morris; Weaver, Mark A

    2018-01-05

    Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visits. Following discharge from the ED, patients, particularly older patients, often have difficulty controlling their pain and managing analgesic side effects. We conducted a pilot study of an educational video about pain management with and without follow-up telephone support for older adults presenting to the ED with musculoskeletal pain. ED patients aged 50 years and older with musculoskeletal pain were randomized to: (1) usual care, (2) a brief educational video only, or (3) a brief educational video plus a protocol-guided follow-up telephone call from a physician 48-72 hours after discharge (telecare). The primary outcome was the change from the average pain severity before the ED visit to the average pain severity during the past week assessed one month after the ED visit. Pain was assessed using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. Of 75 patients randomized (mean age 64 years), 57 (76%) completed follow up at one month. Of the 18 patients lost to follow up, 12 (67%) had non-working phone numbers. Among patients randomized to the video (arms 2 and 3), 46/50 viewed the entire video; among the 25 patients randomized to the video plus telecare (arm 3), 23 were reached for telecare. Baseline pain scores for the usual care, video, and video plus telecare groups were 7.3, 7.1, and 7.5. At one month, pain scores were 5.8, 4.9, and 4.5, corresponding to average decreases in pain of -1.5, -2.2, and -3.0, respectively. In the pairwise comparison between intervention groups, the video plus telecare group had a 1.7-point (95% CI 1.2, 2.1) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care, and the video group had a 1.1-point (95% CI 0.6, 1.6) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care after adjustment for baseline pain, age, and gender. At one month, clinically important differences were also observed between the video plus telecare and usual care groups for analgesic side effects, ongoing opioid use

  7. Pain and pain mechanisms in patients with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, S; Christensen, A W; Christensen, R

    2017-01-01

    completed the PDQ (RA: 3,826, PsA: 1,180, SpA: 1,093). 52% of all patients and 63% of PDQ-completers had VAS pain score ≥ 30 mm. The distribution of the PDQ classification-groups (18) were; RA: 56%/24%/20%. PsA: 45%/ 27%/ 28%. SpA: 55% / 24%/ 21%. More patients with PsA had PDQ score >18....... The objectives were to quantify and characterize pain phenotypes (non-neuropathic vs. neuropathic features) among Danish arthritis patients using the PDQ, and to assess the association with on-going inflammation. METHODS: The PDQ was included onto the DANBIO touch screens at 22 departments of Rheumatology......28-CRP and VAS pain but not with indicators of peripheral inflammation (CRP and SJC). Thus, pain classification by PDQ may assist in mechanism-based pain treatment....

  8. Post-traumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in patients with injury-related chronic pain: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Åhman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sofia Åhman, Britt-Marie StålnackeDepartment of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SwedenAim: To investigate, in patients with injury-related chronic pain, pain intensity, levels of post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depressions.Methods: One hundred and sixty patients aged 17–62 years, admitted for assessment to the Pain Rehabilitation Clinic at the Umeå University Hospital, Umeå Sweden, for chronic pain caused by an injury, answered a set of questionnaires to assess post-traumatic stress (Impact of Event Scale [IES], pain intensity (VAS, depression, and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HAD].Results: Moderate to severe post-traumatic stress was reported by 48.1% of the patients. Possible–probable anxiety on the HAD was scored by 44.5% and possible–probable depression by 45.2%. Pain intensity (VAS was significantly correlated to post-traumatic stress (r = 0.183, p = 0.022, the HAD-scores anxiety (r = 0.186, p = 0.0021, and depression (r = 0.252, p = 0.002. No statistically significant differences were found between genders for post-traumatic stress, pain intensity, anxiety, or depression. Participants with moderate to severe stress reaction reported statistically significant higher anxiety scores on the HAD (p = 0.030 in comparison with patients with mild stress.Conclusion: The findings of relationships between pain intensity, post-traumatic stress, depression, and anxiety may have implications for clinicians and underline the importance of considering all these factors when managing patients with injury-related chronic pain.Keywords: post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, chronic pain

  9. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  10. Applying JIT principles to resident education to reduce patient delays: a pilot study in an academic medical center pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kayode A; Chambers, Chester G; Dada, Maqbool; Christo, Paul J; Hough, Douglas; Aron, Ravi; Ulatowski, John A

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effect on patient waiting times, patient/doctor contact times, flow times, and session completion times of having medical trainees and attending physicians review cases before the clinic session. The major hypothesis was that review of cases prior to clinic hours would reduce waiting times, flow times, and use of overtime, without reducing patient/doctor contact time. Prospective quality improvement. Specialty pain clinic within Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, MD, United States. Two attending physicians participated in the intervention. Processing times for 504 patient visits are involved over a total of 4 months. Trainees were assigned to cases the day before the patient visit. Trainees reviewed each case and discussed it with attending physicians before each clinic session. Primary measures were activity times before and after the intervention. These were compared and also used as inputs to a discrete event simulation to eliminate differences in the arrival process as a confounding factor. The average time that attending physicians spent teaching trainees while the patient waited was reduced, but patient/doctor contact time was not significantly affected. These changes reduced patient waiting times, flow times, and clinic session times. Moving some educational activities ahead of clinic time improves patient flows through the clinic and decreases congestion without reducing the times that trainees or patients interact with physicians. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The language of pain: A short study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Rathnam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain perception is a very controversial topic in child patients. It is affected by various factors such as fear, anxiety, previous experiences, parental factors, and pain threshold. The communication of such pain by the child to the parent is also very confusing with children having rudimentary and developing communication skills. A study to evaluate the pain perception of children and the parental understanding of the children′s pain would be helpful in this scenario. The effect on behavior due to pain is also attempted in this particular study. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 100 children aged between 5-13 years accompanied by either parent was performed. Data collection was done with the help of questionnaires, which assessed the parental understanding of the child′s pain. Pain perception recording was done with the Visual Analog Scale of Faces (VASOF. The behavior of the child was noted using the Frankl′s behavior rating scale. Data was collated and statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS (version 10 software. Results and conclusion: The results show that parental factors such as education, work culture, influence parental understanding of pain. VASOF proves to be a reliable tool for pain perception in children. Behavior of the child shows a positive correlation to pain perception.

  12. Pain Threshold Tests in Patients With Heel Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Bernice; Masharawi, Youssef

    2016-07-01

    Pressure pain threshold (PPT) is a useful tool for evaluating mechanical sensitivity in patients suffering from various musculoskeletal disorders. However, no previous study has investigated PPT in the heel of patients experiencing plantar heel pain syndrome (PHPS). The aim of this study was to compare PPT levels and topographic presentation of sensitivity in the heel of patients with PHPS and in healthy controls. The reliability of PPT testing in patients with PHPS was assessed for intra- and interrater recordings. The PPT levels of 40 feet in each group were then assessed on 5 predetermined sites in the heel using a standardized measurement protocol. Patient functional status (FS) as measured by the Foot & Ankle Computerized Adaptive Test was employed as an external reference. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed no group differences for PPTs at all sites (P = .406). Age (P = .099) or BMI (P = .510) did not affect PPT values, although there was an effect on gender (P = .006). The analysis revealed significant differences between sites (P < .001) demonstrating a diverse topographic distribution. In the PHPS group, PPT levels at the anterior/medial, posterior/medial and central sites were significantly lower than at the posterior/lateral and anterior/lateral sites (P < .05). For the control group, PPT levels at the anterior/medial site were significantly lower than all other sites (P < .001). No significant differences were found between PPT of the PHPS patients and controls, therefore, PPT cannot be recommended as an assessment tool for these patients. The topographic distribution indicated low PPT levels at the anterior/medial area of the heel in patients with PHPS and controls. Level II, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. A Cross-Sectional Clinic-Based Study in Patients With Side-Locked Unilateral Headache and Facial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sanjay; Rathore, Chaturbhuj; Makwana, Prayag; Dave, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    To undertake the epidemiological evaluation of the patients presenting with side-locked headache and facial pain in a tertiary neurology outpatient clinic. Side-locked unilateral headache and facial pain include a large number of primary and secondary headaches and cranial neuropathies. A diagnostic approach for the patients presenting with strictly unilateral headaches is important as many of these headache disorders respond to a highly selective drug. Epidemiological data may guide us to formulate a proper approach for such patients. However, the literature is sparse on strictly unilateral headache and facial pain. We prospectively recruited 307 consecutive adult patients (>18 years) with side-locked headache and facial pain presenting to a neurology outpatient clinic between July 2014 and December 2015. All patients were subjected to MRI brain and other investigations to find out the different secondary causes. The diagnosis was carried out by at least two headache specialists together. All patients were classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorder-third edition (ICHD-3β). The mean age at the time of examination was 42.4 ± 13.6 years (range 18-80 years). Forty-eight percent of patients were male. Strictly unilateral headaches accounted for 19.2% of the total headaches seen in the clinic. Headaches were classified as primary in 58%, secondary in 18%, and cranial neuropathies and other facial pain in 16% patients. Five percent of patients could not be classified. Three percent of patients were classified as per the Appendix section of ICHD-3β. The prevalence of secondary headaches and painful cranial neuropathies increased with age. A total of 36 different diagnoses were made. Only two diseases (migraine and cluster headache) had a prevalence of more than 10%. The prevalence of 13 diseases varied between 6 and 9%. The prevalence of other 14 groups was ≤1%. Migraine was the most common diagnosis (15%). Cervicogenic headache

  14. Chronic low back pain patients' use of, level of knowledge of and perceived benefits of complementary medicine: a cross-sectional study at an academic pain center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Julie; Scala, Emmanuelle; Faouzi, Mohamed; Decosterd, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-04

    Chronic pain patients often use complementary medicine (CM) to alleviate their pain; however, little is known about the use of CM by chronic low back pain (cLBP) patients. We investigated the frequency of use of CM by cLBP patients, the perceived effects of these therapies, patients' knowledge regarding CM, and patient-physician communication regarding CM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from November 2014 to February 2015. A questionnaire was distributed by physicians to 238 consecutive patients consulting for cLBP at the Pain Center of Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland. Poisson regression model was used to analyze patients' level of knowledge regarding various CMs, and the logistic regression model was used to assess CM use for cLBP. The questionnaire was returned by 168 cLBP patients (response rate: 70.6%). Lifetime prevalence of CM use for cLBP was 77.3%. The most commonly used therapies were osteopathy (48.8%), massage (45.2%) and acupuncture (31.6%), rated for their usefulness on a 0-10 scale as a mean ± SD of 5.4 ± 2.7, 5.9 ± 2.5 and 3.8 ± 3.2, respectively. The CM treatment best known by patients was osteopathy, followed by massage and acupuncture. If their doctors proposed CM as a treatment for cLBP, 78% of participants reported being very or somewhat likely to try CM. Respondents with CM health insurance were more likely to use CM (OR = 2.26; 95%CI: 1.07-4.78; p = 0.031) for cLBP. Respondents having experienced cLBP for more than five years were more likely to use CM to treat their cLBP than respondents having experienced cLBP for one year or less (OR = 2.84; 95%CI: 1.02-7.88; p = 0.044). More than three-quarters of cLBP patients in our sample did use CM to treat their cLBP. The results showed that the most commonly used therapies were not necessarily the highest rated in terms of perceived usefulness. These results highlight the importance of developing integrative pain centers in which patients may obtain advice

  15. Endpoints in pediatric pain studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Monique); I. Ceelie (Ilse); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAssessing pain intensity in (preverbal) children is more difficult than in adults. Tools to measure pain are being used as primary endpoints [e.g., pain intensity, time to first (rescue) analgesia, total analgesic consumption, adverse effects, and long-term effects] in studies on the

  16. Effect of smoking status and nicotine dependence on pain intensity and outcome of treatment in Indian patients with temporomandibular disorders: A longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Katyayan, Manish Khan

    2017-01-01

    Evidence regarding the association of smoking with various forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain is vast, but that with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is scarce. The aims of this study are to evaluate the effect of smoking status (SS) and nicotine dependence (ND) on TMD pain intensity and treatment outcome in an Indian population with TMD. Nine hundred and sixty-two patients with TMD were selected for this longitudinal cohort study. Lifetime SS was evaluated and patients were classified as current smokers (YS), former smokers (FS), or nonsmokers (NS). The Fagerstrom test was used to evaluate the ND of YS. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analog scale scores. Six months posttreatment, the pain intensity was again recorded. The effect of treatment was evaluated using a global transition outcome measure and categorized as treatment success or failure. A minimum 30% reduction in pain was used as a criterion for categorizing patients as those who had gotten "better." Data obtained from the study were compared using Chi-square tests, paired samples t -tests, and one-way ANOVA tests. The criterion for statistical significance for all analyses was set at P = 0.05. Among groups of SS, YS showed the maximum pain intensity at baseline and posttreatment. The outcome of treatment was most successful in NS and least in FS. The number of patients who had gotten "better" after treatment was significantly highest in NS. There was no significant difference between groups of ND with respect to pain intensity, treatment outcome, or "better" patients. Among Indian patients with TMD, smokers reported significantly greater pain intensity and poorer response to treatment than NS. Pain intensity or treatment outcome was independent of ND.

  17. Health care costs before and after diagnosis of depression in patients with unexplained pain: a retrospective cohort study using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Reed,1 Jihyung Hong,2 Diego Novick,1 Alan Lenox-Smith,3 Michael Happich41Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 3Eli Lilly UK, Basingstoke, UK; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Bad Homburg, GermanyPurpose: To assess the impact of pain severity and time to diagnosis of depression on health care costs for primary care patients with pre-existing unexplained pain symptoms who subsequently received a diagnosis of depression.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study analyzed 4000 adults with unexplained pain (defined as painful physical symptoms [PPS] without any probable organic cause and a subsequent diagnosis of depression, identified from the UK General Practice Research Database using diagnostic codes. Patients were categorized into four groups based on pain severity (milder or more severe; based on number of pain-relief medications and use of opioids and time to diagnosis of depression (≤1 year or >1 year from PPS index date. Annual health care costs were calculated (2009 values and included general practitioner (GP consultations, secondary care referrals, and prescriptions for pain-relief medications for the 12 months before depression diagnosis and in the subsequent 2 years. Multivariate models of cost included time period as a main independent variable, and adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities.Results: Total annual health care costs before and after depression diagnosis for the four patient groups were higher for the groups with more severe pain (£819–£988 versus £565–£628; P < 0.001 for all pairwise comparisons and highest for the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis in the subsequent 2 years (P < 0.05. Total GP costs were highest in the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis both before and after depression diagnosis (P

  18. Postoperative pain: knowledge and beliefs of patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jacqueline Fm; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Alblas, Eva E; Kalkman, Cor J; van Wijck, Albert Jm

    2017-11-01

    To describe patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. Moreover, to explore the effect of information and education on patients' and nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding pain management. In the treatment of postoperative pain, patients' and nurses' inadequate knowledge and erroneous beliefs may hamper the appropriate use of analgesics. A randomised controlled trial and a cross-sectional study. In 2013, half of 760 preoperative patients were allocated to the intervention group and received written information about the complications of postoperative pain. The knowledge and beliefs of 1184 nurses were studied in 2014 in a cross-sectional study. All data were collected with the same questionnaires. In the intervention group, patients' knowledge level was significant higher than in the control group, while no differences were found in beliefs. Nurses had higher knowledge and more positive beliefs towards pain management compared with both patient groups. Nurses with additional pain education scored better than nurses without additional pain education. Nurses were also asked what percentage of pain scores matched their impression of the patient's pain, and the mean was found to be 63%. Written information was effective for increasing patients' knowledge. However, it was not effective for changing beliefs about analgesics and patients and nurses had erroneous beliefs about analgesics. It is necessary to continue to inform patients and nurses about the need for analgesics after surgery. Such education could also emphasise that a discrepancy between a patient's reported pain score and the nurse's own assessment of the patient's pain should prompt a discussion with the patient about his/her pain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Painful Memories: Reliability of Pain Intensity Recall at 3 Months in Senior Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Daoust

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Validity of pain recall is questioned in research. Objective. To evaluate the reliability of pain intensity recall for seniors in an emergency department (ED. Methods. This study was part of a prospective multicenter project for seniors (≥65 years old treated in an ED for minor traumatic injury. Pain intensity (0–10 numerical rating scale was evaluated at the initial ED visit, at one week (baseline, and 3 months. At three months, patients were asked to recall the pain intensity they had at baseline. Results. 482 patients were interviewed (mean age 76.6 years, SD ± 7.3 and 72.8% were female. Intraclass correlation coefficient between pain at baseline and its recall was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14–0.33. Senior patients tended to overestimate their pain intensity by a mean of 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9–1.5 units. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the variance of baseline pain recall at 3 months was explained by pain at ED visit (11%, pain at 3 months (7%, and pain at baseline (2%. Conclusion. The accuracy of pain intensity recall after three months is poor in seniors and seems to be influenced by the pain experienced at the time of injury.

  20. Low Dose I-131 MIBG therapy as an adjunct for bone pain palliation in pediatric patients with end-stage neuroblastoma: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, Thomas; Herbert, Anthony; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: This study describes the initial experience in the use of low-dose 1-131 MIBG in patients with metastaticl refractory Neuroblastoma given at 18.5 Mbql Kg (0.5 mCi/Kg )to (1) achieve disease palliation (i.e., pain I symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life, through subjective response from patient/carers and (2) allow day-admission to minimize hospital stay providing more quality time between the patients and carers. Methods: Patients with refractory and metastatic Neuroblastoma whose primary treatment goal at that particular stage is pain palliation were given low-dose 1-131 M IBG at a dose of 18.5 Mbql Kg ( 0.5 mCil Kg)l. Assessment of subjective pain relief following 1-131 MIBG was done through interviews from hospital visits of the patient and home visits by the team. Results: Four patients underwent Low-Dose 1-131 MIBG Therapy for pain palliation between May 2007- March 2008. Median age was 5.75 years old and median total dose given was 539 Mbql patient (14.5 mCil patient). All patients at a cenain time had relief from disease pain allowing them to communicate with family and participate in physical activities not priyiledged before. Observations gathered from carersl parents revealed that the overall quality-of-life improved after the 1-131 MIBG therapy with concurrent pain medication protocol. Conclusion: This initial I pilot study described achievement of disease palliation (i.e., pain and symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life of Stage IV Neuroblastoma patients and allows day-admissions providing more quality time between the patient and the family and reduces patient anxiety.

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Dry Eye Patients With Chronic Pain Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Smitt-Kamminga, Nicole Sillevis; Kozareva, Diana; Nibourg, Simone A.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE: To investigate clinical characteristics of dry eye disease (DED) patients with a chronic pain syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. study. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients of a tertiary care DED patient cohort in the Netherlands were included. Chronic pain syndromes irritable bowel

  2. Pain assessment according to the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain classification in patients with spinal cord injury referred to a multidisciplinary pain center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnig, S; Landmann, G; Stockinger, L; Opsommer, E

    2016-10-01

    This is a retrospective study. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of pain types in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) according to the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain (ISCIP) classification. This study was conducted in a multidisciplinary pain center. Socio-demographic and clinical data were examined and ISCIP classification was applied. Sixty-six individuals (51±13 years) with SCI had pain, a lesion older than 5 years in 67% and a pain history older than 5 years in 54% of patients. According to the ISCIP classification, nociceptive pain was present in 58% (musculoskeletal pain) and 3% (visceral pain) of the patients. At-level, below-level neuropathic pain and other neuropathic pain were observed, respectively in 53, 42 and 5% of patients. Unknown pain type was found in 8% of patients. Patients with complete lesions showed significantly more frequent neuropathic pain (P=0.021) and more frequent at-level SCI pain (P=0.00) compared with those with incomplete lesions. Patients with paraplegia had more often at-level pain (P=0.00), whereas patients with tetraplegia reported more often below-level pain (P=0.00). Patients had severe pain (mean intensity: 8.2 (±1.6) on a 0 to 10 numerical scale) and showed high grades of pain chronicity. Mild to severe depression and anxiety were present, respectively in 53 and 56% of patients. The health-related quality of life was low. The use of the ISCIP classification in a clinical setting is mirroring the very complex pain situation in patients with SCI referred to a multidisciplinary pain center, and it might be an important step for adequate pain therapy.

  3. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    , incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... treatment as addiction may result in poor pain control. Several screening tools were identified, but only a few were thoroughly validated with respect to validity and reliability. Most of the identified guidelines mention addiction as a potential problem. The guidelines in cancer pain management...

  4. Understanding patient requirements for technology systems that support pain management in palliative care services: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, Matthew J; Taylor, Sally; Bennett, Michael I; Bewick, Bridgette M

    2017-11-01

    Approaches to pain management using electronic systems are being developed for use in palliative care. This article explores palliative care patients' perspectives on managing and talking about pain, the role of technology in their lives and how technology could support pain management. Face-to-face interviews were used to understand patient needs and concerns to inform how electronic systems are developed. A total of 13 interviews took place with a convenience sample of community-based patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care through a hospice. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Four meta-themes emerged: Technology could be part of my care; I'm trying to understand what is going on; My pain is ever-changing and difficult to control; and I'm selective about who to tell about pain. Patients described technology as peripheral to existing processes of care. To be relevant, systems may need to take account of the complexity of a patient's pain experience alongside existing relationships with health professionals.

  5. Dopaminergic tone does not influence pain levels during placebo interventions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyt, Ina; Moslemi, Kurosh; Baastrup, Cathrine; Grosen, Kasper; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Petersen, Gitte L; Price, Donald D; Hall, Kathryn T; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2017-10-23

    Placebo effects have been reported in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Expected pain levels and positive emotions are involved in the observed pain relief, but the underlying neurobiology is largely unknown. Patients with neuropathic pain are highly motivated for pain relief, and as motivational factors such as expectations of reward, as well as pain processing in itself, are related to the dopaminergic system, it can be speculated that dopamine release contributes to placebo effects in neuropathic pain. Nineteen patients with neuropathic pain after thoracic surgery were tested during a placebo intervention consisting of open and hidden applications of the pain-relieving agent lidocaine (2 mL) and no treatment. The dopamine antagonist haloperidol (2 mg) and the agonist levodopa/carbidopa (100/25 mg) were administered to test the involvement of dopamine. Expected pain levels, desire for pain relief, and ongoing and evoked pain were assessed on mechanical visual analog scales (0-10). Significant placebo effects on ongoing (P ≤ 0.003) and evoked (P ≤ 0.002) pain were observed. Expectancy and desire accounted for up to 41.2% and 71.5% of the variance in ongoing and evoked pain, respectively, after the open application of lidocaine. We found no evidence for an effect of haloperidol and levodopa/carbidopa on neuropathic pain levels (P = 0.071-0.963). Dopamine seemed to influence the levels of expectancy and desire, yet there was no evidence for indirect or interaction effects on the placebo effect. This is the first study to suggest that dopamine does not contribute to placebo effects in chronic neuropathic pain.

  6. Agreement between diagnoses reached by clinical examination and available reference standards: a prospective study of 216 patients with lumbopelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tropp Hans

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue origin of low back pain (LBP or referred lower extremity symptoms (LES may be identified in about 70% of cases using advanced imaging, discography and facet or sacroiliac joint blocks. These techniques are invasive and availability varies. A clinical examination is non-invasive and widely available but its validity is questioned. Diagnostic studies usually examine single tests in relation to single reference standards, yet in clinical practice, clinicians use multiple tests and select from a range of possible diagnoses. There is a need for studies that evaluate the diagnostic performance of clinical diagnoses against available reference standards. Methods We compared blinded clinical diagnoses with diagnoses based on available reference standards for known causes of LBP or LES such as discography, facet, sacroiliac or hip joint blocks, epidurals injections, advanced imaging studies or any combination of these tests. A prospective, blinded validity design was employed. Physiotherapists examined consecutive patients with chronic lumbopelvic pain and/or referred LES scheduled to receive the reference standard examinations. When diagnoses were in complete agreement regardless of complexity, "exact" agreement was recorded. When the clinical diagnosis was included within the reference standard diagnoses, "clinical agreement" was recorded. The proportional chance criterion (PCC statistic was used to estimate agreement on multiple diagnostic possibilities because it accounts for the prevalence of individual categories in the sample. The kappa statistic was used to estimate agreement on six pathoanatomic diagnoses. Results In a sample of chronic LBP patients (n = 216 with high levels of disability and distress, 67% received a patho-anatomic diagnosis based on available reference standards, and 10% had more than one tissue origin of pain identified. For 27 diagnostic categories and combinations, chance clinical agreement

  7. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3-12 months' duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Hanne; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2012-09-06

    There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE) were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient's capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological-hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23-30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7-10 (Box scale from 0-10) and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort.Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be regarded as two symptom complexes that mutually affect each other in negative

  8. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Technology for Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia, the PCoA® Acute Device, for Hospitalized Patients with Postoperative Pain, in Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Stefan; Conrad, Stefan; Shtrichman, Ronit; Schimo, Kai; Hoffmann, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Acute postoperative pain delays recovery and increases morbidity and mortality. Traditional administration of postoperative analgesics by nurses is often inefficient. The present study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and usability of a novel, patient-controlled analgesic dispenser, the PCoA Acute. A controlled pilot study was conducted at three medical centers. Patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled into two groups, both taking oral analgesics: a control group ( n = 43), opioids dispensed by nurses, and a test group ( n = 27), opioids dispensed via the PCoA Acute. Pill intake data were recorded. Pain ratings at rest and during movement were surveyed. No severe adverse events were recorded. Average pill intake time was reduced from 8 : 58 minutes in the control group to 1 : 17 minutes in the test group ( P value PCoA Acute users were satisfied with its use. The study confirmed that PCoA Acute is safe and effective. It is well accepted by patients and medical staff. Its use can optimize pain medication administration.

  9. Pain management in patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pieper, M.J.C.; van Dalen-Kok, A.H.; de Waal, M.W.M.; Husebo, B.S.; Lautenbacher, S.; Kunz, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Corbett, A.

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause

  10. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C.; Sibbald, Gary R.

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose

  11. Real-World Massage Therapy Produces Meaningful Effectiveness Signal for Primary Care Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Results of a Repeated Measures Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, William G; Munk, Niki; Love, Margaret M; Bruckner, Geza G; Stewart, Kathryn E; Pearce, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    While efficacy of massage and other nonpharmacological treatments for chronic low back pain is established, stakeholders have called for pragmatic studies of effectiveness in "real-world" primary health care. The Kentucky Pain Research and Outcomes Study evaluated massage impact on pain, disability, and health-related quality of life for primary care patients with chronic low back pain. We report effectiveness and feasibility results, and make comparisons with established minimal clinically important differences. Primary care providers referred eligible patients for 10 massage sessions with community practicing licensed massage therapists. Oswestry Disability Index and SF-36v2 measures obtained at baseline and postintervention at 12 and 24 weeks were analyzed with mixed linear models and Tukey's tests. Additional analyses examined clinically significant improvement and predictive patient characteristics. Of 104 enrolled patients, 85 and 76 completed 12 and 24 weeks of data collection, respectively. Group means improved at 12 weeks for all outcomes and at 24 weeks for SF-36v2's Physical Component Summary and Bodily Pain Domain. Of those with clinically improved disability at 12 weeks, 75% were still clinically improved at 24 weeks ( P  < 0.01). For SF-36v2 Physical and Mental Component Summaries, 55.4% and 43.4%, respectively, showed clinically meaningful improvement at 12 weeks, 46.1% and 30.3% at 24 weeks. For Bodily Pain Domain, 49.4% were clinically improved at 12 weeks, 40% at 24 weeks. Adults older than age 49 years had better pain and disability outcomes than younger adults. Results provide a meaningful signal of massage effect for primary care patients with chronic low back pain and call for further research in practice settings using pragmatic designs with control groups. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Comparing the effects of epidural methylprednisolone acetate injected in patients with pain due to lumbar spinal stenosis or herniated disks: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharibi F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jafar Mobaleghi1, Faramarz Allahdini2, Karim Nasseri3, Behzad Ahsan3, Shoaleh Shami4, Mansour Faizi5, Fardin Gharibi51Department of Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Anesthesia, 4Faculty of Nursing, 5Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, IranObjective: Satisfactory results have been seen with epidural steroid injections (ESI in patients with herniated disks (HD, but the role in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS has been less investigated. We compared long-term effects of ESI in HD and LSS patients.Methods: In a prospective, single-blind uncontrolled study, 60 patients with radicular pain due to HD (n = 32 or LSS (n = 28 were enrolled over a 9-month period. Methylprednisolone acetate 80 mg plus 0.5% bupivacaine 10 mg were diluted in normal saline up to a total volume of 10 mL, and injected into the epidural space. The amount of pain based on numeric pain score, level of activity, and subjective improvement were reported by patients after 2 and 6 months by telephone. Demographic data were analyzed with the chi-square test. The differences in numeric pain scale scores between the two groups at different times were analyzed with the t-test.Results: There were no differences between HD and LSS patients regarding age, sex, and average duration of pain prior to ESI. The degree of pain was significantly higher in LSS patients in comparison with HD patients in the pre-injection period. The amount of pain was significantly reduced in both groups 2 months after injection. This pain reduction period lasted for 6 months in the HD group, but to a lesser extent in LSS patients (P < 0.05.Discussion: Epidural methylprednisolone injection has less analgesic effect in LSS, with less permanent effect in comparison with HD.Keywords: methylprednisolone acetate, lumbar spinal stenosis, herniated disk

  13. Pain and somatosensory findings in patients 3 years after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Kristensen, Anders D; Thillemann, Theis M

    2009-01-01

    in patients and controls. Patients with chronic hip pain had higher scores on the mental vulnerability scale (Poperated side, which was more prominent in patients...... with chronic hip pain and 18 controls without chronic hip pain were recruited from a previous questionnaire study about hip pain after total hip arthroplasty. All participants answered questions about pain and mental vulnerability and underwent clinical examination followed by quantitative sensory testing...... with pain. Pain referred from the back or deeper structures in the hip seems to play a role for the pain in subgroups of patients. In addition, chronic hip pain was associated with mental vulnerability....

  14. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campa-Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT, dry needling and stretching (DN-S, and soft tissue techniques (STT. All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM, pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  15. Pain acceptance and opiate use disorders in addiction treatment patients with comorbid pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lewei Allison; Bohnert, Amy S B; Price, Amanda M; Jannausch, Mary; Bonar, Erin E; Ilgen, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Studies from pain treatment settings indicate that poor acceptance of pain may be an important and modifiable risk factor for higher severity of opioid use. However, the degree to which pain acceptance relates to opioid use severity in the addiction treatment population is unknown. In this study of addiction treatment patients with co-morbid pain, we examined correlates of severity of opiate (heroin and prescription opioid) use, with a particular focus on the role of pain acceptance. Patients in residential addiction treatment with comorbid pain (N=501) were stratified into low, moderate and high severity of opiate use. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared across opiate severity categories. 72% (N=360) of the participants had symptoms that were consistent with an opiate use disorder. Younger age, Caucasian race, female gender, cocaine use and lower pain acceptance were associated with higher severity of opiate use, whereas pain intensity was not. Controlling for demographic and other risk factors, such as substance use and pain intensity, higher pain acceptance was associated with lower odds of severe prescription opioid (AOR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.68 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance) and heroin use (AOR 0.57, 95% CI 0.44-0.75 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance). Problematic opiate use is common in addictions treatment patients with chronic pain. Lower pain acceptance is related to greater opiate use severity, and may be an important modifiable target for interventions to successfully treat both pain and opiate use disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of music therapy versus music medicine on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Potvin, Noah; Kesslick, Amy; Shim, Minjung; Radl, Donna; Schriver, Emily; Gracely, Edward J; Komarnicky-Kocher, Lydia T

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of music therapy (MT) versus music medicine (MM) interventions on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients and to enhance understanding of patients' experiences of these two types of music interventions. This study employed a mixed methods intervention design in which qualitative data were embedded within a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty-one adult cancer patients participated in two sessions that involved interactive music making with a music therapist (MT) and two sessions in which they listened to pre-recorded music without the presence of a therapist (MM). Before and after each session, participants reported on their mood, anxiety, relaxation, and pain by means of visual analogue and numeric rating scales. Thirty participants completed an exit interview. The quantitative data suggest that both interventions were equally effective in enhancing target outcomes. However, 77.4 % of participants expressed a preference for MT sessions. The qualitative data indicate that music improves symptom management, embodies hope for survival, and helps connect to a pre-illness self, but may also access memories of loss and trauma. MT sessions helped participants tap into inner resources such as playfulness and creativity. Interactive music making also allowed for emotional expression. Some participants preferred the familiarity and predictability of listening to pre-recorded music. The findings of this study advocate for the use of music in cancer care. Treatment benefits may depend on patient characteristics such as outlook on life and readiness to explore emotions related to the cancer experience.

  17. PAIN RELIEF IN POLYTRAUMA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pain management in Polytrauma is a poorly-addressed concern at the time of active resuscitation. But, very often, pain assessment is also a challenge! Opioids belong to conventional analgesics of choice in any acute pain conditions. But, recently application of regional anaesthesia techniques and subanaesthetic doses of ketamine are satisfactorily employed. A clear understanding of neuropathic element of pain must be made as they require specific therapy. It must be emphasised that effective pain therapy is a multidisciplinary team work with active involvement of pain psychologist.

  18. Relationship between optimism and quality of life in patients with two chronic rheumatic diseases: axial spondyloarthritis and chronic low back pain: a cross sectional study of 288 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Sarah; Molto, Anna; Bailly, Florian; Dadoun, Sabrina; Fabre, Stéphanie; Rein, Christopher; Hudry, Christophe; Zenasni, Franck; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Pertuiset, Edouard; Fautrel, Bruno; Gossec, Laure

    2015-06-10

    Axial Spondyloarthritis (AxSpA) and chronic low back pain are rheumatic diseases that impact patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In other chronic conditions, HRQoL was positively associated with dispositional optimism, a personality trait. The objective was to explore the relationship between optimism and HRQoL in these two diseases. A cross-sectional study was performed in 2 tertiary care hospitals and 2 private practices in France. Patients had definite AxSpA or chronic low back pain according to the rheumatologist. A generic HRQoL questionnaire (Short Form, SF-12) with physical and mental composite scores (PCS and MCS respectively) and an optimism questionnaire (the Life Orientation Test-revised, LOT-R) were collected. Analyses included non-parametric correlations and multiple regression analyses to study the effect of optimism on PCS and MCS. In all, 288 (199 AxSpA and 89 low back pain) patients were included: mean age, 47.3 ± 11.9 years, 48.6 % were males. Pain levels (0-10) were 4.5 ± 2.4 and 4.3 ± 2.4 in AxSpA and LOW BACK PAIN patients, respectively. HRQoL was similarly altered in both diseases, for both physical and mental composite scores (mean PCS: 43.7 ± 8.2 vs. 41.9 ± 7.1; mean 45.9 ± 7.8 vs. 46.7 ± 8.1 for AxSpA and low back pain respectively). Optimism was moderate and similar in both populations. Optimism was positively correlated to MCS in both diseases (rho = 0.54 and 0.58, respectively, both p Optimism was similar in these 2 chronic diseases and was an explanatory factor of the mental component of HRQoL, but not physical HRQoL. Physical HRQoL may reflect more the disease process than character traits.

  19. Quantitative sensory testing in classical trigeminal neuralgia-a blinded study in patients with and without concomitant persistent pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Maarbjerg, Stine; Reimer, Maren

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the third International Classification of Headache Disorders state that there should be no neurological deficits in patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at clinical examination. However, studies demonstrating sensory abnormalities at bedside examination in TN...... scores were calculated to process frequency analyses and Z-profiles. We found increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side (47.2% vs 0%, P = 0.008), asymptomatic side (33.3% vs 0%, P = 0.011), and hand (36% vs 0%, P ... increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side compared with the asymptomatic side (-2.980 vs -2.166, P = 0.040). Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was detected bilaterally in the face and the hand. Trigeminal neuralgia patients with concomitant persistent pain tended to have higher mean...

  20. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  1. Migraine pain location in adult patients from eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sparse literature documenting the location of pain at the onset of migraine attacks and during established headaches is available. Objectives: A prospective study (2003-05 on 800 adult migraine patients (International Classifications of Headache Disorders (ICHD, 2:1.1, 1.2.1 and 1.6.1 was conducted to document (a sites of onset of pain and (b location of pain during established attacks (in> 50% occasions through semistructured interviews. Results: Demography: N = 800; M:F = 144:656 (1:4.56; age, 16-42 years (mean, 26 years; duration of migraine, 1-18 years (mean, 6.8 years. 87% of the subjects were ethnic Bengalis from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, Calcutta being the capital city. Migraine types (on the basis of> 50% headache spells: N = 800; 1.1:668 (83.5%; 1.2.1:18 (2.25%; 1.6.1:114 (14.25%. Location of pain at onset: Unilateral onset was present in 41.38% of the patients; of these, 53.17% had eye pain; 8.16%, frontal pain and 38.67%, temporal pain. In 32.25% of the patients, bilateral/central location of pain, mostly bitemporal or at vertex was noted. Cervico-occipital pain onset was noted in 26.43% patients (predominantly occipital, 14.68%; predominantly cervical, 11.75%. Location of established headaches: In 47.4% of the patients, with unilateral ocular or temporal onset, pain remained at the same site. Pain became hemicranial in 32.9%. In most patients, unilateral frontal onset pain (55.5% became bilateral or holocranial. Most bilateral ocular (69.4% and temporal onset (69.7% pains remained at the same location. However, most bifrontal (55.6% and vertex onset (56.9% pains subsequently became holocranial. Most occipital pains at onset became holocranial (45.3%, but cervical pains subsequently became either hemicranial (38.3% or holocranial (36.2%. Conclusions: This study documents location of pain at the onset and during established headaches in migraine patients largely from a specific ethnic group. Migraine with

  2. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 (ρ < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients (ρ < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure (ρ < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure

  3. The immediate effects of thoracic transverse mobilization in patients with the primary complaint of mechanical neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, CIndy; Boyles, Robert; Murahashi, Laura; Sena, Tanya; Yarnall, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Posterior-to-anterior (PA) vertebral mobilization to the thoracic spine has been studied as an intervention for neck pain. Our purpose was to explore effects of a different mobilization technique, transverse vertebral pressure, on cervical range of motion (ROM) and pain when applied to the thoracic spine among participants with neck pain. A single-blinded quasi-experimental study with a one-group pretest-posttest design. A transverse group consisted of 21 participants whose neck pain increased with active movements. A non-intervention group of 20 asymptomatic participants was included simply to ensure rater blinding. The treatment group received Grades IV to IV+ transverse mobilizations at T1 through T4 bilaterally. Measurements taken immediately after intervention included pre/post cervical ROM, distant pressure pain threshold (PPT), and a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Analysis utilized t-tests and ordinal counterparts. The transverse group demonstrated significant gains in extension and bilateral rotation (P≤0.005) but not flexion or side-bend. A total of 57% of mobilized participants reported clinically meaningful decreased pain (Ptransverse mobilization to the upper thoracic spine, significant gains in cervical extension and bilateral rotation, and decreased pain scores were found. There were no adverse effects. Unlike other mobilization studies, PPT changes at a remote site were statistically but not clinically meaningful. Findings suggest that transverse mobilization would be a productive topic for controlled clinical trials.

  4. Impact on quality of life of a nursing intervention programme for patients with chronic non-cancer pain: an open, randomized controlled parallel study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Fernandez, Angeles; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel; Canca-Sanchez, Jose Carlos; Moreno-Martin, Gabriel; Vergara-Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effect of a nurse-led intervention programme for patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Chronic non-cancer pain is a widespread health problem and one that is insufficiently controlled. Nurses can play a vital role in pain management, using best practices in the assessment and management of pain under a holistic approach where the patient plays a proactive role in addressing the disease process. Improving the quality of life, reducing disability, achieving acceptance of health status, coping and breaking the vicious circle of pain should be the prime objectives of our care management programme. Open randomized parallel controlled study. The experimental group will undertake one single initial session, followed by six group sessions led by nurses, aimed at empowering patients for the self-management of pain. Healthy behaviours will be encouraged, such as sleep and postural hygiene, promotion of physical activity and healthy eating. Educational interventions on self-esteem, pain-awareness, communication and relaxing techniques will be carried out. As primary end points, quality of life, perceived level of pain, anxiety and depression will be evaluated. Secondary end points will be coping and satisfaction. Follow-up will be performed at 12 and 24 weeks. The study was approved by the Ethics and Research Committee Costa del Sol. If significant effects were detected, impact on quality of life through a nurse-led programme would offer a complementary service to existing pain clinics for a group of patients with frequent unmet needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Compared to Conservative Treatment in Patients With Painful Acute or Subacute Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures: Three-Months Follow-up in a Clinical Randomized Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rousing, Rikke; Andersen, Mikkel Østerheden; Jespersen, Stig M.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical randomized study. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) to conservative treatment of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures in a clinical randomized study with respect to pain, physical and mental outcome, and to asses...... patients (41 females) were included from January 2001 until January 2008. Patients with acute (treatment. Pain was assessed with a visual analogue scale and physical and mental...... within both groups and between the groups after 3 months with a few exceptions. We observed 2 adjacent fractures in the PVP group and non in the conservative group. CONCLUSION: The majority of patients with acute or subacute painful osteoporotic compression fractures in the spine will recover after a few...

  7. A Controlled and Retrospective Study of 144 Chronic Low Back Pain Patients to Evaluate the Effectiveness of an Intensive Functional Restoration Program in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Caby

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: A controlled and retrospective study of 144 chronic low back pain patients to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive functional restoration program in France. Objective: Evaluating the efficiency of an intensive, dynamic and multidisciplinary functional restoration program in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP, during 6 and 12 months follow up. Summary of background data: Chronic low back pain disease has a multifactor nature, involving physical, psychological professional and social factors. A functional restoration program (FRP has been included in a multidisciplinary training program which provides an efficient therapeutic solution. However, the effectiveness of an FRP has not been yet established. Methods: 144 subjects (71 males, 73 females with chronic low back pain were included in a functional restoration program. The FRP includes physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions together with psychological counselling. Patients participated as in- or outpatients 6 h per day, 5 days a week over 5 weeks. Pain intensity, trunk flexibility, trunk strength, lifting ability, quality of life and return to work were recorded before, immediately after, and at 6 months and 12 months after the treatment period. Results: All outcome measures were significantly higher just after the FRP (144 patients and at 6 and 12 months (from available data in 31 subjects compared to pre-treatment values. This FRP for chronic low back pain maintained its benefits whatever the patient’s activities. Conclusions: The effects reflected on all outcome measures, both on short and long term follow-up. The multidisciplinary FRP for chronic low back pain patients durably stopped the de-conditioning syndrome and involved new life-style habits for the patient, daily pain management and a return to work.

  8. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellegaard Hanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP. In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological–hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23–30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7–10 (Box scale from 0–10 and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Results Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort. Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. Conclusions CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be

  9. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE) were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological–hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23–30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7–10 (Box scale from 0–10) and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Results Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort. Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. Conclusions CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be regarded as two symptom

  10. Lidocaine patches reduce pain in trauma patients with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Karen A; Mayberry, John C; Peck, Ellen G; Schreiber, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Rib fracture pain is notoriously difficult to manage. The lidocaine patch is effective in other pain scenarios with an excellent safety profile. This study assesses the efficacy of lidocaine patches for treating rib fracture pain. A prospectively gathered cohort of patients with rib fracture was retrospectively analyzed for use of lidocaine patches. Patients treated with lidocaine patches were matched to control subjects treated without patches. Subjective pain reports and narcotic use before and after patch placement, or equivalent time points for control subjects, were gathered from the chart. All patients underwent long-term follow-up, including a McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Twenty-nine patients with lidocaine patches (LP) and 29 matched control subjects (C) were analyzed. During the 24 hours before patch placement, pain scores and narcotic use were similar (LP 5.3, C 4.6, P = 0.19 and LP 51, C 32 mg morphine, P = 0.17). In the 24 hours after patch placement, LP patients had a greater decrease in pain scores (LP 1.2, C 0.0, P = 0.01) with no change in narcotic use (LP -8.4, C 0.5-mg change in morphine, P = 0.25). At 60 days, LP patients had a lower MPQ pain score (LP 7.7, C 12.2, P rib fracture pain. Lidocaine patches resulted in a sustained reduction in pain, outlasting the duration of therapy.

  11. Chronic Pain in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Mixed-Methods Cross-Sectional Study Examining Patient Characteristics and Reasons for Presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Poulin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic pain (CP accounts for 10–16% of emergency department (ED visits, contributing to ED overcrowding and leading to adverse events. Objectives. To describe patients with CP attending the ED and identify factors contributing to their visit. Methods. We used a mixed-method design combining interviews and questionnaires addressing pain, psychological distress, signs of opioid misuse, and disability. Participants were adults who attended the EDs of a large academic tertiary care center for their CP problem. Results. Fifty-eight patients (66% women; mean age 46.5, SD = 16.9 completed the study. The most frequently cited reason (60% for ED visits was inability to cope with pain. Mental health problems were common, including depression (61% and anxiety (45%. Participants had questions about the etiology of their pain, concerns about severe pain-related impairment, and problems with medication renewals or efficacy and sometimes felt invalidated in the ED. Although most participants had a primary care physician, the ED was seen as the only or best option when pain became unmanageable. Conclusions. Patients with CP visiting the ED often present with complex difficulties that cannot be addressed in the ED. Better access to interdisciplinary pain treatment is needed to reduce the burden of CP on the ED.

  12. Thermal and pressure pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain: comparison of involved and uninvolved sides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A; Kindler, Lindsay L; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z

    2011-03-01

    Cross-sectional. In the examination of patients with unilateral shoulder pain, pain provocation testing to compare the involved and uninvolved sides has been considered useful. However, side-to-side comparisons of experimental pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain are not widely reported in the literature. To compare experimental pain sensitivity between the involved and uninvolved sides in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. In consecutive patients seeking operative treatment for shoulder pain, sensitivity measures of bilateral pressure pain threshold at the shoulder and forearm, and thermal pain threshold, tolerance, and temporal summation at the forearm, were examined. Pressure sensitivity was tested with a Fischer pressure algometer, and thermal sensitivity with a computer-controlled Medoc neurosensory analyzer. The involved and uninvolved sides were compared with an analysis of variance. Influence of sex and location of testing were considered as covariates in the analysis. Fifty-nine consecutively recruited participants completed experimental pain sensitivity testing. Participants reported significantly lower pressure pain thresholds in the involved side compared to the uninvolved side (F1,56 = 4.96, P = .030). In addition, female compared to male participants demonstrated lower pressure pain thresholds in the bilateral shoulder regions (F1,56 = 10.84, P = .002). There was no difference in thermal pain sensitivity between sides. Average clinical pain intensity was negatively correlated with pressure pain threshold at the involved local site (r = -0.284, P = .029), indicating an influence of clinical pain intensity on local pressure pain. The results of this study provide evidence for higher experimental pressure pain sensitivity in the involved side of patients with unilateral shoulder pain and no difference between sides for thermal pain sensitivity. Females demonstrated higher pain sensitivity than males to pressure stimuli at the

  13. Clinical study of patients with persistent orofacial pain Estudo clínico de pacientes com dor orofacial persistente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tadeu Tesseroli de Siqueira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To evaluate a sample of patients with persistent facial pain unresponsive to prior treatments. METHODS: Hospital records of 26 patients with persistent facial pain were reviewed (20 female and 6 male. RESULTS: Patients were classified into three groups according to their presenting symptoms: aGroup I, eight patients (30.7% with severe, diffuse pain at the face, teeth or head; bGroup II, eight patients (30.7% with chronic non-myofascial pain and; cGroup III, ten patients with chronic myofascial pain (38.4%. We find 11 different diagnoses among the 26 patients: pulpitis(7, leukemia(1, oropharyngeal tumor(1, atypical odontalgia(1, Eagle's syndrome(1, trigeminal neuralgia(4, continuous neuralgia(1, temporomandibular disorders (9, fibromyalgia (2, tension-type headache(1, conversion hysteria(2. After the treatment program all patients had a six-month follow-up period with pain relief, except the patient with tumor. CONCLUSION: The wide variability of orofacial pain diagnosis (benign to life-threatening diseases indicates the necessity to reevaluate patients presenting recurrent pain that is refractory to the usual treatments.OBJETIVO: Avaliar uma amostra de doentes com dor facial persistente. MÉTODO: Foram revisados 26 prontuários de doentes com dor facial persistente (20 mulheres e 6 homens. RESULTADOS: Classificação dos doentes, após o diagnóstico: aGrupo I, oito pacientes (30,7% com dor facial difusa de fortíssima intensidade; bGrupo II, oito pacientes (30,7% com dor crônica de natureza não-miofascial e; cGrupo III, dez pacientes com dor crônica miofascial (38,4%. Foram encontrados 11 diagnósticos diferentes entre os 26 pacientes: pulpites(7, leucemia(1, tumor de orofaringe(1, odontalgia atípica(1, síndrome de Eagle(1, neuralgia idiopática do trigêmeo(4, neuralgia atípica(1, disordens temporomandibular (9, fibromialgia(2 cefaléia tipo-tensão(1, histeria de conversão(2. O acompanhamento dos doentes, após receberem a

  14. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen

  15. Integrating data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies to predict the response to pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More patient-specific medical care is expected as more is learned about variations in patient responses to medical treatments. Analytical tools enable insights by linking treatment responses from different types of studies, such as randomized controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies. Given the importance of evidence from both types of studies, our goal was to integrate these types of data into a single predictive platform to help predict response to pregabalin in individual patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN. Methods We utilized three pivotal RCTs of pregabalin (398 North American patients and the largest observational study of pregabalin (3159 German patients. We implemented a hierarchical cluster analysis to identify patient clusters in the Observational Study to which RCT patients could be matched using the coarsened exact matching (CEM technique, thereby creating a matched dataset. We then developed autoregressive moving average models (ARMAXs to estimate weekly pain scores for pregabalin-treated patients in each cluster in the matched dataset using the maximum likelihood method. Finally, we validated ARMAX models using Observational Study patients who had not matched with RCT patients, using t tests between observed and predicted pain scores. Results Cluster analysis yielded six clusters (287–777 patients each with the following clustering variables: gender, age, pDPN duration, body mass index, depression history, pregabalin monotherapy, prior gabapentin use, baseline pain score, and baseline sleep interference. CEM yielded 1528 unique patients in the matched dataset. The reduction in global imbalance scores for the clusters after adding the RCT patients (ranging from 6 to 63% depending on the cluster demonstrated that the process reduced the bias of covariates in five of the six clusters. ARMAX models of pain score performed well (R 2 : 0.85–0.91; root mean square errors: 0.53–0

  16. Comparison of pain intensity, emotional status and disability level in patients with chronic neck and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuğ, Filiz; Kavlak, Erdoğan; Kurtca, Mine Pekesen; Ünal, Ayşe; Cavlak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    This study was planned to compare of pain, emotional status and disability level in patients with chronic neck pain and low back pain. In this study, fifty patients with chronic low back pain (Group I) and fifty patients with chronic neck pain (Group II) at least 6 months were evaluated. A Visual Analog Scale was used to describe pain intensity. To determine emotional status of the subjects, the Beck Depression Scale was used The Oswestry Disability Index and the Neck Disability Index were used to evaluate disability level. The mean age of the patients with low back pain and neck pain were 39.70 ± 9.71 years, 45.44 ± 10.39 years, respectively. It was not found a significant difference between in low back pain (Group I) and neck pain (Group II) in results of pain intensity (p= 0.286) and pain duration (p= 0.382). It was found a significant difference between group I and group II in results of emotional status (p= 0.000) and disability level (p= 0.000). The emotional status and disability level scores were found highest in patient's with low back pain. Chronic low back pain is affect in patients than chronic neck pain as a emotional status and disability level.

  17. Sensory Testing in Patients With Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Ringsted, Thomas K; Kehlet, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    pain syndrome [PTPS (n=14)]. The primary outcome was investigation of the areas of sensory dysfunction, evaluated twice by dynamic sensory mapping with metal rollers and a brush. RESULTS:: In PTPS patients, sensory dysfunction was present on the surgical side, and in 12 of 14 patients MISD......OBJECTIVES:: Mirror-image sensory dysfunction (MISD) has not been systematically characterized in persistent postoperative pain. METHODS:: The presence of MISD was evaluated with standardized stimuli, in preoperative patients scheduled for a thoracotomy (n=14) and in patients with postthoracotomy...... of the PTPS patients experienced mirror pain. DISCUSSION:: MISD is a common finding in PTPS patients and deserves further study involving mechanism and clinical implications....

  18. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn...

  19. Pain patterns and descriptions in patients with radicular pain: Does the pain necessarily follow a specific dermatome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly stated that nerve root pain should be expected to follow a specific dermatome and that this information is useful to make the diagnosis of radiculopathy. There is little evidence in the literature that confirms or denies this statement. The purpose of this study is to describe and discuss the diagnostic utility of the distribution of pain in patients with cervical and lumbar radicular pain. Methods Pain drawings and descriptions were assessed in consecutive patients diagnosed with cervical or lumbar nerve root pain. These findings were compared with accepted dermatome maps to determine whether they tended to follow along the involved nerve root's dermatome. Results Two hundred twenty-six nerve roots in 169 patients were assessed. Overall, pain related to cervical nerve roots was non-dermatomal in over two-thirds (69.7% of cases. In the lumbar spine, the pain was non-dermatomal in just under two-thirds (64.1% of cases. The majority of nerve root levels involved non-dermatomal pain patterns except C4 (60.0% dermatomal and S1 (64.9% dermatomal. The sensitivity (SE and specificity (SP for dermatomal pattern of pain are low for all nerve root levels with the exception of the C4 level (Se 0.60, Sp 0.72 and S1 level (Se 0.65, Sp 0.80, although in the case of the C4 level, the number of subjects was small (n = 5. Conclusion In most cases nerve root pain should not be expected to follow along a specific dermatome, and a dermatomal distribution of pain is not a useful historical factor in the diagnosis of radicular pain. The possible exception to this is the S1 nerve root, in which the pain does commonly follow the S1 dermatome.

  20. Presenting characteristics and processing times for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients with chest pain in an emergency department: Time, Ethnicity, and Delay (TED) Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechkunanukul, Kannikar; Grantham, Hugh; Teubner, David; Hyun, Karice K; Clark, Robyn A

    2016-10-01

    To date there has been limited published data presenting the characteristics and timeliness of the management in an Emergency Department (ED) for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients presenting with chest pain. This study aimed to describe the presenting characteristics and processing times for CALD patients with chest pain compared to the Australian-born population, and current guidelines. This study was a cross sectional analysis of a cohort of patients who presented with chest pain to the metropolitan hospital between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2014. Of the total study population (n=6640), 1241 (18.7%) were CALD and 5399 (81.3%) were Australian-born. CALD patients were significantly older than Australian-born patients (mean age 62 vs 56years, p<0.001). There were no differences in the proportion of patients who had central chest pain (74.9% vs 75.7%, p=0.526); ambulance utilisation (41.7% vs 41.1%, p=0.697); and time to initial treatment in ED (21 vs 22min, p=0.375). However, CALD patients spent a significantly longer total time in ED (5.4 vs 4.3h, p<0.001). There was no difference in guideline concordance between the two groups with low rates of 12.5% vs 13%, p=0.556. Nonetheless, CALD patients were 22% (95% CI, 0.65, 0.95, p=0.015) less likely to receive the guideline management for chest pain. The initial emergency care was equally provided to all patients in the context of a low rate of concordance with three chest pain related standards from the two guidelines. Nonetheless, CALD patients spent a longer time in ED compared to the Australian-born group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Overgeneral autobiographical memory in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianhua; Liu, Yanling; Li, Li; Hu, Yiqiu; Wu, Siwei; Yao, Shuqiao

    2014-03-01

    Overgenerality and delay of the retrieval of autobiographical memory (AM) are well documented in a range of clinical conditions, particularly in patients with emotional disorder. The present study extended the investigation to chronic pain, attempting to identify whether the retrieval of AM in patients with chronic pain tends to be overgeneral or delayed. With an observational cross-sectional design, we evaluated the AM both in patients with chronic pain and healthy controls by Autobiographical Memory Test. Pain conditions were assessed using the pain diagnostic protocol, the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ). Emotion was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Subjects included 176 outpatients with chronic pain lasting for at least 6 months and 170 healthy controls. 1) Compared with the healthy group, the chronic pain group had more overgeneral memories (OGMs) (F = 29.061, P OGM were significant (P OGM scores could be predicted by the BDI score (9.7%), pain chronicity (4.3%), PSEQ score (7.1%), and Affective Index (of SF-MPQ) score (2.7%). 3) In the chronic pain group, the stepwise multiple regression models for variables predicting latency were significant (P < 0.05). Specifically, the variance in latency could be predicted by age (3.1%), pain chronicity (2.7%), pain duration (4.3%), and PSEQ score (2.0%). The retrieval of AM in patients with chronic pain tends to be overgeneral and delayed, and the retrieval style of AM may be contributed to negative emotions and chronic pain conditions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Differences in Pain Processing Between Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain, Recurrent Low Back Pain, and Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Dorien; Danneels, Lieven; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Descheemaeker, Filip; Meeus, Mira

    2017-05-01

    The impairment in musculoskeletal structures in patients with low back pain (LBP) is often disproportionate to their complaint. Therefore, the need arises for exploration of alternative mechanisms contributing to the origin and maintenance of non-specific LBP. The recent focus has been on central nervous system phenomena in LBP and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various symptoms and characteristics of chronic pain. Knowledge concerning changes in pain processing in LBP remains ambiguous, partly due to the diversity in the LBP population. The purpose of this study is to compare quantitative sensory assessment in different groups of LBP patients with regard to chronicity. Recurrent low back pain (RLBP), mild chronic low back pain (CLBP), and severe CLBP are compared on the one hand with healthy controls (HC), and on the other hand with fibromyalgia (FM) patients, in which abnormal pain processing has previously been reported. Cross-sectional study. Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium. Twenty-three RLBP, 15 mild CLBP, 16 severe CLBP, 26 FM, and 21 HC participated in this study. Quantitative sensory testing was conducted by manual pressure algometry and computer-controlled cuff algometry. A manual algometer was used to evaluate hyperalgesia as well as temporal summation of pain and a cuff algometer was used to evaluate deep tissue hyperalgesia, the efficacy of the conditioned pain modulation and spatial summation of pain. Pressure pain thresholds by manual algometry were significantly lower in FM compared to HC, RLBP, and severe CLBP. Temporal summation of pain was significantly higher in FM compared to HC and RLBP. Pain tolerance thresholds assessed by cuff algometry were significantly lower in FM compared to HC and RLBP and also in severe CLBP compared to RLBP. No significant differences between groups were found for spatial summation or conditioned pain modulation. No psychosocial issues were taken into account for this

  3. Pain in Alzheimer's disease : nursing assistants' and patients' evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E; van Manen, F

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports on a study examining the level of agreement between the pain perceptions of nursing assistants, older people without dementia and patients with Alzheimer's dementia. It was hypothesized that nursing assistants would overestimate the pain experience of patients with

  4. Does Mindfulness Improve After Heart Coherence Training in Patients With Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Healthy Subjects? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soer, Remko; de Jong, Annemieke B; Hofstra, Bert L; Preuper, Henrica R Schiphorst; Reneman, Michiel F

    2015-07-01

    Mindfulness and heart coherence training (HCT) training are applied increasingly in the treatment of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Questionnaires have been developed to assess changes in mindfulness but no gold standard is available. Explore the relationship between changes in mindfulness scores and changes in heart coherence after 3 sessions of HCT in patients with CMP and in healthy subjects. Ten patients with CMP and 15 healthy subjects were trained in self-regulation with the use of HCT following a standardized stress relief program developed by the HeartMath Institute. A heart coherence-score (HC-score) was constructed with scores ranging from 0-100 with higher scores reflecting more heart rate variability (HRV) coherency. Change scores, Spearman correlation coefficients, and Wilcoxon Signed Rank test were calculated to test relationships and differences between HC-score, the Mindfulness Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS) and Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). A new questionnaire was constructed to explore on which mindfulness-related domains patients with CMP report changes after HCT. Increases were present on HC-score in healthy subjects (Ppilot study, mindfulness as assessed by the MAAS and FFMQ does not appear to improve after HCT. HRV coherency, MAAS, and FFMQ measure different constructs and are weakly related. It is of great importance to choose and develop valid measures that reflect patients' states of mindfulness. Content and face validity of measures of mindfulness may be considered in the light of performance-based measures.

  5. Different mechanisms for the short-term effects of real versus sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhof, Jan; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; Oostendorp, Rob A; Crul, Ben J

    2012-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has existed since the early 1970s. However, randomized placebo controlled studies show inconclusive results in the treatment of chronic pain. These results could be explained by assuming that TENS elicits a placebo response. However, in animal research TENS has been found to decrease hyperalgesia, which contradicts this assumption. The aim of this study is to use quantitative sensory testing to explore changes in pain processing during sham versus real TENS in patients with chronic pain. Patients with chronic pain (N = 20) were randomly allocated to real TENS or sham TENS application. Electrical pain thresholds (EPTs) were determined inside and outside the segment stimulated, before and after the first 20 minutes of the intervention, and after a period of 10 days of daily real/sham TENS application. Pain relief did not differ significantly for real versus sham TENS. However, by comparing time courses of EPTs, it was found that EPT values outside the segment of stimulation increased for sham TENS, whereas for real TENS these values decreased. There were, however, no differences for EPT measurements inside the segment stimulated. These results illustrate the importance of including mechanism-reflecting parameters in addition to symptoms when conducting pain research.

  6. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and Primary Diagnosis of Non-Cardiac Pain at the Time of Discharge from Emergency Department: A 30-Days Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohammadhossien; Mirzaei, Masoud; Amin, Ahmad; Emami, Mahmoud; Aryanpoor, Reza; Shamsi, Farimah; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi

    2016-07-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at investigating 30 days' adverse outcomes of patients discharged from ED of a major heart center in Iran. Out of 1638 chest pain admissions to the centre during 2010-2011, 962 patients (mean age= 50.9±15.9 years) who were admitted to Afshar Heart Center's ED with chest pain as their chief complaint, and discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain, were followed for any adverse cardiac events 30 days post discharge. The adverse events were: unstable angina, non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), coronary revascularization (percutaneous angioplasty, coronary artery bypass grafting) and death. Adverse cardiac events, including acute coronary syndrome (ACS), revascularization and death were observed in 30 patients (3.1%) including: acute MI n=5 (0.5%, sudden cardiac death inn=1 (0.1%, coronary revascularization in n=8 (0.8%) and hospitalization due to unstable angina/NSTEMI in n=16 (1-7%). Adverse events were seen more frequently in patients with history of hypertension, dyslipidemia and previous coronary artery disease. In univariate analysis, the chance of postdischarge adverse cardiac events was higher in patients with hypertension (OR=9.36, CI=3.24-27.03), previous coronary artery disease (OR= 3.8, CI=1.78-8.0), dyslipidemia (OR=3.5, CI=1.7-7.38) and discharge against medical advice (OR=2.85, CI= 1.37-5.91). The extent of adverse cardiac events in patients with a primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain within 30 days of discharge was significant, mandating nation-wide registries to provide better care for these patients.

  7. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akın; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorshıd, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential involvement of synovial adipokines in pain and physical function in female patients with knee osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, J; Orellana, C; Albiñana Giménez, N; Berenguer-Llergo, A; Caixàs, A; García-Manrique, M; Galisteo Lencastre, C; Navarro, N; Larrosa, M; Gratacós, J

    2018-02-01

    Adipokines have been reported to play a role in the development, progression and severity of knee osteoarthritis but the influence of the different adipokines are not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between different synovial fluid adipokines with pain and disability knee osteoarthritis patients. Cross-sectional study with systematic inclusion of 115 symptomatic primary knee osteoarthritis female patients with ultrasound-confirmed joint effusion. Age, physical exercise, symptoms duration and different anthropometric measurements were collected. Radiographic severity was evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Pain and disability were assessed by WOMAC-total, -pain, -function subscales and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain and function scales. Seven adipokines and three inflammatory markers were measured by ELISA in synovial fluid. Partial Correlation Coefficient (PCC) and corresponding 95% confidence interval were used as a measure of association. Leptin, osteopontin and inflammatory factors, especially TNF-alpha, were associated to pain and function. After adjustment for potential confounders including inflammatory factors and all adipokines, an association was found for adiponectin with pain (PCC 0.240 [0.012, 0.444]) and for resistin and visfatin with function (PCC 0.336 [0.117, 0.524] and -0.262 [-0.463, -0.036]). No other adipokines or inflammatory markers were statistically and independently associated. An association between physical exercise and pain and disability remained after adjustment, whereas an attenuation of the influence of anthropometric measurements was observed. Different patterns of association between synovial fluid adipokines were observed regarding pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis patients. Specifically, adiponectin was associated to pain while resistin and visfatin were mainly related to function. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

  10. Prediction of pain in orthodontic patients based on preoperative pain assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Baoyu; Ren, Manman; Lin, Feiou; Yao, Linjie

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether pretreatment assessment of experimental pain can predict the level of pain after archwire placement. Methods One hundred and twenty-one general university students seeking orthodontic treatment were enrolled in this study. A cold pressor test was performed to estimate the pain tolerance of subjects before treatment. Self-reported pain intensity was calculated using a 10 cm visual analog scale during the 7 days after treatment. The relationship between pain tolerance and orthodontic pain was analyzed using Spearman’s correlation analysis. Results The maximum mean level of pain intensity occurred at 24 hours after bonding (53.31±16.13) and fell to normal levels at day 7. Spearman’s correlation analysis found a moderate positive association between preoperative pain tolerance and self-reported pain after archwire placement (P0.05). Conclusion A simple and noninvasive preoperative sensory test (the cold pressor test) was useful in predicting the risk of developing unbearable pain in patients after archwire placement. Self-reported pain after archwire placement decreased as individual pain tolerance increased. PMID:27042019

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Chronic Neuropathic or Radicular Pain: An Interaction of Pain and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Moriarty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of empirical research has confirmed an association between chronic pain and cognitive dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cognitive function is affected in patients with a diagnosis of chronic neuropathic or radicular pain relative to healthy control participants matched by age, gender, and years of education. We also examined the interaction of pain with age in terms of cognitive performance. Some limitations of previous clinical research investigating the effects of chronic pain on cognitive function include differences in the pain and cognitive scale materials used, and the heterogeneity of patient participants, both in terms of their demographics and pathological conditions. To address these potential confounds, we have used a relatively homogenous patient group and included both experimental and statistical controls. We have also specifically investigated the interaction effect of pain and age on cognitive performance. Patients (n = 38 and controls (n = 38 were administered a battery of cognitive tests measuring IQ, spatial and verbal memory, attention, and executive function. Educational level, depressive symptoms, and state anxiety were assessed as were medication usage, caffeine, and nicotine consumption to control for possible confounding effects. Both the level of depressive symptoms and the state anxiety score were higher in chronic pain patients than in matched control participants. Chronic pain patients had a lower estimated IQ than controls, and showed impairments on measures of spatial and verbal memory. Attentional responding was altered in the patient group, possibly indicative of impaired inhibitory control. There were significant interactions between chronic pain condition and age on a number of cognitive outcome variables, such that older patients with chronic pain were more impaired than both age-matched controls and younger patients with chronic pain. Chronic pain did not appear

  12. Rehabilitation of scoliosis patients with pain after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    In our centre, the postoperative scoliosis rehabilitation consists in stabilizing postural and respiratory exercises lasting several hours a day (5 1/2 to 7 hours). Additionally to pain treatment, we apply pain physiotherapy, physical therapy, acupuncture and besides manual medicine, also a psychological intervention and pain treatment by medication. 46 patients suffered from heavier pain 10 or more years after scoliosis surgery. The patients reported their pain at the beginning and at the end of 3-6 week in-patient rehabilitation programme. We applied a visual analogous scale (VAS), a numerical scale (NS), a standardized adjective scale (VRS), and a pain frequency scale. All the patients with an average age of 36 years old (SD=16) and an average curve angle of 35 degrees thoracic (SD=36) and 26 degrees lumbar (SD=22) showed a decrease of the values on the pain intensity scale. Pain reduction was highly significant, as well as pain frequency. Chronic pain as a late result following scoliosis surgery can be reduced by an intensive in-patient rehabilitation, at least in the short term. There are further necessary studies in order to follow-up the long-term effect of postoperative rehabilitation.

  13. Attentional Avoidance is Associated with Increased Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Chronic Posttraumatic Pain and Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvold, Mathea; MacLeod, Colin; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    posttraumatic pain patients is unknown. This study investigated AB for linguistic pain- and trauma-related stimuli, and clinical and thermal sensitivity in patients with chronic posttraumatic pain with and without PTSD. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with chronic posttraumatic cervical pain performed the visual......OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in chronic posttraumatic pain. Theoretical models suggest that attentional biases (AB) contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain and PTSD, however, the influence of AB on clinical and heat pain sensitivity in chronic...... attentional probe task assessing patterns of selective attentional responding to trauma cues and to pain cues. The task used short (500 ms) and long (1250 ms) stimulus exposure durations to ensure sensitivity to both the orienting and maintenance of attention. Heat pain threshold (HPT) was assessed at the non-painful...

  14. Plasma IL-8 signature correlates with pain and depressive symptomatology in patients with burning mouth syndrome: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Alison; O'Halloran, Ken D; McKenna, Joseph P; McCreary, Christine; Downer, Eric J

    2018-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a neuropathic orofacial pain condition of unknown aetiology that encompasses intra-oral burning pain without abnormal clinical findings. Psychological, neural and inflammatory processes are associated with BMS pathogenesis. Currently, studies characterising plasma cytokine/chemokine profiles with pain and depression in patients with BMS are lacking. Considering that inflammation is associated with the pathophysiology of BMS, and that inflammation is closely associated with pain and depression, we aimed to correlate depressive symptomatology and oral cavity pain with plasma cytokine/chemokine signatures in a cohort of patients with BMS. In this study, plasma protein levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12p70, TNF-α), Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-6, IL-13) and the chemokine IL-8 were assessed in patients with BMS (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10), using pro-inflammatory-10-plex assays. Clinical histories, alongside self-rated oral cavity pain intensities and depressive symptomatology were assessed using a visual analogue scale and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology questionnaires, respectively. We present evidence that BMS is associated with increased depressive symptomatology and enhanced oral cavity pain. Plasma isolated from BMS patients display enhanced expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8, when compared to plasma from healthy individuals. Plasma IL-8 signature correlates with pain and depressive symptomatology in the study cohort. Overall, these findings indicate that plasma IL-8 profiles are dysregulated in BMS and that modulation of IL-8 production in the disorder may be a tool in the management of BMS symptomatology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diagnosing patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Krogsgaard, M R; Lorenzen, T

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the interobserver agreement of commonly used clinical tests and diagnoses in patients with shoulder pain, and the accuracy of these tests and ultrasonographic findings in comparison with arthroscopic findings. METHODS: Eighty six patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain...

  16. Placebo- and paracetamol-controlled study on the efficacy and tolerability of hyoscine butylbromide in the treatment of patients with recurrent crampy abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Lissner, S.; Tytgat, G. N.; Paulo, L. G.; Quigley, E. M. M.; Bubeck, J.; Peil, H.; Schaefer, E.

    2006-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of oral hyoscine butylbromide (hereafter hyoscine) 10 mg t.d.s., paracetamol 500 mg t.d.s. and their fixed combination against placebo in patients with recurrent crampy abdominal pain. A total of 1637 patients were entered into a four-arm double-blind study.

  17. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    , incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... long-term opioid treatment, and specialised treatment facilities for pain management or addiction medicine should be consulted in these cases....

  18. Percutaneous vertebroplasty compared to conservative treatment in patients with painful acute or subacute osteoporotic vertebral fractures.Three months follow up in a clinical randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rousing, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    with a few exceptions. We observed 2 adjacent fractures in the PVP group and non in the conservative group. Conclusion. The majority of patients with acute or subacute painful osteoporotic compression fractures in the spine will recover after a few months of conservative treatment. The risk of adjacent......Abstract Study design. Clinical randomised study.    Objective. The aim of this study is to compare PVP to conservative treatment of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures in a clinical randomised study with respect to pain, physical and mental outcome, and to asses the risk of adjacent......) were included from January 2001 until January 2008. Patients with acute (treatment. Pain was assessed with a visual analogue scale and physical and mental outcome were...

  19. Medical conditions and body pain in patients presenting orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana Lúcia; Runho, Gabriel Henrique Farto; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de; Camparis, Cinara Maria

    2012-05-01

    To verify the frequency of self-reported medical conditions and pain areas in orofacial pain patients, comparing them with patients from the routine dental care. Data were collected from archives of the Orofacial Pain Clinic (Group A, n=319) and of the routine dental care clinics (Group B, n=84) at Faculdade de Odontologia de Araraquara, São Paulo, in Brazil. All individuals answered a standardized clinical questionnaire and completed a body map indicating their pain areas. The Mann-Whitney's test demonstrated that Group A presented a higher mean number of medical reports than Group B (p=0.004). In both groups, Pearson's correlation test showed that the highest frequencies of medical conditions were positively correlated to highest frequencies of painful areas (0.478, p=0.001 and 0.246, p=0.000, respectively). Group A tended to report more medical conditions and there was a positive correlation between the number of medical conditions and the one of pain areas for both groups.

  20. Neuropathic pain in the orofacial region: The role of pain history. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieb, W; Moreau, N; Chemla, I; Descroix, V; Boucher, Y

    2017-06-01

    Orofacial neuropathic pain is often difficult to treat, mostly because of still unclear underlying mechanisms. The occurrence of such neuropathic pain varies depending on different factors, of which preexisting preoperative pain seems to be of high importance. The aim of this study was thus to test the hypothesis that prior history of pain could indeed be considered a risk factor for the development of orofacial neuropathic pain in the same region. The study was performed in the dental department of the Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière (GHPS) in Paris, France. We investigated the presence of prior inflammatory pain before development of orofacial neuropathic pain in 56 patients. For each patient file, the following items were collected: age, gender; medical history; diagnosis; description of the pain (at time of consultation); presence or absence of prior dental treatment; date and type of dental treatment received. 41 patients (73%) of orofacial neuropathic pain patients had a history of pain compatible with an inflammatory condition; 4% (n=2) did not report any prior pain and 23% (n=13) could not remember. Among the patients with documented history of pain prior to neuropathy, 88% (n=36) received surgical treatment; 61%, (n=25) endodontic treatment and 22%, (n=9) restorative treatment. All eventually received endodontic treatment or tooth extraction. These dental treatments are compatible with the hypothesis of prior inflammatory pain in these patients. These results support the hypothesis that prior inflammatory pain could favor the development of orofacial neuropathic pain. Prevention and treatment of inflammatory trigeminal pain may therefore play a key role in preventing future neuropathic pain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... of MRI (the "old" group). As a new approach, all patients with certain criteria are now referred to MRI before the clinical examination (the "new" group).   Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate if the two different MRI approaches, the "old" and "new", resulted in differences in relation...... to: 1) duration of treatment, 2) number of contacts with clinicians and participation in group exercise, and 3) admission to primary care or another hospital department.   Design: Retrospective inspection of patient files. Method: Files were retrieved from consecutive patients from the "old" and "new...

  2. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  3. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  4. Pain sensitisation and the risk of poor outcome following physiotherapy for patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pain is the dominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and recent evidence suggests factors outside of local joint pathology, such as pain sensitisation, can contribute significantly to the pain experience. It is unknown how pain sensitisation influences outcomes from commonly employed interventions such as physiotherapy. The aims of this study are, first, to provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of people with pain associated with knee OA. Second, we will investigate if indicators of pain sensitisation in patients with knee osteoarthritis are predictive of non-response to physiotherapy. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre prospective cohort study with 140 participants. Eligible patients with moderate to severe symptomatic knee osteoarthritis will be identified at outpatient orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A baseline assessment will provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of each participant by means of clinical examination, quantitative sensory testing, and validated questionnaires measuring pain and functional capacity. Participants will then undergo physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome will be non-response to physiotherapy on completion of the physiotherapy treatment programme as defined by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International treatment responder criteria. A principal component analysis will identify measures related to pain sensitisation to include in the predictive model. Regression analyses will explore the relationship between responder status and pain sensitisation while accounting for confounders. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by St James’ Hospital/AMNCH Research Ethics Committee and by the St Vincent's Healthcare Group Ethics and Medical Research Committee. The results will be presented at international conferences and published in a peer review journal. Trial registration number NCT02310945. PMID:26059523

  5. Pain sensitisation and the risk of poor outcome following physiotherapy for patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2015-06-09

    Pain is the dominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and recent evidence suggests factors outside of local joint pathology, such as pain sensitisation, can contribute significantly to the pain experience. It is unknown how pain sensitisation influences outcomes from commonly employed interventions such as physiotherapy. The aims of this study are, first, to provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of people with pain associated with knee OA. Second, we will investigate if indicators of pain sensitisation in patients with knee osteoarthritis are predictive of non-response to physiotherapy. This is a multicentre prospective cohort study with 140 participants. Eligible patients with moderate to severe symptomatic knee osteoarthritis will be identified at outpatient orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A baseline assessment will provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of each participant by means of clinical examination, quantitative sensory testing, and validated questionnaires measuring pain and functional capacity. Participants will then undergo physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome will be non-response to physiotherapy on completion of the physiotherapy treatment programme as defined by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International treatment responder criteria. A principal component analysis will identify measures related to pain sensitisation to include in the predictive model. Regression analyses will explore the relationship between responder status and pain sensitisation while accounting for confounders. This study has been approved by St James' Hospital/AMNCH Research Ethics Committee and by the St Vincent's Healthcare Group Ethics and Medical Research Committee. The results will be presented at international conferences and published in a peer review journal. NCT02310945. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  6. Long-term use of opioids in 210 officially registered patients with chronic noncancer pain in Taiwan: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tso-Chou; Ger, Luo-Ping; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B; Wang, Ju-O; Ho, Shung-Tai

    2017-04-01

    Prescribing opioids for chronic noncancer pain has been strictly regulated for two decades in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to survey the patients' perspectives and potential drawbacks following long-term use of opioids. An observational cross-sectional survey using the Taiwanese version of Brief Pain Inventory was conducted among outpatients with chronic noncancer pain registered by the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration. Patients were also asked about their sexual behavior, depression, opioid misuse behaviors, and use of complementary and alternative medicine. For 210 of 328 outpatients (64.0%), the median pain duration was 96 months and opioid treatment duration was 57 months. The median morphine equivalent dose was 150 mg/d, with 30.5% of patients exceeding the daily watchful dose, defined as 200 mg of morphine equivalent dose. Pain reduction after taking opioids was ∼50% in the past week. The top three diagnoses were chronic pancreatitis, spinal cord injury, and neuralgia. The leading side effects were constipation (46.7%), and decreased sexual desire (69.5%) and satisfaction (57.9%). Depression was currently diagnosed in 55.2% of patients. Twenty patients (9.5%) displayed at least one aberrant behavior in the past month. Only 76 (36.2%) patients had ever received nerve block procedures, and 118 (56.2%) tried complementary and alternative medicine. This nationwide survey described the concurrent pain intensity, daily function, and various adverse effects by long-term opioids among 210 monitored outpatients with chronic noncancer pain in Taiwan. More efforts are suggested to reduce opioid prescriptions in the 30% of patients exceeding daily watchful dose. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Attitudes of Irish patients with chronic pain towards medicinal cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Ciaran; Edgeworth, Deirdre; Hashim, Mohammad; Harmon, Dominic

    2018-02-08

    Medicinal cannabis use is topical in the media in Ireland. A recent Health Products Regulatory Authority review, however, has recommended against its use for patients with chronic pain. This is despite evidence for its effectiveness in this patient's cohort and the inadequate pain management of these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of Irish patients with chronic pain towards medicinal cannabis. After institutional ethics committee approval, a 12-item questionnaire (excluding demographics) was randomly assigned to patients attending a chronic pain clinic (University Hospital Limerick). The questionnaire was designed to incorporate patient's attitudes on a variety of medicinal cannabis related topics. Ninety-six adult patients were surveyed. 88.54% agreed that cannabis should be legalised for chronic pain medicinal purposes. 80.21% believed it would have health benefits for them and 73.96% agreed it would be socially acceptable to use cannabis for this purpose. 33.33% perceived cannabis to be addictive while 68.75% would be willing to try it if prescribed by a medical professional. The study highlights the attitudes of chronic pain patients in Ireland towards medicinal cannabis. It shows their desire to have medical cannabis legalised for chronic pain and that they view it as a reasonable pain management option.

  8. Observation-based assessment of functional ability in patients with chronic widespread pain: A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen; Jespersen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about functional ability, including activities of daily living (ADL), in patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia (FMS) is largely based on self-report. The purpose of this study was to assess functional ability by using standardised, observation-based assessment...... of ADL performance and to examine the relationship between self-reported and observation-based measures of disability. A total of 257 women with CWP, 199 (77%) fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology tender point criteria for FMS, were evaluated with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills...... (AMPS), an observation-based assessment providing linear measures of ADL motor and ADL process skill ability (unit: logits). A cutoff for effortless and independent ADL task performance is set at 2.0 for the motor scale and 1.0 for the process scale. A total of 248 (96.5%) had ability measures below...

  9. Different activation of opercular and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I) compared with healthy controls during perception of electrically induced pain: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Wolfgang; Wunderlich, Arthur P; Stuber, Gregor; Mayer, Florian; Steffen, Peter; Mentzel, Martin; Weber, Frank; Schmitz, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Although the etiology of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) is still debated, many arguments favor central maladaptive changes in pain processing as an important causative factor. To look for the suspected alterations, 10 patients with CRPS affecting the left hand were explored with functional magnetic resonance imaging during graded electrical painful stimulation of both hands subsequently and compared with healthy participants. Activation of the anterior insula, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and caudate nucleus was seen in patients during painful stimulation. Compared with controls, CRPS patients had stronger activation of the PCC during painful stimulation of the symptomatic hand. The comparison of insular/opercular activation between controls and patients with CRPS I during painful stimulation showed stronger (posterior) opercular activation in controls than in patients. Stronger PCC activation during painful stimulation may be interpreted as a correlate of motor inhibition during painful stimuli different from controls. Also, the decreased opercular activation in CRPS patients shows less sensory-discriminative processing of painful stimuli.These results show that changed cerebral pain processing in CRPS patients is less sensory-discriminative but more motor inhibition during painful stimuli. These changes are not limited to the diseased side but show generalized alterations of cerebral pain processing in chronic pain patients.

  10. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted of ten oncology patients with chronic pain. Rresults: There was a reduction in vital signs and in intensity of pain in ten patients of the sample; after the music sessions, the patients reported a sensation of relief of pain, relaxation, and a belief in the power of music as a supplementary therapy. Cconclusions: Music showed an influence in reducing vital signs and pain intensity, and the patients perceived a reduction of pain and anxiety, and began to believe in music as a form of therapy.

  11. Pronociceptive pain modulation in patients with painful chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Yarnitsky, David; Granovsky, Yelena; Sprecher, Elliot; Steiner, Mariana; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Pud, Dorit

    2011-08-01

    Several chemotherapy agents induce polyneuropathy that is painful for some patients, but not for others. We assumed that these differences might be attributable to varying patterns of pain modulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate pain modulation in such patients. Twenty-seven patients with chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy were tested for detection thresholds (cold, warm, and mechanical) in both the forearm and foot, as well as for heat pain threshold, mechanical temporal summation (TS), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM; also known as the diffuse noxious inhibitory control-like effect), which were tested in the upper limbs. Positive correlations were found between clinical pain levels and both TS (r=0.52, P=0.005) and CPM (r=0.40, P=0.050) for all patients. In addition, higher TS was associated with less efficient CPM (r=0.56, P=0.004). The group of patients with painful polyneuropathy (n=12) showed a significantly higher warm detection threshold in the foot (P=0.03), higher TS (P<0.01), and less efficient CPM (P=0.03) in comparison to the group with nonpainful polyneuropathy. The painfulness of polyneuropathy is associated with a "pronociceptive" modulation pattern, which may be primary to the development of pain. The higher warm sensory thresholds in the painful polyneuropathy group suggest that the severity of polyneuropathy may be another factor in determining its painfulness. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients with Concomitant Chronic Neck Pain and Myofascial Pain in Masticatory Muscles Have More Widespread Pain and Distal Hyperalgesia than Patients with Only Chronic Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Beltrán-Alacreu, Héctor; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2017-03-01

    Insufficient evidence exists to compare widespread pain (WP), pain sensibility, and psychological factors that occur in patients presenting with chronic neck pain (CNP) or a combination of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and other complaints. The present study compared the pain sensibility and psychological factors of subjects with CNP with those with TMD + CNP. Cross-sectional study. Local community. A nonprobabilistic convenience sample of 86 persons with CNP or TMD was recruited into three groups: CNP, TMD with myofascial pain in masticatory muscles with cocomitant CNP (TMD + CNP), and asymptomatic control groups consisted of 27, 29, and 30 participants, respectively. Participants underwent a clinical examination to evaluate WP with computerized assessment based on the pain drawing, pressure pain thresholds (PPT), and psychological factors, which were evaluated using the pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI). Statistically significant differences were observed between participants with CNP and TMD + CNP for WP (t = -2.80, P  < 0.01, d = -1.06). Post hoc analyses only revealed significant differences between TMD + CNP participants and asymptomatic controls for PPT at extratrigeminal areas. Pearson correlation analyses showed a moderate positive association between symptomatic groups within the WP and STAI ( P  < 0.05) and a moderate negative association between PCS and PPT ( P  < 0.05) at the right tibialis muscle. TMD + CNP participants had more areas of pain and also showed widespread pain hyperalgesia. Both groups of participants had psychological factors positively associated with STAI and WP; further, PCS and the PPT at the extratrigeminal region were negatively associated with each other in both groups, except for the left tibialis in the TMD + CNP group. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Predictive factors associated with neck pain in patients with cervical disc degeneration: A cross-sectional study focusing on Modic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingde; Tian, Weifeng; Cao, Peng; Wang, Haonan; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The predictive factors associated with neck pain remain unclear. We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess predictive factors, especially Modic changes (MCs), associated with the intensity and duration of neck pain in patients with cervical disc degenerative disease.We retrospectively reviewed patients in our hospital from January 2013 to December 2016. Severe neck pain (SNP) and persistent neck pain (PNP) were the 2 main outcomes, and were assessed based on the numerical rating scale (NRS). Basic data, and also imaging data, were collected and analyzed as potential predictive factors. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to assess the predictive factors for neck pain.In all, 381 patients (193 males and 188 females) with cervical degenerative disease were included in our study. The number of patients with SNP and PNP were 94 (24.67%) and 109 (28.61%), respectively. The NRS of neck pain in patients with type 1 MCs was significantly higher than type 2 MCs (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.9 ± 1.1; P = .004). The multivariate logistic analysis showed that kyphosis curvature (odds ratio [OR] 1.082, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.044-1.112), spondylolisthesis (OR 1.339, 95% CI 1.226-1.462), and annular tear (OR 1.188, 95% CI 1.021-1.382) were factors associated with SNP, whereas kyphosis curvature (OR 1.568, 95% CI 1.022-2.394), spondylolisthesis (OR 1.486, 95% CI 1.082-2.041), and MCs (OR 1.152, 95% CI 1.074-1.234) were associated with PNP.We concluded that kyphosis curvature, spondylolisthesis, and annular tear are associated with SNP, whereas kyphosis curvature, spondylolisthesis, and MCs are associated with PNP. This study supports the view that MCs can lead to a long duration of neck pain.

  14. Efficacy and safety of oral ketamine for the relief of intractable chronic pain: A retrospective 5-year study of 51 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, F; Coutaux, A; Bellanger, A; Magneux, C; Bourgeois, P; Mion, G

    2015-08-01

    This work summarizes the efficiency, failures and adverse effects of oral administration of ketamine at home for intractable pain. This 5-year retrospective study involved testing ketamine by intravenous in-hospital administration, then a conversion to an oral route, or oral treatment directly administered at home. The daily intravenous dose was increased by steps of 0.5 mg/kg to attain an effective daily dose of 1.5-3.0 mg/kg. Pain was evaluated on a numeric scale from 0 to 10, and evidence of adverse effects was collected every day. The effective daily dose was delivered orally (three to four intakes). If effective, ketamine was continued for 3 months. Short infusions or direct oral treatment began with a 0.5-mg/kg dose, then the daily ketamine dose was increased in 15- to 20-mg increments. Among 55 cases (51 patients, neuropathic pain 60%), the mean effective oral dose was 2 mg/kg. Ketamine was effective in 24 patients (44%, mean pain reduction 67 ± 17%), partially effective in 20% (mean pain reduction 30 ± 11%), with a mean opioid sparing of 63 ± 32%, and failure in 22%. Half of the patients experienced adverse effects, but only eight had to stop treatment. For patients with opioid therapy, failure of ketamine was less frequent (7% vs. 36%; p Pain was reduced or abolished in two-thirds of patients under ketamine therapy; ketamine was effective for patients taking opioids and resulted in few adverse effects. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. Physiotherapists' views of implementing a stratified treatment approach for patients with low back pain in Germany: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karstens, S.; Kuithan, P.; Joos, S.; Hill, J.C.; Wensing, M.; Steinhauser, J.; Krug, K.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The STarT-Back-Approach (STarT: Subgroups for Targeted Treatment) was developed in the UK and has demonstrated clinical and cost effectiveness. Based on the results of a brief questionnaire, patients with low back pain are stratified into three treatment groups. Since the organisation of

  16. Neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: report of 213 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Assis, Maruska Salles; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Cecon, Angelo Daros

    2013-09-01

    Management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) can be a frustrating experience for patients since it poses a therapeutic challenge. In this article the authors describe the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pain after spinal cord injury. In this retrospective study, 213 patients with SCI and neuropathic pain were assessed. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment options, and pain intensity for these patients. The main cause of SCI was spine trauma, which occurred in 169 patients, followed by tumors and infection. Complete lesions were verified in 144 patients. In our study, patients with traumatic SCI and partial lesions seem to be presented with more intense pain; however, this was not statistically significant. Neuropathic pain is a common complaint in patients with SCI and presents a treatment challenge. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of this group of patients may help determine the best approach to intervention.

  17. Neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: report of 213 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI can be a frustrating experience for patients since it poses a therapeutic challenge. In this article the authors describe the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pain after spinal cord injury. Methods In this retrospective study, 213 patients with SCI and neuropathic pain were assessed. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment options, and pain intensity for these patients. Results The main cause of SCI was spine trauma, which occurred in 169 patients, followed by tumors and infection. Complete lesions were verified in 144 patients. In our study, patients with traumatic SCI and partial lesions seem to be presented with more intense pain; however, this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Neuropathic pain is a common complaint in patients with SCI and presents a treatment challenge. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of this group of patients may help determine the best approach to intervention.

  18. HYPNOTHERAPY AS A TREATMENT FOR PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH BURNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F SHAKIBAEI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Burning is an event with many psychosomatic complications. Pain is one of the most trouble matter in these patients that affect on their psychologic features. This study presents a hypnotherapeutics intervention for controlling pain in patients suffered from burning. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial (without placebo, two 22 members group burned patients were selected. In interventional group we conduct a 5 sessions hypnotherapy course. Severity of pain and itching were assessed by visual analogue scale before and after intervention and results were compaired between two groups. Results. All pain parameters were decreased more in interventional group (P < 0.05. Discussion. It seems that hypnotherapy can playa positive role in pain reduction of patients. It is recommended that it would be applied in adjunct to current medications in these patients.

  19. Treating palliative care patients with pain with the body tambura: A prospective case study at St. Joseph′s hospice for dying destitute in Dindigul South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordula Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Body Tambura is a recently invented stringed instrument that is used for receptive music therapy designed to be placed and attached on the human body. The aim of this study was to record perceived effects of a treatment with the Body Tambura on palliative care patients with special reference to pain. Materials and Methods: A prospective case study was carried out with patients of St. Joseph′s Hospice for Dying Destitute in Dindigul/South India. Patients were treated with a treatment after baseline assessment and also on the next day. Outcomes were measured quantitatively by using a numeric rating scale (0-10, 10 maximum intensity of pain felt at baseline, directly after treatment, and the day after the treatment to determine the intensity of the pain. Results: Ten patients (five women and five men participated in the study. The majority described the therapy as a pleasant experience. The pain intensity at baseline was reduced from 8.3 ± standard deviation (SD 1.16 to 4.6 ± 1.52 at day 1 and from 4.6 ± 2.07 to 2.4 ± 1.58 at day 2. Conclusion: A clinically relevant pain reduction was described as short time outcome; the therapy was received and perceived well. Forthcoming research should include a control group, randomization, a larger number of participants, and a longer period of treatment.

  20. Alexithymia and anxiety in female chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saatcioglu Omer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Alexithymia is highly prevalent among chronic pain patients. Pain is a remarkable cause for high levels of chronic anxiety. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alexithymia and to determine anxiety levels among DSM-IV somatoform pain disorder (chronic pain female patients and to examine the relationship between alexithymia and the self-reporting of pain. Methods Thirty adult females (mean age: 34,63 ± 10,62 years, who applied to the outpatient psychiatry clinic at a public hospital with the diagnosis of chronic pain disorder (DSM-IV, were included in the study. Thirty seven healthy females (mean age: 34,46 ± 7,43 years, who matched for sociodemographic features with the patient group, consisted the control group. A sociodemographic data form, 26-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each subject and information was obtained on several aspects of the patients' pain, including intensity (measured by VAS, and duration. Results Chronic pain patients were found significantly more alexithymic than controls. There was a positive correlation between TAS-26 scores and the duration of pain. The alexithymic and nonalexithymic group did not differ in their perception of pain. Neither positive correlation nor significant difference was found between alexithymia and trait anxiety in pain patients. Discussion Alexithymia may be important in addressing the diversity of subjective factors involved in pain. The conceptualization of alexithymia as a personality trait as well as a secondary state reaction is underlined by our data.

  1. Nursing attitudes toward patients with substance use disorders in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Betty D

    2014-03-01

    The problem of inadequate pain management in hospitals is well documented. Patients who have substance use disorders (SUD) have many medical problems and are often in pain as a result of these problems. Nurses often lack knowledge of appropriate treatment of both pain and SUD, and have been identified as having negative attitudes toward patients with SUD. The negative attitudes may affect the quality of care delivered to patients with problems of pain and SUD. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore nurses' attitudes toward hospitalized patients with SUD who are in pain, to expand the knowledge about nurses' attitudes and interactions with patients with SUD in pain, and to generate theory that will contribute to a greater understanding of the problem. Grounded theory methodology was used to interview hospital-based nurses who work with patients with SUD who are in pain. Individual interviews, using a semistructured interview guide, were conducted with 14 nurses who worked with this population. Additionally, an expert addictions nurse was interviewed at the end of the study to validate the findings. Interviews were analyzed and coded with the use of grounded theory concepts. A model illustrating the categories and their relationships was developed based on the theory generated as a result of the study. The implications for nursing practice, education, research, and policy are discussed. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Digital Pills to Measure Opioid Ingestion Patterns in Emergency Department Patients With Acute Fracture Pain: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Peter R; Carreiro, Stephanie; Innes, Brendan J; Rosen, Rochelle K; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Boyer, Edward W

    2017-01-13

    Nonadherence to prescribed regimens for opioid analgesic agents contributes to increasing opioid abuse and overdose death. Opioids are frequently prescribed on an as-needed basis, placing the responsibility to determine opioid dose and frequency with the patient. There is wide variability in physician prescribing patterns because of the lack of data describing how patients actually use as-needed opioid analgesics. Digital pill systems have a radiofrequency emitter that directly measures medication ingestion events, and they provide an opportunity to discover the dose, timing, and duration of opioid therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a novel digital pill system to measure as-needed opioid ingestion patterns in patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) after an acute bony fracture. We used a digital pill with individuals who presented to a teaching hospital ED with an acute extremity fracture. The digital pill consisted of a digital radiofrequency emitter within a standard gelatin capsule that encapsulated an oxycodone tablet. When ingested, the gastric chloride ion gradient activated the digital pill, transmitting a radiofrequency signal that was received by a hip-worn receiver, which then transmitted the ingestion data to a cloud-based server. After a brief, hands-on training session in the ED, study participants were discharged home and used the digital pill system to ingest oxycodone prescribed as needed for pain for one week. We conducted pill counts to verify digital pill data and open-ended interviews with participants at their follow-up appointment with orthopedics or at one week after enrollment in the study to determine the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding digital pills. We analyzed open-ended interviews using applied thematic analysis. We recruited 10 study participants and recorded 96 ingestion events (87.3%, 96/110 accuracy). Study participants reported being able to operate all

  3. Interventions of the nursing diagnosis „Acute Pain“ – Evaluation of patients' experiences after total hip arthroplasty compared with the nursing record by using Q-DIO-Pain: a mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, David C; Gralher, Dieter; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pain affects patients' rehabilitation after hip replacement surgery. Aim: The study aim was to compare patients' responses, on their received pain relieving nursing interventions after hip replacement surgery, with the documented interventions in their nursing records. Method: A mixed methods design was applied. In order to evaluate quantitative data the instrument „Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes“ (Q-DIO) was further developed to measure pain interventions in nursing records (Q-DIO-Pain). Patients (n = 37) answered a survey on the third postoperative day. The patients' survey findings were then compared with the Q-DIO-Pain results and cross-validated by qualitative interviews. Results: The most reported pain level was „no pain“ (NRS 0 – 10 Points). However, 17 – 50 % of patients reported pain levels of three or higher and 11 – 22 % of five or higher in situations of motion / ambulation. A significant match between patients' findings and Q-DIO-Pain results was found for the intervention „helping to adapt medications“ (n = 32, ICC = 0.111, p = 0.042, CI 95 % 2-sided). Otherwise no significant matches were found. Interviews with patients and nurses confirmed that far more pain-relieving interventions affecting „Acute Pain“ were carried out, than were documented. Conclusions: Based on the results, pain assessments and effective pain-relieving interventions, especially before or after motion / ambulation should be improved and documented. It is recommended to implement a nursing standard for pain control.

  4. Open-label study on the long-term efficacy, safety, and impact on quality of life of OROS hydromorphone ER in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark; Thipphawong, John

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy, safety, and impact on quality of life of long-term administration of OROS hydromorphone ER (8-128mg) in patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 113 adults with chronic low back pain who completed a 6-week open-label study were enrolled in this 6-month extension study. The primary end point was the daily pain relief rating obtained during monthly study visits. Secondary end points included Investigator and Patient Global Evaluations, Brief Pain Inventory scores obtained at monthly study visits, and quality-of-life measures (Medical Outcomes Study Questionnaire and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey score) obtained at monthly intervals. Mean±SD change from baseline in pain relief with OROS hydromorphone ER for the Month 6 visit was 0.9±2.55 (P=0.0007) and for the last assessment of the extension study was 0.9±2.53 (P=0.0002). At the Month 6 visit, 81.3% of investigators and 71.0% of patients rated their satisfaction of pain relief with OROS hydromorphone ER treatment as good, very good, or excellent. Changes on the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, a quality-of-life measure, were statistically significant for the physical composite scores for all extension phase time points, including Month 6 (2.1±5.34; Psleep disturbances. Adverse events included gastrointestinal and central nervous system symptoms. The results support the long-term use of OROS hydromorphone ER in managing chronic moderate to severe low back pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Efficient assessment of efficacy in post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain patients: pregabalin in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins TM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tim M Jenkins, Trevor S Smart, Frances Hackman, Carol Cooke, Keith KC TanClinical Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Sandwich, Kent, UKBackground: Detecting the efficacy of novel analgesic agents in neuropathic pain is challenging. There is a critical need for study designs with the desirable characteristics of assay sensitivity, low placebo response, reliable pain recordings, low cost, short duration of exposure to test drug and placebo, and relevant and recruitable population.Methods: We designed a proof-of-concept, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in patients with post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain (PTNP to evaluate whether such a study design had the potential to detect efficacious agents. Pregabalin, known to be efficacious in neuropathic pain, was used as the active analgesic. We also assessed physical activity throughout the study.Results: Twenty-five adults (20–70 years of age with PTNP for ≥3 months entered a screening week and were then randomized to one of the two following treatment sequences: (1 pregabalin followed by placebo or (2 placebo followed by pregabalin. These 2-week treatment periods were separated by a 2-week washout period. Patients on pregabalin treatment received escalating doses to a final dosage of 300 mg/day (days 5–15. In an attempt to minimize placebo response, patients received placebo treatment during the screening week and the 2-week washout period. Average daily pain scores (primary endpoint were significantly reduced for pregabalin versus placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -0.81 (95% confidence interval: -1.45 to -0.17; P = 0.015.Conclusion: The efficacy of pregabalin was similar to that identified in a large, parallel group trial in PTNP. Therefore, this efficient crossover study design has potential utility for future proof-of-concept studies in neuropathic pain.Keywords: pregabalin, post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain, randomized

  6. Physical activity and health-related quality of life in chronic low back pain patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Andrea; Dejonghe, Lea; Haastert, Burkhard; Froboese, Ingo

    2015-03-19

    The aim of the present study was to identify the relationship of physical activity (PA) and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in patients suffering from low back pain (LBP). The present evaluation was conducted as a cross-sectional study based on baseline data of an randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of an intervention promoting PA. Patients answered a questionnaire on domain specific PA (GPAQ) and HRQoL (EQ-5D-5 L). Furthermore, sociodemographic and indication-specific variables as well as work-related aspects were assessed. Associations of PA and HRQoL were estimated by means of regression analysis: one regression model only included domain specific PA (model 1) and a second regression model additionally included further variables (model 2). 412 patients completed the questionnaire. Model 1 showed opposed effects of workplace and leisure time PA: while workplace PA showed a negative association (β = -0.064; p = 0.04), a positive association of leisure time PA could be proved (β = 0.068; p = 0.01). Model 2 showed that only the variables "current work ability" (β = -0.030; p workplace and leisure time PA in the context of assessing health-enhancing effects of PA in LBP patients. In the context of HRQoL it must be assumed that the relevance of PA might be overestimated. Further research should be performed on predictors of HRQoL and thereby particular attention should be paid on the patients' work-related and indication-specific aspects.

  7. Prediction of postoperative pain: a systematic review of predictive experimental pain studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mjöbo, Helena N; Nielsen, Per R

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative testing of a patient's basal pain perception before surgery has the potential to be of clinical value if it can accurately predict the magnitude of pain and requirement of analgesics after surgery. This review includes 14 studies that have investigated the correlation between...... preoperative responses to experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain and demonstrates that the preoperative pain tests may predict 4-54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience depending on the stimulation methods and the test paradigm used. The predictive strength is much higher than...

  8. Comparative study between the effects of isolated manual therapy techniques and those associated with low level laser therapy on pain in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Frare

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to evaluate the pain condition in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction after applying manual therapy techniques and those associated with this low level laser therapy. Methods: The study involved 20 patients with temporomandibular dysfunction, divided randomly into two groups: G1 (n = 10, formed by 7 women and 3 men, average age 28.2 years (± 7, treated with manual therapy techniques and G2 (n = 10, formed by 8 women and 2 men, with average age 24.01 (± 6.04, treated with the combination of manual therapy techniques and low level laser therapy. The patients were treated three times a week for four consecutive weeks. The memorandum of manual therapy techniques based on Chaintow,Makofsky and Bienfaint was used. For low level laser therapy GaAs laser (904 nm, 6 J/cm2, 0.38 mW/cm2 was used, applied at 4pre-auricular points. To analyze the pain level, the visual analog pain scale was used. For data analysis the Student’s-t and Wilcoxon tests were used, both with significance level of 5% (p <0.05.Results: There was significant reduction (p <0.05 in the level of pain in both groups treated, but in G2 the significance was higher.Conclusion: Manual therapy techniques, either alone or associated with low level laser therapy showed satisfactory results for pain control in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  9. A systematic review of the risk factors for clinical response to opioids for all-age patients with cancer-related pain and presentation of the paediatric STOP pain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Vagnoli, Laura; Pugi, Alessandra; Crescioli, Giada; Lombardi, Niccolò; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Aricò, Maurizio; Giglio, Sabrina; Messeri, Andrea; Mugelli, Alessandro; Vannacci, Alfredo; Maggini, Valentina

    2018-05-18

    Inter-patient variability in response to opioids is well known but a comprehensive definition of its pathophysiological mechanism is still lacking and, more importantly, no studies have focused on children. The STOP Pain project aimed to evaluate the risk factors that contribute to clinical response and adverse drug reactions to opioids by means of a systematic review and a clinical investigation on paediatric oncological patients. We conducted a systematic literature search in EMBASE and PubMed up to the 24th of November 2016 following Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA guidelines. Two independent reviewers screened titles and abstracts along with full-text papers; disagreements were resolved by discussion with two other independent reviewers. We used a data extraction form to provide details of the included studies, and conducted quality assessment using the Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. Young age, lung or gastrointestinal cancer, neuropathic or breakthrough pain and anxiety or sleep disturbance were associated to a worse response to opioid analgesia. No clear association was identified in literature regarding gender, ethnicity, weight, presence of metastases, biochemical or hematological factors. Studies in children were lacking. Between June 2011 and April 2014, the Italian STOP Pain project enrolled 87 paediatric cancer patients under treatment with opioids (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, fentanyl and tramadol). Future studies on cancer pain should be designed with consideration for the highlighted factors to enhance our understanding of opioid non-response and safety. Studies in children are mandatory. CRD42017057740 .

  10. Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copay, Anne G; Glassman, Steven D; Subach, Brian R; Berven, Sigurd; Schuler, Thomas C; Carreon, Leah Y

    2008-01-01

    The impact of lumbar spinal surgery is commonly evaluated with three patient-reported outcome measures: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36), and pain scales. A minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is a threshold used to measure the effect of clinical treatments. Variable threshold values have been proposed as MCID for those instruments despite a lack of agreement on the optimal MCID calculation method. This study has three purposes. First, to illustrate the range of values obtained by common anchor-based and distribution-based methods to calculate MCID. Second, to determine a statistically sound and clinically meaningful MCID for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, and leg pain scale in lumbar spine surgery patients. Third, to compare the discriminative ability of two anchors: a global health assessment and a rating of satisfaction with the results of the surgery. This study is a review of prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes data. A total of 454 patients from a large database of surgeries performed by the Lumbar Spine Study Group with a 1-year follow-up on either ODI or PCS were included in the study. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative scores for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, leg pain scale, health transition item (HTI) of the SF-36, and Satisfaction with Results scales. ODI, SF-36, and pain scales were administered before and 1 year after spinal surgery. Several candidate MCID calculation methods were applied to the data and the resulting values were compared. The HTI of the SF-36 was used as the anchor and compared with a second anchor (Satisfaction with Results scale). Potential MCID calculations yielded a range of values: fivefold for ODI, PCS, and leg pain, 10-fold for back pain. Threshold values obtained with the two anchors were very similar. The minimum detectable change (MDC) appears as a statistically and clinically appropriate MCID value. MCID values

  11. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul; Davis, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse-free periods. The current study compared the short-term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. At 4 IRB-approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. © 2015 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Henwood

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP in spinal cord injury (SCI is recognized as severely compromising, in both adjustment after injury and quality of life. Studies indicate that chronic pain in SCI is associated with great emotional distress over and above that of the injury itself. Currently, little is known about the SCI patient's perception of the impact of living with chronic neuropathic pain.

  13. Risks associated with borrowing and sharing of prescription analgesics among patients observed by pain management physicians in Croatia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markotic F

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Filipa Markotic,1 Livia Puljak2 1Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, University Clinical Hospital Mostar, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina; 2Laboratory for Pain Research, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia Background: Understanding and improving patient safety is a key issue in medicine. One of the potential threats to patient safety is the sharing of medication among patients, which is a form of self-medication. This study analyzed experiences and attitudes of pain management physicians (PMPs about sharing prescription analgesics among patients.Methods: This qualitative study was conducted by semi-structured interviews among PMPs employed in Croatian pain clinics. The study involved two researchers and 15 PMPs.Results: Among PMPs, 80% have seen patients who share their prescription analgesics with other patients for whom prescription is not intended. Most PMPs consider prescription analgesics sharing a risky and negative behavior. Some of them, however, found certain positive aspects associated to it, such as being a benevolent behavior, helping patients to get medications when they need them, and helping them cope with pain.Conclusion: The majority of physicians specialized in pain management encountered patients sharing prescription analgesics. Most of them considered this as risky behavior with a number of potential consequences. It has been noted that this problem is neglected and that physicians should inquire about medication sharing. Direct-to-consumers advertising was perceived as a factor contributing to such behavior. Patient education and more involvement of physicians in identifying this behavior were cited as potential remedies for preventing sharing of prescription analgesics. Keywords: analgesics, sharing, lending, borrowing, risks

  14. CORE STABILIZATION PROGRAM AND CONVENTIONAL EXERCISES IN THE PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN-A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Venkata Naga Prahalada Karnati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional back care exercises are advocated to treat the pain and to strengthen the involved muscles. There will always be the possibility of the pain getting recurred due to disproportionate balance and stability in the muscles. The core stabilization is major trend in rehabilitation. It aims at improving stability during functional activities, balance, flexibility, strength training and effectively manage the pain as well. Methods: Forty patients with chronic Mechanical Low back pain were randomly assigned into control group that received conventional back exercises and SWD (n=20, experimental group received core stabilization and SWD (n=20. Both the groups received SWD, along with conventional back exercises for one-group and core stabilization for the other group 3 days a week for 6 weeks .The treatment outcome was assessed using visual analogue scale, Rolland Morris Disability Questionnaire and Lumbar range of motion by using goniometer. Results: After a 6 week training period the core stabilization group scored significantly higher than the conventional group for VAS (p=0.05 and RMDQ (p=0.05 where as ROM improved higher in conventional group (p=0.05 Conclusion: After the treatment sessions Core stabilization group registered a significant improvement when compared to conventional back care exercises in improving function and in relieving pain.

  15. Patients with sciatica still experience pain and disability 5 years after surgery: A systematic review with meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, G C; Witzleb, A J; Fritsch, C; Maher, C G; Ferreira, P H; Ferreira, M L

    2016-11-01

    The clinical course of patients with sciatica is believed to be favourable, but there is conflicting evidence on the postoperative course of this condition. We aimed to investigate the clinical course of sciatica following surgery. An electronic search was conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from inception to April 2015. We screened for prospective cohort studies investigating pain or disability outcomes for patients with sciatica treated surgically. Fractional polynomial regression analysis was used to generate pooled means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of pain and disability up to 5 years after surgery. Estimates of pain and disability (converted to a 0-100 scale) were plotted over time, from inception to last available follow-up time. Forty records (39 cohort studies) were included with a total of 13,883 patients with sciatica. Before surgery, the pooled mean leg pain score was 75.2 (95% CI 68.1-82.4) which reduced to 15.3 (95% CI 8.5-22.1) at 3 months. Patients were never fully recovered in the long-term and pain increased to 21.0 (95% CI 12.5-29.5) at 5 years. The pooled mean disability score before surgery was 55.1 (95% CI 52.3-58.0) and this decreased to 15.5 (95% CI 13.3-17.6) at 3 months, and further reduced to 13.1 (95% CI 10.6-15.5) at 5 years. Although surgery is followed by a rapid decrease in pain and disability by 3 months, patients still experience mild to moderate pain and disability 5 years after surgery. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: This review provides a quantitative summary of the postoperative course of patients with sciatica. Patients with sciatica experienced a rapid reduction in pain and disability in the first 3 months, but still had mild to moderate symptoms 5 years after surgery. Although no significant differences were found, microdiscectomy showed larger improvements compared to other surgical techniques. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  16. An open-label, long-term study examining the safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onouchi K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Onouchi,1 Hiroaki Koga,2 Kazumasa Yokoyama,3 Tamotsu Yoshiyama4 1Aida Memorial Rehabilitation Hospital, Moriya, Japan; 2Kumamoto Rehabilitation Hospital, Kikuchi-Gun, Japan; 3Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 4Pfizer Japan Inc., Tokyo, Japan Purpose: Studies of pregabalin for the treatment of central neuropathic pain have been limited to double-blind trials of 4–17 weeks in duration. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain. The efficacy of pregabalin was also assessed as a secondary measure. Patients and methods: This was a 53-week, multicenter, open-label trial of pregabalin (150–600 mg/day in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or cerebral stroke. Results: A total of 103 patients received pregabalin (post-stroke =60; spinal cord injury =38; and multiple sclerosis =5. A majority of patients (87.4% experienced one or more treatment-related adverse events, most commonly somnolence, weight gain, dizziness, or peripheral edema. The adverse event profile was similar to that seen in other indications of pregabalin. Most treatment-related adverse events were mild (89.1% or moderate (9.2% in intensity. Pregabalin treatment improved total score, sensory pain, affective pain, visual analog scale (VAS, and present pain intensity scores on the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ and ten-item modified Brief Pain Inventory (mBPI-10 total score at endpoint compared with baseline. Improvements in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 total scores were evident in all patient subpopulations. Mean changes from baseline in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 scores at endpoint were –20.1 and –1.4, respectively. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that pregabalin is generally well tolerated and provides sustained efficacy over a 53-week treatment period in

  17. The effects of common medical interventions on pain, back function, and work resumption in patients with chronic low back pain: A prospective 2-year cohort study in six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, T H; Hansson, E K

    2000-12-01

    A prospective cohort study with identical questionnaires and inclusion criteria was performed. To compare in six different countries the frequencies and effects of the common medical interventions used for patients with low back pain who are work incapacitated. Low back pain is a huge problem with increasing costs for health care, industry, and society. Cohorts of employed men and women ages 18 to 59 years who had been sick-listed (100%) for a minimum of 90 days because of low back pain were recruited in Denmark, Germany, Israel, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United States. The subjects received three separate questionnaires with identical questions after 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. The questionnaires included separate questions about background factors, treatment, and the like, as well as validated scales such as the Hannover Activities of Daily Living, von Korff pain score, Short Form-36, and Karasek-Theorell. Working status was obtained from registers. Main outcome measures were working/not working, back function, and pain. All three questionnaires were completed by 2080 subjects in the six countries. With few exceptions, there were great similarities in the appointments, examinations, and treatments in the different countries. Considerable differences were found between the back surgery rates, which ranged from 6% in Sweden to 32% in the United States during the first 90 days of the study. Very few of the interventions had any noticeable positive effects on work resumption, pain, or back function. Back surgery in Sweden was a striking exception, positively affecting all three outcome measures. The frequencies of work resumption within the first year ranged from 73% in the Netherlands to 32% in Denmark. Almost none of the commonly occurring and frequently practiced medical interventions for patients who are sick-listed because of low back pain had any positive effects on either the recorded health measures or work resumption.

  18. Prevalence and impact of constipation and bowel dysfunction induced by strong opioids: a cross-sectional survey of 520 patients with cancer pain: DYONISOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, L; Béziaud, N; Labreze, L; Giardina, V; Caussé, C; Chuberre, B; Allaert, F A; Perrot, S

    2013-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in patients with cancer pain according to the Knowles-Eccersley-Scott symptom score (KESS), the different symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD), and to assess the impact of OIBD on patient's quality-of-life. A cross-sectional observational study, using the KESS questionnaire and the physician's subjective assessment of constipation, and other questionnaires and questions on constipation, OIBD, and quality-of-life, carried out on 1 day at oncology day centres and hospitals. Five hundred and twenty patients were enrolled at 77 centres in France; 61.7% of patients (n = 321) showed a degree of constipation that is problematic for the patient according to KESS (between 9-39). Even more patients, 85.7% (n = 438), were considered constipated according to the physician's subjective assessment-despite laxative use (84.7% of patients). Quality-of-life was significantly reduced in constipated vs non-constipated patients for both PAC-QoL (p hospitalization (16% of patients), pain (75% of patients), and frequent changes in opioid and laxative treatment. This cross-sectional study, in a selected population of cancer patients, has measured prevalence and impact of OIBD. Further confirmation could be sought through the use of longitudinal studies, and larger populations, such as non-cancer pain patients treated with opioids. Cancer patients taking opioids for pain are very frequently constipated, even if they are prescribed laxatives. This leads to relevant impairments of quality-of-life.

  19. Tolerability of the capsaicin 8% patch following pretreatment with lidocaine or tramadol in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: a multicentre, randomized, assessor-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T S; Høye, K; Fricová, J; Vanelderen, P; Ernault, E; Siciliano, T; Marques, S

    2014-10-01

    Application of the capsaicin 8% patch is associated with treatment-related discomfort. Consequently, pretreatment for 60 min with anaesthetic cream is recommended; however, this may be uncomfortable and time consuming. We conducted a multicentre, randomized (1:1), assessor-blinded study in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain to assess tolerability of the capsaicin patch following topical lidocaine (4%) or oral tramadol (50 mg) pretreatment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients tolerating capsaicin patch application (ability to receive ≥90% of a 60-min application). Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) scores were assessed before, during and after treatment. Overall, 122 patients were included (61 per arm). The capsaicin patch was tolerated by 121 patients. Tolerability of the capsaicin patch was similar following pretreatment with lidocaine and tramadol. Following patch application, pain levels increased up to 55 min (change from baseline of 1.3 for lidocaine and 1.4 for tramadol). After patch removal, tramadol-treated patients experienced greater pain relief up to the end of day 1; in the evening, mean changes in NPRS scores from baseline were 0 for lidocaine and -1 for tramadol. Proportions of patients reporting increases of ≥2 NPRS points or >33% from baseline at one or more time point(s) on the day of treatment were similar between arms. Adverse event incidence was comparable between arms. Capsaicin 8% patch tolerability was similar in the two arms, with comparable results for most secondary endpoints. Tramadol given 30 min before patch application should be considered as an alternative pretreatment option in patients receiving capsaicin patch treatment. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  20. Multicenter clinical study for evaluation of efficacy and safety of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch in treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain in 474 chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Lin; Song, Guo-Hong; Liu, Duan-Qi; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Kui-Feng; Zang, Ai-Hua; Cheng, Ying; Cao, Guo-Chun; Liang, Jun; Ma, Xue-Zhen; Ding, Xin; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei-Lian; Hu, Zuo-Wei; Feng, Gang; Huang, Jiang-Jin; Zheng, Xiao; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Wu, Rong; Ren, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Although a new matrix formulation fentanyl has been used throughout the world for cancer pain management, few data about its efficacy and clinical outcomes associated with its use in Chinese patients have been obtained. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the new system in Chinese patients with moderate to severe cancer pain. A total of 474 patients with moderate to severe cancer pain were enrolled in this study and were treated with the new transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (TDF) up to 2 weeks. All the patients were asked to record pain intensity, side effects, quality of life (QOL), adherence and global satisfaction. The initial dose of fentanyl was 25 μg/h titrated with opioid or according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Transdermal fentanyl was changed every three days. After 2 weeks. The mean pain intensity of the 459 evaluated patients decreased significantly from 5.63±1.26 to 2.03±1.46 (P<0.0001). The total remission rate was 91.29%, of which moderate remission rate 53.16%, obvious remission rate 25.49% and complete remission rate 12.64%. The rate of adverse events was 33.75%, 18.78% of which were moderate and 3.80% were severe. The most frequent adverse events were constipation and nausea. No fatal events were observed. The quality of life was remarkably improved after the treatment (P<0.0001). The new TDF is effective and safe in treating patients with moderate to severe cancer pain, and can significantly improve the quality of life.

  1. The Effectiveness of Self Management Program on Pain, Fatigue, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Sickle Cell Patients: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with sickle cell disease, who must manage serious and unpredictable complications related to their disease, particularly chronic pain, suffer from numerous psychosocial problems such as depression, anxiety, stress, and disruption of interpersonal relationships; these problems often lead to fatigue and poor quality of life. Objectives This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of self-management programs targeting pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress in sickle cell patients. Patients and Methods This was a quasi-experimental study; participants were 53 patients with sickle cell disease who were referred to the Thalassemia Clinic of Ahvaz Shafa Hospital. Participants were recruited by census in 2013. Participants received a self-management program that was implemented in five sessions over 12 weeks. Levels of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and stress were assessed before and 24 weeks after the intervention; pain was assessed during the intervention and at a 24 week post-intervention follow-up using the fatigue severity scale (FSS, DASS21, and a pain record. Descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, Chi-square, independent t-tests, paired t-tests, repeated measures tests and correlations were used to analyze the data. Results Scores for fatigue, anxiety, depression, and stress after the intervention were significantly decreased compared to before the intervention (P < 0.001. Repeated measures testing showed that mean scores for frequency and duration of pain decreased significantly during the 12 weeks of intervention, as well as during the 24 weeks of follow-up (P < 0.001. Conclusions The results suggest the effectiveness of self-management programs on the reduction of pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and stress in sickle cell patients. Therefore, self-management programs are advisable in order to empower patients and assist their management of health-related problems.

  2. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Annette; Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Lawton, Sarah A; van der Windt, Danielle; Main, Chris; Sowden, Gail; Burton, A Kim; Lewis, Martyn; Jowett, Sue; Sanders, Tom; Hay, Elaine M; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-07-10

    Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669.

  3. Pain relief that matters to patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Bjerre, Eik; Hansen, Maria Damkjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is used to interpret the clinical relevance of results reported by trials and meta-analyses as well as to plan sample sizes in new studies. However, there is a lack of consensus about the size of MCID in acute pain, which is a core...... patients. Meta-analyses found considerable heterogeneity between studies (absolute MCID: I2 = 93%, relative MCID: I2 = 75%) and results were therefore presented qualitatively, while analyses focused on exploring reasons for heterogeneity. The reported absolute MCID values ranged widely from 8 to 40 mm...

  4. Evaluation of the protein biomarkers and the analgesic response to systemic methylene blue in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a double-blind, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miclescu AA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Adriana A Miclescu,1 Martin Svahn,1 Torsten E Gordh1,2 1Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic, Uppsala University Hospital, 2Pain Research, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Aim: This study was carried out in patients with neuropathic pain in order to assess the analgesic effects and changes in protein biomarkers after the administration of methylene blue (MB, a diaminophenothiazine with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and with inhibitory effects on nitric oxide.Materials and methods: Ten patients with chronic refractory neuropathic pain were randomized to receive either MB (10 mg/mL Methylthioninium chloride 2 mg/kg (MB group or MB 0.02 mg/kg (control group infused over 60 minutes. Sensory function and pain (Numerical Rating Scale were evaluated at baseline and at 60 minutes after the start of the infusion. The patients kept a pain diary during the next 24 hours and for the following 4 days. Plasma and urinary concentrations of 8-isoprostane-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α and plasma protein biomarkers prior to and after the infusions were measured with radioimmunoassay and with proximity extension assay.Results: A decrease of the Numerical Rating Scale at 60 minutes in comparison with baseline was observed in the MB (P=0.047 group. The decrease was significant between the MB and the control group on the day of and day after MB infusion (P=0.04 and P=0.008, respectively. There was no difference in systemic protein expressions between groups except for prolactin (PRL (P=0.02. Three patients demonstrated diminished dynamic mechanical allodynia.Conclusion: MB decreased the pain levels in patients with chronic therapy-resistant neuropathic pain on the first 2 days after administration. Known as an endocrine modulator on the anterior pituitary gland, MB infusion produced a decrease of PRL. The detailed role of PRL effects in chronic neuropathic pain remains undetermined.Keywords: methylene blue, nitric oxide

  5. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (Co......P) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed (Romberg...... Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical...

  6. Intraarticular Pulsed Radiofrequency to Treat Refractory Lumbar Facet Joint Pain in Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Cheol; Cho, Yun-Woo; Ahn, Da Hyun; Do, Kyung Hee

    2018-04-01

    Many treatment techniques have been used for refractory lumbar facet joint pain; however, their efficacy has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory lumbar facet joint pain in patients with low back pain. Twenty patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain were recruited, and each patient was treated via intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency. The treatment effects were measured with a numerical rating scale, and the technical accuracy of intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment was evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Any adverse events or complications also were checked. We performed intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency treatment at 48 levels of the lumbar facet joints in 20 patients (5 men and 15 women; mean age, 64.50 ± 10.65 years) with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Pain scores were significantly reduced at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment (P radiofrequency results in all 20 patients, without any serious adverse effects. Treatment using intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency is an alternative to other techniques in patients with refractory lumbar facet joint pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiotherapy treatment of the diabetic shoulder: a longitudinal study following patients with diabetes and shoulder pain using a pre-post treatment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyhlbäck, Maria; Schröder Winter, Helena; Thierfelder, Tomas; Söderlund, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate a physiotherapy program targeted to reduce pain intensity and improve the daily functioning of diabetics with shoulder problems. It was hypothesized that patients receiving specific physiotherapy treatment improved more frequently and rapidly than diabetic patients followed up without specific physiotherapeutic intervention. A pre-post treatment design was completed for a group of 10 subjects. The treatment protocol, also applied during the daily activities of the subjects, was aiming at reducing pain intensity and shoulder stiffness and improving impaired functioning in daily activities by muscle relaxation, light-load exercise and enhancing proper shoulder co-ordination. The group analysis showed significant decrease of pain intensity level as well as improved shoulder functioning and sustained level of subject self-efficacy beliefs throughout the study period. The results suggest that it is possible to relieve shoulder pain intensity and improve daily activities of patients with diabetes-related shoulder problems by employing a physiotherapy program focusing on muscle relaxation, light-load exercise and on the enhancement of proper shoulder co-ordination in daily activities. A physiotherapy program can be effective in reducing pain and improving shoulder function in diabetics with shoulder problems. The treatment should focus on muscle relaxation, light-load exercise and on the enhancement of proper shoulder co-ordination in daily activities.

  8. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at ...

  9. Pain severity, coping and satisfaction with life in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The primary study aim was to determine whether or not a statistically significant relationship exists between pain severity and satisfaction with life in patients with chronic pain. The second aim was to explore the extent to which coping responses might influence this relationship. Design: A cross-sectional ...

  10. Understanding Facial Expressions of Pain in Patients With Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lautenbacher, Stefan; Baer, Karl-Juergen; Eisold, Patricia; Kunz, Miriam

    Although depression is associated with more clinical pain complaints, psychophysical data sometimes point to hypoalgesic alterations. Studying the more reflex-like facial expression of pain in patients with depression may offer a new perspective. Facial and psychophysical responses to nonpainful and

  11. A prospective, within-patient, crossover study of continuous intravenous and subcutaneous morphine for chronic cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K A; Glare, P A; Walsh, D; Groh, E S

    1997-05-01

    The dose, efficacy, and side effects of continuous intravenous infusion (CIVI) of morphine were compared with continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) of morphine in patients with chronic cancer pain. Eligible patients were referred to the Palliative Care Program and were receiving a stable dose of CIVI of morphine. The design was a within-patient, one-way crossover; in which each patient provided data before and after a switch from CIVI to CSCI of morphine. "Rescue" doses were 50% of the hourly dose given every 2 hours as needed. Morphine was infused intravenously (i.v.) and subcutaneously (s.c.) via a McGaw/AccuPro Volumetric Infusion Pump. After baseline data, including side effects and pain assessment, were obtained, patients were evaluated twice daily for toxicity and analgesic efficacy. Those who had a stable CIVI dose for 48 consecutive hr were crossed over to the CSCI at the same dose as the intravenous (i.v.) phase. A stable dose was defined as no dose change, four or less rescue doses in the previous 24 hr, and a pain rating of none or mild. CIVI was considered equal to CSCI if these criteria were maintained for 96 consecutive hr. Fifty-seven patients were entered, and 40 were evaluable (15 women and 25 men). The median age was 67 (range 30-83 years). All 40 participants, after maintaining a stable dose throughout the i.v. phase, crossed to the s.c. phase and remained on s.c. for at least 48 hr. Thirty-two patients maintained a stable dose throughout the i.v. and s.c. phases. The mean stable i.v. dose (day 2) was 5.05 mg/hr, and the mean stable s.c. dose (day 4) was 5.7 mg/hr (P = 0.01). The mean number of rescue doses on day 2 was 0.83 per 24 hr versus 0.80 per 24 hours on day 4 (P = 0.6). The mean categorical pain score on day 2 was 0.83, and on day 4, 0.85 (P = 0.7). The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) on day 2 was 22.9 mm versus 17.6 mm on day 4 (P = 0.1). The mean incidence of side effects on day 2 was 1.7, and on day 4, 2.0 (P = 0.2). No patient was

  12. The psychometric properties of the cervical nonorganic signs in patients with neck pain: an assessment of pain expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Yi-Jing; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wu, Yuh-Yih; Lin, Rong-Fong; Lu, Yen-Mou

    2018-04-01

    Neck pain is a common cause of disability. This study investigated the psychometric properties of the cervical nonorganic signs (CNOS), a tool for assessing abnormal illness behaviors in patients with neck pain. The CNOS was administered on patients with neck pain. Reliability and validity analyses were used to evaluate the psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate the dimensionality. Correlations with the Short Form-36 were used to investigate the convergent validity. The results supported the reliability (inter-rater reliability intra-class correlation: 0.920), validity (correlated with body pain (|ρ|=0.31) and vitality (|ρ| =0.30), and two-factor dimensionality (χ 2 =   5.904, p= 0.66; χ 2 /df = 0.738; RMSEApain (severe pain) and vitality (poor vitality) expressed by the patients. The CNOS is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing pain and vitality problems. It helps patients to express severe pain and lack of vitality. The rehabilitation discipline could use the scale to understand pain expression and to design proper rehabilitation programs. Implications for Rehabilitation The cervical nonorganic signs has two domains (pain and vitality). The scale is reliable and valid for patients with neck pain. Patients with high scores on the pain domain have severe body pain that may interfere with normal social activities. Clinicians should understand their suffering and try to help them to alleviate the pain.

  13. Pain management in patients with Parkinson's disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogar O

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Orjan Skogar,1,2 Johan Lokk2 1Academy for Health and Care (FUTURUM, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, 2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD, which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance. The symptoms have a great negative impact on health-related quality of life. Separating PD-related pain from pain of other origins is an important challenge and can be characterized as “many syndromes under the same umbrella”. Among the different forms of PD-related pain, musculoskeletal pain is the most common form, accounting for 40%–90% of reported pain in PD patients. Augmentation by pathophysiological pathways other than those secondary to rigidity, tremor, or any of the other motor manifestations of the disease seems most probable. In PD, the basal ganglia process somatosensory information differently, and increased subjective pain sensitivity with lower electrical and heat-pain thresholds has been reported in PD patients. The mechanism is assumed to be diminished activity of the descending inhibitory control system of the basal ganglia. PD pain, like many of the nonmotor symptoms, remains underdiagnosed and, thus, poorly managed. A systematic collection of patient descriptions of type, quality, and duration of pain is, therefore, of utmost importance. Recent studies have validated new and more specific and dedicated pain scales for PD-related symptoms. Symptomatic treatments based

  14. Dynamic Changes in Nociception and Pain Perception After Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Sörensen, Jan; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-12-01

    Patients with an implanted spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system for pain management present an opportunity to study dynamic changes in the pain system in a situation where patients are not stimulated (ie, experiencing severe pain) compared with a situation in which patients have just been stimulated (ie, pain free or greatly reduced pain). The aims of this study were (1) to determine if there are differences in nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds (NWR-T) and electrical pain thresholds (EP-T) before and after SCS; and (2) to establish if these differences are related to psychological factors associated with chronic pain. Seventeen volunteers with chronic neuropathic pain participated in the experiment. Electrical stimuli were applied to assess the NWR-T and the EP-T. In addition, psychological factors (ie, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, and disability indexes) were also recorded. The NWR-T and EP-T were assessed with the SCS system off (at least 8 h before the experiment), and then reassessed 1 hour after the SCS system was turned on. Ongoing pain intensity ratings decreased (P=0.018), whereas the NWR-T increased (P=0.028) after the SCS was turned on, whereas no significant difference was found for EP-T (P=0.324). Psychological factors were significant predictors for EP-T but not for NWR-T. The results of this study suggest that pain relief after SCS is partially mediated by a decrease in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord.

  15. [Perceived pain and weather changes in rheumatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L Cunha; Parente, M; Silva, C; Clemente-Coelho, P; Santos, H; Cortes, S; Medeiros, D; Ribeiro, J Saraiva; Barcelos, F; Sousa, M; Miguel, C; Figueiredo, R; Mediavilla, M; Simões, E; Silva, M; Patto, J Vaz; Madeira, H; Ferreira, J; Micaelo, M; Leitão, R; Las, V; Faustino, A; Teixeira, A

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatic patients with chronic pain describe in a vivid way the influence of climate on pain and disease activity. Several studies seem to confirm this association. To evaluate and compare in a population of rheumatic patients the perceived influence of weather changes on pain and disease activity This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. For three weeks an assisted self-reported questionnaire with nine dimensions and a VAS pain scale was performed on consecutive out-patients in our clinic. 955 patients 787 female 168 male mean age 57.9 years with several rheumatologic diagnosis were evaluated. Overall 70 of the patients believed that the weather influenced their disease and 40 believed that the influence was high. Morning stiffness was influenced in 54 high influenced in 34 . Autumn and Winter were the most influential periods as well as humidity 67 and low temperatures 59 . In our study as well as in literature we found that a high percentage of patients 70 perceived that weather conditions influenced their pain and disease. Fibromyalgia patients seemed to be strongly influenced by weather changes. Our study confirms that patients perception on the influence of climate on pain and therefore their disease is an important clinical factor and it should be considered when evaluating rheumatic patients.

  16. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in patients with intractable pain from osteoporotic or metastatic fractures: a prospective study using quality-of-life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, G.; Chow, E.; Holden, L.; Vidmar, M.; Danjoux, C.; Yee, A.J.M.; Connolly, R.; Finkelstein, J.

    2006-01-01

    osteoporotic fractures. SSPS showed a decrease of 2 or more levels in 88.5% of patients at 12-week follow-up. The mean SSPS with movement was 8.7 preprocedure and 1.8 postprocedure (P < 0.0001). Also, there was significant improvement in all 9 ESAS domains (P < 0.0004). The ingestion of analgesics in morphine equivalents showed a trend toward reduction post-PVP (P < 0.0599). When the patients with pathologic fractures were separated out, the reduction in ingestion of analgesics was significant (P < 0.0008). The TFAS demonstrated significant improvement in patient mobility and function. Extravertebral extravasation of cement was noted in 55.6% of the levels. We used a general linear mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance to analyze the data. PVP in osteoporotic and metastatic fractures significantly improved many patients' global quality-of-life scores and function by markedly decreasing their back pain and reducing their intake of pain medications. The procedure is safe, with no serious complications noted in our study. (author)

  17. Association between use of pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality: A large cohort study of patients experiencing chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Nina; Rawshani, Araz; Gelang, Carita; Herlitz, Johan; Bång, Angela; Andersson, Jan-Otto; Gellerstedt, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In the assessment of patients with chest pain, there is support for the use of pre-hospital ECG in the literature and in the care guidelines. Using propensity score methods, we aim to examine whether the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG among patients with chest pain affects the outcome (30-day mortality). The association between pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality was studied in the overall cohort (n=13151), as well as in the one-to-one matched cohort with 2524 patients not examined with pre-hospital ECG and 2524 patients examined with pre-hospital ECG. In the overall cohort, 21% (n=2809) did not undergo an ECG tracing in the pre-hospital setting. Among those who had pain during transport, 14% (n=1159) did not undergo a pre-hospital ECG while 32% (n=1135) of those who did not have pain underwent an ECG tracing. In the overall cohort, the OR for 30-day mortality in patients who had a pre-hospital ECG, as compared with those who did not, was 0.63 (95% CI 0.05-0.79; pECG was used. The PH-ECG is underused among patients with chest discomfort and the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG may reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D status in patients with musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and headache: a cross-sectional descriptive study in a multi-ethnic general practice in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Kirsten Valebjørg; Brekke, Mette; Gjelstad, Svein; Lagerløv, Per

    2010-09-01

    To investigate vitamin D levels in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal pain, headache, and fatigue. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A health center in Oslo, Norway, with a multi-ethnic population. A total of 572 patients referred by a general practitioner (GP) for an examination of hypovitaminosis D who reported musculoskeletal pain, headache, or fatigue. The patients' native countries were: Norway (n = 249), Europe, America, and South-East Asia (n = 83), and the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia (n = 240). Both genders and all ages were included. Vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D) in nmol/L. Hypovitaminosis D (25-hydroxyvitamin D prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal pain, headache, or fatigue for whom the GP had suspected a low vitamin D level. Hypovitaminosis D was not restricted to immigrant patients. These results indicate that GPs should maintain awareness of hypovitaminosis D and refer patients who report headaches, fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain with minimal sun exposure and a low dietary vitamin D intake for assessment.

  19. Sense of social support in chonic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancane G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical data show that one in five adults of the European citizen suffer from some type of chronic pain. One of the most common types of chronic pain is chronic low back and neck pain. Emotional factors are currently viewed as important determinants in pain perception and behaviour. The perceived social and emotional support have impact to the individual’s adaptation to chronic disease (Cohen, Wills, 1985. The material: 110 chronic low back pain (CLBP patients (48 male and 62 female; in age from 24 to 60 years, mean: 44.2±8, 0 and pilot study of 23 chronic neck pain (CNP patients (19 female and 4 male; in age from 35 to 60 years, mean: 48, 1 ±6. The assessment methods: structured interview; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. SF-36 ® Health Survey: assessment of emotional and social support. Results and conclusions: CLBP patients in presence of symptoms of depression and elevated level of anxiety matched for socio-demographic features had less sense of social support and marked pain impact to daily activities, lower self rating health relating quality of life. In CLBP patients the sense of social and emotional support had relevant interaction with level of participation in daily activities both in patients with and without mental health problems. This fact has to be considered in process of rehabilitation and in managing of health care of CLBP patients. The results of CNP patients pilot study revealed interesting trend that chronic back and neck pain patients seems to be quite different according to sense of social and emotional support, therefore sense of social and emotional support in different chronic pain patients need further research to improve the process and results of rehabilitation in these patients.

  20. Effect of Patient Education on Reducing Medication in Spinal Cord Injury Patients With Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Na Young; Chang, Shin Hye; Lee, Jae Joong; Park, Han Kyul

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether providing education about the disease pathophysiology and drug mechanisms and side effects, would be effective for reducing the use of pain medication while appropriately managing neurogenic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. In this prospective study, 109 patients with an SCI and neuropathic pain, participated in an educational pain management program. This comprehensive program was specifically created, for patients with an SCI and neuropathic pain. It consisted of 6 sessions, including educational training, over a 6-week period. Of 109 patients, 79 (72.5%) initially took more than two types of pain medication, and this decreased to 36 (33.0%) after the educational pain management program was completed. The mean pain scale score and the number of pain medications decreased, compared to the baseline values. Compared to the non-response group, the response group had a shorter duration of pain onset (p=0.004), and a higher initial number of different medications (ppain management program, can be a valuable complement to the treatment of spinal cord injured patients with neuropathic pain. Early intervention is important, to prevent patients from developing chronic SCI-related pain.

  1. The Relationship between Mechanical Hyperalgesia Assessed by Manual Tender Point Examination and Disease Severity in Patients with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen; Jespersen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The clinical utility of tender point (TP) examination in patients reporting chronic widespread pain (CWP) is the subject of contemporary debate. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between mechanical hyperalgesia assessed by manual TP examination and clinical disease severity...

  2. Prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in France, Germany, and the UK - a cross-sectional study including 4,270,142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in general practices in France, Germany, and the UK. This study included all patients aged ≥18 years followed in 2016 in general practitioner practices in France, Germany and the UK. The primary outcome was the prevalence of patients receiving prescriptions for pain medications in France, Germany, and the UK in 2016. The following drugs were included in the analysis: anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, non-steroids and analgesics including opioids, antimigraine preparations, and other analgesics and antipyretics. Demographic variables included age and gender. This study included 4,270,142 patients. The prevalences of pain medication prescriptions were 57.3% in France, 29.6% in Germany, and 21.7% in the UK. Although this prevalence generally remained consistent between age groups in France (54.3%-60.3%), it increased with age in Germany (18-30 years: 23.8%; >70 years: 35.8%) and in the UK (18-30 years: 9.3%; >70 years: 43.8%). Finally, the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in women than in men in all three countries. Paracetamol was prescribed to 82.3% and 60.1% of patients receiving pain medication in France and the UK, respectively, whereas ibuprofen was prescribed to 46.5% of individuals in Germany. The prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in France than in Germany and the UK. Further research is needed to gain a better understanding of the differences in the prescription patterns between these three European countries.

  3. An improved method for sacro-iliac joint imaging: a study of normal subjects, patients with sacro-iliitis and patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, J.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Maisey, M.N.; Laurent, R.; Panayi, G.S.; Saunders, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new method is described for quantitative measurement of the uptake of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) by the sacro-iliac joints. The method uses 'regions of interest' providing advantages over the previously described 'slice' method; the two methods are compared in normal subjects, patients with known sacro-iliitis and patients with low back pain. Sacro-iliac activity, as calculated by the sacro-iliac index (SII) in normal patients, was shown to decrease with age in females but not in males. The SII was compared with radiographs of the sacro-iliac joints in the patients with known sacro-iliac joint disease and in those with low back pain. The method is useful for the exclusion of sacro-iliitis as a specific cause of back pain. (author)

  4. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Patients' perception of postoperative pain management: validation of the International Pain Outcomes (IPO) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaug, Judith; Zaslansky, Ruth; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Komann, Marcus; Allvin, Renée; Backström, Ragnar; Brill, Silviu; Buchholz, Ingo; Engel, Christoph; Fletcher, Dominique; Fodor, Lucian; Funk, Peter; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Gordon, Debra B; Konrad, Christoph; Kopf, Andreas; Leykin, Yigal; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Puig, Margarita; Rawal, Narinder; Taylor, Rod S; Ullrich, Kristin; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-11-01

    PAIN OUT is a European Commission-funded project aiming at improving postoperative pain management. It combines a registry that can be useful for quality improvement and research using treatment and patient-reported outcome measures. The core of the project is a patient questionnaire-the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire-that comprises key patient-level outcomes of postoperative pain management, including pain intensity, physical and emotional functional interference, side effects, and perceptions of care. Its psychometric quality after translation and adaptation to European patients is the subject of this validation study. The questionnaire was administered to 9,727 patients in 10 languages in 8 European countries and Israel. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Discriminant validity assessment used Mann-Whitney U tests to detect mean group differences between 2 surgical disciplines. Internal consistency reliability was calculated as Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis resulted in a 3-factor structure explaining 53.6% of variance. Cronbach's alpha at overall scale level was high (.86), and for the 3 subscales was low, moderate, or high (range, .53-.89). Significant mean group differences between general and orthopedic surgery patients confirmed discriminant validity. The psychometric quality of the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire can be regarded as satisfactory. The International Pain Outcomes questionnaire provides an instrument for postoperative pain assessment and improvement of quality of care, which demonstrated good psychometric quality when translated into a variety of languages in a large European and Israeli patient population. This measure provides the basis for the first comprehensive postoperative pain registry in Europe and other countries. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Pain point system scale (PPSS: a method for postoperative pain estimation in retrospective studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gkotsi A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anastasia Gkotsi,1 Dimosthenis Petsas,2 Vasilios Sakalis,3 Asterios Fotas,3 Argyrios Triantafyllidis,3 Ioannis Vouros,3 Evangelos Saridakis,2 Georgios Salpiggidis,3 Athanasios Papathanasiou31Department of Experimental Physiology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Department of Urology, Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, GreecePurpose: Pain rating scales are widely used for pain assessment. Nevertheless, a new tool is required for pain assessment needs in retrospective studies.Methods: The postoperative pain episodes, during the first postoperative day, of three patient groups were analyzed. Each pain episode was assessed by a visual analog scale, numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale, and a new tool – pain point system scale (PPSS – based on the analgesics administered. The type of analgesic was defined based on the authors’ clinic protocol, patient comorbidities, pain assessment tool scores, and preadministered medications by an artificial neural network system. At each pain episode, each patient was asked to fill the three pain scales. Bartlett’s test and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin criterion were used to evaluate sample sufficiency. The proper scoring system was defined by varimax rotation. Spearman’s and Pearson’s coefficients assessed PPSS correlation to the known pain scales.Results: A total of 262 pain episodes were evaluated in 124 patients. The PPSS scored one point for each dose of paracetamol, three points for each nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or codeine, and seven points for each dose of opioids. The correlation between the visual analog scale and PPSS was found to be strong and linear (rho: 0.715; P <0.001 and Pearson: 0.631; P < 0.001.Conclusion: PPSS correlated well with the known pain scale and could be used safely in the evaluation of postoperative pain in retrospective studies.Keywords: pain scale, retrospective studies, pain point system

  7. Most efficient questionnaires to measure quality of life, physical function, and pain in patients with metastatic spine disease: a cross-sectional prospective survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino Pereira, Nuno Rui; Janssen, Stein J; Raskin, Kevin A; Hornicek, Francis J; Ferrone, Marco L; Shin, John H; Bramer, Jos A M; van Dijk, Cornelis Nicolaas; Schwab, Joseph H

    2017-07-01

    Assessing quality of life, functional outcome, and pain has become important in assessing the effectiveness of treatment for metastatic spine disease. Many questionnaires are able to measure these outcomes; few are validated in patients with metastatic spine disease. As a result, there is no consensus on the ideal questionnaire to use in these patients. Our study aim was to assess whether certain questionnaires measuring quality of life, functional outcome, and pain (1) correlated with each other, (2) measured the construct they claim to measure, (3) had good coverage-floor and ceiling effects, (4) were reliable, and (5) whether there were differences in completion time between them. This is a prospective cross-sectional survey study from three outpatient clinics (two orthopedic oncology clinics and one neurosurgery clinic) from two affiliated tertiary hospital care centers. We included 100 consecutive patients with metastatic spine disease between July 2014 and February 2016. We excluded non-English-speaking patients. The following questionnaires were given in random order: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) or Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function, PROMIS Pain Intensity, EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), and the Spine Oncology Study Group Outcome Questionnaire (SOSG-OQ). We used exploratory factor analysis-correlating questionnaires with an underlying mathematically derived trait-to assess if questionnaires measured the same concept. Coverage was assessed by floor and ceiling effects, and reliability was assessed by standard error of measurement as a function of ability. Differences in completion times were tested using the Friedman test. Questionnaires measured the construct they were developed for, as demonstrated with high correlations (>0.7) with the underlying trait. A floor effect was present in the PROMIS Pain Intensity (7.0%), ODI or NDI (4.0%), and the PROMIS Physical Function (1

  8. Pain management in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Pieper, Marjoleine J C; van Dalen-Kok, Annelore H; de Waal, Margot W M; Husebo, Bettina S; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Scherder, Erik J A; Corbett, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are uncertain. The evidence for efficient treatment (the third perspective) with analgesics is also limited, with few statistically well-powered trials. The most promising evidence supports the use of stepped treatment approaches, and indicates the benefit of pain and behavioral interventions on both these important symptoms. The fourth perspective debates further difficulties in pain management due to the lack of sufficient training and education for health care professionals at all levels, where evidence-based guidance is urgently needed. To address the current inadequate management of pain in dementia, a comprehensive approach is needed. This would include an accurate, validated assessment tool that is sensitive to different types of pain and therapeutic

  9. A Small Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Mobile and Traditional Pain Coping Skills Training Protocols for Cancer Patients with Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Somers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial pain management interventions are efficacious for cancer pain but are underutilized. Recent advances in mobile health (mHealth technologies provide new opportunities to decrease barriers to access psychosocial pain management interventions. The objective of this study was to gain information about the accessibility and efficacy of mobile pain coping skills training (mPCST intervention delivered to cancer patients with pain compared to traditional in-person pain coping skills training intervention. This study randomly assigned participants (N=30 to receive either mobile health pain coping skills training intervention delivered via Skype or traditional pain coping skills training delivered face-to-face (PCST-trad. This pilot trial suggests that mPCST is feasible, presents low burden to patients, may lead to high patient engagement, and appears to be acceptable to patients. Cancer patients with pain in the mPCST group reported decreases in pain severity and physical symptoms as well as increases in self-efficacy for pain management that were comparable to changes in the PCST-trad group (p’s < 0.05. These findings suggest that mPCST, which is a highly accessible intervention, may provide benefits similar to an in-person intervention and shows promise for being feasible, acceptable, and engaging to cancer patients with pain.

  10. Effect of a high-dose target-controlled naloxone infusion on pain and hyperalgesia in patients following groin hernia repair: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Manuel Pedro; Utke Werner, Mads; Berg Dahl, Joergen

    2015-01-01

    no volunteer developed significant secondary hyperalgesia after the placebo infusion. In order to consistently demonstrate latent sensitization in humans, a pain model inducing deep tissue inflammation, as used in animal studies, might be necessary. The aim of the present study is to examine whether a high......-dose target-controlled naloxone infusion can reinstate pain and hyperalgesia following recovery from open groin hernia repair and thus consistently demonstrate opioid-mediated latent sensitization in humans. METHODS/DESIGN: Patients submitted to unilateral, primary, open groin hernia repair will be included...

  11. Pain management in patients with Parkinson's disease: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogar, Orjan; Lokk, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance. The symptoms have a great negative impact on health-related quality of life. Separating PD-related pain from pain of other origins is an important challenge and can be characterized as "many syndromes under the same umbrella". Among the different forms of PD-related pain, musculoskeletal pain is the most common form, accounting for 40%-90% of reported pain in PD patients. Augmentation by pathophysiological pathways other than those secondary to rigidity, tremor, or any of the other motor manifestations of the disease seems most probable. In PD, the basal ganglia process somatosensory information differently, and increased subjective pain sensitivity with lower electrical and heat-pain thresholds has been reported in PD patients. The mechanism is assumed to be diminished activity of the descending inhibitory control system of the basal ganglia. PD pain, like many of the nonmotor symptoms, remains underdiagnosed and, thus, poorly managed. A systematic collection of patient descriptions of type, quality, and duration of pain is, therefore, of utmost importance. Recent studies have validated new and more specific and dedicated pain scales for PD-related symptoms. Symptomatic treatments based on clinical pain classification include not only pharmacological but also nonpharmacological methods and, to some degree, invasive approaches. In the clinic, pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions can be effective to varying degrees - as

  12. Pre-test probability risk scores and their use in contemporary management of patients with chest pain: One year stress echo cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Daniela Cassar; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Roper, Damian; Tsironis, Ioannis; Byrne, Jonathan; Monaghan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare how patients with chest pain would be investigated, based on the two guidelines available for UK cardiologists, on the management of patients with stable chest pain. The UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline which was published in 2010 and the European society of cardiology (ESC) guideline published in 2013. Both guidelines utilise pre-test probability risk scores, to guide the choice of investigation. Design We undertook a large retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of stress echocardiography. Setting A large tertiary centre in the UK in a contemporary clinical practice. Participants Two thirds of the patients in the cohort were referred from our rapid access chest pain clinics. Results We found that the NICE risk score overestimates risk by 20% compared to the ESC Risk score. We also found that based on the NICE guidelines, 44% of the patients presenting with chest pain, in this cohort, would have been investigated invasively, with diagnostic coronary angiography. Using the ESC guidelines, only 0.3% of the patients would be investigated invasively. Conclusion The large discrepancy between the two guidelines can be easily reduced if NICE adopted the ESC risk score. PMID:26673458

  13. Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls – a hypothesis-generating pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckryd E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Bäckryd,1,2 Bijar Ghafouri,1,2 Anders K Carlsson,1,2 Patrik Olausson,1,2 Björn Gerdle1,2 1Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Centre, Region Östergötland, Linköping, SwedenAbstract: Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11, and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients, two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients, three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients, and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in pat